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Sample records for 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide

  1. GIPC interacts with the beta1-adrenergic receptor and regulates beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liaoyuan A; Chen, Wei; Martin, Negin P; Whalen, Erin J; Premont, Richard T; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2003-07-11

    Beta1-adrenergic receptors, expressed at high levels in the human heart, have a carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif that can directly interact with PDZ domain-containing proteins. Using the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl terminus as bait, we identified the novel beta1-adrenergic receptor-binding partner GIPC in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library. Here we demonstrate that the PDZ domain-containing protein, GIPC, co-immunoprecipitates with the beta1-adrenergic receptor in COS-7 cells. Essential for this interaction is the Ser residue of the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif. Our data also demonstrate that beta1-adrenergic receptor stimulation activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK1/2. beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by pertussis toxin, implicating Gi, and was substantially decreased by the expression of GIPC. Expression of GIPC had no observable effect on beta1-adrenergic receptor sequestration or receptor-mediated cAMP accumulation. This GIPC effect was specific for the beta1-adrenergic receptor and was dependent on an intact PDZ binding motif. These data suggest that GIPC can regulate beta1-adrenergic receptor-stimulated, Gi-mediated, ERK activation while having no effect on receptor internalization or Gs-mediated cAMP signaling.

  2. Identification of alpha1-adrenergic receptors and their involvement in phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the frog heart.

    PubMed

    Lazou, Antigone; Gaitanaki, Catherine; Vaxevanellis, Spiros; Pehtelidou, Anastasia

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors in frog heart and to examine their related signal transduction pathway. alpha(1)-Adrenergic binding sites were studied in purified heart membranes using the specific alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist [(3)H]prazosin. Analysis of the binding data indicated one class of binding sites displaying a K(d) of 4.19 +/- 0.56 nM and a B(max) of 14.66 +/- 1.61 fmol/mg original wet weight. Adrenaline, noradrenaline, or phenylephrine, in the presence of propranolol, competed with [(3)H]prazosin binding with a similar potency and a K(i) value of about 10 microM. The kinetics of adrenaline binding was closely related to its biological effect. Adrenaline concentration dependently increased the production of inositol phosphates in the heart in the presence or absence of propranolol. Maximal stimulation was about 8.5-fold, and the half-maximum effective concentration was 30 and 21 microM in the absence and presence of propranolol, respectively. These data clearly show that alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are coupled to the phosphoinositide hydrolysis in frog heart. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence supporting the presence of functional alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors in the frog heart.

  3. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor: Binding and phosphoinositide breakdown in human myometrium

    SciTech Connect

    Breuiller-Fouche, M.; Doualla-Bell Kotto Maka, F.; Geny, B.; Ferre, F. )

    1991-07-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were examined in both inner and outer layers of human pregnant myometrium using radioligand binding of (3H)prazosin. (3H)prazosin bound rapidly and reversibly to a single class of high affinity binding sites in myometrial membrane preparations. Scatchard analysis gave similar values of equilibrium dissociation constants in both myometrial layers. In contrast, more alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were detected in the outer layer than in the inner layer. Antagonist inhibited (3H)prazosin binding with an order of potency of prazosin greater than phentolamine greater than idazoxan. Competition experiments have also revealed that a stable guanine nucleotide decreases the apparent affinity of norepinephrine for myometrial (3H)prazosin binding sites. The functional status of these alpha-1 adrenergic receptors was also assessed by measuring the norepinephrine-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates in myometrial tissue. Norepinephrine produced a concentration-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates in both myometrial layers. However, norepinephrine-induced increases in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate were only observed in the outer layer. These results indicate that alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in human myometrium at the end of pregnancy are linked to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and that this response occurs mainly in the outer layer.

  4. Effect of aging on alpha-1 adrenergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, D.M.; Bowyer, J.F.; Masserano, J.M.; Zahniser, N.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The effects of aging were examined on the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in three brain regions. Tissue minces of thalamus, cerebral cortex and hippocampus from 3-, 18- and 28-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)myoinositol. Exposure of these prelabeled minces to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine revealed that accumulation of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates was selectively reduced by 20 to 30% in the thalamus and cerebral cortex of the oldest age group. Analysis of concentration-response and competition binding curves indicated that this decrease was due to diminished agonist efficacy rather than diminished receptor affinity. The reduction in responsiveness to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex and the lack of any changes in the hippocampus parallel previously reported changes in the density of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors with aging. These data indicate that the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis is reduced in some, but not all, brain regions of aged Fischer 344 rats.

  5. Cloned M1 muscarinic receptors mediate both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-01-01

    The rat M1 muscarinic receptor gene was cloned and expressed in a rat cell line lacking endogenous muscarinic receptors. Assignment of the cloned receptors to the M1 class was pharmacologically confirmed by their high affinity for the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine and low affinity for the M2-selective antagonist AF-DX-116. Guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] converted agonist binding sites on the receptor, from high-affinity to the low-affinity state, thus indicating that the cloned receptors couple to endogenous G-proteins. The cloned receptors mediated both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide hydrolysis, but by different mechanisms. Pertussis toxin blocked the inhibition of adenylate cyclase (indicating coupling of the receptor to inhibitory G-protein), but did not affect phosphoinositide turnover. Furthermore, the stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was less efficient than the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. These findings demonstrate that cloned M1 receptors are capable of mediating multiple responses in the cell by coupling to different effectors, possibly to different G-proteins. Images PMID:2846274

  6. Phorbol esters inhibit alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and contraction in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The mechanisms of pharmacomechanical coupling in vascular tissue are at the present time unclear. The authors and others have proposed that receptor-induced activation of phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis may be involved. To investigate this possibility they studied the actions of two biologically active phorbol esters: phorbol dibutyrate (PDB) and phorbol myristate diacetate (PMA) on receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis in rat aortic rings. They found both PDB (IC/sub 5//sup 0/ approx. 5nM) and PMA (IC/sub 50/ approx. 30 nM) but not 4-..cap alpha..-phorbol (IC32%/sub 0/ > 10,000 nM) inhibited norepinephrine-stimulated PI hydrolysis. In the presence of the calcium channel antagonist nitrendipine, PDB potently inhibited both the phasic and tonic components of norepinephrine-induced vascular contraction. In the presence of 10/sup -7/M nitrendipine, PDB had an IC/sub 50/ for contraction of approximately 10nM. The results thus suggest a functional coupling between ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis and vascular contraction. The findings further imply a mode of feed-back regulation in vascular tissue involving phorbol ester and receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis.

  7. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated increase in the mass of phosphatidic acid and 1,2-diacylglycerol in ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kurz, T; Schneider, I; Tölg, R; Richardt, G

    1999-04-01

    1,2-Diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are produced by phospholipase C and D activity and play a key role as second messengers in receptor-mediated signal transduction. So far, little is known about alterations of endogenous 1,2-DAG and PA production during myocardial ischemia. Rat isolated perfused hearts were subjected to global ischemia, total lipids were extracted, and separated by thin-layer chromatography. The mass of PA and 1,2-DAG were quantified using laserdensitometric analysis of visualized lipids. Compared to normoxic control values (1,2-DAG 713 +/- 45 ng/mg protein, PA 171 +/- 11 ng/mg protein), the myocardial content of 1,2-DAG and PA was unaltered after 10 min of ischemia. Prolonged myocardial ischemia (20 min), however, which was accompanied by marked overflow of endogenous norepinephrine, significantly increased the mass of both second messengers (1,2-DAG 1062 +/- 100 ng/mg protein, PA 340 +/- 29 ng/mg protein). The increase in PA and 1,2-DAG in response to ischemia was abolished by inhibition of ischemia-induced norepinephrine release as well as by alpha1-adrenergic blockade but unaffected by beta-adrenergic blockade. While inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase did not affect ischemia-induced increase in PA and 1,2-DAG, inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activity significantly suppressed ischemia-induced increase in 1,2-DAG but did not affect endogenous production of PA indicating phospholipase C-independent formation of PA and activation of both, phospholipase C and D, in the ischemic heart. Ischemia elicits an alpha1-adrenergic receptor-mediated increase in the mass of myocardial PA and 1,2-DAG. The increase in endogenous PA is suggested to be due to the activation of myocardial phospholipase D, whereas 1,2-DAG is formed predominantly by activation of phospholipase C in the ischemic heart.

  8. Role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein in. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, L.E.; Norris, J.S.

    1987-11-01

    In this study the mechanisms involved in ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization at the level of the plasma membrane were investigated. Stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from saponin-permeabilized DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells was observed with the addition of either the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine and guanosine-5'-triphosphate or the nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide guanylyl-imidodiphosphate. In the presence of (/sup 32/P) NAD, pertussis toxin was found to catalyze ADP-ribosylation of a M/sub r/ = 40,500 (n = 8) peptide in membranes prepared from DDT/sub 1/, MF-2 cells, possibly the ..cap alpha..-subunit of N/sub i/. However, stimulation of unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux by phenylephrine was not affected by previous treatment of cells with 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. These data suggest that the putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein which couples the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells is not a pertussis toxin substrate and may possibly be an additional member of guanine nucleotide binding protein family.

  9. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  10. Effect of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic stimulation on phosphoinositide metabolism and protein kinase C (PK-C) in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaku, T.; Lakatta, E.; Filburn, C.R.

    1986-03-01

    Alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic stimulation is known to enhance membrane phospholipid metabolism resulting in increases in inositol phosphates (IP's) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Cardiomyocytes prelabeled with /sup 3/H-myo-inositol were treated with norepinephrine (NE) for 1-15 min, acid extracted, and IP's separated by ion exchange chromatography. Addition of NE (10/sup -5/M) in the presence of propranolol (10/sup -5/ M) and LiCl (9 mM) enhanced the accumulation of IP's, linearly with time up to 15 min, and reached 7.3, and 1.5-fold at 15 min for IP/sub 1/, IP/sub 2/, and IP/sub 3/, respectively. KCl at 30 mM had no effect on accumulation of IP's, but augmented the effect of NE. PK-C activity was measured in both cytosol (S) and particulate (P) fractions of treated cells. NE alone had a negligible effect on membrane PK-C, while 30 mM KCl caused a small increase. However, pretreatment with KCl followed by NE produced a significant increase above that seen with KCl alone. Dioctanoylglycerol also stimulated membrane association of PK-C in these cells. These data suggest that ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic stimulation of membrane association of myocardial PK-C is mediated by DAG but may be dependent on membrane potential and/or the extent of Ca/sup 2 +/ loading.

  11. Inhibition by islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin, of P2-purinergic receptor-mediated iodide efflux and phosphoinositide turnover in FRTL-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, F.; Sho, K.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Exposure of FRTL-5 thyroid cells to ATP (1 microM to 1 mM) resulted in the stimulation of I- efflux in association with the induction of inositol trisphosphate production and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Nonhydrolyzable ATP derivatives, ADP and GTP, were also as effective in magnitude as ATP, whereas neither AMP nor adenosine exerted significant effect on I- efflux, suggesting a P2-purinergic receptor-mediated activation of I- efflux. Treatment of the cells with the islet-activating protein (IAP) pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylated a 41,000 mol wt membrane protein, effectively suppressed the phosphoinositide response to ATP in addition to ATP-dependent I- efflux at agonist concentrations below 10 microM. In contrast, the I- efflux stimulated by TSH, A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate was insusceptible to IAP. The IAP substrate, probably GTP-binding protein, is hence proposed to mediate the activation of P2-purinergic receptor-linked phospholipase-C in FRTL-5 cells. However, the responses to ATP, its nonhydrolyzable derivatives, or ADP at the higher agonist concentrations, especially above 100 microM, were only partially inhibited by IAP, even though the IAP substrate was totally ADP ribosylated by the toxin. The responses to GTP in the whole concentration range tested were not influenced by IAP treatment. Thus, signals arising from the P2-receptor might be transduced to phospholipase-C by two different pathways, i.e. IAP-sensitive and insensitive ones, and result in the stimulation of I- efflux.

  12. The inhibition of phosphoinositide synthesis and muscarinic-receptor-mediated phospholipase C activity by Li+ as secondary, selective, consequences of inositol depletion in 1321N1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Batty, I H; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    Conditions are described for culture of 1321N1 cells under which cellular inositol is decreased from approximately 20 mM to < 0.5 mM but phosphoinositide concentrations are unaffected. The effects of the muscarinic-receptor agonist carbachol (1 mM) and/or LiCl (10 mM) on phosphoinositide turnover in these or in inositol-replete cells was examined after steady-state [3H]inositol labelling of phospholipid pools. In both inositol-replete and -depleted cells, carbachol stimulated similar initial (0-15 min) rates of phospholipase C (PLC) activity, in the presence of Li+. Subsequently (> 30-60 min) stimulated PLC activity and [3H]PtdIns concentrations declined dramatically only in depleted cells. In inositol-depleted cells, carbachol alone evoked increased concentrations of [3H]inositol, [3H]InsP1, [3H]InsP2, [3H]InsP3 and [3H]InsP4, which were largely sustained over 90 min, and concentrations of [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP and [3H]PtdInsP2 were decreased only to approximately 82, 84 and 93% of control respectively. In the presence of Li+ in these cells, the stimulated rise in [3H]inositol was prevented and, although accumulation of [3H]InsP1, [3H]InsP2 and [3H]InsP3 was initially (0-30 min) potentiated, rates of accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and concentrations of [3H]polyphosphates later (> 30-60 min) declined, and concentrations of [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP and [3H]PtdInsP2 were decreased respectively to approximately 39, 48 and 81% of control. After 60 min in the presence of both carbachol and Li+, stimulated PLC activity was decreased by approximately 70% compared with the initial rate in depleted cells. This decreased PLC activity was reflected by changes in the stimulated concentrations of [3H]Ins(1,3,4)P3 but not of [3H]Ins(1,4,5)P3, but effects of Li+ on the latter may have been obscured by the demonstrated, concomitant and equal stimulated accumulation of [3H]inositol 1:2cyclic,4,5-trisphosphate. These data suggest that receptor-mediated PLC activity is selectively

  13. Evidence for β1-adrenergic receptor involvement in amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor gene expression: implications for cocaine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Rudoy, Carla A.; Reyes, Arith-Ruth S.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that betaxolol, a selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, administered during early phases of cocaine abstinence, ameliorated withdrawal-induced anxiety and blocked increases in amygdalar β1-adrenergic receptor expression in rats. Here, we report the efficacy of betaxolol in reducing increases in gene expression of amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a peptide known to be involved in mediating ‘anxiety-like’ behaviors during initial phases of cocaine abstinence. We also demonstrate attenuation of an amygdalar β1-adrenergic receptor-mediated cell signaling pathway following this treatment. Male rats were administered betaxolol at 24 and 44 hours following chronic cocaine administration. Animals were euthanized at the 48 hour time-point and the amygdala was micro-dissected and processed for quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and/or Western blot analysis. Results showed that betaxolol treatment during early cocaine withdrawal attenuated increases in amygdalar CRF gene expression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory and catalytic subunit (nuclear fraction) protein expression. Our data also reveal that β1-adrenergic receptors are on amygdalar neurons which are immunoreactive for CRF. The present findings suggest that the efficacy of betaxolol treatment on cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety may be related, in part, to its effect on amygdalar β1-adrenergic receptor, modulation of its downstream cell signaling elements and CRF gene expression. PMID:18596687

  14. Evidence for beta1-adrenergic receptor involvement in amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor gene expression: implications for cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rudoy, Carla A; Reyes, Arith-Ruth S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2009-04-01

    We previously showed that betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, administered during early phases of cocaine abstinence, ameliorated withdrawal-induced anxiety and blocked increases in amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor expression in rats. Here, we report the efficacy of betaxolol in reducing increases in gene expression of amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a peptide known to be involved in mediating 'anxiety-like' behaviors during initial phases of cocaine abstinence. We also demonstrate attenuation of an amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor-mediated cell-signaling pathway following this treatment. Male rats were administered betaxolol at 24 and 44 h following chronic cocaine administration. Animals were euthanized at the 48-h time point and the amygdala was microdissected and processed for quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and/or western blot analysis. Results showed that betaxolol treatment during early cocaine withdrawal attenuated increases in amygdalar CRF gene expression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase regulatory and catalytic subunit (nuclear fraction) protein expression. Our data also reveal that beta(1)-adrenergic receptors are on amygdalar neurons, which are immunoreactive for CRF. The present findings suggest that the efficacy of betaxolol treatment on cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety may be related, in part, to its effect on amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, modulation of its downstream cell-signaling elements and CRF gene expression.

  15. Stress-induced decrease of uterine blood flow in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Dreiling, Michelle; Bischoff, Sabine; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Kiehntopf, Michael; Schubert, Harald; Witte, Otto W; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Schwab, Matthias; Rakers, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal maternal stress can be transferred to the fetus via a catecholamine-dependent decrease of uterine blood flow (UBF). However, it is unclear which group of adrenergic receptors mediates this mechanism of maternal-fetal stress transfer. We hypothesized that in sheep, alpha 1-adrenergic receptors may play a key role in catecholamine mediated UBF decrease, as these receptors are mainly involved in peripheral vasoconstriction and are present in significant number in the uterine vasculature. After chronic instrumentation at 125 ± 1 days of gestation (dGA; term 150 dGA), nine pregnant sheep were exposed at 130 ± 1 dGA to acute isolation stress for one hour without visual, tactile, or auditory contact with their flockmates. UBF, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), stress hormones, and blood gases were determined before and during this isolation challenge. Twenty-four hours later, experiments were repeated during alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage induced by a continuous intravenous infusion of urapidil. In both experiments, ewes reacted to isolation with an increase in serum norepinephrine, cortisol, BP, and HR as typical signs of activation of sympatho-adrenal and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Stress-induced UBF decrease was prevented by alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage. We conclude that UBF decrease induced by maternal stress in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. Future studies investigating prevention strategies of impact of prenatal maternal stress on fetal health should consider selective blockage of alpha 1-receptors to interrupt maternal-fetal stress transfer mediated by utero-placental malperfusion.

  16. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  17. Novel arylpiperazines as selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Murray, W V; Jolliffe, L; Pulito, V

    2000-05-15

    A novel series of arylpiperazines has been synthesized and identified as antagonists of alpha1a adrenergic receptor (alpha1a-AR) implicated in benign prostatic hyperplasia. These compounds selectively bind to membrane bound alpha1a-AR with K(i)s as low as 0.66 nM. As such, these potentially represent a viable treatment for BPH without the side effects associated with known alpha1-adrenergic antagonists.

  18. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  19. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  20. Receptor-Mediated Tobacco Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Chernyavsky, Alexander I.; Marubio, Lisa M.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Jolkovsky, David L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2005-01-01

    Tobacco is a known cause of oral disease but the mechanism remains elusive. Nicotine (Nic) is a likely culprit of pathobiological effects because it displaces the local cytotransmitter acetylcholine from the nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) expressed by oral keratinocytes (KCs). To gain a mechanistic insight into tobacco-induced morbidity in the oral cavity, we studied effects of exposures to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) versus equivalent concentration of pure Nic on human and murine KCs. Both ETS and Nic up-regulated expression of cell cycle and apoptosis regulators, differentiation marker filaggrin, and signal transduction factors at both the mRNA and protein levels. These changes could be abolished in cultured human oral KCs transfected with anti-α3 small interfering RNA or treated with the α3β2-preferring antagonist α-conotoxin MII. Functional inactivation of α3-mediated signaling in α3−/− mutant KCs prevented most of the ETS/Nic-dependent changes in gene expression. To determine relevance of the in vitro findings to the in vivo situation, we studied gene expression in oral mucosa of neonatal α3+/+ and α3−/− littermates delivered by heterozygous mice soon after their exposures to ETS or equivalent concentration of pure Nic in drinking water. In addition to reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, the ETS/Nic-dependent alterations in gene expression were also detected by semiquantitative immunofluorescence assay directly in KCs comprising murine oral mucosa. Only wild-type mice consistently developed significant (P < 0.05) changes in the gene expression. These results identified α3β2 nAChR as a major receptor mediating effects of tobacco products on KC gene expression. Real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that in all three model systems the common genes targeted by α3β2-mediated ETS/Nic toxicity were p21, Bcl-2, NF-κB, and STAT-1. The expression of the nAChR subunits α5 and β2 and the muscarinic

  1. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  2. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  3. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  4. Pharmacophore development for antagonists at α1 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, J. B.; Coban, B.; Griffith, R.

    1996-12-01

    Many receptors, including α1 adrenergic receptors, have a range of subtypes. This offers possibilities for the development of highly selective antagonists with potentially fewer detrimental effects. Antagonists developed for α1A receptors, for example, would have potential in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. As part of the molecular design process, structural features necessary for the selective affinity for α1A and α1B adrenergic receptors have been investigated. The molecular modelling software (particularly the Apex module) of Molecular Simulations, Inc. was used to develop pharmacophore models for these two subtypes. Low-energy conformations of a set of known antagonists were used as input, together with a classification of the receptor affinity data. The biophores proposed by the program were evaluated and pharmacophores were proposed. The pharmacophore models were validated by testing the fit of known antagonists, not included in the training set. The critical structural feature for selectivity between the α1A and α1B adrenergic receptor sites is the distance between the basic nitrogen atom and the centre of an aromatic ring system. This will be exploited in the design and synthesis of structurally new selective antagonists for these sites.

  5. Indenopyrazole oxime ethers: synthesis and β1-adrenergic blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Tommaso; Caruso, Anna; Rochais, Christophe; Caputo, Angela Maria; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Dallemagne, Patrick; Filice, Elisabetta; Genest, David; Pasqua, Teresa; Puoci, Francesco; Saturnino, Carmela; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; El-Kashef, Hussein

    2015-03-06

    This paper reports the synthesis and cardiac activity of new β-blockers derived from (Z/E)-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-4(1H)-one oximes (5a,b). The latter compounds were allowed to react with epichlorohydrin, followed by reacting the oxiranyl derivatives formed (6a,b) with some aliphatic amines to give the target compounds (Z/E)-1-phenyl-1H-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-4-one O-((2-hydroxy-3-(substituted amino)propyl)oxime (7a-c) and (Z/E)-1-methyl-1H-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-4-one O-((2-hydroxy-3-(substituted amino)propyl)oxime (8a-c). These final products 7a-c and 8a-c were evaluated for their ability to modulate the cardiac performance of a prototype mammalian heart. The results showed that, out of these molecules tested, 7b elicits a more potent depressant effect on contractility and relaxation, and competitively antagonizes β1-adrenergic receptors.

  6. Dynamics of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Signaling in Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    In neurons, loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] leads to a decrease in exocytosis and changes in electrical excitability. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 levels after phospholipase C activation is therefore essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We measured dynamic changes of PI(4,5)P2, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, diacylglycerol, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and Ca2+ upon muscarinic stimulation in sympathetic neurons from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with electrophysiological and optical approaches. We used this kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show and explain faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in electrically nonexcitable tsA201 cells. They can be used to understand dynamic effects of receptor-mediated phospholipase C activation on excitability and other PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is a minor phospholipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 via phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis leads to a decrease in exocytosis and alters electrical excitability in neurons. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 is essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We studied the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism in sympathetic neurons upon muscarinic stimulation and used the kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show a several-fold faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in an electrically nonexcitable cell line, and provide a framework for future studies of PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. PMID:26818524

  7. Phospholipase D1 is involved in α1-adrenergic contraction of murine vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Jörg W; Loga, Florian; Stegner, David; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hofmann, Franz

    2014-03-01

    α1-Adrenergic stimulation increases blood vessel tone in mammals. This process involves a number of intracellular signaling pathways that include signaling via phospholipase C, diacylglycerol (DAG), and protein kinase C. So far, it is not certain whether signaling via phospholipase D (PLD) and PLD-derived DAG is involved in this process. We asked whether PLD participates in the α1-adrenergic-mediated signaling in vascular smooth muscle. α1-Adrenergic-induced contraction was assessed by myography of isolated aortic rings and by pressure recordings using the hindlimb perfusion model in mice. The effects of the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol (IC50 0.15 vol%) and the inactive congener 2-butanol were comparatively studied. Inhibition of PLD by 1-butanol reduced specifically the α1-adrenergic-induced contraction and the α1-adrenergic-induced pressure increase by 10 and 40% of the maximum, respectively. 1-Butanol did not influence the aortic contractions induced by high extracellular potassium, by the thromboxane analog U46619, or by a phorbol ester. The effects of 1-butanol were absent in mice that lack PLD1 (Pld1(-/-) mice) or that selectively lack the CaV1.2 channel in smooth muscle (sm-CaV1.2(-/-) mice) but still present in the heterozygous control mice. α1-Adrenergic contraction of vascular smooth muscle involves activation of PLD1, which controls a portion of the α1-adrenergic-induced CaV1.2 channel activity.

  8. Receptor-mediated DNA-targeted photoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Tom C; Lobachevsky, Pavel N; Leung, Brenda K Y; White, Jonathan M; Martin, Roger F

    2006-11-01

    We show the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy that combines the potency of a DNA-binding photosensitizer, UV(A)Sens, with the tumor-targeting potential of receptor-mediated endocytosis. The photosensitizer is an iodinated bibenzimidazole, which, when bound in the minor groove of DNA and excited by UV(A) irradiation, induces cytotoxic lesions attributed to a radical species resulting from photodehalogenation. Although reminiscent of photochemotherapy using psoralens and UV(A) irradiation, an established treatment modality in dermatology particularly for the treatment of psoriasis and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, a critical difference is the extreme photopotency of the iodinated bibenzimidazole, approximately 1,000-fold that of psoralens. This feature prompted consideration of combination with the specificity of receptor-mediated targeting. Using two in vitro model systems, we show the UV(A) cytotoxicity of iodo ligand/protein conjugates, implying binding of the conjugate to cell receptors, internalization, and degradation of the conjugate-receptor complex, with release and translocation of the ligand to nuclear DNA. For ligand-transferrin conjugates, phototoxicity was inhibited by coincubation with excess native transferrin. Receptor-mediated UV(A)-induced cytotoxicity was also shown with the iodo ligand conjugate of an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, exemplifying the potential application of the strategy to other cancer-specific targets to thus improve the specificity of phototherapy of superficial lesions and for extracorporeal treatments.

  9. Receptor-mediated signaling in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Grice, C. M.; Bertuzzi, M.; Bignell, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most pathogenic species among the Aspergilli, and the major fungal agent of human pulmonary infection. To prosper in diverse ecological niches, Aspergilli have evolved numerous mechanisms for adaptive gene regulation, some of which are also crucial for mammalian infection. Among the molecules which govern such responses, integral membrane receptors are thought to be the most amenable to therapeutic modulation. This is due to the localization of these molecular sensors at the periphery of the fungal cell, and to the prevalence of small molecules and licensed drugs which target receptor-mediated signaling in higher eukaryotic cells. In this review we highlight the progress made in characterizing receptor-mediated environmental adaptation in A. fumigatus and its relevance for pathogenicity in mammals. By presenting a first genomic survey of integral membrane proteins in this organism, we highlight an abundance of putative seven transmembrane domain (7TMD) receptors, the majority of which remain uncharacterized. Given the dependency of A. fumigatus upon stress adaptation for colonization and infection of mammalian hosts, and the merits of targeting receptor-mediated signaling as an antifungal strategy, a closer scrutiny of sensory perception and signal transduction in this organism is warranted. PMID:23430083

  10. α1-Adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the impact of reducing extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Ives, Stephen J; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Noyes, R Dirk; Morgan, R Garrett; Gifford, Jayson R; Park, Song-Young; Symons, J David; Richardson, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Graded exercise results not only in the modulation of adrenergic mediated smooth muscle tone and a preferential increase in blood flow to the active skeletal muscle termed 'functional sympatholysis', but is also paralleled by metabolically induced reductions in pH. We therefore sought to determine whether pH attenuates α(1)-adrenergic receptor sensitivity in human feed arteries. Feed arteries (560 ± 31 μm i.d.) were harvested from 24 humans (55 ± 4 years old) and studied using the isometric tension technique. Vessel function was assessed using KCl, phenylephrine (PE), ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) concentration-response curves to characterize non-receptor-mediated and receptor-mediated vasocontraction, as well as endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxation, respectively. All concentration-response curves were obtained from (originally contiguous) vessel rings in separate baths with a pH of 7.4, 7.1, 6.8 or 6.5. Reduction of the pH, via HCl, reduced maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (pH 7.4 = 85 ± 19, pH 7.1 = 57 ± 16, pH 6.8 = 34 ± 15 and pH 6.5 = 16 ± 5% KCl(max)), which was partly due to reduced smooth muscle function, as assessed by KCl (pH 7.4 = 88 ± 13, pH 7.1 = 67 ± 8, pH 6.8 = 67 ± 9 and pH 6.5 = 58 ± 8% KCl(max)). Graded acidosis had no effect on maximal vasorelaxation. In summary, these data reveal that reductions in extracellular pH attenuate α(1)-mediated vasocontraction, which is partly explained by reduced smooth muscle function, although vasorelaxation in response to ACh and SNP remained intact. These findings support the concept that local acidosis is likely to contribute to functional sympatholysis and exercise hyperaemia by opposing sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction while not impacting vasodilatation.

  11. An introduction to phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Maffucci, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are minor components of cellular membranes that play critical regulatory roles in several intracellular functions. This chapter describes the main enzymes regulating the turnover of each of the seven PIs in mammalian cells and introduces to some of their intracellular functions and to some evidences of their involvement in human diseases. Due to the complex interrelation between the distinct PIs and the plethora of functions that they can regulate inside a cell, this chapter is not meant to be a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of PI signalling but rather an introduction to this complex signalling field. For more details of their regulation/functions and extensive description of their intracellular roles, more detailed reviews are suggested on each single topic.

  12. Alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in canine lower genitourinary tissues: insight into development and function

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Lepor, H.

    1987-10-01

    Radioligand receptor binding methods were used to characterize the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor in the bladder body, bladder base, prostate and urethra of the male dog. Saturation experiments were performed in tissue homogenates using (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat, an alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist of high specific activity (2,200 Ci. per mmol.). The equilibrium dissociation constant Kd for (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat binding in the bladder body (0.56 pM.), bladder base (0.81 +/- 0.11 pM.), prostate (0.86 +/- 0.19 pM.) and urethra (0.55 pM.) was similar, suggesting homogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic binding sites in lower genitourinary tissues. The receptor density in the bladder body, bladder base, prostate and urethra, expressed as fmol. per mg. wet weight, was 0.22 +/- 0.02, 0.82 +/- 0.09, 0.55 +/- 0.06 and 0.27 +/- 0.06, respectively (mean +/- standard error of mean). Competitive binding experiments with (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat and unlabeled prazosin and clonidine confirmed the selectivity of Heat for alpha 1-adrenergic binding sites. Anatomical dissections have revealed that a major component of the smooth muscle of the bladder base and prostate originates from the ureter, whereas a major component of the smooth muscle of the urethra originates from the bladder. The measured alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities support these developmental theories.

  13. Rho GTPases, phosphoinositides, and actin

    PubMed Central

    Croisé, Pauline; Estay-Ahumada, Catherine; Gasman, Stéphane; Ory, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are well known regulators of the actin cytoskeleton that act by binding and activating actin nucleators. They are therefore involved in many actin-based processes, including cell migration, cell polarity, and membrane trafficking. With the identification of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases as potential binding partners or effectors, Rho GTPases also appear to participate in the regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism. Since both actin dynamics and phosphoinositide turnover affect the efficiency and the fidelity of vesicle transport between cell compartments, Rho GTPases have emerged as critical players in membrane trafficking. Rho GTPase activity, actin remodeling, and phosphoinositide metabolism need to be coordinated in both space and time to ensure the progression of vesicles along membrane trafficking pathways. Although most molecular pathways are still unclear, in this review, we will highlight recent advances made in our understanding of how Rho-dependent signaling pathways organize actin dynamics and phosphoinositides and how phosphoinositides potentially provide negative feedback to Rho GTPases during endocytosis, exocytosis and membrane exchange between intracellular compartments. PMID:24914539

  14. Role of supraspinal and spinal alpha1-adrenergic receptor subtypes in micturition reflex in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Masaru; Matsumoto-Miyai, Kazumasa; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Kawatani, Masahito

    2010-10-01

    α(1)-Adrenergic receptor subtypes are widely distributed in the central nervous system and are involved in autonomic functions such as micturition. We investigated the presence and the role of supraspinal and/or spinal α(1)-adrenergic receptors in modulating the micturition reflex in conscious female Wistar rats. The expression of α(1)-adrenergic receptor subtypes in rat brain and lumbosacral spinal cord was studied using RT-PCR. Continuous-infusion cystometrograms were obtained in conscious rats, and α(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists were administered via intracerebroventricular or intrathecal routes. The mRNA expression of α(1A)-, α(1B)-, and α(1D)-adrenergic receptors was detected in rat brain (midbrain and pons) and lumbosacral spinal cord (dorsal and ventral parts of spinal cord). In addition, intracerebroventricular injection of the α(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist tamsulosin (1-10 μg), the selective α(1A)-adrenergic receptor antagonist silodosin (1-10 μg), and the selective α(1D)-adrenergic receptor antagonist BMY 7378 (1-10 μg) significantly prolonged the intercontraction interval (ICI) but did not alter maximum voiding pressure (MVP). Although intrathecal injection of BMY 7378 (0.0001-10 μg) did not affect ICI, tamsulosin and silodosin prolonged ICI in a dose-dependent manner. MVP was significantly reduced by intrathecal injection of tamsulosin (10 μg) but not by silodosin or BMY 7378 (0.0001-10 μg). Supraspinal α(1A)- and α(1D)-adrenergic receptors are apparently important for the regulation of reflex-bladder activity in conscious rats. Noradrenergic projection from the brain stem to the lumbosacral spinal cord may promote the afferent limb rather than the efferent limb of the micturition reflex pathway via α(1A)-adrenergic receptors.

  15. Biochemistry and structure of phosphoinositide phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Jahan, Nusrat; Bahk, Young Yil

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are the phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol, and play a very significant role in a diverse range of signaling processes in eukaryotic cells. A number of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes, including phosphoinositide-kinases and phosphatases are involved in the synthesis and degradation of these phospholipids. Recently, the function of various phosphatases in the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway has been of great interest. In the present review we summarize the structural insights and biochemistry of various phosphatases in regulating phosphoinositide metabolism.

  16. Mechanics of receptor-mediated endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huajian; Shi, Wendong; Freund, Lambert B.

    2005-07-01

    Most viruses and bioparticles endocytosed by cells have characteristic sizes in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The process of viruses entering and leaving animal cells is mediated by the binding interaction between ligand molecules on the viral capid and their receptor molecules on the cell membrane. How does the size of a bioparticle affect receptor-mediated endocytosis? Here, we study how a cell membrane containing diffusive mobile receptors wraps around a ligand-coated cylindrical or spherical particle. It is shown that particles in the size range of tens to hundreds of nanometers can enter or exit cells via wrapping even in the absence of clathrin or caveolin coats, and an optimal particles size exists for the smallest wrapping time. This model can also be extended to include the effect of clathrin coat. The results seem to show broad agreement with experimental observations. Author contributions: H.G. and L.B.F. designed research; H.G., W.S., and L.B.F. performed research; and H.G., W.S., and L.B.F. wrote the paper.Abbreviations: CNT, carbon nanotube; SWNT, single-walled nanotube.

  17. Receptor-mediated signaling at plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) generate continuity between plant cells via the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane (PM), allowing movement of different classes of molecules between cells. Proteomic data indicates that the PD PM hosts many receptors and receptor kinases, as well as lipid raft and tetraspanin enriched microdomain associated proteins, suggesting the hypothesis that the PD PM is specialized with respect to both composition and function. PD-located receptor proteins and receptor kinases are responsible for perception of microbe associated molecular patterns at PD and initiate signaling that mediates changes to PD flux. In addition, developmentally relevant receptor kinases have different interactions dependent upon whether located at the PD PM or the cellular PM. The implications of these findings are that receptor-mediated signaling in PD membranes differs from that in the cellular PM and, in light the identification of PD-located proteins associated with membrane microdomains and the role of membrane microdomains in analogous signaling processes in animals, suggests that the PD PM contains specialized signaling platforms.

  18. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  19. Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists in aircrew for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Andrew K; Tachikawa, Nina J

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) affects the majority of men later in life. Other than surgery, finasteride (Proscar) is currently the only pharmacologic option available for U.S. Air Force (USAF) aircrew. This article will evaluate the current literature regarding the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy with FDA approved tamsulosin (Flomax) and alfuzosin (Uroxatrol), third-generation alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists. Current literature supports the fact that some third-generation alpha blockers limit the side effects of hypotension when compared to other alpha blockers as a result of the specificity of subtype binding of the receptors and the sustained release formulation. Alpha blockers are currently used almost universally for the treatment of BPH; however, they are currently not approved for USAF aircrew. This article will review the aeromedical implications of the side effects of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists (alfuzosin, tamsulosin), which affect aircrew while performing aeronautical duties, and examine whether alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists should be acceptable medications in certain situations depending on airframe and aeronautical duties.

  20. The protein acyl transferase ZDHHC21 modulates α1 adrenergic receptor function and regulates hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Ethan P.; Jozsef, Levente; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Held, Kara F.; Luciano, Amelia K.; Melendez, Jonathan; Milstone, Leonard M.; Velazquez, Heino; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Palmitoylation, the reversible addition of the lipid palmitate to a cysteine, can alter protein localization, stability, and function. The ZDHHC family of protein acyl transferases catalyzes palmitoylation of numerous proteins. The role of ZDHHC enzymes in intact tissue and in vivo is largely unknown. Herein, we characterize vascular functions in a mouse that expresses a nonfunctional ZDHHC21 (“F233Δ”). Approach and Results Physiological studies of isolated aortae and mesenteric arteries from F233Δ mice revealed an unexpected defect in responsiveness to phenylephrine, an α1 adrenergic receptor agonist. In vivo, F233Δ mice displayed a blunted response to infusion of phenylephrine and were found to have elevated catecholamine levels and elevated vascular α1 adrenergic receptor gene expression. Telemetry studies showed that the F233Δ mice were tachycardic and hypotensive at baseline, consistent with diminished vascular tone. In biochemical studies, ZDHHC21 was shown to palmitoylate the α1D adrenoceptor, and to interact with it in a molecular complex, thus suggesting a possible molecular mechanism by which the receptor can be regulated by ZDHHC21. Conclusions Together the data support a model in which ZDHHC21 F233Δ diminishes the function of vascular α1 adrenergic receptors, leading to reduced vascular tone which manifests in vivo as hypotension and tachycardia. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of a ZDHHC isoform affecting vascular function in vivo and identifies a novel molecular mode of regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. PMID:26715683

  1. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in brown adipose tissue. Thermogenic significance and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Mohell, N

    1984-01-01

    The main function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is to produce heat in response to cold. Norepinephrine (NE), released from sympathetic nerve terminals, activates the tissue via binding to adrenergic receptors. While the role of the classical beta-adrenergic pathways (including cAMP production and lipolysis) in regulation of BAT metabolism is well documented, very little is known about alpha-adrenergic receptors and responses, which are the scope of the present thesis. The results demonstrate that hamster and rat BAT possess a large number of specific (3H)prazosin binding sites (about 100 000 binding sites per cell) with all the characteristics generally expected of physiologically relevant alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The stimulation of these receptors results in at least two physiological responses; increased phosphatidylinositol turnover and increased respiration. About 20% of the NE-stimulated oxygen consumption (i.e. heat production) is due to the activation of (as yet unknown) alpha 1-adrenergic pathways, while 80% originates from beta 1-adrenergic responses. Comparison of agonist and antagonist affinities for alpha 1-receptors with their potencies to regulate the above responses indicates that tight coupling exists between alpha 1-receptor occupation and respiration, and that part of the alpha 1-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover is closely associated with receptor occupation and may thus be related to the mediation of alpha 1-stimulation. Part of the hormone-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover is also Ca2+-independent. Agonist affinity of alpha 1-receptors is regulated by guanine nucleotides, Mg2+, and Na+. This indicates an involvement of a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the transduction of alpha 1-adrenergic signals. However, alpha 1-stimulation does not alter cAMP production (instead changes in cellular Ca2+ dynamics have been demonstrated). Cold acclimation of animals increases alpha 1-receptor density in BAT. As the opposite has been

  2. Receptor-Mediated Enhancement of Beta Adrenergic Drug Activity by Ascorbate In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Patrick F.; Root-Bernstein, Robert; Robinson, N. Edward; Abraham, William M.; Berney, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Previous in vitro research demonstrated that ascorbate enhances potency and duration of activity of agonists binding to alpha 1 adrenergic and histamine receptors. Objectives Extending this work to beta 2 adrenergic systems in vitro and in vivo. Methods Ultraviolet spectroscopy was used to study ascorbate binding to adrenergic receptor preparations and peptides. Force transduction studies on acetylcholine-contracted trachealis preparations from pigs and guinea pigs measured the effect of ascorbate on relaxation due to submaximal doses of beta adrenergic agonists. The effect of inhaled albuterol with and without ascorbate was tested on horses with heaves and sheep with carbachol-induced bronchoconstriction. Measurements Binding constants for ascorbate binding to beta adrenergic receptor were derived from concentration-dependent spectral shifts. Dose- dependence curves were obtained for the relaxation of pre-contracted trachealis preparations due to beta agonists in the presence and absence of varied ascorbate. Tachyphylaxis and fade were also measured. Dose response curves were determined for the effect of albuterol plus-and-minus ascorbate on airway resistance in horses and sheep. Main Results Ascorbate binds to the beta 2 adrenergic receptor at physiological concentrations. The receptor recycles dehydroascorbate. Physiological and supra-physiological concentrations of ascorbate enhance submaximal epinephrine and isoproterenol relaxation of trachealis, producing a 3–10-fold increase in sensitivity, preventing tachyphylaxis, and reversing fade. In vivo, ascorbate improves albuterol's effect on heaves and produces a 10-fold enhancement of albuterol activity in “asthmatic” sheep. Conclusions Ascorbate enhances beta-adrenergic activity via a novel receptor-mediated mechanism; increases potency and duration of beta adrenergic agonists effective in asthma and COPD; prevents tachyphylaxis; and reverses fade. These novel effects are probably caused by a

  3. cap alpha. /sub 2/-Adrenergic receptor-mediated sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Toews, M.L.; Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-03-01

    Preincubation of HT29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonists resulted in a 10- to 20-fold increase in forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production as compared to cells preincubated without agonist. Similar results were obtained using either a (/sup 3/H)adenine prelabeling assay or a cyclic AMP radioimmunoassay to measure cyclic AMP levels. This phenomenon, which is termed sensitization, is ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-mediated and rapid in onset and reversal. Yohimbine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-selective antagonist, blocked norepinephrine-induced sensitization, whereas prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic) and sotalol (..beta..-adrenergic) did not. The time for half-maximal sensitization was 5 min and the half-time for reversal was 10 min. Only a 2-fold sensitization of cyclic AMP production stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide was observed, indicating that sensitization is relatively selective for forskolin. Sensitization reflects an increased production of cyclic AMP and not a decreased degradation of cyclic AMP, since incubation with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and forskolin did not mimic sensitization. Increasing the levels of cyclic AMP during the preincubation had no effect on sensitization, indicating that sensitization is not caused by decreased cyclic AMP levels during the preincubation. This rapid and dramatic sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is a previously unreported effect that can be added to the growing list of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic responses that are not mediated by a decrease in cyclic AMP.

  4. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP{sub 4}), an IP{sub 3} derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP{sub 4} are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP{sub 4} in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP{sub 3} and IP{sub 4} hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP{sub 4} and calcium homeostasis.

  5. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  6. Alpha 1-adrenergic agonists selectively suppress voltage-dependent K+ current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Apkon, M; Nerbonne, J M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agonists on the waveforms of action potentials and voltage-gated ionic currents were examined in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. After "puffer" applications of either of two alpha 1 agonists, phenylephrine and methoxamine, action-potential durations were increased. In voltage-clamped cells, phenylephrine (5-20 microM) or methoxamine (5-10 microM) reduced the amplitudes of Ca2+-independent voltage-activated outward K+ currents (Iout); neither the kinetics nor the voltage-dependent properties of Iout were significantly affected. The effects of phenylephrine or methoxamine on Iout were larger and longer-lasting at higher concentrations and after prolonged or repeated exposures; in all experiments, however, Iout recovered completely when puffer applications were discontinued. The suppression of Iout is attributed to the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, as neither beta- nor alpha 2-adrenergic agonists had measurable effects on Iout; in addition, the effect of phenylephrine was attenuated in the presence of the alpha antagonist phentolamine (10 microM), but not in the presence of the beta antagonist propranolol (10 microM). Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, in contrast, were not altered measurably by phenylephrine or methoxamine and no currents were activated directly by these agents. Suppression of Iout was also observed during puffer applications of either of two protein kinase C activators, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 nM-1 microM) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (60 microM). We conclude that the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in adult rat ventricular myocytes leads to action-potential prolongation as a result of the specific suppression of Iout and that this effect may be mediated by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:2903506

  7. Discovery of Quinazoline-Based Fluorescent Probes to α1-Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    α1-Adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs), as the essential members of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can mediate numerous physiological responses in the sympathetic nervous system. In the current research, a series of quinazoline-based small-molecule fluorescent probes to α1-ARs (1a–1e), including two parts, a pharmacophore for α1-AR recognition and a fluorophore for visualization, were well designed and synthesized. The biological evaluation results displayed that these probes held reasonable fluorescent properties, high affinity, accepted cell toxicity, and excellent subcellular localization imaging potential for α1-ARs. PMID:26005522

  8. Recent advances in the molecular pharmacology of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Guarino, R D; Perez, D M; Piascik, M T

    1996-08-01

    This review is intended to discuss recent developments in the molecular pharmacology of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor (alpha 1-AR) subtypes. After a brief historical development, we will focus on the more contemporary issues having to do with this receptor family. Emphasis will be put on recent data regarding the cloning, nomenclature, signalling mechanisms, and genomic organization of the alpha 1-AR subtypes. We will also highlight recent mutational studies that identify key amino acid residues involved in ligand binding, as well as the role of the alpha 1-AR subtypes in regulating physiologic processes.

  9. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  10. Identification and characterization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the canine prostate using (/sup 125/I)-Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Lepor, H.; Baumann, M.; Shapiro, E.

    1987-11-01

    We have recently utilized radioligand receptor binding methods to characterize muscarinic cholinergic and alpha adrenergic receptors in human prostate adenomas. The primary advantages of radioligand receptor binding methods are that neurotransmitter receptor density is quantitated, the affinity of unlabelled drugs for receptor sites is determined, and receptors can be localized using autoradiography on slide-mounted tissue sections. Recently, (/sup 125/I)-Heat, a selective and high affinity ligand with high specific activity (2200 Ci/mmole) has been used to characterize alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the brain. In this study alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the dog prostate were characterized using (/sup 125/I)-Heat. The Scatchard plots were linear indicating homogeneity of (/sup 125/I)-Heat binding sites. The mean alpha 1 adrenergic receptor density determined from these Scatchard plots was 0.61 +/- 0.07 fmol/mg. wet wt. +/- S.E.M. The binding of (/sup 125/I)-Heat to canine prostate alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was of high affinity (Kd = 86 +/- 19 pM). Steady state conditions were reached following an incubation interval of 30 minutes and specific binding and tissue concentration were linear within the range of tissue concentrations assayed. The specificity of (/sup 125/I)-Heat for alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was confirmed by competitive displacement assays using unlabelled clonidine and prazosin. Retrospective analysis of the saturation experiments demonstrated that Bmax can be accurately calculated by determining specific (/sup 125/I)-Heat binding at a single ligand concentration. (/sup 125/I)-Heat is an ideal ligand for studying alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate and its favorable properties should facilitate the autoradiographic localization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate.

  11. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Cantley, Lewis C

    2002-05-31

    Phosphorylated lipids are produced at cellular membranes during signaling events and contribute to the recruitment and activation of various signaling components. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), which catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate, in cell survival pathways; the regulation of gene expression and cell metabolism; and cytoskeletal rearrangements are highlighted. The PI3K pathway is implicated in human diseases including diabetes and cancer, and understanding the intricacies of this pathway may provide new avenues for therapuetic intervention.

  12. Aging increases cytochrome P450 4A modulation of alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Berezan, Dellice J; Dunn, Kathryn M J; Falck, John R; Davidge, Sandra T

    2008-03-01

    Aging is associated with peripheral vascular dysfunction. In vascular smooth muscle, cytochrome P450 4A (CYP4A) enzymes form the vasoconstrictor 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). 20-HETE acts as an intracellular messenger to modulate vasoconstriction induced by various agonists, including the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) and endothelin-1 (ET-1). Eicosanoids produced by CYP4A contribute to the elevated vascular tone in hypertension, but the effects of advanced age on CYP4A modulation of vasoconstriction are unknown. Mesenteric arteries were isolated from young (3 to 4 months) and aged (17 to 18 months) Sprague-Dawley rats. Vasoconstriction was induced with PE or ET-1 in the absence or presence of the CYP4A inhibitor DDMS and/or the ETA inhibitor BQ123. CYP4A inhibition with DDMS significantly reduced PE sensitivity in aged rats, but it had no effect in young. Furthermore, in aged rats only, ETA inhibition reduced PE sensitivity while combined inhibition of CYP4A and ETA had no additional effect, suggesting that the pathways work in concert in aging. Exogenous ET-1 constriction was not altered by DDMS in young or aged rats. Overall, our data indicate that aging increases the contribution of CYP4A to alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in systemic arteries. Understanding aging-related changes in vascular function is important for development of novel targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  13. The alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cardiac hypertrophy: signaling mechanisms and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Cotecchia, Susanna; Del Vescovo, Cosmo Damiano; Colella, Matilde; Caso, Stefania; Diviani, Dario

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex remodeling process of the heart induced by physiological or pathological stimuli resulting in increased cardiomyocyte size and myocardial mass. Whereas cardiac hypertrophy can be an adaptive mechanism to stressful conditions of the heart, prolonged hypertrophy can lead to heart failure which represents the primary cause of human morbidity and mortality. Among G protein-coupled receptors, the α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) play an important role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy as demonstrated by numerous studies in the past decades, both in primary cardiomyocyte cultures and genetically modified mice. The results of these studies have provided evidence of a large variety of α1-AR-induced signaling events contributing to the defining molecular and cellular features of cardiac hypertrophy. Recently, novel signaling mechanisms have been identified and new hypotheses have emerged concerning the functional role of the α1-adrenergic receptors in the heart. This review will summarize the main signaling pathways activated by the α1-AR in the heart and their functional implications in cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cocaine increases dopaminergic neuron and motor activity via midbrain α1 adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Richard Brandon; Wanat, Matthew J; Gomez, Jorge A; Brown, Zeliene J; Phillips, Paul E M; Paladini, Carlos A

    2015-03-13

    Cocaine reinforcement is mediated by increased extracellular dopamine levels in the forebrain. This neurochemical effect was thought to require inhibition of dopamine reuptake, but cocaine is still reinforcing even in the absence of the dopamine transporter. Here, we demonstrate that the rapid elevation in dopamine levels and motor activity elicited by cocaine involves α1 receptor activation within the ventral midbrain. Activation of α1 receptors increases dopaminergic neuron burst firing by decreasing the calcium-activated potassium channel current (SK), as well as elevates dopaminergic neuron pacemaker firing through modulation of both SK and the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih). Furthermore, we found that cocaine increases both the pacemaker and burst-firing frequency of rat ventral-midbrain dopaminergic neurons through an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent mechanism within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. These results demonstrate the mechanism underlying the critical role of α1 adrenergic receptors in the regulation of dopamine neurotransmission and behavior by cocaine.

  15. Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders with the Alpha-1 Adrenergic Antagonist Prazosin.

    PubMed

    Simon, Philippe Yves Rémy; Rousseau, Pierre-François

    2017-03-01

    The present review aims to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of the α-1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin as primary pharmacologic treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A systematic review was performed using keywords (i.e., prazosin, α-1-adrenergic antagonist, α-1-blocker, post-traumatic stress disorder) in the databases PubMed/Medline (1966-May 2016), Embase (1966-May 2016), ScienceDirect (1823-May 2016), OvidSP (1946-May 2016) and Nature (1845-May 2016). To be considered for inclusion, studies had to test the efficacy of prazosin either alone or added to ongoing treatment in adults with PTSD, use validated tools to assess and monitor the disorders, allow comparisons on the basis of univariate analyses (i.e., p-values of t-tests and effect sizes) and list the identified adverse reactions. 12 studies were included: 5 randomized controlled trials, 4 open-label prospective trials and 3 retrospective file reviews. The evaluation concerned 276 patients exposed to civilian trauma (19%) or war trauma (81%). Prazosin significantly decreases trauma nightmares, avoidance, hypervigilance and improves patient status in all studies. No significant difference of blood pressure was observed at the end of trials. Beyond the methodological and clinical biases of these studies, the present review not only confirms the effectiveness and good tolerability of prazosin, but also suggests its possible use as primary pharmacologic treatment for PTSD. Uncertainties remain, however, regarding the prescription modalities and dosages.

  16. The alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptor mediates hyperactivity of coloboma mice, a model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Kristy J; Hess, Ellen J

    2006-09-01

    Drugs that modify noradrenergic transmission such as atomoxetine and clonidine are increasingly prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the therapeutic targets of these compounds are unknown. Norepinephrine is also implicated in the hyperactivity exhibited by coloboma mice. To identify the receptor subtypes that regulate the hyperactivity, coloboma mice were systematically challenged with adrenergic drugs. The beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol and the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin each had little effect on the hyperactivity. Conversely, the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine reduced the activity of coloboma mice but not control mice. Subtype-selective blockade of alpha(2C)-, but not alpha(2A)- or alpha(2B)-adrenergic receptors, ameliorated hyperactivity of coloboma mice without affecting activity of control mice, suggesting that alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptors mediate the hyperactivity. Localized in the basal ganglia, alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptors are in a prime position to impact locomotor activity and are, therefore, potential targets of pharmacotherapy for ADHD.

  17. Bradykinin stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, R. W.; Goodman, C. B.; Young, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    1. Bradykinin (BK)-induced contraction of ileal smooth muscle is assumed to be due to phosphoinositide hydrolysis but this has never been reported. We have investigated whether BK receptors are linked to this transduction mechanism in guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle and determined whether these receptors are equivalent to those labelled in [3H]-BK binding assays. 2. In membranes prepared from longitudinal muscle, [3H]-BK bound to a single class of sites with high affinity. Characterization of the binding with BK analogues indicated that the radioligand selectivity labelled a B2 type receptor. 3. BK significantly elevated tissue levels of [3H]-inositol phosphates in longitudinal muscle slices preincubated with [3H]-myo-inositol. The agonists potencies of BK, Lys-BK, Met-Lys-BK, Tyr5-BK and Tyr8-BK were in agreement with their relative potencies in the binding assay. The B1 receptor agonist des-Arg9-BK, did not stimulate inositol phosphate production. The response to BK was blocked by known B2 receptor antagonists but not by the B1 antagonist des-Arg9, Leu8-BK. 4. BK-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis was unaffected by exposure of muscle slices to either atropine or indomethacin. 5. The results indicate that the B2 receptors linked to phosphoinositide turnover in ileal longitudinal muscle exhibit properties similar to those involved in contractile responses. Also, the receptor mediating the phosphoinositide response is likely to be that labelled in the [3H]-BK binding studies. PMID:1324057

  18. Modulation of hematopoiesis via alpha 1-adrenergic receptors on bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Maestroni, G J; Conti, A

    1994-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that adrenergic agents can affect hematopoiesis after syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice. In particular, chemical sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and/or administration of the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin were shown to increase the concentration of blood granulocytes, platelets, and bone marrow colony-forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), and to induce a granulocytic hyperplasia of the spleen. Here we show that prazosin can also enhance myelopoiesis and platelet formation in normal mice. Furthermore, noradrenaline and the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist methoxamine could directly inhibit the in vitro growth of GM-CFU. The effect of noradrenaline was counteracted by prazosin and by other alpha-adrenergic antagonists such as phentolamine and yohimbine, in the following order of potency: prazosin > phentolamine > yohimbine. In line with these results, we were able to demonstrate that 3H-prazosin binds specifically to both bone marrow cell membranes and intact bone marrow cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding to intact cells revealed the presence of two binding sites. A kd of 0.98 +/- 0.32 nM and a B max of 5 +/- 2.9 fM/2 x 10(6) cells characterized the higher affinity site, while the lower affinity site displayed a kd of 55.9 +/- 8.2 nM and a B max of 44 +/- 7.7 fM/mg protein. These saturation studies, together with competition experiments to evaluate the ability of various adrenergic compounds to displace 3H-prazosin binding, classified the higher affinity site as an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor. The remaining low affinity binding site remains to be characterized. Furthermore, separation of bone marrow cells by counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) showed that the high-affinity binding is due to a lymphoid/stem cell fraction with no blasts and no GM-CFU progenitors. The low-affinity site was apparent on the rotor-off fraction, which was enriched with GM-CFU progenitor cells. These findings

  19. Phosphoinositides alter lipid bilayer properties

    PubMed Central

    Hobart, E. Ashley; Koeppe, Roger E.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), which constitutes ∼1% of the plasma membrane phospholipid, plays a key role in membrane-delimited signaling. PIP2 regulates structurally and functionally diverse membrane proteins, including voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, inwardly rectifying ion channels, transporters, and receptors. In some cases, the regulation is known to involve specific lipid–protein interactions, but the mechanisms by which PIP2 regulates many of its various targets remain to be fully elucidated. Because many PIP2 targets are membrane-spanning proteins, we explored whether the phosphoinositides might alter bilayer physical properties such as curvature and elasticity, which would alter the equilibrium between membrane protein conformational states—and thereby protein function. Taking advantage of the gramicidin A (gA) channels’ sensitivity to changes in lipid bilayer properties, we used gA-based fluorescence quenching and single-channel assays to examine the effects of long-chain PIP2s (brain PIP2, which is predominantly 1-stearyl-2-arachidonyl-PIP2, and dioleoyl-PIP2) on bilayer properties. When premixed with dioleoyl-phosphocholine at 2 mol %, both long-chain PIP2s produced similar changes in gA channel function (bilayer properties); when applied through the aqueous solution, however, brain PIP2 was a more potent modifier than dioleoyl-PIP2. Given the widespread use of short-chain dioctanoyl-phosphoinositides, we also examined the effects of diC8-phosphoinositol (PI), PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,5)P2, PI(3,4)P2, and PI(3,4,5)P3. The diC8 phosphoinositides, except for PI(3,5)P2, altered bilayer properties with potencies that decreased with increasing head group charge. Nonphosphoinositide diC8 phospholipids generally were more potent bilayer modifiers than the polyphosphoinositides. These results show that physiological increases or decreases in plasma membrane PIP2 levels, as a result of activation of PI kinases or phosphatases, are likely

  20. Intracellular mechanisms for alpha 1-adrenergic regulation of the transient outward current in rabbit atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A P; Fedida, D; Clark, R B; Giles, W R

    1990-01-01

    1. The intracellular mechanism(s) underlying the decrease of a transient outward K+ current (It) induced by alpha 1-adrenergic agonists was studied in isolated adult rabbit atrial myocytes using whole-cell voltage clamp and cell-attached patch clamp techniques. Experiments were carried out at 22-23 degrees C. 2. Application of the specific alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, methoxamine, produced a decrease in It which was irreversible after the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, GTP gamma S and Gpp(NH)p, had been introduced into cells via the recording micropipette. 3. Pre-treatment of cells with 0.1-0.15 microgram/ml pertussis toxin (PT) for 8-9 h at 30-34 degrees C did not prevent the alpha 1-induced decrease in It. Yet, this protocol, as measured by the PT-catalysed incorporation of [32P]ADP-ribose in membrane-associated 40 and 41 kDa proteins, effectively caused the ADP-ribosylation of approximately 70% of the PT-sensitive GTP-binding proteins (i.e. Gi) in these treated cells. After taking into account the proportion of non-viable cells (20-30%), the effectiveness of this treatment probably approaches 100% in the viable myocytes from which electrophysiological recordings were made. 4. Cell-attached patch recordings showed that bath application of methoxamine altered the single-channel events underlying It by decreasing their opening probability. Averaged currents from ensemble single-channel openings recorded in the presence of 0.2 mM-methoxamine outside the patch reproduced the features of alpha 1-adrenergic modulation of the macroscopic It observed during whole-cell voltage clamp measurements. This observation provides evidence for the involvement of a diffusible intracellular second messenger in the alpha 1-adrenergic modulation of It. 5. The protein kinase C (PKC) activators, 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) increased It, when included in the bath perfusate, whereas the inactive analogues, 4 alpha-phorbol and 4 alpha

  1. Successful treatment of retrograde ejaculation with the alpha1-adrenergic agonist methoxamine: case study.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, P A; Fanciulli, G; Delitala, G

    2005-01-01

    We treated two patients affected by retrograde ejaculation (RE) with the pure alpha1-adrenergic agonist methoxamine; the drug was self-administered intramuscularly by the patients 30 min prior to intercourse or masturbation. A previous trial with oral imipramine had been ineffective in both patients. Sperm count increased substantially, particularly in the first patient who had insulin-dependent diabetes and was seeking fertility. In this patient, total ejaculated sperm increased from 22 millions to 488 and 419.5 millions on two different occasions, with good motility; two clinical pregnancies were obtained in the partner of this patient after 3 and 4 months of treatment, respectively. The second patient did not desire fertility. In both patients, no side effects were seen except for slight piloerection; blood pressure values increased slightly, and heart rate was unchanged. We conclude that self-administered methoxamine can be a useful, noninvasive and inexpensive treatment of RE, when oral agents are ineffective.

