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Sample records for 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide

  1. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and prostaglandin E2 formation in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Possible parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2

    SciTech Connect

    Slivka, S.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-03-25

    alpha 1-Adrenergic receptors mediate two effects on phospholipid metabolism in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK-D1) cells: hydrolysis of phosphoinositides and arachidonic acid release with generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The similarity in concentration dependence for the agonist (-)-epinephrine in eliciting these two responses implies that they are mediated by a single population of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. However, we find that the kinetics of the two responses are quite different, PGE2 production occurring more rapidly and transiently than the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides. The antibiotic neomycin selectively decreases alpha 1-receptor-mediated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis without decreasing alpha 1-receptor-mediated arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation. In addition, receptor-mediated inositol trisphosphate formation is independent of extracellular calcium, whereas release of labeled arachidonic acid is largely calcium-dependent. Moreover, based on studies obtained with labeled arachidonic acid, receptor-mediated generation of arachidonic acid cannot be accounted for by breakdown of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate, phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, or phosphatidic acid. Further studies indicate that epinephrine produces changes in formation or turnover of several classes of membrane phospholipids in MDCK cells. We conclude that alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in MDCK cells appear to regulate phospholipid metabolism by the parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2. This parallel activation of phospholipases contrasts with models described in other systems which imply sequential activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol lipase or phospholipase A2.

  2. α1-Adrenergic receptors mediate coordinated Ca2+ signaling of cortical astrocytes in awake, behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fengfei; O'Donnell, John; Thrane, Alexander S; Zeppenfeld, Douglas; Kang, Hongyi; Xie, Lulu; Wang, Fushun; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-12-01

    Astrocyte Ca2+ signals in awake behaving mice are widespread, coordinated and differ fundamentally from the locally restricted Ca2+ transients observed ex vivo and in anesthetized animals. Here we show that the synchronized release of norepinephrine (NE) from locus coeruleus (LC) projections throughout the cerebral cortex mediate long-ranging Ca2+ signals by activation of astrocytic α1-adrenergic receptors. When LC output was triggered by either physiological sensory (whisker) stimulation or an air-puff startle response, astrocytes responded with fast Ca2+ transients that encompassed the entire imaged field (positioned over either frontal or parietal cortex). The application of adrenergic inhibitors, including α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin, potently suppressed both evoked, as well as the frequently observed spontaneous astroglial Ca2+ signals. The LC-specific neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), which reduced cortical NE content by >90%, prevented nearly all astrocytic Ca2+ signals in awake mice. The observations indicate that in adult, unanesthetized mice, astrocytes do not respond directly to glutamatergic signaling evoked by sensory stimulation. Instead astrocytes appear to be the primary target for NE, with astrocytic Ca2+ signaling being triggered by the α1-adrenergic receptor. In turn, astrocytes may coordinate the broad effects of neuromodulators on neuronal activity.

  3. Effect of aging on alpha-1 adrenergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, D.M.; Bowyer, J.F.; Masserano, J.M.; Zahniser, N.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The effects of aging were examined on the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in three brain regions. Tissue minces of thalamus, cerebral cortex and hippocampus from 3-, 18- and 28-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)myoinositol. Exposure of these prelabeled minces to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine revealed that accumulation of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates was selectively reduced by 20 to 30% in the thalamus and cerebral cortex of the oldest age group. Analysis of concentration-response and competition binding curves indicated that this decrease was due to diminished agonist efficacy rather than diminished receptor affinity. The reduction in responsiveness to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex and the lack of any changes in the hippocampus parallel previously reported changes in the density of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors with aging. These data indicate that the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis is reduced in some, but not all, brain regions of aged Fischer 344 rats.

  4. Role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein in. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, L.E.; Norris, J.S.

    1987-11-01

    In this study the mechanisms involved in ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization at the level of the plasma membrane were investigated. Stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from saponin-permeabilized DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells was observed with the addition of either the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine and guanosine-5'-triphosphate or the nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide guanylyl-imidodiphosphate. In the presence of (/sup 32/P) NAD, pertussis toxin was found to catalyze ADP-ribosylation of a M/sub r/ = 40,500 (n = 8) peptide in membranes prepared from DDT/sub 1/, MF-2 cells, possibly the ..cap alpha..-subunit of N/sub i/. However, stimulation of unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux by phenylephrine was not affected by previous treatment of cells with 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. These data suggest that the putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein which couples the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells is not a pertussis toxin substrate and may possibly be an additional member of guanine nucleotide binding protein family.

  5. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  6. The inhibition of phosphoinositide synthesis and muscarinic-receptor-mediated phospholipase C activity by Li+ as secondary, selective, consequences of inositol depletion in 1321N1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Batty, I H; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    Conditions are described for culture of 1321N1 cells under which cellular inositol is decreased from approximately 20 mM to < 0.5 mM but phosphoinositide concentrations are unaffected. The effects of the muscarinic-receptor agonist carbachol (1 mM) and/or LiCl (10 mM) on phosphoinositide turnover in these or in inositol-replete cells was examined after steady-state [3H]inositol labelling of phospholipid pools. In both inositol-replete and -depleted cells, carbachol stimulated similar initial (0-15 min) rates of phospholipase C (PLC) activity, in the presence of Li+. Subsequently (> 30-60 min) stimulated PLC activity and [3H]PtdIns concentrations declined dramatically only in depleted cells. In inositol-depleted cells, carbachol alone evoked increased concentrations of [3H]inositol, [3H]InsP1, [3H]InsP2, [3H]InsP3 and [3H]InsP4, which were largely sustained over 90 min, and concentrations of [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP and [3H]PtdInsP2 were decreased only to approximately 82, 84 and 93% of control respectively. In the presence of Li+ in these cells, the stimulated rise in [3H]inositol was prevented and, although accumulation of [3H]InsP1, [3H]InsP2 and [3H]InsP3 was initially (0-30 min) potentiated, rates of accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and concentrations of [3H]polyphosphates later (> 30-60 min) declined, and concentrations of [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP and [3H]PtdInsP2 were decreased respectively to approximately 39, 48 and 81% of control. After 60 min in the presence of both carbachol and Li+, stimulated PLC activity was decreased by approximately 70% compared with the initial rate in depleted cells. This decreased PLC activity was reflected by changes in the stimulated concentrations of [3H]Ins(1,3,4)P3 but not of [3H]Ins(1,4,5)P3, but effects of Li+ on the latter may have been obscured by the demonstrated, concomitant and equal stimulated accumulation of [3H]inositol 1:2cyclic,4,5-trisphosphate. These data suggest that receptor-mediated PLC activity is selectively

  7. Intratesticular alpha1-adrenergic receptors mediate stress-disturbed transcription of steroidogenic stimulator NUR77 as well as steroidogenic repressors DAX1 and ARR19 in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Stojkov-Mimic, Natasa J; Bjelic, Maja M; Radovic, Sava M; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the role of testicular α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) in stress-triggered adaptation of testosterone-producing Leydig cells of adult rats. Results showed that in vivo blockade of testicular α1-ADRs prevented partial recovery of circulating androgen levels registered after 10× repeated immobilization stress (10 × IMO). Moreover, α1-ADR-blockade diminished 10 × IMO-triggered recovery of Leydig cell androgen production, and abolished mitochondrial membrane potential recovery. In the same cells, 10 × IMO-induced increase in Star transcript was abolished, Lhcgr transcript decreased, while transcription of other steroidogenic proteins was not changed. α1-ADR-blockade recovered stress-induced decrease of Nur77, one of the main steroidogenic stimulator, while significantly reduced 10 × IMO-increased in the transcription of the main steroidogenic repressors, Arr19 and Dax1. In vitro experiments revealed an adrenaline-induced α1-ADR-mediated decrease in Nur77 transcription in Leydig cells. Adrenaline-induced increase of repressor Dax1 also involves ADRs in Leydig cells. Accordingly, α1-ADRs participate in some of the stress-triggered effects on the steroidogenic machinery of Leydig cells. PMID:26003139

  8. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors: targets for agonist drugs to treat heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; O'Connell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2011-10-01

    Evidence from cell, animal, and human studies demonstrates that α1-adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive and protective effects in the heart. These effects may be particularly important in chronic heart failure, when catecholamine levels are elevated and β-adrenergic receptors are down-regulated and dysfunctional. This review summarizes these data and proposes that selectively activating α1-adrenergic receptors in the heart might represent a novel and effective way to treat heart failure. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure."

  9. Evidence for beta1-adrenergic receptor involvement in amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor gene expression: implications for cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rudoy, Carla A; Reyes, Arith-Ruth S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2009-04-01

    We previously showed that betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, administered during early phases of cocaine abstinence, ameliorated withdrawal-induced anxiety and blocked increases in amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor expression in rats. Here, we report the efficacy of betaxolol in reducing increases in gene expression of amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a peptide known to be involved in mediating 'anxiety-like' behaviors during initial phases of cocaine abstinence. We also demonstrate attenuation of an amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor-mediated cell-signaling pathway following this treatment. Male rats were administered betaxolol at 24 and 44 h following chronic cocaine administration. Animals were euthanized at the 48-h time point and the amygdala was microdissected and processed for quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and/or western blot analysis. Results showed that betaxolol treatment during early cocaine withdrawal attenuated increases in amygdalar CRF gene expression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase regulatory and catalytic subunit (nuclear fraction) protein expression. Our data also reveal that beta(1)-adrenergic receptors are on amygdalar neurons, which are immunoreactive for CRF. The present findings suggest that the efficacy of betaxolol treatment on cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety may be related, in part, to its effect on amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, modulation of its downstream cell-signaling elements and CRF gene expression.

  10. Stress-induced decrease of uterine blood flow in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Dreiling, Michelle; Bischoff, Sabine; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Kiehntopf, Michael; Schubert, Harald; Witte, Otto W; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Schwab, Matthias; Rakers, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal maternal stress can be transferred to the fetus via a catecholamine-dependent decrease of uterine blood flow (UBF). However, it is unclear which group of adrenergic receptors mediates this mechanism of maternal-fetal stress transfer. We hypothesized that in sheep, alpha 1-adrenergic receptors may play a key role in catecholamine mediated UBF decrease, as these receptors are mainly involved in peripheral vasoconstriction and are present in significant number in the uterine vasculature. After chronic instrumentation at 125 ± 1 days of gestation (dGA; term 150 dGA), nine pregnant sheep were exposed at 130 ± 1 dGA to acute isolation stress for one hour without visual, tactile, or auditory contact with their flockmates. UBF, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), stress hormones, and blood gases were determined before and during this isolation challenge. Twenty-four hours later, experiments were repeated during alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage induced by a continuous intravenous infusion of urapidil. In both experiments, ewes reacted to isolation with an increase in serum norepinephrine, cortisol, BP, and HR as typical signs of activation of sympatho-adrenal and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Stress-induced UBF decrease was prevented by alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage. We conclude that UBF decrease induced by maternal stress in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. Future studies investigating prevention strategies of impact of prenatal maternal stress on fetal health should consider selective blockage of alpha 1-receptors to interrupt maternal-fetal stress transfer mediated by utero-placental malperfusion.

  11. Heat and α1-adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Kwon, Sun Hyung; Shiu, Yan-Ting; Ruan, Ting; Noyes, R. Dirk; Zhang, Quan-Jiang; Symons, J. David; Richardson, Russell S.

    2012-01-01

    Increased local temperature exerts a sympatholytic effect on human skeletal muscle feed arteries. We hypothesized that this attenuated α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness may be due to a temperature-induced increase in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, thereby reducing the impact of the α1-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine (PE). Thirteen human skeletal muscle feed arteries were harvested, and wire myography was used to generate PE concentration-response curves at 37°C and 39°C, with and without the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). A subset of arteries (n = 4) were exposed to 37°C or 39°C, and the protein content of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and α1-adrenergic receptors was determined by Western blot analysis. Additionally, cultured bovine endothelial cells were exposed to static or shear stress conditions at 37°C and 39°C and assayed for eNOS activation (phosphorylation at Ser1177), eNOS expression, and NO metabolites [nitrate + nitrite (NOx)]. Maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (PEmax) was lower at 39°C than at 37°C [39 ± 10 vs. 84 ± 30% maximal response to 100 mM KCl (KClmax)]. NO blockade restored vasocontraction at 39°C to that achieved at 37°C (80 ± 26% KClmax). Western blot analysis of the feed arteries revealed that heating increased eNOS protein, but not α1-adrenergic receptors. Heating of bovine endothelial cells resulted in greater shear stress-induced eNOS activation and NOx production. Together, these data reveal for the first time that, in human skeletal muscle feed arteries, NO blockade can restore the heat-attenuated α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasocontraction and implicate endothelium-derived NO bioavailability as a major contributor to heat-induced sympatholysis. Consequently, these findings highlight the important role of vasodilators in modulating the vascular response to vasoconstrictors. PMID:23042905

  12. Phosphoinositides regulate ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides serve as signature motifs for different cellular membranes and often are required for the function of membrane proteins. Here, we summarize clear evidence supporting the concept that many ion channels are regulated by membrane phosphoinositides. We describe tools used to test their dependence on phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and consider mechanisms and biological meanings of phosphoinositide regulation of ion channels. This lipid regulation can underlie changes of channel activity and electrical excitability in response to receptors. Since different intracellular membranes have different lipid compositions, the activity of ion channels still in transit towards their final destination membrane may be suppressed until they reach an optimal lipid environment. PMID:25241941

  13. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  14. Coincidence detection in phosphoinositide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Jez G.; Cullen, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoinositide lipids function as both signaling molecules and as compartment-specific localization signals for phosphoinositide-binding proteins. In recent years, both phosphoinositides and phosphoinositide-binding proteins have been reported to display a restricted, rather than a uniform, distribution across intracellular membranes. Here, we examine recent data documenting the restricted distribution of both phosphoinositides and phosphoinositide-binding proteins and examine how phosphoinositide-binding proteins might engage multiple binding partners to achieve these restricted localizations, effectively acting as detectors of coincident localization signals. PMID:16139503

  15. β1-adrenergic receptor antagonists signal via PDE4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wito; Mika, Delphine; Blanchard, Elise; Day, Peter; Conti, Marco

    2013-03-01

    It is generally assumed that antagonists of Gs-coupled receptors do not activate cAMP signalling, because they do not stimulate cAMP production via Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase activation. Here, we report a new signalling pathway whereby antagonists of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) increase cAMP levels locally without stimulating cAMP production directly. Binding of antagonists causes dissociation of a preformed complex between β1ARs and Type-4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s). This reduces the local concentration of cAMP-hydrolytic activity, thereby increasing submembrane cAMP and PKA activity. Our study identifies receptor/PDE4 complex dissociation as a novel mechanism of antagonist action that contributes to the pharmacological properties of β1AR antagonists and might be shared by other receptor subtypes.

  16. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  17. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  18. Dynamics of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Signaling in Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    In neurons, loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] leads to a decrease in exocytosis and changes in electrical excitability. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 levels after phospholipase C activation is therefore essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We measured dynamic changes of PI(4,5)P2, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, diacylglycerol, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and Ca2+ upon muscarinic stimulation in sympathetic neurons from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with electrophysiological and optical approaches. We used this kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show and explain faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in electrically nonexcitable tsA201 cells. They can be used to understand dynamic effects of receptor-mediated phospholipase C activation on excitability and other PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is a minor phospholipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 via phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis leads to a decrease in exocytosis and alters electrical excitability in neurons. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 is essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We studied the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism in sympathetic neurons upon muscarinic stimulation and used the kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show a several-fold faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in an electrically nonexcitable cell line, and provide a framework for future studies of PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. PMID:26818524

  19. Age-dependent changes in expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, W.; Williams, R.S.

    1986-07-16

    The expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors within ventricular myocardium of rats ranging in age from 21 days of fetal life to 24 months after birth was measured from (/sup 125/I) 2-(..beta.. hydroxy phenyl) ethylaminomethyl tetralone binding isotherms. No difference was observed in binding affinity between any of the age groups studied. The number of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors was found to be 60-120% higher in membranes from fetal or immature rats up to 25 days of age when compared with adult animals. The increased expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in the developing heart relative to that observed in adult heart is consistent with the hypothesis that alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor stimulation may modulate protein synthesis and growth in mammalian myocardium.

  20. Phosphoinositides and vesicular membrane traffic

    PubMed Central

    Mayinger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositide lipids were initially discovered as precursors for specific second messengers involved in signal transduction, but have now taken the center stage in controlling many essential processes at virtually every cellular membrane. In particular, phosphoinositides play a critical role in regulating membrane dynamics and vesicular transport. The unique distribution of certain phosphoinositides at specific intracellular membranes makes these molecules uniquely suited to direct organelle-specific trafficking reactions. In this regulatory role, phosphoinositides cooperate specifically with small GTPases from the Arf and Rab families. This review will summarize recent progress in the study of phosphoinositides in membrane trafficking and organellar organization and highlight the particular relevance of these signaling pathways in disease. PMID:22281700

  1. α1-Adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the impact of reducing extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Ives, Stephen J; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Noyes, R Dirk; Morgan, R Garrett; Gifford, Jayson R; Park, Song-Young; Symons, J David; Richardson, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Graded exercise results not only in the modulation of adrenergic mediated smooth muscle tone and a preferential increase in blood flow to the active skeletal muscle termed 'functional sympatholysis', but is also paralleled by metabolically induced reductions in pH. We therefore sought to determine whether pH attenuates α(1)-adrenergic receptor sensitivity in human feed arteries. Feed arteries (560 ± 31 μm i.d.) were harvested from 24 humans (55 ± 4 years old) and studied using the isometric tension technique. Vessel function was assessed using KCl, phenylephrine (PE), ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) concentration-response curves to characterize non-receptor-mediated and receptor-mediated vasocontraction, as well as endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxation, respectively. All concentration-response curves were obtained from (originally contiguous) vessel rings in separate baths with a pH of 7.4, 7.1, 6.8 or 6.5. Reduction of the pH, via HCl, reduced maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (pH 7.4 = 85 ± 19, pH 7.1 = 57 ± 16, pH 6.8 = 34 ± 15 and pH 6.5 = 16 ± 5% KCl(max)), which was partly due to reduced smooth muscle function, as assessed by KCl (pH 7.4 = 88 ± 13, pH 7.1 = 67 ± 8, pH 6.8 = 67 ± 9 and pH 6.5 = 58 ± 8% KCl(max)). Graded acidosis had no effect on maximal vasorelaxation. In summary, these data reveal that reductions in extracellular pH attenuate α(1)-mediated vasocontraction, which is partly explained by reduced smooth muscle function, although vasorelaxation in response to ACh and SNP remained intact. These findings support the concept that local acidosis is likely to contribute to functional sympatholysis and exercise hyperaemia by opposing sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction while not impacting vasodilatation.

  2. Phosphoinositide Phosphatases in Cell Biology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are essential signaling molecules linked to a diverse array of cellular processes in eukaryotic cells. The metabolic interconversions of these phospholipids are subject to exquisite spatial and temporal regulation executed by arrays of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. These include PtdIns- and phosphoinositide-kinases that drive phosphoinositide synthesis, and phospholipases and phosphatases that regulate phosphoinositide degradation. In the past decade, phosphoinositide phosphatases have emerged as topics of particular interest. This interest is driven by the recent appreciation that these enzymes represent primary mechanisms for phosphoinositide degradation, and because of their ever-increasing connections with human diseases. Herein, we review the biochemical properties of six major phosphoinositide phosphatases, the functional involvements of these enzymes in regulating phosphoinositide metabolism, the pathologies that arise from functional derangements of individual phosphatases, and recent ideas concerning the involvements of phosphoinositide phosphatases in membrane traffic control. PMID:20043944

  3. Norepinephrine-Induced Adrenergic Activation Strikingly Increased the Atrial Fibrillation Duration through β1- and α1-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Signaling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Nozomi; Cai, Wenqian; Jin, Huiling; Hidaka, Yuko; Prajapati, Rajesh; Umemura, Masanari; Yokoyama, Utako; Sato, Motohiko; Okumura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmias among old people. It causes serious long-term health problems affecting the quality of life. It has been suggested that the autonomic nervous system is involved in the onset and maintenance of AF in human. However, investigation of its pathogenesis and potential treatment has been hampered by the lack of suitable AF models in experimental animals. Objectives Our aim was to establish a long-lasting AF model in mice. We also investigated the role of adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes, which may be involved in the onset and duration of AF. Methods and Results Trans-esophageal atrial burst pacing in mice could induce AF, as previously shown, but with only a short duration (29.0±8.1 sec). We found that adrenergic activation by intraperitoneal norepinephrine (NE) injection strikingly increased the AF duration. It increased the duration to more than 10 minutes, i.e., by more than 20-fold (656.2±104.8 sec; P<0.001). In this model, a prior injection of a specific β1-AR blocker metoprolol and an α1-AR blocker prazosin both significantly attenuated NE-induced elongation of AF. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these receptors’ effects on AF, we assessed the SR Ca2+ leak, a major trigger of AF, and consequent spontaneous SR Ca2+ release (SCR) in atrial myocytes. Consistent with the results of our in-vivo experiments, both metoprolol and prazosin significantly inhibited the NE-induced SR Ca2+ leak and SCR. These findings suggest that both β1-AR and α1-AR may play important roles in the development of AF. Conclusions We have established a long-lasting AF model in mice induced by adrenergic activation, which will be valuable in future AF study using experimental animals, such as transgenic mice. We also revealed the important role of β1- and α1-AR-mediated signaling in the development of AF through in-vivo and in-vitro experiments. PMID:26203906

  4. The functional role of the alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in cerebral blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Raven, Peter B

    2011-09-01

    Cerebral vasculature is richly innervated by the α-1 adrenergic receptors similar to that of the peripheral vasculature. However, the functional role of the α-1adrenergic receptors in cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation is yet to be established. The traditional thinking being that during normotension and normocapnia sympathetic neural activity does not play a significant role in CBF regulation. Reports in the past have stated that catecholamines do not penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) and therefore only influence cerebral vessels from outside the BBB and hence, have a limited role in CBF regulation. However, with the advent of dynamic measurement techniques, beat-to-beat CBF assessment can be done during dynamic changes in arterial blood pressure. Several studies in the recent years have reported a functional role of the α-1adrenergic receptors in CBF regulation. This review focuses on the recent developments on the role of the sympathetic nervous system, specifically that of the α-1 adrenergic receptors in CBF regulation.

  5. Phosphoinositide regulation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are activated by stimuli as diverse as heat, cold, noxious chemicals, mechanical forces, hormones, neurotransmitters, spices, and voltage. Besides their presumably similar general architecture, probably the only common factor regulating them is phosphoinositides. The regulation of TRP channels by phosphoinositides is complex. There is a large number of TRP channels where phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2], acts as a positive cofactor, similarly to many other ion channels. In several cases however, PI(4,5)P2 inhibits TRP channel activity, sometimes even concurrently with the activating effect. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the literature on regulation of TRP channels by membrane phosphoinositides. PMID:24961984

  6. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  7. Effect of repeated treatment with tianeptine and fluoxetine on the central alpha(1)-adrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Rogóz, Z; Skuza, G; Dlaboga, D; Maj, J; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, M

    2001-09-01

    Tianeptine (TIA) is an antidepressant drug which enhances the reuptake of serotonin but, in contrast to tricyclics, shows no affinity for neurotransmitter receptors. The present study was aimed at determining whether repeated TIA treatment induced adaptive changes in the alpha(1)-adrenergic system, similar to those reported by us earlier for tricyclic antidepressants. The experiments were carried out on male mice and rats. TIA was administered at a dose of 5 or 10mg/kg once or repeatedly (twice daily for 14 days) and fluoxetine (FLU), used as a reference compound, at a dose of 10mg/kg. The obtained results showed that TIA administered repeatedly potentiated the methoxamine- and phenylephrine (PHEN)-induced exploratory hyperactivity in rats and clonidine-induced aggressiveness in mice, the effects mediated by alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. TIA given repeatedly (but not acutely) increased the binding (B(max)) of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors in cerebral cortex for [(3)H]prazosin. However, the ability of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist PHEN to compete for these sites was not significantly changed. The above results indicate that repeated TIA administration increases the responsiveness of the alpha(1)-adrenergic system (behavioural and biochemical changes). On the other hand, FLU did not affect any behavioural and biochemical changes in this system.

  8. Long-term reduction of intimal hyperplasia by the selective alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist doxazosin.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, R; Sian, M; Franks, P J; O'Malley, M K

    1992-12-01

    Studies have shown that alpha 1-adrenergic blockade reduces intimal hyperplasia in the rabbit aorta. In this study a selective alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist, doxazosin, has been used to examine whether this effect is persistent and dose dependent. Forty-eight New Zealand White rabbits underwent endothelial denudation of the abdominal aorta using a Fogarty balloon catheter. Test rabbits were given low-dose (2 mg) or high-dose (8 mg) doxazosin daily and all animals killed at either 1 or 12 weeks after the procedure. The aortas were harvested after fixation in situ with 4 per cent glutaraldehyde and neointimal hyperplasia was measured, using an x-y digitizer, as the percentage reduction in luminal cross-sectional area. At 1 week after surgery, rabbits receiving the low dose had a median area reduction of 7.7 per cent and those receiving the high dose a reduction of 8.2 per cent; both had significantly less intimal hyperplasia than control rabbits, which had a median area reduction of 14.8 per cent (P < 0.01). However, at 12 weeks, when compared with the 32.6 per cent reduction in the control group, only those rabbits receiving high-dose doxazosin had significantly less intimal hyperplasia, with a reduction of 5.5 per cent (P < 0.001). It is concluded that selective alpha 1-adrenergic blockade significantly reduces neointimal hyperplasia, that this effect is dose dependent, and that it persists for at least 3 months.

  9. Dynamics of Cytoskeletal Proteins during Fcγ Receptor-mediated Phagocytosis in MacrophagesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Diakonova, Maria; Bokoch, Gary; Swanson, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    Particle ingestion by phagocytosis results from sequential rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and overlying membrane. To assemble a chronology of molecular events during phagosome formation and to examine the contributions of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) to these dynamics, a method was developed for synchronizing Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis by murine macrophages. Erythrocytes opsonized with complement component C3bi were bound to macrophages at 37°C, a condition that does not favor particle phagocytosis. Addition of soluble anti-erythrocyte IgG resulted in rapid opsonization of the bound erythrocytes, followed by their immediate internalization via phagocytosis. Cellular content of F-actin, as measured by binding of rhodamine-phalloidin, increased transiently during phagocytosis, and this increase was not diminished by inhibitors of PI 3-kinase. Immunofluorescence localization of myosins in macrophages fixed at various times during phagocytosis indicated that myosins II and IXb were concentrated in early phagosomes, myosin IC increased later, and myosin V appeared after phagosome closure. Other cytoskeletal proteins showed similar variations in the timing of their appearance in phagosomes. The PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin did not change the dynamics of PI 3-kinase or ezrin localization but prevented the loss of PAK1 from phagosomes. These results suggest that PI 3-kinase deactivates PAK1, and that this may be needed for phagosome closure. PMID:11854399

  10. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP{sub 4}), an IP{sub 3} derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP{sub 4} are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP{sub 4} in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP{sub 3} and IP{sub 4} hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP{sub 4} and calcium homeostasis.

  11. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  12. alpha-1 Adrenergic receptors stimulation induces the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Takeshi; Ihara, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2006-11-01

    The proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is regulated by classical neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, via its own receptors. Previous studies have reported that the depletion of L-norepinephrine decreases the proliferation of NPCs in the adult rat hippocampus and it has been suggested that L-norepinephrine regulates the proliferation of NPCs. However, it remains unknown whether or not adrenergic receptors are involved in the increased proliferation of NPCs. In the present study, an MTT cell proliferation assay was carried out in order to investigate the roles played by adrenergic receptors in the proliferation of NPCs. We demonstrated that L-epinephrine enhanced the proliferation of embryonic NPCs in vitro. In addition, the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist L-phenylephrine was found to enhance the proliferation of NPCs, whereas an alpha-adrenergic antagonist and selective alpha-1 antagonists significantly inhibited cell proliferation increases induced by L-epinephrine and L-phenylephrine. These results suggest that stimulation with alpha-1 adrenergic receptors induces the proliferation of embryonic NPCs.

  13. Cocaine increases dopaminergic neuron and motor activity via midbrain α1 adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Richard Brandon; Wanat, Matthew J; Gomez, Jorge A; Brown, Zeliene J; Phillips, Paul E M; Paladini, Carlos A

    2015-03-13

    Cocaine reinforcement is mediated by increased extracellular dopamine levels in the forebrain. This neurochemical effect was thought to require inhibition of dopamine reuptake, but cocaine is still reinforcing even in the absence of the dopamine transporter. Here, we demonstrate that the rapid elevation in dopamine levels and motor activity elicited by cocaine involves α1 receptor activation within the ventral midbrain. Activation of α1 receptors increases dopaminergic neuron burst firing by decreasing the calcium-activated potassium channel current (SK), as well as elevates dopaminergic neuron pacemaker firing through modulation of both SK and the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih). Furthermore, we found that cocaine increases both the pacemaker and burst-firing frequency of rat ventral-midbrain dopaminergic neurons through an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent mechanism within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. These results demonstrate the mechanism underlying the critical role of α1 adrenergic receptors in the regulation of dopamine neurotransmission and behavior by cocaine.

  14. Agonistic autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic receptor and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor in Alzheimer's and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Karczewski, P; Hempel, P; Kunze, R; Bimmler, M

    2012-05-01

    Although primary causes of Alzheimer's and vascular dementia are unknown, the importance of preceding vascular lesions is widely accepted. Furthermore, there is strong evidence for the involvement of autoimmune mechanisms. Here, we report the presence of agonistic autoantibodies directed at adrenergic receptors in the circulation of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. In 59% of these patients, agonistic autoantibodies against the α(1) -adrenergic receptor and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor were identified. The majority of positive patients (66%) contained both types of autoantibodies in combination. In a control group of patients with neurological impairments others than Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, only 17% were found to harbour these autoantibodies. The autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic receptor interacted preferably with the extracellular loop1 of the receptor. They were further studied in IgG preparations from the column regenerate of a patient who underwent immunoadsorption. The α(1) -adrenergic receptor autoantibodies specifically bound to the extracellular loop1 peptide of the receptor with an apparent EC(50) value of 30 nm. They mobilized intracellular calcium in a clonal cell line expressing the human form of the α(1) -adrenergic receptor. Our data support the notion that autoimmune mechanisms play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. We suggest that agonistic autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor may contribute to vascular lesions and increased plaque formation.

  15. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  17. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in the medial preoptic area are involved in the induction of sleep.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Vetrivelan, Ramalingam; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2006-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent studies that led to the conclusion that the noradrenergic neurons projecting to the medial preoptic area (mPOA) are hypnogenic and that they mediate this action through alpha(1) adrenergic receptors. Microinjection of noradrenaline (NA) into the mPOA induced arousal. Studies using alpha(2) adrenergic drugs showed that the arousal induced by intrapreoptic injection of NA was due to its action on presynaptic alpha(2) adrenergic receptors. A combination of lesion and chemical stimulation techniques demonstrated that when NA acted on the postsynaptic alpha(1 )receptors in the mPOA, it induced sleep. Intrapreoptic injection of alpha(1) agonist, methoxamine could induce sleep, when the hypothermia, which was simultaneously produced, was behaviorally compensated for by the animal. Increased arousal produced by the destruction of noradrenergic fibers in the mPOA further confirmed the hypnogenic role of these fibers.

  18. Endosomal phosphoinositides and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Nicot, Anne-Sophie; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2008-08-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are lipid second messengers implicated in signal transduction and membrane trafficking. Seven distinct PIs can be synthesized by phosphorylation of the inositol ring of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), and their metabolism is accurately regulated by PI kinases and phosphatases. Two of the PIs, PtdIns3P and PtdIns(3,5)P(2), are present on intracellular endosomal compartments, and several studies suggest that they have a role in membrane remodeling and trafficking. We refer to them as 'endosomal PIs'. An increasing number of human genetic diseases including myopathy and neuropathies are associated to mutations in enzymes regulating the turnover of these endosomal PIs. The PtdIns3P and PtdIns(3,5)P(2) 3-phosphatase myotubularin gene is mutated in X-linked centronuclear myopathy, whereas its homologs MTMR2 and MTMR13 and the PtdIns(3,5)P(2) 5-phosphatase SAC3/FIG4 are implicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in the gene encoding the PtdIns3P 5-kinase PIP5K3/PIKfyve have been found in patients affected with François-Neetens fleck corneal dystrophy. This review presents the roles of the endosomal PIs and their regulators and proposes defects of membrane remodeling as a common pathological mechanism for the corresponding diseases.

  19. Comprehensive Behavioral Phenotyping of Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome: Activation of β1-Adrenergic Receptor by Xamoterol as a Potential Cognitive Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Bader, Patrick L.; Tun, Christine; Encarnacion, Angelo; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Belichenko, Pavel; Saw, Nay; Priestley, Matthew; Tsien, Richard W; Mobley, William C; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent form of mental retardation caused by genetic abnormalities in humans. This has been successfully modeled in mice to generate the Ts65Dn mouse, a genetic model of DS. This transgenic mouse model shares a number of physical and functional abnormalities with people with DS, including changes in the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Significant abnormalities in noradrenergic (NE-ergic) afferents from the locus coeruleus to the hippocampus, as well as deficits in NE-ergic neurotransmission are detected in these animals. In the current study we characterized in detail the behavioral phenotype of Ts65Dn mice, in addition to using pharmacological tools for identification of target receptors mediating the learning and memory deficits observed in this model of DS. We undertook a comprehensive approach to mouse phenotyping using a battery of standard and novel tests encompassing: i) locomotion (Activity Chamber, PhenoTyper, and CatWalk), ii) learning and memory (spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, fear conditioning, and Intellicage), and iii) social behavior. Ts65Dn mice showed increased locomotor activity in novel and home cage environments. There were significant and reproducible deficits in learning and memory tests including spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, Intellicage place avoidance and contextual fear conditioning. Although Ts65Dn mice showed no deficit in sociability in the 3-chamber test, a marked impairment in social memory was detected. Xamoterol, a β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-ADR) agonist, effectively restored the memory deficit in contextual fear conditioning, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition. These behavioral improvements were reversed by betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that this mouse model of Down Syndrome display cognitive deficits which is mediated by imbalance in noradrenergic

  20. The Specific α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Influences the Urine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mindi; Wu, Jianqiang; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Urine, reflecting many changes in the body, is a better source than blood for biomarker discovery. However, even under physiological conditions, the urine proteome often varies. Understanding how various regulating factors affect urine proteome helps link changes to urine proteome with urinary biomarkers of physiological conditions as well as corresponding diseases. To evaluate the possible impact of α1-adrenergic receptor on urine proteome, this study investigated effects of the specific inhibitor prazosin on the urine proteome in a rat model by using tandem mass tagging and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 775 proteins were identified, approximately half of which were influenced by prazosin treatment, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system exerts a significant impact on urine proteome. Eight significantly changed proteins were previously annotated as urinary candidate biomarkers. Angiotensinogen, haptoglobin, and beta-2 microglobulin, which were reported to be associated with blood pressure, were validated via Western blot. Prazosin is widely used in clinical practice; thus, these protein changes should be considered when studying corresponding diseases such as hypertension, post-traumatic stress disorder and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The related physiological activities of α1-receptors, controlling blood pressure and fear response might significantly affect the urine proteome and warrant further biomarker studies. PMID:27780262

  1. Modeling the interactions between alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2010-09-01

    As crucial members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, alpha (1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs) are recognized to intervene the actions of endogenous catecholamines such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. So far three distinct alpha(1)-AR subtypes, alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D), have been characterized by functional analysis, radio-ligand binding and molecular biology studies. The alpha(1)-ARs are of therapeutic interest because of their distinct and critical roles in many physiological processes, containing hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia, smooth muscle contraction, myocardial inotropy and chronotropy, and hepatic glucose metabolism. Accordingly, designing subtype-selective antagonists for each of the three alpha(1)-AR subtypes has been an enthusiastic region of medicinal research. Even though a large number of studies on GPCRs have been conducted, understanding of how known antagonists bind to alpha(1)-ARs still remains sketchy and has been a serious impediment to search for potent and subtype-selective alpha(1)-AR antagonists because of the lack of detailed experimental structural knowledge. This review deliberates the simulation of alpha(1)-ARs and their interactions with antagonists by using ligand-based (pharmacophore identification and QSAR modeling) and structure-based (comparative modeling and molecular docking) approaches. Combined with experimental data, these computational attempts could improve our understanding of the structural basis of antagonist binding and the molecular basis of receptor activation, thus offering a more reasonable approach in the design of drugs targeting alpha(1)-ARs.

  2. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors gate rapid orientation-specific reduction in visual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario; Frey, Sebastian; Köhr, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged imbalance in sensory experience leads to dramatic readjustments in cortical representation. Neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in habilitating experience-induced plasticity and regulate memory processes in vivo. Here, we show that a brief period of intense patterned visual stimulation combined with systemic activation of alpha-1 adrenergic neuromodulator receptors (α(1)-ARs) leads to a rapid, reversible, and NMDAR-dependent depression of AMPAR-mediated transmission from ascending inputs to layer II/III pyramidal cells in the visual cortex of young and adult mice. The magnitude of this form of α(1)-AR long-term depression (LTD), measured ex vivo with miniature EPSC recordings, is graded by the number of orientations used during visual experience. Moreover, behavioral tests of visual function following the induction of α(1)-AR LTD reveal that discrimination accuracy of sinusoidal drifting gratings is selectively reduced at high spatial frequencies in a reversible, orientation-specific, and NMDAR-dependent manner. Thus, α(1)-ARs enable rapid cortical synaptic depression which correlates with an orientation-specific decrease in visual discrimination. These findings contribute to our understanding of how adrenergic receptors interact with neuronal networks in response to changes in active sensory experience to produce adaptive behavior.

  3. Nuclear Compartmentalization of α1-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Adult Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Although convention dictates that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at the plasma membrane, accumulating evidence suggests that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at intracellular membranes, most notably the nucleus. In fact, there is now significant evidence indicating that endogenous alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) localize to and signal at the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes. Cumulatively, the data suggest that α1-ARs localize to the inner nuclear membrane, activate intranuclear signaling, and regulate physiologic function in adult cardiac myocytes. Although α1-ARs signal through Gαq, unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, α1-ARs mediate important cardioprotective functions including adaptive/physiologic hypertrophy, protection from cell death (survival signaling), positive inotropy, and preconditioning. Also unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, most, if not all, functional α1-ARs localize to the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes, as opposed to the sarcolemma. Together, α1-AR nuclear localization and cardioprotection might suggest a novel model for compartmentalization of Gq-coupled receptor signaling in which nuclear Gq-coupled receptor signaling is cardioprotective. PMID:25264754

  4. Green tea modulates alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulated glucose transport in cultured rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Maraldi, Tullia; Ghelli, Anna; Rugolo, Michela; Leoncini, Emanuela; Hakim, Gabriele; Hrelia, Silvana

    2007-09-01

    alpha1-Adrenergic stimulation triggers glucose transport in the heart through the translocation of glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and GLUT4 to plasma membranes, mediated by protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. Evidence is emerging that dietary polyphenolic compounds may act not only as antioxidants but also by modulating PKC-mediated signaling. This study evaluated the ability of a green tea extract (GTE) to modulate alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated glucose transport in rat cardiomyocytes. GTE supplementation decreased phenylephrine (PhE)-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 recruitment. PhE stimulation activated PKC alpha, beta, delta, and epsilon, while GTE supplementation decreased the translocation of beta and delta isoforms, but not alpha and epsilon, supporting the notion that GTE directly affects PKC activation and is a beta and delta isoform-selective PKC inhibitor. Due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) involvement in pathological heart alterations, the observation that GTE is able to both inhibit effects originated by some PKC isoforms and counteract ROS deleterious effects could be important in the prevention/counteraction of these diseases.

  5. Receptor-mediated mitophagy in yeast and mammalian systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Sakakibara, Kaori; Chen, Quan; Okamoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Mitophagy, or mitochondria autophagy, plays a critical role in selective removal of damaged or unwanted mitochondria. Several protein receptors, including Atg32 in yeast, NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 in mammalian systems, directly act in mitophagy. Atg32 interacts with Atg8 and Atg11 on the surface of mitochondria, promoting core Atg protein assembly for mitophagy. NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 also have a classic motif to directly bind LC3 (Atg8 homolog in mammals) for activation of mitophagy. Recent studies have shown that receptor-mediated mitophagy is regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylates Atg32 and activates mitophagy in yeast. In contrast, in mammalian cells Src kinase and CK2 phosphorylate FUNDC1 to prevent mitophagy. Notably, in response to hypoxia and FCCP treatment, the mitochondrial phosphatase PGAM5 dephosphorylates FUNDC1 to activate mitophagy. Here, we mainly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of receptor-mediated mitophagy and the implications of this catabolic process in health and disease. PMID:24903109

  6. Free energy landscape of receptor-mediated cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianyi; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion plays a critical role in cell migration, proliferation, signaling, and survival. A number of diseases, including cancer, show a strong correlation between integrin activation and metastasis. A better understanding of cell adhesion is highly desirable for not only therapeutic but also a number of tissue engineering applications. While a number of computational models and experimental studies have addressed the issue of cell adhesion to surfaces, no model or theory has adequately addressed cell adhesion at the molecular level. In this paper, the authors present a thermodynamic model that addresses receptor-mediated cell adhesion at the molecular level. By incorporating the entropic, conformational, solvation, and long- and short-range interactive components of receptors and the extracellular matrix molecules, they are able to predict adhesive free energy as a function of a number of key variables such as surface coverage, interaction distance, molecule size, and solvent conditions. Their method allows them to compute the free energy of adhesion in a multicomponent system where they can simultaneously study adhesion receptors and ligands of different sizes, chemical identities, and conformational properties. The authors' results not only provide a fundamental understanding of adhesion at the molecular level but also suggest possible strategies for designing novel biomaterials.

  7. Phosphoinositide Control of Membrane Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Petrou, Vasileios I.; Zhang, Miao; Mahajan, Rahul; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Adney, Scott K.; Cui, Meng; Baki, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Anionic phospholipids are critical constituents of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, ensuring appropriate membrane topology of transmembrane proteins. Additionally, in eukaryotes, the negatively charged phosphoinositides serve as key signals not only through their hydrolysis products but also through direct control of transmembrane protein function. Direct phosphoinositide control of the activity of ion channels and transporters has been the most convincing case of the critical importance of phospholipid-protein interactions in the functional control of membrane proteins. Furthermore, second messengers, such as [Ca2+]i, or posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation, can directly or allosterically fine-tune phospholipid-protein interactions and modulate activity. Recent advances in structure determination of membrane proteins have allowed investigators to obtain complexes of ion channels with phosphoinositides and to use computational and experimental approaches to probe the dynamic mechanisms by which lipid-protein interactions control active and inactive protein states. PMID:25293526

  8. The use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in children with distal ureterolithiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Glina, F.P.; Castro, P.M.V.; Monteiro, G.G.R.; Guerra, G.C. Del; Glina, S.; Mazzurana, M.; Bernardo, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Urinary lithiasis is the main urologic cause of emergency treatment in adult patient. In the past years, the incidence in children population has increased. However, literature about the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in pediatric population with distal ureterolithiasis is still scarce. The drug acts by decreasing ureter contractions, especially in the distal portion, facilitating calculus expulsion. Objective: This review has the objective to evaluate the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers as medical expulsive treatment in children with distal ureterolithiasis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and LILACS databases. We further searched manually the references of the primary studies. Searches were concluded on October 4th, 2014. Articles were selected, independently and in pairs, by the respective titles and summaries. Any divergence was resolved by consensus. Evidence Synthesis: Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists increased the probability of calculus expulsion by 27% (NNT=4). Calculi smaller than 5mm, increased by 33% (NNT=3). Larger than 5mm, increased by 34% (NNT=3). Conclusion: Alpha-1 adrenergic blocker use is related with a greater incidence of expulsion of ureteral calculi, smaller or greater than 5mm, and fewer episodes of pain when compared to ibuprofen. However it is necessary larger samples to enhance the power analysis of the expulsion of ureteral calculi larger than 5mm and the episodes of pain. Patient Summary: This review analyzed the outcome of alpha adrenergic antagonist in children with ureteral calculi. We conclude that it is the best medicine for use, since it helps the expulsion of the stone. PMID:26717117

  9. Beta1 adrenergic receptor polymorphisms Arg389Gly and Ser49Gly in the Amerindian and Mestizo populations of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, José Manuel; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Vielma, Nadia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Nancy; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto

    2005-08-01

    The beta1 adrenergic receptor genotypes (Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly) were determined in 190 individuals from 3 Mexican populations. Mestizos and Teenek present the highest frequencies for the *Arg allele and the lowest frequencies for the *Gly allele (Arg389Gly) compared to European, Asian, and African populations. Mayos present the highest frequency for the *Gly allele. The knowledge of the distribution of these alleles could help define the significance of these polymorphisms as genetic susceptibility markers in Amerindian populations.

  10. Cell Permeable Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensors for Imaging Phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Samsuzzoha; Rakshit, Ananya; Pal, Suranjana; Datta, Ankona

    2016-07-15

    Phosphoinositides are critical cell-signal mediators present on the plasma membrane. The dynamic change of phosphoinositide concentrations on the membrane including clustering and declustering mediates signal transduction. The importance of phosphoinositides is scored by the fact that they participate in almost all cell-signaling events, and a defect in phosphoinositide metabolism is linked to multiple diseases including cancer, bipolar disorder, and type-2 diabetes. Optical sensors for visualizing phosphoinositide distribution can provide information on phosphoinositide dynamics. This exercise will ultimately afford a handle into understanding and manipulating cell-signaling processes. The major requirement in phosphoinositide sensor development is a selective, cell permeable probe that can quantify phosphoinositides. To address this requirement, we have developed short peptide-based ratiometric fluorescent sensors for imaging phosphoinositides. The sensors afford a selective response toward two crucial signaling phosphoinositides, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P), over other anionic membrane phospholipids and soluble inositol phosphates. Dissociation constant values indicate up to 4 times higher probe affinity toward PI(4,5)P2 when compared to PI4P. Significantly, the sensors are readily cell-permeable and enter cells within 15 min of incubation as indicated by multiphoton excitation confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the sensors light up signaling phosphoinositides present both on the cell membrane and on organelle membranes near the perinuclear space, opening avenues for quantifying and monitoring phosphoinositide signaling.

  11. Alpha-1-adrenergic modulation of K and Cl transport in bovine retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode techniques were used to characterize the electrical responses of the bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)- choroid to epinephrine (EP) and several other catecholamines that are putative paracrine signals between the neural retina and the RPE. Nanomolar amounts of EP or norepinephrine (NEP), added to the apical bath, caused a series of conductance and voltage changes, first at the basolateral or choroid-facing membrane and then at the apical or retina- facing membrane. The relative potency of several adrenergic agonists and antagonists indicates that EP modulation of RPE transport begins with the activation of apical alpha-1-adrenergic receptors. The membrane-permeable calcium (Ca2+) buffer, amyl-BAPTA (1,2-bis(o- aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid) inhibited the EP- induced voltage and conductance changes by approximately 50-80%, implicating [Ca2+]i as a second messenger. This conclusion is supported by experiments using the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, which mimics the effects of EP. The basolateral membrane voltage response to EP was blocked by lowering cell Cl, by the presence of DIDS (4,4'- diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid) in the basal bath, and by current clamping VB to the Cl equilibrium potential. In the latter experiments the EP-induced conductance changes were unaltered, indicating that EP increases basolateral membrane Cl conductance independent of voltage. The EP-induced change in basolateral Cl conductance was followed by a secondary decrease in apical membrane K conductance (approximately 50%) as measured by delta [K]o-induced diffusion potentials. Decreasing apical K from 5 to 2 mM in the presence of EP mimicked the effect of light on RPE apical and basolateral membrane voltage. These results indicate that EP may be an important paracrine signal that provides exquisite control of RPE physiology. PMID:1319462

  12. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  13. Relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and response in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Berger, K.D.; Taylor, P.