  2. β1-adrenergic receptor activation enhances memory in Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Coutellier, Laurence; Ardestani, Pooneh Memar; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    Deficits in social recognition and learning of social cues are major symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we studied the role of β1-noradrenergic signaling in cognitive function to determine whether it could be used as a potential therapeutic target for AD. Using pharmacological, biochemical and behavioral tools, we assessed social recognition and the β1-adrenergic receptor (ADR) and its downstream PKA/phospho-CREB (pCREB) signaling cascade in the medial amygdala (MeA) in Thy1-hAPP(Lond/Swe+)(APP) mouse model of AD. Our results demonstrated that APP mice display a significant social recognition deficit which is dependent on the β1-adrenergic system. Moreover, betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist, impaired social but not object/odor learning in C57Bl/6 mice. Our results identifies activation of the PKA/pCREB downstream of β1-ADR in MeA as responsible signaling cascade for learning of social cues in MeA. Finally, we found that xamoterol, a selective β1-ADR partial agonist, rescued the social recognition deficit of APP mice by increasing nuclear pCREB. Our data indicate that activation of β1-ADR in MeA is essential for learning of social cues, and that an impairment of this cascade in AD may contribute to pathogenesis and cognitive deficits. Therefore, selective activation of β1-ADR may be used as a therapeutic approach to rescue memory deficits in AD. Further safety and translational studies will be needed to ensure the safety of this approach.

  3. β1-adrenergic receptor activation enhances memory in Alzheimer's disease model

    PubMed Central

    Coutellier, Laurence; Ardestani, Pooneh Memar; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deficits in social recognition and learning of social cues are major symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we studied the role of β1-noradrenergic signaling in cognitive function to determine whether it could be used as a potential therapeutic target for AD. Methods Using pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools, we assessed social recognition and the β1-adrenergic receptor (ADR) and its downstream protein kinase A (PKA)/phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) signaling cascade in the medial amygdala (MeA) in Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+(APP) mouse model of AD. Results Our results demonstrated that APP mice display a significant social recognition deficit which is dependent on the β1-adrenergic system. Moreover, betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist, impaired social but not object/odor learning in C57Bl/6 mice. Our results identifies activation of the PKA/pCREB downstream of β1-ADR in MeA as responsible signaling cascade for learning of social cues in MeA. Finally, we found that xamoterol, a selective β1-ADR partial agonist, rescued the social recognition deficit of APP mice by increasing nuclear pCREB. Interpretation Our data indicate that activation of β1-ADR in MeA is essential for learning of social cues, and that an impairment of this cascade in AD may contribute to pathogenesis and cognitive deficits. Therefore, selective activation of β1-ADR may be used as a therapeutic approach to rescue memory deficits in AD. Further safety and translational studies will be needed to ensure the safety of this approach. PMID:24883337

  4. Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders with the Alpha-1 Adrenergic Antagonist Prazosin

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present review aims to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of the α-1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin as primary pharmacologic treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: A systematic review was performed using keywords (i.e., prazosin, α-1-adrenergic antagonist, α-1-blocker, post-traumatic stress disorder) in the databases PubMed/Medline (1966–May 2016), Embase (1966–May 2016), ScienceDirect (1823–May 2016), OvidSP (1946–May 2016) and Nature (1845–May 2016). To be considered for inclusion, studies had to test the efficacy of prazosin either alone or added to ongoing treatment in adults with PTSD, use validated tools to assess and monitor the disorders, allow comparisons on the basis of univariate analyses (i.e., p-values of t-tests and effect sizes) and list the identified adverse reactions. Results: 12 studies were included: 5 randomized controlled trials, 4 open-label prospective trials and 3 retrospective file reviews. The evaluation concerned 276 patients exposed to civilian trauma (19%) or war trauma (81%). Prazosin significantly decreases trauma nightmares, avoidance, hypervigilance and improves patient status in all studies. No significant difference of blood pressure was observed at the end of trials. Conclusions: Beyond the methodological and clinical biases of these studies, the present review not only confirms the effectiveness and good tolerability of prazosin, but also suggests its possible use as primary pharmacologic treatment for PTSD. Uncertainties remain, however, regarding the prescription modalities and dosages. PMID:27432823

  5. Nuclear phosphoinositide regulation of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Bree L; Blind, Raymond D

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipid signaling has clear connections to a wide array of cellular processes, particularly in gene expression and in controlling the chromatin biology of cells. However, most of the work elucidating how phospholipid signaling pathways contribute to cellular physiology have studied cytoplasmic membranes, while relatively little attention has been paid to the role of phospholipid signaling in the nucleus. Recent work from several labs has shown that nuclear phospholipid signaling can have important roles that are specific to this cellular compartment. This review focuses on the nuclear phospholipid functions and the activities of phospholipid signaling enzymes that regulate metazoan chromatin and gene expression. In particular, we highlight the roles that nuclear phosphoinositides play in several nuclear-driven physiological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression. Taken together, the recent discovery of several specifically nuclear phospholipid functions could have dramatic impact on our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that enable tight control of cellular physiology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Phosphoinositides: Key modulators of energy metabolism☆

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Dave; Saltiel, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are key players in many trafficking and signaling pathways. Recent advances regarding the synthesis, location and functions of these lipids have dramatically improved our understanding of how and when these lipids are generated and what their roles are in animal physiology. In particular, phosphoinositides play a central role in insulin signaling, and manipulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels in particular, may be an important potential therapeutic target for the alleviation of insulin resistance associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. In this article we review the metabolism, regulation and functional roles of phosphoinositides in insulin signaling and the regulation of energy metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phosphoinositides. PMID:25463477

  7. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish.

  8. Receptor-mediated Endocytosis in the Caenorhabditis elegans Oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Barth; Hirsh, David

    1999-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte is a highly amenable system for forward and reverse genetic analysis of receptor-mediated endocytosis. We describe the use of transgenic strains expressing a vitellogenin::green fluorescent protein (YP170::GFP) fusion to monitor yolk endocytosis by the C. elegans oocyte in vivo. This YP170::GFP reporter was used to assay the functions of C. elegans predicted proteins homologous to vertebrate endocytosis factors using RNA-mediated interference. We show that the basic components and pathways of endocytic trafficking are conserved between C. elegans and vertebrates, and that this system can be used to test the endocytic functions of any new gene. We also used the YP170::GFP assay to identify rme (receptor-mediated endocytosis) mutants. We describe a new member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor superfamily, RME-2, identified in our screens for endocytosis defective mutants. We show that RME-2 is the C. elegans yolk receptor. PMID:10588660

  9. Receptors mediating toxicity and their involvement in endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Rüegg, Joëlle; Penttinen-Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Mäkelä, Sari; Pongratz, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2009-01-01

    Many toxic compounds exert their harmful effects by activating of certain receptors, which in turn leads to dysregulation of transcription. Some of these receptors are so called xenosensors. They are activated by external chemicals and evoke a cascade of events that lead to the elimination of the chemical from the system. Other receptors that are modulated by toxic substances are hormone receptors, particularly the ones of the nuclear receptor family. Some environmental chemicals resemble endogenous hormones and can falsely activate these receptors, leading to undesired activity in the cell. Furthermore, excessive activation of the xenosensors can lead to disturbances of the integrity of the system as well. In this chapter, the concepts of receptor-mediated toxicity and hormone disruption are introduced. We start by describing environmental chemicals that can bind to xenosensors and nuclear hormone receptors. We then describe the receptors most commonly targeted by environmental chemicals. Finally, the mechanisms by which receptor-mediated events can disrupt the system are depicted.

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  11. Regulation of platelet plug formation by phosphoinositide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang H.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol and its phosphorylated derivatives, phosphoinositides, are minor constituents of phospholipids at the cellular membrane level. Nevertheless, phosphatidylinositol and phosphoinositides represent essential components of intracellular signaling that regulate diverse cellular processes, including platelet plug formation. Accumulating evidence indicates that the metabolism of phosphoinositides is temporally and spatially modulated by the opposing effects of specific phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes, including lipid kinases, lipid phosphatases, and phospholipases. Each of these enzymes generates a selective phosphoinositide or second messenger within precise cellular compartments. Intriguingly, phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes exist in different isoforms, which all produce the same phosphoinositide products. Recent studies using isoform-specific mouse models and chemical inhibitors have elucidated that the different isoforms of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes have nonredundant functions and provide an additional layer of complexity to the temporo-spatial organization of intracellular signaling events. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of phosphoinositide organization during platelet activation. PMID:23757731

  12. Crosstalk between adenosine A1 and β1-adrenergic receptors regulates translocation of PKCε in isolated rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Satoshi; Dobson, James G.; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Shea, Lynne G.; Fenton, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-induced translocation of PKCε to transverse (t) tubular membranes in isolated rat cardiomyocytes is associated with a reduction in β1-adrenergic-stimulated contractile function. The PKCε-mediated activation of protein kinase D (PKD) by endothelin-1 is inhibited by β1-adrenergic stimulated protein kinase A (PKA) suggesting a similar mechanism of A1R signal transduction modulation by adrenergic agonists may exist in the heart. We have investigated the influence of β1-adrenergic stimulation on PKCε translocation elicited by A1R. Immunofluorescence imaging and Western blotting with PKCε and β-COP antibodies were used to quantify the co-localization of PKCε and t-tubular structures in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. The A1R agonist CCPA increased the co-localization of PKCε and t-tubules as detected by imaging. The β1-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) inhibited this effect of CCPA. Forskolin, a potent activator of PKA, mimicked, and H89, a pharmacological PKA inhibitor, and PKI, a membrane-permeable PKA peptide PKA inhibitor, attenuated the negative effect of ISO on the A1R-mediated PKCε translocation. Western blotting with isolated intact hearts revealed an increase in PKCε/β-COP co-localization induced by A1R. This increase was attenuated by the A1R antagonist DPCPX and ISO. The ISO-induced attenuation was reversed by H89. It is concluded that adrenergic stimulation inhibits A1R-induced PKCε translocation to the PKCε anchor site RACK2 constituent of a coatomer containing β-COP and associated with the t-tubular structures of the heart. In that this translocation has been previously associated with the antiadrenergic property of A1R, it is apparent that the interactive effects of adenosine and β1-adrenergic agonists on function are complex in the heart. PMID:22105697

  13. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase by D2 receptor prevents apoptosis in dopaminergic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nair, Venugopalan D; Olanow, C Warren; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2003-07-01

    Whereas dopamine agonists are known to provide symptomatic benefits for Parkinson's disease, recent clinical trials suggest that they might also be neuroprotective. Laboratory studies demonstrate that dopamine agonists can provide neuroprotective effects in a number of model systems, but the role of receptor-mediated signalling in these effects is controversial. We find that dopamine agonists have robust, concentration-dependent anti-apoptotic activity in PC12 cells that stably express human D(2L) receptors from cell death due to H(2)O(2) or trophic withdrawal and that the protective effects are abolished in the presence of D(2)-receptor antagonists. D(2) agonists are also neuroprotective in the nigral dopamine cell line SN4741, which express endogenous D(2) receptors, whereas no anti-apoptotic activity is observed in native PC12 cells, which do not express detectable D(2) receptors. Notably, the agonists studied differ in their relative efficacy to mediate anti-apoptotic effects and in their capacity to stimulate [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding, an indicator of G-protein activation. Studies with inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase indicate that the PI 3-kinase pathway is required for D(2) receptor-mediated cell survival. These studies indicate that certain dopamine agonists can complex with D(2) receptors to preferentially transactivate neuroprotective signalling pathways and to mediate increased cell survival.

  14. The beta-1 adrenergic antagonist, betaxolol, improves working memory performance in rats and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Brian P; Colgan, Lesley; Nou, Eric; Ovadia, Shira; Wilson, Steven R; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have indicated that beta adrenergic receptor stimulation has no effect on the cognitive functioning of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Blockade of beta-1 and beta-2 receptors in the PFC with the mixed beta-1/beta-2 antagonist, propanolol, had no effect on spatial working memory performance. However, more selective blockade of beta-1 or beta-2 receptors might show efficacy if the two receptors have opposite effects on PFC function. The current study examined the effects of the selective beta-1 antagonist, betaxolol, on working memory in rats and monkeys. In rats, betaxolol (.0011-1.11 microg/.5 microL) was infused into the PFC 5 min before delayed alternation testing. Monkeys were systemically injected with betaxolol (.0000011-.11 mg/kg) 2 hours before delayed response testing. Betaxolol produced a dose-related improvement in working memory performance following either direct PFC infusion in rats, or systemic administration in monkeys. However, some aged monkeys developed serious pancreatic problems over the course of this study. These findings suggest that endogenous activation of the beta-1 adrenergic receptor impairs PFC cognitive function. These results may have therapeutic relevance to post-traumatic stress disorder or other disorders with excessive noradrenergic activity and PFC dysfunction. Pancreatic side effects in aged subjects taking betaxolol warrants further investigation.

  15. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors gate rapid orientation-specific reduction in visual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario; Frey, Sebastian; Köhr, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged imbalance in sensory experience leads to dramatic readjustments in cortical representation. Neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in habilitating experience-induced plasticity and regulate memory processes in vivo. Here, we show that a brief period of intense patterned visual stimulation combined with systemic activation of alpha-1 adrenergic neuromodulator receptors (α(1)-ARs) leads to a rapid, reversible, and NMDAR-dependent depression of AMPAR-mediated transmission from ascending inputs to layer II/III pyramidal cells in the visual cortex of young and adult mice. The magnitude of this form of α(1)-AR long-term depression (LTD), measured ex vivo with miniature EPSC recordings, is graded by the number of orientations used during visual experience. Moreover, behavioral tests of visual function following the induction of α(1)-AR LTD reveal that discrimination accuracy of sinusoidal drifting gratings is selectively reduced at high spatial frequencies in a reversible, orientation-specific, and NMDAR-dependent manner. Thus, α(1)-ARs enable rapid cortical synaptic depression which correlates with an orientation-specific decrease in visual discrimination. These findings contribute to our understanding of how adrenergic receptors interact with neuronal networks in response to changes in active sensory experience to produce adaptive behavior.

  16. β1-Adrenergic receptor deficiency in ghrelin-expressing cells causes hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Bharath K.; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Vijayaraghavan, Prasanna; Hepler, Chelsea; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic gastric peptide hormone secreted when caloric intake is limited. Ghrelin also regulates blood glucose, as emphasized by the hypoglycemia that is induced by caloric restriction in mouse models of deficient ghrelin signaling. Here, we hypothesized that activation of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) localized to ghrelin cells is required for caloric restriction–associated ghrelin release and the ensuing protective glucoregulatory response. In mice lacking the β1AR specifically in ghrelin-expressing cells, ghrelin secretion was markedly blunted, resulting in profound hypoglycemia and prevalent mortality upon severe caloric restriction. Replacement of ghrelin blocked the effects of caloric restriction in β1AR-deficient mice. We also determined that treating calorically restricted juvenile WT mice with beta blockers led to reduced plasma ghrelin and hypoglycemia, the latter of which is similar to the life-threatening, fasting-induced hypoglycemia observed in infants treated with beta blockers. These findings highlight the critical functions of ghrelin in preventing hypoglycemia and promoting survival during severe caloric restriction and the requirement for ghrelin cell–expressed β1ARs in these processes. Moreover, these results indicate a potential role for ghrelin in mediating beta blocker–associated hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals, such as young children. PMID:27548523

  17. The Specific α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Influences the Urine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mindi; Wu, Jianqiang; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Urine, reflecting many changes in the body, is a better source than blood for biomarker discovery. However, even under physiological conditions, the urine proteome often varies. Understanding how various regulating factors affect urine proteome helps link changes to urine proteome with urinary biomarkers of physiological conditions as well as corresponding diseases. To evaluate the possible impact of α1-adrenergic receptor on urine proteome, this study investigated effects of the specific inhibitor prazosin on the urine proteome in a rat model by using tandem mass tagging and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 775 proteins were identified, approximately half of which were influenced by prazosin treatment, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system exerts a significant impact on urine proteome. Eight significantly changed proteins were previously annotated as urinary candidate biomarkers. Angiotensinogen, haptoglobin, and beta-2 microglobulin, which were reported to be associated with blood pressure, were validated via Western blot. Prazosin is widely used in clinical practice; thus, these protein changes should be considered when studying corresponding diseases such as hypertension, post-traumatic stress disorder and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The related physiological activities of α1-receptors, controlling blood pressure and fear response might significantly affect the urine proteome and warrant further biomarker studies. PMID:27780262

  18. The structural basis for agonist and partial agonist action on a β(1)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Warne, Tony; Moukhametzianov, Rouslan; Baker, Jillian G; Nehmé, Rony; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-01-13

    β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate intracellular G proteins upon binding catecholamine agonist ligands such as adrenaline and noradrenaline. Synthetic ligands have been developed that either activate or inhibit βARs for the treatment of asthma, hypertension or cardiac dysfunction. These ligands are classified as either full agonists, partial agonists or antagonists, depending on whether the cellular response is similar to that of the native ligand, reduced or inhibited, respectively. However, the structural basis for these different ligand efficacies is unknown. Here we present four crystal structures of the thermostabilized turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) β(1)-adrenergic receptor (β(1)AR-m23) bound to the full agonists carmoterol and isoprenaline and the partial agonists salbutamol and dobutamine. In each case, agonist binding induces a 1 Å contraction of the catecholamine-binding pocket relative to the antagonist bound receptor. Full agonists can form hydrogen bonds with two conserved serine residues in transmembrane helix 5 (Ser(5.42) and Ser(5.46)), but partial agonists only interact with Ser(5.42) (superscripts refer to Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering). The structures provide an understanding of the pharmacological differences between different ligand classes, illuminating how GPCRs function and providing a solid foundation for the structure-based design of novel ligands with predictable efficacies.

  19. Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Modulate Uterine α1-Adrenergic Sensitivity in Ovine Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hynan, Linda S.; Liu, Xiao-tie; Roy, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The uteroplacental vasculature is refractory to α-adrenergic stimulation, and large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa) may contribute. We examined the effects of uterine artery (UA) BKCa inhibition with tetraethylammonium (TEA) on hemodynamic responses to phenylephrine (PE) at 101 to 117 days and 135 to 147 days of ovine gestation, obtaining dose responses for mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and uteroplacental blood flow (UPBF) and vascular resistance (UPVR) before and during UA TEA infusions. The UA α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) were assessed. The PE increased MAP and UPVR and decreased HR and UPBF dose dependently at both gestations (P < .001, analysis of variance). The %▵MAP was less at 135 to 147 days before and during TEA infusions (P ≤ .008); however, responses during TEA were greater (P ≤ .002). The PE increased %▵UPVR>>%▵MAP, thus %▵UPBF fell. The TEA enhanced PE-mediated increases in %▵UPVR at 135 to 147 days (P ≤ .03). The UA α1-AR expression was unchanged in pregnancy. Uterine vascular responses to PE exceed systemic vascular responses throughout pregnancy and are attenuated by BKCa activation, suggesting BKCa protect UPBF. PMID:24026311

  20. Anti-β1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Labovsky, V; Smulski, C R; Gómez, K; Levy, G; Levin, M J

    2007-01-01

    Chronic Chagas heart disease (cChHD), a chronic manifestation of the Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is characterized by high antibody levels against the C-terminal region of the ribosomal P proteins (i.e. peptide R13, EEEDDDMGFGLFD) which bears similarity with the second extracellular loop of β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR, peptide H26R HWWRAESDEARRCYNDPKCCDFVTNR). Because it has not been demonstrated clearly that IgGs from cChHD patients bind to native human β1-AR, the aim of this study was to investigate further the physical interaction between cChHD IgGs and the human β1-AR. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated the binding of these antibodies to the receptor expressed on stably transfected cells, together with a β1-AR agonist-like effect. In addition, immunoadsorption of the serum samples from cChHD patients with a commercially available matrix, containing peptides representing the first and the second extracellular loop of the β1-AR, completely abolished reactivity against the H26R peptide and the physiological response to the receptor. The follow-up of this specificity after in vitro immunoadsorption procedures suggests that this treatment might be used to diminish significantly the serum levels of anti-β1-AR antibodies in patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:17419712

  1. Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor subtypes: non-identical triplets with different dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Hague, Chris; Chen, Zhongjian; Uberti, Michelle; Minneman, Kenneth P

    2003-12-12

    Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are one of the three subfamilies of G protein coupled receptors activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine to control important functions in many target organs. Three human subtypes (alpha(1A), alpha(1B), alpha(1D)) are derived from separate genes and are highly homologous in their transmembrane domains but not in their amino or carboxyl termini. Recent advances in our understanding of these "non-identical triplets" include development of knockout mice lacking single or multiple subtypes, new insights into subcellular localization and trafficking, identification of allosteric modulators, and increasing evidence for an important role in brain function. Although all three subtypes activate the same G(q/11) signaling pathway, they also appear to interact with different protein binding partners. Recent evidence suggests they may also form dimers, and may initiate independent signals through pathways yet to be clearly elucidated. Thus, this subfamily represents a common phenomenon of a group of similar but non-identical receptor subtypes activated by the same neurotransmitter, whose individual functional roles remain to be clearly established.

  2. Norepinephrine regulates cocaine-primed reinstatement via α1-adrenergic receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Karl T; Schroeder, Jason P; Foster, Stephanie L; Squires, Katherine; Smith, Brilee M; Pitts, Elizabeth G; Epstein, Michael P; Weinshenker, David

    2017-06-01

    Drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats is thought to reflect relapse-like behavior and is mediated by the integration of signals from mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic projections and corticostriatal glutamatergic innervation. Cocaine-primed reinstatement can also be attenuated by systemic administration of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitors, which prevent norepinephrine (NE) synthesis, or by α1-adrenergic receptor (α1AR) antagonists, indicating functional modulation by the noradrenergic system. In the present study, we sought to further discern the role of NE in cocaine-seeking behavior by determining whether α1AR activation can induce reinstatement on its own or is sufficient to permit cocaine-primed reinstatement in the absence of all other AR signaling, and identifying the neuroanatomical substrate within the mesocorticolimbic reward system harboring the critical α1ARs. We found that while intracerebroventricular infusion of the α1AR agonist phenylephrine did not induce reinstatement on its own, it did overcome the blockade of cocaine-primed reinstatement by the DBH inhibitor nepicastat. Furthermore, administration of the α1AR antagonist terazosin in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell, attenuated cocaine-primed reinstatement. Combined, these data indicate that α1AR activation in the mPFC is required for cocaine-primed reinstatement, and suggest that α1AR antagonists merit further investigation as pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. β(1) Adrenergic receptor is key to cold- and diet-induced thermogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Cintia B; Fernandes, Gustavo W; Capelo, Luciane P; Fonseca, Tatiane L; Maculan, Flávia D'Angelo; Gouveia, Cecilia H A; Brum, Patrícia C; Christoffolete, Marcelo A; Aoki, Marcelo S; Lancellotti, Carmen L; Kim, Brian; Bianco, Antonio C; Ribeiro, Miriam O

    2012-09-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is predominantly regulated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the adrenergic receptor signaling pathway. Knowing that a mouse with triple β-receptor knockout (KO) is cold intolerant and obese, we evaluated the independent role played by the β(1) isoform in energy homeostasis. First, the 30  min i.v. infusion of norepinephrine (NE) or the β(1) selective agonist dobutamine (DB) resulted in similar interscapular BAT (iBAT) thermal response in WT mice. Secondly, mice with targeted disruption of the β(1) gene (KO of β(1) adrenergic receptor (β(1)KO)) developed hypothermia during cold exposure and exhibited decreased iBAT thermal response to NE or DB infusion. Thirdly, when placed on a high-fat diet (HFD; 40% fat) for 5 weeks, β(1)KO mice were more susceptible to obesity than WT controls and failed to develop diet-induced thermogenesis as assessed by BAT Ucp1 mRNA levels and oxygen consumption. Furthermore, β(1)KO mice exhibited fasting hyperglycemia and more intense glucose intolerance, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia when placed on the HFD, developing marked non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, the β(1) signaling pathway mediates most of the SNS stimulation of adaptive thermogenesis.

  4. Rab11a and its binding partners regulate the recycling of the β1-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Lidia A.; Hajjhussein, Hassan; Frederick, Katherine C.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.

    2010-01-01

    β1-adrenergic receptors (β1-AR) are internalized in response to agonists and then recycle back for another round of signaling. The serine 312 to alanine mutant of the β1-AR (S312A) is internalized but does not recycle. We determined that WT β1-AR and S312A were internalized initially to an early sorting compartment because they colocalized by >70% with the early endosomal markers rab5a and early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1). Subsequently, the WT β1-AR trafficked via rab4a-expressing sorting endosomes to recycling endosomes. In recycling endosomes WT β1-AR were colocalized by >70% with the rab11 GTPase. S312A did not colocalize with either rab4a or rab11, instead they exited from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes in which they were degraded. Rab11a played a prominent role in recycling of the WT β1-AR because dominant negative rab11a inhibited, while constitutively active rab11a accelerated the recycling of the β1-AR. Next, we determined the effect of each of the rab11-intercating proteins on trafficking of the WT β1-AR. The recycling of the β1-AR was markedly inhibited when myosin Vb, FIP2, FIP3 and rabphillin were knocked down. These data indicate that rab11a and a select group of its binding partners play a prominent role recycling of the human β1-AR. PMID:20727405

  5. Thermostabilization of the β1-adrenergic receptor Correlates with Increased Entropy of the Inactive State

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, Michiel JM; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Grisshammer, Reinhard; Tate, Christopher G; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of GPCRs is a major hurdle in their purification and crystallization, but thermostabilization can facilitate structure determination, as has been shown by the structure of the thermostabilized β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) mutant, m23-β1AR, which has been thermostabilized in the inactive state. However, it is unclear from the structure how the six thermostabilizing mutations in m23-β1AR affect receptor dynamics. We have used molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to compare the conformational ensembles for both wild type β1AR (wt-β1AR) and m23-β1AR. Thermostabilization results in an increase in the number of accessible microscopic conformational states within the inactive state ensemble, effectively increasing the side chain entropy of the inactive state at room temperature, while suppressing large-scale main chain conformational changes that lead to activation. We identified several diverse mechanisms of thermostabilization upon mutation. These include, decrease of long range correlated movement between residues in the G-protein coupling site to the extracellular region (Y227A5.58, F338M7.48), formation of new hydrogen bonds (R68S), and reduction of local stress (Y2275.58, F3277.37 and F3387.48). This study provides insights into microscopic mechanisms underlying thermostability that leads to an understanding of the effect of these mutations on the structure of the receptor. PMID:23697892

  6. Alpha-1 Adrenergic Receptors Gate Rapid Orientation-Specific Reduction in Visual Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Sebastian; Köhr, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged imbalance in sensory experience leads to dramatic readjustments in cortical representation. Neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in habilitating experience-induced plasticity and regulate memory processes in vivo. Here, we show that a brief period of intense patterned visual stimulation combined with systemic activation of alpha-1 adrenergic neuromodulator receptors (α1-ARs) leads to a rapid, reversible, and NMDAR-dependent depression of AMPAR-mediated transmission from ascending inputs to layer II/III pyramidal cells in the visual cortex of young and adult mice. The magnitude of this form of α1-AR long-term depression (LTD), measured ex vivo with miniature EPSC recordings, is graded by the number of orientations used during visual experience. Moreover, behavioral tests of visual function following the induction of α1-AR LTD reveal that discrimination accuracy of sinusoidal drifting gratings is selectively reduced at high spatial frequencies in a reversible, orientation-specific, and NMDAR-dependent manner. Thus, α1-ARs enable rapid cortical synaptic depression which correlates with an orientation-specific decrease in visual discrimination. These findings contribute to our understanding of how adrenergic receptors interact with neuronal networks in response to changes in active sensory experience to produce adaptive behavior. PMID:22120418

  7. Nuclear Compartmentalization of α1-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Adult Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Although convention dictates that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at the plasma membrane, accumulating evidence suggests that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at intracellular membranes, most notably the nucleus. In fact, there is now significant evidence indicating that endogenous alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) localize to and signal at the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes. Cumulatively, the data suggest that α1-ARs localize to the inner nuclear membrane, activate intranuclear signaling, and regulate physiologic function in adult cardiac myocytes. Although α1-ARs signal through Gαq, unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, α1-ARs mediate important cardioprotective functions including adaptive/physiologic hypertrophy, protection from cell death (survival signaling), positive inotropy, and preconditioning. Also unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, most, if not all, functional α1-ARs localize to the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes, as opposed to the sarcolemma. Together, α1-AR nuclear localization and cardioprotection might suggest a novel model for compartmentalization of Gq-coupled receptor signaling in which nuclear Gq-coupled receptor signaling is cardioprotective. PMID:25264754

  8. Comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome: activation of β1-adrenergic receptor by xamoterol as a potential cognitive enhancer.

    PubMed

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Bader, Patrick L; Tun, Christine; Encarnacion, Angelo; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Belichenko, Pavel; Saw, Nay; Priestley, Matthew; Tsien, Richard W; Mobley, William C; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2011-08-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent form of mental retardation caused by genetic abnormalities in humans. This has been successfully modeled in mice to generate the Ts65Dn mouse, a genetic model of DS. This transgenic mouse model shares a number of physical and functional abnormalities with people with DS, including changes in the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Significant abnormalities in noradrenergic (NE-ergic) afferents from the locus coeruleus to the hippocampus, as well as deficits in NE-ergic neurotransmission are detected in these animals. In the current study we characterized in detail the behavioral phenotype of Ts65Dn mice, in addition to using pharmacological tools for identification of target receptors mediating the learning and memory deficits observed in this model of DS. We undertook a comprehensive approach to mouse phenotyping using a battery of standard and novel tests encompassing: (i) locomotion (Activity Chamber, PhenoTyper, and CatWalk), (ii) learning and memory (spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, fear conditioning, and Intellicage), and (iii) social behavior. Ts65Dn mice showed increased locomotor activity in novel and home cage environments. There were significant and reproducible deficits in learning and memory tests including spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, Intellicage place avoidance and contextual fear conditioning. Although Ts65Dn mice showed no deficit in sociability in the 3-chamber test, a marked impairment in social memory was detected. Xamoterol, a β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-ADR) agonist, effectively restored the memory deficit in contextual fear conditioning, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition. These behavioral improvements were reversed by betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that this mouse model of Down syndrome displays cognitive deficits which are mediated by an imbalance in the

  9. Comprehensive Behavioral Phenotyping of Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome: Activation of β1-Adrenergic Receptor by Xamoterol as a Potential Cognitive Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Bader, Patrick L.; Tun, Christine; Encarnacion, Angelo; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Belichenko, Pavel; Saw, Nay; Priestley, Matthew; Tsien, Richard W; Mobley, William C; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent form of mental retardation caused by genetic abnormalities in humans. This has been successfully modeled in mice to generate the Ts65Dn mouse, a genetic model of DS. This transgenic mouse model shares a number of physical and functional abnormalities with people with DS, including changes in the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Significant abnormalities in noradrenergic (NE-ergic) afferents from the locus coeruleus to the hippocampus, as well as deficits in NE-ergic neurotransmission are detected in these animals. In the current study we characterized in detail the behavioral phenotype of Ts65Dn mice, in addition to using pharmacological tools for identification of target receptors mediating the learning and memory deficits observed in this model of DS. We undertook a comprehensive approach to mouse phenotyping using a battery of standard and novel tests encompassing: i) locomotion (Activity Chamber, PhenoTyper, and CatWalk), ii) learning and memory (spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, fear conditioning, and Intellicage), and iii) social behavior. Ts65Dn mice showed increased locomotor activity in novel and home cage environments. There were significant and reproducible deficits in learning and memory tests including spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, Intellicage place avoidance and contextual fear conditioning. Although Ts65Dn mice showed no deficit in sociability in the 3-chamber test, a marked impairment in social memory was detected. Xamoterol, a β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-ADR) agonist, effectively restored the memory deficit in contextual fear conditioning, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition. These behavioral improvements were reversed by betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that this mouse model of Down Syndrome display cognitive deficits which is mediated by imbalance in noradrenergic

  10. Role of phosphoinositides at the neuronal synapse

    PubMed Central

    Frere, Samuel G.; Chang-Ileto, Belle; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is amongst the most sophisticated and tightly controlled biological phenomena in higher eukaryotes. In the past few decades, tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying multiple facets of neurotransmission, both pre- and postsynaptically. Brought under the spotlight by pioneer studies in the areas of secretion and signal transduction, phosphoinositides and their metabolizing enzymes have been increasingly recognized as key protagonists in fundamental aspects of neurotransmission. Not surprisingly, dysregulation of phosphoinositide metabolism has also been implicated in synaptic malfunction associated with a variety of brain disorders. In the present chapter, we summarize current knowledge on the role of phosphoinositides at the neuronal synapse and highlight some of the outstanding questions in this research field. PMID:22374090

  11. The use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in children with distal ureterolithiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Glina, F.P.; Castro, P.M.V.; Monteiro, G.G.R.; Guerra, G.C. Del; Glina, S.; Mazzurana, M.; Bernardo, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Urinary lithiasis is the main urologic cause of emergency treatment in adult patient. In the past years, the incidence in children population has increased. However, literature about the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in pediatric population with distal ureterolithiasis is still scarce. The drug acts by decreasing ureter contractions, especially in the distal portion, facilitating calculus expulsion. Objective: This review has the objective to evaluate the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers as medical expulsive treatment in children with distal ureterolithiasis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and LILACS databases. We further searched manually the references of the primary studies. Searches were concluded on October 4th, 2014. Articles were selected, independently and in pairs, by the respective titles and summaries. Any divergence was resolved by consensus. Evidence Synthesis: Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists increased the probability of calculus expulsion by 27% (NNT=4). Calculi smaller than 5mm, increased by 33% (NNT=3). Larger than 5mm, increased by 34% (NNT=3). Conclusion: Alpha-1 adrenergic blocker use is related with a greater incidence of expulsion of ureteral calculi, smaller or greater than 5mm, and fewer episodes of pain when compared to ibuprofen. However it is necessary larger samples to enhance the power analysis of the expulsion of ureteral calculi larger than 5mm and the episodes of pain. Patient Summary: This review analyzed the outcome of alpha adrenergic antagonist in children with ureteral calculi. We conclude that it is the best medicine for use, since it helps the expulsion of the stone. PMID:26717117

  12. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatory signalling modulates α1 -adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle of humans.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Christopher M; Kirby, Brett S; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-12-15

    'Functional sympatholysis' describes the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to attenuate sympathetic vasoconstriction, and is critical to ensure proper blood flow and oxygen delivery to metabolically active skeletal muscle. The signalling mechanism responsible for sympatholysis in healthy humans is unknown. Evidence from animal models has identified endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH) as a potential mechanism capable of attenuating sympathetic vasoconstriction. In this study, increasing endothelium-dependent signalling during exercise significantly enhanced the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to attenuate sympathetic vasoconstriction in humans. This is the first study in humans to identify endothelium-dependent regulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle, and specifically supports a role for EDH-like vasodilatory signalling. Impaired functional sympatholysis is a common feature of cardiovascular ageing, hypertension and heart failure, and thus identifying fundamental mechanisms responsible for sympatholysis is clinically relevant. Stimulation of α-adrenoceptors elicits vasoconstriction in resting skeletal muscle that is blunted during exercise in an intensity-dependent manner. In humans, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that stimulating endothelium-dependent vasodilatory signalling will enhance the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to blunt α1 -adrenergic vasoconstriction. Changes in forearm vascular conductance (FVC; Doppler ultrasound, brachial intra-arterial pressure via catheter) to local intra-arterial infusion of phenylephrine (PE; α1 -adrenoceptor agonist) were calculated during (1) infusion of the endothelium-dependent vasodilators acetylcholine (ACh) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the endothelium-independent vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside, SNP), or potassium chloride (KCl) at rest; (2) mild or moderate intensity handgrip exercise; and (3) combined mild exercise

  13. Alpha-1-adrenergic modulation of K and Cl transport in bovine retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode techniques were used to characterize the electrical responses of the bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)- choroid to epinephrine (EP) and several other catecholamines that are putative paracrine signals between the neural retina and the RPE. Nanomolar amounts of EP or norepinephrine (NEP), added to the apical bath, caused a series of conductance and voltage changes, first at the basolateral or choroid-facing membrane and then at the apical or retina- facing membrane. The relative potency of several adrenergic agonists and antagonists indicates that EP modulation of RPE transport begins with the activation of apical alpha-1-adrenergic receptors. The membrane-permeable calcium (Ca2+) buffer, amyl-BAPTA (1,2-bis(o- aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid) inhibited the EP- induced voltage and conductance changes by approximately 50-80%, implicating [Ca2+]i as a second messenger. This conclusion is supported by experiments using the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, which mimics the effects of EP. The basolateral membrane voltage response to EP was blocked by lowering cell Cl, by the presence of DIDS (4,4'- diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid) in the basal bath, and by current clamping VB to the Cl equilibrium potential. In the latter experiments the EP-induced conductance changes were unaltered, indicating that EP increases basolateral membrane Cl conductance independent of voltage. The EP-induced change in basolateral Cl conductance was followed by a secondary decrease in apical membrane K conductance (approximately 50%) as measured by delta [K]o-induced diffusion potentials. Decreasing apical K from 5 to 2 mM in the presence of EP mimicked the effect of light on RPE apical and basolateral membrane voltage. These results indicate that EP may be an important paracrine signal that provides exquisite control of RPE physiology. PMID:1319462

  14. Solubilization of a guanyl nucleotide-sensitive alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptor from liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.I.; Moss, J.

    1987-05-01

    Rat liver membranes incubated with norepinephrine before solubilization with digitonin yielded a soluble hormone-receptor complex from which the release of tightly bound norepinephrine was facilitated by guanyl nucleotides. Binding of the alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor antagonist, (/sup 3/H)-prazosin, to the soluble preparation was utilized as a gauge of guanyl nucleotide-induced release of receptor-bound agonist. The following potency series was obtained with regard to the ability of guanyl nucleotides to facilitate (/sup 3/H)-prazosin binding to the solubilized preparation: guanosine 5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate)(K/sub 1/2/ = 2.5 nM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ = 10 nM), guanosine triphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ = 34 nM) and adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ > 1 mM). In the presence of guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (0.4 mM), the receptor population displayed monotonic binding parameters with a K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)-prazosin of 1.16 nM by Scatchard analysis. Competition curves against (/sup 3/H)-prazosin with the antagonists phentolamine and yohimbine revealed respective K/sub i/'s of .089 ..mu..M and 1.8 ..mu..M; curves with the agonists norepinephrine and isoproterenol yielded respective K/sub i/'s of 6.2..mu..M and 360 ..mu..M. Competition curves performed in the absence of guanyl nucleotide were complex demonstrating an apparent increase in affinity for agonists and an apparent decrease in affinity for antagonists. These curve shifts are consistent with the conversion of receptor to and from the guanyl nucleotide-sensitive state as a function of competing ligand concentration.

  15. Novel alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways: secreted factors and interactions with the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Papay, Robert; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Gaivin, Robert J; de la Motte, Carol A; Plow, Edward F; Perez, Dianne M

    2006-07-01

    alpha1-Adrenergic receptor (alpha1-ARs) subtypes (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D) regulate multiple signal pathways, such as phospholipase C, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases. We employed oligonucleotide microarray technology to explore the effects of both short- (1 h) and long-term (18 h) activation of the alpha1A-AR to enable RNA changes to occur downstream of earlier well characterized signaling pathways, promoting novel couplings. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies confirmed that PKC was a critical regulator of alpha1A-AR-mediated gene expression, and secreted interleukin (IL)-6 also contributed to gene expression alterations. We next focused on two novel signaling pathways that might be mediated through alpha1A-AR stimulation because of the clustering of gene expression changes for cell adhesion/motility (syndecan-4 and tenascin-C) and hyaluronan (HA) signaling. We confirmed that alpha1-ARs induced adhesion in three cell types to vitronectin, an interaction that was also integrin-, FGF7-, and PKC-dependent. alpha1-AR activation also inhibited cell migration, which was integrin- and PKC-independent but still required secretion of FGF7. alpha1-AR activation also increased the expression and deposition of HA, a glycosaminoglycan, which displayed two distinct structures: pericellular coats and long cable structures, as well as increasing expression of the HA receptor, CD44. Long cable structures of HA can bind leukocytes, which this suggests that alpha1-ARs may be involved in proinflammatory responses. Our results indicate alpha1-ARs induce the secretion of factors that interact with the extracellular matrix to regulate cell adhesion, motility and proinflammatory responses through novel signaling pathways.

  16. Quantitation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in porcine uterine and mesenteric arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, D.B.; Ford, S.P.; Reynolds, L.P.; Bhatnagar, R.K.; Van Orden, D.E.

    1984-11-01

    The activation of vascular alpha-adrenergic receptors may be involved in the control of uterine blood flow. A radioligand binding assay with the use of the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist /sup 3/H-WB-4101 was established to characterize the alpha-adrenergic receptors in uterine and mesenteric arterial membranes obtained from nonpregnant pigs. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-WB-4101 was rapid, saturable, and exhibited the alpha-adrenergic agonist potency order of (-)-epinephrine inhibition constant (Ki) . 0.6 mumol/L greater than (-)-norepinephrine (Ki . 1.5 mumol/L) much greater than (-)-isoproterenol (Ki . 120 mumol/L). The alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (Ki . 6.0 nmol/L) was 200 times more potent than the beta-adrenergic antagonist (+/-)-propranolol (Ki . 1,200 nmol/L); the alpha 1-selective antagonist prazosin (Ki . 1.2 nmol/L) was 130 times more potent than the alpha 2-selective antagonist yohimbine (Ki . 160 nmol/L). Scatchard analysis, as well as iterative curve-fitting analysis, demonstrated that /sup 3/H-WB-4101 binding by arterial membranes was to a single class of binding sites. Uterine arteries exhibited greater maximal binding capacity (BMax) than that of mesenteric arteries (47.5 +/- 3.2 versus 30.9 +/- 3.6 fmol per milligram of protein, p less than 0.01), but the uterine artery dissociation constant (Kd) was higher, thus indicating a lower affinity, when compared with mesenteric artery (0.43 +/- 0.04 versus 0.33 +/- 0.04 nmol/L, p less than 0.05).

  17. Cloning of the cDNA for the human. beta. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Frielle, T.; Collins, S.; Daniel, K.W.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1987-11-01

    Screening of a human placenta lambdagt11 library has led to the isolation of the cDNA for the human ..beta../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 1/AR). Used as the probe was the human genomic clone termed G-21. This clone, which contains an intronless gene for a putative receptor, was previously isolated by virtue of its cross hybridization with the human ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 2/AR). The 2.4-kilobase cDNA for the human ..beta../sub 1/AR encodes a protein of 477 amino acid residues that is 69% homologous with the avian ..beta..AR but only 54% homologous with the human ..beta../sub 2/AR. This suggests that the avian gene encoding ..beta..AR and the human gene encoding ..beta../sub 1/AR evolved from a common ancestral gene. RNA blot analysis indicates a message of 2.5 kilobases in rat tissues, with a pattern of tissue distribution consistent with ..beta../sub 1/AR binding. This pattern is quite distinct from the pattern obtained when the ..beta../sub 2/AR cDNA is used as a probe. Expression of receptor protein in Xenopus laevis oocytes conveys adenylate cyclase responsiveness to catecholamines with a typical ..beta../sub 1/AR specificity. This contrasts with the typical ..beta../sub 2/ subtype specificity observed when the human ..beta../sub 2/AR cDNA is expressed in this system. Mammalian ..beta../sub 1/AR and ..beta../sub 2/AR are thus products of distinct genes, both of which are apparently related to the putative G-21 receptor.

  18. α(1) adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, actively contracts early rat rib fracture callus ex vivo.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Stuart J; Dooley, Philip C; McDonald, Aaron C; Djouma, Elvan; Schuijers, Johannes A; Ward, Alex R; Grills, Brian L

    2011-05-01

    Early, soft fracture callus that links fracture ends together is smooth muscle-like in nature. We aimed to determine if early fracture callus could be induced to contract and relax ex vivo by similar pathways to smooth muscle, that is, contraction via α(1) adrenergic receptor (α(1) AR) activation with phenylephrine (PE) and relaxation via β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2) AR) stimulation with terbutaline. A sensitive force transducer quantified 7 day rat rib fracture callus responses in modified Krebs-Henseliet (KH) solutions. Unfractured ribs along with 7, 14, and 21 day fracture calluses were analyzed for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR gene expression using qPCR, whilst 7 day fracture callus was examined via immunohistochemistry for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR- immunoreactivity. In 7 day callus, PE (10(-6)  M) significantly induced an increase in force that was greater than passive force generated in calcium-free KH (n = 8, mean 51% increase, 95% CI: 26-76%). PE-induced contractions in calluses were attenuated by the α(1) AR antagonist, prazosin (10(-6)  M; n = 7, mean 5% increase, 95% CI: 2-11%). Terbutaline did not relax callus. Gene expression of α(1) ARs was constant throughout fracture healing; however, β(2) AR expression was down-regulated at 7 days compared to unfractured rib (p < 0.01). Furthermore, osteoprogenitor cells of early fibrous callus displayed considerable α(1) AR-like immunoreactivity but not β(2) AR-like immunoreactivity. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that early fracture callus can be pharmacologically induced to contract. We propose that increased concentrations of α(1) AR agonists such as noradrenaline may tonically contract callus in vivo to promote osteogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Pharmacological Analysis and Structure Determination of 7-Methylcyanopindolol–Bound β1-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomomi; Baker, Jillian; Warne, Tony; Brown, Giles A.; Leslie, Andrew G.W.; Congreve, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Comparisons between structures of the β1-adrenergic receptor (AR) bound to either agonists, partial agonists, or weak partial agonists led to the proposal that rotamer changes of Ser5.46, coupled to a contraction of the binding pocket, are sufficient to increase the probability of receptor activation. (RS)-4-[3-(tert-butylamino)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (cyanopindolol) is a weak partial agonist of β1AR and, based on the hypothesis above, we predicted that the addition of a methyl group to form 4-[(2S)-3-(tert-butylamino)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-7-methyl-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (7-methylcyanopindolol) would dramatically reduce its efficacy. An eight-step synthesis of 7-methylcyanopindolol was developed and its pharmacology was analyzed. 7-Methylcyanopindolol bound with similar affinity to cyanopindolol to both β1AR and β2AR. As predicted, the efficacy of 7-methylcyanopindolol was reduced significantly compared with cyanopindolol, acting as a very weak partial agonist of turkey β1AR and an inverse agonist of human β2AR. The structure of 7-methylcyanopindolol–bound β1AR was determined to 2.4-Å resolution and found to be virtually identical to the structure of cyanopindolol-bound β1AR. The major differences in the orthosteric binding pocket are that it has expanded by 0.3 Å in 7-methylcyanopindolol–bound β1AR and the hydroxyl group of Ser5.46 is positioned 0.8 Å further from the ligand, with respect to the position of the Ser5.46 side chain in cyanopindolol-bound β1AR. Thus, the molecular basis for the reduction in efficacy of 7-methylcyanopindolol compared with cyanopindolol may be regarded as the opposite of the mechanism proposed for the increase in efficacy of agonists compared with antagonists. PMID:26385885

  20. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  1. Nebivolol, a β1-adrenergic blocker, protects from peritoneal membrane damage induced during peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Abensur, Hugo; Albar-Vizcaino, Patricia; Parra, Emilio González; Sandoval, Pilar; Ramírez, Laura García; del Peso, Gloria; Acedo, Juan Manuel; Bajo, María A.; Selgas, Rafael; Tomero, José A. Sánchez; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a form of renal replacement treatment, which employs the peritoneal membrane (PM) to eliminate toxins that cannot be removed by the kidney. The procedure itself, however, contributes to the loss of the PM ultrafiltration capacity (UFC), leading consequently to the technique malfunction. β-blockers have been considered deleterious for PM due to their association with loss of UFC and induction of fibrosis. Herein we analyzed the effects of Nebivolol, a new generation of β1-blocker, on PM alterations induced by PD fluids (PDF). In vitro: We found that mesothelial cells (MCs) express β1-adrenergic receptor. MCs were treated with TGF-β to induce mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and co-treated with Nebivolol. Nebivolol reversed the TGF-β effects, decreasing extracellular matrix synthesis, and improved the fibrinolytic capacity, decreasing plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and increasing tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) supernatant levels. Moreover, Nebivolol partially inhibited MMT and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-6 levels in supernatants. In vivo: Twenty-one C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 groups. Control group carried a catheter without PDF infusion. Study group received intraperitoneally PDF and oral Nebivolol during 30 days. PDF group received PDF alone. Nebivolol maintained the UFC and reduced PM thickness, MMT and angiogenesis promoted by PDF. It also improved the fibrinolytic capacity in PD effluents decreasing PAI-1 and IL-8 and increased tPA levels. Conclusion: Nebivolol protects PM from PDF-induced damage, promoting anti-fibrotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-fibrinolytic effects. PMID:27102153

  2. Diaphragm arterioles are less responsive to alpha1- adrenergic constriction than gastrocnemius arterioles.

    PubMed

    Aaker, Aaron; Laughlin, M H

    2002-05-01

    The sympathetic nervous system has greater influence on vascular resistance in low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle than in high-oxidative skeletal muscle (17). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that arterioles isolated from low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle [the white portion of gastrocnemius (WG)] possess greater responsiveness to adrenergic constriction than arterioles isolated from high-oxidative skeletal muscle [red portion of the gastrocnemius muscle (RG) and diaphragm (Dia)]. Second-order arterioles (2As) were isolated from WG, RG, and Dia of rats and reactivity examined in vitro. Results reveal that Dia 2As constrict less to norepinephrine (NE) (10(-9) to 10 (-4) M) than 2As from RG and WG, which exhibited similar NE-induced constrictions. This difference was not endothelium dependent, because responses of denuded 2As were similar to those of intact arterioles. The blunted NE-induced constrictor response of Dia 2As appears to be the result of differences in alpha1-receptor effects because 1) arterioles from Dia also responded less to selective alpha1-receptor stimulation with phenylephrine than RG and WG arterioles; 2) arterioles from Dia, RG, and WG dilated similarly to isoproterenol (10(-9) to 10(-4) M) and did not respond to selective alpha2-receptor stimulation with UK-14304; and 3) endothelin-1 produced similar constriction in 2As from Dia, RG, and WG. We conclude that differences in oxidative capacity and/or fiber type composition of muscle tissue do not explain different NE responsiveness of Dia 2As compared with 2As from gastrocnemius muscle. Differences in alpha1-adrenergic constrictor responsiveness among arterioles in skeletal muscle may contribute to nonuniform muscle blood flow responses observed during exercise and serve to maintain blood flow to Dia during exercise-induced increases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  3. Denopamine, a beta(1)-adrenergic agonist, increases alveolar fluid clearance in ex vivo rat and guinea pig lungs.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, T; Tuchihara, C; Ishigaki, M; Osanai, K; Nambu, Y; Toga, H; Takahashi, K; Ohya, N; Kurihara, T; Matthay, M A

    2001-01-01

    The effect of denopamine, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic agonist, on alveolar fluid clearance was determined in both ex vivo rat and guinea pig lungs. Alveolar fluid clearance was measured by the progressive increase in the concentration of Evans blue-labeled albumin over 1 h at 37 degrees C. Denopamine (10(-6) to 10(-3) M) increased alveolar fluid clearance in a dose-dependent manner in ex vivo rat lungs. Denopamine also stimulated alveolar fluid clearance in guinea pig lungs. Atenolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic antagonist, and amiloride, a sodium channel inhibitor, inhibited denopamine-stimulated alveolar fluid clearance. The potency of denopamine was similar to that of similar doses of isoproterenol or terbutaline. Short-term hypoxia (100% nitrogen for 1-2 h) did not alter the stimulatory effect of denopamine. Denopamine (10(-4), 10(-3) M) increased intracellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in cultured rat alveolar type II cells. In summary, denopamine, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic agonist, stimulates alveolar fluid clearance in both ex vivo rat and guinea pig lungs.

  4. Nonlinear relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and norepinephrine-stimulated calcium flux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, W.S.; Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Alexander, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the relationship between vascular alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and receptor-coupled calcium flux, the authors have studied (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding and l-norepinephrine-induced /sup 45/Ca efflux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from the rabbit aorta. In a crude cellular homogenate, (/sup 3/H)prazosin bound to a single high affinity site, whereas l-norepinephrine (NE) binding was best described by a two-site model. NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was concentration-dependent (EC/sup 50/ = 108 nM) and potently inhibited by prazosin (IC/sup 50/ = 0.15 nM). For the total receptor pool identified by (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding, the relationship between receptor occupancy by NE and NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was markedly nonlinear, such that 50% of maximum NE-stimulated efflux occurred with occupancy of only approximately 7% of receptors. These two experimental approaches provide direct evidence for the presence in cultured rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells of a sizable pool of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in excess of those needed for maximum NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux. This evidence of ''spare'' receptors, together with the finding of two affinity states of agonist binding, raises the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in this system.

  5. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  6. Stronger Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Farré, Daniel; Muñoz, Ana; Moreno, Estefanía; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Rico, Alberto J; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antonio; Labandeira-García, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Radioligand binding assays to rat striatal dopamine D1 receptors showed that brain lateralization of the dopaminergic system were not due to changes in expression but in agonist affinity. D1 receptor-mediated striatal imbalance resulted from a significantly higher agonist affinity in the left striatum. D1 receptors heteromerize with dopamine D3 receptors, which are considered therapeutic targets for dyskinesia in parkinsonian patients. Expression of both D3 and D1-D3 receptor heteromers were increased in samples from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-hemilesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by treatment with 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA). Similar findings were obtained using striatal samples from primates. Radioligand binding studies in the presence of a D3 agonist led in dyskinetic, but not in lesioned or L-DOPA-treated rats, to a higher dopamine sensitivity. Upon D3-receptor activation, the affinity of agonists for binding to the right striatal D1 receptor increased. Excess dopamine coming from L-DOPA medication likely activates D3 receptors thus making right and left striatal D1 receptors equally responsive to dopamine. These results show that dyskinesia occurs concurrently with a right/left striatal balance in D1 receptor-mediated neurotransmission.

  7. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  8. Physical Foundations of PTEN/Phosphoinositide Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Arne; Jiang, Zhiping; Redfern, Roberta E.; Kooijman, Edgar E.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2009-03-01

    Phosphoinositides act as signaling molecules by recruiting critical effectors to specific subcellular membranes to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization, which requires a tight regulation of phosphoinositide generation and turnover as well as a high degree of compartmentalization. PTEN is a phosphatase specific for the 3 position of the phosophoinositide ring that is deleted or mutated in many different disease states. PTEN association with membranes requires the interaction of its C2 domain with phosphatidylserine and the interaction of its N-terminal end with phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphophate (PI(4,5)P2). We have investigated PTEN/PI(4,5)P2 interaction and found that Lys13 is crucial for the observed binding. We also found that the presence of cholesterol enhances PTEN binding to mixed PI(4,5)P2/POPC vesicles. Fluorescence microscopy experiments utilizing GUVs yielded results consistent with enhanced phosphoinositide domain formation in the presence of cholesterol. These experiments were accompanied by zeta potential measurements and solid state MAS ^31P-NMR experiments aimed at investigating the ionization behavior of phosphoinositides.