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy by agonists or antagonists and the regulation of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ was examined. Receptor occupancy was measured using the antagonist (/sup 3/H)prazosin and correlated with agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes. The agonists epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and phenylephrine (PE) coordinately activated Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, reflecting a substantial mobilization of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/, as well as a smaller /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. The agonist concentration dependences for influx and efflux were similar, with the order of potency expected for alpha 1 receptors (E greater than or equal to NE greater than PE). To determine the relationship between receptor occupancy and response, the slowly dissociating antagonist prazosin was used to inactivate specified fractions of the receptor population. A linear relationship was observed between the remaining activatable receptors and residual /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux elicited by E or NE, except at saturating agonist concentrations where some curvature was observed. Moreover, the concentration dependence for agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was shifted toward slightly higher concentrations of E or NE following prazosin inactivation. These results suggest the presence of a modest receptor reserve which is revealed by E or NE, but not by PE. Agonist occupation was measured over the same interval as receptor activation by competition with the initial rate of (/sup 3/H)prazosin association. All three agonists exhibited the major fraction of receptor occupation over the same concentration ranges required for the functional response. Exposure of receptors to specified agonist concentrations for 30 min had little effect on the number of receptors or their ligand affinities, whereas a 2.5-hr exposure to agonist decreased apparent agonist affinity as well as the number of receptors recognized by (/sup 3/H)prazosin.

  14. Alpha(1)-adrenergic-mediated eNOS phosphorylation in intact arteries.

    PubMed

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C; Todd, Sarah E; Araj, Christina A; Mutchler, Stephanie M; Goodell, Cara A Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Activation of arterial smooth muscle alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors results in vasoconstriction, as well as a secondary release of nitric oxide and slow vasodilation, presumably through gap junction communication from smooth muscle to endothelium. We hypothesized that this slow vasodilation is due to activation of eNOS through phosphorylation at Ser1179 and dephosphorylation at Thr495. Phosphorylation was measured by western blot using mouse mesenteric arteries that were cannulated and pressurized (75 mm Hg) and treated either by 1) 5 min of phenylephrine superfusion (10(-5)M) (PE5), 2) 15 min of phenylephrine (PE15), 3) 15 min phenylephrine followed by acetylcholine (10(-4)M) (PE+ACh), or 4) 20 min time control with no treatment (NT) [4-5 arteries pooled per treatment per blot; 5 blots performed]. These treatments allowed correlation between vasomotor changes, namely maximal constriction (PE5), slow vasodilation (PE15), and maximal dilation (PE+ACh), and relative phosphorylation changes. Phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179 was increased relative to NT by more than 2-fold at PE5 and remained similarly increased at PE15 and PE+ACh. Phosphorylation of eNOS at Thr495 was less in all treatments relative to NT, but not significantly. Treatment with L-NAME (10(-4)M) or endothelial denudation indicated that the slow dilation in response to phenylephrine was completely due to nitric oxide synthase and was endothelial dependent. These results indicate that eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1179 occurs before the slow dilation and is not actively involved in this vasodilation or dilation to acetylcholine, but may play a permissive role in eNOS activation by other mechanisms. It is not yet known what mechanism is responsible for Ser1179 phosphorylation with phenylephrine stimulation.

  15. Intraventricular and interventricular cellular heterogeneity of inotropic responses to α(1)-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Charles; Thai, Kevin; Park, Ki Wan; Wang, Paul; Makwana, Om; Lovett, David H; Simpson, Paul C; Baker, Anthony J

    2013-04-01

    α1-Adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) elicit a negative inotropic effect (NIE) in the mouse right ventricular (RV) myocardium but a positive inotropic effect (PIE) in the left ventricular (LV) myocardium. Effects on myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity play a role, but effects on Ca(2+) handling could also contribute. We monitored the effects of α1-AR stimulation on contraction and Ca(2+) transients using single myocytes isolated from the RV or LV. Interestingly, for both the RV and LV, we found heterogeneous myocyte inotropic responses. α1-ARs mediated either a PIE or NIE, although RV myocytes had a greater proportion of cells manifesting a NIE (68%) compared with LV myocytes (36%). Stimulation of a single α1-AR subtype (α1A-ARs) with a subtype-selective agonist also elicited heterogeneous inotropic responses, suggesting that the heterogeneity arose from events downstream of the α1A-AR subtype. For RV and LV myocytes, an α1-AR-mediated PIE was associated with an increased Ca(2+) transient and a NIE was associated with a decreased Ca(2+) transient, suggesting a key role for Ca(2+) handling. For RV and LV myocytes, α1-AR-mediated decreases in the Ca(2+) transient were associated with increased Ca(2+) export from the cell and decreased Ca(2+) content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, for myocytes with α1-AR-induced increased Ca(2+) transients, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) content was not increased, suggesting that other mechanisms contributed to the increased Ca(2+) transients. This study demonstrates the marked heterogeneity of LV and RV cellular inotropic responses to stimulation of α1-ARs and reveals a new aspect of biological heterogeneity among myocytes in the regulation of contraction.

  16. Phorbol esters promote alpha 1-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and receptor uncoupling from inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Leeb-Lundberg, L M; Cotecchia, S; Lomasney, J W; DeBernardis, J F; Lefkowitz, R J; Caron, M G

    1985-01-01

    DDT1 MF-2 cells, which are derived from hamster vas deferens smooth muscle, contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (54,800 +/- 2700 sites per cell) that are coupled to stimulation of inositol phospholipid metabolism. Incubation of these cells with tumor-promoting phorbol esters, which stimulate calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, leads to a marked attenuation of the ability of alpha 1-receptor agonists such as norepinephrine to stimulate the turnover of inositol phospholipids. This turnover was measured by determining the 32P content of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid after prelabeling of the cellular ATP pool with 32Pi. These phorbol ester-treated cells also displayed a decrease in binding affinity of cellular alpha 1 receptors for agonists with no change in antagonist affinity. By using affinity chromatography on the affinity resin Affi-Gel-A55414, the alpha 1 receptors were purified approximately equal to 300-fold from control and phorbol ester-treated 32Pi-prelabeled cells. As assessed by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the Mr 80,000 alpha 1-receptor ligand-binding subunit is a phosphopeptide containing 1.2 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. After phorbol ester treatment this increased to 3.6 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. The effect of phorbol esters on norepinephrine-stimulated inositol phospholipid turnover and alpha 1-receptor phosphorylation showed the same rapid time course with a t1/2 less than 2 min. These results indicate that calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase may play an important role in regulating the function of receptors that are coupled to the inositol phospholipid cycle by phosphorylating and deactivating them. Images PMID:2994039

  17. Backbone NMR reveals allosteric signal transduction networks in the β1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Shin; Deupi, Xavier; Opitz, Christian; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Brueckner, Florian; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are physiologically important transmembrane signalling proteins that trigger intracellular responses upon binding of extracellular ligands. Despite recent breakthroughs in GPCR crystallography, the details of ligand-induced signal transduction are not well understood owing to missing dynamical information. In principle, such information can be provided by NMR, but so far only limited data of functional relevance on few side-chain sites of eukaryotic GPCRs have been obtained. Here we show that receptor motions can be followed at virtually any backbone site in a thermostabilized mutant of the turkey β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Labelling with [(15)N]valine in a eukaryotic expression system provides over twenty resolved resonances that report on structure and dynamics in six ligand complexes and the apo form. The response to the various ligands is heterogeneous in the vicinity of the binding pocket, but gets transformed into a homogeneous readout at the intracellular side of helix 5 (TM5), which correlates linearly with ligand efficacy for the G protein pathway. The effect of several pertinent, thermostabilizing point mutations was assessed by reverting them to the native sequence. Whereas the response to ligands remains largely unchanged, binding of the G protein mimetic nanobody NB80 and G protein activation are only observed when two conserved tyrosines (Y227 and Y343) are restored. Binding of NB80 leads to very strong spectral changes throughout the receptor, including the extracellular ligand entrance pocket. This indicates that even the fully thermostabilized receptor undergoes activating motions in TM5, but that the fully active state is only reached in presence of Y227 and Y343 by stabilization with a G protein-like partner. The combined analysis of chemical shift changes from the point mutations and ligand responses identifies crucial connections in the allosteric activation pathway, and presents a general experimental

  18. Pharmacological Analysis and Structure Determination of 7-Methylcyanopindolol–Bound β1-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomomi; Baker, Jillian; Warne, Tony; Brown, Giles A.; Leslie, Andrew G.W.; Congreve, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Comparisons between structures of the β1-adrenergic receptor (AR) bound to either agonists, partial agonists, or weak partial agonists led to the proposal that rotamer changes of Ser5.46, coupled to a contraction of the binding pocket, are sufficient to increase the probability of receptor activation. (RS)-4-[3-(tert-butylamino)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (cyanopindolol) is a weak partial agonist of β1AR and, based on the hypothesis above, we predicted that the addition of a methyl group to form 4-[(2S)-3-(tert-butylamino)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-7-methyl-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (7-methylcyanopindolol) would dramatically reduce its efficacy. An eight-step synthesis of 7-methylcyanopindolol was developed and its pharmacology was analyzed. 7-Methylcyanopindolol bound with similar affinity to cyanopindolol to both β1AR and β2AR. As predicted, the efficacy of 7-methylcyanopindolol was reduced significantly compared with cyanopindolol, acting as a very weak partial agonist of turkey β1AR and an inverse agonist of human β2AR. The structure of 7-methylcyanopindolol–bound β1AR was determined to 2.4-Å resolution and found to be virtually identical to the structure of cyanopindolol-bound β1AR. The major differences in the orthosteric binding pocket are that it has expanded by 0.3 Å in 7-methylcyanopindolol–bound β1AR and the hydroxyl group of Ser5.46 is positioned 0.8 Å further from the ligand, with respect to the position of the Ser5.46 side chain in cyanopindolol-bound β1AR. Thus, the molecular basis for the reduction in efficacy of 7-methylcyanopindolol compared with cyanopindolol may be regarded as the opposite of the mechanism proposed for the increase in efficacy of agonists compared with antagonists. PMID:26385885

  19. Nebivolol, a β1-adrenergic blocker, protects from peritoneal membrane damage induced during peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Abensur, Hugo; Albar-Vizcaino, Patricia; Parra, Emilio González; Sandoval, Pilar; Ramírez, Laura García; del Peso, Gloria; Acedo, Juan Manuel; Bajo, María A.; Selgas, Rafael; Tomero, José A. Sánchez; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a form of renal replacement treatment, which employs the peritoneal membrane (PM) to eliminate toxins that cannot be removed by the kidney. The procedure itself, however, contributes to the loss of the PM ultrafiltration capacity (UFC), leading consequently to the technique malfunction. β-blockers have been considered deleterious for PM due to their association with loss of UFC and induction of fibrosis. Herein we analyzed the effects of Nebivolol, a new generation of β1-blocker, on PM alterations induced by PD fluids (PDF). In vitro: We found that mesothelial cells (MCs) express β1-adrenergic receptor. MCs were treated with TGF-β to induce mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and co-treated with Nebivolol. Nebivolol reversed the TGF-β effects, decreasing extracellular matrix synthesis, and improved the fibrinolytic capacity, decreasing plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and increasing tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) supernatant levels. Moreover, Nebivolol partially inhibited MMT and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-6 levels in supernatants. In vivo: Twenty-one C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 groups. Control group carried a catheter without PDF infusion. Study group received intraperitoneally PDF and oral Nebivolol during 30 days. PDF group received PDF alone. Nebivolol maintained the UFC and reduced PM thickness, MMT and angiogenesis promoted by PDF. It also improved the fibrinolytic capacity in PD effluents decreasing PAI-1 and IL-8 and increased tPA levels. Conclusion: Nebivolol protects PM from PDF-induced damage, promoting anti-fibrotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-fibrinolytic effects. PMID:27102153

  20. Receptor-mediated delivery of engineered nucleases for genome modification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Jaafar, Lahcen; Agyekum, Davies G; Xiao, Haiyan; Wade, Marlene F; Kumaran, R Ileng; Spector, David L; Bao, Gang; Porteus, Matthew H; Dynan, William S; Meiler, Steffen E

    2013-10-01

    Engineered nucleases, which incise the genome at predetermined sites, have a number of laboratory and clinical applications. There is, however, a need for better methods for controlled intracellular delivery of nucleases. Here, we demonstrate a method for ligand-mediated delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) proteins using transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Uptake is rapid and efficient in established mammalian cell lines and in primary cells, including mouse and human hematopoietic stem-progenitor cell populations. In contrast to cDNA expression, ZFN protein levels decline rapidly following internalization, affording better temporal control of nuclease activity. We show that transferrin-mediated ZFN uptake leads to site-specific in situ cleavage of the target locus. Additionally, despite the much shorter duration of ZFN activity, the efficiency of gene correction approaches that seen with cDNA-mediated expression. The approach is flexible and general, with the potential for extension to other targeting ligands and nuclease architectures.

  1. Aggregation of Phosphoinositides at Phisiological Calcium Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe; Forstner, Martin B.

    2012-02-01

    Phosphoinositides play a crucial role in many cellular functions such as calcium signaling, endocytosis, exocytosis and the targeting of proteins to specific membrane sites. To maintain functional specificity, it has been suggested that phosphoinositides are spatially organized in ``pools'' in the cellular plasma membrane. A possible mechanism that could induce and regulate such organization of phosphoinositides is their interaction with Ca2+ ions. Understanding the physicochemical mechanism that can regulate membrane structure is a crucial step in the development of adaptive biomimetic membrane systems. Using Langmuir monolayers, we investigated the effect of bivalent calcium and magnesium cations on the surface pressure-area/lipid isotherm of monolayers of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). It is found that the decrease of area per lipid, i.e. the increase in aggregation, is dependent on both the lipid's head group charge, the bivalent cation and temperature. However, electrostatics are not sufficient to account for all experimental observations. Thus additional interactions between ions and phosphoinositides need to be considered.

  2. Physical Foundations of PTEN/Phosphoinositide Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Arne; Jiang, Zhiping; Redfern, Roberta E.; Kooijman, Edgar E.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2009-03-01

    Phosphoinositides act as signaling molecules by recruiting critical effectors to specific subcellular membranes to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization, which requires a tight regulation of phosphoinositide generation and turnover as well as a high degree of compartmentalization. PTEN is a phosphatase specific for the 3 position of the phosophoinositide ring that is deleted or mutated in many different disease states. PTEN association with membranes requires the interaction of its C2 domain with phosphatidylserine and the interaction of its N-terminal end with phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphophate (PI(4,5)P2). We have investigated PTEN/PI(4,5)P2 interaction and found that Lys13 is crucial for the observed binding. We also found that the presence of cholesterol enhances PTEN binding to mixed PI(4,5)P2/POPC vesicles. Fluorescence microscopy experiments utilizing GUVs yielded results consistent with enhanced phosphoinositide domain formation in the presence of cholesterol. These experiments were accompanied by zeta potential measurements and solid state MAS ^31P-NMR experiments aimed at investigating the ionization behavior of phosphoinositides.

  3. Prostaglandin F/sub 2. cap alpha. activates phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5HT) activate a phosphoinositide-(PI) specific phospholipase C in rat aorta by interaction with ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors and 5HT/sub 2/ receptor, respectively. They have subsequently noted that angiotensin II and vasopressin as well activate PI hydrolysis in the tissue. The most active agent they have thus far investigated is prostaglandin F/sub 2..cap alpha../ (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../). Rat aortic rings were pre-labelled with (/sup 3/H)-inositol and then, in the presence of 10 mM LiCl, exposed to various doses of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../. (/sup 3/H)-inositol monophosphate was the quantified by anion-exchange chromatography. After a 60 min incubation, PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ caused a 10-15 fold increase over basal at maximal concentrations (0.1-1.0 mM). An EC/sub 50/ for PI hydrolysis was between 0.1-1.0 ..mu..M. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ caused maximal aortic contraction at 10 ..mu..M. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../-induced PI hydrolysis, was inhibited by phorbol esters. These results suggest that PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../, similar to 5HT, NE, vasopressin and angiotensin II, causes vasoconstriction by activation of PI hydrolysis.

  4. Targeting the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Ottmann, Oliver G.; Deininger, Michael; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway represents an important anticancer target because it has been implicated in cancer cell growth, survival, and motility. Recent studies show that PI3K may also play a role in the development of resistance to currently available therapies. In a broad range of cancers, various components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling axis are genetically modified, and the pathway can be activated through many different mechanisms. The frequency of genetic alterations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway, coupled with the impact in oncogenesis and disease progression, make this signaling axis an attractive target in anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the critical function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in leukemias and lymphomas has led to the clinical evaluation of novel rationally designed inhibitors in this setting. Three main categories of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors have been developed so far: agents that target phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (dual inhibitors), pan-phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors that target all class I isoforms, and isoform-specific inhibitors that selectively target the α, -β, -γ, or -δ isoforms. Emerging data highlight the promise of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in combination with other therapies for the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies. Further evaluation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in first-line or subsequent regimens may improve clinical outcomes. This article reviews the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in hematologic malignancies and the potential clinical utility of inhibitors that target this pathway. PMID:24425689

  5. Visualization of Receptor-mediated Endocytosis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, Jon; Konopka, James; Singer-Kruger, Birgit; Zerial, Marino; Botstein, David

    1999-01-01

    We studied the ligand-induced endocytosis of the yeast α-factor receptor Ste2p by immuno-electron microscopy. We observed and quantitated time-dependent loss of Ste2p from the plasma membrane of cells exposed to α-factor. This ligand-induced internalization of Ste2p was blocked in the well-characterized endocytosis-deficient mutant sac6Δ. We provide evidence that implicates furrow-like invaginations of the plasma membrane as the site of receptor internalization. These invaginations are distinct from the finger-like plasma membrane invaginations within actin cortical patches. Consistent with this, we show that Ste2p is not located within the cortical actin patch before and during receptor-mediated endocytosis. In wild-type cells exposed to α-factor we also observed and quantitated a time-dependent accumulation of Ste2p in intracellular, membrane-bound compartments. These compartments have a characteristic electron density but variable shape and size and are often located adjacent to the vacuole. In immuno-electron microscopy experiments these compartments labeled with antibodies directed against the rab5 homologue Ypt51p (Vps21p), the resident vacuolar protease carboxypeptidase Y, and the vacuolar H+-ATPase Vph1p. Using a new double-labeling technique we have colocalized antibodies against Ste2p and carboxypeptidase Y to this compartment, thereby identifying these compartments as prevacuolar late endosomes. PMID:10069819

  6. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  7. Hemoglobin uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-05-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  8. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  9. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice. PMID:25524412

  10. H-Ras regulation of TRAIL death receptor mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Bozza, William P.; Di, Xu; Zhang, Yaqin; Hallett, William; Zhang, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through the death receptors (DRs) 4 and/or 5 expressed on the cell surface. Multiple clinical trials are underway to evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human TRAIL and agonistic antibodies to DR4 or DR5. However, their therapeutic potential is limited by the high frequency of cancer resistance. Here we provide evidence demonstrating the role of H-Ras in TRAIL receptor mediated apoptosis. By analyzing the genome wide mRNA expression data of the NCI60 cancer cell lines, we found that H-Ras expression was consistently upregulated in TRAIL-resistant cell lines. By contrast, no correlation was found between TRAIL sensitivity and K-Ras expression levels or their mutational profiles. Notably, H-Ras upregulation associated with a surface deficiency of TRAIL death receptors. Selective inhibition of H-Ras activity in TRAIL-resistant cells restored the surface expression of both DR4 and DR5 without changing their total protein levels. The resulting cells became highly susceptible to both TRAIL and agonistic DR5 antibody, whereas K-Ras inhibition had little or no effect on TRAIL-induced apoptosis, indicating H-Ras plays a distinct role in the regulation of TRAIL death receptors. Further studies are warranted to determine the therapeutic potential of H-Ras-specific inhibitors in combination with TRAIL receptor agonists. PMID:25026275

  11. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  12. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice.

  13. [Glutamate receptor-mediated retinal neuronal injury in experimental glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Feng; Yang, Xiong-Li

    2016-08-25

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by optic nerve degeneration related to apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In the pathogenesis of RGC death following the onset of glaucoma, functional changes of glutamate receptors are commonly regarded as important risk factors. During the past several years, we have explored the mechanisms underlying RGC apoptosis and retinal Müller cell reactivation (gliosis) in a rat chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model. We demonstrated that elevated intraocular pressure in COH rats may induce changes of various signaling pathways, which are involved in RGC apoptosis by modulating glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR I) by excessive extracellular glutamate in COH rats could contribute to Müller cell gliosis by suppressing Kir4.1 channels. In this review, incorporating our results, we discuss glutamate receptor- mediated RGC apoptosis and Müller cell gliosis in experimental glaucoma. PMID:27546508

  14. TPIP: a novel phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S M; Downes, C P; Leslie, N R

    2001-01-01

    The PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) tumour suppressor is a phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)] 3-phosphatase that plays a critical role in regulating many cellular processes by antagonizing the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway. We have identified and characterized two human homologues of PTEN, which differ with respect to their subcellular localization and lipid phosphatase activities. The previously cloned, but uncharacterized, TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology) is localized to the plasma membrane, but lacks detectable phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase activity. TPIP (TPTE and PTEN homologous inositol lipid phosphatase) is a novel phosphatase that occurs in several differentially spliced forms of which two, TPIP alpha and TPIP beta, appear to be functionally distinct. TPIP alpha displays similar phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase activity compared with PTEN against PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), PtdIns(3,5)P(2), PtdIns(3,4)P(2) and PtdIns(3)P, has N-terminal transmembrane domains and appears to be localized on the endoplasmic reticulum. This is unusual as most signalling-lipid-metabolizing enzymes are not integral membrane proteins. TPIP beta, however, lacks detectable phosphatase activity and is cytosolic. TPIP has a wider tissue distribution than the testis-specific TPTE, with specific splice variants being expressed in testis, brain and stomach. TPTE and TPIP do not appear to be functional orthologues of the Golgi-localized and more distantly related murine PTEN2. We suggest that TPIP alpha plays a role in regulating phosphoinositide signalling on the endoplasmic reticulum, and might also represent a tumour suppressor and functional homologue of PTEN in some tissues. PMID:11716755

  15. Sympathetic denervation does not alter the density or properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat vas deferens

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, P.W.; Johnson, R.D.; Martin, T.J.; Minneman, K.P.

    1985-06-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in surgically denervated rat vas deferens were studied using radioligand binding assays of (/sup 125/I) BE 2254 ((/sup 125/I)BE) and contraction measurements. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding showed no change in the affinity or density of binding sites 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of rat vas deferens. The potency of norepinephrine in inhibiting specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding was also unchanged 7 days after denervation of vas deferens. The potency of phenylephrine in causing contractions in vitro did not change 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of vas deferens; however, there was a significant increase in the maximum contractile response to phenylephrine at all time points. After partial inactivation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in vitro with phenoxybenzamine, there was an equivalent reduction in the number of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites in the control and 14-day denervated vas deferens. The equilibrium dissociation constants calculated from contractile measurements for norepinephrine were the same in the control and denervated tissues. However, there was a 2.2-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to norepinephrine 14 days after denervation and a 3.6-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to methacholine 7 days after denervation.

  16. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine

    PubMed Central

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na+ current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na+-dependent Ca2+ overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca2+ calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  17. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na(+) current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca(2+) calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  18. β1-adrenergic antagonists improve sleep and behavioural disturbances in a circadian disorder, Smith-Magenis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Leersnyder, H.; de Blois, M.-C.; Vekemans, M.; Sidi, D.; Villain, E.; Kindermans, C.; Munnich, A.

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognisable contiguous gene syndrome ascribed to interstitial deletions of chromosome 17p11.2. Patients have a phase shift of their circadian rhythm of melatonin with a paradoxical diurnal secretion of the hormone. Serum melatonin levels and day-night behaviour were studied in nine SMS children (aged 4 to 17 years) given acebutolol, a selective β1-adrenergic antagonist (10 mg/kg early in the morning). Cardiac examination, serum melatonin, motor activity recordings, and sleep diaries were monitored before and after drug administration. The present study shows that a single morning dose of acebutolol suppressed the inappropriate secretion of melatonin in SMS. A significant improvement of inappropriate behaviour with increased concentration, delayed sleep onset, increased hours of sleep, and delayed waking were also noted. These results suggest that β1-adrenergic antagonists help to manage hyperactivity, enhance cognitive performance, and reduce sleep disorders in SMS.


Keywords: Smith-Magenis syndrome; circadian rhythms; melatonin PMID:11546826

  19. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine tumors, there is now increasing interest in pursuing a similar approach with Bn receptors. In the last few years then have been more than 200 studies in this area. In the present paper, the in vitro and in vivo results, as well as results of human studies from many of these studies are reviewed and the current state of Bn receptor-mediated imaging or cytotoxicity is discussed. Both Bn receptor-mediated imaging studies as well as Bn receptor-mediated tumoral cytotoxic studies using radioactive and non-radioactive Bn-based ligands are covered. PMID:21034419

  20. Targeting receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways with nanoparticles: rationale and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shi; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Okamoto, Curtis T.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of drugs and their carrier systems by using receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways was in its nascent stages 25 years ago. In the intervening years, an explosion of knowledge focused on design and synthesis of nanoparticulate delivery systems as well as elucidation of the cellular complexity of what was previously-termed receptor-mediated endocytosis has now created a situation when it has become possible to design and test the feasibility of delivery of highly specific nanoparticle drug carriers to specific cells and tissue. This review outlines the mechanisms governing the major modes of receptor-mediated endocytosis used in drug delivery and highlights recent approaches using these as targets for in vivo drug delivery of nanoparticles. The review also discusses some of the inherent complexity associated with the simple shift from a ligand-drug conjugate versus a ligand-nanoparticle conjugate, in terms of ligand valency and its relationship to the mode of receptor-mediated internalization. PMID:23026636

  1. Possible mechanism for preterm labor associated with bacterial infection. I. Stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by endotoxin in endometrial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.A.; Imai, A.; Tamaya, T. )

    1990-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests an association between intra-amniotic infection and premature initiation of parturition. We recently demonstrated that some factor(s) including endotoxin produced by the organism stimulates endogenous phospholipase A2 resulting in liberation of arachidonic acid and prostaglandin formation. The studies presented in this report were designated to evaluate the mechanism for endotoxin to stimulate phospholipase A2 using human endometrial fibroblasts. Exposure of the fibroblasts to endotoxin from Escherichia coli in the presence of ({sup 32}P) phosphate increased {sup 32}P-labeling of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidyl-inositol (PI) in a dose-dependent and a time-dependent manners. The PA labeling occurred without a measurable lag time. These findings demonstrate that the endotoxin stimulates phosphoinositide metabolism in human endometrial fibroblasts by a receptor-mediated mechanism. Membrane phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by endotoxin results in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} increment, liberation of arachidonic acid, which may be involved in the initiation of parturition.

  2. Effect of early diabetes on the expression of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in aorta and carotid arteries of Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Edith-Rodriguez, Jessica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Arciniega-Martinez, Ivonne Maciel; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Hong, Enrique; Huang, Fengyang; Villafaña, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes have been related to noradrenergic system impairment, especially to the response mediated by alpha-1 receptors. The aim of this work was to investigate possible changes in the expression of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in aorta and carotid arteries of Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats after 4 weeks of the onset of diabetes. Our results suggest that early diabetes modifies the expression of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in aorta and carotid arteries of both WKY and SHR strains in a different way.

  3. Different affinity states of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors defined by agonists and antagonists in bovine aorta plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, G.; Deth, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Evidence for a nonlinear relationship between alpha-1 adrenergic receptor occupancy and tissue responses, together with the finding of different affinity states for agonist binding, has raised the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We have conducted studies to examine: 1) binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, 2) competition of antagonists at these sites and 3) different affinity states of the receptor for agonists and modulation of these states by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p). A plasma membrane-enriched vesicular fraction (F2; 15%/33% sucrose interphase) was prepared from the muscular medial layer of bovine thoracic aorta. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding was characterized by a monophasic saturation isotherm (KD = 0.116 nM, Bmax = 112 fmol/mg of protein). Antagonist displacement studies yielded a relative potency order of prazosin greater than or equal to WB4104 much greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than or equal to idazoxan greater than rauwolscine. Competition curves for unlabeled prazosin, WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4 benzodioxane) and phentolamine were shallow and were best modeled to two binding sites with picomolar and nanomolar KD values. Gpp(NH)p was without effect on antagonist affinity. Agonist (epinephrine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine) competition with (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding was biphasic with pseudo-Hill slopes less than 1.0. Binding was best described by a two-site model in which the average contribution of high affinity sites was 23% of total binding. KD values for the high affinity site ranged from 2.9 to 18 nM, and 3.9 to 5.0 microM for the low affinity site.

  4. The opposite roles of glucocorticoid and α1-adrenergic receptors in stress triggered apoptosis of rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Andric, Silvana A; Kojic, Zvezdana; Bjelic, Maja M; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Janjic, Marija M; Stojkov, Natasa J; Stojilkovic, Stanko S; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2013-01-01

    The stress-induced initiation of proapoptotic signaling in Leydig cells is relatively well defined, but the duration of this signaling and the mechanism(s) involved in opposing the stress responses have not been addressed. In this study, immobilization stress (IMO) was applied for 2 h daily, and animals were euthanized immediately after the first (IMO1), second (IMO2), and 10th (IMO10) sessions. In IMO1 and IMO2 rats, serum corticosterone and adrenaline were elevated, whereas serum androgens and mRNA transcription of insulin-like factor-3 in Leydig cells were inhibited. Reduced oxygen consumption and the mitochondrial membrane potential coupled with a leak of cytochrome c from mitochondria and increased caspase-9 expression, caspase-3 activity, and number of apoptotic Leydig cells was also observed. Corticosterone and adrenaline were also elevated in IMO10 rats but were accompanied with a partial recovery of androgen secretion and normalization of insulin-like factor-3 transcription coupled with increased cytochrome c expression, abolition of proapoptotic signaling, and normalization of the apoptotic events. Blockade of intratesticular glucocorticoid receptors diminished proapoptotic effects without affecting antiapoptotic effects, whereas blockade of intratesticular α(1)-adrenergic receptors diminished the antiapoptotic effects without affecting proapoptotic effects. These results confirmed a critical role of glucocorticoids in mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and showed for the first time the relevance of stress-induced upregulation of α(1)-adrenergic receptor expression in cell apoptotic resistance to repetitive IMOs. The opposite role of two hormones in control of the apoptotic rate in Leydig cells also provides a rationale for a partial recovery of androgen production in chronically stressed animals.

  5. β1-Adrenergic and M2 Muscarinic Autoantibodies and Thyroid Hormone Facilitate Induction of Atrial Fibrillation in Male Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Murphy, Taylor; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Bing; Veitla, Vineet; Scherlag, Benjamin J; Kem, David C; Yu, Xichun

    2016-01-01

    Activating autoantibodies to the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors are present in a very high percentage of patients with Graves' disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible animal model and thereby to examine the impact of these endocrine-like autoantibodies alone and with thyroid hormone on induction of thyroid-associated atrial tachyarrhythmias. Five New Zealand white rabbits were coimmunized with peptides from the second extracellular loops of the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors to produce both sympathomimetic and parasympathomimetic antibodies. A catheter-based electrophysiological study was performed on anesthetized rabbits before and after immunization and subsequent treatment with thyroid hormone. Antibody expression facilitated the induction of sustained sinus, junctional and atrial tachycardias, but not AF. Addition of excessive thyroid hormone resulted in induced sustained AF in all animals. AF induction was blocked acutely by the neutralization of these antibodies with immunogenic peptides despite continued hyperthyroidism. The measured atrial effective refractory period as one parameter of AF propensity shortened significantly after immunization and was acutely reversed by peptide neutralization. No further decrease in the effective refractory period was observed after the addition of thyroid hormone, suggesting other cardiac effects of thyroid hormone may contribute to its role in AF induction. This study demonstrates autonomic autoantibodies and thyroid hormone potentiate the vulnerability of the heart to AF, which can be reversed by decoy peptide therapy. These data help fulfill Witebsky's postulates for an increased autoimmune/endocrine basis for Graves' hyperthyroidism and AF. PMID:26517045

  6. Analysis of the Phosphoinositide Composition of Subcellular Membrane Fractions.

    PubMed

    Sarkes, Deborah A; Rameh, Lucia E

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play critical roles in the transduction of extracellular signals through the plasma membrane and also in endomembrane events important for vesicle trafficking and organelle function (Di Paolo and De Camilli, Nature 443(7112):651-657, 2006). The response triggered by these lipids is heavily dependent on the microenvironment in which they are found. HPLC analysis of labeled phosphoinositides allows quantification of the levels of each phosphoinositide species relative to their precursor, phosphatidylinositol. When combined with subcellular fractionation techniques, this strategy allows measurement of the relative phosphoinositide composition of each membrane fraction or organelle and determination of the microenvironment in which each species is enriched. Here, we describe the steps to separate and quantify total or localized phosphoinositides from cultured cells. PMID:26552687

  7. Phosphoinositide regulation of TRPV1 revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The heat- and capsaicin-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 ion channel (TRPV1) is regulated by plasma membrane phosphoinositides. The effects of these lipids on this channel have been controversial. Recent articles re-ignited the debate and also offered resolution to place some of the data in a coherent picture. This review summarizes the literature on this topic and provides a detailed and critical discussion on the experimental evidence for the various effects of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphayte [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2] on TRPV1. We conclude that PI(4,5)P2 and potentially its precursor PI(4)P are positive cofactors for TRPV1, acting via direct interaction with the channel, and their depletion by Ca2+-induced activation of phospholipase Cδ isoforms (PLCδ) limits channel activity during capsaicin-induced desensitization. Other negatively charged lipids at higher concentrations can also support channel activity, which may explain some controversies in the literature. PI(4,5)P2 also partially inhibits channel activity in some experimental settings, and relief from this inhibition upon PLCβ activation may contribute to sensitization. The negative effect of PI(4,5)P2 is more controversial and its mechanism is less well understood. Other TRP channels from the TRPV and TRPC families may also undergo similar dual regulation by phosphoinositides, thus the complexity of TRPV1 regulation is not unique to this channel. PMID:25754030

  8. The roles of phosphoinositides in mammalian autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process for lysosomal degradation, which is involved in various physiological processes within cells. Its dysfunction is associated with many human diseases, such as cancer, liver diseases, heart diseases, and infectious diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Autophagy involves the formation of a double-membrane bound autophagosome and the degradation of cytosolic components via its fusion and maturation with the lysosome. One of the most important steps in the process of autophagy is membrane biogenesis during autophagosome formation/maturation from different membrane sources within cells. However, there is limited knowledge regarding: (1) how the core autophagy machinery is recruited to the initial site to initiate the formation of the isolation membrane and (2) how the autophagosome matures into the functional autolysosome. Lipid supply for nucleation/elongation of the autophagosome has been proposed as one possible mechanism. Accumulating evidence suggests the important role of phosphoinositides as phospholipids, which represent key membrane-localized signals in the regulation of fundamental cellular processes, in autophagosome formation and maturation. This review focuses on how phosphoinositides influence autophagy induction or autophagosome biogenesis/maturation, because the way they are altered by autophagy might contribute to the pathogenesis of human diseases. PMID:27350551

  9. Nuclear phosphoinositides and their roles in cell biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Alberto M; Ognibene, Andrea; Buontempo, Francesca; Fini, Milena; Bressanin, Daniela; Goto, Kaoru; McCubrey, James A; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla

    2011-10-01

    Since the late 1980s, a growing body of evidence has documented that phosphoinositides and their metabolizing enzymes, which regulate a large variety of cellular functions both in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane, are present also within the nucleus, where they are involved in processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Remarkably, nuclear phosphoinositide metabolism operates independently from that present elsewhere in the cell. Although nuclear phosphoinositides generate second messengers such as diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate, it is becoming increasingly clear that they may act by themselves to influence chromatin structure, gene expression, DNA repair, and mRNA export. The understanding of the biological roles played by phosphoinositides is supported by the recent acquisitions demonstrating the presence in the nuclear compartment of several proteins harboring phosphoinositide-binding domains. Some of these proteins have functional roles in RNA splicing/processing and chromatin assembly. Moreover, recent evidence shows that nuclear phospholipase Cβ1 (a key phosphoinositide metabolizing enzyme) could somehow be involved in the myelodysplastic syndrome, i.e. a hematopoietic disorder that frequently evolves into an acute leukemia. This review aims to highlight the most significant and updated findings about phosphoinositide metabolism in the nucleus under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Phosphoinositide binding inhibits alpha-actinin bundling activity.

    PubMed

    Fraley, Tamara S; Tran, Thuan C; Corgan, Anne Marie; Nash, Coral A; Hao, Jie; Critchley, David R; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2003-06-27

    alpha-Actinin is an abundant actin-bundling and adhesion protein that directly links actin filaments to integrin receptors. Previously, in platelet-derived growth factor-treated fibroblasts, we demonstrated that phosphoinositides bind to alpha-actinin, regulating its localization (Greenwood, J. A., Theibert, A. B., Prestwich, G. D., and Murphy-Ullrich, J. E. (2000) J. Cell Biol. 150, 627- 642). In this study, phosphoinositide binding and regulation of alpha-actinin function is further characterized. Phosphoinositide binding specificity, determined using a protein-lipid overlay procedure, suggests that alpha-actinin interacts with phosphates on the 4th and 5th position of the inositol head group. Binding assays and mutational analyses demonstrate that phosphoinositides bind to the calponin homology domain 2 of alpha-actinin. Phosphoinositide binding inhibited the bundling activity of alpha-actinin by blocking the interaction of the actin-binding domain with actin filaments. Consistent with these results, excessive bundling of actin filaments was observed in fibroblasts expressing an alpha-actinin mutant with decreased phosphoinositide affinity. We conclude that the interaction of alpha-actinin with phosphoinositides regulates actin stress fibers in the cell by controlling the extent to which microfilaments are bundled.

  11. Plant phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    Rupwate, Sunny D.; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) belongs to an important class of enzymes involved in signaling related to lipids. They hydrolyze a membrane-associated phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, to produce inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. The role of PI-PLC and the mechanism behind its functioning is well studied in animal system; however, mechanism of plant PI-PLC functioning remains largely obscure. Here, we attempted to summarize the understanding regarding plant PI-PLC mechanism of regulation, localization, and domain association. Using sedimentation based phospholipid binding assay and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, it was demonstrated that C2 domain of plant PI-PLC alone is capable of targeting membranes. Moreover, change in surface hydrophobicity upon calcium stimulus is the key element in targeting plant PI-PLC from soluble fractions to membranes. This property of altering surface hydrophobicity plays a pivot role in regulation of PI-PLC activity. PMID:22902702

  12. Selective α1-adrenergic blockade disturbs the regional distribution of cerebral blood flow during static handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Igor A; Mattos, João D; Campos, Monique O; Machado, Alessandro C; Rocha, Marcos P; Rocha, Natalia G; Vianna, Lauro C; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2016-06-01

    Handgrip-induced increases in blood flow through the contralateral artery that supplies the cortical representation of the arm have been hypothesized as a consequence of neurovascular coupling and a resultant metabolic attenuation of sympathetic cerebral vasoconstriction. In contrast, sympathetic restraint, in theory, inhibits changes in perfusion of the cerebral ipsilateral blood vessels. To confirm whether sympathetic nerve activity modulates cerebral blood flow distribution during static handgrip (SHG) exercise, beat-to-beat contra- and ipsilateral internal carotid artery blood flow (ICA; Doppler) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer) were simultaneously assessed in nine healthy men (27 ± 5 yr), both at rest and during a 2-min SHG bout (30% maximal voluntary contraction), under two experimental conditions: 1) control and 2) α1-adrenergic receptor blockade. End-tidal carbon dioxide (rebreathing system) was clamped throughout the study. SHG induced increases in MAP (+31.4 ± 10.7 mmHg, P < 0.05) and contralateral ICA blood flow (+80.9 ± 62.5 ml/min, P < 0.05), while no changes were observed in the ipsilateral vessel (-9.8 ± 39.3 ml/min, P > 0.05). The reduction in ipsilateral ICA vascular conductance (VC) was greater compared with contralateral ICA (contralateral: -0.8 ± 0.8 vs. ipsilateral: -2.6 ± 1.3 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P < 0.05). Prazosin was effective to induce α1-blockade since phenylephrine-induced increases in MAP were greatly reduced (P < 0.05). Under α1-adrenergic receptor blockade, SHG evoked smaller MAP responses (+19.4 ± 9.2, P < 0.05) but similar increases in ICAs blood flow (contralateral: +58.4 ± 21.5 vs. ipsilateral: +54.3 ± 46.2 ml/min, P > 0.05) and decreases in VC (contralateral: -0.4 ± 0.7 vs. ipsilateral: -0.4 ± 1.0 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P > 0.05). These findings indicate a role of sympathetic nerve activity in the regulation of cerebral blood flow distribution during SHG.

  13. Autoradiographic imaging of phosphoinositide turnover in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.M.; Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1990-08-17

    With ({sup 3}H)cytidine as a precursor, phosphoinositide turnover can be localized in brain slices by selective autoradiography of the product ({sup 3}H)cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol, which is membrane-bound. In the cerebellum, glutamatergic stimulation elicits an increase of phosphoinositide turnover only in Purkinje cells and the molecular layer. In the hippocampus, both glutamatergic and muscarinic cholinergic stimulation increase phosphoinositide turnover, but with distinct localizations. Cholinergic stimulation affects CA1, CA3, CA4, and subiculum, whereas glutamatergic effects are restricted to the subiculum and CA3. Imaging phosphoinositide turnover in brain slices, which are amenable to electrophysiologic studies, will permit a dynamic localized analysis of regulation of this second messenger in response to synaptic stimulation of specific neuronal pathways.

  14. α-1 Adrenergic receptors are localized on presynaptic elements in the nucleus accumbens and regulate mesolimbic dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, Darlene A; Schroeder, Jason P; Smith, Yoland; Cortright, James J; Bubula, Nancy; Vezina, Paul; Weinshenker, David

    2012-08-01

    Brainstem noradrenergic neurons innervate the mesocorticolimbic reward pathway both directly and indirectly, with norepinephrine facilitating dopamine (DA) neurotransmission via α1-adrenergic receptors (α1ARs). Although α1AR signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) promotes mesolimbic transmission and drug-induced behaviors, the potential contribution of α1ARs in other parts of the pathway, such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), has not been investigated before. We found that local blockade of α1ARs in the medial NAc shell, but not the VTA, attenuates cocaine- and morphine-induced locomotion. To determine the neuronal substrates that could mediate these effects, we analyzed the cellular, subcellular, and subsynaptic localization of α1ARs and characterized the chemical phenotypes of α1AR-containing elements within the mesocorticolimbic system using single and double immunocytochemical methods at the electron microscopic (EM) level. We found that α1ARs are found mainly extra-synaptically in axons and axon terminals in the NAc and are enriched in glutamatergic and dopaminergic elements. α1ARs are also abundant in glutamatergic terminals in the PFC, and in GABA-positive terminals in the VTA. In line with these observations, microdialysis experiments revealed that local blockade of α1ARs attenuated the increase in extracellular DA in the medial NAc shell following administration of cocaine. These data indicate that local α1ARs control DA transmission in the medial NAc shell and behavioral responses to drugs of abuse.

  15. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure.

  16. Doxazosin inhibits proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth-muscle cells independent of alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z W; Shi, X Y; Hoffman, B B

    1998-06-01

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth-muscle cells (VSMCs), stimulated by a variety of growth factors, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. We found unexpectedly that doxazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic-receptor antagonist, inhibits serum-stimulated proliferation of cultured human VSMCs. Subsequent experiments systematically investigated inhibitory effects of doxazosin on mitogenesis stimulated in VSMCs by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor, and G protein-coupled receptor agonists thrombin and angiotensin II. Doxazosin attenuated the stimulation of DNA synthesis for each of these ligands with median inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) from 0.3 to 1 microM. PDGF-AB (1 nM) increased cell number; doxazosin inhibited this response by 70-80%. Prazosin, a related alpha1-receptor antagonist, had similar but less potent effects on inhibiting mitogenesis in these cells. Doxazosin and prazosin inhibited PDGF-AB-stimulated and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I)-stimulated migration of VSMCs by approximately 40-50%. These effects of doxazosin were likely unrelated to alpha1-receptor blockade because pretreatment of cells with phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible alpha1 antagonist, did not change the capacity of doxazosin to inhibit of PDGF-stimulated mitogenesis. Also, doxazosin inhibited PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis in NIH 3T3 cells, which do not express alpha1 receptors. These results suggest that doxazosin is a potent inhibitor of VSMC proliferation and migration through a mechanism unrelated to alpha1-receptor antagonism.

  17. beta-Arrestin mediates beta1-adrenergic receptor-epidermal growth factor receptor interaction and downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Douglas G; Kim, Il-Man; Patel, Priyesh A; Violin, Jonathan D; Rockman, Howard A

    2009-07-24

    beta1-Adrenergic receptor (beta1AR) stimulation confers cardioprotection via beta-arrestin-de pend ent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), however, the precise mechanism for this salutary process is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the beta1AR and EGFR form a complex that differentially directs intracellular signaling pathways. beta1AR stimulation and EGF ligand can each induce equivalent EGFR phosphorylation, internalization, and downstream activation of ERK1/2, but only EGF ligand causes translocation of activated ERK to the nucleus, whereas beta1AR-stimulated/EGFR-transactivated ERK is restricted to the cytoplasm. beta1AR and EGFR are shown to interact as a receptor complex both in cell culture and endogenously in human heart, an interaction that is selective and undergoes dynamic regulation by ligand stimulation. Although catecholamine stimulation mediates the retention of beta1AR-EGFR interaction throughout receptor internalization, direct EGF ligand stimulation initiates the internalization of EGFR alone. Continued interaction of beta1AR with EGFR following activation is dependent upon C-terminal tail GRK phosphorylation sites of the beta1AR and recruitment of beta-arrestin. These data reveal a new signaling paradigm in which beta-arrestin is required for the maintenance of a beta1AR-EGFR interaction that can direct cytosolic targeting of ERK in response to catecholamine stimulation.

  18. Photoreceptor phagocytosis is mediated by phosphoinositide signaling.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Kevany, Brian M; Genoud, Christel; Bai, Xiaodong; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-11-01

    Circadian oscillations in peripheral tissues, such as the retinal compartment of the eye, are critical to anticipating changing metabolic demands. Circadian shedding of retinal photoreceptor cell discs with subsequent phagocytosis by the neighboring retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is essential for removal of toxic metabolites and lifelong survival of these postmitotic neurons. Defects in photoreceptor phagocytosis can lead to severe retinal pathology, but the biochemical mechanisms remain poorly defined. By first documenting a 2.8-fold burst of photoreceptor phagocytosis events in the mouse eye in the morning compared with the afternoon by serial block face imaging, we established time points to assess transcriptional readouts by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 365 oscillating protein-coding transcripts that implicated the phosphoinositide lipid signaling network mediating the discrete steps of photoreceptor phagocytosis. Moreover, examination of overlapping cistromic sites by core clock transcription factors and promoter elements of these effector genes provided a functional basis for the circadian cycling of these transcripts. RNA-Seq also revealed oscillating expression of 16 long intergenic noncoding RNAs and key histone modifying enzymes critical for circadian gene expression. Our phenotypic and genotypic characterization reveals a complex global landscape of overlapping and temporally controlled networks driving the essential circadian process in the eye.