  9. Polymorphisms of the beta1-adrenergic receptor predict exercise capacity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Lynne E; Craft, Laura L; Zengel, Paul; McGuire, Nancy; Rathz, Deborah A; Dorn, Gerald W; Liggett, Stephen B

    2002-11-01

    Exercise performance in patients with congestive heart failure is partially dependent on cardiac beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1AR) function. There are 2 common polymorphisms of the beta1AR gene that alter the encoded amino acids at positions 49 (Ser or Gly) and 389 (Gly or Arg) and alter receptor function in vitro. Their relevance to modification of cardiac function in heart failure is not known. Exercise testing was performed in 263 patients with idiopathic or ischemic cardiomyopathy (left ventricular ejection fraction approximately 25%). Potential associations were sought between beta1AR genotypes and the primary outcome variables of peak oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate response, and exercise time. The major determinants of exercise capacity were the polymorphisms at position 389, where patients homozygous for Gly389 had significantly lower peak VO2 compared with those with Arg389 (14.5 +/- 0.6 vs 17.7 +/- 0.4 mL/kg/min, P =.006), despite similar clinical characteristics including left ventricular ejection fraction. Consistent with a gene dose-response, heterozygosity was associated with an intermediate response (16.9 +/- 0.6 mL/kg/min, P <.05). When position 49 genotypes were included, a graded relationship between the 5 2-locus haplotypes and VO2 was found. Two haplotypes displayed the most divergent peak VO2: homozygous Gly389/Ser49, and homozygous Arg389/Gly49 carriers (14.4 +/- 0.5 vs 18.2 +/- 0.8 mL/kg/min, P =.001). Genotype did not predict the heart rate response. The above results were independent of beta-blocker or other medication use, left ventricular ejection fraction, beta2AR genotype, or other demographic and clinical characteristics. beta1AR polymorphisms are a significant determinant of exercise capacity in patients with congestive heart failure. Early identification, by genetic testing for these polymorphisms, of heart failure patients at risk for development of depressed exercise capacity may be useful for initiation of specific therapy

  10. Beta1-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and clinical efficacy of betaxolol hydrochloride in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Puckett, Brian J; Allen, Robert C; Castillo, Ivan G; Leffler, Christopher T

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between polymorphisms in the gene encoding the beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) and clinical response to betaxolol hydrochloride 0.25% in a small pilot study of normal volunteers. Prospective nonrandomized comparative trial. Forty-eight consecutive normal volunteers who met all eligibility requirements for inclusion into this study. Baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) was recorded. Subjects began treatment with betaxolol (1 drop both eyes twice daily) and underwent follow-up IOP recordings at 3 and 6 weeks. Peripheral blood was obtained for genetic analysis. Response to betaxolol was calculated as the change in mean IOP from baseline (averaged between both eyes and averaged between both follow-up visits). The beta1-AR genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction with restriction fragment length polymorphisms at codons 49 (serine [Ser] or glycine [Gly]) and 389 (arginine [Arg] or Gly). There were 32 Ser49 homozygotes and 16 Gly49 carriers. There were no statistically significant differences between the Ser49 homozygotes and the Gly49 carriers with respect to baseline IOP or response to betaxolol therapy. There were 25 Arg389 homozygotes and 23 Gly389 carriers (22 heterozygotes and 1 Gly389 homozygote). As compared with Gly389 carriers, the Arg389 homozygotes had a higher baseline IOP (15.8 mmHg vs. 13.7 mmHg; P = 0.009) and a greater magnitude of response to betaxolol therapy (-3.4 mmHg vs. -1.5 mmHg; P = 0.0009). The Ser49 homozygote genotype was not independently associated with baseline IOP (P = 0.47) or with a response to betaxolol (P = 0.99). The Arg389 homozygote genotype was independently associated with a higher baseline IOP (P = 0.03) and a greater response to betaxolol (P = 0.03), even after adjusting for baseline IOP. In this small pilot series, a single nucleotide polymorphism at codon 389 in the beta1-AR seems to correlate with a response to betaxolol therapy in normal, nonglaucomatous volunteers. There was no

  11. Myocardial Recovery in Patients With Systolic Heart Failure and Autoantibodies Against β1-Adrenergic Receptors.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Yuji; McNamara, Dennis M; Alexis, Jeffrey D; Cooper, Leslie T; Dec, G William; Pauly, Daniel F; Sheppard, Richard; Starling, Randall C; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-02-28

    Among various cardiac autoantibodies (AAbs), those recognizing the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) demonstrate agonist-like effects and induce myocardial damage that can be reversed by β-blockers and immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) immunoadsorption. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of β1AR-AAbs belonging to the IgG3 subclass in patients with recent-onset cardiomyopathy. Peripheral blood samples were drawn at enrollment in patients with recent-onset cardiomyopathy (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≤0.40; <6 months). The presence of IgG and IgG3-β1AR-AAb was determined, and echocardiograms were assessed, at baseline and 6 months. Patients were followed up for ≤48 months. Among the 353 patients who had blood samples adequate for the analysis, 62 (18%) were positive for IgG3-β1AR-AAbs (IgG3 group), 58 (16%) were positive for IgG but not IgG3 (non-IgG3 group), and the remaining were negative. There were no significant differences in baseline systolic blood pressure, heart rate, or LVEF among the groups at baseline. Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters were significantly larger in the non-IgG3 group compared with the other groups (left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, p < 0.01; left ventricular end-systolic diameter, p = 0.03). At 6 months, LVEF was significantly higher in the IgG3 group (p = 0.007). Multiple regression analysis showed that IgG3-β1AR-AAb was an independent predictor of LVEF at 6 months and change in LVEF over 6 months, even after multivariable adjustment (LVEF at 6 months, β = 0.20, p = 0.01; change in LVEF, β = 0.20, p = 0.008). In patients with high New York Heart Association functional class (III or IV) at baseline, the IgG3 group had a lower incidence of the composite endpoint of all-cause death, cardiac transplantation, and hospitalization due to heart failure, whereas the non-IgG3 group had the highest incidence of the composite endpoint. IgG3-β1AR-AAbs were associated with more

  12. α1-Adrenergic receptor control of the cerebral vasculature in humans at rest and during exercise.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Saxena, Ashwini; Eubank, Wendy L; Hoxha, Besim; Raven, Peter B

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological blockade of α(1)-adrenoreceptors (by prazosin), at rest and during steady-state dynamic exercise, would impair cerebral autoregulation and result in cerebral vasodilatation in healthy humans. In 10 subjects, beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure and mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity were determined at rest and during low (Ex90) and moderate workload (Ex130) on an upright bicycle ergometer without and with prazosin. Plasma noradrenaline concentrations increased significantly from rest to Ex130 during control conditions (from 1.8 ± 0.2 to 3.2 ± 0.3 pmol (ml plasma)(-1)). In the control conditions, the transfer function gain between mean arterial pressure and mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity in the low-frequency range was decreased at Ex90 (P = 0.035) and Ex130 (P = 0.027) from rest. A significant increase in critical closing pressure (CCP) was also observed in the control conditions from rest to Ex90 to Ex130 (from 18 ± 3 to 24 ± 4 to 31 ± 4 mmHg). An average of 74 ± 2% blockade of blood pressure response was achieved with oral prazosin. Following blockade, plasma noradrenaline concentrations further increased at rest and during Ex130 from the control value (from 2.6 ± 0.3 to 4.4 ± 0.5 pmol (ml plasma)(-1)). Prazosin also resulted in an increase in low-frequency gain (P < 0.003) compared with the control conditions. Prazosin blockade abolished the increases in CCP during Ex130 and increased the cerebrovascular conductance index (P = 0.018). These data indicate that in the control conditions a strengthening of cerebral autoregulation occurred with moderate dynamic exercise that is associated with an increase in CCP as a result of the exercise-mediated augmentation of sympathetic activity. Given that α(1)-adrenergic receptor blockade attenuated the increase in dynamic cerebral autoregulation and CCP, we conclude that increases in sympathetic activity have a role in establishing cerebral vascular

  13. Structural Insights into Conformational Stability of Wild-Type and Mutant β1-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Balaraman, Gouthaman S.; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Recent experiments to derive a thermally stable mutant of turkey beta-1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) have shown that a combination of six single point mutations resulted in a 20°C increase in thermal stability in mutant β1AR. Here we have used the all-atom force-field energy function to calculate a stability score to detect stabilizing point mutations in G-protein coupled receptors. The calculated stability score shows good correlation with the measured thermal stability for 76 single point mutations and 22 multiple mutants in β1AR. We have demonstrated that conformational sampling of the receptor for various mutants improve the prediction of thermal stability by 50%. Point mutations Y227A5.58, V230A5.61, and F338M7.48 in the thermally stable mutant m23-β1AR stabilizes key microdomains of the receptor in the inactive conformation. The Y227A5.58 and V230A5.61 mutations stabilize the ionic lock between R1393.50 on transmembrane helix3 and E2856.30 on transmembrane helix6. The mutation F338M7.48 on TM7 alters the interaction of the conserved motif NPxxY(x)5,6F with helix8 and hence modulates the interaction of TM2-TM7-helix8 microdomain. The D186-R317 salt bridge (in extracellular loops 2 and 3) is stabilized in the cyanopindolol-bound wild-type β1AR, whereas the salt bridge between D184-R317 is preferred in the mutant m23. We propose that this could be the surrogate to a similar salt bridge found between the extracellular loop 2 and TM7 in β2AR reported recently. We show that the binding energy difference between the inactive and active states is less in m23 compared to the wild-type, which explains the activation of m23 at higher norepinephrine concentration compared to the wild-type. Results from this work throw light into the mechanism behind stabilizing mutations. The computational scheme proposed in this work could be used to design stabilizing mutations for other G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:20643076

  14. Receptor-Mediated Transport of Insulin across Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, George L.; Johnson, Sandra M.

    1985-03-01

    Hormones such as insulin are transported from the interior to the exterior of blood vessels. Whether endothelial cells, which line the inner walls of blood vessels have a role in this transport of hormones is not clear, but it is known that endothelial cells can internalize and release insulin rapidly with little degradation. The transport of iodine-125-labeled insulin was measured directly through the use of dual chambers separated by a horizontal monolayer of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. In this setting, endothelial cells took up and released the labeled insulin, thereby transporting it across the cells. The transport of insulin across the endothelial cells was temperature sensitive and was inhibited by unlabeled insulin and by antibody to insulin receptor in proportion to the ability of these substances to inhibit insulin binding to its receptor. More than 80 percent of the transported insulin was intact. These data suggest that insulin is rapidly transported across endothelial cells by a receptor-mediated process.

  15. Receptor mediated cellular uptake of low molecular weight dendritic polyglycerols.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Marcelo; Reichert, Stephanie; Welker, Pia; Licha, Kai; Kratz, Felix; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective polymer-based nanocarriers which are able to target diseased tissues still remains a great challenge in current research. Dendritic polyglycerols have emerged as novel polymeric scaffolds that have demonstrated a great potential for diverse biomedical applications. These architectures have already proven their usefulness in therapeutic approaches related to multivalency, given by the synergy between the nanosized dimensions combined with the high density of functional groups. However, a continuous effort is necessary to modify and tailor polyglycerol architectures to fit the future demands of biomedical applications. The present work deals with the development of a general synthetic strategy that allows the linkage of low molecular weight dendritic polyglycerols to fluorescent dyes and cell targeting ligands. The receptor mediated cellular uptake of the polyglycerol conjugates highlight their potential to acts as new targeted nanocarriers that should be able to decrease non-specific cellular uptake.

  16. Menthol inhibits 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents.

    PubMed

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Shuba, Yaroslav; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Frank C; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alcohol monoterpene menthol, a major active ingredient of the peppermint plant, were tested on the function of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 5-HT (1 μM)-evoked currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp technique were reversibly inhibited by menthol in a concentration-dependent (IC50 = 163 μM) manner. The effects of menthol developed gradually, reaching a steady-state level within 10-15 minutes and did not involve G-proteins, since GTPγS activity remained unaltered and the effect of menthol was not sensitive to pertussis toxin pretreatment. The actions of menthol were not stereoselective as (-), (+), and racemic menthol inhibited 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents to the same extent. Menthol inhibition was not altered by intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid injections and transmembrane potential changes. The maximum inhibition observed for menthol was not reversed by increasing concentrations of 5-HT. Furthermore, specific binding of the 5-HT3 antagonist [(3)H]GR65630 was not altered in the presence of menthol (up to 1 mM), indicating that menthol acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. Finally, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in acutely dissociated nodose ganglion neurons were also inhibited by menthol (100 μM). These data demonstrate that menthol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, is an allosteric inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors.

  17. Direct Visualization of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription in Living Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Receptor-Mediated Transcription in Living Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul M. Yen, M.D...reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of...Sep 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Direct Visualization of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription in Living Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  18. Pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy in beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptor double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Palazzesi, Sergio; Musumeci, Marco; Catalano, Liviana; Patrizio, Mario; Stati, Tonino; Michienzi, Simona; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Vitelli, Luigi; Marano, Giuseppe

    2006-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy arises as an adaptive response to increased afterload. Studies in knockout mice have shown that catecholamines, but not alpha1-adrenergic receptors, are necessary for such an adaptation to occur. However, whether beta-adrenergic receptors are critical for the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload is not known at this time. Pressure overload was induced by transverse aortic banding in beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptor double knockout (DbetaKO) mice, in which the predominant cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor subtypes are lacking. Chronic pressure overload for 4 weeks induced cardiac hypertrophy in both DbetaKO and wild-type mice. There were no significant differences between banded mice in left ventricular weight to body weight ratio, in the left ventricular wall thickness, in the cardiomyocyte size or in the expression levels of the load-sensitive cardiac genes such as ANF and beta-MHC. Additionally, the left ventricular systolic pressure, an index of afterload, and cardiac contractility, evaluated as dp/dtmax, the maximal slope of systolic pressure increment, and Ees, end-systolic elastance, were increased at a similar level in both wild-type and DbetaKO banded mice, and were significantly greater than in sham controls. Despite chronic activation of the cardiac beta-adrenergic system being sufficient to induce a pathological hypertrophy, we show that beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptors are not an obligatory component of the signaling pathway that links the increased afterload to the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

  19. Targeting the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Ottmann, Oliver G.; Deininger, Michael; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway represents an important anticancer target because it has been implicated in cancer cell growth, survival, and motility. Recent studies show that PI3K may also play a role in the development of resistance to currently available therapies. In a broad range of cancers, various components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling axis are genetically modified, and the pathway can be activated through many different mechanisms. The frequency of genetic alterations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway, coupled with the impact in oncogenesis and disease progression, make this signaling axis an attractive target in anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the critical function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in leukemias and lymphomas has led to the clinical evaluation of novel rationally designed inhibitors in this setting. Three main categories of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors have been developed so far: agents that target phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (dual inhibitors), pan-phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors that target all class I isoforms, and isoform-specific inhibitors that selectively target the α, -β, -γ, or -δ isoforms. Emerging data highlight the promise of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in combination with other therapies for the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies. Further evaluation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in first-line or subsequent regimens may improve clinical outcomes. This article reviews the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in hematologic malignancies and the potential clinical utility of inhibitors that target this pathway. PMID:24425689

  20. Activation of Phosphoinositide Metabolism by Cholinergic Agents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-16

    acid significantly inhibited NE-induced [3H]IP1 production in slices that had been prelabelled with [3H]inositol and baclofen , a specific GABAB...agonist, was as effective as GABA in enhancing the response to NE (Figure 15). Neither GABA nor baclofen significantly blocked the inhibitory effect of...quisqualate, but baclofen reduced the inhibitory effect of arachidonic acid. Effects of NMDA receptor antagonists on phosphoinositide hydrolysis MK-801 is

  1. The alpha1 adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin reduces heroin self-administration in rats with extended access to heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Walker, Brendan M; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration of dependent rats. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). Thus, prazosin appears to stimulate food intake in extended access rats by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. The data suggest that the alpha1 adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended access.

  2. Chronic stress enhances progression of periodontitis via α1-adrenergic signaling: a potential target for periodontal disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan

    2014-10-17

    This study assessed the roles of chronic stress (CS) in the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system and explored the underlying mechanisms of periodontitis. Using an animal model of periodontitis and CS, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the protein levels of the α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) were assessed. Furthermore, human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDLFs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic the process of inflammation. The proliferation of the HPDLFs and the expression of α1-AR and β2-AR were assessed. The inflammatory-related cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were detected after pretreatment with the α1/β2-AR blockers phentolamine/propranolol, both in vitro and in vivo. Results show that periodontitis under CS conditions enhanced the expression of TH, α1-AR and β2-AR. Phentolamine significantly reduced the inflammatory cytokine levels. Furthermore, we observed a marked decrease in HPDLF proliferation and the increased expression of α1-ARfollowing LPS pretreatment. Pretreatment with phentolamine dramatically ameliorated LPS-inhibited cell proliferation. In addition, the blocking of α1-ARsignaling also hindered the upregulation of the inflammatory-related cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. These results suggest that CS can significantly enhance the pathological progression of periodontitis by an α1-adrenergic signaling-mediated inflammatory response. We have identified a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in those patients suffering from concurrent CS.

  3. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine

    PubMed Central

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na+ current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na+-dependent Ca2+ overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca2+ calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  4. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-12-10

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na(+) current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca(2+) calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine.

  5. Sympathetic denervation does not alter the density or properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat vas deferens

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, P.W.; Johnson, R.D.; Martin, T.J.; Minneman, K.P.

    1985-06-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in surgically denervated rat vas deferens were studied using radioligand binding assays of (/sup 125/I) BE 2254 ((/sup 125/I)BE) and contraction measurements. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding showed no change in the affinity or density of binding sites 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of rat vas deferens. The potency of norepinephrine in inhibiting specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding was also unchanged 7 days after denervation of vas deferens. The potency of phenylephrine in causing contractions in vitro did not change 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of vas deferens; however, there was a significant increase in the maximum contractile response to phenylephrine at all time points. After partial inactivation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in vitro with phenoxybenzamine, there was an equivalent reduction in the number of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites in the control and 14-day denervated vas deferens. The equilibrium dissociation constants calculated from contractile measurements for norepinephrine were the same in the control and denervated tissues. However, there was a 2.2-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to norepinephrine 14 days after denervation and a 3.6-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to methacholine 7 days after denervation.

  6. The α1 Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Reduces Heroin Self-Administration in Rats with Extended Access to Heroin Administration

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell, Thomas N.; Walker, Brendan M.; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration in dependent rats. Prazosin, an α1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). The data show that the α1-adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended drug access, while also stimulating their food intake by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. PMID:18703080

  7. Receptor-mediated toxicity of pahutoxin, a marine trunkfish surfactant.

    PubMed

    Kalmanzon, Eliahu; Rahamim, Yocheved; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Carmeli, Shmuel; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2003-07-01

    Pahutoxin (PHN, choline chloride ester of 3-acetoxypalmitic acid) is a natural fish-killing (ichthyotoxic) agent derived from the defensive secretions of trunkfish. In spite of its obvious structural resemblance to synthetic cationic long-chain quaternary ammonium detergents, we show that PHN's action does not rely on its surfactant properties and is in fact, receptor-mediated. The above conclusion is supported by the following data: 1. Ichthyotoxicity is not related to its detergency or surfactivity, as indicated by the fact that the lethal concentration is about 1.5 orders of magnitude below its critical micelle concentration value (69 microM) and its liposomal/seawater partition coefficient is low (62-85); 2. The trunkfish is tolerant to its own pahutoxin; 3. Ichthyotoxicity occurs only upon application to the surrounding water, suggesting the existence of externally located receptors; 4. The receptor hypothesis was supported by the aid of equilibrium saturation binding assays revealing the presence of specific binding sites to PHN on the fish gill membranes; 5. The PHN tolerant trunkfish was shown to be devoid of PHN-binding sites. Some chemo-ecological, and environmental implications are discussed.

  8. Glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity in optic nerve oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Carlos; Sánchez-Gómez, M. Victoria; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Miledi, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    In cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from perinatal rat optic nerves, we have analyzed the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits as well as the effect of the activation of these receptors on oligodendrocyte viability. Reverse transcription–PCR, in combination with immunocytochemistry, demonstrated that most oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro express the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 and the kainate receptor subunits GluR6, GluR7, KA1 and KA2. Acute and chronic exposure to kainate caused extensive oligodendrocyte death in culture. This effect was partially prevented by the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and was completely abolished by the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), suggesting that both AMPA and kainate receptors mediate the observed kainate toxicity. Furthermore, chronic application of kainate to optic nerves in vivo resulted in massive oligodendrocyte death which, as in vitro, could be prevented by coinfusion of the toxin with CNQX. These findings suggest that excessive activation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by oligodendrocytes may act as a negative regulator of the size of this cell population. PMID:9238063

  9. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  10. Visualization of Receptor-mediated Endocytosis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, Jon; Konopka, James; Singer-Kruger, Birgit; Zerial, Marino; Botstein, David

    1999-01-01

    We studied the ligand-induced endocytosis of the yeast α-factor receptor Ste2p by immuno-electron microscopy. We observed and quantitated time-dependent loss of Ste2p from the plasma membrane of cells exposed to α-factor. This ligand-induced internalization of Ste2p was blocked in the well-characterized endocytosis-deficient mutant sac6Δ. We provide evidence that implicates furrow-like invaginations of the plasma membrane as the site of receptor internalization. These invaginations are distinct from the finger-like plasma membrane invaginations within actin cortical patches. Consistent with this, we show that Ste2p is not located within the cortical actin patch before and during receptor-mediated endocytosis. In wild-type cells exposed to α-factor we also observed and quantitated a time-dependent accumulation of Ste2p in intracellular, membrane-bound compartments. These compartments have a characteristic electron density but variable shape and size and are often located adjacent to the vacuole. In immuno-electron microscopy experiments these compartments labeled with antibodies directed against the rab5 homologue Ypt51p (Vps21p), the resident vacuolar protease carboxypeptidase Y, and the vacuolar H+-ATPase Vph1p. Using a new double-labeling technique we have colocalized antibodies against Ste2p and carboxypeptidase Y to this compartment, thereby identifying these compartments as prevacuolar late endosomes. PMID:10069819

  11. Purine receptor mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling of human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Nanna; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Langevin, Helene; Nedergaard, Maiken; Takano, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that activation of adenosine A1 receptors on peripheral pain fibers contributes to acupuncture-induced suppression of painful input. In addition to adenosine, acupuncture triggers the release of other purines, including ATP and ADP that may bind to purine receptors on nearby fibroblasts. We here show that purine agonists trigger increase in cytosolic Ca 2+ signaling in a cultured human fibroblasts cell line. The profile of agonist-induced Ca2+ increases indicates that the cells express functional P2yR2 and P2yR4 receptors, as well as P2yR1 and P2xR7 receptors. Unexpectedly, purine-induced Ca2+ signaling was associated with a remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. ATP induced a transient loss in F-actin stress fiber. The changes of actin cytoskeleton occurred slowly and peaked at 10 min after agonist exposure. Inhibition of ATP-induced increases in Ca2+ by cyclopiazonic acid blocked receptor-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling. The Ca2+ ionophore failed to induce cytoskeletal remodeling despite triggering robust increases in cytosolic Ca2+. These observations indicate that purine signaling induces transient changes in fibroblast cytoarchitecture that could be related to the beneficial effects of acupuncture. PMID:23462235

  12. SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE RECEPTORS MEDIATE NEUROMODULATORY FUNCTIONS IN THE CNS

    PubMed Central

    Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Goforth, Paulette B.; Mba, Mba U.; Macdonald, Timothy L.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Satin, Leslie S.; Welch, Sandra P.; Selley, Dana E.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate is a ubiquitous, lipophilic cellular mediator that acts in part by activation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Modulation of S1P signaling is an emerging pharmacotherapeutic target for immunomodulatory drugs. Although multiple S1P receptor types exist in the CNS, little is known about their function. Here we report that S1P stimulated G- protein activity in the CNS, and results from [35S]GTPγS autoradiography using the S1P1-selective agonist SEW2871 and the S1P1/3-selective antagonist VPC44116 show that in several regions a majority of this activity is mediated by S1P1 receptors. S1P receptor activation inhibited glutamatergic neurotransmission as determined by electrophysiological recordings in cortical neurons in vitro, and this effect was mimicked by SEW2871 and inhibited by VPC44116. Moreover, central administration of S1P produced in vivo effects resembling the actions of cannabinoids, including thermal antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and hypolocomotion, but these actions were independent of CB1 receptors. At least one of the central effects of S1P, thermal antinociception, is also at least partly S1P1 receptor mediated because it was produced by SEW2871 and attenuated by VPC44116. These results indicate that CNS S1P receptors are part of a physiologically relevant and widespread neuromodulatory system, and that the S1P1 receptor contributes to S1P-mediated antinociception. PMID:19493165

  13. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  14. Biologically bounded risk assessment for receptor-mediated nongenotoxic carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Sutter, T R

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a biologically bounded marginal effect model for use in risk assessment of human exposure to receptor-mediated nongenotoxic carcinogens. Schematically this model can be reduced to four components: CI, the absence of an observable biological response; CII, observable biochemical responses but no observable pathology; CIII, observable pathology; and CIV, both observable pathology and lethality. The inflection point in the marginal response curve between CI and CII is defined as the biologically evaluated scientifically tested no observable effect level (BESTNOEL). We demonstrate the utility of this approach by applying it to the well-studied nongenotoxic carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Using a well-developed mechanistic understanding of the initial interactions of TCDD with the cell, we justify the selection of the minimal effective dose for CYP1A1 mRNA induction as the BESTNOEL. With allowance for variation in human sensitivity to TCDD, the BESTNOEL is assigned a human liver tissue burden of approximately 0.25-25 ppt and an allowable daily intake level in the range of 15-1500 fg/kg/day. In the future, the BESTNOEL can help establish a lower boundary for acceptable extrapolation when using either statistical or biologically based attributable risk models.

  15. Hemoglobin uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-05-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms.

  16. Possible mechanism for preterm labor associated with bacterial infection. I. Stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by endotoxin in endometrial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.A.; Imai, A.; Tamaya, T. )

    1990-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests an association between intra-amniotic infection and premature initiation of parturition. We recently demonstrated that some factor(s) including endotoxin produced by the organism stimulates endogenous phospholipase A2 resulting in liberation of arachidonic acid and prostaglandin formation. The studies presented in this report were designated to evaluate the mechanism for endotoxin to stimulate phospholipase A2 using human endometrial fibroblasts. Exposure of the fibroblasts to endotoxin from Escherichia coli in the presence of ({sup 32}P) phosphate increased {sup 32}P-labeling of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidyl-inositol (PI) in a dose-dependent and a time-dependent manners. The PA labeling occurred without a measurable lag time. These findings demonstrate that the endotoxin stimulates phosphoinositide metabolism in human endometrial fibroblasts by a receptor-mediated mechanism. Membrane phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by endotoxin results in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} increment, liberation of arachidonic acid, which may be involved in the initiation of parturition.

  17. GRK5 Gln41Leu polymorphism is not associated with sensitivity to β1-adrenergic blockade in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kurnik, Daniel; Cunningham, Andrew J; Sofowora, Gbenga G; Kohli, Utkarsh; Li, Chun; Friedman, Eitan A; Muszkat, Mordechai; Menon, Usha B; Wood, Alastair JJ; Stein, C Michael

    2010-01-01

    Aims A common, functionally significant polymorphism in GRK5 (Gln41Leu) encodes a gain-of-function enzyme that enhances desensitization of the β1-adrenergic receptor. GRK5 Leu41 has been postulated to confer endogenous ‘genetic β-blockade’ and contribute to an attenuated response to β-blockers in black subjects. The effects of this GRK5 variant on sensitivity to a β-blocker have not been studied in humans. We hypothesized that the GRK5 Gln41Leu variant contributes to interindividual variability in response to β-blockade and to the ethnic difference in sensitivity between black and Caucasian individuals. Materials & methods We measured the heart rate at rest and during a graded incremental exercise in 154 healthy subjects (85 white and 69 black) before and after an oral administration of 25 mg atenolol. We determined the genotypes of GRK5 (Gln41Leu), β1-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1 Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly) genotypes and plasma atenolol concentrations. The effects of genotype and covariates on sensitivity to atenolol, measured as the reduction in exercise-induced tachycardia, were determined using multiple regression analyses. Results The minor allele frequency of GRK5 Leu41 was 32.6% in blacks and 0% in whites. Black individuals were less sensitive to atenolol than white individuals (p ≤ 0.011) but this was not explained by the GRK5 genotype. The GRK5 genotype had no effect on resting heart rate before (p = 0.61) and after adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, atenolol concentrations, BMI and ADRB1 genotypes (p = 0.81). The decrease in heart rate after atenolol administration did not differ significantly according to the GRK5 genotype at rest or after exercise, before (all p > 0.14) and after statistical adjustment for covariates (all p > 0.17). Conclusion The GRK5 Gln41Leu polymorphism does not affect sensitivity to the β1-adrenergic blocker, atenolol, during acute physiological adrenergic stimulation, nor does it contribute to the ethnic differences in

  18. The inotropic effect of nitric oxide on mammalian papillary muscle is dependent on the level of beta1-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Reading, S A; Barclay, J K

    2002-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide has a positive inotropic effect on mammalian cardiac muscle contractility and that this effect sums with the positive inotropic effect of beta1-adrenergic agonists when both are present. Feline right ventricular papillary muscles were stimulated to contract isometrically at 0.2 Hz in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer (KREBS) gassed with 95% O2 and 5% CO2 (26 degrees C; pH 7.34). The nitric oxide (NO) donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, 10(-5) M), and the membrane permeable cGMP analog 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate sodium (Br-cGMP, 10(-5) M), significantly increased developed force by 13.3+/-1.5% (n = 11) and 7.8+/-2.8% (n = 7), respectively. SNAP, at 10(-5) M, significantly increased the force developed by papillary muscle treated with 10(-11) M or 10(-9) M dobutamine hydrochloride (a beta1-adrenergic agonist) (n = 25, 11.3+/-2.9% and 10.0+/-3.6%, respectively) when compared with the addition of KREBS (n = 27, 2.6+/-0.9% and 5.5+/-0.9%), but the increase was less than predicted by the sum of inotropic effects of SNAP and dobutamine. SNAP at 10(-5) M did not change developed force in muscles treated with 10(-7) M dobutamine but it significantly decreased developed force in muscles challenged with 10(-5) M dobutamine (n = 18, 29.3+/-5.0%) when compared with KREBS (n = 10, 41.5+/-6.8%). Similarly, 10(-4) M 8-bromo-adenosine cyclic 3',5'-hydrogen phosphate monosodium (a membrane permeable cAMP analog) increased developed force 14.9+/-3.3% and the addition of 10(-5) M Br-cGMP to those muscles significantly reduced developed force by 3.5%+/-1.1% (n = 7). Thus, the positive inotropic effect of NO decreased and ultimately became an attenuation as the level of beta1-adrenergic stimulation increased due at least in part, to an interaction between the cAMP and cGMP second messenger pathways.

  19. Developmental changes in the role of a pertussis toxin sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein in the rat cardiac alpha sub 1 -adrenergic system

    SciTech Connect

    Han, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    During development, the cardiac alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic chronotropic response changes from positive in the neonate to negative in the adult. This thesis examined the possibility of a developmental change in coupling of a PT-sensitive G-protein to the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor. Radioligand binding experiments performed with the iodinated alpha{sub 1}-selective radioligand ({sup 125}I)-I-2-({beta}-(4-hydroxphenyl)ethylaminomethyl)tetralone (({sup 125}I)-IBE 2254) demonstrated that the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to a G-protein in both neonatal and adult rat hearts. However, in the neonate the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to a PT-insensitive G-protein, whereas in the adult the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to both a PT-insensitive and a PT-sensitive G-protein. Consistent with the results from binding experiments, PT did not have any effect on the alpha{sub 1}-mediated positive chronotropic response in the neonate, whereas in the adult the alpha{sub 1}-mediated negative chronotropic response was completely converted to a positive one after PT-treatment. This thesis also examined the possibility of an alteration in coupling of the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor to its effector under certain circumstances such as high potassium (K{sup +}) depolarization in nerve-muscle (NM) co-cultures, a system which has been previously shown to be a convenient in vitro model to study the mature inhibitory alpha{sub 1}-response.

  20. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine tumors, there is now increasing interest in pursuing a similar approach with Bn receptors. In the last few years then have been more than 200 studies in this area. In the present paper, the in vitro and in vivo results, as well as results of human studies from many of these studies are reviewed and the current state of Bn receptor-mediated imaging or cytotoxicity is discussed. Both Bn receptor-mediated imaging studies as well as Bn receptor-mediated tumoral cytotoxic studies using radioactive and non-radioactive Bn-based ligands are covered. PMID:21034419

  1. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  2. Evidence that somatostatin sst2 receptors mediate striatal dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Hathway, G J; Humphrey, P P A; Kendrick, K M

    1999-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a cyclic tetradecapeptide present in medium-sized aspiny interneurones in the rat striatum. We have previously shown that exogenous SRIF potently stimulates striatal dopamine (DA) release via a glutamate-dependent mechanism. We now report the ability of the selective sst2 receptor agonist, BIM-23027, to mimic this effect of SRIF.In vivo microdialysis studies were performed in anaesthetized male Wistar rats. In most experiments, compounds were administered by retrodialysis into the striatum for 15 min periods, 90 min and 225 min after sampling commenced, with levels of neurotransmitters being measured by HPLC with electrochemical and fluorescence detection.BIM-23027 (50 and 100 nM) stimulated DA release with extracellular levels increasing by up to 18 fold.Prior retrodialysis of BIM-23027 (50 nM) abolished the effects of subsequent administration of SRIF (100 nM).The agonist effects of both BIM-23027 and SRIF were abolished by the selective sst2 receptor antagonist, L-Tyr8-CYN-154806 (100 nM).The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, DNQX (100 μM), abolished the agonist effects of BIM-23027 as previously shown for SRIF.This study provides evidence that the sst2 receptor mediates the potent dopamine-releasing actions observed with SRIF in the rat striatum. Dopamine release evoked by both peptides appears to be mediated indirectly via a glutamatergic pathway. Other subtype-specific somatostatin receptor ligands were unable to elicit any effects and therefore we conclude that no other somatostatin receptor types are involved in mediating the dopamine-releasing actions of SRIF in the striatum. PMID:10578151

  3. Adrenergic regulation of gluconeogenesis: possible involvement of two mechanisms of signal transduction in alpha 1-adrenergic action.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M

    1985-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agents on hepatocyte metabolism involve two mechanisms: (i) a calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process that is modulated by glucocorticoids and (ii) a calcium-dependent insulin-insensitive process that is modulated by thyroid hormones. We have studied the effect of epinephrine (plus propranolol) on gluconeogenesis from lactate and dihydroxyacetone. It was observed that the adrenergic stimulation of gluconeogenesis from lactate seemed to occur through both mechanisms, whereas when the substrate was dihydroxyacetone the action took place exclusively through the calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process. This effect was absent in hepatocytes from adrenalectomized rats, suggesting that it is modulated by glucocorticoids. PMID:2995981

  4. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-06-25

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca/sup 2 +/ gating.

  5. β1-Adrenergic and M2 Muscarinic Autoantibodies and Thyroid Hormone Facilitate Induction of Atrial Fibrillation in Male Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Murphy, Taylor; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Bing; Veitla, Vineet; Scherlag, Benjamin J; Kem, David C; Yu, Xichun

    2016-01-01

    Activating autoantibodies to the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors are present in a very high percentage of patients with Graves' disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible animal model and thereby to examine the impact of these endocrine-like autoantibodies alone and with thyroid hormone on induction of thyroid-associated atrial tachyarrhythmias. Five New Zealand white rabbits were coimmunized with peptides from the second extracellular loops of the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors to produce both sympathomimetic and parasympathomimetic antibodies. A catheter-based electrophysiological study was performed on anesthetized rabbits before and after immunization and subsequent treatment with thyroid hormone. Antibody expression facilitated the induction of sustained sinus, junctional and atrial tachycardias, but not AF. Addition of excessive thyroid hormone resulted in induced sustained AF in all animals. AF induction was blocked acutely by the neutralization of these antibodies with immunogenic peptides despite continued hyperthyroidism. The measured atrial effective refractory period as one parameter of AF propensity shortened significantly after immunization and was acutely reversed by peptide neutralization. No further decrease in the effective refractory period was observed after the addition of thyroid hormone, suggesting other cardiac effects of thyroid hormone may contribute to its role in AF induction. This study demonstrates autonomic autoantibodies and thyroid hormone potentiate the vulnerability of the heart to AF, which can be reversed by decoy peptide therapy. These data help fulfill Witebsky's postulates for an increased autoimmune/endocrine basis for Graves' hyperthyroidism and AF.

  6. Stimulation of an alpha1-adrenergic receptor downregulates ecto-5' nucleotidase activity on the apical membrane of RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Reigada, David; Zhang, Xiulan; Crespo, Ana; Nguyen, Johnathan; Liu, Ji; Pendrak, Klara; Stone, Richard A; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire

    2006-09-01

    The purines ATP and adenosine play an important role in the communication between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). While the RPE is known to release ATP into subretinal space, the source of extracellular adenosine is unclear. In other tissues, ecto-nucleotidases mediate the consecutive dephosphorylation of ATP to AMP, and AMP is converted to adenosine by ecto-5' nucleotidase (CD73). This study identifies ecto-5' nucleotidase on RPE cells and investigates modulation of enzyme activity. The RPE was the most active site of 5'AMP dephosphorylation in the posterior rat eye. The ecto-5' nucleotidase inhibitor alphabetamADP prevented the production adenosine by the apical membrane of the bovine RPE. Cultured human ARPE-19 cells expressed mRNA and protein for ecto-5' nucleotidase. The production of phosphate from 5'AMP by ARPE-19 cells was inhibited by alphabetamADP, but the ecto-alkaline phosphatase inhibitor levamisole had no effect. Degradation of 5'AMP was blocked by norepinephrine, epinephrine and phenylephrine, with inhibition by antagonists prazosin and corynanthine implicating the alpha1 adrenergic receptor. The block of enzyme activity by norepinephrine was rapid, occurring within 1 min, and was similar at both 4 and 37 degrees C, consistent with cleavage of the enzyme from its GPI anchor. HPLC measurements indicated norepinephrine reduced levels of adenosine in the bath. In the apical face of the bovine-RPE eyecup, norepinephrine reduced the production of phosphate from 5'AMP, suggesting that both receptor and enzyme face sub-retinal space. In conclusion, RPE cells express ecto-5' nucleotidase, with activity on the apical membrane, and stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors downregulates activity. As epinephrine is released at light onset, and adenosine can inhibit phagocytosis, the corresponding decrease in subretinal adenosine levels may contribute to the enhanced the phagocytosis of rod outer segments that occurs at this time.

  7. Co-translational formation and pharmacological characterization of beta1-adrenergic receptor/nanodisc complexes with different lipid environments.

    PubMed

    Rues, Ralf-Bernhardt; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2016-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are of key significance for biomedical research. Streamlined approaches for their efficient recombinant production are of pivotal interest in order to explore their intrinsic conformational dynamics and complex ligand binding behavior. We have systematically optimized the co-translational association and folding of G protein-coupled receptors with defined membranes of nanodiscs by cell-free expression approaches. Each optimization step was quantified and the ligand binding active fraction of the receptor samples could drastically be improved. The strategy was exemplified with a stabilized and a non-stabilized derivative of the turkey beta1-adrenergic receptor. Systematic lipid screens with preformed nanodiscs revealed that generation of ligand binding active conformations of the analyzed beta1-adrenergic receptors strongly depends on lipid charge, flexibility and chain length. The lipid composition of the nanodisc membranes modulates the affinities to a variety of ligands of both receptor derivatives. In addition, the thermostabilization procedure had a significant impact on specific ligand affinities of the receptor and abolished or reduced the binding of certain antagonists. Both receptors were highly stable after purification with optimized nanodisc membranes. The procedure avoids any detergent contact of the receptors and sample production takes less than two days. Moreover, even non-stabilized receptors can be analyzed and their prior purification is not necessary for the formation of nanodisc complexes. The established process appears therefore to be suitable as a new platform for the functional or even structural characterization of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors associated with defined lipid environments.

  8. The Polymorphisms of Ser49Gly and Gly389Arg in Beta-1-Adrenergic Receptor Gene in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    KOKUT, Süleyman; ATAY, İnci Meltem; UZ, Efkan; AKPINAR, Abdullah; DEMİRDAŞ, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It was reported that the genetic susceptibility of major depressive disorder (MDD) is related with genetic polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the genotype and allele frequencies of Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly polymorphisms in MDD by comparing them with healthy subjects. Methods A total of 144 patients with MDD diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 105 healthy controls were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for genotyping. Results Of the 144 participants in the MDD group, 77 (53.5%) had homozygous wild type (AA), 57 (39.6%) had heterozygous type (AG), and 10 (6.9%) had mutant (GG) genotype for Ser49Gly, whereas 75 (52.1%) had homozygous wild type (GG), 59 (41.0%) had heterozygous (GC) type, and 10 (6.9%) had mutant homozygous (CC) genotype for Gly386Arg. There were no significant difference in the allele and genotype frequencies of the beta-1-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1) gene for Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly polymorphisms after comparing with healthy controls (p=0.626; p=0.863 and p=0.625; p=0.914). Conclusion The results of our study did not reveal a major effect of the polymorphism of Ser49Gly and Gly389Arg in the ADRB1 gene in MDD. Further studies with larger sample size are required to elucidate the role of other beta-1 adrenergic gene polymorphisms in MDD. PMID:28360691

  9. Impairment of contextual conditioned fear extinction after microinjection of alpha-1-adrenergic blocker prazosin into the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Do-Monte, Fabrício H M; Allensworth, Melody; Carobrez, Antônio P

    2010-07-29

    Long-lasting memories of aversive or stressful events have been associated with the noradrenergic system activation. Alpha-1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin has successfully been used in the last years to treat anxiety disorders related to aversive memories recurrence in humans. Contextual conditioned fear extinction paradigm in rats has been used to better understand the mechanisms involved in the attenuation of defensive behaviour after a traumatic situation. Here we investigated the effects of systemic administration of prazosin in the fear extinction processes. Rats were previously paired in a contextual fear conditioning box (1 footshock, 1 mA, 2s duration), further returning to the same box during three consecutive days receiving an intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or prazosin 30 min before (acquisition of extinction; 0.1 or 0.5mg/kg) or immediately after (consolidation of extinction, 0.5 or 1.5mg/kg) each extinction session (10 min). On the last day, all animals were re-exposed undrugged to the apparatus. Since the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been described as a key structure in the modulation of conditioned fear extinction, the effects of intra-mPFC microinjection (0.2 microl per side) of vehicle (PBS) or prazosin (0.75 or 2.5 nmol) in the acquisition of fear extinction (10 min before extinction session 1) were further evaluated. Subjects were drug-free re-exposed to the same box in the next day (extinction session 2). The percentage of freezing time was used as the memory retention parameter. The results showed that either systemic or intra-mPFC-alpha-1-adrenergic blockade increased the freezing time in the last extinction sessions, suggesting impairment of the extinction of contextual conditioned fear in rats.

  10. Direct evidence for a β1-adrenergic receptor–directed autoimmune attack as a cause of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Roland; Boivin, Valérie; Hein, Lutz; Triebel, Sven; Angermann, Christiane E.; Ertl, Georg; Lohse, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    Today, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) represents the main cause of severe heart failure and disability in younger adults and thus is a challenge for public health. About 30% of DCM cases are genetic in origin; however, the large majority of cases are sporadic, and a viral or immune pathogenesis is suspected. Following the established postulates for pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, here we provide direct evidence that an autoimmune attack directed against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor may play a causal role in DCM. First, we immunized inbred rats against the second extracellular β1-receptor loop (β1-ECII; 100% sequence identity between human and rat) every month. All these rats developed first, receptor-stimulating anti–β1-ECII Ab’s and then, after 9 months, progressive severe left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction. Second, we transferred sera from anti–β1-ECII–positive and Ab-negative animals every month to healthy rats of the same strain. Strikingly, all anti–β1-ECII–transferred rats also developed a similar cardiomyopathic phenotype within a similar time frame, underlining the pathogenic potential of these receptor Ab’s. As a consequence, β1-adrenergic receptor–targeted autoimmune DCM should now be categorized with other known receptor Ab-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as Graves disease or myasthenia gravis. Although carried out in an experimental animal model, our findings should further encourage the development of therapeutic strategies that combat harmful anti–β1-ECII in receptor Ab–positive DCM patients. PMID:15146239

  11. Induction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and estrogen receptor-mediated activities, and modulation of cell proliferation by dinaphthofurans.

    PubMed

    Vondrácek, Jan; Chramostová, Katerina; Plísková, Martina; Bláha, Ludek; Brack, Werner; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2004-09-01

    A group of heterocyclic aromatic compounds, dinaphthofurans (DNFs), recently have been identified as potentially significant contaminants in freshwater sediments. In the present study, a battery of in vitro assays was used for detection of toxic effects of DNFs that are potentially associated with endocrine disruption and tumor promotion. Dinaphthofurans were found to act as relatively potent inducers of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity in the chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene expression DR-CALUX assay. The relative AhR-inducing potencies of DNFs were similar or even higher than relative potencies of unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with dinaphtho[1,2-b;2'3'-d]furan being the most potent AhR agonist. Two compounds, dinaphtho[2,1-b;2'3'-d]furan and dinaphtho[1,2-b;1'2'-d]furan, induced estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated activity in the estrogen receptor-mediated CALUX (the ER-CALUX) assay. Two types of potential tumor-promoting effects of DNFs were investigated, using in vitro bioassays for detection of inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and detection of a release from contact inhibition. Although the acute inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication was not observed, all six tested DNFs were able to release rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells from contact inhibition at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In summary, the present study indicated that DNFs can exert multiple biological effects in vitro, including induction of the AhR-mediated activity, release of cells from contact inhibition, and induction of ER-mediated activity.

  12. Phosphoinositide regulation of TRPV1 revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The heat- and capsaicin-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 ion channel (TRPV1) is regulated by plasma membrane phosphoinositides. The effects of these lipids on this channel have been controversial. Recent articles re-ignited the debate and also offered resolution to place some of the data in a coherent picture. This review summarizes the literature on this topic and provides a detailed and critical discussion on the experimental evidence for the various effects of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphayte [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2] on TRPV1. We conclude that PI(4,5)P2 and potentially its precursor PI(4)P are positive cofactors for TRPV1, acting via direct interaction with the channel, and their depletion by Ca2+-induced activation of phospholipase Cδ isoforms (PLCδ) limits channel activity during capsaicin-induced desensitization. Other negatively charged lipids at higher concentrations can also support channel activity, which may explain some controversies in the literature. PI(4,5)P2 also partially inhibits channel activity in some experimental settings, and relief from this inhibition upon PLCβ activation may contribute to sensitization. The negative effect of PI(4,5)P2 is more controversial and its mechanism is less well understood. Other TRP channels from the TRPV and TRPC families may also undergo similar dual regulation by phosphoinositides, thus the complexity of TRPV1 regulation is not unique to this channel. PMID:25754030

  13. Phosphoinositide lipid phosphatases: natural regulators of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephanie J; Parry, Richard V; Westwick, John; Ward, Stephen G

    2008-02-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway has been implicated in a range of T lymphocyte cellular functions, particularly growth, proliferation, cytokine secretion, and survival. Dysregulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent signaling and function in leukocytes, including B and T lymphocytes, has been implicated in many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. As befits a pivotal signaling cascade, several mechanisms exist to ensure that the pathway is tightly regulated. This minireview focuses on two lipid phosphatases, viz. the 3'-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and SHIP (Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase). We discuss their role in regulating T lymphocyte signaling as well their potential as future therapeutic targets.

  14. Vgl-4, a novel member of the vestigial-like family of transcription cofactors, regulates alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Huei; Mullett, Steven J; Stewart, Alexandre F R

    2004-07-16

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle genes are regulated by the transcriptional enhancer factor (TEF-1) family of transcription factors. In skeletal muscle, TEF-1 factors interact with a skeletal muscle-specific cofactor called Vestigial-like 2 (Vgl-2) that is related to the Drosophila protein Vestigial. Here, we characterize Vgl-4, the only member of the Vestigial-like family expressed in the heart. Unlike other members of the Vgl family that have a single TEF-1 interaction domain called the tondu (TDU) motif, Vgl-4 has two TDU motifs in its carboxyl-terminal domain. Like other Vgl factors, Vgl-4 physically interacts with TEF-1 in an immunoprecipitation assay. Vgl-4 functionally interacts with TEF-1 and also with myocyte enhancer factor 2 in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Overexpression of Vgl-4 in cardiac myocytes interfered with the basal expression and alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of a TEF-1-dependent skeletal alpha-actin promoter. In cardiac myocytes cultured in serum and in serum-free medium, a myc-tagged Vgl-4 protein was located in the nucleus and cytoplasm but was exported from the nucleus when cells were treated with alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist. A chimeric nuclear-retained Vgl-4 protein inhibited alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation. In contrast, deletion of the TDU motifs of Vgl-4 prevented Vgl-4 nuclear localization, relieved Vgl-4 interference of basal activity, and enhanced alpha1-adrenergic up-regulation of the skeletal alpha-actin promoter. Nuclear export of Vgl-4 is dependent on the nuclear exportin CRM-1. These results suggest that Vgl-4 modulates the activity of TEF-1 factors and counteracts alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

  15. [Detection of Autoantibodies Against the 1-Adrenergic Receptor in the Sera of Patients via the Competitive cell-Based Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay].

    PubMed

    Shevelev, A Y; Kostiukevich, M V; Efremov, E E; Vlasik, T N; Mironova, N A; Zykov, K A; Kashirina, N M; Kuznetsova, I B; Sharf, T V; Mamochkina, E N; Lipatova, L N; Peklo, M M; Rutkevich, P N; Yanushevskaya, E V; Rybalkin, I N; Stukalova, O V; Malkina, T A; Belyaeva, M M; Kuznetsova, T V; Tkachev, G A; Zinchenko, L V; Gupalo, E M; Agapova, O Y; Yureneva-Tkhorzhevskaya, T V; Rvacheva, A V; Sidorova, M V; Sadgyan, A S; Tereshchenko, S N; Golitsyn, S P

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the level of anti-1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease and with presence of cardiovascular pathology in comparison with a group of healthy volunteers. The study included 44 patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease ("idiopathic"), 34 patients with diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) of inflammatory origin, 35 patients with coronary heart disease and ventricular arrhythmias, 12patients with coronary heart disease with no ventricular arrhythmias, and 19 healthy volunteers (control group). The level of autoantibodies against the 1-adrenergic receptor was determined by the developed competitive cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by the standard ELISA using peptides corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the 1-adrenergic receptor. Elevated level of autoantibodies detected by a competitive cell-based ELISA was observed in 62% of patients with DCM compared to 21% of healthy volunteers (p=0.0006). In patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias, the level of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies was lower than in healthy subjects (p=0.003). Coronary heart disease patients with or without ventricular arrhythmias exhibited no differences from the control group. The number of significantly positive signals in peptide-based ELISA did not exceed 10% in any of the groups. No correlation between the data from competitive cell-based ELISA and peptide-based ELISA was found. This study demonstrated that competitive cell-based ELISA technique can be applied for detection of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies. The results in DCM patients generally correspond to the expected. Decreased level of autoantibodies in patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias indicates that this disease is related to changes in the immune system. Such relation is not observed in the case of coronary heart disease

  16. Plant phosphoinositide signaling - dynamics on demand.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic membranes contain small amounts of lipids with regulatory roles. An important class of such regulatory lipids are phosphoinositides (PIs). Within membranes, PIs serve as recruitment signals, as regulators of membrane protein function or as precursors for second messenger production, thereby influencing a multitude of cellular processes with key importance for plant function and development. Plant PIs occur locally and transiently within membrane microdomains, and their abundance is strictly controlled. To understand the functions of the plant PI-network it is important to understand not only downstream PI-effects, but also to identify and characterize factors contributing to dynamic PI formation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Downregulation of β1 -adrenergic receptors in rat C6 glioblastoma cells by hyperforin and hyperoside from St John's wort.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Daniel; Hage-Hülsmann, Anne; Prenner, Lars; Kolb, Christiane; Weiser, Dieter; Häberlein, Hanns

    2013-06-01

    While the use of St John's wort extracts as treatment for mild to moderate depression is well established the mode of action is still under investigation. Individual constituents of St John's wort extract were tested for possible effects on the β1 AR density and a subsequent change in downstream signalling in rat C6 glioblastoma cells. The effect of compounds from St John's wort extract on the downregulation of β1 -adrenergic receptor-GFP fusion proteins (β1 AR-green fluorescent protein (GFP)) of transfected rat C6 gliobastoma cells (C6-β1 AR-GFP) was investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The influence on the lateral mobility of β1 AR-GFP in C6-β1 AR-GFP was investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The formation of second messenger was determined by c-AMP-assay. Confocal LSM revealed that pretreatment of cells with 1 μm of hyperforin and hyperoside for 6 days, respectively, led to an internalization of β1 AR-GFP under non-stimulating conditions. Observation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed two diffusion time constants for control cells, with τdiff1  = 0.78 ± 0.18 ms and τdiff2  = 122.53 ± 69.41 ms, similarly distributed. Pretreatment with 1 μm hyperforin or 1 μm hyperoside for 3 days did not alter the τdiff values but decreased the fraction of τdiff1 whereas the fraction of τdiff2 increased significantly. An elevated level of β1 AR-GFP with hindered lateral mobility was in line with β1 AR-GFP internalization induced by hyperforin and hyperoside, respectively. A reduced β1 -adrenergic responsiveness was assumed for C6 gliobastoma cells after pretreatment for 6 days with 1 μm of both hyperforin and hyperoside, which was confirmed by decreased cAMP formation of about 10% and 5% under non-stimulating conditions. Decrease in cAMP formation by 23% for hyperforin and 15% for hyperoside was more pronounced after stimulation with 10 μm dobutamine for 30 min. The

  18. Selective α1-adrenergic blockade disturbs the regional distribution of cerebral blood flow during static handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Igor A; Mattos, João D; Campos, Monique O; Machado, Alessandro C; Rocha, Marcos P; Rocha, Natalia G; Vianna, Lauro C; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2016-06-01

    Handgrip-induced increases in blood flow through the contralateral artery that supplies the cortical representation of the arm have been hypothesized as a consequence of neurovascular coupling and a resultant metabolic attenuation of sympathetic cerebral vasoconstriction. In contrast, sympathetic restraint, in theory, inhibits changes in perfusion of the cerebral ipsilateral blood vessels. To confirm whether sympathetic nerve activity modulates cerebral blood flow distribution during static handgrip (SHG) exercise, beat-to-beat contra- and ipsilateral internal carotid artery blood flow (ICA; Doppler) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer) were simultaneously assessed in nine healthy men (27 ± 5 yr), both at rest and during a 2-min SHG bout (30% maximal voluntary contraction), under two experimental conditions: 1) control and 2) α1-adrenergic receptor blockade. End-tidal carbon dioxide (rebreathing system) was clamped throughout the study. SHG induced increases in MAP (+31.4 ± 10.7 mmHg, P < 0.05) and contralateral ICA blood flow (+80.9 ± 62.5 ml/min, P < 0.05), while no changes were observed in the ipsilateral vessel (-9.8 ± 39.3 ml/min, P > 0.05). The reduction in ipsilateral ICA vascular conductance (VC) was greater compared with contralateral ICA (contralateral: -0.8 ± 0.8 vs. ipsilateral: -2.6 ± 1.3 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P < 0.05). Prazosin was effective to induce α1-blockade since phenylephrine-induced increases in MAP were greatly reduced (P < 0.05). Under α1-adrenergic receptor blockade, SHG evoked smaller MAP responses (+19.4 ± 9.2, P < 0.05) but similar increases in ICAs blood flow (contralateral: +58.4 ± 21.5 vs. ipsilateral: +54.3 ± 46.2 ml/min, P > 0.05) and decreases in VC (contralateral: -0.4 ± 0.7 vs. ipsilateral: -0.4 ± 1.0 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P > 0.05). These findings indicate a role of sympathetic nerve activity in the regulation of cerebral blood flow distribution during SHG.

  19. β1-Adrenergic blockers exert antioxidant effects, reduce matrix metalloproteinase activity, and improve renovascular hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Elen; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Ceron, Carla S; Prado, Cibele M; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Martins-Oliveira, Alisson; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2014-08-01

    Hypertension induces left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) by mechanisms involving oxidative stress and unbalanced cardiac matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. We hypothesized that β1-adrenergic receptor blockers with antioxidant properties (nebivolol) could reverse hypertension-induced LVH more effectively than conventional β1-blockers (metoprolol) when used at doses that exert similar antihypertensive effects. Two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) hypertension was induced in male Wistar rats. Six weeks after surgery, hypertensive and sham rats were treated with nebivolol (10 mg kg(-1)day(-1)) or metoprolol (20 mg kg(-1)day(-1)) for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was monitored weekly by tail-cuff plethysmography. LV structural changes and fibrosis were studied in hematoxylin/eosin- and picrosirius-stained sections, respectively. Cardiac MMP levels and activity were determined by in situ zymography, gel zymography, and immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidium and lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence assays were used to assess cardiac reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Nitrotyrosine levels were determined in LV samples by immunohistochemistry and green fluorescence and were evaluated using the ImageJ software. Cardiac protein kinase B/Akt (AKT) phosphorylation state was assessed by Western blot. Both β-blockers exerted similar antihypertensive effects and attenuated hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. Both drugs reduced myocyte hypertrophy and collagen deposition in 2K1C rats. These effects were associated with lower cardiac ROS and nitrotyrosine levels and attenuation of hypertension-induced increases in cardiac MMP-2 levels and in situ gelatinolytic activity after treatment with both β-blockers. Whereas hypertension increased AKT phosphorylation, no effects were found with β-blockers. In conclusion, we found evidence that two β1-blockers with different properties attenuate hypertension-induced LV hypertrophy and cardiac collagen deposition in association with

  20. Phosphoinositides in the mammalian endo-lysosomal network

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Peter J.; Carlton, Jeremy G.

    2014-01-01

    The endo-lysosomal system is an interconnected tubulo-vesicular network that acts as a sorting station to process and distribute internalised cargo. This network accepts cargoes from both the plasma membrane and the biosynthetic pathway, and directs these cargos either towards the lysosome for degradation, the peri-nuclear recycling endosome for return to the cell surface, or to the trans-Golgi network. These intracellular membranes are variously enriched in different phosphoinositides that help to shape compartmental identity. These lipids act to localise a number of phosphoinositide-binding proteins that function as sorting machineries to regulate endosomal cargo sorting. Herein we discuss regulation of these machineries by phosphoinositides and explore how phosphoinositide-switching contributes toward sorting decisions made at this platform. PMID:22374088

  1. Phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases: How do they affect tumourigenesis?

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    The activity of biological molecules is often affected by their phosphorylation state. Regulatory phosphorylation operates as a binary switch and is usually controlled by counteracting kinases and phosphatases. However, phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) has three phosphorylation sites on its inositol ring. The phosphorylation status of PtdIns is controlled by multiple kinases and phosphatases with distinct substrate specificities, serving as a 'lipid code' or 'phosphoinositide code'. Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) converts PtdIns(4,5)P₂ to PtdIns(3,4,5)P₃, which plays a pivotal role in signals controlling glucose uptake, cytoskeletal reorganization, cell proliferation and apoptosis. PI3K is pro-oncogenic, whereas phosphoinositide phosphatases that degrade PtdIns(3,4,5)P₃ are not always anti-oncogenic. Recent studies have revealed the unique characteristics of phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases.

  2. The A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc-signaling complex mediates alpha1 adrenergic receptor-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Cotecchia, Susanna; Nenniger-Tosato, Monique; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Diviani, Dario

    2007-06-12

    In response to various pathological stresses, the heart undergoes a pathological remodeling process that is associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Because cardiac hypertrophy can progress to heart failure, a major cause of lethality worldwide, the intracellular signaling pathways that control cardiomyocyte growth have been the subject of intensive investigation. It has been known for more than a decade that the small molecular weight GTPase RhoA is involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Although some of the hypertrophic pathways activated by RhoA have now been identified, the identity of the exchange factors that modulate its activity in cardiomyocytes is currently unknown. In this study, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critical for activating RhoA and transducing hypertrophic signals downstream of alpha1-adrenergic receptors (ARs). In particular, our results indicate that suppression of AKAP-Lbc expression by infecting rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes with lentiviruses encoding AKAP-Lbc-specific short hairpin RNAs strongly reduces both alpha1-AR-mediated RhoA activation and hypertrophic responses. Interestingly, alpha1-ARs promote AKAP-Lbc activation via a pathway that requires the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein G12. These findings identify AKAP-Lbc as the first Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocytes hypertrophy.

  3. Mapping of a functional autoimmune epitope on the beta 1-adrenergic receptor in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Y; Marullo, S; Hoyer, S; Waagstein, F; Andersson, B; Vahlne, A; Guillet, J G; Strosberg, A D; Hjalmarson, A; Hoebeke, J

    1990-01-01

    The presence and properties of serum autoantibodies against beta-adrenergic receptors in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were studied using synthetic peptides derived from the predicted sequences of the human beta-adrenergic receptors. Peptides corresponding to the sequences of the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors were used as antigens in an enzyme immunoassay to screen sera from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 42), ischemic heart disease (n = 17), or healthy blood donors (n = 34). The sera of thirteen dilated cardiomyopathy patients, none of the ischemic heart disease patients, and four of the healthy controls monospecifically recognized the beta 1-peptide. Only affinity-purified antibodies of these patients had a inhibitory effect on radioligand binding to the beta 1 receptor of C6 rat glioma cells. They recognized the receptor protein by immunoblot and bound in situ to human myocardial tissue. We conclude that a subgroup of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy have in their sera autoantibodies specifically directed against the second extracellular loop of the beta 1-adrenergic receptor. These antibodies could serve as a marker of an autoimmune response with physiological and/or pathological implications. Images PMID:1700798

  4. Sympathetic nervous system promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating inflammation through activation of alpha1-adrenergic receptors of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Huan, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xu-Dong; Chen, Xue-Jiao; Wu, Lin; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Liang; Yang, Da-Peng; Zhang, Xia; Bie, Ping; Qian, Cheng; Xia, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is known to play a significant role in tumor initiation and metastasis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) frequently occurs in cirrhotic livers after chronic inflammation, and the SNS is hyperactive in advanced liver cirrhosis. However, it remains unclear whether the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating chronic liver inflammation. In this study, a retrospective pathological analysis and quantification of sympathetic nerve fiber densities (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH(+)) in HCC patients, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats were performed. Our data showed that high density of sympathetic nerve fibers and α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) of Kupffer cells (KCs) were associated with a poor prognosis of HCC. Sympathetic denervation or blocking of α1-ARs decreased DEN-induced HCC incidence and tumor development. In addition, synergistic effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in hepatocarcinogenesis were observed. The suppression of the SNS reduced IL-6 and TGF-β expression, which suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis, and KCs play a key role in this process. After the ablation of KCs, IL-6 and TGF-β expression and the development of HCC were inhibited. This study demonstrates that sympathetic innervation is crucial for hepatocarcinogenesis and that the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by activating α1-ARs of KCs to boost the activation of KCs and to maintain the inflammatory microenvironment. These results indicate that sympathetic denervation or α1-ARs blockage may represent novel treatment approaches for HCC.

  5. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure.

  6. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptors in Heart Failure: The Adaptive Arm of the Cardiac Response to Chronic Catecholamine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; O'Connell, Timothy D.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the non-failing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and b□eta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain- and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs, to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  7. The role of α1-adrenergic receptors in regulating metabolism: increased glucose tolerance, leptin secretion and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Papay, Robert S; Perez, Dianne M

    2017-04-01

    The role of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) and their subtypes in metabolism is not well known. Most previous studies were performed before the advent of transgenic mouse models and utilized transformed cell lines and poorly selective antagonists. We have now studied the metabolic regulation of the α1A- and α1B-AR subtypes in vivo using knock-out (KO) and transgenic mice that express a constitutively active mutant (CAM) form of the receptor, assessing subtype-selective functions. CAM mice increased glucose tolerance while KO mice display impaired glucose tolerance. CAM mice increased while KO decreased glucose uptake into white fat tissue and skeletal muscle with the CAM α1A-AR showing selective glucose uptake into the heart. Using indirect calorimetry, both CAM mice demonstrated increased whole body fatty acid oxidation, while KO mice preferentially oxidized carbohydrate. CAM α1A-AR mice displayed significantly decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and glucose levels while α1A-AR KO displayed increased levels of triglycerides and glucose. Both CAM mice displayed increased plasma levels of leptin while KO mice decreased leptin levels. Most metabolic effects were more efficacious with the α1A-AR subtype. Our results suggest that stimulation of α1-ARs results in a favorable metabolic profile of increased glucose tolerance, cardiac glucose uptake, leptin secretion and increased whole body lipid metabolism that may contribute to its previously recognized cardioprotective and neuroprotective benefits.

  8. A new TIPE of phosphoinositide regulator in cancer.

    PubMed

    Moniz, Larissa S; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2014-10-13

    Specific phosphoinositide lipids promote cell growth and cancer. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Fayngerts and colleagues demonstrate that the TIPE3 protein enhances PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, is overexpressed in certain cancers, and promotes tumorigenesis. TIPE3 can act as a lipid transfer protein and may constitute a novel phosphoinositide metabolism regulator.

  9. Receptor-mediated endocytosis for drug delivery in African trypanosomes: fulfilling Paul Ehrlich's vision of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alsford, Sam; Field, Mark C; Horn, David

    2013-05-01

    Bloodstream-form cells of Trypanosoma brucei exhibit massively increased endocytic activity relative to the insect midgut stage, enabling rapid recycling of variant surface glycoprotein and antibody clearance from the surface. In addition, recent advances have identified a role for receptor-mediated endocytosis in the uptake of the antitrypanosomal drug, suramin, via invariant surface glycoprotein 75, and in the uptake of trypanosome lytic factor 1 via haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor. Here, we argue that receptor-mediated endocytosis represents both a validated drug target and a promising route for the delivery of novel therapeutics into trypanosomes.

  10. The effect of α1 -adrenergic blockade on post-exercise brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude.

    PubMed

    Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Hansen, Alex B; Howe, Connor A; Willie, Chris K; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J; Hoiland, Ryan L; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α1 -adrenergic blockade. Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise. At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α1 -adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and administration of α1 -adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow-mediated dilatation. Our data indicate that post-exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high-altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate-intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α1 -adrenergic pathway. In a double-blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo-controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal-exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi-recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α1 -adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg( -1) ). These experiments were completed at both sea-level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography

  11. The alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, benoxathian and prazosin, induce apoptosis and a switch towards megakaryocytic differentiation in human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Robert; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Haas, Helga S; Leitinger, Gerd; Schauenstein, Konrad; Sadjak, Anton

    2009-10-01

    The erythroleukemia cell lines K562 and human erythroleukemia (HEL) are established models to study erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation in vitro. In this study, we show that the alpha1-adrenergic antagonists, benoxathian and prazosin, inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis in K562 and HEL cells. Furthermore, both tested substances induced the expression of the megakaryocytic marker CD41a, whereas the expression of the erythroid marker glycophorin-a was decreased or unchanged. Even though the expression of differentiation markers was similar after benoxathian and prazosin treatment in both cell lines, endomitosis of erythroleukemia cells was observed only after prazosin treatment. So far, benoxathian and prazosin are the first described extracellular ligands, which cause megakaryocytic differentiation in K562 and HEL cells. In summary, these results indicate a possible role of alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling in the regulation of erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation, even though the receptor dependence of the observed effects needs further investigation.

  12. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Waters, Wendy W.; Ziegler, Michael G.; deBlock, Heidi F.; Mills, Paul J.; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  13. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptor blockade modifies insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) activity in rat prostate and modulates oxytocin functions.

    PubMed

    Saníger, Marcela Arrazola; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; de la Chica, Susana; Carrera-González, María Pilar; Mayas, María Dolores; Manuel Martínez-Martos, José

    2011-08-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is one of the important paracrine factors that prostate synthesizes. OT maintains its resting tone and stimulates its contractile activity. However, the involvement of OT in modulating cell proliferation of the prostate is being investigated. In fact, alterations in OT concentrations accompany both benign prostatic hyperplasia/hypertrophy and carcinoma of the prostate. The enzyme Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) is the main responsible of OT levels regulation through its catabolism. To date, the long-acting selective α(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist doxazosin is widely used to the treatment of BPH. Thus, our aim was to analyze the effects of doxazosin on IRAP specific activity and its putative effects on prostate OT regulation and functions. Fifteen male Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously with 10 mg/Kg doxazosin during 15 days and fifteen controls were treated with the vehicle only. After the treatment period, prostate was removed to obtain soluble and membrane-bound fractions. Soluble and membrane-bound IRAP specific activities were assayed fluorometrically using leucyl-ß-naphthylamide as substrate. Prostate OT content was assayed by enzyme immunoassay. Doxazosin treatment significantly increased membrane-bound IRAP specific activity in rat prostate by 59.4%, whereas no changes were observed in the soluble fraction. Treatment with doxazosin also significantly increased OT concentration by 26.3%. In vivo administration of doxazosin to male rats modify both prostatic IRAP activity and OT levels. Because there is now evidence that OT plays a physiological role in the regulation of growth and muscular contractility within the gland, more attention should be paid to IRAP activity, which could represent a new target for the regulation of the functions of OT under physiological or pathological conditions such as BPH and prostate cancer.

  14. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight.

    PubMed

    Meck, Janice V; Waters, Wendy W; Ziegler, Michael G; deBlock, Heidi F; Mills, Paul J; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L

    2004-04-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  15. Agonist-promoted desensitization and phosphorylation of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors coupled to stimulation of phosphatidylinositol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Cotecchia, S.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    In the DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 hamster vas deferens smooth muscle cell line the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR) agonist norepinephrine (NE) promotes rapid attenuation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR-mediated phosphatidylinositol (PI) metabolism which is paralleled by rapid phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR. Cells were labeled by incubation with /sup 32/P/sub i/. Coincubation with NE (100 ..mu..M) significantly increases the rate of /sup 32/P-labeling of both PI and phosphatidic acid. Pretreatment of cells with 100 ..mu..M NE (in the presence of 1 ..mu..M propranolol to prevent ..beta..-AR interactions) results in a drastic attenuation of the NE response on PI metabolism. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR from labeled cells can be solubilized and purified by affinity chromatography on Affigel-A55414 and wheat germ agglutinin agarose chromatography. SDS-PAGE of purified ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR shows a NE-promoted increase in phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 80K ligand binding peptide. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation increases from approx. 1 mol phosphate/mol ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR in the basal condition to approx. 2.5 after NE treatment. Both desensitization and phosphorylation are rapid being maximal within 10-20 min of agonist exposure. These results together with previous findings that phorbol esters promote rapid ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR uncoupling and phosphorylation suggest that receptor phosphorylation is an important mechanism of regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR receptor responsiveness.

  16. Phosphoregulation of Cardiac Inotropy via Myosin Binding Protein-C During Increased Pacing Frequency or β1-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Carl W.; Wu, Xin; Liu, Yang; Rosas, Paola C.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Hudmon, Andy; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Powers, Patricia A.; Valdivia, Héctor H.; Moss, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammalian hearts exhibit positive inotropic responses to β-adrenergic stimulation as a consequence of protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation or as a result of increased beat frequency (the Bowditch effect). Several membrane and myofibrillar proteins are phosphorylated under these conditions, but the relative contributions of these to increased contractility are not known. Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) by PKA accelerates the kinetics of force development in permeabilized heart muscle, but its role in vivo is unknown. Such understanding is important, since adrenergic responsiveness of the heart and the Bowditch effect are both depressed in heart failure. Methods and Results The roles of cMyBP-C phosphorylation were studied using mice in which either WT or nonphosphorylatable forms of cMyBP-C [ser273ala, ser282ala, ser302ala: cMyBP-C(t3SA)] were expressed at similar levels on a cMyBP-C null background. Force and [Ca2+]in measurements in isolated papillary muscles showed that the increased force and twitch kinetics due to increased pacing or β1-adrenergic stimulation were nearly absent in cMyBP-C(t3SA) myocardium, even though [Ca2+]intransients under each condition were similar to WT. Biochemical measurements confirmed that PKA phosphorylated ser273, ser282 and ser302 in WT cMyBP-C. In contrast, CaMKIIδ, which is activated by increased pacing, phosphorylated ser302 principally, ser282 to a lesser degree, and ser273 not at all. Conclusions Phosphorylation of cMyBP-C increases the force and kinetics of twitches in living cardiac muscle. Further, cMyBP-C is a principal mediator of increased contractility observed with β-adrenergic stimulation or increased pacing, due to PKA and CaMKIIδ phosphorylations of cMyB-C. PMID:25740838

  17. Two alpha1-adrenergic receptor subtypes regulating the vasopressor response have differential roles in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Chihiro; Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Oikawa, Ryo; Tomabechi, Takashi; Fukuda, Shinya; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Takeo, Satoshi; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Cotecchia, Susanna; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2005-03-01

    To study the functional role of individual alpha1-adrenergic (AR) subtypes in blood pressure (BP) regulation, we used mice lacking the alpha1B-AR and/or alpha1D-AR with the same genetic background and further studied their hemodynamic and vasoconstrictive responses. Both the alpha1D-AR knockout and alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice, but not the alpha1B-AR knockout mice, had significantly (p < 0.05) lower levels of basal systolic and mean arterial BP than wild-type mice in nonanesthetized condition, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. All mutants showed a significantly (p < 0.05) reduced catecholamine-induced pressor and vasoconstriction responses. It is noteworthy that the infusion of norepinephrine did not elicit any pressor response at all in alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice. In an attempt to further examine alpha1-AR subtype, which is involved in the genesis or maintenance of hypertension, BP after salt loading was monitored by tail-cuff readings and confirmed at the endpoint by direct intra-arterial recording. After salt loading, alpha1B-AR knockout mice developed a comparable level of hypertension to wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking alpha1D-AR had significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated BP and lower levels of circulating catecholamines. Our data indicated that alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR subtypes participate cooperatively in BP regulation; however, the deletion of the functional alpha1D-AR, not alpha1B-AR, leads to an antihypertensive effect. The study shows differential contributions of alpha1B- and alpha1D-ARs in BP regulation.

  18. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Waters, Wendy W.; Ziegler, Michael G.; deBlock, Heidi F.; Mills, Paul J.; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  19. Phosphoregulation of Cardiac Inotropy via Myosin Binding Protein-C During Increased Pacing Frequency or β1-Adrenergic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Carl W; Wu, Xin; Liu, Yang; Rosas, Paola C; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Hudmon, Andy; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Powers, Patricia A; Valdivia, Héctor H; Moss, Richard L

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian hearts exhibit positive inotropic responses to β-adrenergic stimulation as a consequence of protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation or as a result of increased beat frequency (the Bowditch effect). Several membrane and myofibrillar proteins are phosphorylated under these conditions, but the relative contributions of these to increased contractility are not known. Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) by protein kinase A accelerates the kinetics of force development in permeabilized heart muscle, but its role in vivo is unknown. Such understanding is important because adrenergic responsiveness of the heart and the Bowditch effect are both depressed in heart failure. The roles of cMyBP-C phosphorylation were studied using mice in which either WT or nonphosphorylatable forms of cMyBP-C [ser273ala, ser282ala, ser302ala: cMyBP-C(t3SA)] were expressed at similar levels on a cMyBP-C null background. Force and [Ca(2+)]in measurements in isolated papillary muscles showed that the increased force and twitch kinetics because increased pacing or β1-adrenergic stimulation were nearly absent in cMyBP-C(t3SA) myocardium, even though [Ca(2+)]in transients under each condition were similar to WT. Biochemical measurements confirmed that protein kinase A phosphorylated ser273, ser282, and ser302 in WT cMyBP-C. In contrast, CaMKIIδ, which is activated by increased pacing, phosphorylated ser302 principally, ser282 to a lesser degree, and ser273 not at all. Phosphorylation of cMyBP-C increases the force and kinetics of twitches in living cardiac muscle. Further, cMyBP-C is a principal mediator of increased contractility observed with β-adrenergic stimulation or increased pacing because of protein kinase A and CaMKIIδ phosphorylations of cMyB-C. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Activating autoantibodies to the beta-1 adrenergic and m2 muscarinic receptors facilitate atrial fibrillation in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Stavrakis, Stavros; Yu, Xichun; Patterson, Eugene; Huang, Shijun; Hamlett, Sean R; Chalmers, Laura; Pappy, Reji; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Morshed, Syed A; Davies, Terry F; Lazzara, Ralph; Kem, David C

    2009-09-29

    We studied activating autoantibodies to beta-1 adrenergic receptors (AAbeta1AR) and activating autoantibodies to M2 muscarinic receptors (AAM2R) in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Graves' hyperthyroidism. Atrial fibrillation frequently complicates hyperthyroidism. Both AAbeta1AR and AAM2R have been described in some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and AF. We hypothesized that their copresence would facilitate AF in autoimmune Graves' hyperthyroidism. Immunoglobulin G purified from 38 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism with AF (n=17) or sinus rhythm (n=21) and 10 healthy control subjects was tested for its effects on isolated canine Purkinje fiber contractility with and without atropine and nadolol. Immunoglobulin G electrophysiologic effects were studied using intracellular recordings from isolated canine pulmonary veins. Potential cross-reactivity of AAbeta1AR and AAM2R with stimulating thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies was evaluated before and after adsorption to Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human TSHRs using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The frequency of AAbeta1AR and/or AAM2R differed significantly between patients with AF and sinus rhythm (AAbeta1AR=94% vs. 38%, p<0.001; AAM2R=88% vs. 19%, p<0.001; and AAbeta1AR+AAM2R=82% vs. 10%, p<0.001). The copresence of AAbeta1AR and AAM2R was the strongest predictor of AF (odds ratio: 33.61, 95% confidence interval: 1.17 to 964.11, p=0.04). Immunoglobulin G from autoantibody-positive patients induced hyperpolarization, decreased action potential duration, enhanced early afterdepolarization formation, and facilitated triggered firing in pulmonary veins by local autonomic nerve stimulation. Immunoadsorption studies showed that AAbeta1AR and AAM2R were immunologically distinct from TSHR antibodies. When present in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism, AAbeta1AR and AAM2R facilitate development of AF.

  1. Activating autoantibodies to the beta1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors facilitate atrial fibrillation in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakis, Stavros; Yu, Xichun; Patterson, Eugene; Huang, Shijun; Hamlett, Sean R.; Chalmers, Laura; Pappy, Reji; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Morshed, Syed A.; Davies, Terry F.; Lazzara, Ralph; Kem, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We studied activating autoantibodies to β1-adrenergic (AAβ1AR) and M2 muscarinic receptors (AAM2R) in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Background AF frequently complicates hyperthyroidism. AAβ1AR and AAM2R have been described in some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and AF. We hypothesized their co-presence would facilitate AF in autoimmune Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Methods IgG purified from 38 patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism with AF (n=17) or sinus rhythm (n=21) and 10 healthy controls was tested for its effects on isolated canine Purkinje fiber contractility with and without atropine and nadolol. IgG electrophysiologic effects were studied using intracellular recordings from isolated canine pulmonary veins. Potential cross-reactivity of AAβ1AR and AAM2R with stimulating thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies was evaluated before and after adsorption to CHO cells expressing human TSHRs using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results The frequency of AAβ1AR and/or AAM2R differed significantly between patients with AF and sinus rhythm (AAβ1AR = 94% vs. 38%, p<0.001; AAM2R = 88% vs. 19%, p<0.001; and AAβ1AR+AAM2R = 82% vs. 10%, p<0.001). The co-presence of AAβ1AR and AAM2R was the strongest predictor of AF (odds ratio 33.61, 95% CI 1.17 - 964.11, p=0.04). IgG from autoantibody-positive patients induced hyperpolarization, decreased action potential duration, enhanced early afterdepolarization formation and facilitated triggered firing in pulmonary veins by local autonomic nerve stimulation. Imunoadsorption studies demonstrated that AAβ1AR and AAM2R were immunologically distinct from TSHR antibodies. Conclusions AAβ1AR and AAM2R when present in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism facilitate development of AF. PMID:19778674

  2. Phosphoinositide metabolism and adrenergic receptors in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; de Vellis, J.

    1986-03-01

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide (PI) breakdown functions as a signal generating system. Diacylglycerol, one breakdown product of phosphotidylinositol-4,5-diphosphate hydrolysis, can stimulate protein kinase C, whereas inositol triphosphate, the other product, has been proposed to be a second messenger for Ca/sup + +/ mobilization. Using purified astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brain, the effects of adrenergic agonists and antagonists at 10/sup -5/ M were measured on PI breakdown. Astrocytes grown in culture were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, and basal (/sup 3/H) inositol phosphate (IP/sub 1/) accumulation was measured in the presence of Li/sup +/. Epinephrine > norepinephrine (NE) were the most active stimulants of IP/sub 1/ production. The ..cap alpha../sub 1/ adrenoreceptor blockers, phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine, added alone had no effect on IP/sub 1/ production was reduced below basal levels. Propranolol partially blocked the effects of NE. Clonidine and isoproterenol, separately added, reduced IP/sub 1/ below basal levels and when added together diminished IP/sub 1/ accumulation even further. The role of adrenergic stimulation in the production of c-AMP.

  3. Assaying inositol and phosphoinositide phosphatase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Janet L; Ercetin, Mustafa; Gillaspy, Glenda E

    2013-01-01

    One critical aspect of phosphoinositide signaling is the turnover of signaling molecules in the pathway. These signaling molecules include the phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PtdInsPs) and inositol phosphates (InsPs). The enzymes that catalyze the breakdown of these molecules are thus important potential regulators of signaling, and in many cases the activity of such enzymes needs to be measured and compared to other enzymes. PtdInsPs and InsPs are broken down by sequential dephosphorylation reactions which are catalyzed by a set of specific phosphatases. Many of the phosphatases can act on both PtdInsP and InsP substrates. The protocols described in this chapter detail activity assays that allow for the measurement of PtdInsP and InsP phosphatase activities in vitro starting with native or recombinant enzymes. Three different assays are described that have different equipment requirements and allow one to test a range of PtdInsP and InsP phosphatases that act on different substrates.

  4. Molecular mimicry between the immunodominant ribosomal protein P0 of Trypanosoma cruzi and a functional epitope on the human beta 1- adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Sera from chagasic patients possess antibodies recognizing the carboxy- terminal part of the ribosomal P0 protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor. Comparison of both peptides showed that they contain a pentapeptide with very high homology (AESEE in P0 and AESDE in the human beta 1- adrenergic receptor). Using a competitive immunoenzyme assay, recognition of the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop (H26R) was inhibited by both P0-14i (AAAESEEEDDDDDF) and P0-beta (AESEE). Concomitantly, recognition of P0-beta was inhibited with the H26R peptide. Recognition of P0 in Western blots was inhibited by P0- 14i, P0-beta, and H26R, but not by a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor or by an unrelated peptide. Autoantibodies affinity purified with the immobilized H26R peptide were shown to exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats. This effect was blocked by both the specific beta 1 blocker bisoprolol and the peptide P0-beta. These results unambiguously prove that T. cruzi is able to induce a functional autoimmune response against the cardiovascular human beta 1-adrenergic receptor through a molecular mimicry mechanism. PMID:7790824

  5. Molecular mimicry between the immunodominant ribosomal protein P0 of Trypanosoma cruzi and a functional epitope on the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, I; Levin, M J; Wallukat, G; Elies, R; Lebesgue, D; Chiale, P; Elizari, M; Rosenbaum, M; Hoebeke, J

    1995-07-01

    Sera from chagasic patients possess antibodies recognizing the carboxy-terminal part of the ribosomal P0 protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor. Comparison of both peptides showed that they contain a pentapeptide with very high homology (AESEE in P0 and AESDE in the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor). Using a competitive immunoenzyme assay, recognition of the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop (H26R) was inhibited by both P0-14i (AAAESEEEDDDDDF) and P0-beta (AESEE). Concomitantly, recognition of P0-beta was inhibited with the H26R peptide. Recognition of P0 in Western blots was inhibited by P0-14i, P0-beta, and H26R, but not by a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor or by an unrelated peptide. Autoantibodies affinity purified with the immobilized H26R peptide were shown to exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats. This effect was blocked by both the specific beta 1 blocker bisoprolol and the peptide P0-beta. These results unambiguously prove that T. cruzi is able to induce a functional autoimmune response against the cardiovascular human beta 1-adrenergic receptor through a molecular mimicry mechanism.

  6. Interaction between phosphoinositide turnover system and cyclic AMP pathway for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1992-06-30

    It is found that secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells is regulated through muscarinic receptor-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositide hydrolysis system. In this report, whether the cAMP pathway interacts with the phosphoinositide turnover system for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptors was studied. Stimulation of QGP-1N cells with carbachol increased intracellular cAMP levels. The carbachol-induced increase in cAMP levels was inhibited by atropine. Calcium ionophore (A23187) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased cAMP synthesis. Dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin and theophylline stimulated secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin. When either dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin or theophylline was added in culture medium with A23187, phorbol ester or carbachol, a synergistic effect was found on pancreastatin and somatostatin secretion. These results suggest that interaction between the phosphoinositide turnover system and the cAMP pathway occurs in QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptor stimulation for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin.

  7. Betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Rudoy, C A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2007-06-30

    Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on beta-adrenergic receptor (beta(1) and beta(2)) expression in the amygdala. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, but not beta(2)-adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 h following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 h following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on beta(1)-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline. Furthermore

  8. Phosphoinositide and Inositol Phosphate Analysis in Lymphocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Karsten; Huang, Yina Hsing; Lin, Hongying; Sandberg, Mark; Mayr, Georg W.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocyte antigen receptor engagement profoundly changes the cellular content of phosphoinositide lipids and soluble inositol phosphates. Among these, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) play key signaling roles by acting as pleckstrin homology (PH) domain ligands that recruit signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. Moreover, PIP2 acts as a precursor for the second messenger molecules diacylglycerol and soluble inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), essential mediators of PKC, Ras/Erk, and Ca2+ signaling in lymphocytes. IP3 phosphorylation by IP3 3-kinases generates inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (IP4), an essential soluble regulator of PH domain binding to PIP3 in developing T cells. Besides PIP2, PIP3, IP3, and IP4, lymphocytes produce multiple other phosphoinositides and soluble inositol phosphates that could have important physiological functions. To aid their analysis, detailed protocols that allow one to simultaneously measure the levels of multiple different phosphoinositide or inositol phosphate isomers in lymphocytes are provided here. They are based on thin layer, conventional and high-performance liquid chromatographic separation methods followed by radiolabeling or non-radioactive metal-dye detection. Finally, less broadly applicable nonchromatographic methods for detection of specific phosphoinositide or inositol phosphate isomers are discussed. Support protocols describe how to obtain pure unstimulated CD4+CD8+ thymocyte populations for analyses of inositol phosphate turnover during positive and negative selection, key steps in T cell development. PMID:19918943

  9. Role of calcium in regulation of phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Patel, J; Keith, R A; Salama, A I; Moore, W C

    1991-01-01

    Using primary neuronal cultures we have examined the role of extracellular Ca2+ in a receptor-regulated phosphoinositide turnover. We report that receptor (glutamic acid and acetylcholine)-activated phosphoinositide turnover requires the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (EC50 = 21.1 microM). The requirement for Ca2+ appears to be at an intracellular level and is highly selective for Ca2+. We also found that several inorganic and organic Ca2+ channel blockers, including La3+ and verapamil, inhibit phosphoinositide turnover. However, the pharmacological profile of these agents in this regard was distinct from their actions at the voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. To explain the above requirement for extracellular Ca2+ in agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover and its sensitivity to Ca(2+)-channel blockers, we propose a hypothetical model suggesting that Ca2+, following IP-3-mediated mobilization, exerts a facilitatory action on the activity of receptor-phospholipase C complex. We further propose that in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or in the presence of certain Ca(2+)-channel blockers, refilling of calciosomes is ineffectual or inhibited, causing its depletion and subsequent inactivation of agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover.

  10. Expression of α(1)-adrenergic receptors in rat prefrontal cortex: cellular co-localization with 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Santana, Noemí; Mengod, Guadalupe; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in behavioural control and cognitive processes that are altered in schizophrenia. The brainstem monoaminergic systems control PFC function, yet the cells/networks involved are not fully known. Serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) increase PFC neuronal activity through the activation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (α(1)ARs) and 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT(2A)Rs), respectively. Neurochemical and behavioural interactions between these receptors have been reported. Further, classical and atypical antipsychotic drugs share nm in vitro affinity for α(1)ARs while having preferential affinity for D(2) and 5-HT(2A)Rs, respectively. Using double in situ hybridization we examined the cellular expression of α(1)ARs in pyramidal (vGluT1-positive) and GABAergic (GAD(65/67)-positive) neurons in rat PFC and their co-localization with 5-HT(2A)Rs. α(1)ARs are expressed by a high proportion of pyramidal (59-85%) and GABAergic (52-79%) neurons. The expression in pyramidal neurons exhibited a dorsoventral gradient, with a lower percentage of α(1)AR-positive neurons in infralimbic cortex compared to anterior cingulate and prelimbic cortex. The expression of α(1A), α(1B) and α(1D) adrenergic receptors was segregated in different layers and subdivisions. In all them there is a high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs (∼80%). These observations indicate that NE controls the activity of most PFC pyramidal neurons via α(1)ARs, either directly or indirectly, via GABAergic interneurons. Antipsychotic drugs can thus modulate the activity of PFC via α(1)AR blockade. The high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs indicates a convergence of excitatory serotonergic and noradrenergic inputs onto the same neuronal populations. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics may exert a more powerful control of PFC function through the simultaneous blockade of α(1)ARs and 5-HT(2A)Rs.

  11. DNA immunizations with M2 muscarinic and beta1 adrenergic receptor coding plasmids impair cardiac function in mice.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Luis E D; Hernández, Ciria C Q; Mattos, Elisabete C; Brandão, Izaira Tincani; Olivieri, Bianca; Campelo, Roberto P; Araújo-Jorge, Tânia; Silva, Célio Lopes; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2005-05-01

    Autoimmune mediated myocardial damage is likely to be a pathogenic mechanism for acquired dilated cardiomyopathies. Evidence confirms that autoantibodies that bind to M(2) muscarinic (M(2)AChR) and beta(1) adrenergic receptors (beta(1)AR) are present in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagasic patients' sera. To elucidate the role of these antibodies in cardiac functional impairment, we used a murine model immunized with plasmids encoding the M(2)AChR or beta(1)AR via gene-gun bombardment. Anti-M(2)AChR and beta(1)AR antibodies were detected over the course of 37 weeks. These antibodies were directed to the second extracellular loop (el2) of both receptors and the third intracellular loop (il3) of the M(2)AChR. Peak antibody titers from weeks 2 to 5 against M(2)AChR-el2 and beta(1)AR-el2 as well as elevated titers against M(2)AChR-il3 were detected. Anti-M(2)AChR-il3 and anti-beta(1)AR-el2 antibodies were predominant in IgG1 subclass immunoglobulins, suggesting a T-helper-2 biased lymphocyte response. Heart morphology and function was assessed by echocardiography over the course of 42 weeks. Data showed progressive decrease in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and LV mass that was mostly evident for beta(1)AR-immunized mice albeit a small change in LV dimensions. Fractional shortening was altered and values of 41%, 37% and 48% were observed at week 42 for the M(2)AChR, beta(1)AR and control groups respectively. In support of autonomic deregulation, a twofold increase in M(2)AChR and a similar decrease in beta(1)AR density were observed in radioligand saturation assays for both experimental groups. Histological analysis revealed myofibril disarray and fibrosis, pointing towards remodeling as a consequence of the long-term presence of anti-receptor antibodies.

  12. Ser49Gly of beta1-adrenergic receptor is associated with effective beta-blocker dose in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Yvonne; Levin, Malin C; Eggertsen, Robert; Nyström, Ernst; Mobini, Reza; Schaufelberger, Maria; Andersson, Bert

    2005-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms at codons 49 and 389 of the beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) on the response to beta-blockers and outcome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We genotyped both codons of the beta1-AR in 375 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and 492 control subjects. Neither of the polymorphisms was associated with susceptibility for dilated cardiomyopathy. In a retrospective analysis of patients receiving beta-blockers, there was a significant association between long-term survival rate and codon 49 (P = .014) but not codon 389 (P = .08). Despite a similar mean heart rate (69 beats/min), patients with the Ser49 genotype tended to have higher doses of beta-blockade compared with Gly49 carriers (P = .065). In patients receiving a low dose of beta-blockade (< or = 50% of targeted full dose), the 5-year mortality rate was lower among Gly49 carriers than Ser49 patients (risk ratio [RR], 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.80; P = .020). In patients receiving high doses of beta-blockers, there was no significant difference in outcome between genotypes (P = .20), which was attributable to a better outcome for Ser49 patients treated with a high dose of beta-blockade as compared with a low dose. Gly49 carriers had a similar survival rate with different doses of beta-blockers. With low-dose beta-blockers, both codon 49 (RR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.89; P = .029) and codon 389 (RR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.04-5.63, P = .039) were related to 5-year mortality rate. In patients with heart failure, the influence of codon 49 on the outcome and effect of beta-blockers appeared to be more pronounced than that of codon 389. The more common Ser49Ser genotype responded less beneficially to beta-blockade and would motivate genotyping to promote higher doses for the best outcome effect.

  13. Women at altitude: short-term exposure to hypoxia and/or alpha(1)-adrenergic blockade reduces insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Braun, B; Rock, P B; Zamudio, S; Wolfel, G E; Mazzeo, R S; Muza, S R; Fulco, C S; Moore, L G; Butterfield, G E

    2001-08-01

    After short-term exposure to high altitude (HA), men appear to be less sensitive to insulin than at sea level (SL). We hypothesized that the same would be true in women, that reduced insulin sensitivity would be directly related to the rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations at altitude, and that the addition of alpha-adrenergic blockade would potentiate the reduction. To test the hypotheses, 12 women consumed a high-carbohydrate meal at SL and after 16 h at simulated 4,300-m elevation (HA). Subjects were studied twice at each elevation: once with prazosin (Prz), an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist, and once with placebo (Pla). Mathematical models were used to assess insulin resistance based on fasting [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] and postprandial [composite model insulin sensitivity index (C-ISI)] glucose and insulin concentrations. Relative to SL-Pla (HOMA-IR: 1.86 +/- 0.35), insulin resistance was greater in HA-Pla (3.00 +/- 0.45; P < 0.05), SL-Prz (3.46 +/- 0.51; P < 0.01), and HA-Prz (2.82 +/- 0.43; P < 0.05). Insulin sensitivity was reduced in HA-Pla (C-ISI: 4.41 +/- 1.03; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (5.73 +/- 1.01; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (4.18 +/- 0.99; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (8.02 +/- 0.92). Plasma epinephrine was significantly elevated in HA-Pla (0.57 +/- 0.08 ng/ml; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (0.42 +/- 0.07; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (0.82 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (0.28 +/- 0.04), but correlations with HOMA-IR, HOMA-beta-cell function, and C-ISI were weak. In women, short-term exposure to simulated HA reduced insulin sensitivity compared with SL. The change does not appear to be directly mediated by a concurrent rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations.

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in the vertebrate retina

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Raju V. S.

    2010-01-01

    The phosphoinositide (PI) cycle, discovered over 50 years ago by Mabel and Lowell Hokin, describes a series of biochemical reactions that occur on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane of cells in response to receptor activation by extracellular stimuli. Studies from our laboratory have shown that the retina and rod outer segments (ROSs) have active PI metabolism. Biochemical studies revealed that the ROSs contain the enzymes necessary for phosphorylation of phosphoinositides. We showed that light stimulates various components of the PI cycle in the vertebrate ROS, including diacylglycerol kinase, PI synthetase, phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). This article describes recent studies on the PI3K-generated PI lipid second messengers in the control and regulation of PI-binding proteins in the vertebrate retina. PMID:19638643

  15. Ethanol inhibits epileptiform activity and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in rat amygdaloid slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gean, P.W. )

    1992-02-26

    The effect of ethanol on the epileptiform activity induced by Mg{sup ++}-free solution was studied in rat amygdalar slices using intracellular recording techniques. The spontaneous and evoked epileptiform discharges consisting of an initial burst followed by afterdischarges were observed 20-30 min after switching to Mg{sup ++}-free medium. Superfusion with ethanol reversibly reduced the duration of spontaneous and evoked bursting discharges in a concentration-dependent manner. Synaptic response mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation was isolated by application of a solution containing the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and either in Mg{sup ++}-free solution or in the presence of 50 {mu}M bicuculline. Application of ethanol reversibly suppressed the duration of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic response. These results suggest that intoxicating concentrations of ethanol possess anticonvulsant activity through blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic excitation.

  16. Menthol enhances phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in midbrain periaqueductal grey neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Benjamin K; Karim, Shafinaz; Goodchild, Ann K; Vaughan, Christopher W; Drew, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Menthol, a naturally occurring compound in the essential oil of mint leaves, is used for its medicinal, sensory and fragrant properties. Menthol acts via transient receptor potential (TRPM8 and TRPA1) channels and as a positive allosteric modulator of recombinant GABAA receptors. Here, we examined the actions of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated currents in intact midbrain slices. Experimental Approach Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons in midbrain slices from rats to determine the effects of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated phasic IPSCs and tonic currents. Key Results Menthol (150–750 μM) produced a concentration-dependent prolongation of spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, but not non-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs throughout the PAG. Menthol actions were unaffected by TRPM8 and TRPA1 antagonists, tetrodotoxin and the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil. Menthol also enhanced a tonic current, which was sensitive to the GABAA receptor antagonists, picrotoxin (100 μM), bicuculline (30 μM) and Zn2+ (100 μM), but unaffected by gabazine (10 μM) and a GABAC receptor antagonist, 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid hydrate (TPMPA; 50 μM). In addition, menthol potentiated currents induced by the extrasynaptic GABAA receptor agonist THIP/gaboxadol (10 μM). Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that menthol positively modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic populations of GABAA receptors in native PAG neurons. The development of agents that potentiate GABAA-mediated tonic currents and phasic IPSCs in a manner similar to menthol could provide a basis for novel GABAA-related pharmacotherapies. PMID:24460753

  17. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists modulate ductal secretion of BDL rats via Ca(2+)- and PKC-dependent stimulation of cAMP.

    PubMed

    LeSage, Gene D; Alvaro, Domenico; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Marucci, Luca; Roskams, Tania; Phinizy, Jo Lynne; Marzioni, Marco; Benedetti, Antonio; Taffetani, Silvia; Barbaro, Barbara; Fava, Giammarco; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2004-11-01

    Acetylcholine potentiates secretin-stimulated ductal secretion by Ca(2+)-calcineurin-mediated modulation of adenylyl cyclase. D2 dopaminergic receptor agonists inhibit secretin-stimulated ductal secretion via activation of protein kinase C (PKC)-gamma. No information exists regarding the effect of adrenergic receptor agonists on ductal secretion in a model of cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). We evaluated the expression of alpha-1A/1C, -1beta and beta-1 adrenergic receptors in liver sections and cholangiocytes from normal and BDL rats. We evaluated the effects of the alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptor agonists (phenylephrine and dobutamine, respectively) on bile and bicarbonate secretion and cholangiocyte IP(3) and Ca(2+) levels in normal and BDL rats. We measured the effect of phenylephrine on lumen expansion in intrahepatic bile duct units (IBDUs) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in cholangiocytes from BDL rats in the absence or presence of BAPTA/AM and Gö6976 (a PKC-alpha inhibitor). We evaluated if the effects of phenylephrine on ductal secretion were associated with translocation of PKC isoforms leading to increased protein kinase A activity. Alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptors were present mostly in the basolateral domain of cholangiocytes and, following BDL, their expression increased. Phenylephrine, but not dobutamine, increased secretin-stimulated choleresis in BDL rats. Phenylephrine did not alter basal but increased secretin-stimulated IBDU lumen expansion and cAMP levels, which were blocked by BAPTA/AM and Go6976. Phenylephrine increased IP(3) and Ca(2+) levels and activated PKC-alpha and PKC-beta-II. In conclusion, coordinated regulation of ductal secretion by secretin (through cAMP) and adrenergic receptor agonist activation (through Ca(2+)/PKC) induces maximal ductal bicarbonate secretion in liver diseases. (Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http

  18. The Golgi apparatus is a functionally distinct Ca2+ store regulated by PKA and Epac branches of the β1-adrenergic signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaokang.; Kirton, Hannah M.; MacDougall, David A.; Boyle, John P.; Deuchars, James; Frater, Brenda; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Hardy, Matthew E.; White, Edward; Calaghan, Sarah C.; Peers, Chris; Steele, Derek S.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ release from the Golgi apparatus regulates key functions of the organelle, including vesicle trafficking. However, the signaling pathways that control this form of Ca2+ release are poorly understood and evidence of discrete Golgi Ca2+ release events is lacking. Here, we identified the Golgi apparatus as the source of prolonged Ca2+ release events that originate from the nuclear ‘poles’ of primary cardiac cells. Once initiated, Golgi Ca2+ release was unaffected by global depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+, and disruption of the Golgi apparatus abolished Golgi Ca2+ release without affecting sarcoplasmic reticulum function, suggesting functional and anatomical independence of Golgi and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. Maximal activation of β1-adrenoceptors had only a small stimulating effect on Golgi Ca2+ release. However, inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 or 4, or downregulation of PDE 3 and 4 in heart failure markedly potentiated β1-adrenergic stimulation of Golgi Ca2+ release, consistent with compartmentalization of cAMP signaling within the Golgi apparatus microenvironment. β1-adrenergic stimulation of Golgi Ca2+ release involved activation of both Epac and PKA signaling pathways and CaMKII. Interventions that stimulated Golgi Ca2+ release induced trafficking of vascular growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) from the Golgi apparatus to the surface membrane. These data establish the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear focal point for Ca2+ and β1-adrenergic signaling, which functions independently from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the global Ca2+ transients that underlie the primary contractile function of the cell. PMID:26462734

  19. Postsynaptic α1-Adrenergic Vasoconstriction Is Impaired in Young Patients With Vasovagal Syncope and Is Corrected by Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Suggs, Melissa; Merchant, Sana; Sutton, Richard; Terilli, Courtney; Visintainer, Paul; Medow, Marvin S

    2016-08-01

    Syncope is a sudden transient loss of consciousness and postural tone with spontaneous recovery; the most common form is vasovagal syncope (VVS). During VVS, gravitational pooling excessively reduces central blood volume and cardiac output. In VVS, as in hemorrhage, impaired adrenergic vasoconstriction and venoconstriction result in hypotension. We hypothesized that impaired adrenergic responsiveness because of excess nitric oxide can be reversed by reducing nitric oxide. We recorded cardiopulmonary dynamics in supine syncope patients and healthy volunteers (aged 15-27 years) challenged with a dose-response using the α1-agonist phenylephrine (PE), with and without the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, monoacetate salt (L-NMMA). Systolic and diastolic pressures among control and VVS were the same, although they increased after L-NMMA and saline+PE (volume and pressor control for L-NMMA). Heart rate was significantly reduced by L-NMMA (P<0.05) for control and VVS compared with baseline, but there was no significant difference in heart rate between L-NMMA and saline+PE. Cardiac output and splanchnic blood flow were reduced by L-NMMA for control and VVS (P<0.05) compared with baseline, while total peripheral resistance increased (P<0.05). PE dose-response for splanchnic flow and resistance were blunted for VVS compared with control after saline+PE, but enhanced after L-NMMA (P<0.001). Postsynaptic α1-adrenergic vasoconstrictive impairment was greatest in the splanchnic vasculature, and splanchnic blood flow was unaffected by PE. Forearm and calf α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction were unimpaired in VVS and unaffected by L-NMMA. Impaired postsynaptic α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in young adults with VVS can be corrected by nitric oxide synthase inhibition, demonstrated with our use of L-NMMA. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Sandra S; Plank, Christian; Cotten, Matt; Wagner, Ernst; Zenke, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells and are unique in their ability to prime naïve T cells. Gene modification of dendritic cells is of particular interest for immunotherapy of diseases where the immune system has failed or is aberrantly regulated, such as in cancer or autoimmune disease, respectively. Dendritic cells abundantly express mannose receptor and mannose receptor-related receptors, and receptor-mediated gene transfer via mannose receptor offers a versatile tool for targeted gene delivery into these cells. Accordingly, mannose polyethylenimine DNA transfer complexes were generated and used for gene delivery into dendritic cells. Mannose receptor belongs to the group of scavenger receptors that allow dendritic cells to take up pathogenic material, which is directed for degradation and MHC class II presentation. Therefore, a limiting step of transgene expression by mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery is endosomal degradation of DNA. Several strategies have been explored to overcome this limitation including the addition of endosomolytic components to DNA transfer complexes like adenovirus particles and influenza peptides. Here, we review the current understanding of mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into dendritic cells and discuss strategies to identify appropriate endosomolytic agents to improve DNA transfer efficacy.

  1. Size of single-wall carbon nanotube affects the folate receptor-mediated cancer cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Charbgoo, Fahimeh; Nikkhah, Maryam; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2017-08-30

    Advances in nanobiotechnology and targeting strategy could improve the delivery of therapeutic molecules into cancer cells, leading to improved treatment efficiency with minimal side effects on normal cells. To design an efficient nanocarrier, consideration of parameters that facilitate direct drug delivery into the target cells is important. We studied the effect of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) size on their cell internalization level via the folate receptor-mediated pathway through folic acid targeting. Folate-SWNTs were covalently synthesized and characterized. Folate-SWNTs ≤ 450 nm had lower cell internalization level than folate-SWNTs >450 nm with a P value of ≤0.01. This indicated that using folate-SWNT with an average length of ≤450 nm was not suitable for receptor-mediated cancer cell targeting. Receptor-mediated uptake of folate-SWNTs is dependent on the nanoparticle length. However, sub-450 nm SWNTs could serve as a vehicle to transfer nucleic acids into the cells due to direct cell penetrance based on their needle-like structure. We find that SWNTs larger than 450 nm were suitable to target the cells through receptors. These results might provide a promising approach for designing more effective targeted delivery systems based on SWNTs. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  3. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  4. Phosphoinositide lipid second messengers: new paradigms for transepithelial signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Blazer-Yost, Bonnie L; Nofziger, Charity

    2005-05-01

    Multiple forms of phosphatidylinositol are generated by differential phosphorylation of the inositol headgroup. These phosphoinositides, specifically PI(4,5)P2, have been implicated as modulators in a variety of transport processes. The data indicate that phosphoinositides can modulate transporters directly or via the activation of down-stream signaling components. The phosphoinositide pathway has been linked to changes in transporter kinetics, intracellular signaling, membrane targeting and membrane stability. Recent results obtained for several of the well-characterized transport systems suggest the need to reassess the role of PI(4,5)P2 and question whether lower abundance forms of the phosphoinositides, notably PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) and PI(3,4)P2, are the pertinent transport regulators. In contrast to PI(4,5)P2, these latter forms represent a dynamic, regulated pool, the characteristics of which are more compatible with the nature of signaling intermediates. A recently described, novel transepithelial signaling pathway has been demonstrated for PIP3 in which a signal initiated on the basolateral membrane is transduced to the apical membrane entirely within the planar face of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The new paradigms emerging from recent studies may be widely applicable to transporter regulation in other cell types and are particularly relevant for signaling in polarized cells.

  5. Phosphoinositide turnover in Toll-like receptor signaling and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tu Le, Oanh Thi; Ngoc Nguyen, Tu Thi; Lee, Sang Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Lipid components in biological membranes are essential for maintaining cellular function. Phosphoinositides, the phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PI), regulate many critical cell processes involving membrane signaling, trafficking, and reorganization. Multiple metabolic pathways including phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases and phospholipases tightly control spatio-temporal concentration of membrane phosphoinositides. Metabolizing enzymes responsible for PI 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) production or degradation play a regulatory role in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and trafficking. These enzymes include PI 4-phosphate 5-kinase, phosphatase and tensin homolog, PI 3-kinase, and phospholipase C. PI(4,5)P2 mediates the interaction with target cytosolic proteins to induce their membrane translocation, regulate vesicular trafficking, and serve as a precursor for other signaling lipids. TLR activation is important for the innate immune response and is implicated in diverse pathophysiological disorders. TLR signaling is controlled by specific interactions with distinct signaling and sorting adaptors. Importantly, TLR signaling machinery is differentially formed depending on a specific membrane compartment during signaling cascades. Although detailed mechanisms remain to be fully clarified, phosphoinositide metabolism is promising for a better understanding of such spatio-temporal regulation of TLR signaling and trafficking. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(7): 361-368] PMID:24856829

  6. Slowly developing depression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated responses in young rat hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail; Li, Rui; Xu, Hui-Ping; Jilderos, Barbro; Wigström, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Background Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type glutamate receptors is essential in triggering various forms of synaptic plasticity. A critical issue is to what extent such plasticity involves persistent changes of glutamate receptor subtypes and many prior studies have suggested a main role for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in mediating the effect. Our previous work in hippocampal slices revealed that, under pharmacological unblocking of NMDA receptors, both AMPA and NMDA receptor mediated responses undergo a slowly developing depression. In the present study we have further adressed this phenomenon, focusing on the contribution via NMDA receptors. Pharmacologically isolated NMDA receptor mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded for two independent synaptic pathways in CA1 area using perfusion with low Mg2+ (0.1 mM) to unblock NMDA receptors. Results Following unblocking of NMDA receptors, there was a gradual decline of NMDA receptor mediated EPSPs for 2–3 hours towards a stable level of ca. 60–70 % of the maximal size. If such an experimental session was repeated twice in the same pathway with a period of NMDA receptor blockade in between, the depression attained in the first session was still evident in the second one and no further decay occurred. The persistency of the depression was also validated by comparison between pathways. It was found that the responses of a control pathway, unstimulated in the first session of receptor unblocking, behaved as novel responses when tested in association with the depressed pathway under the second session. In similar experiments, but with AP5 present during the first session, there was no subsequent difference between NMDA EPSPs. Conclusions Our findings show that merely evoking NMDA receptor mediated responses results in a depression which is input specific, induced via NMDA receptor activation, and is maintained for several hours through

  7. Synthesis and function of membrane phosphoinositides in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Strahl, Thomas; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-03-01

    It is now well appreciated that derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) are key regulators of many cellular processes in eukaryotes. Of particular interest are phosphoinositides (mono- and polyphosphorylated adducts to the inositol ring in PtdIns), which are located at the cytoplasmic face of cellular membranes. Phosphoinositides serve both a structural and a signaling role via their recruitment of proteins that contain phosphoinositide-binding domains. Phosphoinositides also have a role as precursors of several types of second messengers for certain intracellular signaling pathways. Realization of the importance of phosphoinositides has brought increased attention to characterization of the enzymes that regulate their synthesis, interconversion, and turnover. Here we review the current state of our knowledge about the properties and regulation of the ATP-dependent lipid kinases responsible for synthesis of phosphoinositides and also the additional temporal and spatial controls exerted by the phosphatases and a phospholipase that act on phosphoinositides in yeast.

  8. Synthesis and Function of Membrane Phosphoinositides in Budding Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Strahl, Thomas; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    It is now well appreciated that derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) are key regulators of many cellular processes in eukaryotes. Of particular interest are phosphoinositides (mono- and polyphosphorylated adducts to the inositol ring in PtdIns), which are located at the cytoplasmic face of cellular membranes. Phosphoinositides serve both a structural and a signaling role via their recruitment of proteins that contain phosphoinositide-binding domains. Phosphoinositides also have a role as precursors of several types of second messengers for certain intracellular signaling pathways. Realization of the importance of phosphoinositides has brought increased attention to characterization of the enzymes that regulate their synthesis, interconversion, and turnover. Here we review the current state of our knowledge about the properties and regulation of the ATP-dependent lipid kinases responsible for synthesis of phosphoinositides and also the additional temporal and spatial controls exerted by the phosphatases and a phospholipase that act on phosphoinositides in yeast. PMID:17382260

  9. Site of action of the general anesthetic propofol in muscarinic M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Murasaki, Osamu; Kaibara, Muneshige; Nagase, Yoshihisa; Mitarai, Sayaka; Doi, Yoshiyuki; Sumikawa, Koji; Taniyama, Kohtaro

    2003-12-01

    Although a potential target site of general anesthetics is primarily the GABA A receptor, a chloride ion channel, a previous study suggested that the intravenous general anesthetic propofol attenuates the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 receptor)-mediated signal transduction. In the present study, we examined the target site of propofol in M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction. Two-electrode voltage-clamp method was used in Xenopus oocytes expressing both M1 receptors and associated G protein alpha subunits (Gqalpha). Propofol inhibited M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 50 nM). Injection of guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS) into oocytes overexpressing Gqalpha was used to investigate direct effects of propofol on G protein coupled with the M1 receptor. Propofol did not affect activation of Gqalpha-mediated signal transduction with the intracellular injection of GTPgammaS. We also studied effects of propofol on l-[N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS) binding and M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction in mammalian cells expressing M1 receptor. Propofol inhibited the M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction but did not inhibit binding of [3H]NMS. Effects of propofol on Gs- and Gi/o-coupled signal transduction were investigated, using oocytes expressing the beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2 receptor)/cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or oocytes expressing the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor)/Kir3.1 (a member of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels). Neither beta2 receptor-mediated nor M2 receptor-mediated signal transduction was inhibited by a relatively high concentration of propofol (50 microM). These results indicate that propofol inhibits M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction by selectively disrupting interaction between the receptor and associated G protein.

  10. Muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic mechanisms contribute to the spinal mediation of stimulation-induced antinociception from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dias, Quintino M; Crespilho, Simone F; Silveira, João Walter S; Prado, Wiliam A

    2009-05-01

    The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) injection of antagonists of acetylcholine, noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, opioids and GABA on stimulation-produced antinociception (SPA) from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) of rats were studied using the tail-flick test. The electrical stimulation of the PPTg produced a strong and long-lasting increase in tail-flick latency. The intensity and duration of the effect were significantly reduced in rats pretreated with i.p. or i.t. atropine (a non-selective muscarinic cholinergic antagonist), or i.t. phenoxybenzamine or WB 4101 (non-selective and selective alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonists, respectively). Intraperitoneal phenoxybenzamine, i.p. or i.t. methysergide or naloxone (non-selective serotonin and opioid antagonists, respectively), or i.t. idazoxan (a selective alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist) only reduced the duration of the effect. The duration of SPA from the PPTg was increased by i.t. phaclofen (a GABA(B) antagonist). The effect from the nucleus was not altered following i.t. bicuculline (a GABA(A) antagonist), or i.p. or i.t. mecamylamine, propranolol or haloperidol (non-selective nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists, respectively). Thus, SPA from the PPTg involves the spinal activation of muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic but not nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic mechanisms. Serotonergic, endogenous opioid and alpha(2)-adrenergic mechanisms are involved in the duration but not in the intensity of the effect.

  11. Iron-56 irradiation diminishes muscarinic but not {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Joseph, J.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Dalton, T.K.; Roth, G.S.

    1994-12-01

    Initial findings from our laboratory have indicated that muscarinic enhancement of K{sup +}-evoked release of dopamine from perifused striatal slices is reduced after exposure to {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. This finding suggested that there is a radiation-induced deficit in muscarinic receptor sensitivity. Subsequent findings have indicated that at least part of the loss in sensitivity may occur as a result of alterations in the initial steps of the signal transduction process and involve muscarinic receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling. The present study was carried out to localize this deficit further by determining carbachol-stimulated low-K{sub m} guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity in striatal and hippocampal tissue obtained from rats exposed to 0, 0.1 or 1.0 Gy of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. In addition, to examine the specificity of the effect of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation, {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase activity was also examined in these tissues. The results showed that there was a high degree of specificity in the effects of {sup 56}Fe particles. Decrements were observed in muscarinic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in striatum but not in hippocampus, and {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation did not affect {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic low-K{sub m} GTPase activity in either brain tissue. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Chloride transporters and receptor-mediated endocytosis in the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Devuyst, Olivier; Luciani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The epithelial cells lining the proximal tubules of the kidney reabsorb a large amount of filtered ions and solutes owing to receptor-mediated endocytosis and polarized transport systems that reflect final cell differentiation. Dedifferentiation of proximal tubule cells and dysfunction of receptor-mediated endocytosis characterize Dent’s disease, a rare disorder caused by inactivating mutations in the CLCN5 gene that encodes the endosomal chloride–proton exchanger, ClC-5. The disease is characterized by a massive urinary loss of solutes (renal Fanconi syndrome), with severe metabolic complications and progressive renal failure. Investigations of mutations affecting the gating of ClC-5 revealed that the proximal tubule dysfunction may occur despite normal endosomal acidification. In addition to defective endocytosis, proximal tubule cells lacking ClC-5 show a trafficking defect in apical receptors and transporters, as well as lysosomal dysfunction and typical features of dedifferentiation, proliferation and oxidative stress. A similar but milder defect is observed in mouse models with defective CFTR, a chloride channel that is also expressed in the endosomes of proximal tubule cells. These data suggest a major role for endosomal chloride transport in the maintenance of epithelial differentiation and reabsorption capacity of the renal proximal tubule. Key points The reabsorptive activity of renal proximal tubule cells is mediated by receptor-mediated endocytosis and polarized transport systems that reflect final cell differentiation. Loss-of-function mutations of the endosomal chloride–proton exchanger ClC-5 (Dent’s disease) cause a major trafficking defect in proximal tubule cells, associated with lysosomal dysfunction, oxidative stress and dedifferentiation/proliferation. A similar but milder defect is associated with mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). Vesicular chloride transport appears to be important for

  13. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery to Macrophages in Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Arora, Sunil K.; Sehgal, Shobha; Basu, Sandip K.

    1989-05-01

    Methotrexate coupled to maleylated bovine serum albumin was taken up efficiently through the ``scavenger'' receptors present on macrophages and led to selective killing of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amazonensis amastigotes in cultured hamster peritoneal macrophages. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free methotrexate in eliminating the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, in a model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in hamsters, the drug conjugate brought about more than 90% reduction in the size of footpad lesions within 11 days. In contrast, the free drug at a similar concentration did not significantly affect lesion size. These studies demonstrate the potential of receptor-mediated drug delivery in the therapy of macrophage-associated diseases.

  14. Investigations of receptor-mediated phagocytosis by hormone-induced (imprinted) Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Sundermann, C A; Csaba, G

    1996-08-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis by Tetrahvmena pyriformis was studied using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled concanavalin A (TRITC-Con A) with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. In the presence of insulin, or 24 h after insulin pretreatment (hormonal imprinting), the binding and uptake of TRITC-Con A increased when compared to controls, owing to the binding of TRITC-Con A to sugar oligomers of insulin receptors. Mannose inhibited the binding of Con A, thus demonstrating the specificity of binding. Histamine, a phagocytosis-promoting factor in mammals and Tetrahymena, and galactose, did not influence the uptake of TRITC-Con A.

  15. Phosphoinositides, Major Actors in Membrane Trafficking and Lipid Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bertazzi, Dimitri L.; Bär, Séverine; Friant, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins and lipids between the different compartments of eukaryotic cells. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and thus are involved in regulating various cellular functions, such as vesicular budding, membrane fusion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although detected in small concentrations in membranes, their role is essential to cell function, since imbalance in their concentrations is a hallmark of many cancers. Their synthesis involves phosphorylating/dephosphorylating positions D3, D4 and/or D5 of their inositol ring by specific lipid kinases and phosphatases. This process is tightly regulated and specific to the different intracellular membranes. Most enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis are conserved between yeast and human, and their loss of function leads to severe diseases (cancer, myopathy, neuropathy and ciliopathy). PMID:28294977

  16. DAPP1: a dual adaptor for phosphotyrosine and 3-phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Dowler, S; Currie, R A; Downes, C P; Alessi, D R

    1999-08-15

    We have identified a novel 280 amino acid protein which contains a putative myristoylation site at its N-terminus followed by an Src homology (SH2) domain and a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain at its C-terminus. It has been termed dual adaptor for phosphotyrosine and 3-phosphoinositides (DAPP1). DAPP1 is widely expressed and exhibits high-affinity interactions with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) and PtdIns(3,4)P(2), but not with other phospholipids tested. These observations predict that DAPP1 will interact with both tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and 3-phosphoinositides and may therefore play a role in regulating the location and/or activity of such proteins(s) in response to agonists that elevate PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) and PtdIns(3,4)P(2).

  17. Soman-induced seizures impair norepinephrine-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Phann, S.; Forster, J.; Ballough, G.P.; Cann, F.J.

    1993-05-13

    Seizure activity increases turnover of phosphoinositide bisphosphate (PIP2). Turnover of PIP2 is thought to be modulated by neurotransmitter interactions. The effect of soman-induced seizures on neurotransmitter-stimulated PIP 2 turnover was examined in rats. Thirty minutes after induction of seizure activity, rats were euthanized and slices prepared from the hippocampus or cerebral cortex were incubated with myo-(2-3H) inositol for incorporation into phospholipids. Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H) inositol-l-phosphate (IP1) in the presence of LiCl. Carbachol, norepinephrine (NE) and high K+ increased accumulation of IP1 in slices from control rats. GABA was without effect on IP1 accumulation but potentiated the stimulation of PIP, hydrolysis by NE. NE-stimulated IP1 accumulation in slices from rats undergoing seizures was significantly reduced. GABA potentiation of the NE-stimulated hydrolysis was also reduced.