  19. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Waters, Wendy W.; Ziegler, Michael G.; deBlock, Heidi F.; Mills, Paul J.; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  20. Agonist-promoted desensitization and phosphorylation of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors coupled to stimulation of phosphatidylinositol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Cotecchia, S.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    In the DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 hamster vas deferens smooth muscle cell line the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR) agonist norepinephrine (NE) promotes rapid attenuation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR-mediated phosphatidylinositol (PI) metabolism which is paralleled by rapid phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR. Cells were labeled by incubation with /sup 32/P/sub i/. Coincubation with NE (100 ..mu..M) significantly increases the rate of /sup 32/P-labeling of both PI and phosphatidic acid. Pretreatment of cells with 100 ..mu..M NE (in the presence of 1 ..mu..M propranolol to prevent ..beta..-AR interactions) results in a drastic attenuation of the NE response on PI metabolism. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR from labeled cells can be solubilized and purified by affinity chromatography on Affigel-A55414 and wheat germ agglutinin agarose chromatography. SDS-PAGE of purified ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR shows a NE-promoted increase in phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 80K ligand binding peptide. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation increases from approx. 1 mol phosphate/mol ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR in the basal condition to approx. 2.5 after NE treatment. Both desensitization and phosphorylation are rapid being maximal within 10-20 min of agonist exposure. These results together with previous findings that phorbol esters promote rapid ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR uncoupling and phosphorylation suggest that receptor phosphorylation is an important mechanism of regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR receptor responsiveness.

  1. Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 and Atypical Chemokine Receptor 3 Regulate Vascular α1-Adrenergic Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Harold H; Wong, Yee M; Tripathi, Abhishek; Nevins, Amanda M; Gamelli, Richard L; Volkman, Brian F; Byron, Kenneth L; Majetschak, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR) 4 and atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) 3 ligands have been reported to modulate cardiovascular function in various disease models. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine how pharmacological modulation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 regulate cardiovascular function. In vivo administration of TC14012, a CXCR4 antagonist and ACKR3 agonist, caused cardiovascular collapse in normal animals. During the cardiovascular stress response to hemorrhagic shock, ubiquitin, a CXCR4 agonist, stabilized blood pressure, whereas coactivation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 with CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), or blockade of CXCR4 with AMD3100 showed opposite effects. While CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect myocardial function, they selectively altered vascular reactivity upon α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation in pressure myography experiments. CXCR4 activation with ubiquitin enhanced α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction, whereas ACKR3 activation with various natural and synthetic ligands antagonized α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction. The opposing effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 activation by CXCL12 could be dissected pharmacologically. CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect vasoconstriction upon activation of voltage-operated Ca2+ channels or endothelin receptors. Effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 agonists on vascular α1-AR responsiveness were independent of the endothelium. These findings suggest that CXCR4 and ACKR3 modulate α1-AR reactivity in vascular smooth muscle and regulate hemodynamics in normal and pathological conditions. Our observations point toward CXCR4 and ACKR3 as new pharmacological targets to control vasoreactivity and blood pressure. PMID:25032954

  2. Cardioprotective Stimuli Mediate Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase and Phosphoinositide Dependent Kinase 1 Nuclear Accumulation in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marta; Avitabile, Daniele; Fischer, Kimberlee; Emmanuel, Gregory; Gude, Natalie; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Mishra, Shikha; Schaefer, Eric M.; Brown, Joan Heller; Sussman, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) / phosphoinositide dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) signaling pathway exerts cardioprotective effects in the myocardium through activation of key proteins including Akt. Activated Akt accumulates in nuclei of cardiomyocytes suggesting that biologically relevant targets are located in that subcellular compartment. Nuclear Akt activity could be potentiated in both intensity and duration by the presence of a nuclear-associated PI3K / PDK1 signaling cascade as has been described in other non-myocyte cell types. PI3K / PDK1 distribution was determined in vitro and in vivo by immunostaining and nuclear extraction of cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes or transgenic mouse hearts. Results show that PI3K and PDK1 are present at a basal level in cardiomyocytes nuclei and that cardioprotective stimulation with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increases their nuclear localization. In comparison, overexpression of nuclear-targeted Akt does not mediate increased translocation of either PI3K or PDK1 indicating that accumulation of Akt does not drive PI3K or PDK1 into the nuclear compartment. Furthermore, PI3K and phospho-Akt473 show parallel temporal accumulation in the nucleus following (MI) infarction challenge. These findings demonstrate the presence of a dynamically regulated nuclear-associated signaling cascade involving PI3K and PDK that presumably influences nuclear Akt activation. PMID:19269295

  3. Phosphoinositides Regulate Ciliary Protein Trafficking to Modulate Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Elle C.; Garcia, Galo; Abedin, Monika; Schurmans, Stéphane; Inoue, Takanari; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary cilia interpret vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signals. Why cilia are essential for signaling is unclear. One possibility is that some forms of signaling require a distinct membrane lipid composition, found at cilia. We found that the ciliary membrane contains a particular phosphoinositide, PI(4)P, whereas a different phosphoinositide, PI(4,5)P2, is restricted to the membrane of the ciliary base. This distribution is created by Inpp5e, a ciliary phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase. Without Inpp5e, ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels are elevated and Hh signaling is disrupted. Inpp5e limits the ciliary levels of inhibitors of Hh signaling, including Gpr161 and the PI(4,5)P2-binding protein Tulp3. Increasing ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels or conferring the ability to bind PI(4)P on Tulp3 increases the ciliary localization of Tulp3. Lowering Tulp3 in cells lacking Inpp5e reduces ciliary Gpr161 levels and restores Hh signaling. Therefore, Inpp5e regulates ciliary membrane phosphoinositide composition, and Tulp3 reads out ciliary phosphoinositides to control ciliary protein localization, enabling Hh signaling. PMID:26305592

  4. A Trypanosoma cruzi Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (TcVps34) Is Involved in Osmoregulation and Receptor-mediated Endocytosis*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schoijet, Alejandra C.; Miranda, Kildare; Girard-Dias, Wendell; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Torres, Héctor N.; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has the ability to respond to a variety of environmental changes during its life cycle both in the insect vector and in the vertebrate host. Because regulation of transcription initiation seems to be nonfunctional in this parasite, it is important to investigate other regulatory mechanisms of adaptation. Regulatory mechanisms at the level of signal transduction pathways involving phosphoinositides are good candidates for this purpose. Here we report the identification of the first phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in T. cruzi, with similarity with its yeast counterpart, Vps34p. TcVps34 specifically phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol to produce phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, thus confirming that it belongs to class III PI3K family. Overexpression of TcVps34 resulted in morphological and functional alterations related to vesicular trafficking. Although inhibition of TcVps34 with specific PI3K inhibitors, such as wortmannin and LY294,000, resulted in reduced regulatory volume decrease after hyposmotic stress, cells overexpressing this enzyme were resistant to these inhibitors. Furthermore, these cells were able to recover their original volume faster than wild type cells when they were submitted to severe hyposmotic stress. In addition, in TcVps34-overexpressing cells, the activities of vacuolar-H+-ATPase and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase were altered, suggesting defects in the acidification of intracellular compartments. Furthermore, receptor-mediated endocytosis was partially blocked although fluid phase endocytosis was not affected, confirming a function for TcVps34 in membrane trafficking. Taken together, these results strongly support that TcVps34 plays a prominent role in vital processes for T. cruzi survival such as osmoregulation, acidification, and vesicular trafficking. PMID:18801733

  5. Menthol enhances phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in midbrain periaqueductal grey neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Benjamin K; Karim, Shafinaz; Goodchild, Ann K; Vaughan, Christopher W; Drew, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Menthol, a naturally occurring compound in the essential oil of mint leaves, is used for its medicinal, sensory and fragrant properties. Menthol acts via transient receptor potential (TRPM8 and TRPA1) channels and as a positive allosteric modulator of recombinant GABAA receptors. Here, we examined the actions of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated currents in intact midbrain slices. Experimental Approach Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons in midbrain slices from rats to determine the effects of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated phasic IPSCs and tonic currents. Key Results Menthol (150–750 μM) produced a concentration-dependent prolongation of spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, but not non-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs throughout the PAG. Menthol actions were unaffected by TRPM8 and TRPA1 antagonists, tetrodotoxin and the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil. Menthol also enhanced a tonic current, which was sensitive to the GABAA receptor antagonists, picrotoxin (100 μM), bicuculline (30 μM) and Zn2+ (100 μM), but unaffected by gabazine (10 μM) and a GABAC receptor antagonist, 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid hydrate (TPMPA; 50 μM). In addition, menthol potentiated currents induced by the extrasynaptic GABAA receptor agonist THIP/gaboxadol (10 μM). Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that menthol positively modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic populations of GABAA receptors in native PAG neurons. The development of agents that potentiate GABAA-mediated tonic currents and phasic IPSCs in a manner similar to menthol could provide a basis for novel GABAA-related pharmacotherapies. PMID:24460753

  6. p87 and p101 subunits are distinct regulators determining class IB phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) specificity.

    PubMed

    Shymanets, Aliaksei; Prajwal; Bucher, Kirsten; Beer-Hammer, Sandra; Harteneck, Christian; Nürnberg, Bernd

    2013-10-25

    Class IB phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) comprises a single catalytic p110γ subunit, which binds to two non-catalytic subunits, p87 or p101, and controls a plethora of fundamental cellular responses. The non-catalytic subunits are assumed to be redundant adaptors for Gβγ enabling G-protein-coupled receptor-mediated regulation of PI3Kγ. Growing experimental data provide contradictory evidence. To elucidate the roles of the non-catalytic subunits in determining the specificity of PI3Kγ, we tested the impact of p87 and p101 in heterodimeric p87-p110γ and p101-p110γ complexes on the modulation of PI3Kγ activity in vitro and in living cells. RT-PCR, biochemical, and imaging data provide four lines of evidence: (i) specific expression patterns of p87 and p101, (ii) up-regulation of p101, providing the basis to consider p87 as a protein forming a constitutively and p101 as a protein forming an inducibly expressed PI3Kγ, (iii) differences in basal and stimulated enzymatic activities, and (iv) differences in complex stability, all indicating apparent diversity within class IB PI3Kγ. In conclusion, expression and activities of PI3Kγ are modified differently by p87 and p101 in vitro and in living cells, arguing for specific regulatory roles of the non-catalytic subunits in the differentiation of PI3Kγ signaling pathways. PMID:24014027

  7. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  8. Enhancement of steroid receptor-mediated transcription for the development of highly responsive bioassays.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Philippe; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; Martial, Joseph A; Muller, Marc

    2005-06-01

    We have previously generated several transformed human mammary cell lines for the detection of steroid receptor-mediated activities and used these cell lines to detect and characterize steroid hormone (ant)agonistic compounds. In this report, we describe the specific optimization procedures used to enhance receptor-mediated transcription through the human glucocorticoid, progesterone and androgen receptors, respectively. Sodium arsenite-induced chemical stress leads to a substantial and specific increase in the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription, resulting in maximal stimulations of more than 2000-fold by the agonist dexamethasone. Similarly, a combined treatment with forskolin (an activator of adenylate cyclase) and trichostatin A (an inhibitor of histone deacetylases) leads to a synergistic enhancement of progesterone or androgen stimulation, resulting in a maximal induction of more than 200-fold or about 100-fold, respectively. The enhanced responses to specific steroids are mediated by the corresponding nuclear receptor. We show that by using these enhanced transcriptional stimulation protocols, it is possible to detect lower amounts of steroid hormones without substantially affecting the relative biological activities of various agonists. Finally, the application of these enhanced reporter cell assays to real biological samples from meat-producing animals is evaluated, and some validation parameters are presented.

  9. Expression of α(1)-adrenergic receptors in rat prefrontal cortex: cellular co-localization with 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Santana, Noemí; Mengod, Guadalupe; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in behavioural control and cognitive processes that are altered in schizophrenia. The brainstem monoaminergic systems control PFC function, yet the cells/networks involved are not fully known. Serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) increase PFC neuronal activity through the activation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (α(1)ARs) and 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT(2A)Rs), respectively. Neurochemical and behavioural interactions between these receptors have been reported. Further, classical and atypical antipsychotic drugs share nm in vitro affinity for α(1)ARs while having preferential affinity for D(2) and 5-HT(2A)Rs, respectively. Using double in situ hybridization we examined the cellular expression of α(1)ARs in pyramidal (vGluT1-positive) and GABAergic (GAD(65/67)-positive) neurons in rat PFC and their co-localization with 5-HT(2A)Rs. α(1)ARs are expressed by a high proportion of pyramidal (59-85%) and GABAergic (52-79%) neurons. The expression in pyramidal neurons exhibited a dorsoventral gradient, with a lower percentage of α(1)AR-positive neurons in infralimbic cortex compared to anterior cingulate and prelimbic cortex. The expression of α(1A), α(1B) and α(1D) adrenergic receptors was segregated in different layers and subdivisions. In all them there is a high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs (∼80%). These observations indicate that NE controls the activity of most PFC pyramidal neurons via α(1)ARs, either directly or indirectly, via GABAergic interneurons. Antipsychotic drugs can thus modulate the activity of PFC via α(1)AR blockade. The high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs indicates a convergence of excitatory serotonergic and noradrenergic inputs onto the same neuronal populations. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics may exert a more powerful control of PFC function through the simultaneous blockade of α(1)ARs and 5-HT(2A)Rs.

  10. Beta-1 adrenergic agonist treatment mitigates negative changes in cancellous bone microarchitecture and inhibits osteocyte apoptosis during disuse.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua M; Swift, Sibyl N; Allen, Matthew R; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2014-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays an important role in mediating bone remodeling. However, the exact role that beta-1 adrenergic receptors (beta1AR) have in this process has not been elucidated. We have previously demonstrated the ability of dobutamine (DOB), primarily a beta1AR agonist, to inhibit reductions in cancellous bone formation and mitigate disuse-induced loss of bone mass. The purpose of this study was to characterize the independent and combined effects of DOB and hindlimb unloading (HU) on cancellous bone microarchitecture, tissue-level bone cell activity, and osteocyte apoptosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 6-mos, were assigned to either normal cage activity (CC) or HU (n = 18/group) for 28 days. Animals were administered either daily DOB (4 mg/kg BW/d) or an equal volume of saline (VEH) (n = 9/gp). Unloading resulted in significantly lower distal femur cancellous BV/TV (-33%), Tb.Th (-11%), and Tb.N (-25%) compared to ambulatory controls (CC-VEH). DOB treatment during HU attenuated these changes in cancellous bone microarchitecture, resulting in greater BV/TV (+29%), Tb.Th (+7%), and Tb.N (+21%) vs. HU-VEH. Distal femur cancellous vBMD (+11%) and total BMC (+8%) were significantly greater in DOB- vs. VEH-treated unloaded rats. Administration of DOB during HU resulted in significantly greater osteoid surface (+158%) and osteoblast surface (+110%) vs. HU-VEH group. Furthermore, Oc.S/BS was significantly greater in HU-DOB (+55%) vs. CC-DOB group. DOB treatment during unloading fully restored bone formation, resulting in significantly greater bone formation rate (+200%) than in HU-VEH rats. HU resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cancellous osteocytes (+85%), reduced osteocyte number (-16%), lower percentage of occupied osteocytic lacunae (-30%) as compared to CC-VEH, these parameters were all normalized with DOB treatment. Altogether, these data indicate that beta1AR agonist treatment during disuse mitigates negative

  11. Ion channel regulation by phosphoinositides analyzed with VSPs-PI(4,5)P2 affinity, phosphoinositide selectivity, and PI(4,5)P2 pool accessibility.

    PubMed

    Rjasanow, Alexandra; Leitner, Michael G; Thallmair, Veronika; Halaszovich, Christian R; Oliver, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    The activity of many proteins depends on the phosphoinositide (PI) content of the membrane. E.g., dynamic changes of the concentration of PI(4,5)P2 are cellular signals that regulate ion channels. The susceptibility of a channel to such dynamics depends on its affinity for PI(4,5)P2. Yet, measuring affinities for endogenous PIs has not been possible directly, but has relied largely on the response to soluble analogs, which may not quantitatively reflect binding to native lipids. Voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs) turn over PI(4,5)P2 to PI(4)P when activated by depolarization. In combination with voltage-clamp electrophysiology VSPs are useful tools for rapid and reversible depletion of PI(4,5)P2. Because cellular PI(4,5)P2 is resynthesized rapidly, steady state PI(4,5)P2 changes with the degree of VSP activation and thus depends on membrane potential. Here we show that titration of endogenous PI(4,5)P2 with Ci-VSP allows for the quantification of relative PI(4,5)P2 affinities of ion channels. The sensitivity of inward rectifier and voltage-gated K(+) channels to Ci-VSP allowed for comparison of PI(4,5)P2 affinities within and across channel subfamilies and detected changes of affinity in mutant channels. The results also reveal that VSPs are useful only for PI effectors with high binding specificity among PI isoforms, because PI(4,5)P2 depletion occurs at constant overall PI level. Thus, Kir6.2, a channel activated by PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P was insensitive to VSP. Surprisingly, despite comparable PI(4,5)P2 affinity as determined by Ci-VSP, the Kv7 and Kir channel families strongly differed in their sensitivity to receptor-mediated depletion of PI(4,5)P2. While Kv7 members were highly sensitive to activation of PLC by Gq-coupled receptors, Kir channels were insensitive even when PI(4,5)P2 affinity was lowered by mutation. We hypothesize that different channels may be associated with distinct pools of PI(4,5)P2 that differ in their accessibility to PLC and VSPs.

  12. Ion channel regulation by phosphoinositides analyzed with VSPs—PI(4,5)P2 affinity, phosphoinositide selectivity, and PI(4,5)P2 pool accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Rjasanow, Alexandra; Leitner, Michael G.; Thallmair, Veronika; Halaszovich, Christian R.; Oliver, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    The activity of many proteins depends on the phosphoinositide (PI) content of the membrane. E.g., dynamic changes of the concentration of PI(4,5)P2 are cellular signals that regulate ion channels. The susceptibility of a channel to such dynamics depends on its affinity for PI(4,5)P2. Yet, measuring affinities for endogenous PIs has not been possible directly, but has relied largely on the response to soluble analogs, which may not quantitatively reflect binding to native lipids. Voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs) turn over PI(4,5)P2 to PI(4)P when activated by depolarization. In combination with voltage-clamp electrophysiology VSPs are useful tools for rapid and reversible depletion of PI(4,5)P2. Because cellular PI(4,5)P2 is resynthesized rapidly, steady state PI(4,5)P2 changes with the degree of VSP activation and thus depends on membrane potential. Here we show that titration of endogenous PI(4,5)P2 with Ci-VSP allows for the quantification of relative PI(4,5)P2 affinities of ion channels. The sensitivity of inward rectifier and voltage-gated K+ channels to Ci-VSP allowed for comparison of PI(4,5)P2 affinities within and across channel subfamilies and detected changes of affinity in mutant channels. The results also reveal that VSPs are useful only for PI effectors with high binding specificity among PI isoforms, because PI(4,5)P2 depletion occurs at constant overall PI level. Thus, Kir6.2, a channel activated by PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P was insensitive to VSP. Surprisingly, despite comparable PI(4,5)P2 affinity as determined by Ci-VSP, the Kv7 and Kir channel families strongly differed in their sensitivity to receptor-mediated depletion of PI(4,5)P2. While Kv7 members were highly sensitive to activation of PLC by Gq-coupled receptors, Kir channels were insensitive even when PI(4,5)P2 affinity was lowered by mutation. We hypothesize that different channels may be associated with distinct pools of PI(4,5)P2 that differ in their accessibility to PLC and VSPs. PMID

  13. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  14. Arabidopsis AtPLC2 Is a Primary Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C in Phosphoinositide Metabolism and the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Kanehara, Kazue; Yu, Chao-Yuan; Cho, Yueh; Cheong, Wei-Fun; Torta, Federico; Shui, Guanghou; Wenk, Markus R; Nakamura, Yuki

    2015-09-01

    Phosphoinositides represent important lipid signals in the plant development and stress response. However, multiple isoforms of the phosphoinositide biosynthetic genes hamper our understanding of the pivotal enzymes in each step of the pathway as well as their roles in plant growth and development. Here, we report that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C2 (AtPLC2) is the primary phospholipase in phosphoinositide metabolism and is involved in seedling growth and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lipidomic profiling of multiple plc mutants showed that the plc2-1 mutant increased levels of its substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, suggesting that the major phosphoinositide metabolic pathway is impaired. AtPLC2 displayed a distinct tissue expression pattern and localized at the plasma membrane in different cell types, where phosphoinositide signaling occurs. The seedlings of plc2-1 mutant showed growth defect that was complemented by heterologous expression of AtPLC2, suggesting that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity borne by AtPLC2 is required for seedling growth. Moreover, the plc2-1 mutant showed hypersensitive response to ER stress as evidenced by changes in relevant phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Our results revealed the primary enzyme in phosphoinositide metabolism, its involvement in seedling growth and an emerging link between phosphoinositide and the ER stress response. PMID:26401841

  15. Receptor-mediated delivery of photoprotective agents by low-density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, S.T.; Yang, Y.L.; Falck, J.R.; Anderson, R.G.W.

    1984-12-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been used to deliver toxic molecules to cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In these studies, the cholesteryl ester core of LDL was replaced with a lipophilic, toxic molecule. The authors report that photoprotective azo dyes can be stably incorporated into LDL, and that this reconstituted LDL protects cells from the photosensitizing action of pyrene methanol (PM) in a receptor-dependent process. The photoprotective action of the azo dye is due to its ability to scavenge singlet oxygen that is produced by the photosensitive agent in response to UV light.

  16. Investigations of receptor-mediated phagocytosis by hormone-induced (imprinted) Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Sundermann, C A; Csaba, G

    1996-08-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis by Tetrahvmena pyriformis was studied using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled concanavalin A (TRITC-Con A) with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. In the presence of insulin, or 24 h after insulin pretreatment (hormonal imprinting), the binding and uptake of TRITC-Con A increased when compared to controls, owing to the binding of TRITC-Con A to sugar oligomers of insulin receptors. Mannose inhibited the binding of Con A, thus demonstrating the specificity of binding. Histamine, a phagocytosis-promoting factor in mammals and Tetrahymena, and galactose, did not influence the uptake of TRITC-Con A.

  17. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery to Macrophages in Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Arora, Sunil K.; Sehgal, Shobha; Basu, Sandip K.

    1989-05-01

    Methotrexate coupled to maleylated bovine serum albumin was taken up efficiently through the ``scavenger'' receptors present on macrophages and led to selective killing of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amazonensis amastigotes in cultured hamster peritoneal macrophages. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free methotrexate in eliminating the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, in a model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in hamsters, the drug conjugate brought about more than 90% reduction in the size of footpad lesions within 11 days. In contrast, the free drug at a similar concentration did not significantly affect lesion size. These studies demonstrate the potential of receptor-mediated drug delivery in the therapy of macrophage-associated diseases.

  18. CD44, α4 integrin, and fucoidin receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jacob D.; Hess, Krista L.; Cook-Mills, Joan M.

    2011-01-01

    Various types of phagocytes mediate the clearance of apoptotic cells. We previously reported that human and murine high endothelial venule (HEV) cells ingest apoptotic cells. In this report, we examined endothelial cell fucoidin receptor-mediated phagocytosis using a murine endothelial cell model mHEV. mHEV cell recognition of apoptotic leukocytes was blocked by fucoidin but not by other phagocytic receptor inhibitors such as mannose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, phosphatidylserine (PS), or blocking anti-PS receptor antibodies. Thus, the mHEV cells used fucoidin receptors for recognition and phagocytosis of apoptotic leukocytes. The fucoidin receptor-mediated endothelial cell phagocytosis was specific for apoptotic leukocytes, as necrotic cells were not ingested. This is in contrast to macrophages, which ingest apoptotic and necrotic cells. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of apoptotic cells did not alter viable lymphocyte migration across these endothelial cells. Antibody blocking of CD44 and α4 integrin on the apoptotic leukocyte inhibited this endothelial cell phagocytosis, suggesting a novel function for these adhesion molecules in the removal of apoptotic targets. The removal of apoptotic leukocytes by endothelial cells may protect the microvasculature, thus ensuring that viable lymphocytes can successfully migrate into tissues. PMID:12960273

  19. Target shape dependence in a simple model of receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Richards, David M.; Endres, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis are vitally important particle uptake mechanisms in many cell types, ranging from single-cell organisms to immune cells. In both processes, engulfment by the cell depends critically on both particle shape and orientation. However, most previous theoretical work has focused only on spherical particles and hence disregards the wide-ranging particle shapes occurring in nature, such as those of bacteria. Here, by implementing a simple model in one and two dimensions, we compare and contrast receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis for a range of biologically relevant shapes, including spheres, ellipsoids, capped cylinders, and hourglasses. We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. Further, the 2D model can explain why some nonspherical particles engulf fastest (not at all) when presented to the membrane tip-first (lying flat). Our work reveals how some bacteria may avoid being internalized simply because of their shape, and suggests shapes for optimal drug delivery. PMID:27185939

  20. The miR-199-dynamin regulatory axis controls receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan F; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that modulate many physiological processes; however, their role in regulating intracellular transport remains largely unknown. Intriguingly, we found that the dynamin (DNM) genes, a GTPase family of proteins responsible for endocytosis in eukaryotic cells, encode the conserved miR-199a and miR-199b family of miRNAs within their intronic sequences. Here, we demonstrate that miR-199a and miR-199b regulate endocytic transport by controlling the expression of important mediators of endocytosis such as clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), Rab5A, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Importantly, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p overexpression markedly inhibits CLTC, Rab5A, LDLR and Cav-1 expression, thus preventing receptor-mediated endocytosis in human cell lines (Huh7 and HeLa). Of note, miR-199a-5p inhibition increases target gene expression and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Taken together, our work identifies a new mechanism by which microRNAs regulate intracellular trafficking. In particular, we demonstrate that the DNM, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p genes act as a bifunctional locus that regulates endocytosis, thus adding an unexpected layer of complexity in the regulation of intracellular trafficking.

  1. Melanocortin MC(4) receptor-mediated feeding and grooming in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mul, Joram D; Spruijt, Berry M; Brakkee, Jan H; Adan, Roger A H

    2013-11-01

    Decades ago it was recognized that the pharmacological profile of melanocortin ligands that stimulated grooming behavior in rats was strikingly similar to that of Xenopus laevis melanophore pigment dispersion. After cloning of the melanocortin MC1 receptor, expressed in melanocytes, and the melanocortin MC4 receptor, expressed mainly in brain, the pharmacological profiles of these receptors appeared to be very similar and it was demonstrated that these receptors mediate melanocortin-induced pigmentation and grooming respectively. Grooming is a low priority behavior that is concerned with care of body surface. Activation of central melanocortin MC4 receptors is also associated with meal termination, and continued postprandial stimulation of melanocortin MC4 receptors may stimulate natural postprandial grooming behavior as part of the behavioral satiety sequence. Indeed, melanocortins fail to suppress food intake or induce grooming behavior in melanocortin MC4 receptor-deficient rats. This review will focus on how melanocortins affect grooming behavior through the melanocortin MC4 receptor, and how melanocortin MC4 receptors mediate feeding behavior. This review also illustrates how melanocortins were the most likely candidates to mediate grooming and feeding based on the natural behaviors they induced.

  2. Understanding magnetic nanoparticle osteoblast receptor-mediated endocytosis using experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for controlling drug delivery through an external magnetic force to treat a wide range of diseases, including osteoporosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, osteoblast (or bone forming cell) proliferation and long-term functions (such as calcium deposition) were significantly enhanced. Hydroxyapatite is the major inorganic component of bone. As a further attempt to understand why, in the current study, the uptake of such nanoparticles into osteoblasts was experimentally investigated and mathematically modeled. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using a co-precipitation method and were coated with hydroxyapatite. A cellular uptake experiment at low temperatures indicated that receptor-mediated endocytosis contributed to the internalization of the magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts. A model was further developed to explain the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts using receptor-mediated endocytosis. This model may explain the internalization of hydroxyapatite into osteoblasts to elevate intracellular calcium levels necessary to promote osteoblast functions to treat a wide range of orthopedic problems, including osteoporosis.

  3. Frequency and amplitude control of cortical oscillations by phosphoinositide waves.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ding; Xiao, Shengping; Guo, Su; Lin, Qingsong; Nakatsu, Fubito; Wu, Min

    2016-03-01

    Rhythmicity is prevalent in the cortical dynamics of diverse single and multicellular systems. Current models of cortical oscillations focus primarily on cytoskeleton-based feedbacks, but information on signals upstream of the actin cytoskeleton is limited. In addition, inhibitory mechanisms--especially local inhibitory mechanisms, which ensure proper spatial and kinetic controls of activation--are not well understood. Here, we identified two phosphoinositide phosphatases, synaptojanin 2 and SHIP1, that function in periodic traveling waves of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells. The local, phase-shifted activation of lipid phosphatases generates sequential waves of phosphoinositides. By acutely perturbing phosphoinositide composition using optogenetic methods, we showed that pulses of PtdIns(4,5)P2 regulate the amplitude of cyclic membrane waves while PtdIns(3,4)P2 sets the frequency. Collectively, these data suggest that the spatiotemporal dynamics of lipid metabolism have a key role in governing cortical oscillations and reveal how phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) activity could be frequency-encoded by a phosphatase-dependent inhibitory reaction. PMID:26751515

  4. Phosphoinositides: Tiny Lipids With Giant Impact on Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) make up only a small fraction of cellular phospholipids, yet they control almost all aspects of a cell's life and death. These lipids gained tremendous research interest as plasma membrane signaling molecules when discovered in the 1970s and 1980s. Research in the last 15 years has added a wide range of biological processes regulated by PIs, turning these lipids into one of the most universal signaling entities in eukaryotic cells. PIs control organelle biology by regulating vesicular trafficking, but they also modulate lipid distribution and metabolism via their close relationship with lipid transfer proteins. PIs regulate ion channels, pumps, and transporters and control both endocytic and exocytic processes. The nuclear phosphoinositides have grown from being an epiphenomenon to a research area of its own. As expected from such pleiotropic regulators, derangements of phosphoinositide metabolism are responsible for a number of human diseases ranging from rare genetic disorders to the most common ones such as cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Moreover, it is increasingly evident that a number of infectious agents hijack the PI regulatory systems of host cells for their intracellular movements, replication, and assembly. As a result, PI converting enzymes began to be noticed by pharmaceutical companies as potential therapeutic targets. This review is an attempt to give an overview of this enormous research field focusing on major developments in diverse areas of basic science linked to cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23899561

  5. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  6. Phosphoinositides differentially regulate alpha-actinin flexibility and function.

    PubMed

    Corgan, Anne Marie; Singleton, CoreyAyne; Santoso, Cynthia B; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2004-03-15

    Alpha-actinin is a cell-adhesion and cytoskeletal protein that bundles actin microfilaments and links these filaments directly to integrin-adhesion receptors. Phosphoinositides bind to and regulate the interaction of a-actinin with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 inhibits and disrupts a-actinin-bundling activity, whereas PtdIns(4,5)P2 can only inhibit activity. In addition, a protease-sensitivity assay was developed to examine the flexibility of the linker region between the actin-binding domain and the spectrin repeats of a-actinin. Both phosphoinositides influenced the extent of proteolysis and the cleavage sites. PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding decreased the proteolysis of a-actinin, suggesting a role in stabilizing the structure of the protein. In contrast, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding enhanced a-actinin proteolysis, indicating an increase in the flexibility of the protein. Furthermore, phosphoinositide binding influenced the proteolysis of the N- and C-terminal domains of a-actinin, indicating regulation of structure within both domains. These results support the hypothesis that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 differentially regulate a-actinin function by modulating the structure and flexibility of the protein.

  7. Phosphoinositides differentially regulate alpha-actinin flexibility and function.

    PubMed Central

    Corgan, Anne Marie; Singleton, CoreyAyne; Santoso, Cynthia B; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-actinin is a cell-adhesion and cytoskeletal protein that bundles actin microfilaments and links these filaments directly to integrin-adhesion receptors. Phosphoinositides bind to and regulate the interaction of a-actinin with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 inhibits and disrupts a-actinin-bundling activity, whereas PtdIns(4,5)P2 can only inhibit activity. In addition, a protease-sensitivity assay was developed to examine the flexibility of the linker region between the actin-binding domain and the spectrin repeats of a-actinin. Both phosphoinositides influenced the extent of proteolysis and the cleavage sites. PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding decreased the proteolysis of a-actinin, suggesting a role in stabilizing the structure of the protein. In contrast, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding enhanced a-actinin proteolysis, indicating an increase in the flexibility of the protein. Furthermore, phosphoinositide binding influenced the proteolysis of the N- and C-terminal domains of a-actinin, indicating regulation of structure within both domains. These results support the hypothesis that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 differentially regulate a-actinin function by modulating the structure and flexibility of the protein. PMID:14670080

  8. High-expression β(1) adrenergic receptor/cell membrane chromatography method based on a target receptor to screen active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Xue, Hui; Wang, Xin; Yang, Qian; Song, Yanhong; Li, Xiaoni

    2014-02-01

    β-Adrenergic receptors are important targets for drug discovery. We have developed a new β1 -adrenergic receptor cell membrane chromatography (β1 AR-CMC) with offline ultra-performance LC (UPLC) and MS method for screening active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines. In this study, Chinese hamster ovary-S cells with high β1 AR expression levels were established and used to prepare a cell membrane stationary phase in a β1 AR-CMC model. The retention fractions were separated and identified by the UPLC-MS system. The screening results found that isoimperatorin from Rhizoma et Radix Notopterygii was the targeted component that could act on β1 AR in similar manner of metoprolol as a control drug. In addition, the biological effects of active component were also investigated in order to search for a new type of β1 AR antagonist. It will be a useful method for drug discovery as a leading compound resource.

  9. Biophysical Fragment Screening of the β1-Adrenergic Receptor: Identification of High Affinity Arylpiperazine Leads Using Structure-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biophysical fragment screening of a thermostabilized β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enabled the identification of moderate affinity, high ligand efficiency (LE) arylpiperazine hits 7 and 8. Subsequent hit to lead follow-up confirmed the activity of the chemotype, and a structure-based design approach using protein–ligand crystal structures of the β1AR resulted in the identification of several fragments that bound with higher affinity, including indole 19 and quinoline 20. In the first example of GPCR crystallography with ligands derived from fragment screening, structures of the stabilized β1AR complexed with 19 and 20 were determined at resolutions of 2.8 and 2.7 Å, respectively. PMID:23517028

  10. Effect of Alpha-1-Adrenergic Agonist, Midodrine for the Management of Long-Standing Neurogenic Shock in Patient with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taikwan

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 71-year-old male patient who had suffered from long-lasting neurogenic shock for 13 weeks after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by a bicycle accident. The neurogenic shock was resolved dramatically 2 weeks after the administration of alpha-1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine hydrochloride. In usual cases, neurogenic shock tends to improve between 2 and 6 weeks after SCI; however, in a few cases, the shock lasts for several months. In our case, spinal shock lasted for 13 weeks and exhibited very sensitive decline of blood pressure for even a slight decrease of dopamine despite recovered bulbospongiosus reflex. Three days after midodrine hydrochloride was added, hypotension improved dramatically. We discuss our rare case with pertinent literatures. PMID:27169082

  11. AB257. The study of the influence of the changes in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor and NGF on the diabetic urethral function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shouzhen; Wang, Wenfu; Zhu, Kejia; Zhang, Dongqing; Wang, Yong; Shi, Benkang

    2016-01-01

    Background To study the influence of the changes in the α1-adrenergic receptor and NGF/ProNGF pathway on the diabetic urethral function. Methods A total of 20 female Wistar rats were divided into two groups equally at random. Urethral function was examined by recordings of bladder pressure and urethral perfusion pressure (UPP). The expression of α1-adrenergic receptor in the urethra was measured via RT-qPCR and ELISA method. The expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the urethra was measured via RT-qPCR and ELISA method. The expression of proNGF, P75NTR and sortilin in the urethra was measured by western blotting. Results The lowest urethral pressure (UPP nadir) during urethral relaxation was higher in diabetic rats. The UPP nadir and baseline UPP in diabetic rats was significantly decreased by intravenous administration of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist (tamsulosin). The α1a and α1d adrenergic receptor in the urethra of the diabetic group was significantly increased via RT-qPCR and western blotting (P<0.05). The RT-qPCR and ELISA studies showed a significant decrease of NGF and the western blotting studies showed a significant increase of proNGF (P<0.05). There was a statistical decrease of the P75NTR in the urethras of diabetic rats (P<0.05) and no significant difference concerning sortilin between two groups (P>0.05). Conclusions The increase in the expression of α1-adrenoceptor and changes of the NGF/ProNGF pathway in the diabetic urethral was a possible mechanism of the diabetic urethral dysfunction.

  12. Inhibition of muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism by cocaine, norcocaine and cocaethylene in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tan, X X; Costa, L G

    1994-05-13

    The interaction of cocaine, its metabolites norcocaine and benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene, which is formed following a combined cocaine and ethanol exposure, with muscarinic receptor binding and phosphoinositide metabolism was investigated in brain from immature rats. Cocaine and norcocaine inhibited binding of [3H]telenzepine and carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in cerebral cortex, while benzoylecgonine was devoid of any inhibitory activity. Cocaethylene was the most potent inhibitor of both binding and phosphoinositide metabolism. The effect of cocaine was more pronounced at the muscarinic receptors, but a small inhibition of histamine--and serotonin--stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism was also observed.

  13. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  14. An engineered substance P variant for receptor-mediated delivery of synthetic antibodies into tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Shahir S; Luchniak, Anna; Uysal, Serdar; Brawley, Crista M; Rock, Ronald S; Kossiakoff, Anthony A

    2009-07-01

    We have developed and tested a robust delivery method for the transport of proteins to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells without compromising the integrity of the cell membrane. This receptor-mediated delivery (RMD) technology utilizes a variant of substance P (SP), a neuropeptide that is rapidly internalized upon interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R). Cargos in the form of synthetic antibody fragments (sABs) were conjugated to the engineered SP variant (SPv) and efficiently internalized by NK1R-expressing cells. The sABs used here were generated to bind specific conformational forms of actin. The internalized proteins appear to escape the endosome and retain their binding activity within the cells as demonstrated by co-localization with the actin cytoskeleton. Further, since the NK1R is over-expressed in many cancers, SPv-mediated delivery provides a highly specific method for therapeutic utilization of affinity reagents targeting intracellular processes in diseased tissue.

  15. Transferrin protein nanospheres: a nanoplatform for receptor-mediated cancer cell labeling and gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael A.; Spurlin, Tighe A.; Tona, Alessandro; Elliott, John T.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the use of transferrin protein nanospheres (TfpNS) for targeting cancer cells in vitro. Protein nanospheres represent an easily prepared and modifiable nanoplatform for receptor-specific targeting, molecular imaging and gene delivery. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate conjugated TfpNS (RBITC-TfpNS) show significantly enhanced uptake in vitro in SK-MEL-28 human malignant melanoma cells known to overexpress transferrin receptors compared to controls. RBITCTfpNS labeling of the cancer cells is due to transferrin receptor-mediated uptake, as demonstrated by competitive inhibition with native transferrin. Initial fluorescence microscopy studies indicate GFP plasmid can be transfected into melanoma cells via GFP plasmid encapsulated by TfpNS.

  16. Administration of pyrene lipids by receptor-mediated endocytosis and their degradation in skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Agmon, V.; Dinur, T.; Cherbu, S.; Dagan, A.; Gatt, S. )

    1991-10-01

    Sphingomyelin and seven glycosphingolipids were labeled with the fluorescent probe pyrene and administered into cultured fibroblasts by receptor-mediated endocytosis. For this purpose pyrene sphingomyelin or mixtures of pyrene glycolipid and unlabeled sphingomyelin were dispersed as small, unilamellar liposomes. Apolipoprotein E was then added and the receptor for this ligand on the cell surface was utilized for uptake of the liposomes and their transport to the lysosomes, where the respective pyrene lipids were degraded. Following incubation with each of the respective pyrene lipids, only the administered compound and the pyrene ceramide were present; intermediate hydrolysis products were not detected. This indicated that, in skin fibroblasts, the lysosomal ceramidase was limiting and controlled the rate of total degradation of the pyrene sphingolipids.

  17. Receptor mediated uptake of paclitaxel from a synthetic high density lipoprotein nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Mooberry, Linda K; Nair, Maya; Paranjape, Sulabha; McConathy, Walter J; Lacko, Andras G

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the mechanism(s) whereby paclitaxel (PTX), is taken up by cancer cells, once encapsulated into synthetic/reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL). The uptake of PTX was found to be facilitated by the scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1) when drug-loaded rHDL particles were incubated with cells that express the SRB1 receptor. Studies with double-labeled, PTX containing rHDL nanoparticles showed that prostate cancer (PC-3) cells incorporated PTX primarily via a selective (SR-B1 type) uptake mechanism. In the presence of a 10-fold excess of plasma HDL, PTX uptake decreased to 30% of the control. These findings suggest that the incorporation of lipophilic drugs by cancer cells from rHDL nanoparticles is facilitated by a receptor mediated (SR-B1) mechanism.

  18. Targeting receptor-mediated transport for delivery of biologics across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Jason M.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2016-01-01

    Biologics are an emerging class of medicines with substantial promise to treat neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis. However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a formidable obstacle that appreciably limits brain uptake and hence, therapeutic potential, of biologics following intravenous administration. One promising strategy for overcoming the BBB to deliver biologics is the targeting of endogenous receptor-mediated transport (RMT) systems that employ vesicular trafficking to transport ligands across the BBB endothelium. If a biologic is modified with an appropriate targeting ligand, it can gain improved access to the brain via RMT. Various RMT targeting strategies have been developed over the past 20 years, and this review will explore exciting recent advances, with a particular emphasis on those studies showing brain targeting in vivo. PMID:25340933

  19. Effects of 2-phenoxyethanol on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated ion currents.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, U; Madeja, M; Binding, N; Witting, U; Speckmann, E J

    1999-02-01

    The actions were examined of 17 frequently used glycol ether compounds on the glutamate receptor-mediated ion currents. The receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of rat brain mRNA. Most of the 17 glycol ethers exerted no effects on the glutamate subreceptors activated by kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), whereas 2-phenoxyethanol (ethylene glycol monophenyl ether) caused a considerable reduction of NMDA-induced membrane currents in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. The threshold concentration of the ethylene glycol monophenyl ether effect was < 10 mumol/l. The concentration for a 50% inhibition (IC50) was approximately 360 mumol/l. The results indicate a neurotoxic potential for 2-phenoxyethanol.

  20. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  1. AMPA receptor-mediated miniature synaptic calcium transients in GluR2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sabrina; Jia, Zhengping; Roder, John; Murphy, Timothy H

    2002-07-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors are normally Ca(2+) impermeable due to the expression of the GluR2 receptor subunit. By using GluR2 null mice we were able to detect miniature synaptic Ca(2+) transients (MSCTs) associated with AMPA-type receptor-mediated miniature synaptic currents at single synapses in primary cortical cultures. MSCTs and associated Ca(2+) transients were monitored under conditions that isolated responses mediated by AMPA or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. As expected, addition of the antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxalene-2,3-dione (CNQX, 3 microM) blocked the AMPA receptor-mediated MSCTs. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels did not contribute to AMPA MSCTs because CdCl(2) (0.1-0.2 mM) did not significantly alter the frequency or the amplitude of the MSCTs. The amplitude of AMPA MSCTs appeared to be regulated independently from event frequency since the two measures were not correlated (R = 0.023). Synapses were identified that only expressed MSCTs attributed to either NMDA or AMPA receptors. At synapses with only NMDA responses, MSCT amplitude was significantly lower (by 40%) than synapses expressing both NMDA and AMPA responses. At synapses that showed MSCTs mediated by both AMPA and NMDA receptors, the amplitude of the transients in each condition was positively correlated (R = 0.94). Our results suggest that when AMPA and NMDA receptors are co-expressed at synapses, mechanisms exist to ensure proportional scaling of each receptor type that are distinct from the presynaptic factors controlling the frequency of miniature release. PMID:12091530

  2. Current injection and receptor-mediated excitation produce similar maximal firing rates in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Hilary E; Fregosi, Ralph F; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    The maximum firing rates of motoneurons (MNs), activated in response to synaptic drive, appear to be much lower than that elicited by current injection. It could be that the decrease in input resistance associated with increased synaptic activity (but not current injection) might blunt overall changes in membrane depolarization and thereby limit spike-frequency output. To test this idea, we recorded, in the same cells, maximal firing responses to current injection and to synaptic activation. We prepared 300 μm medullary slices in neonatal rats that contained hypoglossal MNs and used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record their maximum firing rates in response to triangular-ramp current injections and to glutamate receptor-mediated excitation. Brief pressure pulses of high-concentration glutamate led to significant depolarization, high firing rates, and temporary cessation of spiking due to spike inactivation. In the same cells, we applied current clamp protocols that approximated the time course of membrane potential change associated with glutamate application and with peak current levels large enough to cause spike inactivation. Means (SD) of maximum firing rates obtained in response to glutamate application were nearly identical to those obtained in response to ramp current injection [glutamate 47.1 ± 12.0 impulses (imp)/s, current injection 47.5 ± 11.2 imp/s], even though input resistance was 40% less during glutamate application compared with current injection. Therefore, these data suggest that the reduction in input resistance associated with receptor-mediated excitation does not, by itself, limit the maximal firing rate responses in MNs.

  3. Glutamate receptor-mediated oligodendrocyte toxicity in periventricular leukomalacia: a protective role for topiramate.

    PubMed

    Follett, Pamela L; Deng, Wenbin; Dai, Weimin; Talos, Delia M; Massillon, Leon J; Rosenberg, Paul A; Volpe, Joseph J; Jensen, Frances E

    2004-05-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia is a form of hypoxic-ischemic cerebral white matter injury seen most commonly in premature infants and is the major antecedent of cerebral palsy. Glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is a predominant mechanism of hypoxic-ischemic injury to developing cerebral white matter. We have demonstrated previously the protective effect of AMPA-kainate-type glutamate receptor blockade in a rodent model of periventricular leukomalacia. The present study explores the therapeutic potential of glutamate receptor blockade for hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury. We demonstrate that AMPA receptors are expressed on developing human oligodendrocytes that populate fetal white matter at 23-32 weeks gestation, the period of highest risk for periventricular leukomalacia. We show that the clinically available anticonvulsant topiramate, when administered post-insult in vivo, is protective against selective hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury and decreases the subsequent neuromotor deficits. We further demonstrate that topiramate attenuates AMPA-kainate receptor-mediated cell death and calcium influx, as well as kainate-evoked currents in developing oligodendrocytes, similar to the AMPA-kainate receptor antagonist 6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo-(f)quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX). Notably, protective doses of NBQX and topiramate do not affect normal maturation and proliferation of oligodendrocytes either in vivo or in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that AMPA-kainate receptor blockade may have potential for translation as a therapeutic strategy for periventricular leukomalacia and that the mechanism of protective efficacy of topiramate is caused at least in part by attenuation of excitotoxic injury to premyelinating oligodendrocytes in developing white matter.