  18. Betaxolol, a selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rudoy, C.A.; Van Bockstaele, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on β-adrenergic receptor (β1 and β2) expression in the amygdala. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that β1–adrenergic receptor, but not β2–adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective β1–adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 hours following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 hours following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on β1-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Results Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline

  19. Phosphoinositides Direct Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Gag Trafficking and Release

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S.; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H.; Medina, Gisselle N.; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), the predominant phosphoinositide on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments hence the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other phosphoinositides to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these phosphoinositides was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound PI(3)P with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P2 as revealed by NMR spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in PI(3,5)P2. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P2 from PI(3)P, caused Gag to co-localize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by co-expression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane. However, co-expression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that phosphoinositide-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. PMID:21176037

  20. Phosphoinositide phosphatases: just as important as the kinases.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Jennifer M; Fedele, Clare G; Davies, Elizabeth M; Becanovic, Jelena; Mitchell, Christina A

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositide phosphatases comprise several large enzyme families with over 35 mammalian enzymes identified to date that degrade many phosphoinositide signals. Growth factor or insulin stimulation activates the phosphoinositide 3-kinase that phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] to form phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)], which is rapidly dephosphorylated either by PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), or by the 5-phosphatases (inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases), generating PtdIns(3,4)P(2). 5-phosphatases also hydrolyze PtdIns(4,5)P(2) forming PtdIns(4)P. Ten mammalian 5-phosphatases have been identified, which regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation, synaptic vesicle recycling, insulin signaling, and embryonic development. Two 5-phosphatase genes, OCRL and INPP5E are mutated in Lowe and Joubert syndrome respectively. SHIP [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain inositol phosphatase] 2, and SKIP (skeletal muscle- and kidney-enriched inositol phosphatase) negatively regulate insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. SHIP2 polymorphisms are associated with a predisposition to insulin resistance. SHIP1 controls hematopoietic cell proliferation and is mutated in some leukemias. The inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatases, INPP4A and INPP4B degrade PtdIns(3,4)P(2) to PtdIns(3)P and regulate neuroexcitatory cell death, or act as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer respectively. The Sac phosphatases degrade multiple phosphoinositides, such as PtdIns(3)P, PtdIns(4)P, PtdIns(5)P and PtdIns(3,5)P(2) to form PtdIns. Mutation in the Sac phosphatase gene, FIG4, leads to a degenerative neuropathy. Therefore the phosphatases, like the lipid kinases, play major roles in regulating cellular functions and their mutation or altered expression leads to many human diseases.

  1. Phosphoinositides: Tiny Lipids With Giant Impact on Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) make up only a small fraction of cellular phospholipids, yet they control almost all aspects of a cell's life and death. These lipids gained tremendous research interest as plasma membrane signaling molecules when discovered in the 1970s and 1980s. Research in the last 15 years has added a wide range of biological processes regulated by PIs, turning these lipids into one of the most universal signaling entities in eukaryotic cells. PIs control organelle biology by regulating vesicular trafficking, but they also modulate lipid distribution and metabolism via their close relationship with lipid transfer proteins. PIs regulate ion channels, pumps, and transporters and control both endocytic and exocytic processes. The nuclear phosphoinositides have grown from being an epiphenomenon to a research area of its own. As expected from such pleiotropic regulators, derangements of phosphoinositide metabolism are responsible for a number of human diseases ranging from rare genetic disorders to the most common ones such as cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Moreover, it is increasingly evident that a number of infectious agents hijack the PI regulatory systems of host cells for their intracellular movements, replication, and assembly. As a result, PI converting enzymes began to be noticed by pharmaceutical companies as potential therapeutic targets. This review is an attempt to give an overview of this enormous research field focusing on major developments in diverse areas of basic science linked to cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23899561

  2. Signal transduction abnormalities in suicide: focus on phosphoinositide signaling system.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2013-11-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern and each year about one million people die by suicide worldwide. Recent studies suggest that suicide may be associated with specific neurobiological abnormalities. Earlier studies of neurobiology of suicide focused on abnormalities of the serotonergic mechanism. These studies suggested that some serotonin receptor subtypes may be abnormal in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Since these receptors are linked to signal transduction pathways, abnormalities of signaling mechanisms have been recently studied in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Of particular interest is the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor-linked phosphoinositide signaling system. Several studies have focused on the abnormalities on the component of this signaling system and these studies suggest the abnormalities of G proteins, the effectors phospholipase C and the second or the third messenger systems, such as protein kinase A. Further studies revealed abnormalities in the downstream transcription factors such as the cyclic AMP response element binding protein and some of the targeted genes of these transcription factors. The most important gene in this aspect which has been studied in the suicide is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Here we critically review the studies focusing on these components of the phosphoinositide signaling system in the postmortem brain of both adult and teenage suicide victims. These studies provide a better understanding of the signal transduction abnormalities in suicide focusing on the phosphoinositide signaling pathway. These studies may lead to new therapeutic agents targeting specific sites in this signaling cascade.

  3. Phosphoinositides differentially regulate alpha-actinin flexibility and function.

    PubMed

    Corgan, Anne Marie; Singleton, CoreyAyne; Santoso, Cynthia B; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2004-03-15

    Alpha-actinin is a cell-adhesion and cytoskeletal protein that bundles actin microfilaments and links these filaments directly to integrin-adhesion receptors. Phosphoinositides bind to and regulate the interaction of a-actinin with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 inhibits and disrupts a-actinin-bundling activity, whereas PtdIns(4,5)P2 can only inhibit activity. In addition, a protease-sensitivity assay was developed to examine the flexibility of the linker region between the actin-binding domain and the spectrin repeats of a-actinin. Both phosphoinositides influenced the extent of proteolysis and the cleavage sites. PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding decreased the proteolysis of a-actinin, suggesting a role in stabilizing the structure of the protein. In contrast, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding enhanced a-actinin proteolysis, indicating an increase in the flexibility of the protein. Furthermore, phosphoinositide binding influenced the proteolysis of the N- and C-terminal domains of a-actinin, indicating regulation of structure within both domains. These results support the hypothesis that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 differentially regulate a-actinin function by modulating the structure and flexibility of the protein.

  4. 5-HT1-like receptor-mediated contraction in the human internal mammary artery.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, O; Ciçek, S; Ay, I; Tatar, H; Tuncer, M

    1996-07-01

    We wished to characterize the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating vasoconstriction in the human internal mammary artery (IMA). Segments of the IMA obtained from patients undergoing coronary by-pass surgery were suspended in an organ bath and exposed to 5-HT and sumatriptan (SUM), a 5-HT1-like receptor agonist, in the presence and absence of potassium chloride (KCl) and angiotensin II. 5-HT induced concentration-dependent contractions in all quiescent and pre-contracted preparations. SUM induced small contractions in 70% of quiescent IMA rings, whereas it elicited marked and concentration-dependent contractions in all of the preparations given a moderate tone by a threshold concentration of KCl and angiotensin II. The efficacy of SUM was higher in precontracted arteries. Concentration-effect curves (CEC) of 5-HT and SUM were not affected by the 5-HT3-receptor antagonist tropisetron (1 microM). The nonselective antagonist, methiothepin (30 nM), shifted the CEC of SUM to the right. 5-HT2A-receptor antagonist, ketanserin (1 microM) inhibited responses to 5-HT, whereas it affected only the responses to the smaller concentrations of SUM. When methiothepin (30 nM) was applied in the presence of ketanserin (1 microM), a further inhibition in the responses to 5-HT was observed. These results suggest that 5-HT1-like receptors mediate the contractile action of SUM and contribute to that of 5-HT in IMA.

  5. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  6. Folate receptor mediated intracellular protein delivery using PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate.

    PubMed

    Hwa Kim, Sun; Hoon Jeong, Ji; Joe, Cheol O; Gwan Park, Tae

    2005-04-18

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins or other bioactive macromolecules into a specific cell, a di-block copolymer conjugate, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PLL-PEG-FOL), was synthesized. The PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate was physically complexed with fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) in an aqueous phase by ionic interactions. Cellular uptake of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes was greatly enhanced against a folate receptor over-expressing cell line (KB cells) compared to a folate receptor deficient cell line (A549 cells). The presence of an excess amount of free folate (1 mM) in the medium inhibited the intracellular delivery of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes. This suggests that the enhanced cellular uptake of FITC-BSA by KB cells in a specific manner was attributed to folate receptor-mediated endocytosis of the complexes having folate moieties on the surface. The PLL-PEG-FOL di-block copolymer could be potentially applied for intracellular delivery of a wide range of other biological active agents that have negative charges on the surface.

  7. Understanding magnetic nanoparticle osteoblast receptor-mediated endocytosis using experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for controlling drug delivery through an external magnetic force to treat a wide range of diseases, including osteoporosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, osteoblast (or bone forming cell) proliferation and long-term functions (such as calcium deposition) were significantly enhanced. Hydroxyapatite is the major inorganic component of bone. As a further attempt to understand why, in the current study, the uptake of such nanoparticles into osteoblasts was experimentally investigated and mathematically modeled. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using a co-precipitation method and were coated with hydroxyapatite. A cellular uptake experiment at low temperatures indicated that receptor-mediated endocytosis contributed to the internalization of the magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts. A model was further developed to explain the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts using receptor-mediated endocytosis. This model may explain the internalization of hydroxyapatite into osteoblasts to elevate intracellular calcium levels necessary to promote osteoblast functions to treat a wide range of orthopedic problems, including osteoporosis.

  8. Neuregulin-1-beta1 enters brain and spinal cord by receptor-mediated transport.

    PubMed

    Kastin, Abba J; Akerstrom, Victoria; Pan, Weihong

    2004-02-01

    Proteins of the neuregulin (NRG) family play important regulatory roles in neuronal survival and synaptic activity. NRG-1-beta1 has particular potential as a therapeutic agent because it enhances myelination of neurites in spinal cord explants. In this study, we determined the permeation of NRG-1-beta1 across the blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barriers (BBB and BSCB respectively). Intact radioactively labeled NRG-1-beta1 had a saturable and relatively rapid influx rate from blood to the CNS in mice. Capillary depletion studies showed that NRG-1-beta1 entered the parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord rather than being trapped in the capillaries that compose the BBB. The possible mechanism of receptor-mediated transport was shown by the ability of antibodies to erbB3 and erbB4 receptors to inhibit the influx. Lipophilicity, less important for such saturable transport mechanisms, was measured by the octanol : buffer partition coefficient and found to be low. The results indicate that NRG-1-beta1 enters spinal cord and brain by a saturable receptor-mediated mechanism, which provides the opportunity for possible therapeutic manipulation at the BBB level.

  9. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils.

  10. The miR-199-dynamin regulatory axis controls receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan F; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that modulate many physiological processes; however, their role in regulating intracellular transport remains largely unknown. Intriguingly, we found that the dynamin (DNM) genes, a GTPase family of proteins responsible for endocytosis in eukaryotic cells, encode the conserved miR-199a and miR-199b family of miRNAs within their intronic sequences. Here, we demonstrate that miR-199a and miR-199b regulate endocytic transport by controlling the expression of important mediators of endocytosis such as clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), Rab5A, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Importantly, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p overexpression markedly inhibits CLTC, Rab5A, LDLR and Cav-1 expression, thus preventing receptor-mediated endocytosis in human cell lines (Huh7 and HeLa). Of note, miR-199a-5p inhibition increases target gene expression and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Taken together, our work identifies a new mechanism by which microRNAs regulate intracellular trafficking. In particular, we demonstrate that the DNM, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p genes act as a bifunctional locus that regulates endocytosis, thus adding an unexpected layer of complexity in the regulation of intracellular trafficking.

  11. Target shape dependence in a simple model of receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Richards, David M; Endres, Robert G

    2016-05-31

    Phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis are vitally important particle uptake mechanisms in many cell types, ranging from single-cell organisms to immune cells. In both processes, engulfment by the cell depends critically on both particle shape and orientation. However, most previous theoretical work has focused only on spherical particles and hence disregards the wide-ranging particle shapes occurring in nature, such as those of bacteria. Here, by implementing a simple model in one and two dimensions, we compare and contrast receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis for a range of biologically relevant shapes, including spheres, ellipsoids, capped cylinders, and hourglasses. We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. Further, the 2D model can explain why some nonspherical particles engulf fastest (not at all) when presented to the membrane tip-first (lying flat). Our work reveals how some bacteria may avoid being internalized simply because of their shape, and suggests shapes for optimal drug delivery.

  12. Effect of Alpha-1-Adrenergic Agonist, Midodrine for the Management of Long-Standing Neurogenic Shock in Patient with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taikwan

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 71-year-old male patient who had suffered from long-lasting neurogenic shock for 13 weeks after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by a bicycle accident. The neurogenic shock was resolved dramatically 2 weeks after the administration of alpha-1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine hydrochloride. In usual cases, neurogenic shock tends to improve between 2 and 6 weeks after SCI; however, in a few cases, the shock lasts for several months. In our case, spinal shock lasted for 13 weeks and exhibited very sensitive decline of blood pressure for even a slight decrease of dopamine despite recovered bulbospongiosus reflex. Three days after midodrine hydrochloride was added, hypotension improved dramatically. We discuss our rare case with pertinent literatures. PMID:27169082

  13. Functional supersensitivity of alpha 1-adrenergic system in spinal ventral horn is due to absence of an uptake system and not to postsynaptic change.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, T; Ono, H; Fukuda, H

    1991-01-25

    The excitatory effects of adrenoceptor agonists on ventral horn cells were compared using an extracellular recording technique in spinal cord slices isolated from non-treated and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated rats (intracisternally 14 days previously). In spinal cord slices isolated from 6-OHDA-treated rats, the concentration-response curves for the alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated facilitatory effects produced by noradrenaline and phenylephrine but not those produced by methoxamine and isoproterenol were shifted to the left. 6-OHDA pretreatment decreased the level and uptake of noradrenaline and increased the number of [3H]prazosin binding sites in the spinal cord. These results suggest that in 6-OHDA-induced denervation, functional supersensitivity of the alpha 1-adrenergic system in the spinal ventral horn is due to absence of an uptake system, and not to postsynaptic change.

  14. Changes in myocardial beta1-adrenergic receptor and stimulatory G-protein gene expression after chronic treatment with doxorubicin in rat.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Keiichiro; Akatsuka, Keiko; Momozaki, Masami; Fujimori, Yuuki; Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Temma, Kyosuke; Hara, Yukio

    2004-08-01

    The gene expression of beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) and stimulatory G-protein Gsalpha in ventricle after chronic treatment with doxorubicin (DOX) in rat was investigated. The rats were treated with DOX in a dose of 2.5 mg/kg once a week for 5 weeks, the cumulative dose being 12.5 mg/kg. Two weeks after the last injection, the positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol was noticeably decreased in left atrial muscle preparations isolated from DOX-treated rats. Northern blot hybridization showed that the mRNA transcripts of beta(1)AR and Gsalpha, important signal transduction elements for regulating heart rate and contractility, were significantly decreased in the ventricle of DOX-treated rats. Thus, chronic treatment with DOX decreases the gene expression levels of myocardial beta(1)AR and Gsalpha.

  15. Contracting human skeletal muscle maintains the ability to blunt α1 -adrenergic vasoconstriction during KIR channel and Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Hearon, Christopher M; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-06-15

    During exercise there is a balance between vasoactive factors that facilitate increases in blood flow and oxygen delivery to the active tissue and the sympathetic nervous system, which acts to limit muscle blood flow for the purpose of blood pressure regulation. Functional sympatholysis describes the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to blunt the stimulus for vasoconstriction, yet the underlying signalling of this response in humans is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that activation of inwardly rectifying potassium channels and the sodium-potassium ATPase pump, two potential vasodilator pathways within blood vessels, contributes to the ability to blunt α1 -adrenergic vasoconstriction. Our results show preserved blunting of α1 -adrenergic vasconstriction despite blockade of these vasoactive factors. Understanding this complex phenomenon is important as it is impaired in a variety of clinical populations. Sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle is blunted relative to that which occurs in resting tissue; however, the mechanisms underlying this 'functional sympatholysis' remain unclear in humans. We tested the hypothesis that α1 -adrenergic vasoconstriction is augmented during exercise following inhibition of inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR ) channels and Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase (BaCl2  + ouabain). In young healthy humans, we measured forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and calculated forearm vascular conductance (FVC) at rest, during steady-state stimulus conditions (pre-phenylephrine), and after 2 min of phenylephrine (PE; an α1 -adrenoceptor agonist) infusion via brachial artery catheter in response to two different stimuli: moderate (15% maximal voluntary contraction) rhythmic handgrip exercise or adenosine infusion. In Protocol 1 (n = 11 subjects) a total of six trials were performed in three conditions: control (saline), combined enzymatic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis (l

  16. The Golgi apparatus is a functionally distinct Ca2+ store regulated by the PKA and Epac branches of the β1-adrenergic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaokang; Kirton, Hannah M; MacDougall, David A; Boyle, John P; Deuchars, James; Frater, Brenda; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Hardy, Matthew E; White, Edward; Calaghan, Sarah C; Peers, Chris; Steele, Derek S

    2015-10-13

    Ca(2+) release from the Golgi apparatus regulates key functions of the organelle, including vesicle trafficking. We found that the Golgi apparatus was the source of prolonged Ca(2+) release events that originated near the nuclei of primary cardiomyocytes. Golgi Ca(2+) release was unaffected by depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+), and disruption of the Golgi apparatus abolished Golgi Ca(2+) release without affecting sarcoplasmic reticulum function, suggesting functional and spatial independence of Golgi and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores. β1-Adrenoceptor stimulation triggers the production of the second messenger cAMP, which activates the Epac family of Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the kinase PKA (protein kinase A). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs), including those in the PDE3 and PDE4 families, degrade cAMP. Activation of β1-adrenoceptors stimulated Golgi Ca(2+) release, an effect that required activation of Epac, PKA, and the kinase CaMKII. Inhibition of PDE3s or PDE4s potentiated β1-adrenergic-induced Golgi Ca(2+) release, which is consistent with compartmentalization of cAMP signaling near the Golgi apparatus. Interventions that stimulated Golgi Ca(2+) release appeared to increase the trafficking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) from the Golgi apparatus to the surface membrane of cardiomyocytes. In cardiomyocytes from rats with heart failure, decreases in the abundance of PDE3s and PDE4s were associated with increased Golgi Ca(2+) release events. These data suggest that the Golgi apparatus is a focal point for β1-adrenergic-stimulated Ca(2+) signaling and that the Golgi Ca(2+) store functions independently from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the global Ca(2+) transients that trigger contraction in cardiomyocytes.

  17. Dopamine acting at D1-like, D2-like and α1-adrenergic receptors differentially modulates theta and gamma oscillatory activity in primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Mazhar; Johnson, Nicholas W; Sehirli, Umit S; Woodhall, Gavin L; Stanford, Ian M

    2017-01-01

    The loss of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's is accompanied by the emergence of exaggerated theta and beta frequency neuronal oscillatory activity in the primary motor cortex (M1) and basal ganglia. DA replacement therapy or deep brain stimulation reduces the power of these oscillations and this is coincident with an improvement in motor performance implying a causal relationship. Here we provide in vitro evidence for the differential modulation of theta and gamma activity in M1 by DA acting at receptors exhibiting conventional and non-conventional DA pharmacology. Recording local field potentials in deep layer V of rat M1, co-application of carbachol (CCh, 5 μM) and kainic acid (KA, 150 nM) elicited simultaneous oscillations at a frequency of 6.49 ± 0.18 Hz (theta, n = 84) and 34.97 ± 0.39 Hz (gamma, n = 84). Bath application of DA resulted in a decrease in gamma power with no change in theta power. However, application of either the D1-like receptor agonist SKF38393 or the D2-like agonist quinpirole increased the power of both theta and gamma suggesting that the DA-mediated inhibition of oscillatory power is by action at other sites other than classical DA receptors. Application of amphetamine, which promotes endogenous amine neurotransmitter release, or the adrenergic α1-selective agonist phenylephrine mimicked the action of DA and reduced gamma power, a result unaffected by prior co-application of D1 and D2 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and sulpiride. Finally, application of the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin blocked the action of DA on gamma power suggestive of interaction between α1 and DA receptors. These results show that DA mediates complex actions acting at dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptors, α1 adrenergic receptors and possibly DA/α1 heteromultimeric receptors to differentially modulate theta and gamma activity in M1.

  18. SAP97 Controls the Trafficking and Resensitization of the Beta-1-Adrenergic Receptor through Its PDZ2 and I3 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nooh, Mohammed M.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Kim, Sung-Jin; Xiang, Yang K.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have determined that the type-1 PDZ sequence at the extreme carboxy-terminus of the ß1-adrenergic receptor (ß1-AR) binds SAP97 and AKAP79 to organize a scaffold involved in trafficking of the ß1-AR. In this study we focused on characterizing the domains in SAP97 that were involved in recycling and resensitization of the ß1-AR in HEK-293 cells. Using a SAP97 knockdown and rescue strategy, we determined that PDZ-deletion mutants of SAP97 containing PDZ2 rescued the recycling and resensitization of the ß1-AR. Among the three PDZs of SAP97, PDZ2 displayed the highest affinity in binding to the ß1-AR. Expression of isolated PDZ2, but not the other PDZs, inhibited the recycling of the ß1-AR by destabilizing the macromolecular complex involved in trafficking and functional resensitization of the ß1-AR. In addition to its PDZs, SAP97 contains other protein interacting domains, such as the I3 sequence in the SRC homology-3 (SH3) domain, which binds to AKAP79. Deletion of I3 from SAP97 (ΔI3-SAP97) did not affect the binding of SAP97 to the ß1-AR. However, ΔI3-SAP97 could not rescue the recycling of the ß1-AR because it failed to incorporate AKAP79/PKA into the SAP97-ß1-AR complex. Therefore, bipartite binding of SAP97 to the ß1-AR and to AKAP79 is necessary for SAP97-mediated effects on recycling, externalization and functional resensitization of the ß1-AR. These data establish a prominent role for PDZ2 and I3 domains of SAP97 in organizing the ß1-adrenergic receptosome involved in connecting the ß1-AR to trafficking and signaling networks. PMID:23696820

  19. Decreased Autophagy in Rat Heart Induced by Anti-β1-Adrenergic Receptor Autoantibodies Contributes to the Decline in Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihu; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ke; Wang, Jin; Yan, Zi; Zhang, Suli; Du, Yunhui; Liu, Huirong

    2013-01-01

    It has been recognized that changes in mitochondrial structure plays a key role in development of cardiac dysfunction, and autophagy has been shown to exert maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis effects. Our previous study found that anti-β1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies (β1-AABs) could lead to cardiac dysfunction along with abnormalities in mitochondrial structure. The present study tested the hypothesis that β1-AABs may induce the decline in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by suppression of cardiac autophagy, which contributed to cardiac dysfunction. Male adult rats were randomized to receive a vehicle or peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the β1 adrenergic receptor (β1-AAB group, 0.4 μg/g every two weeks for 12 weeks) and treated with rapamycin (RAPA, an autophagy agonist) at 5 mg/kg/day for two days before detection. At the 4th week, 8th week and 12th week of active immunization, the rats were sacrificed and cardiac function and the levels of cardiac LC3 and Beclin-1 were detected. ΔΨm in cardiac myocytes was determined by myocardial radionuclide imaging technology and JC-1 staining. In the present study, β1-AABs caused cardiac dysfunction, reduced ΔΨm and decreased cardiac autophagy. Treatment with RAPA markedly attenuated β1-AABs-induced cardiac injury evidenced by recovered ΔΨm. Taken together, these results suggested that β1-AABs exerted significant decreased ΔΨm, which may contribute to cardiac dysfunction, most likely by decreasing cardiac autophagy in vivo. Moreover, myocardial radionuclide imaging technology may be needed to assess the risk in developing cardiac dysfunction for the people who have β1-AABs in their blood. PMID:24278413

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and NMDA-potentiating effects are blunted in the striatum of aged rats: a possible additional mechanism in striatal senescence.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Pintor, Annita; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Gaudi, Simona; Grò, Maria Cristina; Passarelli, Francesca; Reggio, Rosaria; Galluzzo, Mariangela; Massotti, Marino; Popoli, Patrizia

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to verify whether an impairment of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated neurotransmission did occur in the aged striatum. To this end, the ability of the subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine, to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced effects in striatal slices from young (3 months) and aged (24 months) rats was compared. The ability of RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine to induce maximal phosphoinositide turnover and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate effects was significantly reduced in slices from old vs. young rats. These changes were associated with a significant reduction in the expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor protein (-28.8%) and phospholipase C-beta1 (-55.8%) in old striata, while receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression was unchanged. These results show that the signalling associated with subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors undergoes significant age-related changes and that a reduced expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors and, more importantly, phospholipase C-beta1 may account for the functional decline of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  1. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  2. The CB₁ receptor-mediated endocannabinoid signaling and NGF: the novel targets of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Parichehr; Hassanzadeh, Anna

    2012-05-01

    Increasing interest has recently been attracted towards the identification of natural compounds including those with antidepressant properties. Curcumin has shown promising antidepressant effect, however, its molecular target(s) have not been well defined. Based on the interaction between the neurotrophins and endocannabinoid system as well as their contribution to the emotional reactivity and antidepressant action, here we show that 4-week treatment with curcumin, similar to the classical antidepressant amitriptyline, results in the sustained elevation of brain nerve growth factor (NGF) and endocannabinoids in dose-dependent and brain region-specific fashion. Pretreatment with cannabinoid CB(1) receptor neutral antagonist AM4113, but not the CB(2) antagonist SR144528, prevents the enhancement of brain NGF contents. AM4113 exerts no effect by itself. Our findings by presenting the CB(1) receptor-mediated endocannabinoid signaling and NGF as novel targets for curcumin, suggest that more attention should be focused on the therapeutic potential of herbal medicines including curcumin.

  3. Using GFP--ligand fusions to measure receptor-mediated endocytosis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Medina-Kauwe, Lali K; Chen, Xinhua

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has enabled the production of many types of chimeric proteins containing heterologous functional domains that have served a variety of useful capacities for cell biology research. Among proteins gaining wide use as a fusion partner is Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP has been employed by numerous groups as a reporter gene for cell transfection and as an autofluorescent tag by recombinant fusion to foreign sequences. Here we describe the use of GFP as a tag for ligands, and provide examples of how purified recombinant GFP-ligand fusion proteins may be used to detect ligand-receptor interactions, including receptor-mediated endocytosis. Both its utility and limitations are discussed.

  4. The C-kit receptor-mediated signal transduction and tumor-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Wu, Yan-Ling; Chen, Bing-Jia; Zhang, Wen; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    As an important member of tyrosine kinase family, c-kit receptor causes specific expression of certain genes, regulates cell differentiation and proliferation, resists cell apoptosis, and plays a key role in tumor occurrence, development, migration and recurrence through activating the downstream signaling molecules following interaction with stem cell factor (SCF). The abnormality of SCF/c-kit signaling pathway is closely related to some certain tumors. The discovery of c-kit receptor-targeted drugs has promoted clinical-related cancer's diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review recent research progress on c-kit receptor-mediated signal transduction and its potential therapeutic application as a target in tumor-related diseases.

  5. Bicarbonate contributes to GABAA receptor-mediated neuronal excitation in surgically resected human hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Young; Fenoglio, Kristina A; Kerrigan, John F; Rho, Jong M

    2009-01-01

    The role of bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) in GABA(A) receptor-mediated depolarization of human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) neurons was investigated using cellular electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Activation of GABA(A) receptors with muscimol (30 microM) provoked neuronal excitation in over 70% of large (18-22 microM) HH neurons in HCO(3)(-) buffer. Subsequent perfusion of HCO(3)(-)-free HEPES buffer produced partial suppression of muscimol-induced excitation. Additionally, 53% of large HH neurons under HCO(3)(-)-free conditions exhibited reduced intracellular calcium accumulation by muscimol. These results suggest that HCO(3)(-) efflux through GABA(A) receptors on a subpopulation of large HH neurons may contribute to membrane depolarization and subsequent activation of L-type calcium channels.

  6. D2-like dopamine receptors mediate the response to amphetamine in a mouse model of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of psychostimulants in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are not well understood, but indirect evidence implicates D2 dopamine receptors. Here we dissect the components of dopaminergic neurotransmission in the hyperactive mouse mutant coloboma to identify pre- and postsynaptic elements essential for the effects of amphetamine in these mice. Amphetamine treatment reduced locomotor activity in coloboma mice, but induced a robust increase in dopamine overflow suggesting that abnormal regulation of dopamine efflux does not account for the behavioral effect. However, the D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists haloperidol and raclopride, but not the D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390, blocked the amphetamine-induced reduction in locomotor activity in coloboma mice, providing direct evidence that D2-like dopamine receptors mediate the effect of amphetamine in these mice. With the precedent established that it is possible to directly antagonize this response, this strategy should prove useful for identifying novel therapeutics in ADHD. PMID:17291774

  7. The C-Kit Receptor-Mediated Signal Transduction and Tumor-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Wu, Yan-Ling; Chen, Bing-Jia; Zhang, Wen; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    As an important member of tyrosine kinase family, c-kit receptor causes specific expression of certain genes, regulates cell differentiation and proliferation, resists cell apoptosis, and plays a key role in tumor occurrence, development, migration and recurrence through activating the downstream signaling molecules following interaction with stem cell factor (SCF). The abnormality of SCF/c-kit signaling pathway is closely related to some certain tumors. The discovery of c-kit receptor-targeted drugs has promoted clinical-related cancer's diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review recent research progress on c-kit receptor-mediated signal transduction and its potential therapeutic application as a target in tumor-related diseases. PMID:23678293

  8. Studies on phosphoinositide metabolism in retinal rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Gehm, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine whether isolated mammalian photoreceptors (bovine rod outer segments, ROS) were capable of synthesizing and hydrolyzing phosphoinositides, and if so, how synthesis and hydrolysis might be regulated. Synthesis of phosphoinositides was demonstrated by the incorporation of radioactively labeled precursors. ROS incubated with ({gamma}{sup 32}P)ATP produced labeled phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}). When Mn{sup 2+}, CTP and inositol were added, labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI) was also produced. ({sup 3}H)Inositol was incorporated into PI, PIP and PIP{sub 2}, although prolonged incubation was required for detectable incorporation into PIP{sub 2}. Incorporation of ({sup 3}H)inositol was dependent on CTP, indicating that labeling proceeded via synthesis, not base exchange. Incubation with ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)CTP produced labeled CDP-diacylglycerol, an intermediate in PI synthesis. Incorporation of labeled precursors was stimulated by Mg{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+} and spermine, but unaffected by light. Phosphoinositide hydrolysis was measured using exogenous {sup 3}H-labeled substrates. PI, PIP, and PIP{sub 2} were all hydrolyzed but most attention was devoted to PIP{sub 2}. Crude enzyme preparations contained an endogenous inhibitor whose effects were Ca{sup 2+}-dependently relieved by calmodulin antagonists. This inhibitor does not appear to be calmodulin but may be a novel Ca{sup 2+}-binding regulatory protein. No evidence for regulation of PLC activity by light or G-proteins was obtained. The effects on PLC activity of Mg{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, spermine, pH and detergents were also characterized.

  9. Chronic psychoemotional stress impairs cannabinoid-receptor-mediated control of GABA transmission in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Silvia; De Chiara, Valentina; Musella, Alessandra; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Mataluni, Giorgia; Bernardi, Giorgio; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2008-07-16

    Exposure to stressful events has a myriad of consequences in animals and in humans, and triggers synaptic adaptations in many brain areas. Stress might also alter cannabinoid-receptor-mediated transmission in the brain, but no physiological study has addressed this issue so far. In the present study, we found that social defeat stress, induced in mice by exposure to aggression, altered cannabinoid CB(1)-receptor-mediated control of synaptic transmission in the striatum. In fact, the presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic IPSCs induced by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonist HU210 [(6aR)-trans-3-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-1-hydroxy-6,6-dimethyl-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-9-methanol] was reduced after a single stressful episode and fully abolished after 3 and 7 d of stress exposure. Repeated psychoemotional stress also impaired the sensitivity of GABA synapses to endocannabinoids mobilized by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation, whereas the cannabinoid CB(1)-mediated control of glutamate transmission was unaffected by repeated exposure to an aggressor. Corticosteroids released in response to the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis played a major role in the synaptic defects observed in stressed animals, because these alterations were fully prevented by pharmacological blockade of glucocorticoid receptors and were mimicked by corticosterone injections. The recovery of stress-induced synaptic defects was favored when stressed mice were given access to a running wheel or to sucrose consumption, which function as potent natural rewards. A similar rescuing effect was obtained by a single injection of cocaine, a psychostimulant with strong rewarding properties. Targeting cannabinoid CB(1) receptors or endocannabinoid metabolism might be a valuable option to treat stress-associated neuropsychiatric conditions.

  10. Extracellular acidosis impairs P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and migration of microglia.

    PubMed

    Langfelder, Antonia; Okonji, Emeka; Deca, Diana; Wei, Wei-Chun; Glitsch, Maike D

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage and immune cell of the brain and are critically involved in combating disease and assaults on the brain. Virtually all brain pathologies are accompanied by acidosis of the interstitial fluid, meaning that microglia are exposed to an acidic environment. However, little is known about how extracellular acidosis impacts on microglial function. The activity of microglia is tightly controlled by 'on' and 'off' signals, the presence or absence of which results in generation of distinct phenotypes in microglia. Activation of G protein coupled purinergic (P2Y) receptors triggers a number of distinct behaviours in microglia, including activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Using pharmacological tools and fluorescence imaging of the murine cerebellar microglia cell line C8B4, we show that extracellular acidosis interferes with P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling in these cells. Distinct P2Y receptors give rise to signature intracellular Ca(2+) signals, and Ca(2+) release from stores and Ca(2+) influx are differentially affected by acidotic conditions: Ca(2+) release is virtually unaffected, whereas Ca(2+) influx, mediated at least in part by store-operated Ca(2+) channels, is profoundly inhibited. Furthermore, P2Y1 and P2Y6-mediated stimulation of migration is inhibited under conditions of extracellular acidosis, whereas basal migration independent of P2Y receptor activation is not. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an acidic microenvironment impacts on P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, thereby influencing microglial responses and responsiveness to extracellular signals. This may result in altered behaviour of microglia under pathological conditions compared with microglial responses in healthy tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Voltage-dependent inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor-mediated currents by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Adams, David J

    2005-01-01

    The effect of 5-HT and related indolealkylamines on heteromeric recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated using the two-electrode voltage-clamp recording technique. In the absence of external Mg2+ ions, 5-HT inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of 5-HT was independent of the NR1a and NR2 subunit combination. The inhibition of glutamate-evoked currents by 5-HT was use- and voltage-dependent. The voltage sensitivity of inhibition for NR1a+NR2 subunit combinations by 5-HT was similar, exhibiting an e-fold change per ∼20 mV, indicating that 5-HT binds to a site deep within the membrane electric field. The inhibition of the open NMDA receptor by external Mg2+ and 5-HT was not additive, suggesting competition between Mg2+ and 5-HT for a binding site in the NMDA receptor channel. The concentration-dependence curves for 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated currents are shifted to the right in the presence of external Mg2+. The related indolealkylamines inhibited glutamate-evoked currents with the following order of inhibitory potency: 5-MeOT=5-methyltryptamine>tryptamine>7-methyltryptamine>5-HT≫tryptophan=melatonin. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT and related compounds can attenuate glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic responses and may provide a basis for drug treatment of excitoxic neurodegeneration. PMID:15655527

  12. Current injection and receptor-mediated excitation produce similar maximal firing rates in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Hilary E; Fregosi, Ralph F; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    The maximum firing rates of motoneurons (MNs), activated in response to synaptic drive, appear to be much lower than that elicited by current injection. It could be that the decrease in input resistance associated with increased synaptic activity (but not current injection) might blunt overall changes in membrane depolarization and thereby limit spike-frequency output. To test this idea, we recorded, in the same cells, maximal firing responses to current injection and to synaptic activation. We prepared 300 μm medullary slices in neonatal rats that contained hypoglossal MNs and used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record their maximum firing rates in response to triangular-ramp current injections and to glutamate receptor-mediated excitation. Brief pressure pulses of high-concentration glutamate led to significant depolarization, high firing rates, and temporary cessation of spiking due to spike inactivation. In the same cells, we applied current clamp protocols that approximated the time course of membrane potential change associated with glutamate application and with peak current levels large enough to cause spike inactivation. Means (SD) of maximum firing rates obtained in response to glutamate application were nearly identical to those obtained in response to ramp current injection [glutamate 47.1 ± 12.0 impulses (imp)/s, current injection 47.5 ± 11.2 imp/s], even though input resistance was 40% less during glutamate application compared with current injection. Therefore, these data suggest that the reduction in input resistance associated with receptor-mediated excitation does not, by itself, limit the maximal firing rate responses in MNs. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Synthesis and mannose receptor-mediated uptake of clustered glycomimetics by human dendritic cells: effect of charge.

    PubMed

    Angyalosi, Gerhild; Grandjean, Cyrille; Lamirand, Mélanie; Auriault, Claude; Gras-Masse, Hélène; Melnyk, Oleg

    2002-10-07

    Effect of charge and shape of multivalent lysine-based cluster glycomimetics on their mannose receptor-mediated uptake by human dendritic cells has been evaluated: The capture is strongly affected by the shape of the ligands. The effect of charge is less pronounced although positive charges on the ligands seem to favor non-specific endocytosis capture.

  14. Contracting human skeletal muscle maintains the ability to blunt α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction during KIR channel and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Hearon, Christopher M; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle is blunted relative to that which occurs in resting tissue; however, the mechanisms underlying this ‘functional sympatholysis’ remain unclear in humans. We tested the hypothesis that α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction is augmented during exercise following inhibition of inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) channels and Na+/K+-ATPase (BaCl2 + ouabain). In young healthy humans, we measured forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and calculated forearm vascular conductance (FVC) at rest, during steady-state stimulus conditions (pre-phenylephrine), and after 2 min of phenylephrine (PE; an α1-adrenoceptor agonist) infusion via brachial artery catheter in response to two different stimuli: moderate (15% maximal voluntary contraction) rhythmic handgrip exercise or adenosine infusion. In Protocol 1 (n = 11 subjects) a total of six trials were performed in three conditions: control (saline), combined enzymatic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis (l-NMMA + ketorolac) and combined inhibition of NO, PGs, KIR channels and Na+/K+-ATPase (l-NMMA + ketorolac + BaCl2 + ouabain). In Protocol 2 (n = 6) a total of four trials were performed in two conditions: control (saline), and combined KIR channel and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition. All trials occurred after local β-adrenoceptor blockade (propranolol). PE-mediated vasoconstriction was calculated (%ΔFVC) in each condition. Contrary to our hypothesis, despite attenuated exercise hyperaemia of ∼30%, inhibition of KIR channels and Na+/K+-ATPase, combined with inhibition of NO and PGs (Protocol 1) or alone (Protocol 2) did not enhance α1-mediated vasoconstriction during exercise (Protocol 1: −27 ± 3%; P = 0.2 vs. control, P = 0.4 vs.l-NMMA + ketorolac; Protocol 2: −21 ± 7%; P = 0.9 vs. control). Thus, contracting human skeletal muscle maintains the ability to blunt α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction during

  15. Contribution of both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ sensitization to the alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction of rat penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Nuria; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Garcia-Sacristán, Albino; Simonsen, Ulf; Prieto, Dolores

    2007-02-01

    Sympathetic adrenergic nerves maintain the flaccid state of the penis through the tonic release of norepinephrine that contracts trabecular and arterial smooth muscle. Simultaneous measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and tension and experiments with alpha-toxin-permeabilized arteries were performed in branches of the rat dorsal penile artery to investigate the intracellular Ca(2+) signaling pathways underlying alpha(1)-adrenergic vasoconstriction. Phenylephrine increased both [Ca(2+)](i) and tension, these increases being abolished by extracellular Ca(2+) removal and reduced by about 50% by the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine (0.3 microM). Non-L-type Ca(2+) entry through store-operated channels was studied by inhibiting the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). CPA (30 microM) induced variable phasic contractions that were abolished by extracellular Ca(2+) removal and by the store-operated channels antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB, 50 microM) and largely inhibited by nifedipine (0.3 microM). CPA induced a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)](i) that was reduced in a Ca(2+)-free medium. Under conditions of L-type channels blockade, Ca(2+) readmission after store depletion with CPA evoked a sustained and marked elevation in [Ca(2+)](i) not coupled to contraction. 2-APB (50 microM) inhibited the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by CPA and the nifedipine-insensitive increases in both [Ca(2+)](i) and contraction elicited by phenylephrine. In alpha-toxin-permeabilized penile arteries, activation of G proteins with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) and of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor with phenylephrine both enhanced the myofilament sensitivity to Ca(2+). This Ca(2+) sensitization was reduced by selective inhibitors of PKC, tyrosine kinase (TK), and Rho kinase (RhoK) by 43%, 67%, and 82%, respectively. As a whole, the present data suggest the alpha(1)-adrenergic vasoconstriction in penile small arteries

  16. Caveolae-specific activation loop between CaMKII and L-type Ca(2+) channel aggravates cardiac hypertrophy in α1-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tonegawa, Kota; Otsuka, Wataru; Kumagai, Shohei; Matsunami, Sachi; Hayamizu, Nao; Tanaka, Shota; Moriwaki, Kazumasa; Obana, Masanori; Maeda, Makiko; Asahi, Michio; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Fujio, Yasushi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Activation of CaMKII induces a myriad of biological processes and plays dominant roles in cardiac hypertrophy. Caveolar microdomain contains many calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) targets, including L-type Ca(2+) channel (LTCC) complex, and serves as a signaling platform. The location of CaMKII activation is thought to be critical; however, the roles of CaMKII in caveolae are still elusive due to lack of methodology for the assessment of caveolae-specific activation. Our aim was to develop a novel tool for the specific analysis of CaMKII activation in caveolae and to determine the functional role of caveolar CaMKII in cardiac hypertrophy. To assess the caveolae-specific activation of CaMKII, we generated a fusion protein composed of phospholamban and caveolin-3 (cPLN-Cav3) and GFP fusion protein with caveolin-binding domain fused to CaMKII inhibitory peptide (CBD-GFP-AIP), which inhibits CaMKII activation specifically in caveolae. Caveolae-specific activation of CaMKII was detected using phosphospecific antibody for PLN (Thr(17)). Furthermore, adenoviral overexpression of LTCC β2a-subunit (β2a) in NRCMs showed its constitutive phosphorylation by CaMKII, which induces hypertrophy, and that both phosphorylation and hypertrophy are abolished by CBD-GFP-AIP expression, indicating that β2a phosphorylation occurs specifically in caveolae. Finally, β2a phosphorylation was observed after phenylephrine stimulation in β2a-overexpressing mice, and attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy after chronic phenylephrine stimulation was observed in nonphosphorylated mutant of β2a-overexpressing mice. We developed novel tools for the evaluation and inhibition of caveolae-specific activation of CaMKII. We demonstrated that phosphorylated β2a dominantly localizes to caveolae and induces cardiac hypertrophy after α1-adrenergic stimulation in mice.NEW & NOTEWORTHY While signaling in caveolae is thought to be important in cardiac hypertrophy, direct evidence is missing

  17. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway is involved in the control of modified low-density lipoprotein uptake by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Michael, Daryn R; Davies, Thomas S; Laubertová, Lucia; Gallagher, Hayley; Ramji, Dipak P

    2015-03-01

    The transformation of macrophages into lipid-loaded foam cells is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Both receptor-mediated uptake of modified LDL, mediated primarily by scavenger receptors-A (SR-A) and CD36 along with other proteins such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and macropinocytosis contribute to macrophage foam cell formation. The signaling pathways that are involved in the control of foam cell formation are not fully understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in relation to foam cell formation in human macrophages. The pan PI3K inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the uptake of modified LDL and macropinocytosis, as measured by Lucifer Yellow uptake, by human macrophages. In addition, the expression of SR-A, CD36 and LPL was attenuated by LY294002. The use of isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors showed that PI3K-β, -γ and -δ were all required for the expression of SR-A and CD36 whereas only PI3K-γ was necessary in the case of LPL. These studies reveal a pivotal role of PI3K in the control of macrophage foam cell formation and provide further evidence for their potential as therapeutic target against atherosclerosis.

  18. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  19. Developmental changes in AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated quantal transmission at thalamocortical synapses in the barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Neil J; Benke, Timothy A; Mellor, Jack; Scott, Helen; Gürdal, Esra; Crabtree, John W; Isaac, John T R

    2005-05-25

    During the first week of life, there is a shift from kainate to AMPA receptor-mediated thalamocortical transmission in layer IV barrel cortex. However, the mechanisms underlying this change and the differential properties of AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission remain essentially unexplored. To investigate this, we studied the quantal properties of AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission using strontium-evoked miniature EPSCs. AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission exhibited very different quantal properties but were never coactivated by a single quantum of transmitter, indicating complete segregation to different synapses within the thalamocortical input. Nonstationary fluctuation analysis showed that synaptic AMPA receptors exhibited a range of single-channel conductance (gamma) and a strong negative correlation between gamma and functional channel number, indicating that these two parameters are reciprocally regulated at thalamocortical synapses. We obtained the first estimate of gamma for synaptic kainate receptors (<2 pS), and this primarily accounted for the small quantal size of kainate receptor-mediated transmission. Developmentally, the quantal contribution to transmission of AMPA receptors increased and that of kainate receptors decreased. No changes in AMPA or kainate quantal amplitude or in AMPA receptor gamma were observed, demonstrating that the developmental change was attributable to a decrease in the number of kainate synapses and an increase in the number of AMPA synapses contributing to transmission. Therefore, we demonstrate fundamental differences in the quantal properties for these two types of synapse. Thus, the developmental switch in transmission will dramatically alter information transfer at thalamocortical inputs to layer IV.

  20. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase: the key switch mechanism in insulin signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, P R; Withers, D J; Siddle, K

    1998-01-01

    Insulin plays a key role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. However, until recently little was known about the signalling pathways that are involved in linking the insulin receptor with downstream responses. It is now apparent that the activation of class 1a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) is necessary and in some cases sufficient to elicit many of insulin's effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The lipid products of PI 3-kinase act as both membrane anchors and allosteric regulators, serving to localize and activate downstream enzymes and their protein substrates. One of the major ways these lipid products of PI 3-kinase act in insulin signalling is by binding to pleckstrin homology (PH) domains of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase (PDK) and protein kinase B (PKB) and in the process regulating the phosphorylation of PKB by PDK. Using mechanisms such as this, PI 3-kinase is able to act as a molecular switch to regulate the activity of serine/threonine-specific kinase cascades important in mediating insulin's effects on endpoint responses. PMID:9677303

  1. Intracellular delivery of phosphoinositides and inositol phosphates using polyamine carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Shoichiro; DeWald, Daryll B.; Shope, Joseph C.; Chen, Jian; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2000-01-01

    Phosphoinositide signaling regulates events in endocytosis and exocytosis, vesicular trafficking of proteins, transduction of extracellular signals, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, regulation of calcium flux, and apoptosis. Obtaining mechanistic insights in living cells is impeded by the membrane impermeability of these anionic lipids. We describe a carrier system for intracellular delivery of phosphoinositide polyphosphates (PIPns) and fluorescently labeled PIPns into living cells, such that intracellular localization can be directly observed. Preincubation of PIPns or inositol phosphates with carrier polyamines produced complexes that entered mammalian, plant, yeast, bacterial, and protozoal cells in seconds to minutes via a nonendocytic mechanism. Time-dependent transit of both PIPns and the carrier to specific cytosolic and nuclear compartments was readily visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Platelet-derived growth factor treatment of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts containing carrier-delivered phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole resulted in the redistribution of the fluorescent signal, suggesting that fluorescent PtdIns(4,5)P2 was a substrate for phospholipase C. We also observed a calcium flux in NIH 3T3 cells when complexes of carrier and PtdIns(4,5)P2 or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate were added extracellularly. This simple intracellular delivery system allows for the efficient translocation of biologically active PIPns, inositol phosphates, and their fluorescent derivatives into living cells in a physiologically relevant context. PMID:11005844

  2. Alcohol induced changes in phosphoinositide signaling system in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.; Piano, M.; Schwertz, D.; Davis, J.; Pandey, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide break down functions as a signal generating system in a manner similar to the C-AMP system. In order to examine if the changes produced by chronic ethanol treatment on membrane lipid composition and metabolism effect the cellular functions of the neuron, the authors have examined the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on norepinephrine (NE) serotonin (5HT) and calcium ionophore (CI) stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat cortical slices. Rats were maintained on liber-decarli diet alcohol and control liquid diet containing isocaloric sucrose substitute for two months. They were then sacrificed and brain was removed for determination of PI turnover. 5HT stimulated {sup 3}H- inositol monophosphate ({sup 3}H-IPI) formation was significantly lower in the cortex of alcohol treated rats as compared to control rats. However, neither CI nor NE stimulated IP1 formation was significantly different from control rats. The results thus indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol decreases 5HT induced PI breakdown in rat cortex. In order to examine if this decrease is related to a decrease in 5HT2 receptors, or decreased in coupling of receptor to the effector pathway, the authors are currently determining the number and affinity of 5HT2 receptors in alcohol treated rats.

  3. Odorant-stimulated phosphoinositide signaling in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Klasen, K.; Corey, E.A.; Kuck, F.; Wetzel, C.H.; Hatt, H.; Ache, B.W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence has revived interest in the idea that phosphoinositides (PIs) may play a role in signal transduction in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). To provide direct evidence that odorants indeed activate PI signaling in ORNs, we used adenoviral vectors carrying two different fluorescently tagged probes, the pleckstrin homology (PH) domains of phospholipase Cδ1 (PLCδ1) and the general receptor of phosphoinositides (GRP1), to monitor PI activity in the dendritic knobs of ORNs in vivo. Odorants mobilized PI(4,5)P2/IP3 and PI(3,4,5)P3, the substrates and products of PLC and PI3K. We then measured odorant activation of PLC and PI3K in olfactory ciliary-enriched membranes in vitro using a phospholipid overlay assay and ELISAs. Odorants activated both PLC and PI3K in the olfactory cilia within 2 sec of odorant stimulation. Odorant-dependent activation of PLC and PI3K in the olfactory epithelium could be blocked by enzyme-specific inhibitors. Odorants activated PLC and PI3K with partially overlapping specificity. These results provide direct evidence that odorants indeed activate PI signaling in mammalian ORNs in a manner that is consistent with the idea that PI signaling plays a role in olfactory transduction. PMID:19781634

  4. Phosphoinositides in the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Bishé, Bryan; Syed, Gulam; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2012-10-19

    Eukaryotes possess seven different phosphoinositides (PIPs) that help form the unique signatures of various intracellular membranes. PIPs serve as docking sites for the recruitment of specific proteins to mediate membrane alterations and integrate various signaling cascades. The spatio-temporal regulation of PI kinases and phosphatases generates distinct intracellular hubs of PIP signaling. Hepatitis C virus (HCV), like other plus-strand RNA viruses, promotes the rearrangement of intracellular membranes to assemble viral replication complexes. HCV stimulates enrichment of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) pools near endoplasmic reticulum (ER) sites by activating PI4KIIIα, the kinase responsible for generation of ER-specific PI4P pools. Inhibition of PI4KIIIα abrogates HCV replication. PI4P, the most abundant phosphoinositide, predominantly localizes to the Golgi and plays central roles in Golgi secretory functions by recruiting effector proteins involved in transport vesicle generation. The PI4P effector proteins also include the lipid-transfer and structural proteins such as ceramide transfer protein (CERT), oxysterol binding protein (OSBP) and Golgi phosphoprotein 3 (GOLPH3) that help maintain Golgi-membrane composition and structure. Depletion of Golgi-specific PI4P pools by silencing PI4KIIIβ, expression of dominant negative CERT and OSBP mutants, or silencing GOLPH3 perturb HCV secretion. In this review we highlight the role of PIPs and specifically PI4P in the HCV life cycle.

  5. Discovery of novel brain permeable and G protein-biased beta-1 adrenergic receptor partial agonists for the treatment of neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bitna; Jahangir, Alam; Evans, Andrew K; Briggs, Denise; Ravina, Kristine; Ernest, Jacqueline; Farimani, Amir B; Sun, Wenchao; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Green, Michael; Feinberg, Evan N; Pande, Vijay S; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    The beta-1 adrenergic receptor (ADRB1) is a promising therapeutic target intrinsically involved in the cognitive deficits and pathological features associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence indicates that ADRB1 plays an important role in regulating neuroinflammatory processes, and activation of ADRB1 may produce neuroprotective effects in neuroinflammatory diseases. Novel small molecule modulators of ADRB1, engineered to be highly brain permeable and functionally selective for the G protein with partial agonistic activity, could have tremendous value both as pharmacological tools and potential lead molecules for further preclinical development. The present study describes our ongoing efforts toward the discovery of functionally selective partial agonists of ADRB1 that have potential therapeutic value for AD and neuroinflammatory disorders, which has led to the identification of the molecule STD-101-D1. As a functionally selective agonist of ADRB1, STD-101-D1 produces partial agonistic activity on G protein signaling with an EC50 value in the low nanomolar range, but engages very little beta-arrestin recruitment compared to the unbiased agonist isoproterenol. STD-101-D1 also inhibits the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in vitro and in vivo, and shows high brain penetration. Other than the therapeutic role, this newly identified, functionally selective, partial agonist of ADRB1 is an invaluable research tool to study mechanisms of G protein-coupled receptor signal transduction.

  6. Excitatory drive onto dopaminergic neurons in the rostral linear nucleus is enhanced by norepinephrine in an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Williams, Megan A; Li, Chia; Kash, Thomas L; Matthews, Robert T; Winder, Danny G

    2014-11-01

    Dopaminergic innervation of the extended amygdala regulates anxiety-like behavior and stress responsivity. A portion of this dopamine input arises from dopamine neurons located in the ventral lateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and rostral (RLi) and caudal linear nuclei of the raphe (CLi). These neurons receive substantial norepinephrine input, which may prime them for involvement in stress responses. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, we explored the physiology and responsiveness to norepinephrine of these neurons. We find that RLi dopamine neurons differ from VTA dopamine neurons with respect to membrane resistance, capacitance and the hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih. Further, we found that norepinephrine increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) on RLi dopamine neurons. This effect was mediated through the α1 adrenergic receptor (AR), as the actions of norepinephrine were mimicked by the α1-AR agonist methoxamine and blocked by the α1-AR antagonist prazosin. This action of norepinephrine on sEPSCs was transient, as it did not persist in the presence of prazosin. Methoxamine also increased the frequency of miniature EPSCs, indicating that the α1-AR action on glutamatergic transmission likely has a presynaptic mechanism. There was also a modest decrease in sEPSC frequency with the application of the α2-AR agonist UK-14,304. These studies illustrate a potential mechanism through which norepinephrine could recruit the activity of this population of dopaminergic neurons.

  7. Combining the α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist, Prazosin, with the β-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist, Propranolol, Reduces Alcohol Drinking More Effectively Than Either Drug Alone

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Dennis D; Beckwith, Lauren E; Kincaid, Carrie L; Froehlich, Janice C

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that activation of the noradrenergic system may contribute to alcohol drinking in animals and humans. Our previous studies demonstrated that blocking α1-adrenergic receptors with the antagonist, prazosin, decreased alcohol drinking in rats under various conditions. Since noradrenergic activation is also regulated by β-adrenergic receptors, we now examine the effects of the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol, alone or in combination with prazosin, on alcohol drinking in rats selectively bred for high voluntary alcohol intake and alcohol preference (P line). Methods Two studies were conducted with male P rats. In study one, rats were allowed to become alcohol-dependent during 14 weeks of ad libitum access to food, water and 20% alcohol and the effect of propranolol (5–15 mg/kg, IP) and prazosin (1–2 mg/kg, IP) on alcohol intake during withdrawal were assessed. In study two, the effect of propranolol (5 mg/kg, IP) and prazosin (2 mg/kg, IP) on alcohol intake following prolonged imposed abstinence was assessed. Results Alcohol drinking following propranolol treatment was variable, but the combination of propranolol + prazosin consistently suppressed alcohol drinking during both alcohol withdrawal and following prolonged imposed abstinence, and the combination of these two drugs was more effective than was treatment with either drug alone. Conclusions Treatment with prazosin + propranolol, or a combination of other centrally active α1- and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists, may assist in preventing alcohol relapse in some individuals. PMID:24891220

  8. Discovery of the First Environment-Sensitive Near-Infrared (NIR) Fluorogenic Ligand for α1-Adrenergic Receptors Imaging in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhao; Lin, Yuxing; Cheng, Yanna; Wu, Wenxiao; Cai, Rong; Chen, Shouzhen; Shi, Benkang; Han, Bo; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-03-10

    Fluorescent ligands are gaining popularity as tools to aid GPCR research. Nonetheless, in vivo application of such tools is hampered due to their short excitation wavelengths in the visible range and lack of fluorogenic switch. Here we report the discovery of fluorescent ligands (3a-f) for α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) by conjugating the environment-sensitive fluorophore cyane 5 (Cy5) with the quinazoline pharmacophore. Among them, the conjugated compound 3a, with acylated piperazine and the shortest carbon chain spacer, exhibited potent binding and remarkable changes in fluorescence (10-fold) upon binding to α1-AR. Furthermore, it could be employed to selectively and specifically label α1-ARs with no washing procedures in single cells, prostate tissue slices, intact tumor xenografts and organs in living mice. Especially, the slice imaging results gave direct and visual evidence that there is a close relationship between α1-ARs and pathological prostate. It is anticipated that our fluorescent tools will find broad applications in the study of α1-AR pharmacology and physiology to aid development of novel therapeutics.

  9. 3D Structure Prediction of Human β1-Adrenergic Receptor via Threading-Based Homology Modeling for Implications in Structure-Based Drug Designing

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Saeed, Maria; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of left ventricular dysfunction accompanied by impairment of the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) signal cascade. The disturbed β1-AR function may be based on an elevated sympathetic tone observed in patients with heart failure. Prolonged adrenergic stimulation may induce metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances in the myocardium, resulting in tachyarrhythmia that leads to the development of heart failure in human and sudden death. Hence, β1-AR is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop effective and specific drug against this tempting pharmaceutical target is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure of Homo sapiens β1-AR (hsβADR1). This study encompasses elucidation of 3D structural and physicochemical properties of hsβADR1 via threading-based homology modeling. Furthermore, the docking performance of several docking programs including Surflex-Dock, FRED, and GOLD were validated by re-docking and cross-docking experiments. GOLD and Surflex-Dock performed best in re-docking and cross docking experiments, respectively. Consequently, Surflex-Dock was used to predict the binding modes of four hsβADR1 agonists. This study provides clear understanding of hsβADR1 structure and its binding mechanism, thus help in providing the remedial solutions of cardiovascular, effective treatment of asthma and other diseases caused by malfunctioning of the target protein. PMID:25860348

  10. 3D structure prediction of human β1-adrenergic receptor via threading-based homology modeling for implications in structure-based drug designing.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Saeed, Maria; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of left ventricular dysfunction accompanied by impairment of the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) signal cascade. The disturbed β1-AR function may be based on an elevated sympathetic tone observed in patients with heart failure. Prolonged adrenergic stimulation may induce metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances in the myocardium, resulting in tachyarrhythmia that leads to the development of heart failure in human and sudden death. Hence, β1-AR is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop effective and specific drug against this tempting pharmaceutical target is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure of Homo sapiens β1-AR (hsβADR1). This study encompasses elucidation of 3D structural and physicochemical properties of hsβADR1 via threading-based homology modeling. Furthermore, the docking performance of several docking programs including Surflex-Dock, FRED, and GOLD were validated by re-docking and cross-docking experiments. GOLD and Surflex-Dock performed best in re-docking and cross docking experiments, respectively. Consequently, Surflex-Dock was used to predict the binding modes of four hsβADR1 agonists. This study provides clear understanding of hsβADR1 structure and its binding mechanism, thus help in providing the remedial solutions of cardiovascular, effective treatment of asthma and other diseases caused by malfunctioning of the target protein.

  11. Impaired gene expression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, but not stimulatory G-protein Gs alpha, in rat ventricular myocardium treated with isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Keiichiro; Momozaki, Masami; Akatsuka, Keiko; Fujimori, Yuuki; Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Temma, Kyosuke; Hara, Yukio

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the gene expression of beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) and stimulatory G-protein Gsalpha, important signal transduction elements for regulating heart rate and contractility, in ventricle after chronic treatment with isoproterenol (ISO) in rat. Rats were treated with ISO (4 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) twice a day for 4 d. Ventricle weight of the heart and ventricle weight/body weight ratio were increased by 23% and 25% compared with control, respectively. Positive inotropic responses to ISO in left atrial muscle preparations isolated from ISO-treated rats were markedly decreased. Northern blot hybridization showed that the mRNA transcript of beta(1)AR was significantly decreased in ventricle of ISO-treated rats, whereas Gsalpha mRNA level was unchanged. Present results demonstrate that the gene expression of myocardial beta(1)AR, but not Gsalpha, was decreased in rat myocardium of ISO-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and suggesting that decrease in the gene expression of beta(1)AR may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the diminished cardiac function.

  12. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Is the Primary Mediator of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Inhibition in Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth; Ache, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    Odorants inhibit as well as excite primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in many animal species. Growing evidence suggests that inhibition of mammalian ORNs is mediated by phosphoinositide (PI) signaling through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and that canonical adenylyl cyclase III signaling and PI3K signaling interact to provide the basis for ligand-induced selective signaling. As PI3K is known to act in concert with phospholipase C (PLC) in some cellular systems, the question arises as to whether they work together to mediate inhibitory transduction in mammalian ORNs. The present study is designed to test this hypothesis. While we establish that multiple PLC isoforms are expressed in the transduction zone of rat ORNs, that odorants can activate PLC in ORNs in situ, and that pharmacological blockade of PLC enhances the excitatory response to an odorant mixture in some ORNs in conjunction with PI3K blockade, we find that by itself PLC does not account for an inhibitory response. We conclude that PLC does not make a measurable independent contribution to odor-evoked inhibition, and that PI3K is the primary mediator of PI-dependent inhibition in mammalian ORNs. PMID:27147969

  13. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  14. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD)

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yasunobu; Maeno, Emi; Shimizu, Takahiro; Dezaki, Katsuya; Wang, Jun; Morishima, Shigeru

    2001-01-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl− channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl− channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl− conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNFα receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma × rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be

  15. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD).

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Maeno, E; Shimizu, T; Dezaki, K; Wang, J; Morishima, S

    2001-04-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl- channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl- channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl- conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNF receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be abolished by

  16. Histamine H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis with cell shape change and adhesion molecule upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ping; Ngo, Karen; Nguyen, Steven; Thurmond, Robin L; Edwards, James P; Karlsson, Lars; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping

    2004-01-01

    During mast cell degranulation, histamine is released in large quantities. Human eosinophils were found to express histamine H4 but not H3 receptors. The possible effects of histamine on eosinophils and the receptor mediating these effects were investigated in our studies. Histamine (0.01–30 μM) induced a rapid and transient cell shape change in human eosinophils, but had no effects on neutrophils. The maximal shape change was at 0.3 μM histamine with EC50 at 19 nM. After 60 min incubation with 1 μM histamine, eosinophils were desensitized and were refractory to shape change response upon histamine restimulation. Histamine (0.01–1 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. Histamine-induced eosinophil shape change was mediated by the H4 receptor. This effect was completely inhibited by H4 receptor-specific antagonist JNJ 7777120 (IC50 0.3 μM) and H3/H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (IC50 1.4 μM), but not by selective H1, H2 or H3 receptor antagonists. H4 receptor agonists imetit (EC50 25 nM) and clobenpropit (EC50 72 nM) could mimic histamine effect in inducing eosinophil shape change. Histamine (0.01–100 μM) induced upregulation of adhesion molecules CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) on eosinophils. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 and thioperamide. Histamine (0.01–10 μM) induced eosinophil chemotaxis with an EC50 of 83 nM. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 (IC50 86 nM) and thioperamide (IC50 519 nM). Histamine (0.5 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. In conclusion, we have demonstrated a new mechanism of eosinophil recruitment driven by mast cells via the release of histamine. Using specific histamine receptor ligands, we have provided a definitive proof that the H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis, cell shape change and

  17. Characterisation of a plant 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 homologue which contains a pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Deak, M; Casamayor, A; Currie, R A; Downes, C P; Alessi, D R

    1999-05-28

    A plant homologue of mammalian 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) has been identified in Arabidopsis and rice which displays 40% overall identity with human 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1. Like the mammalian 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1, Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 and rice 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 possess a kinase domain at N-termini and a pleckstrin homology domain at their C-termini. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 can rescue lethality in Saccharomyces cerevisiae caused by disruption of the genes encoding yeast 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 homologues. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 interacts via its pleckstrin homology domain with phosphatidic acid, PtdIns3P, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and PtdIns(3,4)P2 and to a lesser extent with PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns4P. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 is able to activate human protein kinase B alpha (PKB/AKT) in the presence of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 is only the second plant protein reported to possess a pleckstrin homology domain and the first plant protein shown to bind 3-phosphoinositides.

  18. VISUALIZIATION OF CELLULAR PHOSPHOINOSITIDE POOLS WITH GFP-FUSED PROTEIN-DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Tamas; Várnai, Péter

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the method of following phosphoinositide dynamics in live cells. Inositol phospholipids have emerged as universal signaling molecules present in virtually every membrane of eukaryotic cells. Phosphoinositides are present only in tiny amounts compared to structural lipids but are metabolically very active as they are produced and degraded by the numerous inositide kinase and phosphatase enzymes. Phosphoinositides control the membrane-recruitment and activity of many protein signaling-complexes in specific membrane compartments and have been implicated in the regulation of a variety of signaling and trafficking pathways. It has been a challenge to develop methods that allow detection of phosphoinositides at the single cell level. The only available technique in live cell application is based on the use of the same protein domains selected by evolution to recognize cellular phosphoinositides. Some of these isolated protein modules when fused to fluorescent proteins can follow dynamic changes in phosphoinositides. While this technique can provide information on phosphoinositide dynamics in live cells with subcellular resolution and rapidly gained popularity, it also has several limitations that must be taken into account when interpreting the data. Here, we summarize the design and practical use of these constructs and also review important considerations for the interpretation of the data obtained by this technique. PMID:19283730

  19. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    PubMed

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    , hippocampal or hypothalamic slices were used instead of cortical slices. The Ca2+-induced tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine (in the presence of ranitidine); this effect was abolished by clobenpropit. In slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, impromidine failed to facilitate the Ca2+-evoked tritium overflow. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in mouse brain cortex slices was inhibited by histamine by about 60% (both in the absence or presence of ranitidine). The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished (but not reversed) by clobenpropit. In conclusion, noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain cortex is inhibited via presynaptic H3 receptors and facilitated via H2 receptors not located presynaptically. In the mouse brain cortex, only inhibitory H3 receptors occur. The extent of the H3 receptor-mediated effect is more marked in the mouse than in the guinea-pig brain cortex.

  20. Receptor-mediated uptake and transport of macromolecules in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henning; Miller, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The human placenta is required to be the anchor, the conduit and the controller during pregnancy. The survival of the baby and its associated placenta is dependent upon the placenta shielding the embryo/fetus from harm, e.g., autoimmune disease - thrombophilia, antiphospholipid syndrome or infections, while simultaneously providing for the passage of critical nutrients (e.g., amino acids, vitamins) and beneficial immunoglobulins. In a number of instances, the movements of macromolecules into and through the placenta can result in the passage of the intact molecules into the fetal circulation or in the case of proteins - catabolism to amino acids which are utilized by the placenta and the fetus for continued growth and development. The transfer of two such macromolecules, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin or B12), are examined as to the unique receptor-mediated transfer capability of the human placenta, its transfer specificity as related to specific receptors and the role of endogeneous placental proteins (trancobalamins) in facilitating the recognition and transport of specifically B12. Brief comparisons will be made to other animal species and the differences in specific organ transfer capabilities.

  1. Kainate Receptors Mediate Signaling in Both Transient and Sustained OFF Bipolar Cell Pathways in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Looger, Loren L.; Tomita, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors. PMID:24790183

  2. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes. PMID:25324743

  3. Multivalent ligand-receptor-mediated interaction of small filled vesicles with a cellular membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2017-07-01

    The ligand-receptor-mediated contacts of small sub-100-nm-sized lipid vesicles (or nanoparticles) with the cellular membrane are of interest in the contexts of cell-to-cell communication, endocytosis of membrane-coated virions, and drug (RNA) delivery. In all these cases, the interior of vesicles is filled by biologically relevant content. Despite the diversity of such systems, the corresponding ligand-receptor interaction possesses universal features. One of them is that the vesicle-membrane contacts can be accompanied by the redistribution of ligands and receptors between the contact and contact-free regions. In particular, the concentrations of ligands and receptors may become appreciably higher in the contact regions and their composition may there be different compared to that in the suspended state in the solution. A statistical model presented herein describes the corresponding distribution of various ligands and receptors and allows one to calculate the related change of the free energy with variation of the vesicle-engulfment extent. The results obtained are used to clarify the necessary conditions for the vesicle-assisted pathway of drug delivery.

  4. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-01-01

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism. PMID:6896821

  5. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-05-15

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism.

  6. Beta receptor-mediated modulation of the late positive potential in humans.

    PubMed

    de Rover, Mischa; Brown, Stephen B R E; Boot, Nathalie; Hajcak, Greg; van Noorden, Martijn S; van der Wee, Nic J A; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-02-01

    Electrophysiological studies have identified a scalp potential, the late positive potential (LPP), which is modulated by the emotional intensity of observed stimuli. Previous work has shown that the LPP reflects the modulation of activity in extrastriate visual cortical structures, but little is known about the source of that modulation. The present study investigated whether beta-adrenergic receptors are involved in the generation of the LPP. We used a genetic individual differences approach (experiment 1) and a pharmacological manipulation (experiment 2) to test the hypothesis that the LPP is modulated by the activation of β-adrenergic receptors. In experiment 1, we found that LPP amplitude depends on allelic variation in the β1-receptor gene polymorphism. In experiment 2, we found that LPP amplitude was modulated by the β-blocker propranolol in a direction dependent on subjects' level of trait anxiety: In participants with lower trait anxiety, propranolol led to a (nonsignificant) decrease in the LPP modulation; in participants with higher trait anxiety, propranolol increased the emotion-related LPP modulation. These results provide initial support for the hypothesis that the LPP reflects the downstream effects, in visual cortical areas, of β-receptor-mediated activation of the amygdala.

  7. Selective antagonism of AMPA receptors unmasks kainate receptor-mediated responses in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Paternain, A V; Morales, M; Lerma, J

    1995-01-01

    Although both protein and mRNAs for kainate receptor subunits are abundant in several brain regions, the responsiveness of AMPA receptors to kainate has made it difficult to demonstrate the presence of functional kainate-type receptors in native cells. Recently, however, we have shown that many hippocampal neurons in culture express glutamate receptors of the kainate type. The large nondesensitizing response that kainate induces at AMPA receptors precludes detection and analysis of smaller, rapidly desensitizing currents induced by kainate at kainate receptors. Consequently, the functional significance of these strongly desensitizing glutamate receptors remains enigmatic. We report here that the family of new noncompetitive antagonists of AMPA receptors (GYKI 52466 and 53655) minimally affects kainate-induced responses at kainate receptors while completely blocking AMPA receptor-mediated currents, making it possible to separate the responses mediated by each receptor. These compounds will allow determination of the role played by kainate receptors in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the mammalian brain, as well as evaluation of their involvement in neurotoxicity.

  8. Substance P selectively modulates GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Govindaiah, G; Wang, Yanyan; Cox, Charles L

    2010-02-01

    Substance P (SP) is co-localized and co-released with gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from approximately 50% of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum. MSNs innervate several cellular targets including neighboring MSNs and cholinergic interneurons via collaterals. However, the functional role of SP release onto striatal interneurons is unknown. Here we examined SP-mediated actions on inhibitory synaptic transmission in cholinergic interneurons using whole-cell recordings in mouse corticostriatal slices. We found that SP selectively suppressed GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), but not excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in cholinergic interneurons. In contrast, SP did not alter IPSCs in fast-spiking interneurons and MSNs. SP suppressed IPSC amplitude in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, and the NK1 receptor antagonist RP67580 attenuated the SP-mediated suppression. In addition, RP67580 alone enhanced the evoked IPSC amplitude in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting an endogenous action of SP on regulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission. SP did not alter the paired-pulse ratio, but reduced the amplitudes of GABA(A) agonist muscimol-induced outward currents and miniature IPSCs in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting SP exerts its effects primarily at the post-synaptic site. Our results indicate that the physiological effects of SP are to enhance the activity of striatal cholinergic interneurons and provide a rationale for designing potential new antiparkinsonian agents.

  9. S-nitrosylated SHP-2 contributes to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Sunico, Carmen R.; McKercher, Scott R.; Cui, Jiankun; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) can cause neuronal damage, contributing to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases and stroke (i.e., focal cerebral ischemia). NO can mediate neurotoxic effects at least in part via protein S-nitrosylation, a reaction that covalently attaches NO to a cysteine thiol (or thiolate anion) to form an S-nitrosothiol. Recently, the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) and its downstream pathways have emerged as important mediators of cell survival. Here we report that in neurons and brain tissue NO can S-nitrosylate SHP-2 at its active site cysteine, forming S-nitrosylated SHP-2 (SNO–SHP-2). We found that NMDA exposure in vitro and transient focal cerebral ischemia in vivo resulted in increased levels of SNO–SHP-2. S-Nitrosylation of SHP-2 inhibited its phosphatase activity, blocking downstream activation of the neuroprotective physiological ERK1/2 pathway, thus increasing susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings suggest that formation of SNO–SHP-2 represents a key chemical reaction contributing to excitotoxic damage in stroke and potentially other neurological disorders. PMID:23382182

  10. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  11. Dual effects of anandamide on NMDA receptor-mediated responses and neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Hampson, A J; Bornheim, L M; Scanziani, M; Yost, C S; Gray, A T; Hansen, B M; Leonoudakis, D J; Bickler, P E

    1998-02-01

    Anandamide is an endogenous ligand of cannabinoid receptors that induces pharmacological responses in animals similar to those of cannabinoids such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Typical pharmacological effects of cannabinoids include disruption of pain, memory formation, and motor coordination, systems that all depend on NMDA receptor mediated neurotransmission. We investigated whether anandamide can influence NMDA receptor activity by examining NMDA-induced calcium flux (deltaCa2+NMDA) in rat brain slices. The presence of anandamide reduced deltaCa2+NMDA and the inhibition was disrupted by cannabinoid receptor antagonist, pertussis toxin treatment, and agatoxin (a calcium channel inhibitor). Whereas these treatments prevented anandamide inhibiting deltaCa2+NMDA, they also revealed another, underlying mechanism by which anandamide influences deltaCa2+NMDA. In the presence of cannabinoid receptor antagonist, anandamide potentiated deltaCa2+NMDA in cortical, cerebellar, and hippocampal slices. Anandamide (but not THC) also augmented NMDA-stimulated currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing cloned NMDA receptors, suggesting a capacity to directly modulate NMDA receptor activity. In a similar manner, anandamide enhanced neurotransmission across NMDA receptor-dependent synapses in hippocampus in a manner that was not mimicked by THC and was unaffected by cannabinoid receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that anandamide can modulate NMDA receptor activity in addition to its role as a cannabinoid receptor ligand.

  12. Different receptors mediate the electrophysiological and growth cone responses of an identified neuron to applied dopamine.

    PubMed

    Dobson, K S; Dmetrichuk, J M; Spencer, G E

    2006-09-15

    Neurotransmitters are among the many cues that may guide developing axons toward appropriate targets in the developing nervous system. We have previously shown in the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis that dopamine, released from an identified pre-synaptic cell, differentially affects growth cone behavior of its target and non-target cells in vitro. Here, we describe a group of non-target cells that also produce an inhibitory electrophysiological response to applied dopamine. We first determined, using pharmacological blockers, which receptors mediate this physiological response. We demonstrated that the dopaminergic electrophysiological responses of non-target cells were sensitive to a D2 receptor antagonist, as are known target cell responses. However, the non-target cell receptors were linked to different G-proteins and intracellular signaling pathways than the target cell receptors. Despite the presence of a D2-like receptor at the soma, the growth cone collapse of these non-target cells was mediated by D1-like receptors. This study shows that different dopamine receptor sub-types mediated the inhibitory physiological and growth cone responses of an identified cell type. We therefore not only provide further evidence that D2- and D1-like receptors can be present on the same neuron in invertebrates, but also show that these receptors are likely involved in very different cellular functions.

  13. Internalisation of the bleomycin molecules responsible for bleomycin toxicity: a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Mahrour, N; Orlowski, S; Tounekti, O; Poddevin, B; Belehradek, J; Mir, L M

    1999-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) does not diffuse through the plasma membrane but nevertheless displays cytotoxic activity due to DNA break generation. The aim of the study was to describe the mechanism of BLM internalisation. We previously provided evidence for the existence of BLM-binding sites at the surface of DC-3F Chinese hamster fibroblasts, as well as of their involvement in BLM cytotoxicity on DC-3F cells and related BLM-resistant sublines. Here we report that A253 human cells and their BLM-resistant subline C-10E also possessed a membrane protein of ca. 250 kDa specifically binding BLM. Part of this C-10E cell resistance could be explained by a decrease in the number of BLM-binding sites exposed at the cell surface with respect to A253 cells. The comparison between A253 and DC-3F cells exposing a similar number of BLM-binding sites revealed that the faster the fluid phase endocytosis, the greater the cell sensitivity to BLM. Moreover, the experimental modification of endocytotic vesicle size showed that BLM cytotoxicity was directly correlated with the flux of plasma membrane area engulfed during endocytosis rather than with the fluid phase volume incorporated. Thus, BLM would be internalised by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism which would first require BLM binding to its membrane receptor and then the transfer of the complex into intracellular endocytotic vesicles, followed by BLM entry into the cytosol, probably from a nonacidic compartment.

  14. Optimization of stress response through the nuclear receptor-mediated cortisol signalling network

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin, Alexey; Sahin, Nilgun; Phillips, Anna; Hood, Steve R.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Plant, Nick

    2013-01-01

    It is an accepted paradigm that extended stress predisposes an individual to pathophysiology. However, the biological adaptations to minimize this risk are poorly understood. Using a computational model based upon realistic kinetic parameters we are able to reproduce the interaction of the stress hormone cortisol with its two nuclear receptors, the high-affinity glucocorticoid receptor and the low-affinity pregnane X-receptor. We demonstrate that regulatory signals between these two nuclear receptors are necessary to optimize the body’s response to stress episodes, attenuating both the magnitude and duration of the biological response. In addition, we predict that the activation of pregnane X-receptor by multiple, low-affinity endobiotic ligands is necessary for the significant pregnane X-receptor-mediated transcriptional response observed following stress episodes. This integration allows responses mediated through both the high and low-affinity nuclear receptors, which we predict is an important strategy to minimize the risk of disease from chronic stress. PMID:23653204

  15. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Daniel H; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius; Moyer, Amanda; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Peters, Diane E; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Selvaraj, Arul; Yamada, Susan S; Brenner, David A; Burgdorf, Sven; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels; Holmbeck, Kenn; Weigert, Roberto; Bugge, Thomas H

    2013-09-16

    Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase-dependent manner and was subsequently routed to lysosomes for complete degradation. Collagen uptake was predominantly executed by a quantitatively minor population of M2-like macrophages, whereas more abundant Col1a1-expressing fibroblasts and Cx3cr1-expressing macrophages internalized collagen at lower levels. Genetic ablation of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies a key role of M2-like macrophages in this process.

  16. Endothelial adenosine A2a receptor-mediated glycolysis is essential for pathological retinal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiping; Yan, Siyuan; Wang, Jiaojiao; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Shuya; Xu, Xizhen; Yang, Qiuhua; Zeng, Xianqiu; Zhou, Yaqi; Gu, Xuejiao; Lu, Sarah; Fu, Zhongjie; Fulton, David J; Weintraub, Neal L; Caldwell, Ruth B; Zhang, Wenbo; Wu, Chaodong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Ahmad, Aftab; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Li, Qinkai; Jiang, Xuejun; Sun, Ye; Sodhi, Akrit; Smith, Lois; Hong, Mei; Huo, Yuqing

    2017-09-19

    Adenosine/adenosine receptor-mediated signaling has been implicated in the development of various ischemic diseases, including ischemic retinopathies. Here, we show that the adenosine A2a receptor (ADORA2A) promotes hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent endothelial cell glycolysis, which is crucial for pathological angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies. Adora2a expression is markedly increased in the retina of mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Endothelial cell-specific, but not macrophage-specific Adora2a deletion decreases key glycolytic enzymes and reduces pathological neovascularization in the OIR mice. In human primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells, hypoxia induces the expression of ADORA2A by activating HIF-2α. ADORA2A knockdown decreases hypoxia-induced glycolytic enzyme expression, glycolytic flux, and endothelial cell proliferation, sprouting and tubule formation. Mechanistically, ADORA2A activation promotes the transcriptional induction of glycolytic enzymes via ERK- and Akt-dependent translational activation of HIF-1α protein. Taken together, these findings advance translation of ADORA2A as a therapeutic target in the treatment of proliferative retinopathies and other diseases dependent on pathological angiogenesis.Pathological angiogenesis in the retina is a major cause of blindness. Here the authors show that adenosine receptor A2A drives pathological angiogenesis in the oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model by promoting glycolysis in endothelial cells via the ERK/Akt/HIF-1α pathway, thereby suggesting new therapeutic targets for disease treatment.

  17. MAGI-1 acts as a scaffolding molecule for NGF receptor-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Mizuno, Makoto; Nagata, Koh-ichi

    2013-10-01

    We have recently found that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted organization-1 (MAGI-1) was enriched in rat nervous tissues such as the glomeruli in olfactory bulb of adult rats and dorsal root entry zone in spinal cord of embryonic rats. In addition, we revealed the localization of MAGI-1 in the growth cone of the primary cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells. These results point out the possibility that MAGI-1 is involved in the regulation of neurite extension or guidance. In this study, we attempted to reveal the physiological role(s) of MAGI-1 in neurite extension. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of MAGI-1 caused inhibition of nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. To clarify the involvement of MAGI-1 in NGF-mediated signal pathway, we tried to identify binding partners for MAGI-1 and identified p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a low affinity NGF receptor, and Shc, a phosphotyrosine-binding adaptor. These three proteins formed an immunocomplex in PC12 cells. Knockdown as well as overexpression of MAGI-1 caused suppression of NGF-stimulated activation of the Shc-ERK pathway, which is supposed to play important roles in neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. These results indicate that MAGI-1 may act as a scaffolding molecule for NGF receptor-mediated signaling pathway.

  18. Cell receptors: definition, mechanisms and regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Féger, J; Gil-Falgon, S; Lamaze, C

    1994-12-01

    Receptors allow the cells to recognize specific ligands and to receive extracellular messages. They can be classified into five families: 1) receptors for lipidic or lipophilic ligands; 2) the seven transmembrane receptors which mediate their messages by transduction through the activation of G-proteins, effectors and second messengers to amplify the response; 3) receptors which present an enzymatic activity on their transmembrane domains; 4) channel-receptors, transmembrane oligomeric molecules which let ions flow into the cell and 5) receptors which role is to internalize ligands, whatever their various functions. In parallel a concept of membrane plasticity was developed: vesicles are constantly formed from the plasma membrane, addressing complexes of ligand-receptors to specific intracellular compartments. This receptor-mediated endocytosis of ligand plays a critical role in regulating the number of a given receptor at the plasma membrane and in the cellular uptake of nutrients, growth factors and hormones. Many pathways exist for these transports but little is known about the signals which select the ligands or the receptors and direct them to their appropriate intracellular destination.

  19. The effect of vanadate on receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in rat liver parenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kindberg, G.M.; Gudmundsen, O.; Berg, T. )

    1990-06-05

    Vanadate is a phosphate analogue that inhibits enzymes involved in phosphate release and transfer reactions. Since such reactions may play important roles in endocytosis, we studied the effects of vanadate on various steps in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid labeled with 125I-tyramine-cellobiose (125I-TC-AOM). The labeled degradation products formed from 125I-TC-AOM are trapped in the lysosomes and may therefore serve as lysosomal markers in subcellular fractionation studies. Vanadate reduced the amount of active surface asialoglycoprotein receptors approximately 70%, but had no effect on the rate of internalization and retroendocytosis of ligand. The amount of surface asialoglycoprotein receptors can be reduced by lowering the incubation temperature gradually from 37 to 15 degrees C; vanadate affected only the temperature--sensitive receptors. Vanadate inhibited degradation of 125I-TC-AOM 70-80%. Degradation was much more sensitive to vanadate than binding; half-maximal effects were seen at approximately 1 mM vanadate for binding and approximately 0.1 mM vanadate for degradation. By subcellular fractionation in sucrose and Nycodenz gradients, it was shown that vanadate completely prevented the transfer of 125I-TC-AOM from endosomes to lysosomes. Therefore, the inhibition of degradation by vanadate was indirect; in the presence of vanadate, ligand did not gain access to the lysosomes. The limited degradation in the presence of vanadate took place in a prelysosomal compartment. Vanadate did not affect cell viability and ATP content.

  20. FLIP ing the coin? Death receptor-mediated signals during skin tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Leverkus, Martin; Diessenbacher, Philip; Geserick, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Keratinocyte skin cancer is a multi-step process, during which a number of obstacles have to be overcome by the tumor cell to allow the development of a manifest tumor. Beside proliferation and immortality, apoptosis resistance is one additional and critical step during skin carcinogenesis. Over the past two decades, much has been learned about the prototypical membrane-bound inducers of apoptosis, namely the death receptors and their ligands, and the apoptosis signalling pathways activated by death receptors have been elucidated in great detail. In contrast, much less is known about the tissue-specific role of the death receptor/ligands systems during the development of skin cancer. Here, we summarize and discuss the role of this intriguing receptor family and the potential mechanistical impact of the intracellular caspase-8 inhibitor cFLIP for keratinocyte skin cancer. Given more recent data about cFLIP and its isoforms, a more complex regulatory role of cFLIP can be suspected. Indeed, cFLIP may not solely interfere with death receptor-mediated apoptosis signalling pathways, but may positively or negatively influence other, potential harmful signalling pathways such as the production of inflammatory cytokines, tumor cell migration or the activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB, considered crucial during skin tumorigenesis. In this respect, cFLIP may act to 'FLIP the coin' during the development of keratinocyte skin cancer.

  1. Receptor-mediated transcytosis: a mechanism for active extravascular transport of nanoparticles in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Xiong, Chiyi; Zhang, Rui; Shi, Lifang; Huang, Miao; Zhang, Guodong; Song, Shaoli; Huang, Qian; Liu, Gang-Yu; Li, Chun

    2012-08-10

    Targeted nanoparticle-based delivery systems have been used extensively to develop effective cancer theranostics. However, how targeting ligands affect extravascular transport of nanoparticles in solid tumors remains unclear. Here, we show, using B16/F10 melanoma cells expressing melanocortin type-1 receptor (MC1R), that the nature of targeting ligands, i.e., whether they are agonists or antagonists, directs tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution after extravasation of nanoparticles from tumor vessels into the extravascular fluid space. Pegylated hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS, diameter=40 nm) coated with MC1R agonist are internalized upon ligand-receptor binding, whereas MC1R antagonist-conjugated HAuNS remain attached on the cell surface. Transcellular transport of agonist-conjugated HAuNS was confirmed by a multilayer tumor cell model and by transmission electron microscopy. MC1R agonist- but not MC1R antagonist-conjugated nanoparticles exhibit significantly higher tumor uptake than nontargeted HAuNS and are quickly dispersed from tumor vessels via receptor-mediated endocytosis and subsequent transcytosis. These results confirm an active transport mechanism that can be used to overcome one of the major biological barriers for efficient nanoparticle delivery to solid tumors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  3. Spinal GABA receptors mediate the suppressive effect of electroacupuncture on cold allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Han, Jae-Bok; Kim, Sun-Kwang; Park, Jung-Hyuk; Go, Dong-Hyun; Sun, Boram; Min, Byung-Il

    2010-03-31

    This study was performed to determine whether spinal GABAergic systems mediate the relieving effects of low frequency electroacupuncture (EA) on cold allodynia in a rat tail model of neuropathic pain. For neuropathic surgery, the right superior caudal trunk was resected at the level between the S1 and S2 spinal nerves innervating the tail. Two weeks after the nerve injury, the intrathecal catheter was implanted. Five days after the catheterization, rats were intrathecally injected with gabazine (GABA(A) receptor antagonist, 0.0003, 0.001 or 0.003mug), or saclofen (GABA(B) receptor antagonist, 3, 10 or 30mug). Ten minutes after the injection, EA (2Hz) was applied to the ST36 acupoint for 30min. The cold allodynia was assessed by the tail immersion test (i.e. immersing the tail in cold (4 degrees C) water and measuring the latency of an abrupt tail movement) before and after the EA treatment. EA stimulation at ST36 significantly inhibited the cold allodynia sign, whereas EA at non-acupoint and plain acupuncture at ST36 (without electrical stimulation) did not show antiallodynic effects. Intrathecal administration of gabazine or saclofen blocked the relieving effects of ST36 EA stimulation on cold allodynia. These results suggest that spinal GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors mediate the suppressive effect of low frequency EA on cold allodynia in the tail neuropathic rats.

  4. Receptor-Mediated Entry of Pristine Octahedral DNA Nanocages in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Giulia; Raniolo, Sofia; Ottaviani, Alessio; Falconi, Mattia; Franch, Oskar; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Desideri, Alessandro; Biocca, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    DNA offers excellent programming properties for the generation of nanometer-scaled polyhedral structures with a broad variety of potential applications. Translation to biomedical applications requires improving stability in biological fluids, efficient and selective cell binding, and/or internalization of the assembled DNA nanostructures. Here, we report an investigation on the selective mechanism of cellular uptake of pristine DNA nanocages in cells expressing the receptor "oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1" (LOX-1), a scavenger receptor associated with cardiovascular diseases and, more recently, identified as a tumor marker. For this purpose a truncated octahedral DNA nanocage functionalized with a single biotin molecule, which allows DNA cage detection through the biotin-streptavidin assays, was constructed. The results indicate that DNA nanocages are stable in biological fluids, including human serum, and are selectively bound and very efficiently internalized in vesicles only in LOX-1-expressing cells. The amount of internalized cages is 30 times higher in LOX-1-expressing cells than in normal fibroblasts, indicating that the receptor-mediated uptake of pristine DNA nanocages can be pursued for a selective cellular internalization. These results open the route for a therapeutic use of pristine DNA cages targeting LOX-1-overexpressing tumor cells.

  5. Accumbens shell AMPA receptors mediate expression of extinguished reward seeking through interactions with basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Millan, E Zayra; McNally, Gavan P

    2011-07-01

    Extinction is the reduction in drug seeking when the contingency between drug seeking behavior and the delivery of drug reward is broken. Here, we investigated a role for the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh). Rats were trained to respond for 4% (v/v) alcoholic beer in one context (Context A) followed by extinction in a second context (Context B). Rats were subsequently tested in the training context, A (ABA), or the extinction context, B (ABB). Pre-test injections of the glutamate AMPA receptor antagonist, NBQX (1 µg) into AcbSh had no effect on renewal of alcoholic beer seeking when rats were returned to the training context (ABA). However, NBQX increased responding when rats were tested in the extinction context (ABB). In a second experiment, rats received training, extinction, and test in the same context. Pre-test injections of NBQX (0, 0.3, and 1 µg) into the AcbSh dose-dependently attenuated expression of extinction. We also found that NBQX in the AcbSh had no effect on initial acquisition of extinction or the motivation to respond for reward as measured by break point on a progressive ratio schedule. Finally, we show that pharmacological disconnection of a basolateral amygdala (BLA) → AcbSh pathway via NBQX in AcbSh combined with reversible inactivation of the contralateral BLA attenuates expression of extinction. Together, these results suggest that AcbSh AMPA receptors mediate expression of extinguished reward seeking through glutamatergic inputs from the BLA.

  6. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  7. Low temperature blocks fluid-phase pinocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, R C; Soares, M J

    2000-05-01

    Gold-labeled albumin and transferrin were used to follow at the ultrastructural level the early events and the effect of low temperature on protein uptake by Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. In parasites incubated for 5 min at 28 degrees C with protein-gold complexes, extracellular markers were found only at the cytostome and/or the flagellar pocket regions, whereas intracellular gold particles were detected inside small uncoated vesicles located nearby. Within 10 min, labeling was also observed in uncoated vesicles close to the nucleus. Only after 30 min could the tracers be detected in the reservosomes. Weak labeling in the cytostome and flagellar pocket of parasites incubated at 4 degrees C with the albumin-gold solution indicated that albumin uptake occurred by fluid-phase pinocytosis. On the other hand, intense labeling at the cytostome was observed in parasites incubated at 4 degrees C with gold-labeled transferrin, showing that receptor-mediated endocytosis occurs mainly at this site. Both proteins were absent from the cells at 4 degrees C and 12 degrees C. Raising the temperature from 12 degrees C to 28 degrees C led to transferrin labeling in intracellular vesicles dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, but not in reservosomes. Our results suggest that low temperatures affect the transport and pinching of endocytic vesicles as well as the rate of delivery of transferrin to reservosomes.

  8. Receptor mediated endocytosis of vicilin in Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larval midgut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Daniele; Oliveira, Gabriel B; Uchôa, Adriana F; Samuels, Richard I; Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Silva, Carlos P

    2017-08-01

    The transport of proteins across the intestinal epithelium of insects is still not well understood. There is evidence that vicilin, a major storage protein of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata), is internalized in larvae of the seed-beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. It has been reported that this vicilin interacts with proteins present in the microvillar membranes of columnar cells along the digestive tract of the larvae. In the present work, we studied the cellular pathway involved in endocytosis of vicilin in larval C. maculatus by employing ex vivo experiments. In the ex vivo approach, we incubated FITC-labelled vicilin with isolated midgut wholemounts in the absence or in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors. The fate of labelled or non-labelled globulins was monitored by confocal microscopy and fluorescence measurement. Our results suggest that the internalization of vicilins is due to receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we report the identity of a microvillar vicilin-binding protein that was purified using affinity chromatography on a vicilin-sepharose column. The putative vicilin receptor showed high homology to proteins with the CRAL-TRIO domain, specifically the Sec14 superfamily member α-tocopherol transfer protein. The precise mechanism involved in vicilin internalization was defined through the use of specific inhibitors of the endocytosis pathway. The inhibitors filipin III and nystatin significantly inhibited the endocytosis of vicilin, while chlorpromazine and phenylarsine oxide had a much lower effect on endocytosis, suggesting that the endocytic pathway is predominantly mediated by caveolin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis by receptor-mediated drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Basu, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    p-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) conjugated to maleylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA) was taken up efficiently through high-affinity MBSA-binding sites on macrophages. Binding of the radiolabeled conjugate to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages at 4 degrees C was competed for by MBSA but not by PAS. At 37 degrees C, the radiolabeled conjugate was rapidly degraded by the macrophages, leading to release of acid-soluble degradation products in the medium. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free PAS in killing the intracellular mycobacteria in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected in culture with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The killing of intracellular mycobacteria mediated by the drug conjugate was effectively prevented by simultaneous addition of excess MBSA (100 micrograms/ml) or chloroquine (3 microM) to the medium, whereas these agents did not affect the microbicidal action of free PAS. These results suggest that (i) uptake of the PAS-MBSA conjugate was mediated by cell surface receptors on macrophages which recognize MBSA and (ii) lysosomal hydrolysis of the internalized conjugate resulted in intracellular release of a pharmacologically active form of the drug, which led to selective killing of the M. tuberculosis harbored by mouse macrophages infected in culture. This receptor-mediated modality of delivering drugs to macrophages could contribute to greater therapeutic efficacy and minimization of toxic side effects in the management of tuberculosis and other intracellular mycobacterial infections.

  10. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  11. Lactate Modulates the Activity of Primary Cortical Neurons through a Receptor-Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism. PMID:23951229

  12. Interactions of legionella effector proteins with host phosphoinositide lipids.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Dolinsky, Stephanie; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    By means of the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system Legionella pneumophila translocates several effector proteins into host cells, where they anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. Thus, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate anchors the effector proteins SidC and SidM, which promote the interaction of LCVs with the ER and the secretory vesicle trafficking -pathway. In this chapter, we describe protocols to (1) identify PI-binding proteins in Legionella lysates using PI-beads, (2) determine PI-binding specificities and affinities of recombinant Legionella effector proteins by protein-lipid overlays, and (3) use Legionella effectors to identify cellular PI lipids.

  13. Phosphoinositide kinase signaling controls ER-PM cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Omnus, Deike J.; Manford, Andrew G.; Bader, Jakob M.; Emr, Scott D.; Stefan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipid dynamics must be precisely regulated for normal cellular function, and disruptions in lipid homeostasis are linked to the progression of several diseases. However, little is known about the sensory mechanisms for detecting membrane composition and how lipid metabolism is regulated in response to membrane stress. We find that phosphoinositide (PI) kinase signaling controls a conserved PDK-TORC2-Akt signaling cascade as part of a homeostasis network that allows the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to modulate essential responses, including Ca2+-regulated lipid biogenesis, upon plasma membrane (PM) stress. Furthermore, loss of ER-PM junctions impairs this protective response, leading to PM integrity defects upon heat stress. Thus PI kinase–mediated ER-PM cross-talk comprises a regulatory system that ensures cellular integrity under membrane stress conditions. PMID:26864629

  14. GTP and cytosol stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in isolated platelet membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baldassare, J.J.; Fisher, G.J.

    1986-06-13

    Hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides by phospholipase C was examined in isolated membranes prepared from (/sup 32/P)labelled platelets. In the presence of guanosine 5'-(3-O)-thiotriphosphate (GTP..gamma..S), thrombin increased the release of inositol triphosphate and inositol biphosphate approximately 500%. GTP..gamma..S alone stimulated release 2 fold. Maximal activation of thrombin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis was observed at 10 ..mu..M GTP. Although addition of calcium had no effect, 2 mM EGTA completely inhibited inositolphosphate release. Addition of high speed supernatant to (/sup 32/P)labelled membranes stimulated the release of inositolphosphates. This hydrolysis was further enhanced by the addition of GTP. These data demonstrate that the breakdown of polyphosphoinositides in isolated platelet membranes is dependent on GTP and stimulated by platelet cytosol.

  15. Doxazosin, an α-1-adrenergic-receptor Antagonist, for Nightmares in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and/or Borderline Personality Disorder: a Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Stefan; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Repantis, Dimitris; Behnia, Behnoush; Bernard, Florian; Hansen, Marie-Luise; Otte, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Centrally active α-1-adrenergic-receptor antagonists such as prazosin are effective in the treatment of nightmares in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A pharmacological alternative is doxazosin, which has a longer half-life and fewer side effects. However, doxazosin is currently being used without solid empirical evidence. Furthermore, no study so far has assessed the effects of α-1-antagonists on nightmares in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). We retrospectively assessed the effectiveness of doxazosin on nightmares in PTSD and BPD. Method: A retrospective chart review of patients treated with doxazosin for trauma-associated nightmares in our clinic was performed. As in previous prazosin studies, the B2 score of the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was used as the primary outcome measure. Furthermore, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-Addendum for PTSD (PSQI-A) and sleep logs were analyzed. Results: We identified 51 patients with PTSD and/or BPD (mean age 35.7 years, 92.3% women) who received doxazosin for nightmares. Of these, 46 patients continued doxazosin over a 4-week period and 31 patients over a 12-week period. Within the 12-week period, doxazosin treatment significantly reduced nightmares regardless of PTSD/BPD. 25 percent of patients treated for 12 weeks had full remission of nightmares. PSQI-A scores indicated that additional trauma-associated sleep symptoms improved over 12 weeks. Furthermore, recuperation of sleep improved with doxazosin within the first 4 weeks of treatment. Conclusion: Doxazosin might improve trauma associated nightmares and more general sleep parameters in patients with PTSD and BPD. Randomized controlled trials are warranted.

  16. Modulation of neuroinflammation and pathology in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease using a biased and selective beta-1 adrenergic receptor partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Pooneh Memar; Evans, Andrew K; Yi, Bitna; Nguyen, Tiffany; Coutellier, Laurence; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2017-04-01

    Degeneration of noradrenergic neurons occurs at an early stage of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The noradrenergic system regulates arousal and learning and memory, and has been implicated in regulating neuroinflammation. Loss of noradrenergic tone may underlie AD progression at many levels. We have previously shown that acute administration of a partial agonist of the beta-1 adrenergic receptor (ADRB1), xamoterol, restores behavioral deficits in a mouse model of AD. The current studies examined the effects of chronic low dose xamoterol on neuroinflammation, pathology, and behavior in the pathologically aggressive 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of AD. In vitro experiments in cells expressing human beta adrenergic receptors demonstrate that xamoterol is highly selective for ADRB1 and functionally biased for the cAMP over the β-arrestin pathway. Data demonstrate ADRB1-mediated attenuation of TNF-α production with xamoterol in primary rat microglia culture following LPS challenge. Finally, two independent cohorts of 5XFAD and control mice were administered xamoterol from approximately 4.0-6.5 or 7.0-9.5 months, were tested in an array of behavioral tasks, and brains were examined for evidence of neuroinflammation, and amyloid beta and tau pathology. Xamoterol reduced mRNA expression of neuroinflammatory markers (Iba1, CD74, CD14 and TGFβ) and immunohistochemical evidence for microgliosis and astrogliosis. Xamoterol reduced amyloid beta and tau pathology as measured by regional immunohistochemistry. Behavioral deficits were not observed for 5XFAD mice. In conclusion, chronic administration of a selective, functionally biased, partial agonist of ADRB1 is effective in reducing neuroinflammation and amyloid beta and tau pathology in the 5XFAD model of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Post-transcriptional induction of beta 1-adrenergic receptor by retinoic acid, but not triiodothyronine, in C6 glioma cells expressing thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    López-Barahona, M; Iglesias, T; García-Higuera, I; Mayor, F; Zaballos, A; Bernal, J; Muñoz, A

    1996-12-01

    Thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine; T3) has been shown to control the expression of beta 1-adrenergic receptors (beta 1-AR) in cardiac myocytes, but not in C6 glioma cells. This cell specificity has been attributed to low expression of T3 receptors and high expression of the c-erbA alpha 2 splice variant that interferes with the action of T3. To check this hypothesis we have expressed the c-erbA/thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alpha 1 gene in C6 glioma cells and investigated their response to thyroid hormone. Cells expressing TR alpha 1, but not wild-type cells, were responsive to T3 as shown by increased expression of mitochrondrial hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase after T3 exposure. However, T3 had no effect on beta 1-AR gene expression in either set of cells. The beta 1-AR mRNA concentrations were, however, altered by retinoic acid (RA) treatment. Retinoic acid caused a rapid up-regulation of beta 1-AR mRNA levels that was blocked by cycloheximide. Retinoic acid did not increase the beta 1-AR gene transcription rate in run-on experiments. These results indicate an indirect post-transcriptional effect of RA. Control of beta 1-AR expression in C6 cells is also exerted at the translational level, because there was no correlation between mRNA and protein induction, as determined by radioligand binding studies. We conclude that lack of responsiveness of the beta 1-AR gene in C6 cells to T3 is not due to high expression of c-erbA alpha 2 but to undefined cell-specific factors.

  18. Sorting of β1-Adrenergic Receptors Is Mediated by Pathways That Are Either Dependent on or Independent of Type I PDZ, Protein Kinase A (PKA), and SAP97*

    PubMed Central

    Nooh, Mohammed M.; Chumpia, Maryanne M.; Hamilton, Thomas B.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.

    2014-01-01

    The β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) is a target for treatment of major cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure and hypertension. Recycling of agonist-internalized β1-AR is dependent on type I PSD-95/DLG/ZO1 (PDZ) in the C-tail of the β1-AR and on protein kinase A (PKA) activity (Gardner, L. A., Naren, A. P., and Bahouth, S. W. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5085–5099). We explored the effects of point mutations in the PDZ and in the activity of PKA on recycling of the β1-AR and its binding to the PDZ-binding protein SAP97. These studies indicated that β1-AR recycling was inhibited by PKA inhibitors and by mutations in the PDZ that interfered with SAP97 binding. The trafficking effects of short sequences differing in PDZ and SAP97 binding were examined using chimeric mutant β1-AR. β1-AR chimera containing the type I PDZ of the β2-adrenergic receptor that does not bind to SAP97 failed to recycle except when serine 312 was mutated to aspartic acid. β1-AR chimera with type I PDZ sequences from the C-tails of aquaporin-2 or GluR1 recycled in a SAP97- and PKA-dependent manner. Non-PDZ β1-AR chimera derived from μ-opioid, dopamine 1, or GluR2 receptors promoted rapid recycling of chimeric β1-AR in a SAP97- and PKA-independent manner. Moreover, the nature of the residue at position −3 in the PDZ regulated whether the β1-AR was internalized alone or in complex with SAP97. These results indicate that divergent pathways were involved in trafficking the β1-AR and provide a roadmap for its trafficking via type I PDZs versus non-PDZs. PMID:24324269

  19. Evidence from photoaffinity labelling studies for coupling of the alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor to a guanine-nucleotide (G) binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.M.; Sena, L.; Schwarz, K.R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1986-05-01

    In contrast to ..beta..- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors the role of a G-protein in signal transduction at ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors has been difficult to define. Using rat hepatic membranes prepared to avoid retention of endogenous nucleotides and activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive proteases, a Gpp(NH)p shift in agonist ((-)epinephrine) affinity from an IC/sub 50/ 10/sup -6/ to 5 x 10/sup -5/ M was readily demonstrable in competition studies with the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-specific radioligand (/sup 3/H)prazosin, but was not observed in membranes prepared without protease inhibitors (PIs). Labelling of these membranes with the photolabile prazosin analog, (/sup 125/I)CP65,526, followed by SDS-PAGE/autoradiography revealed a predominant, specifically labelled protein of M/sub r/ = 80,000, whereas a M/sub r/ = 59,000 peptide was evident with membranes prepared in the absence of PIs. The IC/sub 50/ for inhibition of labelling of the M/sub r/ = 80,000 peptide by (-)epinephrine, as determined by radiochromatogram scanning of autoradiographs of the photolabelled receptor, shifted from 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -6/ in the presence of Gpp(NH)p. However, no shift in agonist affinity at the M/sub r/ = 59,000 peptide was evident in membranes prepared without PIs. This approach provides visual evidence for a G-protein-mediated shift in agonist affinity at the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor and allows a correlation between subunit size analysis and ligand binding.

  20. Effect of alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist prazosin on behavioral alterations induced by MK-801 in a spatial memory task in Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Stuchlík, A; Petrásek, T; Vales, K

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders are current topics in behavioral neuroscience. Application of non-competitive antagonists of NMDA receptors (such as MK-801) was proposed as a model of schizophrenia, as it leads to specific behavioral alterations, which are partly analogous to human psychotic symptoms. This study examined an animal model of schizophrenia induced by a systemic application of MK-801 (0.15 and 0.20 mg/kg) into rats tested in the active allothetic place avoidance (AAPA) task. Previous studies suggested that MK-801 may interact in vivo with other neurotransmitter systems, including noradrenergic system. Our experiments therefore evaluated the hypothesis that both locomotor stimulation and deficit in avoidance behavior in AAPA task induced by this drug would be reversible by application of alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (1 and 2 mg/kg). The results showed that both doses of prazosin partially reversed hyperlocomotion induced by higher doses of MK-801 and an avoidance deficit measured as number of entrances into the shock sector. Interestingly, no effect of prazosin on the MK-801-induced decrease of maximum time between two entrances (another measure of cognitive performance) was observed. These results support previous data showing that prazosin can compensate for the hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 and newly show that this partial reduction sustains even in the forced locomotor conditions, which are involved in the AAPA task. The study also shows that certain parameters of avoidance efficiency may be closely related to locomotor activity, whereas other measures of cognition may more selectively reflect cognitive changes.

  1. The cAMP effector EPAC activates Elk1 transcription factor in prostate smooth muscle, and is a minor regulator of α1-adrenergic contraction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate smooth muscle tone is regulated by α1-adrenoceptor-induced contraction and cAMP-mediated relaxation. EPAC is an effector of cAMP, being involved in smooth muscle relaxation and cell cycle control outside the lower urinary tract. Here, we investigated the expression and function of EPAC in human prostate tissues from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Results mRNA and protein expression of EPAC was detected in all prostate tissues by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Immunoreactivity was observed in stromal cells, and colocalized with immunofluorescence for α-smooth muscle actin and calponin. Under normal conditions, noradrenaline- or phenylephrine-induced contraction of prostate strips in the organ bath was not affected by the EPAC activator pCPT (SP-8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMPS.NA) (30 μM). However, when the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (50 μM) was added, EPAC activators pCPT and OME (8-CPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP.Na) (30 μM) significantly reduced contractions by low concentrations of phenylephrine. These effects were not observed on noradrenaline-induced contraction. OME and pCPT caused phosphorylation of the transcription factor Elk1 in prostate tissues. Elk1 activation was confirmed by EMSA (electrophoretic mobility shift assay), where OME and pCPT incresed Elk1 binding to a specific DNA probe. Conclusions EPAC activation may reduce α1-adrenergic prostate contraction in the human prostate, although this effect is masked by cyclooxygenases and β-adrenoceptors. A main EPAC function in the human prostate may be the regulation of the transcription factor Elk1. PMID:23815815

  2. Effects of Combination Treatment of Alpha 1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonists on Voiding Dysfunction: Study on Target Organs in Overactive Bladder Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Overactive bladder (OAB) causes urinary urgency, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) antagonists are known to improve lower urinary tract symptoms associated with OAB. The α1-AR antagonists constitute a variety of drugs according to the receptor subtype affinity. This study investigated the efficacy of tamsulosin, naftopidil, and a combination of the two on OAB rats. Methods The OAB rat model was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide for 14 days. The experimental groups were divided into 5 groups: control group, OAB-induction group, OAB-induction and tamsulosin monotherapy group, OAB-induction and naftopidil monotherapy group, and OAB-induction and tamsulosin-naftopidil combination therapy group. For the drug-treated groups, each drug was administrated for 14 days after the OAB induction. Cystometry for urodynamic evaluation and immunohistochemical stain for c-Fos and nerve growth factor (NGF) expressions in the central micturition centers were performed. Results Increased contraction pressure and time with enhanced c-Fos and NGF expressions in the central micturition centers were found in the OAB rats. Tamsulosin suppressed contraction pressure and time while inhibiting c-Fos and NGF expressions. Naftopidil showed no significant effect and combination therapy showed less of an effect on contraction pressure and time. Naftopidil and combination therapy exerted no significant effect on the c-Fos and NGF expressions. Conclusions Tamsulosin showed the most prominent efficacy for the treatment of OAB compared to the naftopidil and combination. The combination of tamsulosin with naftopidil showed no synergistic effects on OAB; however, further studies of addon therapy might provide opportunities to find a new modality. PMID:27915481

  3. Src and epidermal growth factor receptor mediate the pro-invasive activity of Bcl-w.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Mi; Park, Jong Kuk; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Um, Hong-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Bcl-2 family are established regulators of cell death. However, recent studies have shown that they can also regulate cell migration, invasion, and cancer metastasis. These functions of cancer cells are promoted by pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w) but are suppressed by pro-apoptotic members (Bax and Bak). We have previously shown that Bcl-w and Bcl-XL enhance the ability of respiratory complex-I to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), stimulating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent invasion pathway. Here, we show that Bcl-w overexpression increases the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Src, and their interaction. Our results show that ROS production induced by Bcl-w activates Src, which then binds to and phosphorylates EGFR, leading to stimulation of the PI3K-dependent invasion pathway. Importantly, Bcl-w-induced cell invasion was prevented by treating cells with gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839), an anticancer drug that directly inhibits EGFR. We also show that Bcl-XL can stimulate Src and EGFR phosphorylation, and that this function of Bcl-XL and Bcl-w is antagonized by Bax and Bak. Overall, this study demonstrates the involvement of Src and EGFR in the regulation of cellular invasiveness by Bcl-2 proteins, suggesting that chemotherapeutics targeting EGFR may be useful in preventing the progression of cancers that have altered Bcl-2 protein functions.

  4. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure enhances NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses and NMDA receptor expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T E; Ur, C L; Gruol, D L

    2005-06-28

    In previous studies, we found that chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment-a model of ethanol consumption in which animals are exposed to and withdrawn from intoxicating levels of ethanol on a daily basis-produces neuroadaptive changes in hippocampal area CA1 excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. Synaptic responses mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are known to be sensitive to ethanol and could play an important role in the neuroadaptive changes induced by CIE treatment. To address this issue, we compared electrophysiological recordings of pharmacologically isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices prepared from control rats and rats exposed to 2 weeks of CIE treatment administered by vapor inhalation. We found that fEPSPs induced by NMDA receptor activation were unaltered in slices prepared shortly after cessation of CIE treatment (i.e., < or = 1 day of withdrawal from CIE). However, following 7 days of withdrawal from CIE treatment, NMDA-receptor-mediated fEPSPs were augmented relative to age-matched controls. Western blot analysis of NMDA receptor subunit expression showed that, at 7 days of withdrawal, the level of protein for NR2A and NR2B subunits was elevated in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from CIE-treated animals compared with slices from age-matched controls. These results are consistent with an involvement of NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses in the neuroadaptive effects of CIE on hippocampal physiology and suggest that such changes may contribute to ethanol-induced changes in processes dependent on NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses such as learning and memory, neural development, hyperexcitability and seizures, and neurotoxicity.

  5. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R. . E-mail: gpastern@jhmi.edu

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing.

  6. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion.

  7. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  8. Sec14-like Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Proteins and the Biological Landscape of Phosphoinositide Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Ghosh, Ratna; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoinositides and soluble inositol phosphates are essential components of a complex intracellular chemical code that regulates major aspects of lipid signaling in eukaryotes. These involvements span a broad array of biological outcomes and activities, and cells are faced with the problem of how to compartmentalize and organize these various signaling events into a coherent scheme. It is in the arena of how phosphoinositide signaling circuits are integrated and, and how phosphoinositide pools are functionally defined and channeled to privileged effectors, that phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) transfer proteins (PITPs) are emerging as critical players. As plant systems offer some unique advantages and opportunities for study of these proteins, we discuss herein our perspectives regarding the progress made in plant systems regarding PITP function. We also suggest interesting prospects that plant systems hold for interrogating how PITPs work, particularly in multi-domain contexts, to diversify the biological outcomes for phosphoinositide signaling. PMID:27038688

  9. The Phox homology (PX) domain, a new player in phosphoinositide signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Seet, L F; Hanson, B; Hong, W

    2001-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are key regulators of diverse cellular processes. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain mediates the action of PtdIns(3,4)P(2), PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), while the FYVE domain relays the pulse of PtdIns3P. The recent establishment that the Phox homology (PX) domain interacts with PtdIns3P and other phosphoinositides suggests another mechanism by which phosphoinositides can regulate/integrate multiple cellular events via a spectrum of PX domain-containing proteins. Together with the recent discovery that the epsin N-terminal homologue (ENTH) domain interacts with PtdIns(4,5)P(2), it is becoming clear that phosphoinositides regulate diverse cellular events through interactions with several distinct structural motifs present in many different proteins. PMID:11736640

  10. Inositol metabolism in WRK-1 cells. Relationship of hormone-sensitive to -insensitive pools of phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, M.E.

    1987-09-25

    Previous studies have indicated the existence of two separate pools of phosphoinositides in WRK-1 cells; one is labile and hormone-sensitive with respect to turnover, while the other is stable. Hormonal stimulation results in a rapid increase in /sup 32/Pi incorporation into the sensitive pool, while in the absence of hormone, incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into this pool is slow. Results are quite different when (/sup 3/H)inositol is the precursor utilized. Incorporation of (/sup 3/H)inositol into hormone-sensitive phosphoinositides is not stimulated in the presence of hormone, suggesting entry of this exogenous precursor into the cycle by a route other than the resynthetic phase of the cycle. Furthermore, failure of hormone to induce loss of (/sup 3/H)phosphoinositide in pulse-chase experiments in the absence of lithium suggests reutilization of the (/sup 3/H)inositol moiety generated by phosphodiesteratic cleavage of hormone-sensitive phosphoinositide. Time course studies indicate that the relative rates of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)inositol into sensitive and insensitive phosphoinositide remain constant from 2 to 24 h. Several factors are capable of increasing (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation into hormone-insensitive phosphoinositide including vasopressin, calcium ionophores, and manganese. On the other hand, vasopressin treatment appears to decrease incorporation of (/sup 3/H)inositol into the hormone-sensitive pool, probably by shifting the equilibrium between phosphoinositides and inositol phosphates, since the decrease in radioactivity observed in the phosphoinositides is equaled by the increase observed in that in the inositol phosphates.

  11. SK&F 96365, a novel inhibitor of receptor-mediated calcium entry.

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, J E; Armstrong, W P; Benham, C D; Hallam, T J; Jacob, R; Jaxa-Chamiec, A; Leigh, B K; McCarthy, S A; Moores, K E; Rink, T J

    1990-01-01

    A novel inhibitor of receptor-mediated calcium entry (RMCE) is described. SK&F 96365 (1-(beta-[3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl)-1H- imidazole hydrochloride) is structurally distinct from the known 'calcium antagonists' and shows selectivity in blocking RMCE compared with receptor-mediated internal Ca2+ release. Human platelets, neutrophils and endothelial cells were loaded with the fluorescent Ca2(+)-indicator dyes quin2 or fura-2, in order to measure Ca2+ or Mn2+ entry through RMCE as well as Ca2+ release from internal stores. The IC50 (concn. producing 50% inhibition) for inhibition of RMCE by SK&F 96365 in platelets stimulated with ADP or thrombin was 8.5 microM or 11.7 microM respectively; these concentrations of SK&F 96365 did not affect internal Ca2+ release. Similar effects of SK&F 96365 were observed in suspensions of neutrophils and in single endothelial cells. SK&F 96365 also inhibited agonist-stimulated Mn2+ entry in platelets and neutrophils. The effects of SK&F 96365 were independent of cell type and of agonist, as would be expected for a compound that modulates post-receptor events. Voltage-gated Ca2+ entry in fura-2-loaded GH3 (pituitary) cells and rabbit ear-artery smooth-muscle cells held under voltage-clamp was also inhibited by SK&F 96365; however, the ATP-gated Ca2(+)-permeable channel of rabbit ear-artery smooth-muscle cells was unaffected by SK&F 96365. Thus SK&F 96365 (unlike the 'organic Ca2+ antagonists') shows no selectivity between voltage-gated Ca2+ entry and RMCE, although the lack of effect on ATP-gated channels indicates that it discriminates between different types of RMCE. The effects of SK&F 96365 on functional responses of cells thought to be dependent on Ca2+ entry via RMCE were also studied. Under conditions where platelet aggregation is dependent on stimulated Ca2+ entry via RMCE, the response was blocked by SK&F 96365 with an IC50 of 15.9 microM, which is similar to the IC50 of 8-12 microM observed for

  12. Characterization of putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating tachycardia in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Carlos M; Heiligers, Jan P C; Centurión, David; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    1997-01-01

    , sumatriptan (30, 100 and 300 μg kg−1) and indorenate (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) or the 5-HT4 receptor (partial) agonist cisapride (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) were devoid of effects on feline heart rate per se and failed to modify significantly 5-HT-induced tachycardic responses. Based upon the above rank order of agonist potency, the failure of sumatriptan, indorenate or cisapride to produce cardioacceleration and the blockade by a series of drugs showing high affinity for the cloned 5-ht7 receptor, the present results indicate that the 5-HT receptor mediating tachycardia in the cat is operationally similar to other putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating vascular and non-vascular responses (e.g. relaxation of the rabbit femoral vein, canine external carotid and coronary arteries, rat systemic vasculature and guinea-pig ileum). Since these responses represent functional correlates of the 5-ht7 gene product, the 5-HT7 receptor appellation is reinforced. Therefore, the present experimental model, which is not complicated by the presence of other 5-HT receptors, can be utilized to characterize and develop new drugs with potential agonist and antagonist properties at functional 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:9249256

  13. A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc anchors a PKN-based signaling complex involved in α1-adrenergic receptor-induced p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Cariolato, Luca; Cavin, Sabrina; Diviani, Dario

    2011-03-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways are highly organized signaling systems that transduce extracellular signals into a variety of intracellular responses. In this context, it is currently poorly understood how kinases constituting these signaling cascades are assembled and activated in response to receptor stimulation to generate specific cellular responses. Here, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critically involved in the activation of the p38α MAPK downstream of α(1b)-adrenergic receptors (α(1b)-ARs). Our results indicate that AKAP-Lbc can assemble a novel transduction complex containing the RhoA effector PKNα, MLTK, MKK3, and p38α, which integrates signals from α(1b)-ARs to promote RhoA-dependent activation of p38α. In particular, silencing of AKAP-Lbc expression or disrupting the formation of the AKAP-Lbc·p38α signaling complex specifically reduces α(1)-AR-mediated p38α activation without affecting receptor-mediated activation of other MAPK pathways. These findings provide a novel mechanistic hypothesis explaining how assembly of macromolecular complexes can specify MAPK signaling downstream of α(1)-ARs.