  4. Relationship between Ah receptor-mediated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced humoral immunosuppression and thymic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Antrim, L

    1985-12-01

    Thymic atrophy and humoral immunosuppression by certain polychlorinated biphenyls is associated with the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice. We examined the relationship between these two toxic effects. 3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB), which causes immunosuppression and thymic atrophy, and 2,3,3',4,4',5-hexachlorobiphenyl, which causes immunosuppression without thymic atrophy, were administered i.p. to C57BL/6 mice at 0, 35 and 350 mumol/kg b.wt. 2 days before i.v. immunization with 10 micrograms of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Both congeners caused significant suppression of the day 4 anti-lipopolysaccharide plaque-forming cell response/spleen (less than or equal to 46% of control). TCB (350 mumol/kg) was also administered 2 days before either a primary or secondary i.p. immunization with sheep erythrocytes. TCB treatment before primary immunization had no effects on the day 5 secondary response, whereas treatment before the secondary immunization significantly inhibited both day 5 immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G plaque-forming cells (less than 10 and less than 2% of control, respectively) and decreased serum antibody. TCB administered either 8 or 2 days before or 2 or 4 days after immunization with sheep erythrocytes demonstrated that significant suppression of both plaque-forming cells and serum antibody could occur without thymic atrophy. Immunity was most impaired when TCB was given 2 days before immunization. These results demonstrate that thymic atrophy does not always accompany the severe immunosuppression caused by Ah receptor ligands and suggests that it may not be a sensitive measure of Ah receptor-mediated immunosuppression. The data also suggests that differentiation of B lymphocytes into antibody producing cells is impaired during Ah receptor-mediated gene activation.

  5. Modeling receptor-mediated processes with dioxin: Implications for pharmacokinetics and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.E.; Mills, J.J.; Gargas, M.L. ); Keddersi, L. ); Birnbaum, L.S. ); Neubert, D. ); Greenlee, W.F. )

    1993-02-01

    Dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD), a widespread aromatic hydrocarbon, caused tumors in the liver and other sites when administered chronically to rats at doses as low as 0.01 [mu]g/kg/day. It functions in combination with a cellular protein, the Ah receptor, to alter gene regulation, and this resulting modulation of gene expression is believed to be obligatory for both dioxin toxicity and carcinogenicity. The U.S. EPA is reevaluating its dioxin risk assessment and, as part of this process, will be developing risk assessment approaches for chemicals, such as dioxin, whose toxicity is receptor-mediated. This paper describes a receptor-mediated physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for the tissue distribution and enzyme-inducing properties of dioxin and discusses the potential role of these models in a biologically motivated risk assessment. In this model, ternary interactions among the Ah receptor, dioxin, and DNA binding sites lead to enhance production of specific hepatic proteins. This model was used to examine the tissue disposition of dioxin and the induction of both a dioxin-binding protein (presumably, cytochrome P4501A2), and cytochrome P4501A1. Tumor promotion correlated more closely with predicted induction of P4501A1 than with induction of hepatic binding proteins. Although increased induction of these proteins is not expected to be causally related to tumor formation, these physiological dosimetry and gene-induction response models will be important for biologically motivated dioxin risk assessments in determining both target tissue dose of dioxin and gene products and in examining the relationship between these gene products and the cellular events more directly involved in tumor promotion.

  6. Fluid Shear Stress Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis via Trimeric Death Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to receptor-mediated apoptosis has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlated with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increased in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis was not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress did not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments revealed that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear force can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents. PMID:25110459

  7. Aripiprazole has functionally selective actions at dopamine D2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jonathan D; Vargas, Gabriel A; von Zastrow, Mark; Mailman, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a unique atypical antipsychotic drug with an excellent side-effect profile presumed, in part, to be due to lack of typical D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist properties. Whether aripiprazole is a typical D(2) partial agonist, or a functionally selective D(2) ligand, remains controversial (eg D(2)-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is system dependent; aripiprazole antagonizes D(2) receptor-mediated G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels and guanosine triphosphate nucleotide (GTP)gammaS coupling). The current study examined the D(2L) receptor binding properties of aripiprazole, as well as the effects of the drug on three downstream D(2) receptor-mediated functional effectors: mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, potentiation of arachidonic acid (AA) release, and D(2) receptor internalization. Unlike quinpirole (a full D(2) agonist) or (-)3PPP (S(-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride, a D(2) partial agonist), the apparent D(2) affinity of aripiprazole was not decreased significantly by GTP. Moreover, full or partial agonists are expected to have Hill slopes <1.0, yet that of aripiprazole was significantly >1.0. Whereas aripiprazole partially activated both the MAPK and AA pathways, its potency vs MAPK phosphorylation was much lower relative to potencies in assays either of AA release or inhibition of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation. In addition, unlike typical agonists, neither aripiprazole nor (-)3PPP produced significant internalization of the D(2L) receptor. These data are clear evidence that aripiprazole affects D(2L)-mediated signaling pathways in a differential manner. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that aripiprazole is a functionally selective D(2) ligand rather than a simple partial agonist. Such data may be useful in understanding the novel clinical actions of this drug.

  8. A(2B) receptors mediate antimitogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dubey, R K; Gillespie, D G; Shue, H; Jackson, E K

    2000-01-01

    Adenosine inhibits growth of vascular smooth muscle cells. The goals of this study were to determine which adenosine receptor subtype mediates the antimitogenic effects of adenosine and to investigate the signal transduction mechanisms involved. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) (25 ng/mL) stimulated DNA synthesis ([(3)H]thymidine incorporation), cellular proliferation (cell number), collagen synthesis ([(3)H]proline incorporation), total protein synthesis ([(3)H]leucine incorporation), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. The adenosine receptor agonists 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, but not N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine or CGS21680, inhibited the growth effects of PDGF-BB, an agonist profile consistent with an A(2B) receptor-mediated effect. The adenosine receptor antagonists KF17837 and 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine, but not 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine, blocked the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, an antagonist profile consistent with an A(2) receptor-mediated effect. Antisense, but not sense or scrambled, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor stimulated basal and PDGF-induced DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and MAP kinase activity. Moreover, the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine, 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine plus iodotubericidin (inhibitors of adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase, respectively) were abolished by antisense, but not scrambled or sense, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that adenosine causes inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell growth by activating A(2B) receptors coupled to inhibition of MAP kinase activity. Pharmacological or molecular biological activation of A(2B) receptors may prevent vascular remodeling associated with hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis

  9. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  10. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway is involved in the control of modified low-density lipoprotein uptake by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Michael, Daryn R; Davies, Thomas S; Laubertová, Lucia; Gallagher, Hayley; Ramji, Dipak P

    2015-03-01

    The transformation of macrophages into lipid-loaded foam cells is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Both receptor-mediated uptake of modified LDL, mediated primarily by scavenger receptors-A (SR-A) and CD36 along with other proteins such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and macropinocytosis contribute to macrophage foam cell formation. The signaling pathways that are involved in the control of foam cell formation are not fully understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in relation to foam cell formation in human macrophages. The pan PI3K inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the uptake of modified LDL and macropinocytosis, as measured by Lucifer Yellow uptake, by human macrophages. In addition, the expression of SR-A, CD36 and LPL was attenuated by LY294002. The use of isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors showed that PI3K-β, -γ and -δ were all required for the expression of SR-A and CD36 whereas only PI3K-γ was necessary in the case of LPL. These studies reveal a pivotal role of PI3K in the control of macrophage foam cell formation and provide further evidence for their potential as therapeutic target against atherosclerosis. PMID:25663263

  11. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway is involved in the control of modified low-density lipoprotein uptake by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Michael, Daryn R; Davies, Thomas S; Laubertová, Lucia; Gallagher, Hayley; Ramji, Dipak P

    2015-03-01

    The transformation of macrophages into lipid-loaded foam cells is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Both receptor-mediated uptake of modified LDL, mediated primarily by scavenger receptors-A (SR-A) and CD36 along with other proteins such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and macropinocytosis contribute to macrophage foam cell formation. The signaling pathways that are involved in the control of foam cell formation are not fully understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in relation to foam cell formation in human macrophages. The pan PI3K inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the uptake of modified LDL and macropinocytosis, as measured by Lucifer Yellow uptake, by human macrophages. In addition, the expression of SR-A, CD36 and LPL was attenuated by LY294002. The use of isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors showed that PI3K-β, -γ and -δ were all required for the expression of SR-A and CD36 whereas only PI3K-γ was necessary in the case of LPL. These studies reveal a pivotal role of PI3K in the control of macrophage foam cell formation and provide further evidence for their potential as therapeutic target against atherosclerosis.

  12. Gold nanoparticle supported phospholipid membranes as a biomimetic biosensor platform for phosphoinositide signaling detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Liu, Si-Jia; Tang, Li-Juan; Tang, Ying; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2014-12-15

    Enzyme mediated phosphoinositide signaling plays important regulatory roles in diverse cellular processes and has close implication in human diseases. However, detection of phosphoinositide enzymes remains a challenge because of the difficulty in discriminating the phosphorylation patterns of phosphoinositide. Here we develop a novel enzyme-activated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembly strategy as a homogeneous colorimetric biosensor for activity detection of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. This strategy utilizes a biomimetic mechanism of phosphoinositide signaling, in which AuNP supported phospholipid membranes are constructed to mimic the cellular membrane substrate, and AuNPs modified with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of cytosolic proteins are designed for specific, multivalent recognition of phosphorylated phosphoinositides. This biomimetic strategy enables efficient enzymatic reactions of the substrate and highly selective detection of target enzyme. The biosensor is demonstrated for the detection of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphatase with tensin homology (PTEN). The results revealed that it allows sensitive, rapid visual detection of the enzymes with pM detection limits and four-decade wide dynamic ranges, and is capable of detecting enzyme activities in complex cell lysate samples. This biosensor might provide a general biosensor platform for high-throughput detection of phosphoinositide enzymes with high sensitivity and selectivity in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics.

  13. Concomitant activation of two types of glutamate receptor mediates excitation of salamander retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mittman, S; Taylor, W R; Copenhagen, D R

    1990-01-01

    1. Cells in the ganglion cell layer of salamander retinal slices were voltage clamped using patch pipettes. Light elicited transient excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in on-off ganglion cells and sustained EPSCs in on ganglion cells. Light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents in these cells could be blocked by 100 microM-bicuculline methobromide and 500 nM-strychnine. 2. In the presence of external Cd2+, at a concentration that blocked light-evoked synaptic inputs, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the non-NMDA-receptor agonists, quisqualate and kainate, gated conductances in both on-off and on ganglion cells. The current-voltage (I-V) curve for the conductance elicited by NMDA had a negative slope between -40 and -70 mV and a reversal potential near 0 mV. The I-V curves for the non-NMDA-receptor-mediated conductances were nearly linear and also had reversal potentials near 0 mV. 3. I-V curves were measured at an early time point near the peak of transient EPSCs and at a later time point during the decay phase of the responses. The late I-V curve had a negative slope below -40 mV. The early I-V curve had a positive slope over the entire voltage range but the slope was greater at positive than at negative potentials. The evoked current reversed near 0 mV at both time points. 4. The region of negative slope of the late I-V curve was eliminated when Mg2+ was removed from the external saline. A slowly decaying component of transient EPSCs was eliminated in 20 microM-DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate (AP7), an NMDA-receptor antagonist. 5. Application of 1 microM-6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a non-NMDA-receptor antagonist at this concentration, blocked a fast component of transient EPSCs. 6. Our results demonstrate that the synaptic inputs to on-off ganglion cells have two components: a slower NMDA-receptor-mediated component having a time-to-peak of 110 +/- 45 ms and an e-fold decay time of 209 +/- 35 ms at -31 mV (mean +/- S.D., n = 5), and a

  14. Contracting human skeletal muscle maintains the ability to blunt α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction during KIR channel and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Hearon, Christopher M; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle is blunted relative to that which occurs in resting tissue; however, the mechanisms underlying this ‘functional sympatholysis’ remain unclear in humans. We tested the hypothesis that α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction is augmented during exercise following inhibition of inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) channels and Na+/K+-ATPase (BaCl2 + ouabain). In young healthy humans, we measured forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and calculated forearm vascular conductance (FVC) at rest, during steady-state stimulus conditions (pre-phenylephrine), and after 2 min of phenylephrine (PE; an α1-adrenoceptor agonist) infusion via brachial artery catheter in response to two different stimuli: moderate (15% maximal voluntary contraction) rhythmic handgrip exercise or adenosine infusion. In Protocol 1 (n = 11 subjects) a total of six trials were performed in three conditions: control (saline), combined enzymatic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis (l-NMMA + ketorolac) and combined inhibition of NO, PGs, KIR channels and Na+/K+-ATPase (l-NMMA + ketorolac + BaCl2 + ouabain). In Protocol 2 (n = 6) a total of four trials were performed in two conditions: control (saline), and combined KIR channel and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition. All trials occurred after local β-adrenoceptor blockade (propranolol). PE-mediated vasoconstriction was calculated (%ΔFVC) in each condition. Contrary to our hypothesis, despite attenuated exercise hyperaemia of ∼30%, inhibition of KIR channels and Na+/K+-ATPase, combined with inhibition of NO and PGs (Protocol 1) or alone (Protocol 2) did not enhance α1-mediated vasoconstriction during exercise (Protocol 1: −27 ± 3%; P = 0.2 vs. control, P = 0.4 vs.l-NMMA + ketorolac; Protocol 2: −21 ± 7%; P = 0.9 vs. control). Thus, contracting human skeletal muscle maintains the ability to blunt α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction during

  15. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD).

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Maeno, E; Shimizu, T; Dezaki, K; Wang, J; Morishima, S

    2001-04-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl- channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl- channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl- conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNF receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be abolished by

  16. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  17. Alcohol induced changes in phosphoinositide signaling system in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.; Piano, M.; Schwertz, D.; Davis, J.; Pandey, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide break down functions as a signal generating system in a manner similar to the C-AMP system. In order to examine if the changes produced by chronic ethanol treatment on membrane lipid composition and metabolism effect the cellular functions of the neuron, the authors have examined the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on norepinephrine (NE) serotonin (5HT) and calcium ionophore (CI) stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat cortical slices. Rats were maintained on liber-decarli diet alcohol and control liquid diet containing isocaloric sucrose substitute for two months. They were then sacrificed and brain was removed for determination of PI turnover. 5HT stimulated {sup 3}H- inositol monophosphate ({sup 3}H-IPI) formation was significantly lower in the cortex of alcohol treated rats as compared to control rats. However, neither CI nor NE stimulated IP1 formation was significantly different from control rats. The results thus indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol decreases 5HT induced PI breakdown in rat cortex. In order to examine if this decrease is related to a decrease in 5HT2 receptors, or decreased in coupling of receptor to the effector pathway, the authors are currently determining the number and affinity of 5HT2 receptors in alcohol treated rats.

  18. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase: the key switch mechanism in insulin signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, P R; Withers, D J; Siddle, K

    1998-01-01

    Insulin plays a key role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. However, until recently little was known about the signalling pathways that are involved in linking the insulin receptor with downstream responses. It is now apparent that the activation of class 1a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) is necessary and in some cases sufficient to elicit many of insulin's effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The lipid products of PI 3-kinase act as both membrane anchors and allosteric regulators, serving to localize and activate downstream enzymes and their protein substrates. One of the major ways these lipid products of PI 3-kinase act in insulin signalling is by binding to pleckstrin homology (PH) domains of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase (PDK) and protein kinase B (PKB) and in the process regulating the phosphorylation of PKB by PDK. Using mechanisms such as this, PI 3-kinase is able to act as a molecular switch to regulate the activity of serine/threonine-specific kinase cascades important in mediating insulin's effects on endpoint responses. PMID:9677303

  19. Ion Induced Changes in Phosphoinositide Monolayers at Phisiological Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe; Forstner, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play a crucial role in many cellular process that occur at the plasma membrane such as calcium release, exocytosis or endocytosis. In order to specifically regulate these functions PIPs must segregate in pools at the plasma membrane. A possible mechanism that could induce and regulate such organization of phosphoinositides is their interaction with bivalent cations. Understanding the physicochemical mechanism that can regulate membrane structure is a crucial step in the development of adaptive biomimetic membrane systems. Using Langmuir monolayers, we investigated the effect of calcium and magnesium on the surface pressure-area/lipid isotherm of monolayer of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2), dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). It is found that the decrease of area per lipid, i.e. the increase in aggregation, is mostly dependent on the lipid's head group charge but ion specific. In addition, we discuss changes in free energy and compressibility of these monolayer-ion systems. NSF

  20. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    PubMed

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    , hippocampal or hypothalamic slices were used instead of cortical slices. The Ca2+-induced tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine (in the presence of ranitidine); this effect was abolished by clobenpropit. In slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, impromidine failed to facilitate the Ca2+-evoked tritium overflow. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in mouse brain cortex slices was inhibited by histamine by about 60% (both in the absence or presence of ranitidine). The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished (but not reversed) by clobenpropit. In conclusion, noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain cortex is inhibited via presynaptic H3 receptors and facilitated via H2 receptors not located presynaptically. In the mouse brain cortex, only inhibitory H3 receptors occur. The extent of the H3 receptor-mediated effect is more marked in the mouse than in the guinea-pig brain cortex.

  1. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  2. Receptor-Mediated Entry of Pristine Octahedral DNA Nanocages in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Giulia; Raniolo, Sofia; Ottaviani, Alessio; Falconi, Mattia; Franch, Oskar; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Desideri, Alessandro; Biocca, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    DNA offers excellent programming properties for the generation of nanometer-scaled polyhedral structures with a broad variety of potential applications. Translation to biomedical applications requires improving stability in biological fluids, efficient and selective cell binding, and/or internalization of the assembled DNA nanostructures. Here, we report an investigation on the selective mechanism of cellular uptake of pristine DNA nanocages in cells expressing the receptor "oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1" (LOX-1), a scavenger receptor associated with cardiovascular diseases and, more recently, identified as a tumor marker. For this purpose a truncated octahedral DNA nanocage functionalized with a single biotin molecule, which allows DNA cage detection through the biotin-streptavidin assays, was constructed. The results indicate that DNA nanocages are stable in biological fluids, including human serum, and are selectively bound and very efficiently internalized in vesicles only in LOX-1-expressing cells. The amount of internalized cages is 30 times higher in LOX-1-expressing cells than in normal fibroblasts, indicating that the receptor-mediated uptake of pristine DNA nanocages can be pursued for a selective cellular internalization. These results open the route for a therapeutic use of pristine DNA cages targeting LOX-1-overexpressing tumor cells. PMID:27214742

  3. Coated vesicles participate in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have purified coated vesicles from rat liver by differential ultracentrifugation. Electron micrographs of these preparations reveal only the polyhedral structures typical of coated vesicles. SDS PAGE of the coated vesicle preparation followed by Coomassie Blue staining of proteins reveals a protein composition also typical of coated vesicles. We determined that these rat liver coated vesicles possess a latent insulin binding capability. That is, little if any specific binding of 125I-insulin to coated vesicles is observed in the absence of detergent. However, coated vesicles treated with the detergent octyl glucoside exhibit a substantial specific 125I-insulin binding capacity. We visualized the insulin binding structure of coated vesicles by cross- linking 125I-insulin to detergent-solubilized coated vesicles using the bifunctional reagent disuccinimidyl suberate followed by electrophoresis and autoradiography. The receptor structure thus identified is identical to that of the high-affinity insulin receptor present in a variety of tissues. We isolated liver coated vesicles from rats which had received injections of 125I-insulin in the hepatic portal vein. We found that insulin administered in this fashion was rapidly and specifically taken up by liver coated vesicles. Taken together, these data are compatible with a functional role for coated vesicles in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin. PMID:6131074

  4. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Cho, J Hoon; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways.

  5. S-nitrosylated SHP-2 contributes to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Sunico, Carmen R.; McKercher, Scott R.; Cui, Jiankun; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) can cause neuronal damage, contributing to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases and stroke (i.e., focal cerebral ischemia). NO can mediate neurotoxic effects at least in part via protein S-nitrosylation, a reaction that covalently attaches NO to a cysteine thiol (or thiolate anion) to form an S-nitrosothiol. Recently, the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) and its downstream pathways have emerged as important mediators of cell survival. Here we report that in neurons and brain tissue NO can S-nitrosylate SHP-2 at its active site cysteine, forming S-nitrosylated SHP-2 (SNO–SHP-2). We found that NMDA exposure in vitro and transient focal cerebral ischemia in vivo resulted in increased levels of SNO–SHP-2. S-Nitrosylation of SHP-2 inhibited its phosphatase activity, blocking downstream activation of the neuroprotective physiological ERK1/2 pathway, thus increasing susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings suggest that formation of SNO–SHP-2 represents a key chemical reaction contributing to excitotoxic damage in stroke and potentially other neurological disorders. PMID:23382182

  6. Killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis by receptor-mediated drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Basu, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    p-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) conjugated to maleylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA) was taken up efficiently through high-affinity MBSA-binding sites on macrophages. Binding of the radiolabeled conjugate to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages at 4 degrees C was competed for by MBSA but not by PAS. At 37 degrees C, the radiolabeled conjugate was rapidly degraded by the macrophages, leading to release of acid-soluble degradation products in the medium. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free PAS in killing the intracellular mycobacteria in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected in culture with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The killing of intracellular mycobacteria mediated by the drug conjugate was effectively prevented by simultaneous addition of excess MBSA (100 micrograms/ml) or chloroquine (3 microM) to the medium, whereas these agents did not affect the microbicidal action of free PAS. These results suggest that (i) uptake of the PAS-MBSA conjugate was mediated by cell surface receptors on macrophages which recognize MBSA and (ii) lysosomal hydrolysis of the internalized conjugate resulted in intracellular release of a pharmacologically active form of the drug, which led to selective killing of the M. tuberculosis harbored by mouse macrophages infected in culture. This receptor-mediated modality of delivering drugs to macrophages could contribute to greater therapeutic efficacy and minimization of toxic side effects in the management of tuberculosis and other intracellular mycobacterial infections.

  7. Peptides in Receptor-Mediated Radiotherapy: From Design to the Clinical Application in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Catherine; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Vivès, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Short peptides can show high affinity for specific receptors overexpressed on tumor cells. Some of these are already used in cancerology as diagnostic tools and others are in clinical trials for therapeutic applications. Therefore, peptides exhibit great potential as a diagnostic tool but also as an alternative or an additional antitumoral approach upon the covalent attachment of a therapeutic moiety such as a radionuclide or a cytotoxic drug. The chemistry offers flexibility to graft onto the targeting-peptide either fluorine or iodine directly, or metallic radionuclides through appropriate chelating agent. Since short peptides are straightforward to synthesize, there is an opportunity to further improve existing peptides or to design new ones for clinical applications. However, several considerations have to be taken into account to optimize the recognition properties of the targeting-peptide to its receptor, to improve its stability in the biological fluids and its residence in the body, or to increase its overall therapeutic effect. In this review, we highlight the different aspects which need to be considered for the development of an efficient peptide receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy in different neoplasms. PMID:24093086

  8. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Lysozyme in Renal Proximal Tubules of the Frog Rana Temporaria

    PubMed Central

    Seliverstova, E.V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endo-somes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intra-cellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  9. Modulation of receptor-mediated gonadotropin action in rat testes by dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Sebokova, E; Garg, M L; Clandinin, M T

    1988-06-01

    The effect of feeding diets enriched with 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, or saturated fatty acids on lipid composition and receptor-mediated action of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) in rat testicular plasma membranes was investigated. Linoleic and alpha-linolenic acid treatments reduced total phospholipid and cholesterol content of the testicular plasma membrane and altered membrane phospholipid composition. Change in phospholipid and cholesterol content after feeding the polyunsaturated fats decreased cholesterol to phospholipid ratios and binding capacity of the LH/hCG receptor in the testicular plasma membrane. LH-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was decreased in animals fed the linolenic acid-rich diet. NaF-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was decreased in animals fed diets high in either polyunsaturated fatty acid. Decreased plasma membrane LH/hCG receptor content was associated with decreased testosterone production in Leydig cells in response to LH in the linolenic acid-fed group. It is suggested that change in cholesterol-to-phospholipid ratios alters the physical properties of testicular plasma membranes in a manner that influences accessibility of LH/hCG receptors in testicular tissue. PMID:2897795

  10. Characterization of NPY receptors mediating contraction in rat intramyocardial coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, D; García-Sacristán, A; Simonsen, U

    1998-09-25

    In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed in order to characterize the receptor subtypes and the mechanisms underlying the contractions induced by neuropeptide Y (NPY) in rat coronary small arteries. The rank order of potency for NPY-receptor agonist-induced increases in tension in endothelium-intact preparations was polypeptide Y (PYY)> NPY > or = [Leu31Pro34]NPY, while NPY(13-36) only induced small contractions at the highest concentration applied. The selective neuropeptide Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBP 3226, caused rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves for NPY and the slope of the Schild plot was not significantly different from unity. The pA2 value for BIBP 3226 against NPY was 7.88+/-0.15 (n = 6). We have earlier shown that endothelial cell removal does not change the contractile responses induced by NPY, but indomethacin (3 x 10(-6) M) significantly reduced the contractions induced by the peptide. In contrast, the thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ29548, which abolished the contractions induced by the thromboxane analogue, U46619, did not change the concentration-response curves for NPY. In conclusion, the present study suggests that Y1 receptors mediate NPY-induced contractions in rat coronary resistance arteries, and that a non-thromboxane prostanoid is involved in the contractile mechanism.

  11. Tonic GABAA Receptor-Mediated Inhibition in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors expressed in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus (DMV) critically regulate the activity of vagal motor neurons and, by inference, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Two types of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition have been identified in the brain, represented by phasic (Iphasic) and tonic (Itonic) inhibitory currents. The hypothesis that Itonic regulates neuron activity was tested in the DMV using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse brain stem slices from rats. An Itonic was present in a subset of DMV neurons, which was determined to be mediated by different receptors than those mediating fast, synaptic currents. Preapplication of tetrodotoxin significantly decreased the resting Itonic amplitude in DMV neurons, suggesting that most of the current was due to action potential (AP)–dependent GABA release. Blocking GABA transport enhanced Itonic and multiple GABA transporters cooperated to regulate Itonic. The Itonic was composed of both a gabazine-insensitive component that was nearly saturated under basal conditions and a gabazine-sensitive component that was activated when extracellular GABA concentration was elevated. Perfusion of THIP (10 μM) significantly increased Itonic amplitude without increasing Iphasic amplitude. The Itonic played a major role in determining the overall excitability of DMV neurons by contributing to resting membrane potential and AP frequency. Our results indicate that Itonic contributes to DMV neuron membrane potential and activity and is thus an important regulator of vagally mediated GI function. PMID:20018836

  12. Toll Receptor-Mediated Hippo Signaling Controls Innate Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zheng, Yonggang; Yin, Feng; Yu, Jianzhong; Silverman, Neal; Pan, Duojia

    2016-01-28

    The Hippo signaling pathway functions through Yorkie to control tissue growth and homeostasis. How this pathway regulates non-developmental processes remains largely unexplored. Here, we report an essential role for Hippo signaling in innate immunity whereby Yorkie directly regulates the transcription of the Drosophila IκB homolog, Cactus, in Toll receptor-mediated antimicrobial response. Loss of Hippo pathway tumor suppressors or activation of Yorkie in fat bodies, the Drosophila immune organ, leads to elevated cactus mRNA levels, decreased expression of antimicrobial peptides, and vulnerability to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, Gram-positive bacteria acutely activate Hippo-Yorkie signaling in fat bodies via the Toll-Myd88-Pelle cascade through Pelle-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of the Cka subunit of the Hippo-inhibitory STRIPAK PP2A complex. Our studies elucidate a Toll-mediated Hippo signaling pathway in antimicrobial response, highlight the importance of regulating IκB/Cactus transcription in innate immunity, and identify Gram-positive bacteria as extracellular stimuli of Hippo signaling under physiological settings. PMID:26824654

  13. Kainate receptors mediate signaling in both transient and sustained OFF bipolar cell pathways in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Borghuis, Bart G; Looger, Loren L; Tomita, Susumu; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-04-30

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors.

  14. NK-1 receptor mediation of neurogenic plasma extravasation in rat skin.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, P. V.; Helme, R. D.; Thomas, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    1. Plasma extravasation was induced by electrical nerve stimulation and by perfusion of tachykinins over a vacuum-induced blister base on rat footpad. 2. Stimulation of the sciatic nerve (18 V, 15 Hz, 0.5 ms) for 20 min produced a significant increase in the protein content of the perfusate. The response in capsaicin pretreated rats was only 4% of the control response. This indicates that the electrically-induced plasma extravasation response was mediated by capsaicin-sensitive sensory fibres. 3. Exogenous perfusion of the mammalian tachykinins substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B and the non-mammalian tachykinins physalaemin, kassinin and eledoisin was used to determine the tachykinin receptor type mediating the plasma extravasation response. Dose-response curves of the tachykinins (10(-9) M-10(-4) M) gave a rank order of potency of substance P = physalaemin greater than eledoisin greater than or equal to kassinin greater than neurokinin B = neurokinin A. 4. In addition, specific agonists of neurokinin receptors were perfused. Perfusion of [Glp6, D-Pro9] SP6-11 and [Glp6, L-Pro9]SP6-11 demonstrated that the L-Pro isomer was much more potent than the D-Pro isomer. 5. The rank order of potency and the greater potency of [Glp6, L-Pro9]SP6-11 over its D-isomer indicate an NK-1 neurokinin receptor mediates plasma extravasation in rat footpad skin. PMID:2477105

  15. Lactate Modulates the Activity of Primary Cortical Neurons through a Receptor-Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism. PMID:23951229

  16. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  17. Internalisation of the bleomycin molecules responsible for bleomycin toxicity: a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Mahrour, N; Orlowski, S; Tounekti, O; Poddevin, B; Belehradek, J; Mir, L M

    1999-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) does not diffuse through the plasma membrane but nevertheless displays cytotoxic activity due to DNA break generation. The aim of the study was to describe the mechanism of BLM internalisation. We previously provided evidence for the existence of BLM-binding sites at the surface of DC-3F Chinese hamster fibroblasts, as well as of their involvement in BLM cytotoxicity on DC-3F cells and related BLM-resistant sublines. Here we report that A253 human cells and their BLM-resistant subline C-10E also possessed a membrane protein of ca. 250 kDa specifically binding BLM. Part of this C-10E cell resistance could be explained by a decrease in the number of BLM-binding sites exposed at the cell surface with respect to A253 cells. The comparison between A253 and DC-3F cells exposing a similar number of BLM-binding sites revealed that the faster the fluid phase endocytosis, the greater the cell sensitivity to BLM. Moreover, the experimental modification of endocytotic vesicle size showed that BLM cytotoxicity was directly correlated with the flux of plasma membrane area engulfed during endocytosis rather than with the fluid phase volume incorporated. Thus, BLM would be internalised by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism which would first require BLM binding to its membrane receptor and then the transfer of the complex into intracellular endocytotic vesicles, followed by BLM entry into the cytosol, probably from a nonacidic compartment.

  18. Structural Basis for Receptor-Mediated Selective Autophagy of Aminopeptidase I Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasunori; Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Kuninori; Matoba, Kazuaki; Kirisako, Hiromi; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Noda, Nobuo N

    2016-06-28

    Selective autophagy mediates the degradation of various cargoes, including protein aggregates and organelles, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Cargo receptors ensure selectivity by tethering specific cargo to lipidated Atg8 at the isolation membrane. However, little is known about the structural requirements underlying receptor-mediated cargo recognition. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and cell biological analysis of the major selective cargo protein in budding yeast, aminopeptidase I (Ape1), and its complex with the receptor Atg19. The Ape1 propeptide has a trimeric coiled-coil structure, which tethers dodecameric Ape1 bodies together to form large aggregates. Atg19 disassembles the propeptide trimer and forms a 2:1 heterotrimer, which not only blankets the Ape1 aggregates but also regulates their size. These receptor activities may promote elongation of the isolation membrane along the aggregate surface, enabling sequestration of the cargo with high specificity. PMID:27320913

  19. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteoglycans by human fibroblasts involves recognition of the protein core.

    PubMed Central

    Glössl, J; Schubert-Prinz, R; Gregory, J D; Damle, S P; von Figura, K; Kresse, H

    1983-01-01

    Endocytosis by cultured human skin fibroblasts of 35SO4(2-)-labelled or [3H]leucine-labelled proteoglycans from fibroblast secretions and of 125I-proteodermatan sulphate from pig skin was quantitatively investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) Core proteins prepared by digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase were at least as efficiently endocytosed as native proteoglycans. Pig skin proteodermatan sulphate was a competitive inhibitor of endocytosis of 35SO4(2-)-labelled proteoglycans. (2) Proteoglycans produced in the presence of tunicamycin and native proteoglycans degraded with endoglycosaminidase H were internalized at a normal rate. Several monosaccharides that can be bound by mammalian lectins were unable to influence the internalization of proteoglycans. Treatment of proteoglycans with neuraminidase, however, resulted in an increased clearance rate. (3) Reductive methylation or acetoacetylation of lysine residues was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the rate of proteoglycan endocytosis. Reversal of acetoacetylation normalized the uptake properties. Endocytosis of native proteoglycans was also reduced in the presence of poly-L-lysine, and this reduction in endocytosis was observed as well with proteoglycans synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethylcysteine. These results suggest that the recognition marker required for receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteodermatan sulphate resides in its protein moiety and involves lysine residues. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6316923

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans is internalized by receptor-mediated or 'triggered' phagocytosis, dependent on actin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both 'zipper' (receptor-mediated) and 'trigger' (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  1. Receptor-mediated adhesion phenomena. Model studies with the Radical-Flow Detachment Assay.

    PubMed

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenberger, D A

    1990-07-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion phenomena play a vital role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. To investigate the physical and chemical factors that influence the cell/surface interaction, we have used a radial flow device, a so-called Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA). The RFDA allows us to make direct observations of the detachment process under specified experimental conditions. In results reported here, we have studied the detachment of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) from ligand-coated glass surfaces. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine several aspects of the adhesion process with particles having uniform properties that can be varied systematically. Advantages of the RFDA are many, especially direct observation of cell detachment over a range of shear stresses with quantitative measurement of the adhesive force. We focus our studies on the effects of ligand and receptor densities, along with the influence of pH and ionic strength of the medium. These data are analyzed with a mathematical model based on the theoretical framework of Bell, G. I. (1978. Science [Wash. DC]. 200:618-627) and Hammer, D. A. and D. A. Lauffenburger (1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487). We demonstrate experimental validation of a theoretical expression for the critical shear stress for particle detachment, and show that it is consistent with reasonable estimates for the receptor-ligand bond affinity.

  2. Relationship between alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor occupancy and regulation of intracellular Ca/sup + +/ in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Berger, K.D.; Button, D.; Taylor, P.

    1986-05-01

    The relationship between ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor occupancy by agonists or antagonists and functional response was examined. Receptor occupancy was measured using the antagonist (/sup 3/H)prazosin, and correlated with agonist-elicited unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux. The agonists epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and phenylephrine (PE) activated /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux with the order of potency expected for ..cap alpha../sub 1/ receptors (E greater than or equal to NE > PE). A parabolic relationship suggesting the presence of a modest receptor reserve was observed between the number of activatable receptors after equilibration with specified (/sup 3/H)prazosin concentrations and residual /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux responses elicited by E or NE. A linear relationship was previously observed for PE. Agonist occupancy was independently measured by competition with the initial rate of (/sup 3/H)prazosin association. Both E and NE inhibited (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding over higher concentration ranges than those required to elicit /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux. Equilibration of cultures with agonist prior to measurement of (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding resulted in small decreases in apparent agonist affinities. These results indicate that BC3H-1 cells possess a small ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor reserve for agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux which is reflected in the catecholamine agonists, and that exposure to agonist converts receptors to a state of reduced agonist affinity.

  3. Discovery of the First Environment-Sensitive Near-Infrared (NIR) Fluorogenic Ligand for α1-Adrenergic Receptors Imaging in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhao; Lin, Yuxing; Cheng, Yanna; Wu, Wenxiao; Cai, Rong; Chen, Shouzhen; Shi, Benkang; Han, Bo; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-03-10

    Fluorescent ligands are gaining popularity as tools to aid GPCR research. Nonetheless, in vivo application of such tools is hampered due to their short excitation wavelengths in the visible range and lack of fluorogenic switch. Here we report the discovery of fluorescent ligands (3a-f) for α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) by conjugating the environment-sensitive fluorophore cyane 5 (Cy5) with the quinazoline pharmacophore. Among them, the conjugated compound 3a, with acylated piperazine and the shortest carbon chain spacer, exhibited potent binding and remarkable changes in fluorescence (10-fold) upon binding to α1-AR. Furthermore, it could be employed to selectively and specifically label α1-ARs with no washing procedures in single cells, prostate tissue slices, intact tumor xenografts and organs in living mice. Especially, the slice imaging results gave direct and visual evidence that there is a close relationship between α1-ARs and pathological prostate. It is anticipated that our fluorescent tools will find broad applications in the study of α1-AR pharmacology and physiology to aid development of novel therapeutics. PMID:26821136

  4. Association analysis about HLA-DRB1, -DQB1 polymorphism and auto-antibodies against α(1)-adrenergic receptors in Chinese patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanxiang; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Min; Ma, Shihui; Liao, Yuhua

    2010-01-01

    The auto-antibodies against α(1)-adrenergic receptors (α(1)-AAs) with agonist activity likes norepinephrine have been discovered in patients with essential hypertension but the mechanism of α(1)-AA production remains unclear. We supposed the α(1)-AAs be correlated to the HLA-DQB1 and DRB1 alleles. Three hundred ninety-six patients with essential hypertension (EH) and 224 normotensives were enrolled, and DNA typing was detected by protein coupled receptor (PCR) amplification with sequence-specific primers. Analysis was performed by α(2) and logistic regression. There were the significant associations of the haplotype HLA-DQB1*0301-DRB1*04 with the prevalence of α(1)-AAs in hypertensive patients and it obviously added to the risk for the α(1)-AA production (adjusted P = 0.019, OR 4.037, 95% CI 1.259-12.947). In normotensives, the haplotype HLA-DQB1*05-DRB1*04 provided a strong predisposition in α (1)-AAs production (adjusted P = 0.024, OR 3.922, 95% CI 1.200-12.817). These results suggest the HLA-DRB1*04 might be the primary risk alleles associated with α(1)-AA production on the haplotypes HLA-DQB1*0301-DRB1*04 and HLA-DQB1*05-DRB1*04 and increased the risk for α (1)-AA production.

  5. 3D Structure Prediction of Human β1-Adrenergic Receptor via Threading-Based Homology Modeling for Implications in Structure-Based Drug Designing

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Saeed, Maria; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of left ventricular dysfunction accompanied by impairment of the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) signal cascade. The disturbed β1-AR function may be based on an elevated sympathetic tone observed in patients with heart failure. Prolonged adrenergic stimulation may induce metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances in the myocardium, resulting in tachyarrhythmia that leads to the development of heart failure in human and sudden death. Hence, β1-AR is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop effective and specific drug against this tempting pharmaceutical target is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure of Homo sapiens β1-AR (hsβADR1). This study encompasses elucidation of 3D structural and physicochemical properties of hsβADR1 via threading-based homology modeling. Furthermore, the docking performance of several docking programs including Surflex-Dock, FRED, and GOLD were validated by re-docking and cross-docking experiments. GOLD and Surflex-Dock performed best in re-docking and cross docking experiments, respectively. Consequently, Surflex-Dock was used to predict the binding modes of four hsβADR1 agonists. This study provides clear understanding of hsβADR1 structure and its binding mechanism, thus help in providing the remedial solutions of cardiovascular, effective treatment of asthma and other diseases caused by malfunctioning of the target protein. PMID:25860348

  6. 3D structure prediction of human β1-adrenergic receptor via threading-based homology modeling for implications in structure-based drug designing.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Saeed, Maria; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of left ventricular dysfunction accompanied by impairment of the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) signal cascade. The disturbed β1-AR function may be based on an elevated sympathetic tone observed in patients with heart failure. Prolonged adrenergic stimulation may induce metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances in the myocardium, resulting in tachyarrhythmia that leads to the development of heart failure in human and sudden death. Hence, β1-AR is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop effective and specific drug against this tempting pharmaceutical target is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure of Homo sapiens β1-AR (hsβADR1). This study encompasses elucidation of 3D structural and physicochemical properties of hsβADR1 via threading-based homology modeling. Furthermore, the docking performance of several docking programs including Surflex-Dock, FRED, and GOLD were validated by re-docking and cross-docking experiments. GOLD and Surflex-Dock performed best in re-docking and cross docking experiments, respectively. Consequently, Surflex-Dock was used to predict the binding modes of four hsβADR1 agonists. This study provides clear understanding of hsβADR1 structure and its binding mechanism, thus help in providing the remedial solutions of cardiovascular, effective treatment of asthma and other diseases caused by malfunctioning of the target protein. PMID:25860348

  7. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Is the Primary Mediator of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Inhibition in Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth; Ache, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    Odorants inhibit as well as excite primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in many animal species. Growing evidence suggests that inhibition of mammalian ORNs is mediated by phosphoinositide (PI) signaling through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and that canonical adenylyl cyclase III signaling and PI3K signaling interact to provide the basis for ligand-induced selective signaling. As PI3K is known to act in concert with phospholipase C (PLC) in some cellular systems, the question arises as to whether they work together to mediate inhibitory transduction in mammalian ORNs. The present study is designed to test this hypothesis. While we establish that multiple PLC isoforms are expressed in the transduction zone of rat ORNs, that odorants can activate PLC in ORNs in situ, and that pharmacological blockade of PLC enhances the excitatory response to an odorant mixture in some ORNs in conjunction with PI3K blockade, we find that by itself PLC does not account for an inhibitory response. We conclude that PLC does not make a measurable independent contribution to odor-evoked inhibition, and that PI3K is the primary mediator of PI-dependent inhibition in mammalian ORNs.

  8. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Is the Primary Mediator of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Inhibition in Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth; Ache, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    Odorants inhibit as well as excite primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in many animal species. Growing evidence suggests that inhibition of mammalian ORNs is mediated by phosphoinositide (PI) signaling through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and that canonical adenylyl cyclase III signaling and PI3K signaling interact to provide the basis for ligand-induced selective signaling. As PI3K is known to act in concert with phospholipase C (PLC) in some cellular systems, the question arises as to whether they work together to mediate inhibitory transduction in mammalian ORNs. The present study is designed to test this hypothesis. While we establish that multiple PLC isoforms are expressed in the transduction zone of rat ORNs, that odorants can activate PLC in ORNs in situ, and that pharmacological blockade of PLC enhances the excitatory response to an odorant mixture in some ORNs in conjunction with PI3K blockade, we find that by itself PLC does not account for an inhibitory response. We conclude that PLC does not make a measurable independent contribution to odor-evoked inhibition, and that PI3K is the primary mediator of PI-dependent inhibition in mammalian ORNs. PMID:27147969

  9. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Is the Primary Mediator of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Inhibition in Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth; Ache, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    Odorants inhibit as well as excite primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in many animal species. Growing evidence suggests that inhibition of mammalian ORNs is mediated by phosphoinositide (PI) signaling through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and that canonical adenylyl cyclase III signaling and PI3K signaling interact to provide the basis for ligand-induced selective signaling. As PI3K is known to act in concert with phospholipase C (PLC) in some cellular systems, the question arises as to whether they work together to mediate inhibitory transduction in mammalian ORNs. The present study is designed to test this hypothesis. While we establish that multiple PLC isoforms are expressed in the transduction zone of rat ORNs, that odorants can activate PLC in ORNs in situ, and that pharmacological blockade of PLC enhances the excitatory response to an odorant mixture in some ORNs in conjunction with PI3K blockade, we find that by itself PLC does not account for an inhibitory response. We conclude that PLC does not make a measurable independent contribution to odor-evoked inhibition, and that PI3K is the primary mediator of PI-dependent inhibition in mammalian ORNs. PMID:27147969

  10. VISUALIZIATION OF CELLULAR PHOSPHOINOSITIDE POOLS WITH GFP-FUSED PROTEIN-DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Tamas; Várnai, Péter

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the method of following phosphoinositide dynamics in live cells. Inositol phospholipids have emerged as universal signaling molecules present in virtually every membrane of eukaryotic cells. Phosphoinositides are present only in tiny amounts compared to structural lipids but are metabolically very active as they are produced and degraded by the numerous inositide kinase and phosphatase enzymes. Phosphoinositides control the membrane-recruitment and activity of many protein signaling-complexes in specific membrane compartments and have been implicated in the regulation of a variety of signaling and trafficking pathways. It has been a challenge to develop methods that allow detection of phosphoinositides at the single cell level. The only available technique in live cell application is based on the use of the same protein domains selected by evolution to recognize cellular phosphoinositides. Some of these isolated protein modules when fused to fluorescent proteins can follow dynamic changes in phosphoinositides. While this technique can provide information on phosphoinositide dynamics in live cells with subcellular resolution and rapidly gained popularity, it also has several limitations that must be taken into account when interpreting the data. Here, we summarize the design and practical use of these constructs and also review important considerations for the interpretation of the data obtained by this technique. PMID:19283730

  11. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R. . E-mail: gpastern@jhmi.edu

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing.

  12. Receptor and non-receptor mediated formation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils of intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Manhart, N; Oismüller, C; Lassnig, A; Spittler, A; Sautner, T; Götzinger, P; Függer, R; Roth, E

    1998-11-27

    Generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) has been implicated in tissue damage in a variety of disease states including sepsis and trauma. On the other hand, generation of ROI in polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) presents a crucial element in the defence of the host against invading microorganisms. In the present study we investigated the generation of superoxide anions (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by neutrophils (PMN)5 of 17 critically ill patients treated at a intensive care unit (ICU) after polytrauma (n = 6), heart operation (n = 6) or during septic shock (n = 5) using flow cytometry. O2- production of PMN from ICU patients was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than that in healthy volunteers (HV) during non-receptor mediated stimulation with phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA) but higher (p < 0.001) during receptor mediated stimulation with formylmethionine-leucine-phenylalanine (FMLP). H2O2 generation of PMN from ICU patients was increased after stimulation with FMLP (p < 0.01) and remained unchanged after stimulation with PMA. Patients in septic shock had lower O2(-)-generation of PMN than did injured patients and patients after heart operations. We conclude that receptor mediated formation of O2- and H2O2 is stimulated in ICU patients. However, in patients in septic shock O2(-)-generation decreases, which potentially might contribute to the immunoparalysis present in septic shock.

  13. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  14. Analysis of hormone-induced changes of phosphoinositide metabolism in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.A.; Fain, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between hormone-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ flux can be investigated using radiolabelled hepatocytes and the subcellular fractions derived from them or from whole liver. Comparison of the results obtained using intact cells to those from subcellular fractions should ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the transmembrane signaling events through which hormone such as vasopressin, angiotensin, and catecholamines acutely activate liver glycogenolysis. The paper reviews hormone-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in intact hepatocytes as well as hepatic enzymes involved in phosphoinositide metabolism. Also discussed is the current status of studies on hormone action in broken cell preparations in liver.