  14. Potentiating effect of eszopiclone on GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in pedunculopontine neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meijun; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2009-07-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, which is mostly active during waking and REM sleep. GABAergic modulation of this area appears to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Eszopiclone (ESZ), a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic agent, appears to modulate GABAergic receptors. However, the action site of ESZ in the brain is still unresolved. We tested the hypothesis that ESZ acts by potentiating GABA(A) receptors on PPN neurons. Wholecell voltage clamp recordings were performed on PPN neurons in 7-15 day rat brainstem slices, and the potentiating effects of ESZ on the responses to the GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine (IGV), and on GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), were determined. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, ESZ (1) increased the amplitude of the outward current induced by IGV, (2) increased its duration, and (3) enhanced the IGV-induced decrease in input resistance (Rin). The GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine (GBZ) blocked these effects. ESZ alone did not induce detectable currents or change Rin at a holding potential of -60 mV, but when held at 0 mV, ESZ induced an outward current in 13/21 PPN cells, an effect blocked by GBZ. ESZ also increased the amplitude (n = 18/21), duration (n = 17/21), and frequency (n = 13/15) of IPSCs. ESZ may potentiate GABA(A) inhibition in the PPN via pre- and post-synaptic modulation, which may underlie the hypnotic effects of ESZ. The differential effects of ESZ on both pre- and post-synaptic sites may partially explain why it has less significant side effects compared to other hypnotic agents.

  15. PKCɛ mediates substance P inhibition of GABAA receptors-mediated current in rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yang; Ma, Ke-tao; Shi, Wen-yan; Wang, Ying-zi; Si, Jun-qiang

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism underlying the modulatory effect of substance P (SP) on GABA-activated response in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was investigated. In freshly dissociated rat DRG neurons, whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record GABA-activated current and sharp electrode intracellular recording technique was used to record GABA-induced membrane depolarization. Application of GABA (1-1000 μmol/L) induced an inward current in a concentration-dependent manner in 114 out of 127 DRG neurons (89.8 %) examined with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Bath application of GABA (1-1000 μmol/L) evoked a depolarizing response in 236 out of 257 (91.8%) DRG neurons examined with intracellular recordings. Application of SP (0.001-1 μmol/L) suppressed the GABA-activated inward current and membrane depolarization. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent and could be blocked by the selective neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors antagonist spantide but not by L659187 and SR142801 (1 μmol/L, n=7), selective antagonists of NK2 and NK3. The inhibitory effect of SP was significantly reduced by the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM, phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, and PKC inhibitor chelerythrine, respectively. The PKA inhibitor H-89 did not affect the SP effect. Remarkably, the inhibitory effect of SP on GABA-activated current was nearly completely removed by a selective PKCε inhibitor epilon-V1-2 but not by safingol and LY333531, selective inhibitors of PKCα and PKCβ. Our results suggest that NK1 receptor mediates SP-induced inhibition of GABA-activated current and membrane depolarization by activating intracellular PLC-Ca²⁺-PKCε cascade. SP might regulate the excitability of peripheral nociceptors through inhibition of the "pre-synaptic inhibition" evoked by GABA, which may explain its role in pain and neurogenic inflammation.

  16. EP2 receptor mediates PGE2-induced cystogenesis of human renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elberg, Gerard; Elberg, Dorit; Lewis, Teresa V; Guruswamy, Suresh; Chen, Lijuan; Logan, Charlotte J; Chan, Michael D; Turman, Martin A

    2007-11-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by formation of cysts from tubular epithelial cells. Previous studies indicate that secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into cyst fluid and production of cAMP underlie cyst expansion. However, the mechanism by which PGE2 directly stimulates cAMP formation and modulates cystogenesis is still unclear, because the particular E-prostanoid (EP) receptor mediating the PGE2 effect has not been characterized. Our goal is to define the PGE2 receptor subtype involved in ADPKD. We used a three-dimensional cell-culture system of human epithelial cells from normal and ADPKD kidneys in primary cultures to demonstrate that PGE2 induces cyst formation. Biochemical evidence gathered by using real-time RT-PCR mRNA analysis and immunodetection indicate the presence of EP2 receptor in cystic epithelial cells in ADPKD kidney. Pharmacological evidence obtained by using PGE2-selective analogs further demonstrates that EP2 mediates cAMP formation and cystogenesis. Functional evidence for a role of EP2 receptor in mediating cAMP signaling was also provided by inhibiting EP2 receptor expression with transfection of small interfering RNA in cystic epithelial cells. Our results indicate that PGE2 produced in cyst fluid binds to adjacent EP2 receptors located on the apical side of cysts and stimulates EP2 receptor expression. PGE2 binding to EP2 receptor leads to cAMP signaling and cystogenesis by a mechanism that involves protection of cystic epithelial cells from apoptosis. The role of EP2 receptor in mediating the PGE2 effect on stimulating cyst formation may have direct pharmacological implications for the treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  17. EP₃ receptors mediate PGE₂-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Felder, Robert B

    2011-10-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE(2) acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP(1), EP(2), EP(3), and EP(4). Since PGE(2) production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE(2) depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE(2) remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE(2), the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP(1), EP(3), and EP(4). In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE(2), sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP(3) receptor antagonist; the EP(1) and EP(4) receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE(2) or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP(3) receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP(3) receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP(3) receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE(2) or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP(3) receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP(3) receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE(2) on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge.

  18. Characterization of Parameters Influencing Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis in Cultured Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Mark A.; Heinstein, Peter F.; Low, Philip S.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent publication, we were able to demonstrate that biotin enters plant cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and that impermeable macromolecules can be cotransported into cells by the same pathway if they are first covalently linked to biotin. In the present study, we have exploited the biotin endocytosis pathway to evaluate the variables in the cell wall and surrounding growth medium that influence the efficiency of endocytosis in plants. Under normal growth conditions, the major constraint limiting macromolecule endocytosis was found to be the size of the internalized macromolecule. Thus, a log-linear relationship with a negative slope exists between the molecular weight of the biotin-conjugated macromolecule and its rate of internalization by cultured soybean cells. This relationship, which extends from insulin (Mr approximately 5700) to immunoglobulin G (Mr approximately 160,000), is characterized by a slope of −1.04 × 105 molecules/cell/min per log Mr unit and an x intercept (no endocytosis detectable) of approximately log 160,000 daltons. Unfortunately, mild digestion with cell wall-degrading enzymes is unable to increase significantly the upper size limit of molecules that can be internalized, but uptake of lower molecular weight proteins can be enhanced by mild cell wall digestion. The optimal extracellular pH for endocytosis was found to be 4.6, i.e. near the normal pH of the cell culture medium. Furthermore, the osmotic strength at which endocytosis occurs most rapidly was observed to be isotonic to slightly hypotonic, suggesting that turgor pressure within the plant cell must not be a major determinant of endocytosis rates by cultured soybean (Glycine max) cells. Finally, cell age was found to impact significantly on the rate of macromolecule internalization, with maximal uptake rates occurring during early exponential growth and decreasing by a factor of 2 when the cells reach stationary growth phase. PMID:16668694

  19. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  20. PAC₁ receptors mediate positive chronotropic responses to PACAP-27 and VIP in isolated mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Donald B; Girard, Beatrice M; Hoover, Jeffrey L; Parsons, Rodney L

    2013-08-05

    PACAP and VIP have prominent effects on cardiac function in several species, but little is known about their influence on the murine heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the expression of PACAP/VIP receptors in mouse heart and the response of isolated atria to peptide agonists. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that PAC₁, VPAC₁, and VPAC₂ receptor mRNAs are present throughout the mouse heart. Expression of all three receptor transcripts was low, PAC₁ being the lowest. No regional differences in expression were detected for individual receptor mRNAs after normalization to L32. Pharmacological effects of PACAP-27, VIP, and the selective PAC₁ agonist maxadilan were evaluated in isolated, spontaneously beating atria from C57BL/6 mice of either sex. Incremental additions of PACAP-27 at 1 min intervals caused a concentration-dependent tachycardia with a logEC₅₀=-9.08 ± 0.15 M (n=7) and a maximum of 96.3 ± 5.9% above baseline heart rate. VIP and maxadilan also caused tachycardia but their potencies were about two orders of magnitude less. Increasing the dosing interval to 5 min caused a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve to maxadilan but no changes in the curves for PACAP-27 or VIP. Under this condition, neither the potency nor the efficacy of maxadilan differed from those of PACAP-27. Neither PACAP-27 nor maxadilan caused tachyphylaxis, and maximal responses to maxadilan were maintained for at least 2 h. We conclude that all three VIP/PACAP family receptors are expressed by mouse cardiac tissue, but only PAC₁ receptors mediate positive chronotropic responses to PACAP-27 and VIP.

  1. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  2. Focal kappa-opioid receptor-mediated dependence and withdrawal in the nucleus paragigantocellularis.

    PubMed

    Sinchaisuk, S; Ho, I K; Rockhold, R W

    2002-12-01

    The nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the development of physical dependence on opioids, including the prototype mu-opioid receptor agonist, morphine, and the mixed agonist/antagonist, butorphanol, which shows selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist activity, in rats. In confirmation of previous work, electrical stimulation of the PGi in opioid-nai;ve rats induced stimulus-intensity-related, withdrawal-like behaviors similar to those observed during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal from dependence upon butorphanol. Novel findings were made in rats surgically implanted with cannulae aimed at the lateral ventricle and the right PGi and made physically dependent by intracerebroventricular infusion of either morphine (26 nmol/microl/h) or butorphanol (26 nmol/microl/h) through an osmotic minipump for 3 days. Two hours following termination of the opioid infusion, microinjections of naloxone (11 nmol/400 nl), a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, or nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) (3.84 nmol/400 nl), a selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, were made into the PGi of morphine-dependent and butorphanol-dependent rats. Discrete PGi injections precipitated withdrawal behaviors, with significant (P<.05) increases noted in the incidence of teeth chattering, wet-dog shakes, and scratching. Composite scores for behavioral withdrawal were significantly higher in nor-BNI-precipitated, butorphanol-dependent rats (score=6.8+/-0.6), in naloxone-precipitated, butorphanol-dependent rats (8.9+/-0.8), and in naloxone-precipitated, morphine-dependent rats (11.5+/-0.9) than in all other groups. Both kappa- and mu-opioid receptor mediated dependence can be demonstrated at the level of a discrete medullary site, the PGi, which further supports a specific role for this nucleus in elicitation of behavioral responses during opioid withdrawal.

  3. Self-Assembly into Nanoparticles Is Essential for Receptor Mediated Uptake of Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Koo, Taeyoung; McClorey, Graham; Benner, Leif; Coenen-Stass, Anna; O'Donovan, Liz; Lehto, Taavi; Garcia-Guerra, Antonio; Nordin, Joel; Saleh, Amer F; Behlke, Mark; Morris, John; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Dugovic, Branislav; Leumann, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Gait, Michael J; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-07-08

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have the potential to revolutionize medicine due to their ability to manipulate gene function for therapeutic purposes. ASOs are chemically modified and/or incorporated within nanoparticles to enhance their stability and cellular uptake, however, a major challenge is the poor understanding of their uptake mechanisms, which would facilitate improved ASO designs with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here, we study the uptake mechanism of three therapeutically relevant ASOs (peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO), 2'Omethyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe), and phosphorothioated tricyclo DNA (tcDNA) that have been optimized to induce exon skipping in models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We show that PPMO and tcDNA have high propensity to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles. PPMO forms micelles of defined size and their net charge (zeta potential) is dependent on the medium and concentration. In biomimetic conditions and at low concentrations, PPMO obtains net negative charge and its uptake is mediated by class A scavenger receptor subtypes (SCARAs) as shown by competitive inhibition and RNAi silencing experiments in vitro. In vivo, the activity of PPMO was significantly decreased in SCARA1 knockout mice compared to wild-type animals. Additionally, we show that SCARA1 is involved in the uptake of tcDNA and 2'OMe as shown by competitive inhibition and colocalization experiments. Surface plasmon resonance binding analysis to SCARA1 demonstrated that PPMO and tcDNA have higher binding profiles to the receptor compared to 2'OMe. These results demonstrate receptor-mediated uptake for a range of therapeutic ASO chemistries, a mechanism that is dependent on their self-assembly into nanoparticles.

  4. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyoung; Kang, Minsung; Wang, Hong; Naik, Gurudatta; Mobley, James A; Sonpavde, Guru; Garvey, W Timothy; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2017-04-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy has been identified to induce oxidative stress in prostate cancer (PCa), leading to reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in a hormone-refractory manner. Thus, antioxidant therapies have gained attention as adjuvants for castration-resistant PCa. Here, we report for the first time that human endostatin (ES) prevents androgen-independent growth phenotype in PCa cells through its molecular targeting of AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and downstream pro-oxidant signaling. This reversal after ES treatment significantly decreased PCa cell proliferation through down-regulation of GR and up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione levels. Proteome and biochemical analyses of ES-treated PCa cells further indicated a significant up-regulation of enzymes in the major reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging machinery, including catalase, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, biliverdin reductase, and thioredoxin reductase, resulting in a concomitant reduction of intracellular ROS. ES further augmented the antioxidant system through up-regulation of glucose influx, the pentose phosphate pathway, and NAD salvaging pathways. This shift in cancer cell redox homeostasis by ES significantly decreased the effect of protumorigenic oxidative machinery on androgen-independent PCa growth, suggesting that ES can suppress GR-induced resistant phenotype upon AR antagonism and that the dual targeting action of ES on AR and GR can be further translated to PCa therapy.-Lee, J. H., Kang, M., Wang, H., Naik, G., Mobley, J. A., Sonpavde, G., Garvey, W. T., Darley-Usmar, V. M., Ponnazhagan, S. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

  5. P2Y6 Receptor-Mediated Proinflammatory Signaling in Human Bronchial Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yuan; Liang, Jocelyn F.; Chow, Alison W.; Cheung, Wing-tai; Ko, Wing-hung

    2014-01-01

    P2Y receptors are expressed in virtually all epithelia and are responsible for the control of fluid and electrolyte transport. In asthmatic inflammation, the bronchial epithelia are damaged by eosinophil-derived, highly toxic cationic proteins, such as major basic protein (MBP). Consequently, extracellular nucleotides are released into the extracellular space from airway epithelial cells, and act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion to regulate immune functions. Our data show damage to the human bronchial epithelial cell line, 16HBE14o-, by poly-L-arginine-induced UDP release into the extracellular medium. Activation of P2Y6 receptor by its natural ligand, UDP, or its specific agonist, MRS 2693, led to the production of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. This may have resulted from increased IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression, and activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK, and NF-κB pathways. Our previous study demonstrated that UDP stimulated transepithelial Cl− secretion via both Ca2+- and cAMP-dependent pathways in 16HBE14o- epithelia. This was further confirmed in this study by simultaneous imaging of Ca2+ and cAMP levels in single cells using the Fura-2 fluorescence technique and a FRET-based approach, respectively. Moreover, the P2Y6 receptor-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-8 was found to be dependent on Ca2+, but not the cAMP/PKA pathway. Together, these studies show that nucleotides released during the airway inflammatory processes will activate P2Y6 receptors, which will lead to further release of inflammatory cytokines. The secretion of cytokines and the formation of such “cytokine networks” play an important role in sustaining the airway inflammatory disease. PMID:25243587

  6. EP3 receptors mediate PGE2-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE2 acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Since PGE2 production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE2 depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE2 remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE2, the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP1, EP3, and EP4. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE2, sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP3 receptor antagonist; the EP1 and EP4 receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE2 or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP3 receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP3 receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE2 or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP3 receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE2 on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge. PMID:21803943

  7. Bradykinin B2-receptor-mediated modulation of membrane currents in guinea-pig cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Naoya; Uemura, Hiroko; Hara, Yukio; Saito, Toshihiro; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Nakaya, Haruaki

    1998-01-01

    In order to define the electrophysiological mechanism(s) responsible for bradykinin (BK)-induced positive inotropic and chronotropic responses in isolated guinea-pig atria, effects of BK on the membrane currents were examined in isolated atrial cells using patch clamp techniques.BK (0.1–1000 nM) increased the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa), which was recorded from enzymatically-dissociated atrial myocytes by the nystatin-perforated patch method, in a concentration-dependent fashion, and the calculated EC50 value for increasing ICa was 5.2 nM. In conventional ruptured patch experiments, BK inhibited the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-operated K+ current (IK.ACh) that was activated by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 μM) with an EC50 value of 0.57 nM. Both the increase in ICa and the decrease in IK.ACh were blocked by HOE140, a selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist.The BK-induced inhibition of IK.ACh was significantly attenuated by staurosporine and calphostin C, protein kinase C inhibitors. In addition, the IK.ACh inhibition by BK was also attenuated by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein or tyrphostin but not by daidzein, an inactive analogue of genistein. However, neither protein kinase C inhibitor nor tyrosine kinase inhibitor affected the BK-induced increase in ICa.In the presence and absence of muscarinic stimulation, BK prolonged the action potential recorded from the atrial cells in the current clamp mode.We conclude that BK increases ICa and decreases IK.ACh in atrial cells, resulting in positive inotropic and chronotropic responses in atrial preparations. Protein kinase C activation, and possibly tyrosine kinase activation, may be involved in the B2-receptor-mediated IK.ACh inhibition. PMID:9786500

  8. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. I. Probabilistic model and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C.; Lauffenburger, D. A.; Quinn, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface play a key role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. We present a probabilistic model of receptor-ligand bond formation between a cell and surface to describe the probability of adhesion in a fluid shear field. Our model extends the deterministic model of Hammer and Lauffenburger (Hammer, D.A., and D.A. Lauffenburger. 1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487) to a probabilistic framework, in which we calculate the probability that a certain number of bonds between a cell and surface exists at any given time. The probabilistic framework is used to account for deviations from ideal, deterministic behavior, inherent in chemical reactions involving relatively small numbers of reacting molecules. Two situations are investigated: first, cell attachment in the absence of fluid stress; and, second, cell detachment in the presence of fluid stress. In the attachment case, we examine the expected variance in bond formation as a function of attachment time; this also provides an initial condition for the detachment case. Focusing then on detachment, we predict transient behavior as a function of key system parameters, such as the distractive fluid force, the receptor-ligand bond affinity and rate constants, and the receptor and ligand densities. We compare the predictions of the probabilistic model with those of a deterministic model, and show how a deterministic approach can yield some inaccurate results; e.g., it cannot account for temporally continuous cell attach mentor detachment, it can underestimate the time needed for cell attachment, it can overestimate the time required for cell detachment for a given level of force, and it can overestimate the force necessary for cell detachment. PMID:2174271

  9. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  10. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor-Mediated Axonal Injury in Adult Rat Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Jianuo; Fox, Howard S.; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    Damage to white matter such as corpus callosum (CC) is a pathological characteristic in many brain disorders. Glutamate (Glut) excitotoxicity through AMPA receptors on oligodendrocyte (OL) was previously considered as a mechanism for white matter damage. Recent studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are expressed on myelin sheath of neonatal rat OL processes and that activation of these receptors mediated demyelization. Whether NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic axonal injury remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of NMDARs in the adult rat CC and their distributions in myelinated nerve fibers and OL somata by means of immunocytochemical staining and Western blot. Incubation of the CC slices with Glut or NMDA induced axonal injury as revealed by analyzing amplitude of CC fiber compound action potentials (CAPs) and input–output response. Both Glut and NMDA decreased the CAP amplitude and input–output responses, suggesting an involvement of NMDARs in Glut- and NMDA-induced axonal injury. The involvement of NMDAR in Glut-induced axonal injury was further assayed by detection of β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) in the CC axonal fibers. Treatment of the CC slices with Glut resulted in β-APP accumulation in the CC fibers as detected by Western blot, reflecting an impairment of axonal transport function. This injurious effect of Glut on CC axonal transport was significantly blocked by MK801. Taken together, these results show that NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic activity in adult CC slices in vitro. PMID:23161705

  11. Functional evaluation of the receptors mediating vasoconstriction of rat aorta by trace amines and amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Broadley, Kenneth J; Fehler, Martina; Ford, William R; Kidd, Emma J

    2013-09-05

    Trace amines including β-phenylethylamine (β-PEA) and amphetamines classically exert pharmacological actions via indirect sympathomimetic mechanisms. However, there is evidence for other mechanisms and this study explores the receptors mediating vasoconstriction in rat aorta. β-PEA, d-amphetamine, MDMA, cathinone and methylphenidate caused concentration-dependent contractions of rat isolated aortic rings which were unaffected by prazosin (1 μM), ICI-118,551 (1 μM), cocaine (10 μM) and pargyline (10 μM), to inhibit α1- and β2-adrenoceptors, neuronal transport and monoamine oxidase (MAO), respectively. Octopamine concentration-response curves, however, were shifted to the right. In the presence of the inhibitors, the rate of onset of octopamine contractions was slowed. Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the kinetics of the response generated different KM values for octopamine in the absence (2.35 × 10(-6)M) and presence (6.09 × 10(-5)M) of inhibitors, indicating mediation by different receptors. Tryptamine-induced vasoconstriction also resisted blockade by adrenergic inhibitors and the 5-HT1A, 1B, 1D and 5-HT2A receptor antagonists, methiothepin (50 nM) and ketanserin (30 nM), respectively. Trace amines and amphetamines therefore exert vasoconstriction independently of adrenoceptors, neuronal transport and 5-HT receptor activation. There was no evidence of tachyphylaxis or cross-tachyphylaxis of the vasoconstriction to these amines. Tyramine was a partial agonist and in its presence, β-PEA, d-amphetamine and octopamine were antagonised indicating that they all act through a common receptor for which tyramine serves as an antagonist. We conclude that the vasoconstriction is via TAAR-1, because of structural similarities between amines, ability to stimulate recombinant trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR-1) and the presence of TAAR-1 in rat aorta. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fc receptor-mediated immune responses: new tools but increased complexity in HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2013-07-01

    The modest success of the RV144 HIV vaccine trial in Thailand and the ensuing suggestion that a Fc-receptormediated antibody activity might have played a role in the protection observed have intensified investigations on Fcrelated immune responses. HIV neutralizing antibodies have been and continue to be the focal point of research into humoral immune protection. However, recent knowledge that their protective efficacy can be augmented by Fc-FcR interactions has increased the complexity of identifying immune correlates of protection. If anything, continued studies of both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms point to the lack of a single protective anti-HIV immune response. Here we focus on humoral immunity, analyzing the role played by Fc receptor-related responses and discussing how new knowledge of their interactions requires further investigation, but may also spur novel vaccination approaches. We initially address classical Fc-receptor mediated anti-viral mechanisms including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI), and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), as well as the effector cells that mediate these functions. Next, we summarize key aspects of FcR-Fc interactions that are important for potential control of HIV/SIV such as FcR polymorphisms and post-transcriptional modifications. Finally we discuss less commonly studied non-mechanistic anti-HIV immune functions: antibody avidity and envelopespecific B cell memory. Overall, a spectrum of immune responses, reflecting the immune system's redundancy, will likely be needed to prevent HIV infection and/or disease progression. Aside from elicitation of critical immune mechanisms, a successful vaccine will need to induce mature B cell responses and long-lasting immune memory.

  13. Receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal acidification is impaired in proximal tubule epithelial cells of Dent disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gorvin, Caroline M; Wilmer, Martijn J; Piret, Sian E; Harding, Brian; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Wrong, Oliver; Jat, Parmjit S; Lippiat, Jonathan D; Levtchenko, Elena N; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2013-04-23

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis, involving megalin and cubilin, mediates renal proximal-tubular reabsorption and is decreased in Dent disease because of mutations of the chloride/proton antiporter, chloride channel-5 (CLC-5), resulting in low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, and renal failure. To facilitate studies of receptor-mediated endocytosis and the role of CLC-5, we established conditionally immortalized proximal-tubular epithelial cell lines (ciPTECs) from three patients with CLC-5 mutations (30:insH, R637X, and del132-241) and a normal male. Confocal microscopy using the tight junction marker zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and end-binding protein-1 (EB-1), which is specific for the plus end of microtubules demonstrated that the ciPTECs polarized. Receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of fluorescent albumin and transferrin in 30:insH and R637X ciPTECs was significantly decreased, compared with normal ciPTECs, and could be further reduced by competition with 10-fold excess of unlabeled albumin and transferrin, whereas in the del132-241 ciPTEC, receptor-mediated endocytic uptake was abolished. Investigation of endosomal acidification by live-cell imaging of pHluorin-VAMP2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-2), a pH-sensitive-GFP construct, revealed that the endosomal pH in normal and 30:insH ciPTECs was similar, whereas in del132-241 and R637X ciPTECs, it was significantly more alkaline, indicating defective acidification in these ciPTECs. The addition of bafilomycin-A1, a V-ATPase inhibitor, raised the pH significantly in all ciPTECs, demonstrating that the differences in acidification were not due to alterations in the V-ATPase, but instead to abnormalities of CLC-5. Thus, our studies, which have established human Dent disease ciPTECs that will facilitate studies of mechanisms in renal reabsorption, demonstrate that Dent disease-causing CLC-5 mutations have differing effects on endosomal acidification and receptor-mediated endocytosis

  14. Phosphoinositide kinases and the synthesis of polyphosphoinositides in higher plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobak, B. K.; Dewey, R. E.; Boss, W. F.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a family of inositol-containing phospholipids which are present in all eukaryotic cells. Although in most cells these lipids, with the exception of phosphatidylinositol, constitute only a very minor proportion of total cellular lipids, they have received immense attention by researchers in the past 15-20 years. This is due to the discovery that these lipids, rather than just having structural functions, play key roles in a wide range of important cellular processes. Much less is known about the plant phosphoinositides than about their mammalian counterparts. However, it has been established that a functional phosphoinositide system exists in plant cells and it is becoming increasingly clear that inositol-containing lipids are likely to play many important roles throughout the life of a plant. It is not our intention to give an exhaustive overview of all aspects of the field, but rather we focus on the phosphoinositide kinases responsible for the synthesis of all phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol. Also, we mention some of the aspects of current phosphoinositide research which, in our opinion, are most likely to provide a suitable starting point for further research into the role of phosphoinositides in plants.

  15. Regional development of carbachol-, glutamate-, norepinephrine-, and serotonin-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Balduini, W; Candura, S M; Costa, L G

    1991-09-19

    Phosphoinositide metabolism stimulated by activation of cholinergic muscarinic, glutamatergic, alpha-adrenergic and serotoninergic receptors was measured in brain regions of the developing rats. Accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates ([3H]InsPs) in [3H]inositol-prelabeled slices from cerebral cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Large age-, neurotransmitter receptor-, and brain region-dependent differences were found. Carbachol-stimulated [3H]InsPs accumulation peaked on postnatal day 7 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus while in cerebellum and brainstem the effect of muscarinic stimulation was maximal at birth and then declined to adulthood. The effect of glutamate also showed a peak on day 7 in hippocampus and brainstem and a developmentally related decrease in cerebral cortex. In the cerebellum, on the other hand, the response to glutamate remained sustained through adulthood. Stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by norepinephrine increased with age in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but decreased in the cerebellum, while the effect of serotonin did not change significantly with age except in cerebellum. These changes in receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism do not parallel, for the most part, the ontogeny of receptor recognition sites. Activation of the phosphoinositide metabolism pathway leads to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and to stimulation of protein kinase C, which are believed to play significant roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Thus, the differential ability of neurotransmitters to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis might play a role in the development of brain regions.

  16. Phosphoinositide kinases and the synthesis of polyphosphoinositides in higher plant cells.

    PubMed

    Drøbak, B K; Dewey, R E; Boss, W F

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a family of inositol-containing phospholipids which are present in all eukaryotic cells. Although in most cells these lipids, with the exception of phosphatidylinositol, constitute only a very minor proportion of total cellular lipids, they have received immense attention by researchers in the past 15-20 years. This is due to the discovery that these lipids, rather than just having structural functions, play key roles in a wide range of important cellular processes. Much less is known about the plant phosphoinositides than about their mammalian counterparts. However, it has been established that a functional phosphoinositide system exists in plant cells and it is becoming increasingly clear that inositol-containing lipids are likely to play many important roles throughout the life of a plant. It is not our intention to give an exhaustive overview of all aspects of the field, but rather we focus on the phosphoinositide kinases responsible for the synthesis of all phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol. Also, we mention some of the aspects of current phosphoinositide research which, in our opinion, are most likely to provide a suitable starting point for further research into the role of phosphoinositides in plants.

  17. In vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors mitigates stress-disturbed cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Bjelic, Maja M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of stress-associated reproductive dysfunction is complex and largely unknown. This study was designed to systematically analyze molecular effects of systemic in vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) on stress-induced disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling in testosterone-producing Leydig cells using the following parameters (i) level of circulating stress hormones, LH and testosterone; (ii) level of main molecular markers of Leydig cell functionality (testosterone, Insl3, cAMP); (iii) expression of cAMP signaling (cAMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers') and (iv) expression of NO-cGMP signaling (NO-cGMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers'). The results showed that oral administration of α1-ADR blocker before stress increased cGMP and diminished stress-reduced cAMP production in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-induced effects on cAMP/cGMP signaling pathways elements were changed. Sustained in vivo α1-ADR blockade completely abolished stress-increased transcription of most abundantly expressed phosphodiesterase that remove cAMP (Pde4b) and potentiated stress-increased expression of PRKA, the main stimulator of Leydig cell steroidogenesis. In the same Leydig cells, stress-decreased NOS3 expression was abolished, while stress-increased GUCY1 (cGMP 'producer') and PRKG1 (cGMP 'effector') were potentiated. It is possible that all molecules mentioned could contribute, at least in part, in recovery of Leydig cell testosterone production. Presented data provide new role of α1-ADRs in stress-triggered disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling, and new molecular insights into the relationship between stress and mammalian reproduction. Regardless of whether the effects of α1-blocker + stress are direct or indirect, the results are important in terms of human reproductive health and the wide use of α1-ADR antagonists, alone or in combination, to treat post-traumatic stress disorders, hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and

  18. The role of nitric oxide synthase in reduced vasocontractile responsiveness induced by prolonged α1-adrenergic receptor stimulation in rat thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Gürdal, Hakan; Can, Alp; Uğur, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    Prolonged exposure (6–12 h) of rat aorta to alpha1-adrenergic receptor (α1AR) agonist phenylephrine (Phe) leads to a decrease in α1AR-mediated vasoconstriction. This reduced responsiveness to α1AR stimulation was strongly dependent on the intactness of the endothelium. We examined the effect of Phe on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring the conversion of [3H]L-arginine to [3H]L-citrulline in rat aorta or in endothelial cells isolated from rat aorta. Phe stimulation increased NOS activity in control aortas. This response was antagonized by prazosin. However, Phe increased neither the activity of NOS nor intracellular Ca2+ in the isolated endothelial cells from the control aortas, whereas acetylcholine (Ach) was able to stimulate both responses in these cells. This result suggests that Phe stimulates α1AR on vascular smooth muscle cells and has an indirect influence on endothelial cells to increase NOS activity. In Phe-exposed aortic rings, basal NOS activity was found to have increased compared to vehicle-exposed control rings. Stimulation with Phe or Ach caused a small increase over basal NOS activity in these preparations. Prolonged exposure to Phe also caused an enhancement of Ach-mediated vasorelaxation in rat aorta. Immunoblot and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction experiments showed that prolonged exposure of rat aorta to Phe resulted in an increased expression of eNOS, but not iNOS. This increase was antagonized by nonselective antagonist prazosin. Immunohistochemical staining experiments also showed that expression of eNOS increased in endothelial cells after Phe exposure of the aortas. These results, all together, showed that prolonged exposure of rat aorta to α1AR agonist Phe enhanced the expression of eNOS and basal NOS activity, which probably causes a decreased vasocontractile response to Phe or to other agonists such as 5HT (5-hydroxytryptamine) in rat aorta. This phenomenon can be considered more as a functional

  19. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  20. Ciliary Phosphoinositide Regulates Ciliary Protein Trafficking in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Park, Jina; Lee, Nayoung; Kavoussi, Adriana; Seo, Jeong Taeg; Kim, Chul Hoon; Moon, Seok Jun

    2015-12-29

    Cilia are highly specialized antennae-like cellular organelles. Inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase E (INPP5E) converts PI(4,5)P2 into PI4P and is required for proper ciliary function. Although Inpp5e mutations are associated with ciliopathies in humans and mice, the precise molecular role INPP5E plays in cilia remains unclear. Here, we report that Drosophila INPP5E (dINPP5E) regulates ciliary protein trafficking by controlling the phosphoinositide composition of ciliary membranes. Mutations in dInpp5e lead to hearing deficits due to the mislocalization of dTULP and mechanotransduction channels, Inactive and NOMPC, in chordotonal cilia. Both loss of dINPP5E and ectopic expression of the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase Skittles increase PI(4,5)P2 levels in the ciliary base. The fact that Skittles expression phenocopies the dInpp5e mutants confirms a central role for PI(4,5)P2 in the regulation of dTULP, Inactive, and NOMPC localization. These data suggest that the spatial localization and levels of PI(4,5)P2 in ciliary membranes are important regulators of ciliary trafficking and function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Lucio; Follo, Matilde Y; Manzoli, Lucia; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipases are widely occurring and can be found in several different organisms, including bacteria, yeast, plants, animals, and viruses. Phospholipase C (PLC) is a class of phospholipases that cleaves phospholipids on the diacylglycerol (DAG) side of the phosphodiester bond producing DAGs and phosphomonoesters. Among PLCs, phosphoinositide-specific PLC (PI-PLC) constitutes an important step in the inositide signaling pathways. The structures of PI-PLC isozymes show conserved domains as well as regulatory specific domains. This is important, as most PI-PLCs share a common mechanism, but each of them has a peculiar role and can have a specific cell distribution that is linked to a specific function. More importantly, the regulation of PLC isozymes is fundamental in health and disease, as there are several PLC-dependent molecular mechanisms that are associated with the activation or inhibition of important physiopathological processes. Moreover, PI-PLC alternative splicing variants can play important roles in complex signaling networks, not only in cancer but also in other diseases. That is why PI-PLC isozymes are now considered as important molecules that are essential for better understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying both physiology and pathogenesis, and are also potential molecular targets useful for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  2. Multiple roles of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C isozymes.

    PubMed

    Suh, Pann-Ghill; Park, Jae-Il; Manzoli, Lucia; Cocco, Lucio; Peak, Joanna C; Katan, Matilda; Fukami, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Tohru; Yun, Sanguk; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2008-06-30

    Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C is an effector molecule in the signal transduction process. It generates two second messengers, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Currently, thirteen mammal PLC isozymes have been identified, and they are divided into six groups: PLC-beta, -gamma, -delta, -epsilon, -zeta and -eta. Sequence analysis studies demonstrated that each isozyme has more than one alternative splicing variant. PLC isozymes contain the X and Y domains that are responsible for catalytic activity. Several other domains including the PH domain, the C2 domain and EF hand motifs are involved in various biological functions of PLC isozymes as signaling proteins. The distribution of PLC isozymes is tissue and organ specific. Recent studies on isolated cells and knockout mice depleted of PLC isozymes have revealed their distinct phenotypes. Given the specificity in distribution and cellular localization, it is clear that each PLC isozyme bears a unique function in the modulation of physiological responses. In this review, we discuss the structural organization, enzymatic properties and molecular diversity of PLC splicing variants and study functional and physiological roles of each isozyme.

  3. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS OF PHOSPHOINOSITIDES AND PERIPHERAL PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Stahelin, Robert V.; Scott, Jordan L.; Frick, Cary T.

    2015-01-01

    Anionic lipids act as signals for the recruitment of proteins containing cationic clusters to biological membranes. A family of anionic lipids known as the phosphoinositides (PIPs) are low in abundance, yet play a critical role in recruitment of peripheral proteins to the membrane interface. PIPs are mono-, bis-, or trisphosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PI) yielding seven species with different structure and anionic charge. The differential spatial distribution and temporal appearance of PIPs is key to their role in communicating information to target proteins. Selective recognition of PIPs came into play with the discovery that the substrate of protein kinase C termed pleckstrin possessed the first PIP binding region termed the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Since the discovery of the PH domain, more than ten PIP binding domains have been identified including PH, ENTH, FYVE, PX, and C2 domains. Representative examples of each of these domains have been thoroughly characterized to understand how they coordinate PIP headgroups in membranes, translocate to specific membrane docking sites in the cell, and function to regulate the activity of their full-length proteins. In addition, a number of novel mechanisms of PIP-mediated membrane association have emerged, such as coincidence detection – specificity for two distinct lipid headgroups. Other PIP-binding domains may also harbor selectivity for a membrane physical property such as charge or membrane curvature. This review summarizes the current understanding of the cellular distribution of PIPs and their molecular interaction with peripheral proteins. PMID:24556335

  4. Live cell imaging of phosphoinositide dynamics during Legionella infection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The "accidental" pathogen Legionella pneumophila replicates intracellularly in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). To form this specific pathogen vacuole, the bacteria translocate via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system approximately 300 different effector proteins into the host cell. Several of these secreted effectors anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. L. pneumophila thus largely controls the localization of secreted bacterial effectors and the recruitment of host factors to the LCV through the modulation of the vacuole membrane PI pattern. The LCV PI pattern and its dynamics can be studied in real-time using fluorescently labeled protein probes stably produced by the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to (1) construct and handle amoeba model systems as a tool for observing PIs in live cell imaging, (2) capture rapid changes in membrane PI patterning during uptake events, and (3) observe the dynamics of LCV PIs over the course of a Legionella infection.

  5. Targeting phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ for allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Wendy C; Smith, Janet L; Affleck, Karen; Amour, Augustin

    2012-02-01

    Chronic inflammation in the lung has long been linked to the pathogenesis of asthma. Central to this airway inflammation is a T-cell response to allergens, with Th2 cytokines driving the differentiation, survival and function of the major inflammatory cells involved in the allergic cascade. PI3Kδ (phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ) is a lipid kinase, expressed predominantly in leucocytes, where it plays a critical role in immune receptor signalling. A selective PI3Kδ inhibitor is predicted to block T-cell activation in the lung, reducing the production of pro-inflammatory Th2 cytokines. PI3Kδ is also involved in B-cell and mast cell activation. Therefore the inhibition of PI3Kδ should dampen down the inflammatory cascade involved in the asthmatic response through a wide breadth of pharmacology. Current anti-inflammatory therapies, which are based on corticosteroids, are effective in controlling inflammation in mild asthmatics, but moderate/severe asthmatic patients remain poorly controlled, experiencing recurrent exacerbations. Corticosteroids have no effect on mast cell degranulation and do not act directly on B-cells, so, overall, a PI3Kδ inhibitor has the potential to deliver improvements in onset of action, efficacy and reduced exacerbations in moderate/severe asthmatics. Additionally, PI3Kδ inhibition is expected to block effects of Th17 cells, which are increasingly implicated in steroid-insensitive asthma.

  6. Regulation of profilin localization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phosphoinositide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, D B; Gorman, J A; Carman, G M

    1995-11-10

    Profilin is an actin- and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding protein that plays a role in the organization of the cytoskeleton and may be involved in growth factor signaling pathways. The subcellular localization of profilin was examined in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Immunoblot analysis showed that profilin was localized in both the plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions of the cell. Actin was bound to the profilin localized in the cytosol. The association of profilin with the membrane was peripheral and mediated through interaction with phospholipid. The phospholipid dependence of profilin for membrane binding was examined in vitro using pure profilin and defined unilamellar phospholipid vesicles. The presence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in phospholipid vesicles was required for maximum profilin binding. Moreover, the binding of profilin to phospholipid vesicles was dependent on the surface concentration of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. The subcellular localization of profilin was examined in vivo under growth conditions (i.e. inositol starvation of ino1 cells and glucose starvation of respiratory deficient cells) where plasma membrane levels of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate were depleted. Depletion of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate levels resulted in a translocation of profilin from the plasma membrane to the cytosolic fraction. Profilin translocated back to the membrane fraction from the cytosol under growth conditions where plasma membrane levels of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate were replenished. These results suggested that phosphoinositide metabolism played a role in the localization of profilin.

  7. The acyltransferase LYCAT controls specific phosphoinositides and related membrane traffic

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Leslie N.; Dayam, Roya M.; Lee, Minhyoung; Kono, Nozomu; Fairn, Gregory D.; Arai, Hiroyuki; Botelho, Roberto J.; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are key regulators of membrane traffic and signaling. The interconversion of PIPs by lipid kinases and phosphatases regulates their functionality. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) and PIPs have a unique enrichment of 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonyl acyl species; however, the regulation and function of this specific acyl profile remains poorly understood. We examined the role of the PI acyltransferase LYCAT in control of PIPs and PIP-dependent membrane traffic. LYCAT silencing selectively perturbed the levels and localization of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and the membrane traffic dependent on these specific PIPs but was without effect on phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate or biosynthetic membrane traffic. The acyl profile of PI(4,5)P2 was selectively altered in LYCAT-deficient cells, whereas LYCAT localized with phosphatidylinositol synthase. We propose that LYCAT remodels the acyl chains of PI, which is then channeled into PI(4,5)P2. Our observations suggest that the PIP acyl chain profile may exert broad control of cell physiology. PMID:28035047

  8. Cellular and molecular interactions of phosphoinositides and peripheral proteins.

    PubMed

    Stahelin, Robert V; Scott, Jordan L; Frick, Cary T

    2014-09-01

    Anionic lipids act as signals for the recruitment of proteins containing cationic clusters to biological membranes. A family of anionic lipids known as the phosphoinositides (PIPs) are low in abundance, yet play a critical role in recruitment of peripheral proteins to the membrane interface. PIPs are mono-, bis-, or trisphosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PI) yielding seven species with different structure and anionic charge. The differential spatial distribution and temporal appearance of PIPs is key to their role in communicating information to target proteins. Selective recognition of PIPs came into play with the discovery that the substrate of protein kinase C termed pleckstrin possessed the first PIP binding region termed the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Since the discovery of the PH domain, more than ten PIP binding domains have been identified including PH, ENTH, FYVE, PX, and C2 domains. Representative examples of each of these domains have been thoroughly characterized to understand how they coordinate PIP headgroups in membranes, translocate to specific membrane docking sites in the cell, and function to regulate the activity of their full-length proteins. In addition, a number of novel mechanisms of PIP-mediated membrane association have emerged, such as coincidence detection-specificity for two distinct lipid headgroups. Other PIP-binding domains may also harbor selectivity for a membrane physical property such as charge or membrane curvature. This review summarizes the current understanding of the cellular distribution of PIPs and their molecular interaction with peripheral proteins.

  9. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors induce DNA damage through nucleoside depletion

    PubMed Central

    Juvekar, Ashish; Hu, Hai; Yadegarynia, Sina; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Ullas, Soumya; Lien, Evan C.; Bellinger, Gary; Son, Jaekyoung; Hok, Rosanna C.; Seth, Pankaj; Daly, Michele B.; Kim, Baek; Scully, Ralph; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wulf, Gerburg M.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that combining a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor with a poly-ADP Rib polymerase (PARP)-inhibitor enhanced DNA damage and cell death in breast cancers that have genetic aberrations in BRCA1 and TP53. Here, we show that enhanced DNA damage induced by PI3K inhibitors in this mutational background is a consequence of impaired production of nucleotides needed for DNA synthesis and DNA repair. Inhibition of PI3K causes a reduction in all four nucleotide triphosphates, whereas inhibition of the protein kinase AKT is less effective than inhibition of PI3K in suppressing nucleotide synthesis and inducing DNA damage. Carbon flux studies reveal that PI3K inhibition disproportionately affects the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway that delivers Rib-5-phosphate required for base ribosylation. In vivo in a mouse model of BRCA1-linked triple-negative breast cancer (K14-Cre BRCA1f/fp53f/f), the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 led to a precipitous drop in DNA synthesis within 8 h of drug treatment, whereas DNA synthesis in normal tissues was less affected. In this mouse model, combined PI3K and PARP inhibition was superior to either agent alone to induce durable remissions of established tumors. PMID:27402769

  10. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase mediated signaling in lobster olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Pezier, Adeline; Ache, Barry W.

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates and some invertebrates, odorant molecules bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to initiate signal transduction. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity has been implicated physiologically in olfactory signal transduction, suggesting a potential role for a GPCR-activated class I PI3K. Using isoform-specific antibodies, we identified a protein in the olfactory signal transduction compartment of lobster ORNs that is antigenically similar to mammalian PI3Kγ and cloned a gene for a PI3K with amino acid homology with PI3Kβ. The lobster olfactory PI3K co-immunoprecipitates with the G protein α and β subunits, and an odorant-evoked increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate can be detected in the signal transduction compartment of the ORNs. PI3Kγ and β isoform-specific inhibitors reduce the odorant-evoked output of lobster ORNs in vivo. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that PI3K is indeed activated by odorant receptors in lobster ORNs and further support the potential involvement of G protein activated PI3K signaling in olfactory transduction. PMID:20132480

  11. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase p85beta regulates invadopodium formation

    PubMed Central

    Cariaga-Martínez, Ariel E.; Cortés, Isabel; García, Esther; Pérez-García, Vicente; Pajares, María J.; Idoate, Miguel A.; Redondo-Muñóz, Javier; Antón, Inés M.; Carrera, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acquisition of invasiveness is characteristic of tumor progression. Numerous genetic changes are associated with metastasis, but the mechanism by which a cell becomes invasive remains unclear. Expression of p85β, a regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase, markedly increases in advanced carcinoma, but its mode of action is unknown. We postulated that p85β might facilitate cell invasion. We show that p85β localized at cell adhesions in complex with focal adhesion kinase and enhanced stability and maturation of cell adhesions. In addition, p85β induced development at cell adhesions of an F-actin core that extended several microns into the cell z-axis resembling the skeleton of invadopodia. p85β lead to F-actin polymerization at cell adhesions by recruiting active Cdc42/Rac at these structures. In accordance with p85β function in invadopodium-like formation, p85β levels increased in metastatic melanoma and p85β depletion reduced invadopodium formation and invasion. These results show that p85β enhances invasion by inducing cell adhesion development into invadopodia-like structures explaining the metastatic potential of tumors with increased p85β levels. PMID:25217619

  12. Cholinergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rabbit kidney slices

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, L.C.; McArdle, S.; Crews, F.T.

    1986-03-01

    The release of inositol phosphates (IP) from phosphoinositides (PI) by carbachol was studied in the tissue slices from cortex (C), outer medulla (OM) and inner medulla (IM) of rabbit kidneys. The method involved the incubation of the slices with (/sup 3/H)inositol for its incorporation into the PI and measurement of the release of IP in presence of lithium which prevents dephosphorylation of IP. The results of (/sup 3/H)IP formation are expressed as % of total (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation in the tissue. No significant effect of carbachol was found on the release of IP in the C. The drug produced a 48% increase in IP release in the OM. In the IM, carbachol produced a concentration dependent increase in IP release with a maximum of 772% at 1 mM. The release of IP in the IM by 1 mM carbachol was completely blocked by 1 ..mu..M atropine. Our results indicate that IP release by carbachol is due to activation of muscarinic receptors in the IM of the rabbit kidney.

  13. Tools for visualization of phosphoinositides in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kalasova, Ilona; Fáberová, Veronika; Kalendová, Alžběta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Uličná, Lívia; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are glycerol-based phospholipids containing hydrophilic inositol ring. The inositol ring is mono-, bis-, or tris-phosphorylated yielding seven PIs members. Ample evidence shows that PIs localize both to the cytoplasm and to the nucleus. However, tools for direct visualization of nuclear PIs are limited and many studies thus employ indirect approaches, such as staining of their metabolic enzymes. Since localization and mobility of PIs differ from their metabolic enzymes, these approaches may result in incomplete data. In this paper, we tested commercially available PIs antibodies by light microscopy on fixed cells, tested their specificity using protein-lipid overlay assay and blocking assay, and compared their staining patterns. Additionally, we prepared recombinant PIs-binding domains and tested them on both fixed and live cells by light microscopy. The results provide a useful overview of usability of the tools tested and stress that the selection of adequate tools is critical. Knowing the localization of individual PIs in various functional compartments should enable us to better understand the roles of PIs in the cell nucleus.

  14. GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated effects in guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Giotti, A; Luzzi, S; Spagnesi, S; Zilletti, L

    1983-03-01

    1 The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and related substances were examined in guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle.2 GABA at doses ranging from 10(-7) M to 3 x 10(-6) M elicited a relaxation while at higher doses (3 x 10(-6) M - 10(-4) M), as previously described, it caused a contraction followed by relaxation.3 GABA-induced relaxation was bicuculline-insensitive, was mimicked by (-)-baclofen but not by homotaurine and muscimol. The effect of baclofen was stereospecific. GABA- and (-)-baclofen-induced relaxations were dose-dependent and their ED(50) values were similar. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between GABA and (-)-baclofen.4 The bicuculline-insensitive relaxation induced by GABA and (-)-baclofen was prevented by tetrodotoxin and hyoscine but not by phentolamine plus propranolol, naloxone or theophylline.5 In preparations in which the muscle tone was raised by histamine or prostaglandin F(2alpha), GABA and (-)-baclofen induced relaxation to the same extent as before increasing the tone. If the tone was raised by DMPP, a greater bicuculline-insensitive relaxation occurred.6 Contraction caused by GABA was bicuculline-sensitive and was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol. Contraction was dose-dependent and muscimol was about three times more potent than GABA or homotaurine. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between the contractile effects of GABA and those of homotaurine or muscimol.7 Bicuculline competitively antagonized the contractile effects of GABA, homotaurine and muscimol and gave closely similar pA(2) values. The slope of the Schild plot for the above drugs was near 1, confirming the competitive nature of the antagonism.8 The bicuculline-sensitive contraction induced by GABA, homotaurine and muscimol was abolished by tetrodotoxin and was non-competitively antagonized by hyoscine, while it was unaffected by hexamethonium, mepyramine and methysergide.9 It is concluded that two receptors mediate the GABA effects in guinea

  15. Characterization of prejunctional 5-HT receptors mediating inhibition of sympathetic vasopressor responses in the pithed rat.

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, C. M.; Contreras, J.; Ramírez-San Juan, E.; Castillo, C.; Perusquía, M.; Terrón, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    1. It has recently been shown that continuous infusions of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) are able to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the pressor responses induced by preganglionic (T7-T9) sympathetic stimulation in pithed rats pretreated with desipramine (50 micrograms kg-1, i.v.). This inhibitory effect, besides being significantly more pronounced at lower frequencies of stimulation (0.03-I Hz) and devoid of tachyphylaxis, is reversible after interrupting the infusions of 5-HT (up to 5.6 micrograms kg-1 min-1). In the present study we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the receptors mediating the above inhibitory effect of 5-HT. 2. The inhibition induced by 5.6 micrograms kg-1 min-1 of 5-HT on sympathetically-induced pressor responses was not blocked after i.v. treatment with physiological saline (1 ml kg-1), ritanserin (0.1 mg kg-1), MDL 72222 (0.15 mg kg-1) or tropisetron (3 mg kg-1), which did not modify the sympathetically-induced pressor responses per se, but was significantly antagonized by the 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, methysergide (0.3 mg kg-1), which also produced a slight attenuation of the pressor responses to 0.03 and 0.1 Hz per se. 3. Unexpectedly and contrasting with methysergide, the 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, methiothepin (0.01, 0.03 and 0.1 mg kg-1) and metergoline (1 and 3 mg kg-1), apparently failed to block the above 5-HT-induced inhibition. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy that these antagonists also blocked the electrically-induced pressor responses per se, presumably by blockade of vascular alpha 1-adrenoceptors and, indeed, this property might have masked their potential antagonism at the inhibitory 5-HT1-like receptors. 4. Consistent with the above findings, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, a potent 5-HT1-like receptor agonist), metergoline and methysergide mimicked the inhibitory action of 5-HT with the following rank order of agonist potency: 5CT > > 5-HT > metergoline > or = methysergide. 5

  16. Pharmacological characterization of prostanoid receptors mediating vasoconstriction in human umbilical vein

    PubMed Central

    Daray, Federico Manuel; Minvielle, Ana Itatí; Puppo, Soledad; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2003-01-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize pharmacologically the prostanoid receptor subtypes mediating contraction in human umbilical vein (HUV).HUV rings were mounted in organ baths and concentration–response curves to U-46619 (TXA2 mimetic) were constructed in the absence or presence of SQ-29548 or ICI-192,605 (TP receptor antagonists). U-46619 was a potent constrictor (pEC50: 8.03). SQ-29548 and ICI-192,605 competitively antagonized responses to U-46619 with pKB values of 7.96 and 9.07, respectively.Concentration–response curves to EP receptor agonists: PGE2, misoprostol and 17-phenyl-trinor-PGE2 gave pEC50 values of 5.06, 5.25 and 5.32, respectively. Neither pEC50 nor maximum of PGE2 and 17-phenyl-trinor-PGE2 concentration–response curves were modified by the DP/EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH 6809 (1 μM). However, ICI-192,605 produced a concentration-dependent antagonism of the responses to all the EP receptor agonists. The pA2 estimated for ICI-192,605 against PGE2 or misoprostol were 8.91 and 9.22, respectively.Concentration–response curves to FP receptor agonists: PGF2α and fluprostenol gave pEC50 values of 6.20 and 5.82, respectively. ICI-192,605 (100 nM) was completely ineffective against PGF2α or fluprostenol. In addition, lack of antagonistic effect of AH 6809 (1 μM) against PGF2α was observed.In conclusion, the findings obtained with TP-selective agonist and antagonists provide strong evidence of the involvement of TP receptors promoting vasoconstriction in HUV. Furthermore, the action of the natural and synthetic EP receptor agonists appears to be mediated via TP receptors. On the other hand, the results employing FP receptor agonists and antagonists of different prostanoid receptors suggest the presence of FP receptors mediating vasoconstriction in this vessel. PMID:12922927

  17. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  18. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC50 > 10 microM). The presence of 0.5 microM dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake blocker, had no effect on the potency of adenosine. 3. The response to 10 microM NECA was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists, xanthine amine congener (apparent KD = 12 nM), PD 115,199 (apparent KD = 134 nM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (apparent KD = 126 nM). However, the A1-receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, had no significant effect on the responses to NECA or 2-chloroadenosine at concentrations up to 1 microM. 4. Stimulation of A1-receptors with the selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, did not alter the basal accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP but inhibited a forskolin-mediated elevation of [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation by a maximal value of 42%. This inhibition was fully reversed in the presence of 0.1 microM, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. 5. The time course for NECA-mediated [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation was investigated. The results suggest that there is a substantial efflux of cyclic AMP from the cells in addition to the rapid and sustained elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (5 fold over basal) which was also observed. 6. These data indicate that rat astrocytes in primary culture express an A2B-adenosine receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, the presence of A1-receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase appears to have no significant effect on the A2B-receptor-mediated

  19. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  20. Lipoprotein lipase regulates Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages maintained in glucose-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, B; Loike, J D; Kako, Y; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Silverstein, S C; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    During periods of intense activity such as phagocytosis, macrophages are thought to derive most of their energy from glucose metabolism under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To determine whether fatty acids released from lipoproteins by macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) could substitute for glucose as a source of energy for phagocytosis, we cultured peritoneal macrophages from normal and LPL knockout (LPL-KO) mice that had been rescued from neonatal demise by expression of human LPL via the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Normal and LPL-KO macrophages were cultured in medium containing normal (5 mM) or low (1 mM) glucose, and were tested for their capacity to phagocytose IgG-opsonized sheep erythrocytes. LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 and 5 mM glucose phagocytosed 67 and 79% fewer IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, respectively, than macrophages from normal mice. Addition of VLDL to LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose enhanced the macrophages' phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, but did not stimulate phagocytosis by LPL-KO macrophages. Inhibition of secreted LPL with a monoclonal anti-LPL antibody or with tetrahydrolipstatin blocked the ability of VLDL to enhance phagocytosis by LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Addition of oleic acid significantly enhanced phagocytosis by both LPL-expressing and LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Moreover, oleic acid stimulated phagocytosis in cells cultured in non-glucose-containing medium, and increased the intracellular stores of creatine phosphate. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, but not of glycolysis, blocked the capacity of oleic acid to stimulate phagocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl LDL by macrophages from LPL-expressing and LPL-KO mice was similar whether the cells were maintained in 5 or 1 mM glucose, and was not augmented by VLDL. We postulate that fatty acids derived from macrophage LPL-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides and

  1. Melatonin receptors mediate improvements of survival in a model of polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fink, Tobias; Glas, Michael; Wolf, Alexander; Kleber, Astrid; Reus, Erik; Wolff, Martin; Kiefer, Daniel; Wolf, Beate; Rensing, Hauke; Volk, Thomas; Mathes, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    -α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-10 were observed 5 hours after cecal ligation and incision in rats (p < 0.05 vs baseline and corresponding sham); neither ramelteon nor melatonin treatment significantly affected immune response. Melatonin receptors mediate improvements of survival after polymicrobial sepsis in rats and mice; this effect appears to be independent from major alterations of cytokine release.