  15. Deciphering the roles of phosphoinositide lipids in phagolysosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Andreas; Haas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Professional phagocytes engulf microbial invaders into plasma membrane-derived phagosomes. These mature into microbicidal phagolysosomes, leading to killing of the ingested microbe. Phagosome maturation involves sequential fusion of the phagosome with early endosomes, late endosomes, and the main degradative compartments in cells, lysosomes. Some bacterial pathogens manipulate the phosphoinositide (PIP) composition of phagosome membranes and are not delivered to phagolysosomes, pointing at a role of PIPs in phagosome maturation. This hypothesis is supported by comprehensive microscopic studies. Recently, cell-free reconstitution of fusion between phagosomes and endo(lyso)somes identified phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] as key regulators of phagolysosome biogenesis. Here, we describe the emerging roles of PIPs in phagosome maturation and we present tools to study PIP involvement in phagosome trafficking using intact cells or purified compartments. PMID:27489580

  16. Requirement of Phosphoinositides Containing Stearic Acid To Control Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Doignon, François; Laquel, Patricia; Testet, Eric; Tuphile, Karine; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are present in very small amounts but are essential for cell signaling, morphogenesis, and polarity. By mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that some PIPs with stearic acyl chains were strongly disturbed in a psi1Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deficient in the specific incorporation of a stearoyl chain at the sn-1 position of phosphatidylinositol. The absence of PIPs containing stearic acid induced disturbances in intracellular trafficking, although the total amount of PIPs was not diminished. Changes in PIPs also induced alterations in the budding pattern and defects in actin cytoskeleton organization (cables and patches). Moreover, when the PSI1 gene was impaired, a high proportion of cells with bipolar cortical actin patches that occurred concomitantly with the bipolar localization of Cdc42p was specifically found among diploid cells. This bipolar cortical actin phenotype, never previously described, was also detected in a bud9Δ/bud9Δ strain. Very interestingly, overexpression of PSI1 reversed this phenotype.

  17. Interactions of legionella effector proteins with host phosphoinositide lipids.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Dolinsky, Stephanie; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    By means of the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system Legionella pneumophila translocates several effector proteins into host cells, where they anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. Thus, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate anchors the effector proteins SidC and SidM, which promote the interaction of LCVs with the ER and the secretory vesicle trafficking -pathway. In this chapter, we describe protocols to (1) identify PI-binding proteins in Legionella lysates using PI-beads, (2) determine PI-binding specificities and affinities of recombinant Legionella effector proteins by protein-lipid overlays, and (3) use Legionella effectors to identify cellular PI lipids.

  18. Phosphoinositide kinase signaling controls ER-PM cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Omnus, Deike J.; Manford, Andrew G.; Bader, Jakob M.; Emr, Scott D.; Stefan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipid dynamics must be precisely regulated for normal cellular function, and disruptions in lipid homeostasis are linked to the progression of several diseases. However, little is known about the sensory mechanisms for detecting membrane composition and how lipid metabolism is regulated in response to membrane stress. We find that phosphoinositide (PI) kinase signaling controls a conserved PDK-TORC2-Akt signaling cascade as part of a homeostasis network that allows the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to modulate essential responses, including Ca2+-regulated lipid biogenesis, upon plasma membrane (PM) stress. Furthermore, loss of ER-PM junctions impairs this protective response, leading to PM integrity defects upon heat stress. Thus PI kinase–mediated ER-PM cross-talk comprises a regulatory system that ensures cellular integrity under membrane stress conditions. PMID:26864629

  19. In vivo tracking of phosphoinositides in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, Roger C.; Liu, Che-Hsiung; Randall, Alexander S.; Sengupta, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to monitor phosphoinositide turnover during phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated Drosophila phototransduction, fluorescently tagged lipid probes were expressed in photoreceptors and imaged both in dissociated cells, and in eyes of intact living flies. Of six probes tested, TbR332H (a mutant of the Tubby protein pleckstrin homology domain) was judged the best reporter for phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], and the P4M domain from Legionella SidM for phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P). Using accurately calibrated illumination, we found that only ∼50% of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and very little PtdIns4P were depleted by full daylight intensities in wild-type flies, but both were severely depleted by ∼100-fold dimmer intensities in mutants lacking Ca2+-permeable transient receptor potential (TRP) channels or protein kinase C (PKC). Resynthesis of PtdIns4P (t½ ∼12 s) was faster than PtdIns(4,5)P2 (t½ ∼40 s), but both were greatly slowed in mutants of DAG kinase (rdgA) or PtdIns transfer protein (rdgB). The results indicate that Ca2+- and PKC-dependent inhibition of PLC is required for enabling photoreceptors to maintain phosphoinositide levels despite high rates of hydrolysis by PLC, and suggest that phosphorylation of PtdIns4P to PtdIns(4,5)P2 is the rate-limiting step of the cycle. PMID:26483384

  20. Receptor-mediated uptake of ferritin-bound iron by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kalgaonkar, Swati; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Ferritin (Ft) is a large iron (Fe)-binding protein ( approximately 450 kDa) that is found in plant and animal cells and can sequester up to 4500 Fe atoms per Ft molecule. Our previous studies on intestinal Caco-2 cells have shown that dietary factors affect the uptake of Fe from Ft in a manner different from that of Fe from FeSO4, suggesting a different mechanism for cellular uptake. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism for Ft-Fe uptake using Caco-2 cells. Binding of (59)Fe-labeled Ft at 4 degrees C showed saturable kinetics, and Scatchard analysis resulted in a K(d) of 1.6 muM, strongly indicating a receptor-mediated process. Competitive binding studies with excess unlabelled Ft significantly reduced binding, and uptake studies at 37 degrees C showed saturation after 4 h. Enhancing and blocking endocytosis using Mas-7 (a G-protein activator) and hypertonic medium (0.5 M sucrose), respectively, demonstrated that Ft-Fe uptake by Mas-7-treated cells was 140% of control cells, whereas sucrose treatment resulted in a statistically significant reduction in Ft-Fe uptake by 70% as compared to controls. Inhibition of macropinocytosis with 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride (Na+/H+ antiport blocker) resulted in a decrease (by approximately 20%) in Ft-Fe uptake at high concentrations of Ft, suggesting that enterocytes can use more than one Ft uptake mechanism in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that Ft uptake by enterocytes is carried out via endocytosis when Ft levels are within a physiological range, whereas Ft at higher concentrations may be absorbed using the additional mechanism of macropinocytosis. PMID:18602806

  1. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  2. Receptor-mediated mechanism for the transport of prolactin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.J.; Slaby, F.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1987-05-01

    Prolactin (PRL) interacts with areas of the central nervous system which reside behind the blood-brain barrier. While vascular PRL does not cross this barrier, it is readily accessible to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from which it may gain access to the PRL-responsive areas of the brain. Studies were undertaken to characterize the mechanism responsible for the translocation of PRL from blood to CSF. Rats were given external jugular vein injections of (/sup 125/-I)iodo-PRL in the presence or absence of an excess of unlabeled ovine PRL (oPRL), human GH, bovine GH, or porcine insulin. CSF and choroid plexus were removed 60 min later. CSF samples were electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gels and resultant autoradiographs were analyzed with quantitative microdensitometry. The data revealed that unlabeled lactogenic hormones, viz. oPRL and human GH, caused a statistically significant inhibition of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport from blood to CSF. In contrast, nonlactogenic hormones, viz bovine GH and insulin, had no effect on (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport into the CSF. An identical pattern of competition was observed in the binding of hormone to the choroid plexus. Furthermore, vascular injections of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL administered with a range of concentrations of unlabeled oPRL revealed a dose-response inhibition in the transport of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL from blood to CSF. The study demonstrates that PRL enters the CSF by a specific, PRL receptor-mediated transport mechanism. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that the transport mechanism resides at the choroid plexus. The existence of this transport mechanism reflects the importance of the cerebroventricular system in PRL-brain interactions.

  3. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  4. Central beta-adrenergic receptors mediate renal nerve activity during stress in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Koepke, J P; DiBona, G F

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (d,l-propranolol or timolol, 30 micrograms in 2 microL of isotonic saline) on the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) responses to stressful environmental stimulation (air jet to head) in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were examined. Before i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress increased renal activity (68% from 10.6 +/- 2.1 and 63% from 8.2 +/- 0.9 integrator resets/min respectively). In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol in the same conscious SHR, air stress had no effect on renal sympathetic nerve activity (+7% from 8.1 +/- 1.7 and +7% from 5.5 +/- 1.0 integrator resets/min respectively). Air stress decreased UNaV in conscious SHR given i.c.v. saline vehicle (25% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 microEq/min/100 g body weight), but had no effect on effective renal plasma flow or glomerular filtration rate. In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress had no effect on UNaV (0% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 and +9% from 3.3 +/- 0.3 microEq/min/100 g body weight respectively). Mean arterial pressure increased similarly during air stress with i.c.v. saline-vehicle or beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists. Intravenous administration of the same doses of d,l-propranolol or timolol did not prevent the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity or decreased UNaV responses resulting from air stress. These results suggest that central nervous system beta-adrenergic receptors mediate the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased UNaV responses resulting from stressful environmental stimulation in conscious SHR.

  5. Antihistamine terfenadine potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated calcium influx, oxygen radical formation, and neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Trelles, R; Novelli, A; Vega, J A; Marini, A; Fernández-Sánchez, M T

    2000-10-13

    We previously reported that the histamine H1 receptor antagonist terfenadine enhances the excitotoxic response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonists in cerebellar neurons. Here we investigated whether this unexpected action of terfenadine relates to its antihistamine activity, and which specific events in the signal cascade coupled to NMDA receptors are affected by terfenadine. Low concentrations of NMDA (100 microM) or glutamate (15 microM) that were only slightly (<20%) toxic when added alone, caused extensive cell death in cultures pre-exposed to terfenadine (5 microM) for 5 h. Terfenadine potentiation of NMDA receptor response was mimicked by other H1 antagonists, including chlorpheniramine (25 microM), oxatomide (20 microM), and triprolidine (50 microM), was prevented by histamine (1 mM), and did not require RNA synthesis. Terfenadine increased NMDA-mediated intracellular calcium and cGMP synthesis by approximately 2.4 and 4 fold respectively. NMDA receptor-induced cell death in terfenadine-treated neurons was associated with a massive production of hydrogen peroxides, and was significantly inhibited by the application of either (+)-alpha-tocopherol (200 microM) or the endogenous antioxidant melatonin (200 microM) 15 min before or up to 30 min after receptor stimulation. This operational time window suggests that an enduring production of reactive oxygen species is critical for terfenadine-induced NMDA receptor-mediated neurodegeneration, and strengthens the importance of antioxidants for the treatment of excitotoxic injury. Our results also provide direct evidence for antihistamine drugs enhancing the transduction signaling activated by NMDA receptors in cerebellar neurons.

  6. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin and recycling of the transferrin receptor in rat reticulocytes

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    At 4 degrees C transferrin bound to receptors on the reticulocyte plasma membrane, and at 37 degrees C receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin occurred. Uptake at 37 degrees C exceeded binding at 4 degrees C by 2.5-fold and saturated after 20-30 min. During uptake at 37 degrees C, bound transferrin was internalized into a trypsin- resistant space. Trypsinization at 4 degrees C destroyed surface receptors, but with subsequent incubation at 37 degrees C, surface receptors rapidly appeared (albeit in reduced numbers), and uptake occurred at a decreased level. After endocytosis, transferrin was released, apparently intact, into the extracellular space. At 37 degrees C colloidal gold-transferrin (AuTf) clustered in coated pits and then appeared inside various intracellular membrane-bounded compartments. Small vesicles and tubules were labeled after short (5-10 min) incubations at 37 degrees C. Larger multivesicular endosomes became heavily labeled after longer (20-35 min) incubations. Multivesicular endosomes apparently fused with the plasma membrane and released their contents by exocytosis. None of these organelles appeared to be lysosomal in nature, and 98% of intracellular AuTf was localized in acid phosphatase-negative compartments. AuTf, like transferrin, was released with subsequent incubation at 37 degrees C. Freeze-dried and freeze-fractured reticulocytes confirmed the distribution of AuTf in reticulocytes and revealed the presence of clathrin-coated patches amidst the spectrin coating the inner surface of the plasma membrane. These data suggest that transferrin is internalized via coated pits and vesicles and demonstrate that transferrin and its receptor are recycled back to the plasma membrane after endocytosis. PMID:6309857

  7. Scavenger Receptors Mediate the Role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talamillo, Ana; Herboso, Leire; Pirone, Lucia; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Sánchez, Jonatan; Mayor, Ugo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S.; Sutherland, James D.; Barrio, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval–pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor), the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi–mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues. PMID:23637637

  8. Desensitization of histamine H1 receptor-mediated inositol phosphate production in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, D. R.; Zamani, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Histamine stimulated the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates (IPn) in control HeLa cells with an EC50 of 3.7 +/- 0.7 microM in the presence of 10 mM LiCl. The maximum response to histamine after 15 min incubation was 43 +/- 5% over basal accumulation and occurred at a concentration of 1 mM histamine. 2. The histamine-induced IPn production in HeLa cells was confirmed as H1 receptor-mediated, since the H1 antagonist mepyramine (10(-6) M) inhibited the histamine response (10(-4) M) by 83 +/- 7%, whereas the H2 antagonist, ranitidine (10(-4) M), and H3 antagonist, thioperamide (10(-6) M), were ineffective. 3. Histamine (10(-4) M) pretreatment of HeLa cells for 30 min desensitized the subsequent histamine-induced IPn accumulation. The desensitized cells accumulated IPn in response to histamine with an EC50 of 1.7 +/- 0.7 microM after 15 min incubation. The maximum histamine-induced IPn accumulation at 10(-4) M was 19 +/- 5% over basal and was significantly lower (P < 0.03) than the maximum response in control cells. 4. The desensitization of histamine-induced IPn accumulation was time-dependent and, at a desensitizing histamine concentration of 10(-4) M, the half-maximal attenuation occurred after approximately 9 min and maximum desensitization was achieved by 15-20 min. The desensitization of the IPn accumulation was a reversible phenomenon and full recovery of the response occurred 150 min after the removal of the desensitizing histamine-containing medium. The half-time for the recovery of the histamine-induced response was estimated at 120 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358540

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating vasoconstriction in pulmonary arteries from control and pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; Sweeney, G.; Baird, M.; McCulloch, K. M.; Houslay, M.; Morecroft, I.

    1996-01-01

    1. We investigated 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-receptor mediated vasoconstriction in the main, first branch and resistance pulmonary arteries removed from control and pulmonary hypertensive rats. Contractile responses to 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, non-selective 5-HT1 agonist), and sumatriptan (5-HT1D-like receptor agonist) were studied. The effects of methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT1 + 2-receptor antagonist) and ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist) and GR55562 (a novel selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist) on 5-HT-mediated responses were also studied. Basal levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic AMP]i) and guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic GMP]i) were determined and we assessed the degree of inherent tone in the vessels under study. 2. 5-HT was most potent in the resistance arteries. pEC50 values were 5.6 +/- 0.1, 5.3 +/- 0.1, 5.0 +/- 0.2 in the resistance arteries, pulmonary branch and main pulmonary artery, respectively (n = at least 5 from 5 animals). The sensitivity to, and maximum response of, 5-HT was increased in all the arteries removed from the chronic hypoxic (CH) rats. In CH rats the pEC50 values were 5.9 +/- 0.2, 6.3 +/- 0.2, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and the increase in the maximum response was 35%, 51% and 41% in the resistance arteries, pulmonary branch and main pulmonary artery, respectively. Sumatriptan did not contract any vessel from the control rats whilst 5-CT did contract the resistance arteries. In the CH rats, however, they both contracted the resistance arteries (responses to sumatriptan were small) (pEC50: 5-CT; 5.4 +/- 0.2) and the pulmonary artery branches (pEC50: sumatriptan, 5.4 +/- 0.2; 5-CT, 5.4 +/- 0.2). 5-CT also caused a contraction in the main pulmonary artery (pEC50: 6.0 +/- 0.3). 3. Ketanserin (1 nM-1 microM) caused a competitive antagonism of the 5-HT response in all vessels tested. In control rats, the estimated pKb values for ketanserin in resistance arteries, pulmonary branches and main pulmonary

  10. Functional cross-talk between the α1- and β1-adrenergic receptors modulates the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Di; Wang, Sen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Qian, Jin; Guo, Yan

    2014-08-15

    The rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) plays a critical role in cardiac repolarization. Although IKr is known to be regulated by both α1- and β1-adrenergic receptors (ARs), the cross-talk and feedback mechanisms that dictate its response to α1- and β1-AR activation are not known. In the present study, IKr was recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. IKr amplitude was measured before and after the sequential application of selective adrenergic agonists targeting α1- and β1-ARs. Stimulation of either receptor alone (α1-ARs using 1 μM phenylephrine (PE) or β1-ARs using 10 μM xamoterol (Xamo)) reduced IKr by 0.22 ± 0.03 and 0.28 ± 0.01, respectively. The voltage-dependent activation curve of IKr shifted in the negative direction. The half-maximal activation voltage (V0.5) was altered by -6.35 ± 1.53 and -1.95 ± 2.22 mV, respectively, with no major change in the slope factor (k). When myocytes were pretreated with Xamo, PE-induced reduction in IKr was markedly blunted and the corresponding change in V0.5 was significantly altered. Similarly, when cells were pretreated with PE, Xamo-induced reduction of IKr was significantly attenuated. The present results demonstrate that functional cross-talk between α1- and β1-AR signaling regulates IKr. Such non-linear regulation may form a protective mechanism under excessive adrenergic stimulation.

  11. Y27632, a Rho-activated kinase inhibitor, normalizes dysregulation in alpha1-adrenergic receptor-induced contraction of Lyon hypertensive rat artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Maria Regina; Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A; Schott, Christa; Sassard, Jean; Stoclet, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    RhoA-activated kinase (ROK) is involved in disorders of smooth muscle contraction found in hypertension model animals and patients. We examined whether the α1-adrenergic receptor agonist-induced ROK signal is perturbed in resistance small mesentery artery (SMA) of Lyon genetically hypertensive (LH) rats, using a ROK antagonist, Y27632. Smooth muscle strips of SMA and aorta were isolated from LH and Lyon normotensive (LN) rats. After Ca2+-depletion and pre-treatment with phenylephrine (PE), smooth muscle contraction was induced by serial additions of CaCl2. In LH SMA Ca2+ permeated cells to a lesser extent as compared to LN SMA, while CaCl2-induced contraction of LH SMA was greater than that of LN SMA, indicating a higher ratio of force to Ca2+ in LH SMA contraction (Ca2+ sensitization). No hyper-contraction was observed in LH aorta tissues. Treatment of LH SMA with Y27632 restored both Ca2+ permeability and Ca2+-force relationship to levels seen for LN SMA. In response to PE stimulation, phosphorylation of CPI-17, a phosphorylation-dependent myosin phosphatase inhibitor protein, and MYPT1 at Thr853, the inhibitory phosphorylation site of the myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit, was increased in LN SMA, but remained unchanged in LH SMA. These results suggest that the disorder in ROK-dependent Ca2+ permeability and Ca2+-force relationship is responsible for LH SMA hyper-contraction. Unlike other hypertensive models, the ROK-induced hyper-contractility of LH SMA is independent of MYPT1 and CPI-17 phosphorylation, which suggests that ROK-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase does not affect SMA hyper-contractility in LH SMA cells. PMID:19298234

  12. Synthetic catecholamine triggers β1-adrenergic receptor activation and stimulates cardiotoxicity via oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death in rats: Abrogating action of thymol.

    PubMed

    Meeran, M F Nagoor; Jagadeesh, G S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, there are considerable interests in the studies which are more connected with the impact of natural antioxidants against the free radical mediated damage in biological systems. Cardiotoxicity is one of the lethal manifestations of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) which have been associated with the incidence of apoptotic cell death due to oxidative stress. We evaluated the impact of thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol on isoproterenol (ISO), a synthetic catecholamine and a β1-adrenergic receptor agonist in rats. Thymol (7.5 mg/kg body weight) was pre and co-treated into male albino Wistar rats daily for a period of 7 days. Induction of cardiotoxicity was done by the subcutaneous administration of ISO (100 mg/kg body weight) into rats on 6th and 7th day. Cardiotoxicity in rats was confirmed by the increased levels/activity of serum troponin-T and creatine kinase in the serum alongwith decreased activity of creatine kinase in the heart. ISO induced cardiotoxic rats also showed a significant increase in the concentrations of lipid peroxidation products and a significant decrease in the activities/levels of antioxidants in the myocardium whereas Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction study revealed an increased expression of caspase-8, caspase-9 and Fas genes along with a decreased expression of Bcl-xL gene in the myocardium. Thymol pre and co-treated ISO induced cardiotoxic rats showed considerable protective effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Histopathological and in vitro findings are found in line with our biochemical findings. Thus, the present study revealed that thymol counters ISO induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in rats by virtue of its potent antioxidant property. PMID:26996544

  13. Heteromerization of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 with α1A/B-adrenergic receptors controls α1-adrenergic receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhishek; Vana, P. Geoff; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Byron, Kenneth L.; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Volkman, Brian F.; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) contributes to the regulation of blood pressure through interactions with α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) in vascular smooth muscle. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, are unknown. Using proximity ligation assays to visualize single-molecule interactions, we detected that α1A/B-ARs associate with CXCR4 on the cell surface of rat and human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Furthermore, α1A/B-AR could be coimmunoprecipitated with CXCR4 in a HeLa expression system and in human VSMC. A peptide derived from the second transmembrane helix of CXCR4 induced chemical shift changes in the NMR spectrum of CXCR4 in membranes, disturbed the association between α1A/B-AR and CXCR4, and inhibited Ca2+ mobilization, myosin light chain (MLC) 2 phosphorylation, and contraction of VSMC upon α1-AR activation. CXCR4 silencing reduced α1A/B-AR:CXCR4 heteromeric complexes in VSMC and abolished phenylephrine-induced Ca2+ fluxes and MLC2 phosphorylation. Treatment of rats with CXCR4 agonists (CXCL12, ubiquitin) reduced the EC50 of the phenylephrine-induced blood pressure response three- to fourfold. These observations suggest that disruption of the quaternary structure of α1A/B-AR:CXCR4 heteromeric complexes by targeting transmembrane helix 2 of CXCR4 and depletion of the heteromeric receptor complexes by CXCR4 knockdown inhibit α1-AR–mediated function in VSMC and that activation of CXCR4 enhances the potency of α1-AR agonists. Our findings extend the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating α1-AR and provide an example of the importance of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromerization for GPCR function. Compounds targeting the α1A/B-AR:CXCR4 interaction could provide an alternative pharmacological approach to modulate blood pressure. PMID:25775528

  14. Association of 14-3-3 Proteins to β1-Adrenergic Receptors Modulates Kv11.1 K+ Channel Activity in Recombinant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tutor, Antonio S.; Delpón, Eva; Caballero, Ricardo; Gómez, Ricardo; Núñez, Lucía; Vaquero, Miguel; Tamargo, Juan; Penela, Petronila

    2006-01-01

    We identify a new mechanism for the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR)-mediated regulation of human ether-a-go-go–related gene (HERG) potassium channel (Kv11.1). We find that the previously reported modulatory interaction between Kv11.1 channels and 14-3-3ε proteins is competed by wild type β1AR by means of a novel interaction between this receptor and 14-3-3ε. The association between β1AR and 14-3-3ε is increased by agonist stimulation in both transfected cells and heart tissue and requires cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. The β1AR/14-3-3ε association is direct, since it can be recapitulated using purified 14-3-3ε and β1AR fusion proteins and is abolished in cells expressing β1AR phosphorylation–deficient mutants. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies of the effects of isoproterenol on Kv11.1 currents recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp demonstrated that β1AR phosphorylation–deficient mutants do not recruit 14-3-3ε away from Kv11.1 and display a markedly altered agonist-mediated modulation of Kv11.1 currents compared with wild-type β1AR, increasing instead of inhibiting current amplitudes. Interestingly, such differential modulation is not observed in the presence of 14-3-3 inhibitors. Our results suggest that the dynamic association of 14-3-3 proteins to both β1AR and Kv11.1 channels is involved in the adrenergic modulation of this critical regulator of cardiac repolarization and refractoriness. PMID:16914520

  15. Mst1 inhibition rescues β1-adrenergic cardiomyopathy by reducing myocyte necrosis and non-myocyte apoptosis rather than myocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Grace J.; Yan, Lin; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    It is generally held that inhibition of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1) protects the heart through reducing myocyte apoptosis. We determined whether inhibition with a dominant-negative Mst1 (DN-Mst1) would protect against the cardiomyopathy induced by chronic β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) stimulation by preventing myocyte apoptosis. DN-Mst1 mice were mated with β1-AR transgenic (Tg) mice and followed for 20 months. β1-AR Tg mice developed cardiomyopathy as they aged, as reflected by premature mortality and depressed cardiac function, which were rescued in β1-AR × DN-Mst1 bigenic mice. Surprisingly, myocyte apoptosis did not significantly decrease with Mst1 inhibition. Instead, Mst1 inhibition predominantly reduced non-myocyte apoptosis, e.g., fibroblasts, macrophages, neutrophils and endothelial cells. Fibrosis in the hearts with cardiomyopathy increased fivefold and this increase was nearly abolished in the bigenic mice with Mst1 inhibition. Regression analysis showed no correlation between myocyte apoptosis and cardiac function or myocyte number, whereas the latter two correlated significantly, p < 0.05, with fibrosis, which generally results from necrosis. To examine the role of myocyte necrosis, chronic β-AR stimulation with isoproterenol was induced for 24 h and myocyte necrosis was assessed by 1 % Evans blue dye. Compared to WT, DN-Mst1 mice showed significant inhibition, p < 0.05, of myocyte necrosis. We confirmed this result in Mst1-knockout mice, which also showed significant protection, p < 0.05, against myocyte necrosis compared to WT. These data indicate that Mst1 inhibition rescued cardiac fibrosis and myocardial dysfunction in β1-AR cardiomyopathy. However, this did not occur through Mst1 inhibition of myocyte apoptosis but rather by inhibition of cardiomyocyte necrosis and non-myocyte apoptosis, features of Mst1 not considered previously. PMID:25600225

  16. The Phox homology (PX) domain, a new player in phosphoinositide signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Seet, L F; Hanson, B; Hong, W

    2001-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are key regulators of diverse cellular processes. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain mediates the action of PtdIns(3,4)P(2), PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), while the FYVE domain relays the pulse of PtdIns3P. The recent establishment that the Phox homology (PX) domain interacts with PtdIns3P and other phosphoinositides suggests another mechanism by which phosphoinositides can regulate/integrate multiple cellular events via a spectrum of PX domain-containing proteins. Together with the recent discovery that the epsin N-terminal homologue (ENTH) domain interacts with PtdIns(4,5)P(2), it is becoming clear that phosphoinositides regulate diverse cellular events through interactions with several distinct structural motifs present in many different proteins. PMID:11736640

  17. Inositol metabolism in WRK-1 cells. Relationship of hormone-sensitive to -insensitive pools of phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, M.E.

    1987-09-25

    Previous studies have indicated the existence of two separate pools of phosphoinositides in WRK-1 cells; one is labile and hormone-sensitive with respect to turnover, while the other is stable. Hormonal stimulation results in a rapid increase in /sup 32/Pi incorporation into the sensitive pool, while in the absence of hormone, incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into this pool is slow. Results are quite different when (/sup 3/H)inositol is the precursor utilized. Incorporation of (/sup 3/H)inositol into hormone-sensitive phosphoinositides is not stimulated in the presence of hormone, suggesting entry of this exogenous precursor into the cycle by a route other than the resynthetic phase of the cycle. Furthermore, failure of hormone to induce loss of (/sup 3/H)phosphoinositide in pulse-chase experiments in the absence of lithium suggests reutilization of the (/sup 3/H)inositol moiety generated by phosphodiesteratic cleavage of hormone-sensitive phosphoinositide. Time course studies indicate that the relative rates of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)inositol into sensitive and insensitive phosphoinositide remain constant from 2 to 24 h. Several factors are capable of increasing (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation into hormone-insensitive phosphoinositide including vasopressin, calcium ionophores, and manganese. On the other hand, vasopressin treatment appears to decrease incorporation of (/sup 3/H)inositol into the hormone-sensitive pool, probably by shifting the equilibrium between phosphoinositides and inositol phosphates, since the decrease in radioactivity observed in the phosphoinositides is equaled by the increase observed in that in the inositol phosphates.

  18. Phosphoinositide kinases and the synthesis of polyphosphoinositides in higher plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobak, B. K.; Dewey, R. E.; Boss, W. F.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a family of inositol-containing phospholipids which are present in all eukaryotic cells. Although in most cells these lipids, with the exception of phosphatidylinositol, constitute only a very minor proportion of total cellular lipids, they have received immense attention by researchers in the past 15-20 years. This is due to the discovery that these lipids, rather than just having structural functions, play key roles in a wide range of important cellular processes. Much less is known about the plant phosphoinositides than about their mammalian counterparts. However, it has been established that a functional phosphoinositide system exists in plant cells and it is becoming increasingly clear that inositol-containing lipids are likely to play many important roles throughout the life of a plant. It is not our intention to give an exhaustive overview of all aspects of the field, but rather we focus on the phosphoinositide kinases responsible for the synthesis of all phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol. Also, we mention some of the aspects of current phosphoinositide research which, in our opinion, are most likely to provide a suitable starting point for further research into the role of phosphoinositides in plants.

  19. Phosphoinositide kinases and the synthesis of polyphosphoinositides in higher plant cells.

    PubMed

    Drøbak, B K; Dewey, R E; Boss, W F

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a family of inositol-containing phospholipids which are present in all eukaryotic cells. Although in most cells these lipids, with the exception of phosphatidylinositol, constitute only a very minor proportion of total cellular lipids, they have received immense attention by researchers in the past 15-20 years. This is due to the discovery that these lipids, rather than just having structural functions, play key roles in a wide range of important cellular processes. Much less is known about the plant phosphoinositides than about their mammalian counterparts. However, it has been established that a functional phosphoinositide system exists in plant cells and it is becoming increasingly clear that inositol-containing lipids are likely to play many important roles throughout the life of a plant. It is not our intention to give an exhaustive overview of all aspects of the field, but rather we focus on the phosphoinositide kinases responsible for the synthesis of all phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol. Also, we mention some of the aspects of current phosphoinositide research which, in our opinion, are most likely to provide a suitable starting point for further research into the role of phosphoinositides in plants.

  20. The Impact of Hyperthermia on Receptor-Mediated Interleukin-6 Regulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Welc, Steven S.; Morse, Deborah A.; Mattingly, Alex J.; Laitano, Orlando; King, Michelle A.; Clanton, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    In inflammatory cells, hyperthermia inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression and protein secretion. Since hyperthermia alone stimulates IL-6 in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that it would amplify responses to other receptor-mediated stimuli. IL-6 regulation was tested in C2C12 myotubes and in soleus during treatment with epinephrine (EPI) or LPS. In EPI-treated myotubes (100 ng/ml), 1 h exposure at 40.5°C-42°C transiently increased IL-6 mRNA compared to EPI treatment alone at 37°C. In LPS-treated myotubes (1 μg/ml), exposure to 41°C-42°C also increased IL-6 mRNA. In isolated mouse soleus, similar amplifications of IL-6 gene expression were observed in 41°C, during both low (1 ng/ml) and high dose (100 ng/ml) EPI, but only in high dose LPS (1 μg/ml). In myotubes, heat increased IL-6 secretion during EPI exposure but had no effect or inhibited secretion with LPS. In soleus there were no effects of heat on IL-6 secretion during either EPI or LPS treatment. Mechanisms for the effects of heat on IL-6 mRNA were explored using a luciferase-reporter in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) had no impact on IL-6 promoter activity during EPI stimulation, but elevated IL-6 promoter activity during LPS stimulation. In contrast, when the activator protein-1 (AP-1) element was mutated, responses to both LPS and EPI were suppressed in heat. Using siRNA against activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a heat-stress-induced inhibitor of IL-6, no ATF-3-dependent effects were observed. The results demonstrate that, unlike inflammatory cells, hyperthermia in muscle fibers amplifies IL-6 gene expression to EPI and LPS. The effect appears to reflect differential engagement of HSF-1 and AP-1 sensitive elements on the IL-6 gene, with no evidence for involvement of ATF-3. The functional significance of increased IL-6 mRNA expression during heat may serve to overcome the well-known suppression of protein synthetic

  1. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  2. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  3. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase reduce receptor-mediated endocytosis in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, James E; Davidson, Robert G; McTaggart, Fergus; Orton, Terry C; Scott, Robert C; Smith, Graham J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-09-01

    Renal proximal tubule cells are responsible for the reabsorption of proteins that are present in the tubular lumen. This occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that has a requirement for some GTP-binding proteins. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase used for the therapeutic reduction of cholesterol-containing plasma lipoproteins. However, they can also reduce intracellular levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates that are derived from the product of the enzyme, mevalonate, and are required for the prenylation and normal function of GTP-binding proteins. The hypothesis that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in renal proximal tubule cells could reduce receptor mediated-endocytosis was therefore tested. Five different statins inhibited the uptake of FITC-labeled albumin by the proximal tubule-derived opossum kidney cell line in a dose-dependent manner and in the absence of cytotoxicity. The reduction in albumin uptake was related to the degree of inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. Simvastatin (e.g., statin) inhibited receptor-mediated endocytosis of both FITC-albumin and FITC-beta(2)-microglobulin to similar extents but without altering the binding of albumin to the cell surface. The effect on albumin endocytosis was prevented by mevalonate and by the isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by cholesterol. Finally, evidence that the inhibitory effect of statins on endocytosis of proteins may be caused by reduced prenylation and thereby decreased function of one or more GTP-binding proteins is provided. These data establish the possibility in principle that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins in proximal tubule cells may reduce tubular protein reabsorption. PMID:15339975

  4. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  5. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  6. In vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors mitigates stress-disturbed cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Bjelic, Maja M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of stress-associated reproductive dysfunction is complex and largely unknown. This study was designed to systematically analyze molecular effects of systemic in vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) on stress-induced disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling in testosterone-producing Leydig cells using the following parameters (i) level of circulating stress hormones, LH and testosterone; (ii) level of main molecular markers of Leydig cell functionality (testosterone, Insl3, cAMP); (iii) expression of cAMP signaling (cAMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers') and (iv) expression of NO-cGMP signaling (NO-cGMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers'). The results showed that oral administration of α1-ADR blocker before stress increased cGMP and diminished stress-reduced cAMP production in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-induced effects on cAMP/cGMP signaling pathways elements were changed. Sustained in vivo α1-ADR blockade completely abolished stress-increased transcription of most abundantly expressed phosphodiesterase that remove cAMP (Pde4b) and potentiated stress-increased expression of PRKA, the main stimulator of Leydig cell steroidogenesis. In the same Leydig cells, stress-decreased NOS3 expression was abolished, while stress-increased GUCY1 (cGMP 'producer') and PRKG1 (cGMP 'effector') were potentiated. It is possible that all molecules mentioned could contribute, at least in part, in recovery of Leydig cell testosterone production. Presented data provide new role of α1-ADRs in stress-triggered disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling, and new molecular insights into the relationship between stress and mammalian reproduction. Regardless of whether the effects of α1-blocker + stress are direct or indirect, the results are important in terms of human reproductive health and the wide use of α1-ADR antagonists, alone or in combination, to treat post-traumatic stress disorders, hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and

  7. Adrenergic stimulation of lipoprotein lipase gene expression in rat brown adipocytes differentiated in culture: mediation via beta3- and alpha1-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kuusela, P; Rehnmark, S; Jacobsson, A; Cannon, B; Nedergaard, J

    1997-01-01

    In order to investigate whether the positive effect of adrenergic stimulation on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene expression in brown adipose tissue is a direct effect on the brown adipocytes themselves, the expression of the LPL gene was investigated by measuring LPL mRNA levels in brown adipocytes, isolated as precursors from the brown adipose tissue of rats and grown in culture in a fully defined medium before experimentation. Addition of noradrenaline led to an enhancement of LPL gene expression; the mRNA levels increased as a linear function of time for at least 5 h and were finally approx. 3 times higher than in control cells, an increase commensurate with that seen in vivo in both LPL mRNA levels and LPL activity during physiological stimulation. The increase was dependent on transcription. The effect of noradrenaline showed simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics with an EC50 of approx. 11 nM. beta3-Agonists (BRL-37344 and CGP-12177) could mimic the effect of noradrenaline; the beta1-agonist dobutamine and the beta2-agonist salbutamol could not; the alpha1-agonist cirazoline had only a weak effect. The effect of noradrenaline was fully inhibited by the beta-antagonist propranolol and was halved by the alpha1-antagonist prazosin; the alpha2-antagonist yohimbine was without effect. An increase in LPL mRNA level similar to (but not significantly exceeding) that caused by noradrenaline could also be induced by the cAMP-elevating agents forskolin and cholera toxin, and 8-Br-cAMP also increased LPL mRNA levels. The increase in LPL gene expression was not mediated via an increase in the level of an intermediary proteinaceous factor. It is concluded that the physiologically induced increase in LPL gene expression is a direct effect of noradrenaline on the brown adipocytes themselves, mediated via a dominant beta3-adrenergic pathway and an auxiliary alpha1-adrenergic pathway which converge at a regulatory point in transcriptional control. PMID:9032464

  8. Cholinergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rabbit kidney slices

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, L.C.; McArdle, S.; Crews, F.T.

    1986-03-01

    The release of inositol phosphates (IP) from phosphoinositides (PI) by carbachol was studied in the tissue slices from cortex (C), outer medulla (OM) and inner medulla (IM) of rabbit kidneys. The method involved the incubation of the slices with (/sup 3/H)inositol for its incorporation into the PI and measurement of the release of IP in presence of lithium which prevents dephosphorylation of IP. The results of (/sup 3/H)IP formation are expressed as % of total (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation in the tissue. No significant effect of carbachol was found on the release of IP in the C. The drug produced a 48% increase in IP release in the OM. In the IM, carbachol produced a concentration dependent increase in IP release with a maximum of 772% at 1 mM. The release of IP in the IM by 1 mM carbachol was completely blocked by 1 ..mu..M atropine. Our results indicate that IP release by carbachol is due to activation of muscarinic receptors in the IM of the rabbit kidney.

  9. At the poles across kingdoms: phosphoinositides and polar tip growth.

    PubMed

    Ischebeck, Till; Seiler, Stephan; Heilmann, Ingo

    2010-04-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are minor, but essential phospholipid constituents of eukaryotic membranes, and are involved in the regulation of various physiological processes. Recent genetic and cell biological advances indicate that PIs play important roles in the control of polar tip growth in plant cells. In root hairs and pollen tubes, PIs control directional membrane trafficking required for the delivery of cell wall material and membrane area to the growing tip. So far, the exact mechanisms by which PIs control polarity and tip growth are unresolved. However, data gained from the analysis of plant, fungal and animal systems implicate PIs in the control of cytoskeletal dynamics, ion channel activity as well as vesicle trafficking. The present review aims at giving an overview of PI roles in eukaryotic cells with a special focus on functions pertaining to the control of cell polarity. Comparative screening of plant and fungal genomes suggests diversification of the PI system with increasing organismic complexity. The evolutionary conservation of the PI system among eukaryotic cells suggests a role for PIs in tip growing cells in models where PIs so far have not been a focus of attention, such as fungal hyphae.

  10. Tools for visualization of phosphoinositides in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kalasova, Ilona; Fáberová, Veronika; Kalendová, Alžběta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Uličná, Lívia; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are glycerol-based phospholipids containing hydrophilic inositol ring. The inositol ring is mono-, bis-, or tris-phosphorylated yielding seven PIs members. Ample evidence shows that PIs localize both to the cytoplasm and to the nucleus. However, tools for direct visualization of nuclear PIs are limited and many studies thus employ indirect approaches, such as staining of their metabolic enzymes. Since localization and mobility of PIs differ from their metabolic enzymes, these approaches may result in incomplete data. In this paper, we tested commercially available PIs antibodies by light microscopy on fixed cells, tested their specificity using protein-lipid overlay assay and blocking assay, and compared their staining patterns. Additionally, we prepared recombinant PIs-binding domains and tested them on both fixed and live cells by light microscopy. The results provide a useful overview of usability of the tools tested and stress that the selection of adequate tools is critical. Knowing the localization of individual PIs in various functional compartments should enable us to better understand the roles of PIs in the cell nucleus.

  11. Live cell imaging of phosphoinositide dynamics during Legionella infection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The "accidental" pathogen Legionella pneumophila replicates intracellularly in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). To form this specific pathogen vacuole, the bacteria translocate via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system approximately 300 different effector proteins into the host cell. Several of these secreted effectors anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. L. pneumophila thus largely controls the localization of secreted bacterial effectors and the recruitment of host factors to the LCV through the modulation of the vacuole membrane PI pattern. The LCV PI pattern and its dynamics can be studied in real-time using fluorescently labeled protein probes stably produced by the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to (1) construct and handle amoeba model systems as a tool for observing PIs in live cell imaging, (2) capture rapid changes in membrane PI patterning during uptake events, and (3) observe the dynamics of LCV PIs over the course of a Legionella infection.

  12. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  13. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase mediated signaling in lobster olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Corey, Elizabeth A; Bobkov, Yuriy; Pezier, Adeline; Ache, Barry W

    2010-04-01

    In vertebrates and some invertebrates, odorant molecules bind to G protein-coupled receptors on olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to initiate signal transduction. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity has been implicated physiologically in olfactory signal transduction, suggesting a potential role for a G protein-coupled receptor-activated class I PI3K. Using isoform-specific antibodies, we identified a protein in the olfactory signal transduction compartment of lobster ORNs that is antigenically similar to mammalian PI3Kgamma and cloned a gene for a PI3K with amino acid homology with PI3Kbeta. The lobster olfactory PI3K co-immunoprecipitates with the G protein alpha and beta subunits, and an odorant-evoked increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate can be detected in the signal transduction compartment of the ORNs. PI3Kgamma and beta isoform-specific inhibitors reduce the odorant-evoked output of lobster ORNs in vivo. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that PI3K is indeed activated by odorant receptors in lobster ORNs and further support the potential involvement of G protein activated PI3K signaling in olfactory transduction.

  14. Requirement of Phosphoinositides Containing Stearic Acid To Control Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Laquel, Patricia; Testet, Eric; Tuphile, Karine; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are present in very small amounts but are essential for cell signaling, morphogenesis, and polarity. By mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that some PIPs with stearic acyl chains were strongly disturbed in a psi1Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deficient in the specific incorporation of a stearoyl chain at the sn-1 position of phosphatidylinositol. The absence of PIPs containing stearic acid induced disturbances in intracellular trafficking, although the total amount of PIPs was not diminished. Changes in PIPs also induced alterations in the budding pattern and defects in actin cytoskeleton organization (cables and patches). Moreover, when the PSI1 gene was impaired, a high proportion of cells with bipolar cortical actin patches that occurred concomitantly with the bipolar localization of Cdc42p was specifically found among diploid cells. This bipolar cortical actin phenotype, never previously described, was also detected in a bud9Δ/bud9Δ strain. Very interestingly, overexpression of PSI1 reversed this phenotype. PMID:26711260

  15. Structure, function, and control of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Rebecchi, M J; Pentyala, S N

    2000-10-01

    Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) subtypes beta, gamma, and delta comprise a related group of multidomain phosphodiesterases that cleave the polar head groups from inositol lipids. Activated by all classes of cell surface receptor, these enzymes generate the ubiquitous second messengers inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. The last 5 years have seen remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular and biological facets of PLCs. New insights into their multidomain arrangement and catalytic mechanism have been gained from crystallographic studies of PLC-delta(1), while new modes of controlling PLC activity have been uncovered in cellular studies. Most notable is the realization that PLC-beta, -gamma, and -delta isoforms act in concert, each contributing to a specific aspect of the cellular response. Clues to their true biological roles were also obtained. Long assumed to function broadly in calcium-regulated processes, genetic studies in yeast, slime molds, plants, flies, and mammals point to specific and conditional roles for each PLC isoform in cell signaling and development. In this review we consider each subtype of PLC in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals and discuss their molecular regulation and biological function. PMID:11015615

  16. Genomic organization and complete cDNA sequence of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 gene (PLCB3)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagercrantz, J.; Carson, E.; Phelan, C.

    1995-04-10

    We have characterized the complete cDNA sequence, genomic structure, and expression of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 (PLC {beta}3) gene (gene symbol PLCB3). PLC {beta}3 plays an important role in initiating receptor-mediated signal transduction. Activation of PLC takes place in many cells as a response to stimulation by hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and other ligands. The partial cDNA sequence of PLC {beta}3, previously published, was extended with 876 bp in the 5{prime} direction, giving a transcript of 4400 bp and a total open reading frame of 1234 amino acids. This was in accordance with expression analysis by Northern blotting that revealed a single 4.4-kb transcript in all tissues tested. Genomic data were obtained by sequencing plasmid subclones of a cosmid that contained the whole gene. The size of the complete transcription unit was estimated to be on the order of 15 kb. The gene contains 31 exons, with all splice donor and acceptor sites conforming to the GT/AG rule. No exon exceeds 571 bp in length, and the shortest exon spans only 36 bp. More than half of the introns are smaller than 200 bp, with the smallest being only 79 bp long. The transcription initiation site was determined to be within an 8-bp cluster 328-321 bp upstream of the translation initiation site. The 5{prime} flanking region is highly GC rich, with multiple CpG doublets, and contains multiple binding sites for Sp1. Lacking typical transcriptional regulatory sequences such as TATA and CAAT boxes, the putative promoter region conforms to the group of housekeeping promoters. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Prostaglandin E(2)-stimulated secretion of protein in the salivary glands of the lone star tick via a phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J; Bowman, A S; Aljamali, M; Payne, M R; Tucker, J S; Dillwith, J W; Essenberg, R C; Sauer, J R

    2000-11-01

    Previous studies identified a prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) receptor in the salivary glands of partially fed female lone star ticks, Amblyomma americanum (L.). In the present studies, protein secretion from dispersed salivary gland acini was shown to be specific for PGE(2), as compared with PGF(2alpha) or the thromboxane analog U-46619, in accordance with their respective binding affinities for the PGE(2) receptor. Furthermore, the selective PGE(2) EP1 receptor agonist, 17-phenyl trinor PGE(2), was as effective as PGE(2) in stimulating secretion of anticoagulant protein. Calcium ionophore A-23187 (1 to 100 microM) stimulated secretion of anticoagulant protein in a dose-dependent manner but the voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channel blocker verapamil (1 to 1000 microM) and the receptor-mediated Ca(2+)-entry antagonist, SK&F 96365 (1 and 10 microM), and 5mM ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,NN', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) had no appreciable effect on inhibiting PGE(2)-stimulated secretion of anticoagulant protein. PGE(2) (0.1 microM) and the non-hydrolyzable analog of guanosine triphosphate (GTP), GTPgammaS (10 microM), directly activated phospholipase C (PLC) in a membrane-enriched fraction of the salivary glands after PLC was first incubated with the PGE(2) EP1 receptor antagonist AH-6809, which presumably antagonized endogenous PGE(2) (0.3 microM) in the broken-cell-membrane-enriched fraction. TMB-8, an antagonist of intracellular inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors, inhibited PGE(2)-stimulated secretion. The results support the hypothesis that PGE(2) stimulates secretion of tick salivary gland protein via a phosphoinositide signaling pathway and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+).

  18. Inositol Pentakisphosphate Isomers Bind PH Domains with Varying Specificity and Inhibit Phosphoinositide Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    S Jackson; S Al-Saigh; C Schultz; M Junop

    2011-12-31

    PH domains represent one of the most common domains in the human proteome. These domains are recognized as important mediators of protein-phosphoinositide and protein-protein interactions. Phosphoinositides are lipid components of the membrane that function as signaling molecules by targeting proteins to their sites of action. Phosphoinositide based signaling pathways govern a diverse range of important cellular processes including membrane remodeling, differentiation, proliferation and survival. Myo-Inositol phosphates are soluble signaling molecules that are structurally similar to the head groups of phosphoinositides. These molecules have been proposed to function, at least in part, by regulating PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Given the structural similarity of inositol phosphates we were interested in examining the specificity of PH domains towards the family of myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. In work reported here we demonstrate that the C-terminal PH domain of pleckstrin possesses the specificity required to discriminate between different myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. The structural basis for this specificity was determined using high-resolution crystal structures. Moreover, we show that while the PH domain of Grp1 does not possess this high degree of specificity, the PH domain of protein kinase B does. These results demonstrate that some PH domains possess enough specificity to discriminate between myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers allowing for these molecules to differentially regulate interactions with phosphoinositides. Furthermore, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting myo-inositol phosphates as regulators of important PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Finally, in addition to expanding our knowledge of cellular signaling, these results provide a basis for developing tools to probe biological pathway.

  19. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    '-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 0.5-1.0 microM) did not significantly affect the EPSPm. 4. The selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 0.2 microM) fully reversed the depressant effects of both adenosine (100 microM) and CADO (1 microM) on the EPSPm and the stimulus-evoked reductions in spike frequency adaptation. 5. DPCPX (0.2 microM) alone caused a small but variable mean increase in the EPSPm of 22 +/- 19% and enabled activation of an EPSPm by a previously subthreshold stimulus. In contrast, the selective adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-IT; 10 microM) inhibited the EPSPm by 74 +/- 10%, an effect that was reversed by DPCPX. 6. The concentration-response relationship for the depressant action of CADO on the EPSPm more closely paralleled that for its presynaptic depressant action on glutamate-mediated EPSPs than that for postsynaptic hyperpolarization. The respective mean IC50 and EC50 concentrations for these effects were 0.3, 0.8 and 3.0 microM. 7. CADO (1-5 microM) did not have a significant effect on the postsynaptic depolarization, increase in input resistance and reduction in spike frequency adaptation evoked by carbachol (0.5-3.0 microM). All these effects were abolished by atropine (1 microM). 8. These data provide good evidence for an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of mAChR-mediated synaptic responses in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. This inhibition is mediated predominantly presynaptically, is active tonically and can be enhanced when extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine are raised. PMID:9234198

  20. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2006-05-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins.

  1. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubule cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J; Stuart, J; Tobin, A B; Walls, J; Nahorski, S

    1998-05-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin is an important function of the kidney proximal tubule epithelium. We have measured endocytosis of [125I]-albumin in opossum kidney cells and examined the regulation of this process by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Albumin endocytosis was inhibited by both wortmannin (IC50 6.9 nM) and LY294002 (IC50 6.5 microM) at concentrations that suggested the involvement of PI 3-kinase in its regulation. Recycling rates were unaffected. We transfected OK cells with either a wild-type p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, or a dominant negative form of the p85 subunit (Deltap85) using the LacSwitch expression system. Transfects were screened by immunoblotting with anti-PI 3-kinase antibodies. Under basal conditions, transfects demonstrated no expression of p85 or Deltap85, but expression was briskly induced by treatment of the cells with IPTG (EC50 13.7 microM). Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity by Deltap85 was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay of anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from transfected cells stimulated with insulin. Expression of Deltap85 resulted in marked inhibition of albumin endocytosis, predominantly as a result of reduction of the Vmax of the transport process. Expression of p85 had no significant effect on albumin uptake. The results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase regulates an early step in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubular cells. PMID:9593770

  2. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins. PMID:16603603

  3. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  4. Activation of innate antiviral immune response via double-stranded RNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Azadzoi, Kazem M.; Su, Ning; Dai, Peng; Sun, Jianbin; Wang, Qin; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Wentao; Lei, Xiaoying; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Viruses induce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the host cells. The mammalian system has developed dsRNA-dependent recognition receptors such as RLRs that recognize the long stretches of dsRNA as PAMPs to activate interferon-mediated antiviral pathways and apoptosis in severe infection. Here we report an efficient antiviral immune response through dsRNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis against infections from different classes of viruses. We demonstrated that virus-infected A549 cells were efficiently killed in the presence of a chimeric RLR receptor, dsCARE. It measurably suppressed the interferon antiviral pathway but promoted IL-1β production. Canonical cell death analysis by morphologic assessment, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase cleavage and chemical inhibition excluded the involvement of apoptosis and consistently suggested RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis as the underlying mechanism of infected cell death. The necroptotic pathway was augmented by the formation of RIP1-RIP3 necrosome, recruitment of MLKL protein and the activation of cathepsin D. Contributing roles of RIP1 and RIP3 were confirmed by gene knockdown. Furthermore, the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 but not the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD impeded dsCARE-dependent infected cell death. Our data provides compelling evidence that the chimeric RLR receptor shifts the common interferon antiviral responses of infected cells to necroptosis and leads to rapid death of the virus-infected cells. This mechanism could be targeted as an efficient antiviral strategy. PMID:26935990

  5. In vitro study on the effects of some selected agonists and antagonists of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors on the contractility of the aneurysmally-changed aortic smooth muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Gnus, J; Czerski, A; Ferenc, S; Zawadzki, W; Witkiewicz, W; Hauzer, W; Rusiecka, A; Bujok, J

    2012-02-01

    The study included 18 sections of the aneurysmally-changed abdominal aortas, obtained from patients of the Provincial Specialist Hospital in Wroclaw and 18 sections of normal abdominal aortas obtained from swine. The collected samples were placed horizontally in the incubation chamber. Changes in their transverse section area were registered. They were stretched to a tension of 5 mN. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was used as the incubatory environment. Incubation of the sections was performed at a temperature of 37°C, in the gaseous mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide used in the following proportion: 95% of O(2) and 5% of CO(2). Contractions of the aorta were registered with isotonic transducers (Letica Scientific Instruments). In the studies, we examined the influence of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (and their subtypes α(1A), α(1B), α(1D)) on the contractility of the aortic muscle in humans and swine by their stimulation or inhibition with some selected agonists or antagonists. This time, it was shown that the stimulation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors leads to contractions of the human and swine aortic muscle; the observed increase in the muscle tone may follow from the stimulation of all subtypes of alpha-1 receptor (α(1A), α(1B), α(1D)). All three subtypes of 1-adrenergic receptor are engaged in vasoconstriction, especially of α(1A) and α(1D) subtypes; the α(1B) subtype is less significant for aortic contractility. The contractile response of the aneurysmally-changed abdominal aorta in humans to agonists of α-adrenergic receptors was significantly less intense than that of the normal porcine aorta. It can be concluded that aneurysms influence the contractile response of the aorta.

  6. [Phosphoinositides: lipidic essential actors in the intracellular traffic].

    PubMed

    Bertazzi, Dimitri L; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Sanjuan-Vazquez, Myriam; Raess, Matthieu A; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PPIn) are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins between the different intracellular compartments. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and are thus involved in crucial cellular functions including vesicle budding, fusion and dynamics of membranes and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Although they are present in low concentrations in membranes, their activity is essential for cell survival and needs to be tightly controlled. Therefore, phosphatases and kinases specific of the various cellular membranes can phosphorylate/dephosphorylate their inositol ring on the positions D3, D4 and/or D5. The differential phosphorylation determines the intracellular localisation and the activity of the PPIn. Indeed, non-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is the basic component of the PPIn and can be found in all eukaryotic cells at the cytoplasmic face of the ER, the Golgi, mitochondria and microsomes. It can get phosphorylated on position D4 to obtain PtdIns4P, a PPIn enriched in the Golgi compartment and involved in the maintenance of this organelle as well as anterograde and retrograde transport to and from the Golgi. PtdIns phosphorylation on position D3 results in PtdIns3P that is required for endosomal transport and multivesicular body (MVB) formation and sorting. These monophosphorylated PtdIns can be further phosphorylated to produce bisphophorylated PtdIns. Thus, PtdIns(4,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation, is enriched in the plasma membrane and involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. PtdIns(3,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns3P phosphorylation, is enriched in late endosomes, MVBs and the lysosome/vacuole and plays a role in endosome to vacuole transport. PtdIns(3,4)P2 is absent in yeast, cells and mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation in human cells; PtdIns(3,4)P2 is localised in the plasma membrane and plays an important role as a second messenger by recruiting

  7. [Phosphoinositides: lipidic essential actors in the intracellular traffic].

    PubMed

    Bertazzi, Dimitri L; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Sanjuan-Vazquez, Myriam; Raess, Matthieu A; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PPIn) are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins between the different intracellular compartments. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and are thus involved in crucial cellular functions including vesicle budding, fusion and dynamics of membranes and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Although they are present in low concentrations in membranes, their activity is essential for cell survival and needs to be tightly controlled. Therefore, phosphatases and kinases specific of the various cellular membranes can phosphorylate/dephosphorylate their inositol ring on the positions D3, D4 and/or D5. The differential phosphorylation determines the intracellular localisation and the activity of the PPIn. Indeed, non-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is the basic component of the PPIn and can be found in all eukaryotic cells at the cytoplasmic face of the ER, the Golgi, mitochondria and microsomes. It can get phosphorylated on position D4 to obtain PtdIns4P, a PPIn enriched in the Golgi compartment and involved in the maintenance of this organelle as well as anterograde and retrograde transport to and from the Golgi. PtdIns phosphorylation on position D3 results in PtdIns3P that is required for endosomal transport and multivesicular body (MVB) formation and sorting. These monophosphorylated PtdIns can be further phosphorylated to produce bisphophorylated PtdIns. Thus, PtdIns(4,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation, is enriched in the plasma membrane and involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. PtdIns(3,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns3P phosphorylation, is enriched in late endosomes, MVBs and the lysosome/vacuole and plays a role in endosome to vacuole transport. PtdIns(3,4)P2 is absent in yeast, cells and mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation in human cells; PtdIns(3,4)P2 is localised in the plasma membrane and plays an important role as a second messenger by recruiting

  8. CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase-controlled phosphoinositide availability limits VEGFA signaling and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weijun; Pham, Van N.; Stratman, Amber N.; Castranova, Daniel; Kamei, Makoto; Kidd, Kameha R.; Lo, Brigid D.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Davis, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis and translating these into effective therapies are of enormous scientific and clinical interests. In this report, we demonstrate the central role of CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase (CDS) in the regulation of VEGFA signaling and angiogenesis. CDS activity maintains phosphoinositide 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) availability through resynthesis of phosphoinositides, whereas VEGFA, mainly through phospholipase Cγ1, consumes PIP2 for signal transduction. Loss of CDS2, 1 of 2 vertebrate CDS enzymes, results in vascular-specific defects in zebrafish in vivo and failure of VEGFA-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells in vitro. Absence of CDS2 also results in reduced arterial differentiation and reduced angiogenic signaling. CDS2 deficit-caused phenotypes can be successfully rescued by artificial elevation of PIP2 levels, and excess PIP2 or increased CDS2 activity can promote excess angiogenesis. These results suggest that availability of CDS-controlled resynthesis of phosphoinositides is essential for angiogenesis. PMID:22649102

  9. Angiotensin II attenuates NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal cell death and prevents the associated reduction in Bcl-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Schelman, William R; Andres, Robert; Ferguson, Paul; Orr, Brent; Kang, Evan; Weyhenmeyer, James A

    2004-09-10

    While angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a major role in the regulation of blood pressure, fluid homeostasis and neuroendocrine function, recent studies have also implicated the peptide hormone in cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. In support of this, we have previously demonstrated that Ang II attenuates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling [Molec. Brain Res. 48 (1997) 197]. To further examine the modulatory role of Ang II on NMDA receptor function, we investigated the effect of angiotensin receptor (AT) activation on NMDA-mediated cell death and the accompanying decrease in Bcl-2 expression. The viability of differentiated N1E-115 and NG108-15 neuronal cell lines was reduced following exposure to NMDA in a dose-dependent manner. MTT analysis (mitochondrial integrity) revealed a decrease in cell survival of 49.4+/-12.3% in NG108 cells and 79.9+/-6.8% in N1E cells following treatment with 10 mM NMDA for 20 h. Cytotoxicity in N1E cells was inhibited by the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801. Further, NMDA receptor-mediated cell death in NG108 cells was attenuated by treatment with Ang II. The Ang II effect was inhibited by both AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists, losartan and PD123319, respectively, suggesting that both receptor subtypes may play a role in the survival effect of Ang II. Since it has been shown that activation of NMDA receptors alters the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, Western blot analysis was performed in N1E cells to determine whether Ang II alters the NMDA-induced changes in Bcl-2 expression. A concentration-dependent decrease of intracellular Bcl-2 protein levels was observed following treatment with NMDA, and this reduction was inhibited by MK801. Addition of Ang II suppressed the NMDA receptor-mediated reduction in Bcl-2. The Ang II effect on NMDA-mediated changes in Bcl-2 levels was blocked by PD123319, but was not significantly changed by losartan, suggesting AT2 receptor specificity. Taken together, these

  10. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  11. Maitotoxin: Effects on calcium channels, phosphoinositide breakdown, and arachidonate release in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, O.H.; Padgett, W.L.; Nishizawa, Y.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-02-01

    Maitotoxin (MTX) increases formation of (3H)inositol phosphates from phosphoinositides and release of (3H)arachidonic acid from phospholipids in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Formation of (3H)inositol phosphates is detected within 1 min of incubation even with concentrations as low as 0.3 ng/ml (90 pm) MTX, whereas release of (3H)arachidonic acid is not detected until 20 min even with concentrations as high as 1 ng/ml (300 pm) MTX. Stimulation of arachidonic acid release can be detected at 0.03 ng/ml (9 pm) MTX, whereas 0.1 ng/ml (30 pm) MTX is the threshold for detection of phosphoinositide breakdown. Organic and inorganic calcium channel blockers, except Cd2+ and a high concentration of Mn2+, have no effect on MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown, whereas inorganic blockers (e.g., Co2+, Mn2+, Cd2+), but not organic blockers (nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem), inhibit MTX-stimulated arachidonic acid release. All calcium channel blockers, however, inhibited MTX-elicited influx of 45Ca2+ and the MTX-elicited increase in internal Ca2+ measured with fura-2 was markedly reduced by nifedipine. MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown and arachidonic acid release are abolished or reduced, respectively, in the absence of extracellular calcium plus chelating agent. The calcium ionophore A23187 has little or no effect alone but, in combination with MTX, A23187 inhibits MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown and enhances arachidonic acid release, the latter even in the absence of extracellular calcium. The results suggest that different sites and/or mechanisms are involved in stimulation of calcium influx, breakdown of phosphoinositides, and release of arachidonic acid by MTX.

  12. Inhibition of the Fc receptor-mediated oxidative burst in macrophages by the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Bliska, J B; Black, D S

    1995-01-01

    Suppression of host-cell-mediated immunity is a hallmark feature of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection. To better understand this process, the interaction of Y. pseudotuberculosis with macrophages and the effect of the virulence plasmid-encoded Yersinia tyrosine phosphatase (YopH) on the oxidative burst was analyzed in a chemiluminescence assay. An oxidative burst was generated upon infection of macrophages with a plasmid-cured strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis opsonized with immunoglobulin G antibody. Infection with plasmid-containing Y. pseudotuberculosis inhibited the oxidative burst triggered by secondary infection with opsonized bacteria. The tyrosine phosphatase activity of YopH was necessary for this inhibition. These results indicate that YopH inhibits Fc receptor-mediated signal transduction in macrophages in a global fashion. In addition, bacterial protein synthesis was not required for macrophage inhibition, suggesting that YopH export and translocation are controlled at the posttranslational level. PMID:7822039

  13. Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and calcium signaling of beta 2 integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Sawada, C; Higuchi, H; Teraoka, H; Yamaguchi, M

    1997-01-01

    Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling of complement receptor type 3 (CR3)-deficient neutrophils from a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were compared to those of control heifers. The mean phagocytic activity of IgG-coated yeasts and aggregated bovine IgG (Agg-IgG)-induced superoxide production of CR3-deficient neutrophils were 10% and 77.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. The [Ca2+]i signals in CR3-deficient neutrophils stimulated with Agg-IgG or concanavalin A were different with mean peak [Ca2+]i concentrations of 78% and 41.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. These findings suggest that Fc receptor-mediated neutrophil functions are closely dependent on the presence of CR3 (CD11b/CD18) on the neutrophil cell surfaces. PMID:9343828

  14. Multi-functionalized hyaluronic acid nanogels crosslinked with carbon dots as dual receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Han, Yu; Pei, Mingliang; Zhao, Xubo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based theranostic nanogels were designed for the tumor diagnosis and chemotherapy, by crosslinking the folate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) modified hyaluronic acid (FA-PEG-HA) with carbon dots (CDs) for the first time. Due to the extraordinary fluorescence property of the integrated CDs, the theranostic nanogels could be used for the real-time and noninvasive location tracking to cancer cells. HA could load Doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic interaction with a drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 32.5%. The nanogels possessed an ideal release of DOX in the weak acid environment, while it was restrained in the neutral media, demonstrating the pH-responsive controlled release behavior. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake results clearly illustrated that most DOX was released and accumulated in the cell nuclei and killed the cancer cells efficaciously, due to their dual receptor-mediated targeting characteristics. PMID:27516286

  15. The influence of receptor-mediated interactions on reaction-diffusion mechanisms of cellular self-organisation.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Baker, Ruth E; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. PMID:22072186

  16. Imaging receptor-mediated endocytosis with a polymeric nanoparticle-based coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering probe.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling; Lu, Yanhui; Lee, Robert J; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2007-08-23

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy was used to visualize receptor-mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking with the aid of a CARS probe. The probe was made of 200-nm polystyrene particles encapsulated in folate-targeted liposomes. By tuning (omega(p) - omega(s)) to 3045 cm(-1), which corresponds to the aromatic C-H stretching vibration, the polystyrene nanoparticles with a high density of aromatic C-H bonds were detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio, while the epi-detected CARS signal from cellular organelles was cancelled by the destructive interference between the resonant contribution from the aliphatic C-H vibration and the nonresonant contribution. Without any photobleaching, the CARS probe allowed single-particle tracking analysis of intracellular endosome transport. No photodamage to cells was observed under the current experimental conditions. These results show the advantages and potential of using a CARS probe to study cellular processes. PMID:17663581

  17. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Intracellular Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors contributes to AMPA receptor-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, A; Matute, C; Alberdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oligodendrocytes induces cytosolic Ca2+ overload and excitotoxic death, a process that contributes to demyelination and multiple sclerosis. Excitotoxic insults cause well-characterized mitochondrial alterations and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, which is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of ER-Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) to excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes in vitro. First, we observed that oligodendrocytes express all previously characterized RyRs and IP3Rs. Blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release by TMB-8 following α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated insults attenuated both oligodendrocyte death and cytosolic Ca2+ overload. In turn, RyR inhibition by ryanodine reduced as well the Ca2+ overload whereas IP3R inhibition was ineffective. Furthermore, AMPA-triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and activation of caspase-3, which in all instances was diminished by RyR inhibition. In addition, we observed that AMPA induced an ER stress response as revealed by α subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, overexpression of GRP chaperones and RyR-dependent cleavage of caspase-12. Finally, attenuating ER stress with salubrinal protected oligodendrocytes from AMPA excitotoxicity. Together, these results show that Ca2+ release through RyRs contributes to cytosolic Ca2+ overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and cell death following AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes. PMID:21364659

  19. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  20. Insulin-Independent GABAA Receptor-Mediated Response in the Barrel Cortex of Mice with Impaired Met Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by genetic variants, susceptibility alleles, and environmental perturbations. The autism associated gene MET tyrosine kinase has been implicated in many behavioral domains and endophenotypes of autism, including abnormal neural signaling in human sensory cortex. We investigated somatosensory thalamocortical synaptic communication in mice deficient in Met activity in cortical excitatory neurons to gain insights into aberrant somatosensation characteristic of ASD. The ratio of excitation to inhibition is dramatically increased due to decreased postsynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the trigeminal thalamocortical pathway of mice lacking active Met in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, insulin failed to increase GABAA receptor-mediated response in the barrel cortex of mice with compromised Met signaling. Thus, lacking insulin effects may be a risk factor in ASD pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A proposed common cause of neurodevelopmental disorders is an imbalance in excitatory neural transmission, provided by the glutamatergic neurons, and the inhibitory signals from the GABAergic interneurons. Many genes associated with autism spectrum disorders impair synaptic transmission in the expected cell type. Previously, inactivation of the autism-associated Met tyrosine kinase receptor in GABAergic interneurons led to decreased inhibition. In thus report, decreased Met signaling in glutamatergic neurons had no effect on excitation, but decimated inhibition. Further experiments indicate that loss of Met activity downregulates GABAA receptors on glutamatergic neurons in an insulin independent manner. These data provide a new mechanism for the loss of inhibition and subsequent abnormal excitation/inhibition balance and potential molecular candidates for treatment or prevention. PMID:27030755

  1. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated.

  2. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Rory A.; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated. PMID:26313408

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Phosphoinositide Kinome from Two Ciliates Reveals Novel Evolutionary Links for Phosphoinositide Kinases in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leondaritis, George; Siokos, John; Skaripa, Irini; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2013-01-01

    Background The complexity of phosphoinositide signaling in higher eukaryotes is partly due to expansion of specific families and types of phosphoinositide kinases (PIKs) that can generate all phosphoinositides via multiple routes. This is particularly evident in the PI3Ks and PIPKs, and it is considered an evolutionary trait associated with metazoan diversification. Yet, there are limited comprehensive studies on the PIK repertoire of free living unicellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We undertook a genome-wide analysis of putative PIK genes in two free living ciliated cells, Tetrahymena and Paramecium. The Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia genomes were probed with representative kinases from all families and types. Putative homologs were verified by EST, microarray and deep RNA sequencing database searches and further characterized for domain structure, catalytic efficiency, expression patterns and phylogenetic relationships. In total, we identified and characterized 22 genes in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome and 62 highly homologues genes in Paramecium tetraurelia suggesting a tight evolutionary conservation in the ciliate lineage. Comparison to the kinome of fungi reveals a significant expansion of PIK genes in ciliates. Conclusions/Significance Our study highlights four important aspects concerning ciliate and other unicellular PIKs. First, ciliate-specific expansion of PI4KIII-like genes. Second, presence of class I PI3Ks which, at least in Tetrahymena, are associated with a metazoan-type machinery for PIP3 signaling. Third, expansion of divergent PIPK enzymes such as the recently described type IV transmembrane PIPKs. Fourth, presence of possible type II PIPKs and presumably inactive PIKs (hence, pseudo-PIKs) not previously described. Taken together, our results provide a solid framework for future investigation of the roles of PIKs in ciliates and indicate that novel functions and novel regulatory pathways of

  4. Coordinated Expression of Phosphoinositide Metabolic Genes during Development and Aging of Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Stanley I.; Primiani, Christopher T.; Chen, Chuck T.; Ahn, Kwangmi; Ryan, Veronica H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Phosphoinositides, lipid-signaling molecules, participate in diverse brain processes within a wide metabolic cascade. Hypothesis Gene transcriptional networks coordinately regulate the phosphoinositide cascade during human brain Development and Aging. Methods We used the public BrainCloud database for human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to examine age-related expression levels of 49 phosphoinositide metabolic genes during Development (0 to 20+ years) and Aging (21+ years). Results We identified three groups of partially overlapping genes in each of the two intervals, with similar intergroup correlations despite marked phenotypic differences between Aging and Development. In each interval, ITPKB, PLCD1, PIK3R3, ISYNA1, IMPA2, INPPL1, PI4KB, and AKT1 are in Group 1, PIK3CB, PTEN, PIK3CA, and IMPA1 in Group 2, and SACM1L, PI3KR4, INPP5A, SYNJ1, and PLCB1 in Group 3. Ten of the genes change expression nonlinearly during Development, suggesting involvement in rapidly changing neuronal, glial and myelination events. Correlated transcription for some gene pairs likely is facilitated by colocalization on the same chromosome band. Conclusions Stable coordinated gene transcriptional networks regulate brain phosphoinositide metabolic pathways during human Development and Aging. PMID:26168237

  5. Triggering Actin Comets Versus Membrane Ruffles: Distinctive Effects of Phosphoinositides on Actin Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tasuku; Falkenburger, Björn H.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    A limited set of phosphoinositide membrane lipids regulate diverse cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. We developed two techniques based on rapamycin-induced protein dimerization to rapidly change the concentration of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. First, we increased PI(4,5)P2 synthesis from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] using a membrane recruitable form of PI(4)P 5-kinase, and found that COS-7, HeLa, and HEK293 cells formed bundles of motile actin filaments known as actin comets. In contrast, a second technique that increased the concentration of PI(4,5)P2 without consuming PI(4)P induced membrane ruffles. These distinct phenotypes were mediated by dynamin-mediated vesicular trafficking and mutually inhibitory crosstalk between the small guanosine triphosphatases Rac and RhoA. Our results indicate that the effect of PI(4,5)P2 on actin reorganization depends on the abundance of other phosphoinositides, such as PI(4)P. Thus, combinatorial regulation of phosphoinositide concentrations may contribute to the diversity of phosphoinositide functions. PMID:22169478

  6. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datz, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Torrano, Adriano A.; Spada, Fabio; Vrabel, Milan; Engelke, Hanna; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranostic systems.Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the

  7. Differential ontogeny of alpha 1-adrenergic and cholinergic receptor sites in the atria and ventricles of the inbred Dahl hypertension-sensitive (S/JR) and -resistant (R/JR) rat.

    PubMed

    McCaughran, J A; Juno, C J; O'Malley, E

    1987-10-01

    The ontogeny of atrial and ventricular alpha 1-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor sites was investigated in inbred Dahl hypertension-sensitive (S/JR) and -resistant (R/JR) rats between 5 and 150 days of age. The density of sites in both cardiac regions was generally greater in the neonate than mature rat. A marked proliferation of sites was observed in neonatal and young adult rats that occurred in the following order: ventricular cholinoceptors----ventricular adrenoceptors----atrial cholinoceptors----atrial adrenoceptors. The density of ventricular adrenoceptors was greater in the S/JR rat than the R/JR rat at 5 days of age. At 150 days of age, the density of sites was less in the S/JR rat than the age-matched R/JR rat or the normotensive 50-day-old S/JR rat. The development of atrial adrenoceptors was similar between the strains, regardless of the blood pressure. The density of ventricular cholinergic receptors was greater in the S/JR strain at 5 and 15 days of age. However, the density of atrial cholinergic sites was consistently greater in the S/JR strain throughout development. The results of this study suggest that: (1) significant prenatal receptor development occurs in the heart; (2) receptor development may precede the functional maturation of postganglionic autonomic efferents; and (3) distinguishing differences in the regional density of alpha 1-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic binding sites are present between S/JR and R/JR rats at much earlier points in development than previously shown.

  8. Beta 1-adrenergic regulation of the GT1 gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal cell lines: stimulation of GnRH release via receptors positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de la Escalera, G; Choi, A L; Weiner, R I

    1992-09-01

    The release of GnRH evoked by norepinephrine (NE) was studied in GT1 GnRH neuronal cell lines in superfusion and static cultures. GnRH release from static cultured GT1-7 cells was stimulated by NE in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mimicked by the nonsubtype-selective beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and blocked by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol and the beta 1-adrenergic subtype-specific antagonist CGP 20712A. However, the stimulation of GnRH release by NE was not affected by the beta 2-, alpha-, alpha 1-, or alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists ICI 118.551, phentolamine, prazosin, or yohimbine, respectively. Superfusion of GT1-1 cells with NE for 60-100 min resulted in rapid and sustained increases in GnRH secretion. The NE-stimulated GnRH release showed a higher amplitude and longer duration than the spontaneous GnRH pulses characteristic of GT1-1 cells. In parallel to the stimulation of GnRH release, NE also rapidly increased (first observed at 60 sec) the intracellular concentration of cAMP in isobutylmethylxanthine-pretreated GT1-1 and GT1-7 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. The stimulation of intracellular cAMP concentration was also mimicked by isoproterenol and blocked by propranolol and CGP 20712A. In addition, GT1 cells express beta 1- but not beta 2-adrenergic receptor mRNA, as probed by Northern blot analysis. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of NE on GnRH neurons. The pharmacological evidence and the mRNA analysis are consistent with NE acting through a beta 1-adrenergic receptor positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

  9. The positive feedback action of vasopressin on its own release from rat septal tissue in vitro is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Ramirez, A D; Ramirez, V D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on its own septal release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion procedure. As compared to basal release from septal fragments, pulses of synthetic AVP (15 pg/5 min) resulted in a 25-fold augmented release of endogenous AVP, indicating a positive feedback action. Both the basal and stimulated AVP release were significantly increased by 60 mM potassium and markedly reduced by omission of calcium. Preincubation of the septal fragments with the V2/V1 AVP receptor antagonist d(CH2)5 [D-Tyr (Et)2,Val4]AVP resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the positive feedback action of AVP which was nearly completely blocked at doses between 1.25 and 5 ng per 100 microliters incubation medium. As compared to this effect, the V1 antagonist d(CH2)5 Tyr (Me)2 AVP as well as oxytocin were significantly less potent. The results suggest that the positive feedback action of AVP on its own release from septal fragments is potassium-stimulated, calcium-dependent and mainly V2 receptor-mediated. The physiological significance of this phenomenon remains to be shown. PMID:1830507

  10. An special epithelial staining agents: folic acid receptor-mediated diagnosis (FRD) effectively and conveniently screen patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng-Han; Hu, Ling-Yun; Du, Xin-Xin; Yang, Min; Zhang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Ke; Li, Li-An; Jiang, Shu-Fang; Li, Ya-Li

    2015-01-01

    High-quality screening with cytology has markedly reduced mortality from cervical cancer. However, it needs experienced pathologists to review and make the final decisions. We have developed folic acid receptor-mediated diagnosis (FRD) kits to effectively and conveniently screen patients with cervical cancer. We conduct present study aim to assess clinical significances of FRD in screening cervical cancer. A total of 169 patients were enrolled at Chinese People's liberation Army (PLA) general hospital. We compared diagnostic significances of FRD with thinprep cytology test (TCT). Meanwhile, colposcopy was also performed to confirm any lesion suspicious for cervical cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of FRD were 71.93% and 66.07% in diagnosis cervical cancer, respectively. Meanwhile, the positive predictive values (PPV), negative predictive values (NPV), Youden index were 51.90%, 82.22%, 0.38, respectively. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of TCT in diagnosis cervical cancer were 73.68% and 61.61% respectively. PPV, NPV and Youden index for TCT were 49.41%, 82.14% and 0.35 respectively. Overall, FRD have high values of sensitivity, specificity and Youden index. However, this difference failed to statistical significance. FRD have comparable diagnostic significance with TCT. Therefore, FRD might serve as one effective method to screen cervical cancer. Especially for those patients living in remote regions of China, where cytology was unavailable.

  11. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  12. Modulation of AMPA receptor mediated current by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in layer I neurons of rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bo; Luo, Dong; Yang, Jie; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Bing-Lin; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yan, Zhen; Chen, Guo-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Layer I neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) exhibit extensive synaptic connections with deep layer neurons, implying their important role in the neural circuit. Study demonstrates that activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) increases excitatory neurotransmission in this layer. Here we found that nicotine selectively increased the amplitude of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated current and AMPA/NMDA ratio, while without effect on NMDA receptor-mediated current. The augmentation of AMPAR current by nicotine was inhibited by a selective α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) and intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA. In addition, nicotinic effect on mEPSC or paired-pulse ratio was also prevented by MLA. Moreover, an enhanced inward rectification of AMPAR current by nicotine suggested a functional role of calcium permeable and GluA1 containing AMPAR. Consistently, nicotine enhancement of AMPAR current was inhibited by a selective calcium-permeable AMPAR inhibitor IEM-1460. Finally, the intracellular inclusion of synthetic peptide designed to block GluA1 subunit of AMPAR at CAMKII, PKC or PKA phosphorylation site, as well as corresponding kinase inhibitor, blocked nicotinic augmentation of AMPA/NMDA ratio. These results have revealed that nicotine increases AMPAR current by modulating the phosphorylation state of GluA1 which is dependent on α7-nAChR and intracellular calcium. PMID:26370265

  13. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid–polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle–membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand–receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand–receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle–membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH–membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor–ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle–cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest. PMID:25438167

  14. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. II. Experimental model studies with the radial-flow detachment assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface are crucial for understanding the role of certain key parameters in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. Here, we use the probabilistic attachment and detachment models developed in the preceding paper to interpret transient data from well-defined experiments. These data are obtained with a simple model cell system that consists of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) and a Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA) using a ligand-coated glass disc. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine transient behavior with particles that possess fairly uniform properties that can be varied systematically, and the RFDA is designed for direct observation of adhesion to the ligand-coated glass surface over a range of shear stresses. Our experiments focus on the effects of surface shear stress, receptor density, and ligand density. These data provide a crucial test of the probabilistic framework. We show that these data can be explained with the probabilistic analyses, whereas they cannot be readily interpreted on the basis of a deterministic analysis. In addition, we examine transient data on cell adhesion reported from other assays, demonstrating the consistency of these data with the predictions of the probabilistic models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2174272

  15. Receptor-mediated activation of a plant Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Sabine; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Wirtz, Wolfgang; Guern, Jean; Hedrich, Rainer; Scheel, Dierk

    1997-01-01

    Pathogen recognition at the plant cell surface typically results in the initiation of a multicomponent defense response. Transient influx of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane is postulated to be part of the signaling chain leading to pathogen resistance. Patch-clamp analysis of parsley protoplasts revealed a novel Ca2+-permeable, La3+-sensitive plasma membrane ion channel of large conductance (309 pS in 240 mM CaCl2). At an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of 1 mM, which is representative of the plant cell apoplast, unitary channel conductance was determined to be 80 pS. This ion channel (LEAC, for large conductance elicitor-activated ion channel) is reversibly activated upon treatment of parsley protoplasts with an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a cell wall protein of Phytophthora sojae. Structural features of the elicitor found previously to be essential for receptor binding, induction of defense-related gene expression, and phytoalexin formation are identical to those required for activation of LEAC. Thus, receptor-mediated stimulation of this channel appears to be causally involved in the signaling cascade triggering pathogen defense in parsley. PMID:11038609

  16. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  17. Trans-activation of EphA4 and FGF receptors mediated by direct interactions between their cytoplasmic domains

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Hideyuki; Fujita, Koji; Jing, Xuefeng; Sawada, Takahiro; Liang, Sitai; Yao, Li; Yan, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yueqiang; Schlessinger, Joseph; Sakaguchi, Kazushige

    2005-01-01

    A yeast two-hybrid analysis has shown that the juxtamembrane region of FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of EphA4, which is a member of the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Complex formation between the two receptors was shown to be mediated by direct interactions between the juxtamembrane domain of FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, or FGFR4 and the N-terminal portion of the tyrosine kinase domain of EphA4. Activation of FGFR1 in transfected cells resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-negative EphA4 mutant and activation of EphA4 led to tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-negative FGFR1 mutant. Moreover, both receptors stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the docking protein FRS2α and induce mitogen-activated protein kinase stimulation with a time course and intensity that depends on the ligand that is applied. We also demonstrate that FGF-receptor-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase stimulation is potentiated in cells costimulated with ephrin-A1. The direct interaction between EphA4 and FGFRs and the potentiation of FGF response that is induced by ephrin-A1 stimulation may modulate the biological responses that are mediated by these receptor families in cells or tissues in which the two receptors are coexpressed. PMID:16365308

  18. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  19. The overexpressed human 46-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor mediates endocytosis and sorting of. beta. -glucuronidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Grubb, J.H.; Sly, W.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The authors studied the function of the human small (46-kDa) mannose 6-phosphate receptor (SMPR) in transfected mouse L cells that do not express the larger insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor. Cells overexpressing human SMPR were studied for enzyme binding to cell surface receptors, for binding to intracellular receptors in permeabilized cells, and for receptor-mediated endocytosis of recombinant human {beta}-glucuronidase. Specific binding to human SMPR in permeabilized cells showed a pH optimum between pH 6.0 and pH 6.5. Binding was significant in the present of EDTA but was enhanced by added divalent cations. Up to 2.3{percent} of the total functional receptor could be detected on the cell surface by enzyme binding. They present experiments showing that at very high levels of overexpression, and at pH 6.5, human SMPR mediated the endocytosis of {beta}-glucuronidase. At pH 7.5, the rate of endocytosis was only 14{percent} the rate seen at pH 6.5. Cells overexpressing human SMPR also showed reduced secretion of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase when compared to cells transfected with vector only, suggesting that overexpressed human SMPR can participate in sorting of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase and partially correct the sorting defect in mouse L cells that do not express the insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

  20. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  1. Histaminergic H1 receptors mediate L-histidine-induced anxiety in elevated plus-maze test in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuchibhotla Vijaya; Krishna, Devarakonda Rama; Palit, Gautam

    2007-05-01

    The central histaminergic system is reported to mediate behavioural, hormonal and physiological homeostasis of living organisms. Recent reports indicate its prominent role in various neurobehavioural disorders such as depression and psychosis. This study evaluated the effect of activation of the central histaminergic system in anxiety-like conditions, using the elevated plus-maze test in mice, and elucidated the role of different histaminergic receptors mediating such effects. Peripheral administration of L-histidine (L-His), in a dose-dependent manner, significantly decreased the exploration time in open arms and number of entries into open arms without modifying the number of entries into closed arms of the elevated plus-maze, indicating anxiogenesis. Further, such effects of central histamine were significantly attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, by pretreatment with pyrilamine (H1 receptor antagonist). Pretreatment with either zolantidine (H2 receptor antagonist) or thioperamide (H3 receptor antagonist), however, failed to attenuate the L-His-induced anxiogenesis. Our results indicate that anxiogenic effects of central histaminergic system appear to be mediated prominently by activation of H1 receptors.

  2. Fatty acyl specificity of the receptor-mediated release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.D.

    1987-05-01

    Histamine and bradykinin appear to exhibit the same fatty acid specificity as thrombin. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 10 ..mu..M histamine for 10 min in buffered saline containing 50 ..mu..M fat-free albumin stimulates the release of previously incorporated (/sup 14/C)arachidonate but not (/sup 14/C)22:4(n-6) or (/sup 14/C)20:3(n-6). Similarly calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells release (/sup 14/C)arachidonate but not (/sup 14/C)22:4(n-6) in response to either bradykinin (1 /sup +/g/ml) or histamine (10..mu..M). In both types of endothelial cells, the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M) exhibits the same pattern of fatty acyl specificity as the receptor-mediated agonists. By contrast, mellitin (2-4 ..mu..g/ml) stimulates the release of free 22:4(n-6) and oleate in addition to arachidonate; release of 22:4(n-6) is 30-70% that of arachidonate. These results suggest that histamine, bradykinin and thrombin stimulate a common calcium-dependent fatty acyl-specific phospholipase activity.

  3. Resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury by inhibiting death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathways in a cisplatin-induced rat model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qiufa; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Zhen, Junhui; Feng, Jinbo; Song, Chun; Jiang, Bei; Hu, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a clinical syndrome characterized by a loss of renal function and acute tubular necrosis. Resveratrol exerts a wide range of pharmacological effects based on its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The present study aimed to evaluate whether resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury in a cisplatin-induced rat model and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved. Rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: Control, cisplatin, resveratrol, and cisplatin plus resveratrol. Rats exposed to cisplatin displayed acute kidney injury, identified by analysis of renal function and histopathological observation. Resveratrol significantly ameliorated the increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal index and histopathological damage induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, compared with untreated control animals, cisplatin lead to significantly increased expression of Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), caspase-8 and Bcl-2 associated protein X apoptosis regulator (Bax), and decreased expression of anti-apoptosis regulators, BH3 interacting domain death agonist (BID) and B cell lymphoma 2 apoptosis regulator (Bcl-2). Administration of resveratrol significantly reversed the cisplatin-induced alteration in these apoptosis-associated proteins. In conclusion, these findings suggest that resveratrol attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury through inactivation of the death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, and may provide a new therapeutic strategy to ameliorate the process of acute kidney injury. PMID:27600998

  4. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  5. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-01-14

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  6. Interrogating the Role of Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms: Biological Fate of Peptide-Functionalized Radiolabeled Gold Nanoparticles in Tumor Mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francisco; Zambre, Ajit; Campello, Maria Paula Cabral; Gano, Lurdes; Santos, Isabel; Ferraria, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Maria João; Singh, Amolak; Upendran, Anandhi; Paulo, António; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-04-20

    To get a better insight on the transport mechanism of peptide-conjugated nanoparticles to tumors, we performed in vivo biological studies of bombesin (BBN) peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in human prostate tumor bearing mice. Initially, we sought to compare AuNPs with thiol derivatives of acyclic and macrocyclic chelators of DTPA and DOTA types. The DTPA derivatives were unable to provide a stable coordination of (67)Ga, and therefore, the functionalization with the BBN analogues was pursued for the DOTA-containing AuNPs. The DOTA-coated AuNPs were functionalized with BBN[7-14] using a unidentate cysteine group or a bidentate thioctic group to attach the peptide. AuNPs functionalized with thioctic-BBN displayed the highest in vitro cellular internalization (≈ 25%, 15 min) in gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptor expressing cancer cells. However, these results fail to translate to in vivo tumor uptake. Biodistribution studies following intravenous (IV) and intraperitoneal (IP) administration of nanoconjugates in tumor bearing mice indicated that the presence of BBN influences to some degree the biological profile of the nanoconstructs. For IV administration, the receptor-mediated pathway appears to be outweighed by the EPR effect. By contrast, in IP administration, it is reasoned that the GRPr-mediated mechanism plays a role in pancreas uptake. PMID:27003101

  7. Characterization of the binding between a 70-kDa heat shock protein, HspA1A, and phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    McCallister, Chelsea; Kdeiss, Brianna; Oliverio, Ryan; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2016-03-25

    HspA1A, a seventy-kilodalton heat shock protein, binds to specific anionic lipids and this interaction regulates important physiological phenomena like apoptosis, tumor growth, and lysosomal rescue. However, whether HspA1A binds to phosphoinositides has yet to be established and quantified. Therefore, in this study, we determined the binding affinity of HspA1A to several phosphoinositides and characterized five aspects of their molecular interaction. First, we established that HspA1A binds phosphatidylinositol monophosphates with higher affinity than di- and triphosphorylated inositides. Second, using high concentrations of potassium we found that HSPA1A embeds within the lipid bilayer of all phosphoinositides tested. However, the effects of the high salt concentrations were significantly different between the different phosphoinositides. Third, using calcium and reaction buffers equilibrated at different pH values we found that these differentially affected HspA1A-phosphoinositide binding, revealing a lipid-specific pattern of binding. Fourth, by assessing the binding properties of the two HspA1A domains, the nucleotide-binding domain and the substrate-binding domain, we determined that in most cases the full-length protein is necessary for binding to phosphoinositides. Fifth, by including in the reactions nucleotides and protein substrates we determined that they minimally and differentially affected phosphoinositide-binding. Collectively, these findings strongly suggest that the HspA1A-phosphoinositide binding is complex yet specific, is mediated by both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, is not related to the lipid-head charge, and depends on the physicochemical properties of the lipid. PMID:26923070

  8. Characterization of the binding between a 70-kDa heat shock protein, HspA1A, and phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    McCallister, Chelsea; Kdeiss, Brianna; Oliverio, Ryan; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2016-03-25

    HspA1A, a seventy-kilodalton heat shock protein, binds to specific anionic lipids and this interaction regulates important physiological phenomena like apoptosis, tumor growth, and lysosomal rescue. However, whether HspA1A binds to phosphoinositides has yet to be established and quantified. Therefore, in this study, we determined the binding affinity of HspA1A to several phosphoinositides and characterized five aspects of their molecular interaction. First, we established that HspA1A binds phosphatidylinositol monophosphates with higher affinity than di- and triphosphorylated inositides. Second, using high concentrations of potassium we found that HSPA1A embeds within the lipid bilayer of all phosphoinositides tested. However, the effects of the high salt concentrations were significantly different between the different phosphoinositides. Third, using calcium and reaction buffers equilibrated at different pH values we found that these differentially affected HspA1A-phosphoinositide binding, revealing a lipid-specific pattern of binding. Fourth, by assessing the binding properties of the two HspA1A domains, the nucleotide-binding domain and the substrate-binding domain, we determined that in most cases the full-length protein is necessary for binding to phosphoinositides. Fifth, by including in the reactions nucleotides and protein substrates we determined that they minimally and differentially affected phosphoinositide-binding. Collectively, these findings strongly suggest that the HspA1A-phosphoinositide binding is complex yet specific, is mediated by both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, is not related to the lipid-head charge, and depends on the physicochemical properties of the lipid.

  9. Preparation and characterization of folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan for intracellular transport of protein through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Song, Xiangrong; Darby, Michael; Liang, Yufeng; He, Ling; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiuhong; Bi, Yueqi; Yang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jiapeng; Li, Yuanbo; Sun, Yiyi; Lee, Robert J; Hou, Shixiang

    2010-01-01

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins to specific tumor cells, folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan (folate-PEG-g-TMC) was synthesized. Nano-scaled spherical polyelectrolyte complexes between the folate-PEG-g-TMC and fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) were prepared under suitable weight ratio of copolymer to FITC-BSA by ionic interaction between the positively charged copolymers and the negatively charged FITC-BSA. Intracellular uptake of FITC-BSA was specifically enhanced in SKOV3 cells (folate receptor over-expressing cell line) through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with A549 cells (folate receptor deficient cell line). Folate-PEG-g-TMC shows promise for intracellular transport of negatively charged therapeutic proteins into folate receptor over-expressing tumor cells.

  10. Monoacylglycerol lipase promotes Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis in microglia but does not regulate LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kouchi, Zen

    2015-08-21

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is important for neuroinflammation. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying its expression and function remain unknown. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment post-translationally upregulated MAGL expression, whereas it downregulated MAGL transcription through a Stat6-mediated mechanism in microglia. Neither MAGL knockdown nor JZL-184, a selective MAGL inhibitor, suppressed LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in microglia. Moreover, exogenous expression of MAGL in BV-2 microglial cell line, which lacks endogenous MAGL, did not promote the induction of inflammatory cytokines by LPS treatment. Interestingly, MAGL knockdown reduced Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis in primary microglia, and introduction of MAGL into the BV-2 cells increased Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Collectively, these results suggest that MAGL regulates phagocytosis, but not LPS-mediated cytokine induction in microglia.

  11. D-3 phosphoinositides of the ciliate Tetrahymena: characterization and study of their regulatory role in lysosomal enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Leondaritis, George; Tiedtke, Arno; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2005-09-30

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, PtdIns3P, is a phosphoinositide which is implicated in regulating membrane trafficking in both mammalian and yeast cells. It also serves as a precursor for the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate, PtdIns3,5P2, a phosphoinositide, the exact functions of which remain unknown. In this report, we show that these two phosphoinositides are constitutive lipid components of the ciliate Tetrahymena. Using HPLC analysis, PtdIns3P and PtdIns3,5P2 were found to comprise 16% and 30-40% of their relevant phosphoinositide pools, respectively. Treatment of Tetrahymena cells with wortmannin (0.1-10 microM) resulted in the depletion of PtdIns3P and PtdIns3,5P2 without any effect on D-4 phosphoinositides. Wortmannin was further used for the investigation of D-3 phosphoinositide involvement in the regulation of lysosomal vesicular trafficking. Incubation of Tetrahymena cells with wortmannin resulted in enhanced secretion of two different lysosomal enzymes without any change in their total activities. Experiments performed with a T. thermophila secretion mutant strain verified that the wortmannin-induced secretion is specific and it is not due to a diversion of lysosomal enzymes to other secretory pathways. Moreover, experiments performed with a phagocytosis-deficient T. thermophila strain showed that a substantial fraction of wortmannin-induced secretion was dependent on the presence of functional phagosomes/phagolysosomes.