  2. The Impact of Hyperthermia on Receptor-Mediated Interleukin-6 Regulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Welc, Steven S.; Morse, Deborah A.; Mattingly, Alex J.; Laitano, Orlando; King, Michelle A.; Clanton, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    In inflammatory cells, hyperthermia inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression and protein secretion. Since hyperthermia alone stimulates IL-6 in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that it would amplify responses to other receptor-mediated stimuli. IL-6 regulation was tested in C2C12 myotubes and in soleus during treatment with epinephrine (EPI) or LPS. In EPI-treated myotubes (100 ng/ml), 1 h exposure at 40.5°C-42°C transiently increased IL-6 mRNA compared to EPI treatment alone at 37°C. In LPS-treated myotubes (1 μg/ml), exposure to 41°C-42°C also increased IL-6 mRNA. In isolated mouse soleus, similar amplifications of IL-6 gene expression were observed in 41°C, during both low (1 ng/ml) and high dose (100 ng/ml) EPI, but only in high dose LPS (1 μg/ml). In myotubes, heat increased IL-6 secretion during EPI exposure but had no effect or inhibited secretion with LPS. In soleus there were no effects of heat on IL-6 secretion during either EPI or LPS treatment. Mechanisms for the effects of heat on IL-6 mRNA were explored using a luciferase-reporter in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) had no impact on IL-6 promoter activity during EPI stimulation, but elevated IL-6 promoter activity during LPS stimulation. In contrast, when the activator protein-1 (AP-1) element was mutated, responses to both LPS and EPI were suppressed in heat. Using siRNA against activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a heat-stress-induced inhibitor of IL-6, no ATF-3-dependent effects were observed. The results demonstrate that, unlike inflammatory cells, hyperthermia in muscle fibers amplifies IL-6 gene expression to EPI and LPS. The effect appears to reflect differential engagement of HSF-1 and AP-1 sensitive elements on the IL-6 gene, with no evidence for involvement of ATF-3. The functional significance of increased IL-6 mRNA expression during heat may serve to overcome the well-known suppression of protein synthetic

  3. Dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms involved in the expression of learned activity of primate striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    background discharge rates nor the responses of TANs were significantly influenced. Background discharge rate of TANs was also not affected by D1- or D2-class antagonists applied by either micropressure injection or iontophoresis. It was concluded that the nigrostriatal DA system enables TANs to express learned activity primarily through D2-class and partly through D1-class receptor-mediated mechanisms in the striatum.

  4. Effect of taurine deficiency on adenosine receptor-mediated relaxation of the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Worku; Mozaffari, Mahmood S

    2003-11-01

    not altered by taurine deficiency. The results indicate that endogenous taurine deficiency causes differential inhibitory effects on adenosine receptor-mediated vasorelaxation, depending upon the agonists used. Given the recognized role of adenosine in the vasculature, these alterations suggest taurine-mediated modulation of blood flow regulation.

  5. Inositol Pentakisphosphate Isomers Bind PH Domains with Varying Specificity and Inhibit Phosphoinositide Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    S Jackson; S Al-Saigh; C Schultz; M Junop

    2011-12-31

    PH domains represent one of the most common domains in the human proteome. These domains are recognized as important mediators of protein-phosphoinositide and protein-protein interactions. Phosphoinositides are lipid components of the membrane that function as signaling molecules by targeting proteins to their sites of action. Phosphoinositide based signaling pathways govern a diverse range of important cellular processes including membrane remodeling, differentiation, proliferation and survival. Myo-Inositol phosphates are soluble signaling molecules that are structurally similar to the head groups of phosphoinositides. These molecules have been proposed to function, at least in part, by regulating PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Given the structural similarity of inositol phosphates we were interested in examining the specificity of PH domains towards the family of myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. In work reported here we demonstrate that the C-terminal PH domain of pleckstrin possesses the specificity required to discriminate between different myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. The structural basis for this specificity was determined using high-resolution crystal structures. Moreover, we show that while the PH domain of Grp1 does not possess this high degree of specificity, the PH domain of protein kinase B does. These results demonstrate that some PH domains possess enough specificity to discriminate between myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers allowing for these molecules to differentially regulate interactions with phosphoinositides. Furthermore, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting myo-inositol phosphates as regulators of important PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Finally, in addition to expanding our knowledge of cellular signaling, these results provide a basis for developing tools to probe biological pathway.

  6. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  7. Enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Blue, Mary E; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the X-linked gene for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The underlying cellular mechanism for the sensory deficits in patients with RTT is largely unknown. This study used the Bird mouse model of RTT to investigate sensory thalamocortical synaptic transmission in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice. Electrophysiological results showed an excitation/inhibition imbalance, biased toward inhibition, due to an increase in efficacy of postsynaptic GABAA receptors rather than alterations in inhibitory network and presynaptic release properties. Enhanced inhibition impaired the transmission of tonic sensory signals from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex. Previous morphological studies showed an upregulation of NMDA receptors in the neocortex of both RTT patients and Mecp2-null mice at early ages [Blue ME, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Ann Neurol 45: 541-545, 1999; Blue ME, Kaufmann WE, Bressler J, Eyring C, O'Driscoll C, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294: 1624-1634, 2011]. Although AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission was not altered in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice, extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses increased markedly. These responses were blocked by memantine, suggesting that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of RTT. The results suggest that enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses may underlie impaired somatosensation and that pharmacological blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may have therapeutic value for RTT.

  8. Antipsychotic-Induced Alterations in CB1 Receptor-Mediated G-Protein Signaling and In Vivo Pharmacology in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, Seth H.; Burston, James J.; Howard, Daniel R.; Selley, Dana E.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid and dopamine systems have been implicated in schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of sub-chronic treatment with two antipsychotics on CB1 receptor-mediated in vitro and in vivo effects. Adult and adolescent male and female rats were injected twice daily with haloperidol (0.3 mg/kg), clozapine (10 mg/kg), or saline for 10 days. Subsequently, CB1 receptor number and function were assessed by [3H]SR141716 and WIN55,212-2-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding, respectively. The effects of sub-chronic antipsychotic treatment on the in vivo actions of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) were also evaluated. In adult female rats, antipsychotic treatment attenuated maximal stimulation of CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein activity in the striatum (clozapine) and prefrontal cortex (both antipsychotics), but not in the ventral midbrain. Associated changes in CB1 receptor number were not observed, suggesting that this attenuation was not due to downregulation. In vivo, sub-chronic treatment with clozapine, but not haloperidol, attenuated Δ9-THC-induced suppression of activity in adult females, whereas neither drug altered hypothermia or catalepsy. In contrast, antipsychotic treatment did not change CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein activation in any brain region in adult male rats and in adolescents of either sex. In vivo, haloperidol, but not clozapine, enhanced Δ9-THC-mediated suppression of activity and hypothermia in adult male rats whereas neither antipsychotic affected Δ9-THC-induced in vivo effects in adolescent rats. These findings suggest that modulation of the endocannabinoid system might contribute in a sex- and age-selective manner to differences in motor side effects of clozapine versus haloperidol. PMID:18708079

  9. Enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Blue, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the X-linked gene for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The underlying cellular mechanism for the sensory deficits in patients with RTT is largely unknown. This study used the Bird mouse model of RTT to investigate sensory thalamocortical synaptic transmission in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice. Electrophysiological results showed an excitation/inhibition imbalance, biased toward inhibition, due to an increase in efficacy of postsynaptic GABAA receptors rather than alterations in inhibitory network and presynaptic release properties. Enhanced inhibition impaired the transmission of tonic sensory signals from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex. Previous morphological studies showed an upregulation of NMDA receptors in the neocortex of both RTT patients and Mecp2-null mice at early ages [Blue ME, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Ann Neurol 45: 541–545, 1999; Blue ME, Kaufmann WE, Bressler J, Eyring C, O'Driscoll C, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294: 1624–1634, 2011]. Although AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission was not altered in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice, extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses increased markedly. These responses were blocked by memantine, suggesting that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of RTT. The results suggest that enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses may underlie impaired somatosensation and that pharmacological blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may have therapeutic value for RTT. PMID:26683074

  10. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  11. Genomic organization and complete cDNA sequence of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 gene (PLCB3)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagercrantz, J.; Carson, E.; Phelan, C.

    1995-04-10

    We have characterized the complete cDNA sequence, genomic structure, and expression of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 (PLC {beta}3) gene (gene symbol PLCB3). PLC {beta}3 plays an important role in initiating receptor-mediated signal transduction. Activation of PLC takes place in many cells as a response to stimulation by hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and other ligands. The partial cDNA sequence of PLC {beta}3, previously published, was extended with 876 bp in the 5{prime} direction, giving a transcript of 4400 bp and a total open reading frame of 1234 amino acids. This was in accordance with expression analysis by Northern blotting that revealed a single 4.4-kb transcript in all tissues tested. Genomic data were obtained by sequencing plasmid subclones of a cosmid that contained the whole gene. The size of the complete transcription unit was estimated to be on the order of 15 kb. The gene contains 31 exons, with all splice donor and acceptor sites conforming to the GT/AG rule. No exon exceeds 571 bp in length, and the shortest exon spans only 36 bp. More than half of the introns are smaller than 200 bp, with the smallest being only 79 bp long. The transcription initiation site was determined to be within an 8-bp cluster 328-321 bp upstream of the translation initiation site. The 5{prime} flanking region is highly GC rich, with multiple CpG doublets, and contains multiple binding sites for Sp1. Lacking typical transcriptional regulatory sequences such as TATA and CAAT boxes, the putative promoter region conforms to the group of housekeeping promoters. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. 5-HT2A receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the stimulus effects of hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Richard A; Regina, Meredith; Doat, Mireille; Winter, J C

    2002-05-01

    The role of 5-HT2A-mediated stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the discriminative effects of hallucinogens was investigated in PC12 cells stably expressing the rat 5-HT2A receptor (PC12-5-HT2A cells). The hallucinogenic compounds, D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), (-)2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), psilocybin, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (MDMT) and N,N-diethyltryptamine (DET), all caused a concentration-dependent increase in the generation of [3H]inositol phosphates. The nonhallucinogenic compounds, 6-fluoro-N,N-diethyltryptamine (6-F-DET), lisuride and quipazine, also displayed significant efficacy in stimulating phosphoinositide hydrolysis, while 2-bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL), which is not a hallucinogen, did not alter inositol phosphate generation. The beta-carbolines, harmaline and harmane, also did not alter phosphoinositide hydrolysis. Comparison of these results with previous drug discrimination studies indicated the apparent lack of correlation between the degree of substitution in LSD- and DOM-trained animals and efficacy in stimulating phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The present study indicates that 5-HT2A-mediated stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis does not appear to be the sole critical signaling mechanism involved in the discriminative effects of hallucinogens.

  13. BIN1/M-Amphiphysin2 induces clustering of phosphoinositides to recruit its downstream partner dynamin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picas, Laura; Viaud, Julien; Schauer, Kristine; Vanni, Stefano; Hnia, Karim; Fraisier, Vincent; Roux, Aurélien; Bassereau, Patricia; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frédérique; Payrastre, Bernard; Laporte, Jocelyn; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Goud, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    Phosphoinositides play a central role in many physiological processes by assisting the recruitment of proteins to membranes through specific phosphoinositide-binding motifs. How this recruitment is coordinated in space and time is not well understood. Here we show that BIN1/M-Amphiphysin2, a protein involved in T-tubule biogenesis in muscle cells and frequently mutated in centronuclear myopathies, clusters PtdIns(4,5)P2 to recruit its downstream partner dynamin. By using several mutants associated with centronuclear myopathies, we find that the N-BAR and the SH3 domains of BIN1 control the kinetics and the accumulation of dynamin on membranes, respectively. We show that phosphoinositide clustering is a mechanism shared by other proteins that interact with PtdIns(4,5)P2, but do not contain a BAR domain. Our numerical simulations point out that clustering is a diffusion-driven process in which phosphoinositide molecules are not sequestered. We propose that this mechanism plays a key role in the recruitment of downstream phosphoinositide-binding proteins.

  14. Small GTPases and phosphoinositides in the regulatory mechanisms of macropinosome formation and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Egami, Youhei; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Maekawa, Masashi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Araki, Nobukazu

    2014-01-01

    Macropinosome formation requires the sequential activation of numerous signaling pathways that coordinate the actin-driven formation of plasma membrane protrusions (ruffles) and circular ruffles (macropinocytic cups), followed by the closure of these macropinocytic cups into macropinosomes. In the process of macropinosome formation, localized productions of phosphoinositides such as PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 spatiotemporally orchestrate actin polymerization and rearrangement through recruiting and activating a variety of actin-associated proteins. In addition, the sequential activation of small GTPases, which are known to be master regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, plays a pivotal role in parallel with phosphoinositides. To complete macropinosome formation, phosphoinositide breakdown and Rho GTPase deactivation must occur in appropriate timings. After the nascent macropinosomes are formed, phosphoinositides and several Rab GTPases control macropinosome maturation by regulating vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the critical functions of phosphoinositide metabolism and small GTPases in association with their downstream effectors in macropinocytosis. PMID:25324782

  15. Specific interactions among transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) proteins and phosphoinositide 4-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Yauch, R L; Hemler, M E

    2000-01-01

    In earlier work we established that phosphoinositide 4-kinase (PI 4-kinase) may associate with transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF, tetraspanin) proteins, but critical specificity issues were not addressed. Here we demonstrate that at least five different TM4SF proteins (CD9, CD63, CD81, CD151 and A15/TALLA1) can associate with a similar or identical 55 kDa type II PI 4-kinase. These associations were specific, since we found no evidence for other phosphoinositide kinases (e.g. phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphoinositide-4-phosphate 5-kinase) associating with TM4SF proteins, and many other TM4SF proteins (including CD82 and CD53) did not associate with PI 4-kinase. CD63-PI 4-kinase complexes were almost entirely intracellular, and thus are distinct from other TM4SF-PI 4-kinase complexes (e.g. involving CD9), which are largely located in the plasma membrane. These results suggest that a specific subset of TM4SF proteins may recruit PI 4-kinase to specific membrane locations, and thereby influence phosphoinositide-dependent signalling. PMID:11042117

  16. Ca2+ Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei Phosphoinositide Phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    King-Keller, Sharon; Moore, Christina A; Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-05-01

    We characterized a phosphoinositide phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from the procyclic form (PCF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The protein contains a domain organization characteristic of typical PI-PLCs, such as X and Y catalytic domains, an EF-hand calcium-binding motif, and a C2 domain, but it lacks a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In addition, the T. brucei PI-PLC (TbPI-PLC) contains an N-terminal myristoylation consensus sequence found only in trypanosomatid PI-PLCs. A peptide containing this N-terminal domain fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) was targeted to the plasma membrane. TbPI-PLC enzymatic activity was stimulated by Ca(2+) concentrations below the cytosolic levels in the parasite, suggesting that the enzyme is constitutively active. TbPI-PLC hydrolyzes both phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), with a higher affinity for PIP2. We found that modification of a single amino acid in the EF-hand motif greatly affected the protein's Ca(2+) sensitivity and substrate preference, demonstrating the role of this motif in Ca(2+) regulation of TbPI-PLC. Endogenous TbPI-PLC localizes to intracellular vesicles and might be using an intracellular source of PIP2. Knockdown of TbPI-PLC expression by RNA interference (RNAi) did not result in growth inhibition, although enzymatic activity was still present in parasites, resulting in hydrolysis of PIP2 and a contribution to the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)/diacylglycerol (DAG) pathway. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Class (I) Phosphoinositide 3-Kinases in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gyori, David; Chessa, Tamara; Hawkins, Phillip T.; Stephens, Len R.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a diverse family of enzymes which regulate various critical biological processes, such as cell proliferation and survival. Class (I) PI3Ks (PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ) mediate the phosphorylation of the inositol ring at position D3 leading to the generation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 can be dephosphorylated by several phosphatases, of which the best known is the 3-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog). The Class (I) PI3K pathway is frequently disrupted in human cancers where mutations are associated with increased PI3K-activity or loss of PTEN functionality within the tumor cells. However, the role of PI3Ks in the tumor stroma is less well understood. Recent evidence suggests that the white blood cell-selective PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ isoforms have an important role in regulating the immune-suppressive, tumor-associated myeloid cell and regulatory T cell subsets, respectively, and as a consequence are also critical for solid tumor growth. Moreover, PI3Kα is implicated in the direct regulation of tumor angiogenesis, and dysregulation of the PI3K pathway in stromal fibroblasts can also contribute to cancer progression. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of the Class (I) PI3K family in the tumor microenvironment can be a highly attractive anti-cancer strategy and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors may act as potent cancer immunotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:28273837

  18. Phosphoinositides direct equine infectious anemia virus gag trafficking and release.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H; Medina, Gisselle N; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2) ], the predominant phosphoinositide (PI) on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments; hence, the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other PIs to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these PIs was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P(2) as revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in phosphatidylinositol 3,5-biphosphate [PI(3,5)P(2) ]. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P(2) from PI(3)P, caused Gag to colocalize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by coexpression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P(2) from the plasma membrane. However, coexpression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that PI-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    '-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 0.5-1.0 microM) did not significantly affect the EPSPm. 4. The selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 0.2 microM) fully reversed the depressant effects of both adenosine (100 microM) and CADO (1 microM) on the EPSPm and the stimulus-evoked reductions in spike frequency adaptation. 5. DPCPX (0.2 microM) alone caused a small but variable mean increase in the EPSPm of 22 +/- 19% and enabled activation of an EPSPm by a previously subthreshold stimulus. In contrast, the selective adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-IT; 10 microM) inhibited the EPSPm by 74 +/- 10%, an effect that was reversed by DPCPX. 6. The concentration-response relationship for the depressant action of CADO on the EPSPm more closely paralleled that for its presynaptic depressant action on glutamate-mediated EPSPs than that for postsynaptic hyperpolarization. The respective mean IC50 and EC50 concentrations for these effects were 0.3, 0.8 and 3.0 microM. 7. CADO (1-5 microM) did not have a significant effect on the postsynaptic depolarization, increase in input resistance and reduction in spike frequency adaptation evoked by carbachol (0.5-3.0 microM). All these effects were abolished by atropine (1 microM). 8. These data provide good evidence for an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of mAChR-mediated synaptic responses in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. This inhibition is mediated predominantly presynaptically, is active tonically and can be enhanced when extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine are raised. PMID:9234198

  20. Morphine inhibits an alpha9-acetylcholine nicotinic receptor-mediated response by a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Lioudyno, M I; Verbitsky, M; Holt, J C; Elgoyhen, A B; Guth, P S

    2000-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are known to be targets for modulation by a number of substances, including the opiates. It is known that acetylcholine (ACh) coexists with opioid peptides in cochlear efferent neurons, and such a colocalization has been proposed for the vestibular system. In the present study we test the hypothesis that morphine, an opioid receptor agonist with a broad spectrum of selectivity, modulates alpha9nACh receptor-mediated responses in frog vestibular hair cells. Morphine dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited ACh-induced currents as recorded by the perforated patch-clamp method. In the presence of morphine the ACh dose-response curve was shifted to the right in a parallel fashion, suggesting a competitive interaction. However, naloxone did not antagonize the inhibition produced by morphine. To test the hypothesis that morphine could interact with the alpha9nACh receptor without the involvement of opioid receptors, experiments were performed using Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with the alpha9nACh receptor cRNA. The currents activated by ACh in Xenopus oocytes, a system that lacks opioid receptors, were also dose-dependently inhibited by morphine. We conclude that morphine inhibits the alpha9nACh receptor-mediated response in hair cells and Xenopus oocytes through a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors but may be a direct block of the alpha9nACh receptor.

  1. Activation of innate antiviral immune response via double-stranded RNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Azadzoi, Kazem M.; Su, Ning; Dai, Peng; Sun, Jianbin; Wang, Qin; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Wentao; Lei, Xiaoying; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Viruses induce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the host cells. The mammalian system has developed dsRNA-dependent recognition receptors such as RLRs that recognize the long stretches of dsRNA as PAMPs to activate interferon-mediated antiviral pathways and apoptosis in severe infection. Here we report an efficient antiviral immune response through dsRNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis against infections from different classes of viruses. We demonstrated that virus-infected A549 cells were efficiently killed in the presence of a chimeric RLR receptor, dsCARE. It measurably suppressed the interferon antiviral pathway but promoted IL-1β production. Canonical cell death analysis by morphologic assessment, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase cleavage and chemical inhibition excluded the involvement of apoptosis and consistently suggested RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis as the underlying mechanism of infected cell death. The necroptotic pathway was augmented by the formation of RIP1-RIP3 necrosome, recruitment of MLKL protein and the activation of cathepsin D. Contributing roles of RIP1 and RIP3 were confirmed by gene knockdown. Furthermore, the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 but not the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD impeded dsCARE-dependent infected cell death. Our data provides compelling evidence that the chimeric RLR receptor shifts the common interferon antiviral responses of infected cells to necroptosis and leads to rapid death of the virus-infected cells. This mechanism could be targeted as an efficient antiviral strategy. PMID:26935990

  2. GABAa and GABAc receptor-mediated modulation of responses to color stimuli: electroretinographic study in the turtle Emys orbicularis.

    PubMed

    Kupenova, Petia; Vitanova, Lily; Popova, Elka

    2010-04-01

    GABAergic transmission is involved in color coding in the retina. The specific contribution of different GABA receptors to spectral sensitivity of the retinal responses is not well characterized. We studied GABAa and GABAc receptor-mediated effects on the intensity-response functions of the electroretinographic ON (b-wave) and OFF (d-wave) responses to color stimuli. For this purpose, we compared the effects of GABAa receptor blockade by bicuculline with the effects of GABAa + GABAc receptor blockade by picrotoxin. The blockade of both GABAa and GABAc receptors caused an amplitude increase of the electroretinographic responses, but the effects of the two blockades depended in a specific manner on stimulus intensity and wavelength. The effects of GABAa receptor blockade showed distinct color ON/OFF asymmetry. The absolute and relative sensitivities of the ON responses to blue stimuli and OFF responses to red stimuli were increased to the greatest degree while the sensitivity of the ON responses to red stimuli and OFF responses to blue stimuli was least increased. In contrast, color ON/OFF asymmetry was not typical of the effects of GABAc receptor blockade. The most prominent GABAc effect was the sensitivity increase of the ON and OFF responses to blue stimuli and, to some lesser extent, to green stimuli. The results of this study indicate a specific role of GABAa and GABAc receptor-mediated influences in processing of chromatic information in the distal retina.

  3. Loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions induce preterm cellular and structural remodeling of the cervix and premature birth.

    PubMed

    Yellon, Steven M; Dobyns, Abigail E; Beck, Hailey L; Kurtzman, James T; Garfield, Robert E; Kirby, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone), or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term.

  4. Reboxetine enhances the olanzapine-induced antipsychotic-like effect, cortical dopamine outflow and NMDA receptor-mediated transmission.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Björkholm, Carl; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-08-01

    Preclinical data have shown that addition of the selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine increases the antipsychotic-like effect of the D(2/3) antagonist raclopride and, in parallel, enhances cortical dopamine output. Subsequent clinical results suggested that adding reboxetine to stable treatments with various antipsychotic drugs (APDs) may improve positive, negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated in rats the effects of adding reboxetine to the second-generation APD olanzapine on: (i) antipsychotic efficacy, using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, (ii) extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability, using a catalepsy test, (iii) dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals and (iv) cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission, using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Reboxetine (6 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR induced by a suboptimal dose (1.25 mg/kg), but not an optimal (2.5 mg/kg) dose of olanzapine without any concomitant catalepsy. Addition of reboxetine to the low dose of olanzapine also markedly increased cortical dopamine outflow and facilitated prefrontal NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Our data suggest that adjunctive treatment with a NET inhibitor may enhance the therapeutic effect of low-dose olanzapine in schizophrenia without increasing EPS liability and add an antidepressant action, thus in principle allowing for a dose reduction of olanzapine with a concomitant reduction of dose-related side effects, such as EPS and weight gain.

  5. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins. PMID:16603603

  6. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubule cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, N J; Stuart, J; Tobin, A B; Walls, J; Nahorski, S

    1998-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin is an important function of the kidney proximal tubule epithelium. We have measured endocytosis of [125I]-albumin in opossum kidney cells and examined the regulation of this process by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Albumin endocytosis was inhibited by both wortmannin (IC50 6.9 nM) and LY294002 (IC50 6.5 microM) at concentrations that suggested the involvement of PI 3-kinase in its regulation. Recycling rates were unaffected. We transfected OK cells with either a wild-type p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, or a dominant negative form of the p85 subunit (Deltap85) using the LacSwitch expression system. Transfects were screened by immunoblotting with anti-PI 3-kinase antibodies. Under basal conditions, transfects demonstrated no expression of p85 or Deltap85, but expression was briskly induced by treatment of the cells with IPTG (EC50 13.7 microM). Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity by Deltap85 was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay of anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from transfected cells stimulated with insulin. Expression of Deltap85 resulted in marked inhibition of albumin endocytosis, predominantly as a result of reduction of the Vmax of the transport process. Expression of p85 had no significant effect on albumin uptake. The results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase regulates an early step in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubular cells. PMID:9593770

  7. Antigen-Specific Immune Modulation Targets mTORC1 Function To Drive Chemokine Receptor-Mediated T Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weirong; Wan, Xiaoxiao; Ukah, Tobechukwu K; Miller, Mindy M; Barik, Subhasis; Cattin-Roy, Alexis N; Zaghouani, Habib

    2016-11-01

    To contain autoimmunity, pathogenic T cells must be eliminated or diverted from reaching the target organ. Recently, we defined a novel form of T cell tolerance whereby treatment with Ag downregulates expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and prevents diabetogenic Th1 cells from reaching the pancreas, leading to suppression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). This report defines the signaling events underlying Ag-induced chemokine receptor-mediated tolerance. Specifically, we show that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major target for induction of CXCR3 downregulation and crippling of Th1 cells. Indeed, Ag administration induces upregulation of programmed death-ligand 1 on dendritic cells in a T cell-dependent manner. In return, programmed death-ligand 1 interacts with the constitutively expressed programmed death-1 on the target T cells and stimulates docking of Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 phosphatase to the cytoplasmic tail of programmed death-1. Active Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 impairs the signaling function of the PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway, leading to functional defect of mTORC1, downregulation of CXCR3 expression, and suppression of T1D. Thus, mTORC1 component of the metabolic pathway serves as a target for chemokine receptor-mediated T cell tolerance and suppression of T1D.

  8. Further characterization of the 5-HT receptor mediating vascular relaxation and elevation of cyclic AMP in porcine isolated vena cava.

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, M. J.; Feniuk, W.; Humphrey, P. P.

    1989-01-01

    1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) produce both smooth muscle relaxation and elevation of tissue adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels in isolated rings of neonatal porcine vena cava. We now present studies attempting to characterize in more detail the 5-HT receptor mediating these responses. 2. Both 5-HT and 5-CT relaxed porcine isolated vena cava rings (EC50 values 200 nM and 4 nM respectively) and elevated tissue cyclic AMP levels (EC50 values 1500 nM and 16 nM respectively). For both responses 5-CT was approximately 50-100 fold more potent than 5-HT. 3. Both 5-CT-induced smooth muscle relaxation and cyclic AMP elevation were potently and specifically antagonized to a similar extent by methiothepin, methysergide and spiperone. 4. At concentrations up to 1 microM, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin, buspirone, ipsapirone, n,n-dipropyl-5-CT, cyanopindolol, RU24969, ketanserin, GR38032 and GR43175 were devoid of both agonist and antagonist activity for both responses. 5. These findings suggest that the same 5-HT1-like receptor mediates both smooth muscle relaxation and elevation of cyclic AMP. This receptor is unlike any known 5-HT1 ligand binding site or adenylate cyclase-coupled 5-HT receptor in brain tissues. PMID:2541857

  9. 5-Carboxamidotryptamine is a selective agonist at 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating vasodilatation and tachycardia in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, H. E.; Feniuk, W.; Humphrey, P. P.; Perren, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to characterize the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating bronchoconstriction, vasodilatation, vasodepression and tachycardia in anaesthetized cats following bilateral vagosympathectomy and beta-adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol. 5-HT (1-100 micrograms/kg-1 i.v.) caused dose-related bronchoconstriction and tachycardia but variable and complex effects on diastolic blood pressure and carotid arterial vascular resistance. In contrast, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 0.01-1 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) caused consistent, dose-related decreases in diastolic blood pressure and carotid arterial vascular resistance and increases in heart rate. 5-CT did not cause bronchoconstriction. The 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was dose-dependently antagonized by methiothepin, methysergide and ketanserin (10-100 micrograms kg-1 i.v.). The highest doses used of these antagonists did not antagonize bronchoconstriction induced by prostaglandin F2 alpha. The high potency of all three antagonists indicate a 5-HT2-receptor mediated effect. The 5-HT- and 5-CT-induced tachycardia as well as the 5-CT-induced vasodepressor and carotid arterial vasodilator responses were dose-dependently antagonized by low doses of methiothepin (10-100 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) and by high doses of methysergide (100-1000 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) but were little affected by ketanserin in doses up to 1000 micrograms kg-1 i.v. These selective effects of 5-CT appear to be mediated by '5-HT1-like' receptors. PMID:2937503

  10. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  11. 5-HT7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning and possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuji, Minoru; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-18

    Fear conditioning is a valuable behavioral paradigm for studying the neural basis of emotional learning and memory. The present study examined the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) signaling on the serotonin (5-HT)7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning. Conditioning was performed in a trial in which a tone was followed by an electrical foot-shock. Context- and tone-dependent fear were examined in tests conducted 24 and 48h after conditioning, respectively. The selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist 2a-[4-(4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridyl)butyl]-2a,3,4,-tetrahydrobenzo(c,d)indol-2-(1H)-one (DR4004) (5mg/kg), when administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) immediately after conditioning, caused a significant decrease in both context- and tone-dependent fear responses (freezing behavior). A significant increase in ERK activity was observed in the amygdala of mice that displayed context- or tone-dependent fear responses, and these changes were also inhibited by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.) immediately after conditioning. In contrast, the increase in hippocampal ERK activity in mice that displayed context-dependent fear responses was further enhanced by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.). These results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor-mediated ERK signaling may play a significant role in the processes of emotional learning and memory.

  12. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  13. Decoding the role of phosphoinositides in phototropin signaling involved in chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Labuz, Justyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2013-08-01

    In angiosperms, light-dependent chloroplast movements are exclusively mediated by UVA/blue light receptors - phototropins. The two photoreceptors of Arabidopsis thaliana, phot1 and phot2, have overlapping roles in the control of these movements. Experiments performed in different plant species point to the participation of phosphoinositides in blue light-controlled chloroplast relocations. Here, we report a summary of recent findings presenting the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate as well as phosphatidylinositol 3- and 4-phosphates in weak blue light-mediated (accumulation) and strong blue light-mediated (avoidance) responses of chloroplasts. The blue light-activated alterations in phosphoinositide concentration are partly responsible for cytosolic Ca (2+) changes. Ca (2+) influx from apoplast does not seem to be involved in the mechanism of movement responses. In summary, interplay between phosphoinositides and intracellular Ca (2+) regulates chloroplast redistribution in response to blue light in higher plants.

  14. CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase-controlled phosphoinositide availability limits VEGFA signaling and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weijun; Pham, Van N.; Stratman, Amber N.; Castranova, Daniel; Kamei, Makoto; Kidd, Kameha R.; Lo, Brigid D.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Davis, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis and translating these into effective therapies are of enormous scientific and clinical interests. In this report, we demonstrate the central role of CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase (CDS) in the regulation of VEGFA signaling and angiogenesis. CDS activity maintains phosphoinositide 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) availability through resynthesis of phosphoinositides, whereas VEGFA, mainly through phospholipase Cγ1, consumes PIP2 for signal transduction. Loss of CDS2, 1 of 2 vertebrate CDS enzymes, results in vascular-specific defects in zebrafish in vivo and failure of VEGFA-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells in vitro. Absence of CDS2 also results in reduced arterial differentiation and reduced angiogenic signaling. CDS2 deficit-caused phenotypes can be successfully rescued by artificial elevation of PIP2 levels, and excess PIP2 or increased CDS2 activity can promote excess angiogenesis. These results suggest that availability of CDS-controlled resynthesis of phosphoinositides is essential for angiogenesis. PMID:22649102

  15. Stimulatory effect of bombesin on phosphoinositide metabolism in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Novotná, R; Novotný, I

    1997-10-03

    The pineal gland is under complex peptidergic nervous control originating from hypothalamic nuclei. The daily rhythm of bombesin-like peptide in the hypothalamus suggests that this neuropeptide, similarly as other neuropeptides, might be involved in modulation of the physiological activity of the pineal gland. In our experiments we studied the mechanism of signal transduction of bombesin in the isolated pineal glands of rats. The phosphoinositide signalling system was examined by measuring 32P-labelling of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2), which reflects phosphoinositide cycle activation. Bombesin induced a significant increase in 32P-labelling of PI, PIP and PIP2. The antagonist of this neuropeptide, (D-Phe12-Leu14)-bombesin, suppressed the increase in 32P-labelling of all phosphoinositides. Bombesin was without effect on cAMP dependent protein phosphorylation. The data indicate that bombesin activates the PI signalling system via specific receptors.

  16. Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel.

    PubMed

    Badheka, Doreen; Borbiro, Istvan; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Phosphoinositides are emerging as general regulators of the functionally diverse transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been reported to positively regulate many TRP channels, but in several cases phosphoinositide regulation is controversial. TRP melastatin 3 (TRPM3) is a heat-activated ion channel that is also stimulated by chemical agonists, such as pregnenolone sulfate. Here, we used a wide array of approaches to determine the effects of phosphoinositides on TRPM3. We found that channel activity in excised inside-out patches decreased over time (rundown), an attribute of PI(4,5)P2-dependent ion channels. Channel activity could be restored by application of either synthetic dioctanoyl (diC8) or natural arachidonyl stearyl (AASt) PI(4,5)P2. The PI(4,5)P2 precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) was less effective at restoring channel activity. TRPM3 currents were also restored by MgATP, an effect which was inhibited by two different phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase inhibitors, or by pretreatment with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzyme, indicating that MgATP acted by generating phosphoinositides. In intact cells, reduction of PI(4,5)P2 levels by chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases or a voltage-sensitive 5'-phosphatase inhibited channel activity. Activation of PLC via muscarinic receptors also inhibited TRPM3 channel activity. Overall, our data indicate that TRPM3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel and that decreasing PI(4,5)P2 abundance limits its activity. As all other members of the TRPM family have also been shown to require PI(4,5)P2 for activity, our data establish PI(4,5)P2 as a general positive cofactor of this ion channel subfamily.

  17. Sec14 Like PITPs Couple Lipid Metabolism with Phosphoinositide Synthesis to Regulate Golgi Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Davison, James M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2017-01-01

    An interface coordinating lipid metabolism with proteins that regulate membrane trafficking is necessary to regulate Golgi morphology and dynamics. Such an interface facilitates the membrane deformations required for vesicularization, forms platforms for protein recruitment and assembly on appropriate sites on a membrane surface and provides lipid co-factors for optimal protein activity in the proper spatio-temporally regulated manner. Importantly, Sec14 and Sec14-like proteins are a unique superfamily of proteins that sense specific aspects of lipid metabolism, employing this information to potentiate phosphoinositide production. Therefore, Sec14 and Sec14 like proteins form central conduits to integrate multiple aspects of lipid metabolism with productive phosphoinositide signaling. PMID:22374094

  18. Phosphoinositide hydrolysis mediated by H1 receptors in autoimmune myocarditis mice

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Nora; Leiros, Claudia Perez; Sterin-Borda, Leonor

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in myocardium from autoimmune myocarditis mice by ThEA and histamine was assayed. Myocardium from autoimmune heart, but not the normal forms, specifically increased phosphoinositide turnover in the presence of histaminergic agonists. This increment was blocked by a specific H1 antagonist mepyramine and to the same extent by the phospholipase C inhibitor NCDC. By using a binding assay H1 histaminergic receptors were detected in autoimmune heart membrane preparations, but this was not observed in normal heart. These data suggest that autoimmune myocardium expressed a functional H1 receptor that could involve a distinctive mechanism operating in the disease. PMID:18475540

  19. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated.

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Phosphoinositide Kinome from Two Ciliates Reveals Novel Evolutionary Links for Phosphoinositide Kinases in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leondaritis, George; Siokos, John; Skaripa, Irini; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2013-01-01

    Background The complexity of phosphoinositide signaling in higher eukaryotes is partly due to expansion of specific families and types of phosphoinositide kinases (PIKs) that can generate all phosphoinositides via multiple routes. This is particularly evident in the PI3Ks and PIPKs, and it is considered an evolutionary trait associated with metazoan diversification. Yet, there are limited comprehensive studies on the PIK repertoire of free living unicellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We undertook a genome-wide analysis of putative PIK genes in two free living ciliated cells, Tetrahymena and Paramecium. The Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia genomes were probed with representative kinases from all families and types. Putative homologs were verified by EST, microarray and deep RNA sequencing database searches and further characterized for domain structure, catalytic efficiency, expression patterns and phylogenetic relationships. In total, we identified and characterized 22 genes in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome and 62 highly homologues genes in Paramecium tetraurelia suggesting a tight evolutionary conservation in the ciliate lineage. Comparison to the kinome of fungi reveals a significant expansion of PIK genes in ciliates. Conclusions/Significance Our study highlights four important aspects concerning ciliate and other unicellular PIKs. First, ciliate-specific expansion of PI4KIII-like genes. Second, presence of class I PI3Ks which, at least in Tetrahymena, are associated with a metazoan-type machinery for PIP3 signaling. Third, expansion of divergent PIPK enzymes such as the recently described type IV transmembrane PIPKs. Fourth, presence of possible type II PIPKs and presumably inactive PIKs (hence, pseudo-PIKs) not previously described. Taken together, our results provide a solid framework for future investigation of the roles of PIKs in ciliates and indicate that novel functions and novel regulatory pathways of

  1. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  2. Progesterone reverts LPS-reduced FAAH activity in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by a receptor-mediated fashion.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel L; Aisemberg, Julieta; Salazar, Ana I; Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Vercelli, Claudia A; Franchi, Ana M

    2013-12-05

    Increased anandamide concentrations are associated with pregnancy failure. Anandamide levels are regulated by the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The aim of the study was to investigate the role of progesterone (P) on FAAH modulation in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) under septic conditions. We observed that in vivo administration of LPS to non-pregnant (NP) mice decreased FAAH activity of PBMC while in pregnant mice no changes in FAAH activity were observed. NP animals administered with P had a similar response to LPS as the pregnant animals. Also, NP mice injected with P antagonist and P showed that the effect of P on LPS-reduced FAAH activity was impaired. Furthermore, LPS produced a decrease in the ratio of PR-B/PR-A in NP animals. Our results showed that, in our model the endotoxin decreased PBMC's FAAH activity and this condition was reverted by P in a receptor-mediated fashion.

  3. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  4. Functional evidence for a 5-HT2B receptor mediating contraction of longitudinal muscle in human small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Borman, R A; Burleigh, D E

    1995-01-01

    Application of 5-hydroxytryptamine induces contraction of longitudinal muscle strips from human terminal ileum. The response was resistant to antagonism by ketanserin, ondansetron or DAU6285, but was non-surmountably antagonized by methysergide. The selective 5-HT2B/2C receptor antagonist, SB 200646A evoked a concentration-dependent, parallel and dextral displacement of the concentration-response curve to 5-HT, yielding a pA2 estimate of 7.17. Application of yohimbine, a 5-HT1 and 5-HT2B receptor antagonist, also induced a rightward shift of the response curve to 5-HT, yielding a pA2 estimate of 8.10. In conclusion, it appears that a 5-HT2B receptor mediates the contractile response of the longitudinal muscle of human small intestine to 5-HT. PMID:7599919

  5. Imaging receptor-mediated endocytosis with a polymeric nanoparticle-based coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering probe.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling; Lu, Yanhui; Lee, Robert J; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2007-08-23

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy was used to visualize receptor-mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking with the aid of a CARS probe. The probe was made of 200-nm polystyrene particles encapsulated in folate-targeted liposomes. By tuning (omega(p) - omega(s)) to 3045 cm(-1), which corresponds to the aromatic C-H stretching vibration, the polystyrene nanoparticles with a high density of aromatic C-H bonds were detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio, while the epi-detected CARS signal from cellular organelles was cancelled by the destructive interference between the resonant contribution from the aliphatic C-H vibration and the nonresonant contribution. Without any photobleaching, the CARS probe allowed single-particle tracking analysis of intracellular endosome transport. No photodamage to cells was observed under the current experimental conditions. These results show the advantages and potential of using a CARS probe to study cellular processes.

  6. The influence of receptor-mediated interactions on reaction-diffusion mechanisms of cellular self-organisation.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Baker, Ruth E; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction.

  7. Enhanced phosphodiesteratic breakdown and turnover of phosphoinositides during reperfusion of ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Otani, H; Prasad, M R; Engelman, R M; Otani, H; Cordis, G A; Das, D K

    1988-11-01

    In this study, we examined phosphoinositide metabolism during ischemia and reperfusion using an isolated and perfused rat heart. When myocardial phosphoinositides were prelabeled with [3H]inositol, reperfusion after 30 minutes of normothermic global ischemia resulted in significant accumulations of radiolabeled inositol phosphate, inositol bisphosphate, and inositol trisphosphate. Isotopic incorporation of [3H]inositol into phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate was increased significantly in the heart reperfused with [3H]inositol after 30 minutes of ischemia compared with that perfused with [3H]inositol after 30 minutes of nonischemic perfusion. However, isotopic incorporation of [3H]glycerol into diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, and all of the three phosphoinositides was diminished in the reperfused hearts. Reperfusion of the ischemic heart prelabeled with [14C]arachidonic acid resulted in significant increases in [14C]diacylglycerol and [14C]phosphatidic acid. The enhanced accumulations of [3H]inositol phosphates during reperfusion were not affected by treatment with prazosin plus atropine or indomethacin, but were inhibited by hypoxic reperfusion, reperfusion with Ca2+-free buffer, or by mepacrine. These results suggest that myocardial reperfusion stimulates phosphodiesteratic breakdown and turnover of phosphoinositides, and increased Ca2+ influx caused by reperfusion may be involved in the mechanism of stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activity in the rat heart.

  8. Coordinated Expression of Phosphoinositide Metabolic Genes during Development and Aging of Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Stanley I.; Primiani, Christopher T.; Chen, Chuck T.; Ahn, Kwangmi; Ryan, Veronica H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Phosphoinositides, lipid-signaling molecules, participate in diverse brain processes within a wide metabolic cascade. Hypothesis Gene transcriptional networks coordinately regulate the phosphoinositide cascade during human brain Development and Aging. Methods We used the public BrainCloud database for human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to examine age-related expression levels of 49 phosphoinositide metabolic genes during Development (0 to 20+ years) and Aging (21+ years). Results We identified three groups of partially overlapping genes in each of the two intervals, with similar intergroup correlations despite marked phenotypic differences between Aging and Development. In each interval, ITPKB, PLCD1, PIK3R3, ISYNA1, IMPA2, INPPL1, PI4KB, and AKT1 are in Group 1, PIK3CB, PTEN, PIK3CA, and IMPA1 in Group 2, and SACM1L, PI3KR4, INPP5A, SYNJ1, and PLCB1 in Group 3. Ten of the genes change expression nonlinearly during Development, suggesting involvement in rapidly changing neuronal, glial and myelination events. Correlated transcription for some gene pairs likely is facilitated by colocalization on the same chromosome band. Conclusions Stable coordinated gene transcriptional networks regulate brain phosphoinositide metabolic pathways during human Development and Aging. PMID:26168237

  9. Loss of Progesterone Receptor-Mediated Actions Induce Preterm Cellular and Structural Remodeling of the Cervix and Premature Birth

    PubMed Central

    Yellon, Steven M.; Dobyns, Abigail E.; Beck, Hailey L.; Kurtzman, James T.; Garfield, Robert E.; Kirby, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone), or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term. PMID:24339918

  10. Intracellular Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors contributes to AMPA receptor-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, A; Matute, C; Alberdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oligodendrocytes induces cytosolic Ca2+ overload and excitotoxic death, a process that contributes to demyelination and multiple sclerosis. Excitotoxic insults cause well-characterized mitochondrial alterations and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, which is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of ER-Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) to excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes in vitro. First, we observed that oligodendrocytes express all previously characterized RyRs and IP3Rs. Blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release by TMB-8 following α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated insults attenuated both oligodendrocyte death and cytosolic Ca2+ overload. In turn, RyR inhibition by ryanodine reduced as well the Ca2+ overload whereas IP3R inhibition was ineffective. Furthermore, AMPA-triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and activation of caspase-3, which in all instances was diminished by RyR inhibition. In addition, we observed that AMPA induced an ER stress response as revealed by α subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, overexpression of GRP chaperones and RyR-dependent cleavage of caspase-12. Finally, attenuating ER stress with salubrinal protected oligodendrocytes from AMPA excitotoxicity. Together, these results show that Ca2+ release through RyRs contributes to cytosolic Ca2+ overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and cell death following AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes. PMID:21364659

  11. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated modes of action for liver carcinogenicity: Results of a workshop.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Melvin E; Preston, R Julian; Maier, Andrew; Willis, Alison M; Patterson, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of sub-threshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOAs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance Framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR, the CAR and the PPARα. This article describes the workshop process, key issues discussed and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the MOA, and similar data gaps in early steps. Three additional papers in this series describe the results and conclusions for each case-study receptor regarding its MOA, relevance of the MOA to humans and the resulting dose-response implications.

  13. A new CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors-mediated anaphylaxis guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Osakada, Noriko; Fujita, Manabu; Matsumura, Naoya; Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Nakade, Shinji; Nabe, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2017-04-01

    Although the effectiveness of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on asthma has been clinically established, the effects of CysLT2 receptor antagonists are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to develop a new CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors-mediated anaphylaxis guinea pig model using S-hexyl GSH, a γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GTP) inhibitor, to suppress conversion of LTC4 to LTD4. Actively sensitized guinea pigs were challenged with OVA in the absence or presence of S-hexyl GSH, and survival rate following anaphylactic response was monitored. OVA-induced fatal anaphylaxis in the absence of S-hexyl GSH was almost completely inhibited by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, but not by the CysLT2 receptor antagonist BayCysLT2RA. However, under treatment with S-hexyl-GSH, the inhibitory effect of motelukast was dramatically diminished, whereas that of BayCysLT2RA was markedly increased. The dual CysLT1/2 receptor antagonist ONO-6950 effectively inhibited anaphylactic response in both S-hexyl GSH-treated and non-treated animals. LC/MS/MS analysis revealed that S-hexyl GSH treatment actually inhibited LTC4 metabolism in the blood and lung tissues. Using S-hexyl GSH, we developed a novel CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors-mediated anaphylaxis guinea pig model that can be useful for not only screening both CysLT2 and CysLT1/2 receptors antagonists, but also for functional analysis of CysLT2 receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adenosine A2 receptor-mediated regulation of renal hemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate is abolished in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Persson, Patrik; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are one of the earliest indications of altered kidney function in diabetes. Adenosine regulates GFR through tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism acting on adenosine A1 receptor. In addition, adenosine can directly regulate vascular tone by acting on A1 and A2 receptors expressed in afferent and efferent arterioles. Opposite to A1 receptors, A2 receptors mediate vasorelaxation. This study investigates the involvement of adenosine A2 receptors in regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) and GFR in control and diabetic kidneys. GFR was measured by inulin clearance and RBF by a transonic flow probe placed around the renal artery. Measurements were performed in isoflurane-anesthetized normoglycemic and alloxan-diabetic C57BL/6 mice during baseline and after acute administration of 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX), a selective A2 receptor antagonist. GFR and RBF were lower in diabetic mice compared to control (258 ± 61 vs. 443 ± 33 μl min(-1) and 1,083 ± 51 vs. 1,405 ± 78 μl min(-1)). In control animals, DMPX decreased RBF by -6%, whereas GFR increased +44%. DMPX had no effects on GFR and RBF in diabetic mice. Sodium excretion increased in diabetic mice after A2 receptor blockade (+78%). In conclusion, adenosine acting on A2 receptors mediates an efferent arteriolar dilatation which reduces filtration fraction (FF) and maintains GFR within normal range in normoglycemic mice. However, this regulation is absent in diabetic mice, which may contribute to reduced oxygen availability in the diabetic kidney.

  15. The P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Mediates Tissue Factor Expression in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ling; Ma, Wanshu; Littmann, Timothy; Camp, Riley; Shen, Jianzhong

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the role of P2Y12 receptor in platelet aggregation leads to a new anti-thrombotic drug Plavix; however, little is known about non-platelet P2Y receptors in thrombosis. This study tested the hypothesis that endothelial P2Y receptor(s) mediates up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), the initiator of coagulation cascade. Stimulation of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) by UTP/ATP increased the mRNA level of TF but not of its counterpart-tissue factor pathway inhibitor, which was accompanied by up-regulation of TF protein and cell surface activity. RT-PCR revealed a selective expression of P2Y2 and P2Y11 receptors in HCAEC. Consistent with this, TF up-regulation was inhibited by suramin or by siRNA silencing of P2Y2 receptor, but not by NF-157, a P2Y11-selective antagonist, suggesting a role for the P2Y2 receptor. In addition, P2Y2 receptor activated ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways without affecting the positive NF-κB and negative AKT regulatory pathways of TF expression. Furthermore, TF up-regulation was abolished or partially suppressed by inhibition of p38 or JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, blockade of the PLC/Ca2+ pathway did not affect P2Y2 receptor activation of p38, JNK, and TF induction. However, blockade of Src kinase reduced phosphorylation of p38 but not JNK, eliminating TF induction. In contrast, inhibition of Rho kinase reduced phosphorylation of JNK but not p38, decreasing TF expression. These findings demonstrate that P2Y2 receptor mediates TF expression in HCAEC through new mechanisms involving Src/p38 and Rho/JNK pathways, possibly contributing to a pro-thrombotic status after vascular injury. PMID:21652710

  16. Reboxetine Enhances the Olanzapine-Induced Antipsychotic-Like Effect, Cortical Dopamine Outflow and NMDA Receptor-Mediated Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Björkholm, Carl; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data have shown that addition of the selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine increases the antipsychotic-like effect of the D2/3 antagonist raclopride and, in parallel, enhances cortical dopamine output. Subsequent clinical results suggested that adding reboxetine to stable treatments with various antipsychotic drugs (APDs) may improve positive, negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated in rats the effects of adding reboxetine to the second-generation APD olanzapine on: (i) antipsychotic efficacy, using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, (ii) extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability, using a catalepsy test, (iii) dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals and (iv) cortical N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission, using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Reboxetine (6 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR induced by a suboptimal dose (1.25 mg/kg), but not an optimal (2.5 mg/kg) dose of olanzapine without any concomitant catalepsy. Addition of reboxetine to the low dose of olanzapine also markedly increased cortical dopamine outflow and facilitated prefrontal NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Our data suggest that adjunctive treatment with a NET inhibitor may enhance the therapeutic effect of low-dose olanzapine in schizophrenia without increasing EPS liability and add an antidepressant action, thus in principle allowing for a dose reduction of olanzapine with a concomitant reduction of dose-related side effects, such as EPS and weight gain. PMID:20463659

  17. Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Mice Reduces μ-Opioid Receptor-Mediated G-protein Activity in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, Michelle R.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Selley, Dana E.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Dewey, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition that is often difficult to treat using conventional pharmacological interventions and the exact mechanisms involved in the establishment and maintenance of this type of chronic pain have yet to be fully elucidated. The present studies examined the effect of chronic nerve injury on μ-opioid receptors and receptor-mediated G-protein activity within the supraspinal brain regions involved in pain processing of mice. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) reduced paw withdrawal latency, which was maximal at 10 days post-injury. [d-Ala2,(N-Me)Phe4, Gly5-OH] enkephalin (DAMGO)-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding was then conducted at this time point in membranes prepared from the rostral ACC (rACC), thalamus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) of CCI and sham-operated mice. Results showed reduced DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in the thalamus and PAG of CCI mice, with no change in the rACC. In thalamus, this reduction was due to decreased maximal stimulation by DAMGO, with no difference in EC50 values. In PAG, however, DAMGO Emax values did not significantly differ between groups, possibly due to the small magnitude of the main effect. [3H]Naloxone binding in membranes of the thalamus showed no significant differences in Bmax values between CCI and sham-operated mice, indicating that the difference in G-protein activation did not result from differences in μ-opioid receptor levels. These results suggest that CCI induced a region-specific adaptation of μ-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activity, with apparent desensitization of the μ-opioid receptor in the thalamus and PAG and could have implications for treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21762883

  18. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Modifies NMDA Receptor Mediated Release of Intracellular Calcium: Implications for Endocannabinoid Control of Hippocampal Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Robert E.; Miller, Frances; Palchik, Guillermo; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors (CB1) leads to continuous suppression of neuronal plasticity in hippocampus and other brain regions, suggesting that endocannabinoids may have a functional role in synaptic processes that produce state-dependent transient modulation of hippocampal cell activity. In support of this, it has previously been shown in vitro that cannabinoid CB1 receptors modulate second messenger systems in hippocampal neurons that can modulate intracellular ion channels, including channels which release calcium from intracellular stores. Here we demonstrate in hippocampal slices a similar endocannabinoid action on excitatory glutamatergic synapses via modulation of NMDA-receptor mediated intracellular calcium levels in confocal imaged neurons. Calcium entry through glutamatergic NMDA-mediated ion channels increases intracellular calcium concentrations via modulation of release from ryanodine-sensitive channels in endoplasmic reticulum. The studies reported here show that NMDA-elicited increases in Calcium Green fluorescence are enhanced by CB1 receptor antagonists (i.e. rimonabant), and inhibited by CB1 agonists (i.e. WIN 55,212-2). Suppression of endocannabinoid breakdown by either reuptake inhibition (AM404) or fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibition (URB597) produced suppression of NMDA elicited calcium increases comparable to WIN 55,212-2, while enhancement of calcium release provoked by endocannabinoid receptor antagonists (Rimonabant) was shown to depend on the blockade of CB1 receptor mediated de-phosphorylation of Ryanodine receptors. Such CB1 receptor modulation of NMDA elicited increases in intracellular calcium may account for the respective disruption and enhancement by CB1 agents of trial-specific hippocampal neuron ensemble firing patterns during performance of a short-term memory task, reported previously from this laboratory. PMID:21288475

  19. Low responsiveness to agents evoking 5-HT2 receptor-mediated behaviors in Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Ciccocioppo, R; Panocka, I; Stefanini, E; Gessa, G L; Massi, M

    1995-05-01

    The selective NK3 tachykinin agonist senktide evokes in rodents 5-HT mediated behaviors, including 5-HT2 receptor-mediated wet dog shakes (WDS) and head shakes (HS). It was observed previously that genetically selected Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats show a small number of WDS and HS following intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of senktide. The present study was aimed at confirming these observations and at providing information on the reasons accounting for the anomalous response of sP rats. Senktide (500-2000 ng/rat, ICV) produced a much lower number of WDS and HS in sP rats than in nonselected Wistar (nsW) rats. Both behaviors were suppressed by the 5-HT2 antagonist ritanserin (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously), confirming that 5-HT2 receptors mediate the response. HS induced by the ICV injection of 5-HT agonists endowed with marked activity at 5-HT2 receptors, such as quipazine (1500-6000 ng/rat) or DOI (500-3500 ng/rat), were much less pronounced in sP rats than in nsW rats. Moreover, WDS following peripheral injection of 5-hydroxytryptophan, 25-100 mg/kg, and carbidopa, 12.5 mg/kg, were less intense in sP and in ethanol-naive sP rats than in nsW and in Sardinian alcohol-nonpreferring rats. These findings suggest that sP rats have an inherent different regulation of central 5-HT2 mechanisms.

  20. Receptor-mediated Ca2+ and PKC signaling triggers the loss of cortical PKA compartmentalization through the redistribution of gravin.

    PubMed

    Schott, Micah B; Grove, Bryon

    2013-11-01

    A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs) direct the flow of cellular information by positioning multiprotein signaling complexes into proximity with effector proteins. However, certain AKAPs are not stationary but can undergo spatiotemporal redistribution in response to stimuli. Gravin, a 300kD AKAP that intersects with a diverse signaling array, is localized to the plasma membrane but has been shown to translocate to the cytosol following the elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). Despite the potential for gravin redistribution to impact multiple signaling pathways, the dynamics of this event remain poorly understood. In this study, quantitative microscopy of cells expressing gravin-EGFP revealed that Ca(2+) elevation caused the complete translocation of gravin from the cell cortex to the cytosol in as little as 60s of treatment with ionomycin or thapsigargin. In addition, receptor mediated signaling was also shown to cause gravin redistribution following ATP treatment, and this event required both [Ca(2+)]i elevation and PKC activation. To understand the mechanism for Ca(2+) mediated gravin dynamics, deletion of calmodulin-binding domains revealed that a fourth putative calmodulin binding domain called CB4 (a.a. 670-694) is critical for targeting gravin to the cell cortex despite its location downstream of gravin's membrane-targeting domains, which include an N-terminal myristoylation site and three polybasic domains. Finally, confocal microscopy of cells co-transfected with gravin-EYFP and PKA RII-ECFP revealed that gravin redistribution mediated by ionomycin, thapsigargin, and ATP each triggered the gravin-dependent loss of PKA localized at the cell cortex. Our results support the hypothesis that gravin redistribution regulates cross-talk between PKA-dependent signaling and receptor-mediated events involving Ca(2+) and PKC. © 2013.

  1. Insulin-Independent GABAA Receptor-Mediated Response in the Barrel Cortex of Mice with Impaired Met Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by genetic variants, susceptibility alleles, and environmental perturbations. The autism associated gene MET tyrosine kinase has been implicated in many behavioral domains and endophenotypes of autism, including abnormal neural signaling in human sensory cortex. We investigated somatosensory thalamocortical synaptic communication in mice deficient in Met activity in cortical excitatory neurons to gain insights into aberrant somatosensation characteristic of ASD. The ratio of excitation to inhibition is dramatically increased due to decreased postsynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the trigeminal thalamocortical pathway of mice lacking active Met in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, insulin failed to increase GABAA receptor-mediated response in the barrel cortex of mice with compromised Met signaling. Thus, lacking insulin effects may be a risk factor in ASD pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A proposed common cause of neurodevelopmental disorders is an imbalance in excitatory neural transmission, provided by the glutamatergic neurons, and the inhibitory signals from the GABAergic interneurons. Many genes associated with autism spectrum disorders impair synaptic transmission in the expected cell type. Previously, inactivation of the autism-associated Met tyrosine kinase receptor in GABAergic interneurons led to decreased inhibition. In thus report, decreased Met signaling in glutamatergic neurons had no effect on excitation, but decimated inhibition. Further experiments indicate that loss of Met activity downregulates GABAA receptors on glutamatergic neurons in an insulin independent manner. These data provide a new mechanism for the loss of inhibition and subsequent abnormal excitation/inhibition balance and potential molecular candidates for treatment or prevention. PMID:27030755

  2. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  3. H1 and H2 receptors mediate postexercise hyperemia in sedentary and endurance exercise-trained men and women.

    PubMed

    McCord, Jennifer L; Halliwill, John R

    2006-12-01

    In sedentary individuals, H(1) receptors mediate the early portion of postexercise skeletal muscle hyperemia, whereas H(2) receptors mediate the later portion. It is not known whether postexercise hyperemia also presents in endurance-trained individuals. We hypothesized that the postexercise skeletal muscle hyperemia would also exist in endurance-trained individuals and that combined blockade of H(1) and H(2) receptors would abolish the long-lasting postexercise hyperemia in trained and sedentary individuals. We studied 28 sedentary and endurance trained men and women before and through 90 min after a 60-min bout of cycling at 60% peak O(2) uptake on control and combined H(1)- and H(2)-receptor antagonist days (fexofenadine and ranitidine). We measured arterial pressure (brachial auscultation) and femoral blood flow (Doppler ultrasound). On the control day, femoral vascular conductance (calculated as flow/pressure) was elevated in all groups 60 min after exercise (sedentary men: Delta86 +/- 35%, trained men, Delta65 +/- 18%; sedentary women, Delta61 +/- 19%, trained women: Delta59 +/- 23%, where Delta is change; all P < 0.05 vs. preexercise). In contrast, on the histamine antagonist day, femoral vascular conductance was not elevated in any of the groups after exercise (sedentary men: Delta21 +/- 17%, trained men: Delta9 +/- 5%, sedentary women: Delta19 +/- 4%, trained women: Delta11 +/- 11%; all P > 0.16 vs. preexercise; all P < 0.05 vs. control day). These data suggest postexercise skeletal muscle hyperemia exists in endurance trained men and women. Furthermore, histaminergic mechani