  12. Regulation of rat cortical 5-hydroxytryptamine2A-receptor mediated electrophysiological responses by repeated daily treatment with electroconvulsive shock or imipramine

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    Down-regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) receptors has been a consistent effect induced by most antidepressant drugs. In contrast, electroconvulsive shock (ECS) up-regulates the number of 5-HT2A receptor binding sites. However, the effects of antidepressants on 5-HT2A receptor-mediated responses on identified cells of the cerebral cortex has not been examined. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and ECS on 5-HT2A receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and piriform cortex, respectively. The electrophysiological effects of activating 5-HT2A receptors was consistent with 5-HT2A receptor binding regulation for imipramine and ECS except for the mPFC where chronic ECS decreased the potency of 5-HT at a 5-HT2A receptor-mediated response. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that chronic antidepressant treatments shift the balance of serotonergic neurotransmission towards inhibitory effects in the cortex. PMID:18294819

  13. Regulation of rat cortical 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses by repeated daily treatment with electroconvulsive shock or imipramine.

    PubMed

    Marek, Gerard J

    2008-07-01

    Down-regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) (5-HT(2A)) receptors has been a consistent effect induced by most antidepressant drugs. In contrast, electroconvulsive shock (ECS) up-regulates the number of 5-HT(2A) receptor binding sites. However, the effects of antidepressants on 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated responses on identified cells of the cerebral cortex have not been examined. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and ECS on 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and piriform cortex, respectively. The electrophysiological effects of activating 5-HT(2A) receptors were consistent with 5-HT(2A) receptor binding regulation for imipramine and ECS except for the mPFC where chronic ECS decreased the potency of 5-HT at a 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated response. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that chronic antidepressant treatments shift the balance of serotonergic neurotransmission towards inhibitory effects in the cortex.

  14. Mechanism for phosphoinositide selectivity and activation of TRPV1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Ufret-Vincenty, Carmen A.; Klein, Rebecca M.; Collins, Marcus D.; Rosasco, Mario G.; Martinez, Gilbert Q.

    2015-01-01

    Although PI(4,5)P2 is believed to play an essential role in regulating the activity of numerous ion channels and transporters, the mechanisms by which it does so are unknown. Here, we used the ability of the TRPV1 ion channel to discriminate between PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P to localize the region of TRPV1 sequence that interacts directly with the phosphoinositide. We identified a point mutation in the proximal C-terminal region after the TRP box, R721A, that inverted the selectivity of TRPV1. Although the R721A mutation produced only a 30% increase in the EC50 for activation by PI(4,5)P2, it decreased the EC50 for activation by PI(4)P by more than two orders of magnitude. We used chemically induced and voltage-activated phosphatases to determine that PI(4)P continued to support TRPV1 activity even after depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane. Our data cannot be explained by a purely electrostatic mechanism for interaction between the phosphoinositide and the protein, similar to that of the MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) effector domain or the EGF receptor. Rather, conversion of a PI(4,5)P2-selective channel to a PI(4)P-selective channel indicates that a structured phosphoinositide-binding site mediates the regulation of TRPV1 activity and that the amino acid at position 721 likely interacts directly with the moiety at the 5′ position of the phosphoinositide. PMID:25918361

  15. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  16. Involvement of Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase in the metabolism of phosphatidylserine in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    Sac1 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that preferentially dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Mutation of SAC1 causes not only the accumulation of phosphoinositides but also reduction of the phosphatidylserine (PS) level in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we characterized the mechanism underlying the PS reduction in SAC1-deleted cells. Incorporation of (32) P into PS was significantly delayed in sac1∆ cells. Such a delay was also observed in SAC1- and PS decarboxylase gene-deleted cells, suggesting that the reduction in the PS level is caused by a reduction in the rate of biosynthesis of PS. A reduction in the PS level was also observed with repression of STT4 encoding phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase or deletion of VPS34 encoding phophatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, the combination of mutations of SAC1 and STT4 or VPS34 did not restore the reduced PS level, suggesting that both the synthesis and degradation of phosphoinositides are important for maintenance of the PS level. Finally, we observed an abnormal PS distribution in sac1∆ cells when a specific probe for PS was expressed. Collectively, these results suggested that Sac1 is involved in the maintenance of a normal rate of biosynthesis and distribution of PS.

  17. PITPs as Targets for Selectively Interfering With Phosphoinositide Signaling in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nile, Aaron H.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yuan, Peihua; Mousley, Carl J.; Suresh, Sundari; Wallace, Iain Michael; Shah, Sweety D.; Pohlhaus, Denise Teotico; Temple, Brenda; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Tropsha, Alexander; Davis, Ronald W.; St Onge, Robert P.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2013-01-01

    Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) integrate diverse territories of intracellular lipid metabolism with stimulated phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate production, and are discriminating portals for interrogating phosphoinositide signaling. Yet, neither Sec14-like PITPs, nor PITPs in general, have been exploited as targets for chemical inhibition for such purposes. Herein, we validate the first small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) of the yeast PITP Sec14. These SMIs are nitrophenyl(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methanones (NPPMs), and are effective inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. We further establish Sec14 is the sole essential NPPM target in yeast, that NPPMs exhibit exquisite targeting specificities for Sec14 (relative to related Sec14-like PITPs), propose a mechanism for how NPPMs exert their inhibitory effects, and demonstrate NPPMs exhibit exquisite pathway selectivity in inhibiting phosphoinositide signaling in cells. These data deliver proof-of-concept that PITP-directed SMIs offer new and generally applicable avenues for intervening with phosphoinositide signaling pathways with selectivities superior to those afforded by contemporary lipid kinase-directed strategies. PMID:24292071

  18. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  19. Inhibitory effects of nordihydroguaiaretic acid on ETA-receptor-mediated contractions to endothelin-1 in rat trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. It has been shown previously that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibits endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contractions in rat isolated tracheal smooth muscle. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, this study examined the effects of NDGA on various aspects of the ETA and ETB receptor-effector systems which mediate ET-1-induced contractions in this preparation. 2. NDGA inhibited contractions induced by each of the isoforms of ET (ET-1, ET-2 and ET-3) but not those induced by the ETB receptor-selective agonist, sarafotoxin S6c, the cholinoceptor agonist, carbachol or the depolarizing spasmogen, KCl. 3. Quantitative autoradiographic studies of [125I]-ET-1 binding to rat tracheal smooth muscle indicated that NDGA was not an ET receptor antagonist. 4. NDGA inhibited the ETA receptor-mediated, intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent contractions induced by 100 nM ET-1 in Ca(2+)-free solution (by 75%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, NDGA markedly inhibited the contractions induced by ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid; contractions purportedly due to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. 5. Like NDGA, the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin inhibited contractions to ET-1, but not carbachol or KCl. However, cyclopiazonic acid, but not NDGA, also (a) induced transient contractions in rat trachea, (b) potentiated contractions induced by KCl, and (c) potentiated the extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent phase of ET-1-induced contractions, indicating that NDGA did not inhibit ET-1-induced contractions through Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition and depletion of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+. 6. In control preparations, ET-1 induced a slowly developing, sustained contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8004399

  20. Receptor-mediated hepatic uptake of M6P-BSA-conjugated triplex-forming oligonucleotides in rats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Cheng, Kun; Guntaka, Ramareddy V; Mahato, Ram I

    2006-01-01

    Excessive production of extracellular matrix, predominantly type I collagen, results in liver fibrosis. Earlier we synthesized mannose 6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA) and conjugated to the type I collagen specific triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) for its enhanced delivery to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which is the principal liver fibrogenic cell. In this report, we demonstrate a time-dependent cellular uptake of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO by HSC-T6 cells. Both cellular uptake and nuclear deposition of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO were significantly higher than those of 33P-TFO, leading to enhanced inhibition of type I collagen transcription. Following systemic administration into rats, hepatic accumulation of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO increased from 55% to 68% with the number of M6P per BSA from 14 to 27. Unlike 33P-TFO, there was no significant decrease in the hepatic uptake of (M6P)20-BSA-33P-TFO in fibrotic rats. Prior administration of excess M6P-BSA decreased the hepatic uptake of (M6P)20-BSA-33P-TFO from 66% to 40% in normal rats, and from 60% to 15% in fibrotic rats, suggesting M6P/insulin-like growth factor II (M6P/IGF II) receptor-mediated endocytosis of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO by HSCs. Almost 82% of the total liver uptake in fibrotic rats was contributed by HSCs. In conclusion, by conjugation with M6P-BSA, the TFO could be potentially used for the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  1. Ca(2+)-independent F-actin assembly and disassembly during Fc receptor- mediated phagocytosis in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles by macrophages is presumed to involve the actin-based cytoskeleton since F-actin accumulates beneath forming phagosomes, and particle engulfment is blocked by cytochalasins, drugs that inhibit actin filament assembly. However, it is unknown whether Fc receptor ligation affects the rate or extent of F- actin assembly during phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles. To examine this question we have used a quantitative spectrofluorometric method to examine F-actin dynamics during a synchronous wave of phagocytosis of IgG-coated red blood cells by inflammatory mouse macrophages. We observed a biphasic rise in macrophage F-actin content during particle engulfment, with maxima at 1 and 5 min after the initiation of phagocytosis. F-actin declined to resting levels by 30 min, by which time particle engulfment was completed. These quantitative increases in macrophage F-actin were reflected in localized changes in F-actin distribution. Previous work showed that the number of IgG-coated particles engulfed by macrophages is unaffected by buffering extracellular calcium or by clamping cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) to very low levels (Di Virgilio, F., B. C. Meyer, S. Greenberg, and S. C. Silverstein. 1988. J. Cell Biol. 106: 657-666). To determine whether clamping [Ca2+]i in macrophages affects the rate of particle engulfment, or the assembly or disassembly of F- actin during phagocytosis, we examined these parameters in macrophages whose [Ca2+]i had been clamped to approximately less than 3 nM with fura 2/AM and acetoxymethyl ester of EGTA. We found that the initial rate of phagocytosis, and the quantities of F-actin assembled and disassembled were similar in Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-depleted macrophages. We conclude that Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis in mouse macrophages is accompanied by an ordered sequence of assembly and disassembly of F-actin that is insensitive to [Ca2+]i. PMID:2026648

  2. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Antrim, L A; Sack, G

    1986-12-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue.

  3. Modulation of the input–output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal input–output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency–current (f–I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input–output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f–I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f–I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation. PMID:25194049

  4. Gonadotrophin-releasing activity of neurohypophysial hormones: II. The pituitary oxytocin receptor mediating gonadotrophin release differs from that of corticotrophs.

    PubMed

    Evans, J J; Catt, K J

    1989-07-01

    Neurohypophysial hormones stimulate gonadotrophin release from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro, acting through receptors distinct from those which mediate the secretory response to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The LH response to oxytocin was not affected by the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, methyl isobutylxanthine, but was diminished in the absence of extracellular calcium and was progressively increased as the calcium concentration in the medium was raised to normal. In addition, the calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine, suppressed oxytocin-stimulated secretion of LH. It is likely that the mechanisms of LH release induced by GnRH and neurohypophysial hormones are similar, although stimulation of gonadotrophin secretion is mediated by separate receptor systems. Oxytocin was more active than vasopressin in releasing LH, but less active in releasing ACTH. The highly selective oxytocin agonist, [Thr4,Gly7]oxytocin, elicited concentration-dependent secretion of LH but had little effect on corticotrophin secretion. The neurohypophysial hormone antagonist analogues, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2Val4,Cit8]vasopressin, inhibited the LH response to both oxytocin and vasopressin. However, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin was much less effective in inhibiting the ACTH response to the neurohypophysial hormones, and [d(CH2)5Tyr-(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2,Val4,Cit8]vasopressin exhibited no inhibitory activity against ACTH release. Thus, agonist and antagonist analogues of neurohypophysial hormones display divergent activities with regard to LH and ACTH responses, and the neuropeptide receptor mediating gonadotroph activation is clearly different from that on the corticotroph. Whereas the corticotroph receptor is a vasopressin-type receptor an oxytocin-type receptor is responsible for gonadotrophin release by neurohypophysial hormones.

  5. Two types of functionally different GABAA receptors mediate GABA modulation of cholinergic transmission in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, R; Pencheva, N

    1995-08-01

    1. The effects of GABA (1 microM-2 mM) on longitudinally or circularly oriented organ bath preparations of cat terminal ileum consisted of a relaxation phase with an inhibition of the rhythmic spontaneous phasic contractions, followed by a phase of contractions characterized by an elevation in basal tone and an increase in amplitude of the spontaneous phasic contractions. 2. Muscimol (100 microM), but not baclofen (100 microM), mimicked the relaxation phase of the response to applied GABA (100 microM) in all tissue preparations. In addition, muscimol induced a phase of contractile activity in the circular muscle layer whilst baclofen exerted a 'GABA-like' contractile effect on the longitudinal muscle layer. Bicuculline (30 microM) or picrotoxinin (30 microM) antagonized the GABA- or muscimol-induced relaxations in all preparations and decreased the GABA- but not the baclofen-induced contractions of the longitudinal muscle layer. 3. Tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM) or atropine (0.1 microM) prevented the bicuculline-sensitive phases of the GABA or muscimol effects on both muscle layers but not the contractile effect of baclofen on the longitudinal muscle layer. 4. The bicuculline-sensitive phases of the GABA effect on both muscle layers were almost completely eliminated by 1 nM pirenzepine. At this concentration pirenzepine did not affect the electrically-evoked cholinergic twitch contractions or contractile responses to applied acetylcholine of both muscle layers. 5. During electrically-evoked cholinergic twitch contractions of both muscle layers, GABA (100 microM) had an inhibitory effect. The inhibition occurred in the presence of pirenzepine (1 nM) but not of bicuculline (30 microM). 6. It is suggested that two types of functionally different bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptors mediate an exitatory presynaptic and an inhibitory prejunctional action of GABA on the cholinergic transmission in cat terminal ileum.

  6. Pentosan polysulfate regulates scavenger receptor-mediated, but not fluid-phase, endocytosis in immortalized cerebral endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Deli, M A; Abrahám, C S; Takahata, H; Katamine, S; Niwa, M

    2000-12-01

    1. Effects of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and the structurally related sulfated polyanions dextran sulfate, fucoidan, and heparin on the scavenger receptor-mediated and fluidphase endocytosis in GP8 immortalized rat brain endothelial cells were investigated. 2. Using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarboxyamine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-AcLDL), we found a binding site with high affinity and low binding capacity, and another one with low affinity and high binding capacity. Increasing ligand concentrations could not saturate DiI-AcLDL uptake. DiI-AcLDL uptake, but not binding, was sensitive to pretreatment with filipin, an inhibitor of caveola formation. 3. PPS (20-200 microg/ml) significantly reduced the binding of DiI-AcLDL after coincubation for 3 hr, though this effect was less expressed after 18 hr. Among other polyanions, only fucoidan decreased the DiI-AcLDL binding after 3 hr, whereas dextran sulfate significantly increased it after 18 hr. PPS treatment induced an increase in DiI-AcLDL uptake, whereas other polysulfated compounds caused a significant reduction. 4. Fluid-phase endocytosis determined by the accumulation of Lucifer yellow was concentration and time dependent in GP8 cells. Coincubation with PPS or other sulfated polyanions could not significantly alter the rate of Lucifer yellow uptake. 5. In conclusion. PPS decreased the binding and increased the uptake of DiI-AcLDL in cerebral endothelial cells, an effect not mimicked by the other polyanions investigated.

  7. Receptor-Mediated Recognition and Uptake of Iron from Human Transferrin by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Modun, Belinda; Evans, Robert W.; Joannou, Christopher L.; Williams, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis both recognize and bind the human iron-transporting glycoprotein, transferrin, via a 42-kDa cell surface protein receptor. In an iron-deficient medium, staphylococcal growth can be promoted by the addition of human diferric transferrin but not human apotransferrin. To determine whether the staphylococcal transferrin receptor is involved in the removal of iron from transferrin, we employed 6 M urea–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which separates human transferrin into four forms (diferric, monoferric N-lobe, and monoferric C-lobe transferrin and apotransferrin). S. aureus and S. epidermidis but not Staphylococcus saprophyticus (which lacks the transferrin receptor) converted diferric human transferrin into its apotransferrin form within 30 min. During conversion, iron was removed sequentially from the N lobe and then from the C lobe. Metabolic poisons such as sodium azide and nigericin inhibited the release of iron from human transferrin, indicating that it is an energy-requiring process. To demonstrate that this process is receptor rather than siderophore mediated, we incubated (i) washed staphylococcal cells and (ii) the staphylococcal siderophore, staphyloferrin A, with porcine transferrin, a transferrin species which does not bind to the staphylococcal receptor. While staphyloferrin A removed iron from both human and porcine transferrins, neither S. aureus nor S. epidermidis cells could promote the release of iron from porcine transferrin. In competition binding assays, both native and recombinant N-lobe fragments of human transferrin as well as a naturally occurring human transferrin variant with a mutation in the C-lobe blocked binding of 125I-labelled transferrin. Furthermore, the staphylococci removed iron efficiently from the iron-loaded N-lobe fragment of human transferrin. These data demonstrate that the staphylococci efficiently remove iron from transferrin via a receptor-mediated process and

  8. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  9. Early growth response-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and lung remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Pastura, Patricia A; Acciani, Thomas H; Deutsch, Gail H; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hardie, William D; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2009-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and its receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are induced after lung injury and are associated with remodeling in chronic pulmonary diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. Expression of TGF-alpha in the lungs of adult mice causes fibrosis, pleural thickening, and pulmonary hypertension, in addition to increased expression of a transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1). Egr-1 was increased in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and the vascular adventitia in the lungs of mice conditionally expressing TGF-alpha in airway epithelium (Clara cell secretory protein-rtTA(+/-)/[tetO](7)-TGF-alpha(+/-)). The goal of this study was to determine the role of Egr-1 in TGF-alpha-induced lung disease. To accomplish this, TGF-alpha-transgenic mice were crossed to Egr-1 knockout (Egr-1(ko/ko)) mice. The lack of Egr-1 markedly increased the severity of TGF-alpha-induced pulmonary disease, dramatically enhancing airway muscularization, increasing pulmonary fibrosis, and causing greater airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Smooth muscle hyperplasia, not hypertrophy, caused the ASM thickening in the absence of Egr-1. No detectable increases in pulmonary inflammation were found. In addition to the airway remodeling disease, vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension were also more severe in Egr-1(ko/ko) mice. Thus, Egr-1 acts to suppress epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway and vascular muscularization, fibrosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness in the absence of inflammation. This provides a unique model to study the processes causing pulmonary fibrosis and ASM thickening without the complicating effects of inflammation.

  10. Role of various kinases in muscarinic M3 receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscle of rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Charles D.; Kendig, Derek M.; Al-Qudah, Mohammad; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal muscle layer in gut is the functional opponent to the circular muscle layer during peristalsis. Differences in innervation of the layers allow for the contraction of one layer concurrently with the relaxation of the other, enabling the passage of gut contents in a controlled fashion. Differences in development have given the cells of the two layers differences in receptor populations, membrane lipid handling, and calcium handling profiles/behaviors. The contractile activity of the longitudinal muscle is largely mediated by cholinergic neural input from myenteric plexus. Activation of muscarinic receptors leads to rapid activation of several kinases including MLC kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and Rho kinase. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK) is a prerequisite for contraction in both circular and longitudinal muscle cells. In rat colonic longitudinal muscle strips, we measured muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction following incubation with kinase inhibitors. Basal tension was differentially regulated by Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and CaMKK. Selective inhibitors of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CaMKII each reduced carbachol-induced contraction in the innervated muscle strips. These inhibitors had no direct effect on MLCK activity. Thus unlike previously reported for isolated muscle cells where CaMKII and ERK1/2 are not involved in contraction, we conclude that the regulation of carbachol-induced contraction in innervated longitudinal muscle strips involves the interplay of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CAMKII. PMID:25891767

  11. Modulation of the input-output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-11-15

    The neuronal input-output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency-current (f-I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input-output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f-I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f-I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation.

  12. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Magno, Aaron L.; Ingley, Evan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Ratajczak, Thomas; Ward, Bryan K.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. {yields} The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. {yields} Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. {yields} Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. {yields} Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  13. Guanine nucleotide regulation of muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol phosphate formation in permeabilized 1321N1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, S.A.; Trilivas, I.; Brown, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    Carbachol and guanine nucleotides stimulate formation of the (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates IP, IP2, and IP3 in saponin-permeabilized monolayers labelled with (/sup 3/H) inositol. Carbachol alone has little effect on formation of the (/sup 3/H) inositol phosphates (IPs), but GTP..gamma..S causes synergistic accumulation of (/sup 3/H)IPs to levels similar to those seen in intact cells. GTP, GppNHp, and GTP..gamma..S all support formation of the (/sup 3/H)IPs, with or without hormone, but GTP..gamma..S is the most effective. In the presence of GTP..gamma..S, the effect of carbachol is dose-dependent. Half-maximal and maximal accumulation of the (/sup 3/H)IPs occur at approx. 5 ..mu..M and approx. 100 ..mu..M carbachol, respectively; values close to those seen in intact cells. GTP..gamma..S alone stimulates formation of the (/sup 3/H)IPs after a brief lag time. The combination of GTP..gamma..S and carbachol both increases the rate of, and decreases the lag in, formation of the (/sup 3/H)IPs. LiCl increases (/sup 3/H)IP and IP2, but not IP3, accumulation; while 2,3-diphosphoglycerate substantially increases that of (/sup 3/H)IP3. GTP..gamma..S and carbachol cause formation of (/sup 3/H)IPs in the absence of Ca/sup + +/, but formation induced by GTP..gamma..S with or without carbachol is Ca/sup + +/-sensitive over a range of physiological concentrations. Although carbachol, Ca/sup + +/, and GTP..gamma..S all have effects on formation of (/sup 3/H)IPs, GTP..gamma..S appears to be a primary and obligatory regulator of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the permeabilized 1321N1 astrocytoma cell.

  14. Receptor-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that supply ATP through oxidative phosphorylation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Extrinsic or intrinsic agents can impair mitochondria, and these impaired mitochondria can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as byproducts, inducing cellular damage and cell death. The quality control of mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of normal cellular functions, particularly in cardiomyocytes, because they are terminally differentiated. Accumulation of damaged mitochondria is characteristic of various diseases, including heart failure, neurodegenerative disease, and aging-related diseases. Mitochondria are generally degraded through autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is conserved from yeast to mammals. Autophagy is thought to be a nonselective degradation process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are engulfed by isolation membrane to form autophagosomes in eukaryotic cells. However, recent studies have described the process of selective autophagy, which targets specific proteins or organelles such as mitochondria. Mitochondria-specific autophagy is called mitophagy. Dysregulation of mitophagy is implicated in the development of chronic diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases, and heart failure. In this review, we discuss recent progress in research on mitophagy receptors. PMID:27021519

  15. Effects of single and repeated treatment with antidepressants on apomorphine-induced yawning in the rat: the implication of alpha-1 adrenergic mechanisms in the D-2 receptor function.

    PubMed

    Delini-Stula, A; Hunn, C

    1990-01-01

    Acute (10 or 20 mg/kg IP) and subchronic (2 x 5 or 10 mg/kg IP daily for 7 days) effects of desipramine, imipramine, maprotiline, (+)- and (-)-oxaprotiline enantiomers as well as selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors citalopram and ifoxetine on yawning, induced by low doses of apomorphine, were investigated in the rat. In addition, the effects of alpha-1 receptor agonist adrafinil and antagonist prazosin were also tested. After acute treatment, desipramine, the stereoselective NA-uptake inhibiting (+)-enantiomer of oxaprotiline, and the alpha-1 agonist adrafinil, markedly and significantly suppressed yawning. Prazosin, in contrast, clearly potentiated it. This potentiating effect was abolished by the pretreatment with (+)-oxaprotiline and adrafinil. Other drugs were inactive. After subchronic administration, yawning was antagonized by NA-uptake-inhibiting antidepressants, including imipramine and maprotiline. By comparison to the acute treatment, the inhibitory effects of desipramine and (+)-oxaprotiline were considerably enhanced. Neither selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors nor (-)-oxaprotiline (levoprotiline) were active. Antidepressants therefore modulate the functional activity of D-2 receptors, activated by low doses of apomorphine, predominantly by the virtue of their noradrenergic enhancing properties. This modulatory effect appears to be mediated by alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. PMID:1971448

  16. Prolonged GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition in the cat spinal cord: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, D R; Lacey, G

    1998-08-01

    methochloride. Intravenously administered bicuculline hydrochloride, however, had little or no effect on the inhibition of reflexes following continuous flexor-nerve stimulation. These observations are discussed in the context of possible intraspinal pathways and pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms for GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition of the monosynaptic excitation of spinal motoneurones and of the functional significance of central GABA(B) receptor-associated inhibitory processes, given the relatively minimal effects on motor activity and behaviour produced by baclofen antagonists that penetrate the mammalian blood-brain barrier.

  17. Oligodendrocytes Are Targets of HIV-1 Tat: NMDA and AMPA Receptor-Mediated Effects on Survival and Development

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Shiping; Fuss, Babette; Fitting, Sylvia; Hahn, Yun Kyung; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2015-01-01

    Myelin pallor in HIV+ individuals can occur very early during the disease process. While myelin damage might partly originate from HIV-induced vascular changes, the timing suggests that myelin and/or oligodendrocytes (OLs) may be directly affected. Histological (Golgi–Kopsch, electron microscopy) and biochemical studies have revealed an increased occurrence of abnormal OL/myelin morphology and dysregulated myelin protein expression in transgenic mice expressing the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein. This suggests that viral proteins by themselves might cause OL injury. Since Tat interacts with NMDARs, we hypothesized that activation of NMDARs and subsequent disruption of cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis might be one cause of white matter injury after HIV infection. In culture, HIV-1 Tat caused concentration-dependent death of immature OLs, while more mature OLs remained alive but had reduced myelin-like membranes. Tat also induced [Ca2+]i increases and Thr-287 autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II β (CaMKIIβ) in OLs. Tat-induced [Ca2+]i was attenuated by the NMDAR antagonist MK801, and also by the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist CNQX. Importantly, both MK801 and CNQX blocked Tat-induced death of immature OLs, but only MK801 reversed Tat effects on myelin-like membranes. These results suggest that OLs can be direct targets of HIV proteins released from infected cells. Although viability and membrane production are both affected by glutamatergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, and possibly the ensuing CaMKIIβ activation, the roles of AMPARs and NMDARs appear to be different and dependent on the stage of OL differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Over 33 million individuals are currently infected by HIV. Among these individuals, ∼60% develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Myelin damage and white matter injury have been frequently reported in HIV patients but not extensively studied. Clinical studies

  18. Decreases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species initiate GABAA receptor-mediated electrical suppression in anoxia-tolerant turtle neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, David W; Pamenter, Matthew E; Dukoff, David J; Buck, Leslie T

    2015-01-01

    Key points Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) enhanced GABA transmission prevents injury. The mechanism responsible for increased GABA transmission is unknown; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria may play a role because this is an oxygen-sensitive process. In this study, we show that inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production is sufficient to initiate a redox-sensitive GABA signalling cascade that suppresses pyramidal neuron action potential frequency. These results further our understanding of the turtle's unique strategy for reducing ATP consumption during anoxia and highlights a natural mechanism in which to explore therapies to protect mammalian brain from low-oxygen insults (e.g. cerebral stroke). Abstract Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the anoxia-tolerant western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) neuronal electrical activity is suppressed (i.e. spike arrest), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption is reduced, and cell death does not occur. Electrical suppression is primarily the result of enhanced γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for initiating oxygen-sensitive GABAergic spike arrest is unknown. In turtle cortical pyramidal neurons there are three types of GABAA receptor-mediated currents: spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), giant IPSCs and tonic currents. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging on these three currents since ROS levels naturally decrease with anoxia and may serve as a redox signal to initiate spike arrest. We found that anoxia, pharmacological ROS scavenging, or inhibition of mitochondrial ROS generation enhanced all three types of GABA currents, with tonic currents comprising ∼50% of the total current. Application of hydrogen peroxide inhibited

  19. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    PubMed

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  20. Open-channel block of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses by memantine: therapeutic advantage against NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, H S; Pellegrini, J W; Aggarwal, S K; Lei, S Z; Warach, S; Jensen, F E; Lipton, S A

    1992-11-01

    Excessive activation of NMDA receptors is thought to mediate the calcium-dependent neurotoxicity associated with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, trauma, epilepsy, and several neurodegenerative diseases. For this reason, various NMDA antagonists have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in these diseases, but heretofore none have proven to be both effective and safe. In the present study, memantine, an adamantane derivative similar to the antiviral drug amantadine, is shown to block the channels activated by NMDA receptor stimulation. From whole-cell and single-channel recording experiments, the mechanism of action of memantine is deduced to be open-channel block, similar to MK-801; however, unlike MK-801, memantine is well tolerated clinically. Compared to MK-801, memantine's safety may be related to its faster kinetics of action with rapid blocking and unblocking rates at low micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, at these levels memantine is an uncompetitive antagonist and should theoretically allow near-normal physiological NMDA activity throughout the brain even in the face of pathologically high focal concentrations of glutamate. These pharmacological properties confer upon memantine a therapeutic advantage against NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity with few side effects compared with other organic NMDA open-channel blockers. Moreover, memantine is increasingly effective against escalating levels of glutamate, such as those observed during a stroke. Low micromolar concentrations of memantine, levels known to be tolerated by patients receiving the drug for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, prevent NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in cultures of rat cortical and retinal ganglion cell neurons; memantine also appears to be both safe and effective in a rat stroke model. These results suggest that memantine has considerable therapeutic potential for the myriad of clinical entities associated with NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity.

  1. Evidence for an atypical receptor mediating the augmented bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hannon, J P; Tigani, B; Wolber, C; Williams, I; Mazzoni, L; Howes, C; Fozard, J R

    2002-02-01

    The bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine is markedly and selectively increased following ovalbumin (OA) challenge in actively sensitized, Brown Norway rats. We present a pharmacological analysis of the receptor mediating this response. Like adenosine, the broad-spectrum adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, induced dose-related bronchoconstriction in actively sensitized, OA-challenged animals. In contrast, CPA, CGS 21680 and 2-Cl-IB-MECA, agonists selective for A(1) A(2A) and A(3) receptors, respectively, induced no, or minimal, bronchoconstriction. Neither the selective A(1) receptor antagonist, DPCPX, nor the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, ZM 241385, blocked the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine. MRS 1754, which has similar affinity for rat A(2B) and A(1) receptors, failed to block the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine despite blockade of the A(1) receptor-mediated bradycardia induced by NECA. 8-SPT and CGS 15943, antagonists at A(1), A(2A), and A(2B) but not A(3) receptors, inhibited the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine. However, the degree of blockade (approximately 3 fold) did not reflect the plasma concentrations, which were 139 and 21 times greater than the K(B) value at the rat A(2B) receptor, respectively. Adenosine and NECA, but not CPA, CGS 21680 or 2-Cl-IB-MECA, induced contraction of parenchymal strip preparations from actively sensitized OA-challenged animals. Responses to adenosine could not be antagonized by 8-SPT or MRS 1754 at concentrations >50 times their affinities at the rat A(2B) receptor. The receptor mediating the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine augmented following allergen challenge in actively sensitized BN rats cannot be categorized as one of the four recognized adenosine receptor subtypes.

  2. Characterization of cholinergic muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain from immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Balduini, W.; Murphy, S.D.; Costa, L.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides elicited by stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors has been studied in brain from neonatal (7-day-old) rats in order to determine: (1) whether the neonatal rat could provide a good model system to study this signal-transduction pathway; and (2) whether potential differences with adult nerve tissue would explain the differential, age-related effects of cholinergic agonists. Accumulation of (3H) inositol phosphates in (3H)inositol prelabeled slices from neonatal and adult rats was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Full (acetylcholine, methacholine, carbachol) and partial (oxotremorine, bethanechol) agonists had qualitatively similar, albeit quantitatively different, effects in neonatal and adult rats. Atropine and pirenzepine effectively blocked the carbachol-induced response with inhibition constants of 1.2 and 20.7 nM, respectively. In all brain areas, response to all agonists was higher in neonatal than adult rats, and in hippocampus and cerebral cortex the response was higher than in cerebellum or brainstem. The relative intrinsic activity of partial agonists was higher in the latter two areas (0.6-0.7) than in the former two (0.3-0.4). Carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain areas correlated well with the binding of (3H)QNB (r2 = 0.627) and, particularly, with (3H)pirenzepine (r2 = 0.911). In cerebral cortex the effect of carbachol was additive to that of norepinephrine and glutamate. The presence of calcium (250-500 microM) was necessary for maximal response to carbachol to be elicited; the EC50 value for Ca2+ was 65.4 microM. Addition of EDTA completely abolished the response. Removal of sodium ions from the incubation medium reduced the response to carbachol by 50%.

  3. Modulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in aortic smooth muscle cells by allylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.R.; Murphy, S.K.; Ramos, K. )

    1990-08-01

    Aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) modulate from a contractile to a proliferative phenotype upon subchronic exposure to allylamine. The present studies were designed to determine if this phenotypic modulation is associated with alterations in the metabolism of membrane phosphoinositides. 32P incorporation into phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), and phosphatidic acid (PA) was lower by 31, 35, and 22%, respectively, in SMC from allylamine-treated animals relative to controls. In contrast, incorporation of (3H)myoinositol into inositol phosphates did not differ in allylamine cells relative to control cells. Exposure to dibutyryl (db) cAMP (0.2 mM) and theophylline (0.1 mM) reduced 32P incorporation into PIP and PIP2 in SMC from both experimental groups. Under these conditions, a decrease in (3H)myoinositol incorporation into inositol 1-phosphate was only observed in allylamine cells. The effects of db cAMP and theophylline in allylamine and control SMC correlated with a marked decrease in cellular proliferation. These results suggest that alterations in phosphoinositide synthesis and/or degradation contribute to the enhanced proliferation of SMC induced by allylamine. To further examine this concept, the effects of agents which modulate protein kinase C (PKC) activity were evaluated. Sphingosine (125-500 ng/ml), a PKC inhibitor, decreased SMC proliferation in allylamine, but not control cells. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (1-100 ng/ml), a PKC agonist, stimulated proliferation in control cells, but inhibited proliferation in cells from allylamine-treated animals. We conclude that allylamine-induced phenotypic modulation of SMC is associated with alterations in phosphoinositide metabolism.

  4. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 2: Enhancement of tumor penetration through receptor mediated transcytosis in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor models, presumably through tandem cycles of CD44 mediated endocytosis and exocytosis. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the NPs, better penetration of multilayered tumor cells was observed with much improved cytotoxicities against both drug sensitive and drug resistant cancer spheroids compared to the free drug. Thus, targeting receptors such as CD44 that can readily undergo recycling between the cell surface and interior of the cells can become a useful strategy to enhance the tumor penetration potential of NPs and the efficiency of drug delivery through receptor mediated transcytosis.We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor

  5. 8-Diethylamino-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, a calcium store blocker, increases calcium influx, inhibits alpha-1 adrenergic receptor calcium mobilization, and alters iodide transport in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Smallridge, R C; Gist, I D; Ambroz, C

    1991-07-01

    8-Diethylamino-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8) is known to inhibit mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores but, more recently, other cellular effects have been described. In the present study, the effects of TMB-8 on cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]i levels in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells were determined using the fluorescent dye, Indo-1. TMB-8 increased [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximum rise from 120 +/- 7 nM to 229 +/- 16 nM (90 +/- 5% increase) at 5 x 10(-4) M. This effect was considerably reduced in Ca2+ free buffer, demonstrating a dependency upon extracellular calcium influx but not upon membrane potential and which did not involve the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In Ca2+ free buffer TMB-8, at a dose which did not affect [Ca2+]i, completely prevented norepinephrine (10(-5) M) from mobilizing intracellular Ca2+. To determine whether TMB-8 affected differentiated functions, iodide uptake and efflux studies were performed with 125I. TMB-8 (10(-4) M) inhibited iodide uptake by approximately 40% without affecting efflux. At 10(-3) M TMB-8, efflux was also enhanced. These studies demonstrate that TMB-8 has at least two effects on [Ca2+]i, promoting calcium influx and preventing alpha-1 adrenergic mobilization from intracellular stores. TMB-8 also has multiple effects on 125I transport, both inhibiting influx and increasing efflux. The results emphasize the importance of characterizing the behavior of this compound in any cell system before using it as a biological probe.

  6. Impact of the β-1 adrenergic receptor polymorphism on tolerability and efficacy of bisoprolol therapy in Korean heart failure patients: association between β adrenergic receptor polymorphism and bisoprolol therapy in heart failure (ABBA) study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Young; Chung, Wook-Jin; Jeon, Hui-Kyung; Seo, Hong-Seog; Choi, Dong-Ju; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Kim, Jae-Joong; Shin, Joon Han; Kang, Seok-Min; Lim, Sung Cil; Baek, Sang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: We evaluated the association between coding region variants of adrenergic receptor genes and therapeutic effect in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Methods: One hundred patients with stable CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] < 45%) were enrolled. Enrolled patients started 1.25 mg bisoprolol treatment once daily, then up-titrated to the maximally tolerable dose, at which they were treated for 1 year. Results: Genotypic analysis was carried out, but the results were blinded to the investigators throughout the study period. At position 389 of the β-1 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB1), the observed minor Gly allele frequency (Gly389Arg + Gly389Gly) was 0.21, and no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed in the genotypic distribution of Arg389Gly (p = 0.75). Heart rate was reduced from 80.8 ± 14.3 to 70.0 ± 15.0 beats per minute (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in final heart rate across genotypes. However, the Arg389Arg genotype group required significantly more bisoprolol compared to the Gly389X (Gly389Arg + Gly389Gly) group (5.26 ± 2.62 mg vs. 3.96 ± 2.05 mg, p = 0.022). There were no significant differences in LVEF changes or remodeling between two groups. Also, changes in exercise capacity and brain natriuretic peptide level were not significant. However, interestingly, there was a two-fold higher rate of readmission (21.2% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.162) and one CHF-related death in the Arg389Arg group. Conclusions: The ADRB1 Gly389X genotype showed greater response to bisoprolol than the Arg389Arg genotype, suggesting the potential of individually tailoring β-blocker therapy according to genotype. PMID:26879662

  7. Dynamic formation of ER-PM junctions presents a lipid phosphatase to regulate phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Jensen, Jill B; Vivas, Oscar; Kruse, Martin; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E; Hille, Bertil

    2016-04-11

    Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) contact sites play an integral role in cellular processes such as excitation-contraction coupling and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Another ER-PM assembly is one tethered by the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syt). We have discovered that at steady state, E-Syt2 positions the ER and Sac1, an integral ER membrane lipid phosphatase, in discrete ER-PM junctions. Here, Sac1 participates in phosphoinositide homeostasis by limiting PM phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P), the precursor of PI(4,5)P2 Activation of G protein-coupled receptors that deplete PM PI(4,5)P2disrupts E-Syt2-mediated ER-PM junctions, reducing Sac1's access to the PM and permitting PM PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2to recover. Conversely, depletion of ER luminal calcium and subsequent activation of SOCE increases the amount of Sac1 in contact with the PM, depleting PM PI(4)P. Thus, the dynamic presence of Sac1 at ER-PM contact sites allows it to act as a cellular sensor and controller of PM phosphoinositides, thereby influencing many PM processes. PMID:27044890

  8. Novel small molecule inhibitors of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Richard I; Wu, James M; Polokoff, Mark A; Kochanny, Monica J; Dinter, Harald; Zhu, Daguang; Biroc, Sandra L; Alicke, Bruno; Bryant, Judi; Yuan, Shendong; Buckman, Brad O; Lentz, Dao; Ferrer, Mike; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Finster, Silke; Chang, Zheng; Arnaiz, Damian O

    2005-05-20

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1)/Akt signaling pathway plays a key role in cancer cell growth, survival, and tumor angiogenesis and represents a promising target for anticancer drugs. Here, we describe three potent PDK1 inhibitors, BX-795, BX-912, and BX-320 (IC(50) = 11-30 nm) and their initial biological characterization. The inhibitors blocked PDK1/Akt signaling in tumor cells and inhibited the anchorage-dependent growth of a variety of tumor cell lines in culture or induced apoptosis. A number of cancer cell lines with elevated Akt activity were >30-fold more sensitive to growth inhibition by PDK1 inhibitors in soft agar than on tissue culture plastic, consistent with the cell survival function of the PDK1/Akt signaling pathway, which is particularly important for unattached cells. BX-320 inhibited the growth of LOX melanoma tumors in the lungs of nude mice after injection of tumor cells into the tail vein. The effect of BX-320 on cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo indicates that PDK1 inhibitors may have clinical utility as anticancer agents. PMID:15772071

  9. Modulation of Ciliary Phosphoinositide Content Regulates Trafficking and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Output.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Marcelo; Ena, Sabrina; Van Sande, Jacqueline; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; Schurmans, Stéphane; Schiffmann, Serge N

    2015-08-10

    Ciliary transport is required for ciliogenesis, signal transduction, and trafficking of receptors to the primary cilium. Mutations in inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase E (INPP5E) have been associated with ciliary dysfunction; however, its role in regulating ciliary phosphoinositides is unknown. Here we report that in neural stem cells, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) is found in high levels in cilia whereas phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) is not detectable. Upon INPP5E inactivation, PI(4,5)P2 accumulates at the ciliary tip whereas PI4P is depleted. This is accompanied by recruitment of the PI(4,5)P2-interacting protein TULP3 to the ciliary membrane, along with Gpr161. This results in an increased production of cAMP and a repression of the Shh transcription gene Gli1. Our results reveal the link between ciliary regulation of phosphoinositides by INPP5E and Shh regulation via ciliary trafficking of TULP3/Gpr161 and also provide mechanistic insight into ciliary alterations found in Joubert and MORM syndromes resulting from INPP5E mutations.

  10. Chronic methamphetamine administration reduces histamine-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in mouse frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko

    2003-01-24

    In the present study, it was hypothesized that in vivo pretreatment with repeated methamphetamine would alter the agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in mouse frontal cortical slices. Male ICR mice that received the methamphetamine injection (1.0mg/kg, intraperitoneally) once a day for five consecutive days showed behavioral sensitization to the same dose of methamphetamine 5 days after the last injection of the initial chronic treatment regimen (test day 10). On test day 10, the reduction of histamine (0.1-1.0mM)-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the mouse frontal cortex was observed. The reduction was specific to histamine, but not to norepinephrine (10 microM-0.1mM) or L-glutamate (0.1-0.5mM). The reduction occurred without any change in the expression level of histamine H(1) receptor mRNA. The reduction recovered 25 days after the last injection of the initial chronic treatment regimen (test day 30). The direct application to the slices of a pharmacologically effective concentration of methamphetamine in vitro (10 microM) did not alter the histamine signal transduction. The present results suggest that the reduction is probably one of neuroadaptations in the frontal cortex contributing to behavioral sensitization.

  11. Phenylephrine stimulated breakdown of phosphoinositides in brown adipocytes is attenuated by adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Selective activation of alpha adrenergic receptors on brown adipocytes brings about increased mitochondrial respiration. This response is associated with a rapid breakdown of phosphoinositides in the plasma membrane. The authors have shown that respiration increased by alpha receptor activation can be inhibited by adenosine but the mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. The present study probes the possibility that adenosine inhibition of alpha receptor stimulated respiration is secondary to an inhibition of stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Phospholipids were labeled with (/sup 32/P) by incubation with (/sup 32/P)-Pi for up to four hours. Phenylephrine and other ligands were then added and the radioactivity present in individual lipids determined following their resolution by thin layer chromatography. Addition of 2-chloroadenosine or phenylisopropyl adenosine, but not 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, inhibited phenylephrine promoted breakdown of phosphoinositides. The dose response relation for this effect was similar to that for attenuation of stimulated respiration. This finding demonstrates adenosine inhibition of a phospholipase in brown fat cells and suggests the possibility that breakdown of inositol phospholipids is a critical control site for stimulation and attenuation of respiration.

  12. Arf6 controls retromer traffic and intracellular cholesterol distribution via a phosphoinositide-based mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Marquer, Catherine; Tian, Huasong; Yi, Julie; Bastien, Jayson; Dall'Armi, Claudia; Yang-Klingler, YoungJoo; Zhou, Bowen; Chan, Robin Barry; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases play a critical role in membrane traffic. Among them, Arf6 mediates transport to and from the plasma membrane, as well as phosphoinositide signalling and cholesterol homeostasis. Here we delineate the molecular basis for the link between Arf6 and cholesterol homeostasis using an inducible knockout (KO) model of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We find that accumulation of free cholesterol in the late endosomes/lysosomes of Arf6 KO MEFs results from mistrafficking of Niemann–Pick type C protein NPC2, a cargo of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-M6PR). This is caused by a selective increase in an endosomal pool of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) and a perturbation of retromer, which controls the retrograde transport of CI-M6PR via sorting nexins, including the PI4P effector SNX6. Finally, reducing PI4P levels in KO MEFs through independent mechanisms rescues aberrant retromer tubulation and cholesterol mistrafficking. Our study highlights a phosphoinositide-based mechanism for control of cholesterol distribution via retromer. PMID:27336679

  13. Sac1--Vps74 structure reveals a mechanism to terminate phosphoinositide signaling in the Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yiying; Deng, Yongqiang; Horenkamp, Florian; Reinisch, Karin M.; Burd, Christopher G.

    2014-08-25

    Sac1 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus that controls organelle membrane composition principally via regulation of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate signaling. We present a characterization of the structure of the N-terminal portion of yeast Sac1, containing the conserved Sac1 homology domain, in complex with Vps74, a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase effector and the orthologue of human GOLPH3. The interface involves the N-terminal subdomain of the Sac1 homology domain, within which mutations in the related Sac3/Fig4 phosphatase have been linked to Charcot–Marie–Tooth disorder CMT4J and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Disruption of the Sac1–Vps74 interface results in a broader distribution of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate within the Golgi apparatus and failure to maintain residence of a medial Golgi mannosyltransferase. The analysis prompts a revision of the membrane-docking mechanism for GOLPH3 family proteins and reveals how an effector of phosphoinositide signaling serves a dual function in signal termination.

  14. Sec14-nodulin proteins and the patterning of phosphoinositide landmarks for developmental control of membrane morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ratna; de Campos, Marília K. F.; Huang, Jin; Huh, Seong K.; Orlowski, Adam; Yang, Yuan; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Nile, Aaron; Lee, Hsin-Chieh; Dynowski, Marek; Schäfer, Helen; Róg, Tomasz; Lete, Marta G.; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Alonso, Alicia; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Igumenova, Tatyana I.; Schaaf, Gabriel; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2015-01-01

    Polarized membrane morphogenesis is a fundamental activity of eukaryotic cells. This process is essential for the biology of cells and tissues, and its execution demands exquisite temporal coordination of functionally diverse membrane signaling reactions with high spatial resolution. Moreover, mechanisms must exist to establish and preserve such organization in the face of randomizing forces that would diffuse it. Here we identify the conserved AtSfh1 Sec14-nodulin protein as a novel effector of phosphoinositide signaling in the extreme polarized membrane growth program exhibited by growing Arabidopsis root hairs. The data are consistent with Sec14-nodulin proteins controlling the lateral organization of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) landmarks for polarized membrane morphogenesis in plants. This patterning activity requires both the PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding and homo-oligomerization activities of the AtSfh1 nodulin domain and is an essential aspect of the polarity signaling program in root hairs. Finally, the data suggest a general principle for how the phosphoinositide signaling landscape is physically bit mapped so that eukaryotic cells are able to convert a membrane surface into a high-definition lipid-signaling screen. PMID:25739452

  15. Dynamic formation of ER–PM junctions presents a lipid phosphatase to regulate phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jill B.; Vivas, Oscar; Kruse, Martin; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E.; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane (ER–PM) contact sites play an integral role in cellular processes such as excitation–contraction coupling and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Another ER–PM assembly is one tethered by the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syt). We have discovered that at steady state, E-Syt2 positions the ER and Sac1, an integral ER membrane lipid phosphatase, in discrete ER–PM junctions. Here, Sac1 participates in phosphoinositide homeostasis by limiting PM phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P), the precursor of PI(4,5)P2. Activation of G protein–coupled receptors that deplete PM PI(4,5)P2 disrupts E-Syt2–mediated ER–PM junctions, reducing Sac1’s access to the PM and permitting PM PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2 to recover. Conversely, depletion of ER luminal calcium and subsequent activation of SOCE increases the amount of Sac1 in contact with the PM, depleting PM PI(4)P. Thus, the dynamic presence of Sac1 at ER–PM contact sites allows it to act as a cellular sensor and controller of PM phosphoinositides, thereby influencing many PM processes. PMID:27044890

  16. Chronic exposure to paclitaxel diminishes phosphoinositide signaling by calpain-mediated neuronal calcium sensor-1 degradation.

    PubMed

    Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Zhang, Kun; Sivula, Michael; Heidrich, Felix M; Lee, Yashang; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2007-06-26

    Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a well established chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors, but it is limited in its usefulness by the frequent induction of peripheral neuropathy. We found that prolonged exposure of a neuroblastoma cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglia with therapeutic concentrations of Taxol leads to a reduction in inositol trisphosphate (InsP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. We also observed a Taxol-specific reduction in neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1) protein levels, a known modulator of InsP(3) receptor (InsP(3)R) activity. This reduction was also found in peripheral neuronal tissue from Taxol treated animals. We further observed that short hairpin RNA-mediated NCS-1 knockdown had a similar effect on phosphoinositide-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. When NCS-1 protein levels recovered, so did InsP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Inhibition of the Ca(2+)-activated protease mu-calpain prevented alterations in phosphoinositide-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and NCS-1 protein levels. We also found that NCS-1 is readily degraded by mu-calpain in vitro and that mu-calpain activity is increased in Taxol but not vehicle-treated cells. From these results, we conclude that prolonged exposure to Taxol activates mu-calpain, which leads to the degradation of NCS-1, which, in turn, attenuates InsP(3)mediated Ca(2+) signaling. These findings provide a previously undescribed approach to understanding and treating Taxol-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:17581879

  17. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  18. The Sac1 Phosphoinositide Phosphatase Regulates Golgi Membrane Morphology and Mitotic Spindle Organization in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Boukhelifa, Malika; Tribble, Emily; Morin-Kensicki, Elizabeth; Uetrecht, Andrea; Bear, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are ubiquitous regulators of signal transduction events in eukaryotic cells. PIPs are degraded by various enzymes, including PIP phosphatases. The integral membrane Sac1 phosphatases represent a major class of such enzymes. The central role of lipid phosphatases in regulating PIP homeostasis notwithstanding, the biological functions of Sac1-phosphatases remain poorly characterized. Herein, we demonstrate that functional ablation of the single murine Sac1 results in preimplantation lethality in the mouse and that Sac1 insufficiencies result in disorganization of mammalian Golgi membranes and mitotic defects characterized by multiple mechanically active spindles. Complementation experiments demonstrate mutant mammalian Sac1 proteins individually defective in either phosphoinositide phosphatase activity, or in recycling of the enzyme from the Golgi system back to the endoplasmic reticulum, are nonfunctional proteins in vivo. The data indicate Sac1 executes an essential household function in mammals that involves organization of both Golgi membranes and mitotic spindles and that both enzymatic activity and endoplasmic reticulum localization are important Sac1 functional properties. PMID:18480408

  19. The Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase regulates Golgi membrane morphology and mitotic spindle organization in mammals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Boukhelifa, Malika; Tribble, Emily; Morin-Kensicki, Elizabeth; Uetrecht, Andrea; Bear, James E; Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2008-07-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are ubiquitous regulators of signal transduction events in eukaryotic cells. PIPs are degraded by various enzymes, including PIP phosphatases. The integral membrane Sac1 phosphatases represent a major class of such enzymes. The central role of lipid phosphatases in regulating PIP homeostasis notwithstanding, the biological functions of Sac1-phosphatases remain poorly characterized. Herein, we demonstrate that functional ablation of the single murine Sac1 results in preimplantation lethality in the mouse and that Sac1 insufficiencies result in disorganization of mammalian Golgi membranes and mitotic defects characterized by multiple mechanically active spindles. Complementation experiments demonstrate mutant mammalian Sac1 proteins individually defective in either phosphoinositide phosphatase activity, or in recycling of the enzyme from the Golgi system back to the endoplasmic reticulum, are nonfunctional proteins in vivo. The data indicate Sac1 executes an essential household function in mammals that involves organization of both Golgi membranes and mitotic spindles and that both enzymatic activity and endoplasmic reticulum localization are important Sac1 functional properties.

  20. The Critical Role Of VP1 In Forming The Necessary Cavities For Receptor-mediated Entry Of FMDV To The Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Rees, D J G

    2016-01-01

    The antigenic inconsistency of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is very broad, such that a vaccine made from one isolate will not offer protection against infection with other isolates from the same serotype. Viral particles (VPs) or surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1-VP3, of FMDV determine both the antigenicity of the virus and its receptor-mediated entry into the host cell. Therefore, modifications of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus. Here we show putative cavities on the FMDV-SAT1 (FMDV Southern African Territories1) capsid as possible binding sites for the receptor-mediated viral entry into the host cell. We identified three possible cavities on the FMDV capsid surface, from which the largest one (C2) is shaped in the contact regions of VP1-VP3. Our results demonstrate the significance of VP1, in the formation of FMDV-SAT1 surface cavities, which is the main component in all the identified cavities. Our findings can have profound implications in the protein engineering of FMDV in the contact region of VP1-VP3 found to be embedded in several cavities. Such information is of great significance in the context of vaccine design, as it provides the ground for future improvement of synthetic vaccines to control FMD caused by FMDV-SAT1 serotypes. PMID:27249937

  1. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of polypeptide hormones is a regulated process: inhibition of (125I)iodoinsulin internalization in hypoinsulinemic diabetes of rat and man

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentier, J.L.; Robert, A.; Grunberger, G.; van Obberghen, E.; Freychet, P.; Orci, L.; Gorden, P.

    1986-07-01

    Much data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of hormone excess. Thus, in hyperinsulinemic states there is an accelerated loss of cell surface insulin receptors. In the present experiments we addressed this question in hypoinsulinemic states, in which insulin binding to cell surface receptors is generally increased. In hepatocytes obtained from hypoinsulinemic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, (/sup 125/I)iodoglucagon internalization was increased, while at the same time (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin internalization was decreased. The defect in (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin internalization was corrected by insulin treatment of the animal. In peripheral blood monocytes from patients with type I insulinopenic diabetes, internalization of (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin was impaired; this defect was not present in insulin-treated patients. These data in the hypoinsulinemic rat and human diabetes suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of insulin deficiency as well as insulin excess. Delayed or reduced internalization of the insulin-receptor complex could amplify the muted signal caused by deficient hormone secretion.

  2. Repeated exposure of adult rats to Aroclor 1254 induces neuronal injury and impairs the neurochemical manifestations of the NMDA receptor-mediated intracellular signaling in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hilgier, Wojciech; Łazarewicz, Jerzy W; Strużynska, Lidia; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Aroclor 1254 is a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a class of environmental toxins which cause a wide spectrum of neurotoxic effects. Learning and memory deficits are the profound effects of PCBs which may be related to hippocampal dysfunction. To get insight into the underlying neurochemical mechanisms, we employed the microdialysis technique to investigate the effect of repeated exposure of adult male Wistar rats to Aroclor 1254 (10mg/kg b.w., daily, ig., for 14days), on the neurochemical parameters of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus in vivo assessed using the microdialysis technique. The results demonstrated that exposure to Aroclor 1254, which was associated with substantial neuronal damage and loss in the hippocampus, markedly decreased the NMDA-induced extracellular accumulation of newly loaded (45)CaCl(2), cGMP and glutamate, and reduced the basal content of the NO precursor, arginine, indicating inhibition of the NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway. Aroclor 1254 exposure also decreased the basal microdialysate content of glutamate and glutamine, which may cause inadequate supply of the neurotransmitter glutamate, while the level of two other neuroactive amino acids, aspartate or taurine was not affected by the exposure. The results underscore neuronal lesion and inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in hippocampus as a potential major contributor to the cognitive deficits associated with exposure to PCB.

  3. Selective reduction by isolation rearing of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated dopamine release in vivo in the frontal cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Ago, Y; Sakaue, M; Baba, A; Matsuda, T

    2002-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors modulate in vivo release of brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters which may be involved in isolation-induced aggressive behavior. The present study examined the effect of isolation rearing on the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated modulation of dopamine (DA), 5-HT and noradrenaline (NA) release in the frontal cortex of mice. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist (S)-5-[-[(1,4-benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)amino]propoxy]-1,3-benzodioxole HCl (MKC-242) increased the release of DA and NA and decreased the release of 5-HT in the frontal cortex of mice. The effect of MKC-242 on DA release was significantly less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, while effects of the drug on NA and 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. The effect of the other 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin on cortical DA release was also less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, and that of the drug on cortical 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. In contrast to MKC-242-induced DA release, amphetamine-induced increase in cortical DA release in vivo was greater in isolation-reared mice. The present findings suggest that isolation rearing enhances the activity of cortical dopaminergic neurons and reduces selectively the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated release of DA in the cortex.

  4. The Critical Role Of VP1 In Forming The Necessary Cavities For Receptor-mediated Entry Of FMDV To The Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Rees, D. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The antigenic inconsistency of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is very broad, such that a vaccine made from one isolate will not offer protection against infection with other isolates from the same serotype. Viral particles (VPs) or surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1–VP3, of FMDV determine both the antigenicity of the virus and its receptor-mediated entry into the host cell. Therefore, modifications of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus. Here we show putative cavities on the FMDV-SAT1 (FMDV Southern African Territories1) capsid as possible binding sites for the receptor-mediated viral entry into the host cell. We identified three possible cavities on the FMDV capsid surface, from which the largest one (C2) is shaped in the contact regions of VP1–VP3. Our results demonstrate the significance of VP1, in the formation of FMDV-SAT1 surface cavities, which is the main component in all the identified cavities. Our findings can have profound implications in the protein engineering of FMDV in the contact region of VP1–VP3 found to be embedded in several cavities. Such information is of great significance in the context of vaccine design, as it provides the ground for future improvement of synthetic vaccines to control FMD caused by FMDV-SAT1 serotypes. PMID:27249937

  5. Specific inhibition of herpes virus replication by receptor-mediated entry of an antiviral peptide linked to Escherichia coli enterotoxin B subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, A; Loregian, A; Cross, A; Marsden, H; Hirst, T R; Palù, G

    1994-01-01

    Mimetic peptides capable of selectively disrupting protein-protein interactions represent potential therapeutic agents for inhibition of viral and cellular enzymes. This approach was first suggested by the observation that the peptide YAGAVVNDL, corresponding to the carboxyl-terminal 9 amino acids of the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase of herpes simplex virus, specifically inhibited the viral enzyme in vitro. Evaluation and use of this peptide as a potential antiviral agent has, however, been thwarted by its failure to inhibit virus replication in vivo, presumably because the peptide is too large to enter eukaryotic cells unaided. Here, we show that the nontoxic B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin can be used as a recombinant carrier for the receptor-mediated delivery of YAGAVVNDL into virally infected cells. The resultant fusion protein specifically inhibited herpes simplex virus type 1 replication and ribonucleotide reductase activity in quiescent Vero cells. Preincubation of the fusion protein with soluble GM1 ganglioside abolished this antiviral effect, indicating that receptor-mediated binding to the target cell is necessary for its activity. This provides direct evidence of the usefulness of carrier-mediated delivery to evaluate the intracellular efficacy of a putative antiviral peptide. Images PMID:8090758

  6. Mu-Opioid (MOP) receptor mediated G-protein signaling is impaired in specific brain regions in a rat model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Edina; Büki, Alexandra; Kékesi, Gabriella; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Benyhe, Sándor

    2016-04-21

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder. Clinical reports suggest that many patients with schizophrenia are less sensitive to pain than other individuals. Animal models do not interpret schizophrenia completely, but they can model a number of symptoms of the disease, including decreased pain sensitivities and increased pain thresholds of various modalities. Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides have a substantial role in analgesia. In this biochemical study we investigated changes in the signaling properties of the mu-opioid (MOP) receptor in different brain regions, which are involved in the pain transmission, i.e., thalamus, olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our goal was to compare the transmembrane signaling mediated by MOP receptors in control rats and in a recently developed rat model of schizophrenia. Regulatory G-protein activation via MOP receptors were measured in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays in the presence of a highly selective MOP receptor peptide agonist, DAMGO. It was found that the MOP receptor mediated activation of G-proteins was substantially lower in membranes prepared from the 'schizophrenic' model rats than in control animals. The potency of DAMGO to activate MOP receptor was also decreased in all brain regions studied. Taken together in our rat model of schizophrenia, MOP receptor mediated G-proteins have a reduced stimulatory activity compared to membrane preparations taken from control animals. The observed distinct changes of opioid receptor functions in different areas of the brain do not explain the augmented nociceptive threshold described in these animals.

  7. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  8. Depletion of plasma membrane PtdIns(4,5)P2 reveals essential roles for phosphoinositides in flagellar biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ho-Chun; Rollins, Janet; Fabian, Lacramioara; Hayes, Madeline; Polevoy, Gordon; Bazinet, Christopher; Brill, Julie A

    2008-04-01

    Axonemes are microtubule-based organelles of crucial importance in the structure and function of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Despite great progress in understanding how axonemes are assembled, the signals that initiate axoneme outgrowth remain unknown. Here, we identified phosphatidylinositol phosphates (phosphoinositides) as key regulators of early stages of axoneme outgrowth in Drosophila melanogaster spermatogenesis. In a study of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] function in developing Drosophila male germ cells, we depleted PtdIns(4,5)P2 by expression of a potent phosphoinositide phosphatase. Phosphatase expression dramatically inhibited sperm tail formation and perturbed microtubule organization in a manner reversible by co-expression of a PtdIns 4-phosphate 5-kinase. Depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P2 caused increased levels of basal body gamma-tubulin and altered the distribution of proteins known to be required for axoneme assembly. Examination of PtdIns(4,5)P2-depleted spermatids by transmission electron microscopy revealed defects in basal body docking to the nuclear envelope, and in axoneme architecture and integrity of the developing flagellar axoneme and axial sheath. Our results provide the first evidence that phosphoinositides act at several steps during flagellar biogenesis, coordinately regulating microtubule and membrane organization. They further suggest that phosphoinositides play evolutionarily conserved roles in flagella and cilia, across phyla and in structurally diverse cell types. PMID:18334551

  9. The yeast VAP homolog Scs2p has a phosphoinositide-binding ability that is correlated with its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kagiwada, Satoshi Hashimoto, Misa

    2007-12-28

    The yeast VAMP-associated protein (VAP) homolog Scs2p is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/nuclear membrane protein that binds to an FFAT (diphenylalanine in an acidic tract) motif found in various lipid-metabolic proteins, including Opi1p, a negative regulator of phospholipid biosynthesis. Here, we show that Scs2p is a novel phosphoinositide-binding protein that can bind to phosphatidylinositol monophosphates and bisphosphates in vitro. The phosphoinositide-binding domain was assigned to the N-terminal major sperm protein (MSP) domain which also contains the FFAT-binding domain. When several lysine residues in the MSP domain were substituted for alanine, the resulting mutant Scs2 proteins lost the phosphoinositide-binding ability and failed to complement the inositol auxotrophy of an scs2 deletion strain. However, the mutant proteins still localized in the ER/nuclear membrane, in a similar manner to wild-type Scs2p. These results suggest the possibility that Scs2p activity is regulated by phosphoinositides to coordinate phospholipid biosynthesis in response to changes in phospholipid composition.

  10. Contribution of phosphoinositide-dependent signalling to photomotility of Blepharisma ciliate.

    PubMed

    Fabczak, H

    2000-01-01

    The effect of experimental procedures designed to modify an intracellular phosphoinositide signalling pathway, which may be instrumental in the photophobic response of the protozoan ciliate Blepharisma japonicum, has been investigated. To assess this issue, the latency time of the photophobic response and the cell photoresponsiveness have been assayed employing newly developed computerized videorecording and standard macro-photographic methods. Cell incubation with neomycin, heparin and Li+, drugs known to greatly impede phosphoinositide turnover, causes evident dose-dependent changes in cell photomotile behaviour. The strongest effect on photoresponses is exerted by neomycin, a potent inhibitor of polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis. The presence of micromolar concentrations of neomycin in the cell medium causes both prolongation of response latency and decrease of cell photoresponsiveness. Neomycin at higher concentrations (> 10 microM) abolishes the cell response to light at the highest applied intensity. A slightly lower inhibition of cell responsiveness to light stimulation and prolongation of response latency are observed in cells incubated in the presence of heparin, an inositol trisphosphate receptor antagonist. Lithium ions, widely known to deplete the intracellular phosphoinositide pathway intermediate, inositol trisphosphate, added to the cell medium at millimolar level, also cause a slowly developing inhibitory effect on cell photoresponses. Mastoparan, a specific G-protein activator, efficiently mimics the effect of light stimulation. In dark-adapted ciliates, it elicits ciliary reversal with the response latency typical for ciliary reversal during the photophobic response. Sustained treatment of Blepharisma cells with mastoparan also suppresses the photoresponsiveness, as in the case of cell adaptation to light during prolonged illumination. The mastoparan-induced responses can be eliminated by pretreatment of the cells with neomycin. Moreover, using

  11. Role of caveolin 1 in AT1a receptor-mediated uptake of angiotensin II in the proximal tubule of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao C.; Gu, Victor; Miguel-Qin, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Caveolin 1 (CAV-1) functions not only as a constitutive scaffolding protein of caveolae but also as a vesicular transporter and signaling regulator. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that CAV-1 knockout (CAV-1 KO) inhibits ANG II type 1 [AT1 (AT1a)] receptor-mediated uptake of ANG II in the proximal tubule and attenuates blood pressure responses in ANG II-induced hypertension. To determine the role of CAV-1 in mediating the uptake of FITC-labeled ANG II, wild-type (WT) mouse proximal convoluted tubule cells were transfected with CAV-1 small interfering (si)RNA for 48 h before AT1 receptor-mediated uptake of FITC-labeled ANG II was studied. CAV-1 siRNA knocked down CAV-1 expression by >90% (P < 0.01) and inhibited FITC-labeled ANG II uptake by >50% (P < 0.01). Moreover, CAV-1 siRNA attenuated ANG II-induced activation of MAPK ERK1/2 and Na+/H+ exchanger 3 expression, respectively (P < 0.01). To determine whether CAV-1 regulates ANG II uptake in the proximal tubule, Alexa 488-labeled ANG II was infused into anesthetized WT and CAV-1 KO mice for 60 min (20 ng/min iv). Imaging analysis revealed that Alexa 488-labeled ANG II uptake was decreased by >50% in CAV-1 KO mice (P < 0.01). Furthermore, Val5-ANG II was infused into WT and CAV-1 KO mice for 2 wk (1.5 mg·kg−1·day−1 ip). Basal systolic pressure was higher, whereas blood pressure and renal excretory and signaling responses to ANG II were attenuated, in CAV-1 KO mice (P < 0.01). We concluded that CAV-1 plays an important role in AT1 receptor-mediated uptake of ANG II in the proximal tubule and modulates blood pressure and renal responses to ANG II. PMID:25164083

  12. p90 ribosomal S6 kinases play a significant role in early gene regulation in the cardiomyocyte response to G(q)-protein-coupled receptor stimuli, endothelin-1 and α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Amirak, Emre; Fuller, Stephen J; Sugden, Peter H; Clerk, Angela

    2013-03-01

    ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and their substrates RSKs (p90 ribosomal S6 kinases) phosphorylate different transcription factors, contributing differentially to transcriptomic profiles. In cardiomyocytes ERK1/2 are required for >70% of the transcriptomic response to endothelin-1. In the present study we investigated the role of RSKs in the transcriptomic responses to the G(q)-protein-coupled receptor agonists endothelin-1, phenylephrine (a generic α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist) and A61603 (α(1A)-adrenergic receptor selective). Phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-RSKs appeared in cardiomyocyte nuclei within 2-3 min of stimulation (endothelin-1>A61603≈phenylephrine). All agonists increased nuclear RSK2, but only endothelin-1 increased the nuclear RSK1 content. PD184352 (inhibits ERK1/2 activation) and BI-D1870 (inhibits RSKs) were used to dissect the contribution of RSKs to the endothelin-1-responsive transcriptome. Of the 213 RNAs up-regulated after 1 h, 51% required RSKs for their up-regulation, whereas 29% required ERK1/2 but not RSKs. The transcriptomic response to phenylephrine overlapped with, but was not identical with, endothelin-1. As with endothelin-1, PD184352 inhibited the up-regulation of most phenylephrine-responsive transcripts, but the greater variation in the effects of BI-D1870 suggests that differential RSK signalling influences global gene expression. A61603 induced similar changes in RNA expression in cardiomyocytes as phenylephrine, indicating that the signal was mediated largely through α(1A)-adrenergic receptors. A61603 also increased expression of immediate early genes in perfused adult rat hearts and, as in cardiomyocytes, up-regulation of the majority of genes was inhibited by PD184352. PD184352 or BI-D1870 prevented the increased surface area induced by endothelin-1 in cardiomyocytes. Thus RSKs play a significant role in regulating cardiomyocyte gene expression and hypertrophy in response to G

  13. Add-on effect of bedtime dosing of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist doxazosin on morning hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy in patients undergoing long-term amlodipine monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Toshio; Gomi, Tomoko; Shibuya, Yuko; Shinozaki, Shingo; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Matsuda, Nami

    2007-11-01

    High morning blood pressure is related to target organ damage and future cardiovascular events. Chronobiologic therapies focusing on the early morning period may be an important strategy for antihypertensive therapy. The aim of this study was to clarify the add-on effects of bedtime dosing of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist doxazosin on morning blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension who were under long-acting calcium channel blocker amlodipine monotherapy. The add-on effects of doxazosin at the maximum dose of 6 mg at bedtime on home blood pressure and left ventricular geometry for 1 year were investigated in 49 subjects (37 men and 12 women, aged 57.5+/-9.1 years) with morning hypertension who had been treated with amlodipine alone for more than 1 year. Doxazosin induced a significant decrease in morning blood pressure (145.6+/-5.6/91.5+/-5.4 to 132.4+/-3.7/83.6+/-5.6 mmHg, p

  14. Regulation of calcium and phosphoinositides at endoplasmic reticulum-membrane junctions.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Jensen, Jill B; Hille, Bertil

    2016-04-15

    Effective cellular function requires both compartmentalization of tasks in space and time, and coordination of those efforts. The endoplasmic reticulum's (ER) expansive and ramifying structure makes it ideally suited to serve as a regulatory platform for organelle-organelle communication through membrane contacts. These contact sites consist of two membranes juxtaposed at a distance less than 30 nm that mediate the exchange of lipids and ions without the need for membrane fission or fusion, a process distinct from classical vesicular transport. Membrane contact sites are positioned by organelle-specific membrane-membrane tethering proteins and contain a growing number of additional proteins that organize information transfer to shape membrane identity. Here we briefly review the role of ER-containing membrane junctions in two important cellular functions: calcium signalling and phosphoinositide processing. PMID:27068956

  15. INPP5E interacts with AURKA, linking phosphoinositide signaling to primary cilium stability

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikova, Olga V.; Seo, Seongjin; Cottle, Denny L.; Conduit, Sarah; Hakim, Sandra; Dyson, Jennifer M.; Mitchell, Christina A.; Smyth, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase E (INPP5E) cause the ciliopathies known as Joubert and MORM syndromes; however, the role of INPP5E in ciliary biology is not well understood. Here, we describe an interaction between INPP5E and AURKA, a centrosomal kinase that regulates mitosis and ciliary disassembly, and we show that this interaction is important for the stability of primary cilia. Furthermore, AURKA phosphorylates INPP5E and thereby increases its 5-phosphatase activity, which in turn promotes transcriptional downregulation of AURKA, partly through an AKT-dependent mechanism. These findings establish the first direct link between AURKA and phosphoinositide signaling and suggest that the function of INPP5E in cilia is at least partly mediated by its interactions with AURKA. PMID:25395580

  16. Allosteric Activation of the Phosphoinositide Phosphatase Sac1 by Anionic Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sac family phosphoinositide phosphatases comprise an evolutionarily conserved family of enzymes in eukaryotes. Our recently determined crystal structure of the Sac phosphatase domain of yeast Sac1, the founding member of the Sac family proteins, revealed a unique conformation of the catalytic P-loop and a large positively charged groove at the catalytic site. We now report a unique mechanism for the regulation of its phosphatase activity. Sac1 is an allosteric enzyme that can be activated by its product phosphatidylinositol or anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine. The activation of Sac1 may involve conformational changes of the catalytic P-loop induced by direct binding with the regulatory anionic phospholipids in the large cationic catalytic groove. These findings highlight the fact that lipid composition of the substrate membrane plays an important role in the control of Sac1 function. PMID:22452743

  17. Homotypic vacuole fusion requires VTI11 and is regulated by phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Rodriguez-Welsh, Maria Fernanda; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-06-01

    Most plant cells contain a large central vacuole that is essential to maintain cellular turgor. We report a new mutant allele of VTI11 that implicates the SNARE protein VTI11 in homotypic fusion of protein storage and lytic vacuoles. Fusion of the multiple vacuoles present in vti11 mutants could be induced by treatment with Wortmannin and LY294002, which are inhibitors of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K). We provide evidence that Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) regulates vacuole fusion in vti11 mutants, and that fusion of these vacuoles requires intact microtubules and actin filaments. Finally, we show that Wortmannin also induced the fusion of guard cell vacuoles in fava beans, where vacuoles are naturally fragmented after ABA-induced stomata closure. These results suggest a ubiquitous role of phosphoinositides in vacuole fusion, both during the development of the large central vacuole and during the dynamic vacuole remodeling that occurs as part of stomata movements.

  18. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Lithium suppresses Akt activity by reducing PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation. • Lithium enhances GSK-3β activity by reducing Akt-mediated GSK-3β phosphorylation. • Lithium suppresses GSK-3β activity through its direct inhibition. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P{sub 3} production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity.

  19. Muscarinic receptor activation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis. Relationship to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and diacylglycerol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, E.A.; Goldstein, D.; Brown, J.H. )

    1989-09-05

    We examined the relationship between phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and diacylglycerol (DAG) formation in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) stimulation in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Carbachol increases the release of (3H)choline and (3H)phosphorylcholine ((3H)Pchol) from cells containing (3H)choline-labeled PC. The production of Pchol is rapid and transient, while choline production continues for at least 30 min. mAChR-stimulated release of Pchol is reduced in cells that have been depleted of intracellular Ca2+ stores by ionomycin pretreatment, whereas choline release is unaffected by this pretreatment. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increases the release of choline, but not Pchol, from 1321N1 cells, and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the ability of carbachol to stimulate choline production. Taken together, these results suggest that Ca2+ mobilization is involved in mAChR-mediated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase C, whereas protein kinase C activation is required for mAChR-stimulated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase D. Both carbachol and PMA rapidly increase the formation of (3H)phosphatidic acid ((3H)PA) in cells containing (3H)myristate-labeled PC. (3H)Diacylglycerol ((3H)DAG) levels increase more slowly, suggesting that the predominant pathway for PC hydrolysis is via phospholipase D. When cells are labeled with (3H)myristate and (14C)arachidonate such that there is a much greater 3H/14C ratio in PC compared with the phosphoinositides, the 3H/14C ratio in DAG and PA increases with PMA treatment but decreases in response to carbachol.

  20. Pharmacological characterization of the phosphoinositide second messenger system in the rabbit kidney

    SciTech Connect

    McArdle, S.

    1988-01-01

    The cellular response to hormones and neurotransmitters is a result of receptor activation of a second messenger system to initiate the intracellular cascade. In several tissues, such as brain and liver, one of the second messenger systems involves the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides (PIs) for the formation of inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol as the intracellular messengers. In the present study, they examined the effect of various agents on the hydrolysis of PIs in the rabbit kidney. In the kidney, the effect of the various hormones and neurotransmitters was region specific. Hydrolysis of PIs was stimulated in the inner medulla by (arg{sup 8})-vasopressin, angiotensin II, and atriopeptin I, and in the outer medulla by histamine, adenosine, and secretin. Only carbachol was able to stimulate the hydrolysis of PIs in both the inner and outer medulla. None of the substances tested were able to stimulate this response in the cortex. The following agents did not have an effect in any of the three zones of the kidney: norepinephrine, dopamine, atriopeptins II, and III. They have directly demonstrated the presence of a high affinity saturable binding site on inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells with studies of binding characteristics of the radiolabelled muscarinic antagonist, 1-quinuclidinyl (phenyl-4-{sup 3}H) benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB). The K{sub d} of 0.27 nM and the B{sub max} of 27.5 fmol/mg protein were determined from Scatchard analysis of the saturation data. In summary, they have demonstrated that cholinergic muscarinic receptors are present in the rabbit kidney, specifically in the IMCD cells. These receptors, which are coupled to the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides, may be involved in the vasodilatory and/or diuretic effects of cholinergic agents.

  1. Lasting inhibition of receptor-mediated calcium oscillations in pancreatic acini by neutrophil respiratory burst--a novel mechanism for secretory blockade in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui Yuan; Song, Zhi Min; Cui, Zong Jie

    2013-08-01

    Although overwhelming evidence indicates that neutrophil infiltration is an early event in acute pancreatitis, the effect of neutrophil respiratory burst on pancreatic acini has not been investigated. In the present work, effect of fMLP-induced neutrophil respiratory burst on pancreatic acini was examined. It was found that neutrophil respiratory burst blocked calcium oscillations induced by cholecystokinin or by acetylcholine. Such lasting inhibition was dependent on the density of bursting neutrophils and could be overcome by increased agonist concentration. Inhibition of cholecystokinin stimulation was also observed in AR4-2J cells. In sharp contrast, neutrophil respiratory burst had no effect on calcium oscillations induced by phenylephrine (PE), vasopressin, or by ATP in rat hepatocytes. These data together suggest that inhibition of receptor-mediated calcium oscillations in pancreatic acini by neutrophil respiratory burst would lead to secretory blockade, which is a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. The present work has important implications for clinical treatment and management of acute pancreatitis.

  2. Differential modulation of expression of nuclear receptor mediated genes by tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) on early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Yu, Yijun; Tang, Song; Liu, Hongling; Su, Guanyong; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Yu, Hongxia

    2015-12-01

    As one substitute for phased-out brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is frequently detected in aquatic organisms. However, knowledge about endocrine disrupting mechanisms associated with nuclear receptors caused by TBOEP remained restricted to results from in vitro studies with mammalian cells. In the study, results of which are presented here, embryos/larvae of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0.02, 0.1 or 0.5μM TBOEP to investigate expression of genes under control of several nuclear hormone receptors (estrogen receptors (ERs), androgen receptor (AR), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and pregnane×receptor (P×R)) pathways at 120hpf. Exposure to 0.5μM TBOEP significantly (p<0.05, one-way analysis of variance) up-regulated expression of estrogen receptors (ERs, er1, er2a, and er2b) genes and ER-associated genes (vtg4, vtg5, pgr, ncor, and ncoa3), indicating TBOEP modulates the ER pathway. In contrast, expression of most genes (mr, 11βhsd, ube2i,and adrb2b) associated with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro mammalian cell-based (MDA-kb2 and H4IIE-luc) receptor transactivation assays, were also conducted to investigate possible agonistic or antagonistic effects on AR- and AhR-mediated pathways. In mammalian cells, none of these pathways were affected by TBOEP at the concentrations studied. Receptor-mediated responses (in vivo) and mammalian cell lines receptor binding assay (in vitro) combined with published information suggest that TBOEP can modulate receptor-mediated, endocrine process (in vivo/in vitro), particularly ER and MR. PMID:26562049

  3. Ontogeny of catecholamine and adenosine receptor-mediated cAMP signaling of embryonic red blood cells: role of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Baumann, R; Blass, C; Götz, R; Dragon, S

    1999-12-15

    We have previously shown that the cAMP signaling pathway controls major aspects of embryonic red blood cell (RBC) function in avian embryos (Glombitza et al, Am J Physiol 271:R973, 1996; and Dragon et al, Am J Physiol 271:R982, 1996) that are important for adaptation of the RBC gas transport properties to the progressive hypercapnia and hypoxia of later stages of avian embryonic development. Data about the ontogeny of receptor-mediated cAMP signaling are lacking. We have analyzed the response of primitive and definitive chick embryo RBC harvested from day 3 to 18 of development towards forskolin, beta-adrenergic, and A2 receptor agonists. The results show a strong response of immature definitive and primitive RBC to adenosine A2 and beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, which is drastically reduced in the last stage of development, coincident with the appearance of mature, transcriptionally inactive RBC. Modulation of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) has a controlling influence on cAMP accumulation in definitive RBC. Under physiological conditions, PDE3 is inhibited due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Inhibition of sGC with the specific inhibitor ODQ decreases receptor-mediated stimulation of cAMP production; this effect is reversed by the PDE3 inhibitor milrinone. sGC is acitivated by nitric oxide (NO), but we found no evidence for production of NO by erythrocyte NO-synthase. However, embryonic hemoglobin releases NO in an oxygen-linked manner that may activate guanylyl cyclase.

  4. Single residues in the surface subunits of oncogenic sheep retrovirus envelopes distinguish receptor-mediated triggering for fusion at low pH and infection

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Marceline; Zheng, Yi-Min; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2011-12-20

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV) are two closely related oncogenic retroviruses that share the same cellular receptor yet exhibit distinct fusogenicity and infectivity. Here, we find that the low fusogenicity of ENTV envelope protein (Env) is not because of receptor binding, but lies in its intrinsic insensitivity to receptor-mediated triggering for fusion at low pH. Distinct from JSRV, shedding of ENTV surface (SU) subunit into culture medium was not enhanced by a soluble form of receptor, Hyal2 (sHyal2), and sHyal2 was unable to effectively inactivate the ENTV pseudovirions. Remarkably, replacing either of the two amino acid residues, N191 or S195, located in the ENTV SU with the corresponding JSRV residues, H191 or G195, markedly increased the Env-mediated membrane fusion activity and infection. Reciprocal amino acid substitutions also partly switched the sensitivities of ENTV and JSRV pseudovirions to sHyal2-mediated SU shedding and inactivation. While N191 is responsible for an extra N-linked glycosylation of ENTV SU relative to that of JSRV, S195 possibly forms a hydrogen bond with a surrounding amino acid residue. Molecular modeling of the pre-fusion structure of JSRV Env predicts that the segment of SU that contains H191 to G195 contacts the fusion peptide and suggests that the H191N and G195S changes seen in ENTV may stabilize its pre-fusion structure against receptor priming and therefore modulate fusion activation by Hyal2. In summary, our study reveals critical determinants in the SU subunits of JSRV and ENTV Env proteins that likely regulate their local structures and thereby differential receptor-mediated fusion activation at low pH, and these findings explain, at least in part, their distinct viral infectivity.

  5. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo.

  6. Differential regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta5 integrins upon smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Paulhe, F; Racaud-Sultan, C; Ragab, A; Albiges-Rizo, C; Chap, H; Iberg, N; Morand, O; Perret, B

    2001-11-01

    Smooth muscle cell migration is a key step of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. We demonstrate that alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(5) integrins synergistically regulate smooth muscle cell migration onto vitronectin. Using an original haptotactic cell migration assay, we measured a strong stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in migrating vascular smooth muscle cells. Phosphatidic acid production and phosphoinositide 3-kinase IA activation were triggered only upon alpha(V)beta(3) engagement. Blockade of alpha(V)beta(3) engagement or phospholipase C activity resulted in a strong inhibition of smooth muscle cell spreading on vitronectin. By contrast, blockade of alpha(V)beta(5) reinforced elongation and polarization of cell shape. Moreover, Pyk2-associated tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 4-kinase activities measured in Pyk2 immunoprecipitates were stimulated upon cell migration. Blockade of either alpha(V)beta(3) or alpha(V)beta(5) function, as well as inhibition of phospholipase C activity, decreased both Pyk2-associated activities. We demonstrated that the Pyk2-associated phosphoinositide 4-kinase corresponded to the beta isoform. Our data point to the metabolism of phosphoinositides as a regulatory pathway for the differential roles played by alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(5) upon cell migration and identify the Pyk2-associated phosphoinositide 4-kinase beta as a common target for both integrins.

  7. Effects of acetylcholine and other agents on /sup 32/P-prelabeled phosphoinositides and phosphatidate in crude synaptosomal preparations

    SciTech Connect

    White, H.L.

    1988-05-01

    Experimental conditions are described which permit effects of various agents on polyphosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid (PA) to be evaluated simultaneously in crude nerve-ending preparations from rat brain. Acetylcholine (3-100 microM) or carbachol (30-1,000 microM) induced the hydrolysis of prelabeled polyphosphoinositides and, at the same time, stimulated the net label incorporated in phosphatidic acid. All muscarinic effects were blocked by atropine or pirenzepine. Non-muscarinic agonists (glutamate, adenosine, norepinephrine) stimulated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis in this preparation, but of these only norepinephrine affected phosphatidic acid turnover. A potentiation of acetylcholine-induced phosphoinositide turnover by KCl was observed, as well as an apparent selective inhibition of PIP2 hydrolysis by LiCl. Acetylcholine-stimulated turnover of PA was not necessarily coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis.

  8. Sequential Activities of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase, PKB/Akt, and Rab7 during Macropinosome Formation in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Rupper, Adam; Lee, Kyung; Knecht, David; Cardelli, James

    2001-01-01

    Macropinocytosis plays an important role in the internalization of antigens by dendritic cells and is the route of entry for many bacterial pathogens; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation or maturation of macropinosomes. Like dendritic cells, Dictyostelium amoebae are active in macropinocytosis, and various proteins have been identified that contribute to this process. As described here, microscopic analysis of null mutants have revealed that the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases, PIK1 and PIK2, and the downstream effector protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) are important in regulating completion of macropinocytosis. Although actin-rich membrane protrusions form in these cell lines, they recede without forming macropinosomes. Imaging of cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the pleckstrin homology domain (PH) of PKB (GFP-PHPKB) indicates that D3 phosphoinositides are enriched in the forming macropinocytic cup and remain associated with newly formed macropinosomes for <1 minute. A fusion protein, consisting of GFP fused to an F-actin binding domain, overlaps with GFP-PHPKB in the timing of association with forming macropinosomes. Although macropinocytosis is reduced in cells expressing dominant negative Rab7, microscopic imaging studies reveal that GFP-Rab7 associates only with formed macropinosomes at approximately the time that F-actin and D3 phosphoinositide levels decrease. These results support a model in which F-actin modulating proteins and vesicle trafficking proteins coordinately regulate the formation and maturation of macropinosomes. PMID:11553719

  9. Phosphoinositide binding by the SNX27 FERM domain regulates its localization at the immune synapse of activated T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Rajesh; Tello-Lafoz, Maria; Norwood, Suzanne J.; Yang, Zhe; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Mérida, Isabel; Collins, Brett M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) controls the endosomal-to-cell-surface recycling of diverse transmembrane protein cargos. Crucial to this function is the recruitment of SNX27 to endosomes which is mediated by the binding of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) by its phox homology (PX) domain. In T-cells, SNX27 localizes to the immunological synapse in an activation-dependent manner, but the molecular mechanisms underlying SNX27 translocation remain to be clarified. Here, we examined the phosphoinositide-lipid-binding capabilities of full-length SNX27, and discovered a new PtdInsP-binding site within the C-terminal 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain. This binding site showed a clear preference for bi- and tri-phosphorylated phophoinositides, and the interaction was confirmed through biophysical, mutagenesis and modeling approaches. At the immunological synapse of activated T-cells, cell signaling regulates phosphoinositide dynamics, and we find that perturbing phosphoinositide binding by the SNX27 FERM domain alters the SNX27 distribution in both endosomal recycling compartments and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-enriched domains of the plasma membrane during synapse formation. Our results suggest that SNX27 undergoes dynamic partitioning between different membrane domains during immunological synapse assembly, and underscore the contribution of unique lipid interactions for SNX27 orchestration of cargo trafficking. PMID:25472716

  10. Enhanced type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide signaling after pertussis toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A M; Challiss, R A; Mistry, R; Saunders, R; Thomsen, C; Nahorski, S R

    1997-09-01

    The regulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by the type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1alpha) was investigated in stably transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Incubation of the cells with L-glutamate, quisqualate, and 1-aminocyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid resulted in a marked accumulation of [3H]inositol monophosphate (InsP1) and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] mass in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BHK-mGluR1alpha cells with pertussis toxin [ 100 ng/ml, 24 hr] led to a dramatic 12-16-fold increase in the accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and a 2-fold increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the absence of added agonist. Although only very low levels (/=75%, and the EC50 shifted leftward by 65-fold [-log EC50 values (molar), 7.26 +/- 0.23 versus 5.45 +/- 0.07; n = 4) in PTX-treated compared with control cells. In contrast, antagonist effects on agonist-stimulated [3H]InsP1 responses were similar in control and PTX-treated BHK-mGluR1alpha cells. These changes in the concentration-effect curves for mGluR agonists are consistent with a model in which the receptor associates with PTX-sensitive inhibitory (Gi/o) and PTX-insensitive stimulatory (Gq/11) G proteins that can each influence PIC activity. The present observations are consistent with a dual regulation of mGluR1alpha-mediated PIC activity that could be fundamental in

  11. Identification of key residues in the A-Raf kinase important for phosphoinositide lipid binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsey M; James, Kristy M; Chamberlain, M Dean; Anderson, Deborah H

    2005-03-01

    Raf kinases are involved in regulating cellular signal transduction pathways in response to a wide variety of external stimuli. Upstream signals generate activated Ras-GTP, important for the relocalization of Raf kinases to the membrane. Upon full activation, Raf kinases phosphorylate and activate downstream kinase in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. The Raf family of kinases has three members, Raf-1, B-Raf, and A-Raf. The ability of Raf-1 and B-Raf to bind phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA) has been show to facilitate Raf membrane associations and regulate Raf kinase activity. We have characterized the lipid binding properties of A-Raf, as well as further characterized those of Raf-1. Both A-Raf and Raf-1 were found to bind to 3-, 4-, and 5-monophosphorylated phosphoinositides [PI(3)P, PI(4)P, and PI(5)P] as well as phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P(2)]. In addition, A-Raf also bound specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4,5- and 3,4-bisphosphates [PI(4,5)P(2) and PI(3,4)P(2)] and to PA. A mutational analysis of A-Raf localized the PI(4,5)P(2) binding site to two basic residues (K50 and R52) within the Ras binding domain. Additionally, an A-Raf mutant lacking the first 199 residues [i.e., the entire conserved region 1 (CR1) domain] bound the same phospholipids as full-length Raf-1. This suggests that a second region of A-Raf between amino acids 200 and 606 was responsible for interactions with the monophosphorylated PIs and PI(3,5)P(2). These results raise the possibility that Raf-1 and A-Raf bind to specific phosphoinositides as a mechanism to localize them to particular membrane microdomains rich in these phospholipids. Moreover, the differences in their lipid binding profiles could contribute to their proposed isoform-specific Raf functions.

  12. Receptor-mediated uptake of low-density lipoprotein by B16 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, A. J.; van Geel, P. J.; Oppelaar, H.; van Berkel, T. J.; Bijsterbosch, M. K.

    1996-01-01

    Selective delivery of cytotoxic anti-neoplastic drugs can diminish the severe side-effects associated with these drugs. Many malignant tumours express high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors on their membranes. Therefore, LDL may be used as a carrier to obtain selective delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs to tumours. The present study was performed to investigate the feasibility of the murine B16 tumour/mouse model for the evaluation of LDL-mediated tumour therapy. LDL binds with high affinity to LDL receptors on cultured B16 cells (Kd, 5.9 +/- 2.3 micrograms ml-1; Bmax 206 +/- 23 ng LDL mg-1 cell protein). After binding and internalisation, LDL was very efficiently degraded: 724 +/- 19 ng LDL mg-1 cell protein h-1. Chloroquine and ammonium chloride completely inhibited the degradation of LDL by the B16 cells, indicating involvement of lysosomes. LDL receptors were down-regulated by 70% after preincubation of B16 cells with 300 micrograms ml-1 LDL, indicating that their expression is regulated by intracellular cholesterol. To evaluate the uptake of LDL by the B16 tumour in vivo, tissue distribution studies were performed in C57/B1 mice inoculated with B16 tumours. For these experiments, LDL was radiolabelled with tyramine cellobiose, a non-degradable label, which is retained in cells after uptake. At 24 h after injection of LDL, the liver, adrenals and the spleen were found to be the major organs involved in LDL uptake, with tissue-serum (T/S) ratios of 0.82 +/- 0.08, 1.17 +/- 0.20 and 0.69 +/- 0.08 respectively. Of all the other tissues, the tumour showed the highest uptake of LDL (T/S ratio of 0.40 +/- 0.07). A large part of the LDL uptake was receptor mediated, as the uptake of methylated LDL was much lower. Although the LDL uptake by the liver, spleen and adrenals is higher than that by the tumour, the LDL receptor-mediated uptake by these organs may be selectively down-regulated by methods that do not affect the expression of LDL receptors on

  13. The Basal Transcription Complex Component TAF3 Transduces Changes in Nuclear Phosphoinositides into Transcriptional Output

    PubMed Central

    Stijf-Bultsma, Yvette; Sommer, Lilly; Tauber, Maria; Baalbaki, Mai; Giardoglou, Panagiota; Jones, David R.; Gelato, Kathy A.; van Pelt, Jason; Shah, Zahid; Rahnamoun, Homa; Toma, Clara; Anderson, Karen E.; Hawkins, Philip; Lauberth, Shannon M.; Haramis, Anna-Pavlina G.; Hart, Daniel; Fischle, Wolfgang; Divecha, Nullin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phosphoinositides (PI) are important signaling molecules in the nucleus that influence gene expression. However, if and how nuclear PI directly affects the transcriptional machinery is not known. We report that the lipid kinase PIP4K2B regulates nuclear PI5P and the expression of myogenic genes during myoblast differentiation. A targeted screen for PI interactors identified the PHD finger of TAF3, a TATA box binding protein-associated factor with important roles in transcription regulation, pluripotency, and differentiation. We show that the PI interaction site is distinct from the known H3K4me3 binding region of TAF3 and that PI binding modulates association of TAF3 with H3K4me3 in vitro and with chromatin in vivo. Analysis of TAF3 mutants indicates that TAF3 transduces PIP4K2B-mediated alterations in PI into changes in specific gene transcription. Our study reveals TAF3 as a direct target of nuclear PI and further illustrates the importance of basal transcription components as signal transducers. PMID:25866244

  14. Regulation of glucose metabolism in T cells: new insight into the role of Phosphoinositide 3-kinases

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Naïve T cells are relatively quiescent cells that only require energy to prevent atrophy and for survival and migration. However, in response to developmental or extrinsic cues T cells can engage in rapid growth and robust proliferation, produce of a range of effector molecules and migrate through peripheral tissues. To meet the significantly increased metabolic demands of these activities, T cells switch from primarily metabolizing glucose to carbon dioxide through oxidative phosphorylation to utilizing glycolysis to convert glucose to lactate (termed aerobic glycolysis). This metabolic switch allows glucose to be used as a source of carbon to generate biosynthetic precursors for the production of protein, DNA, and phospholipids, and is crucial for T cells to meet metabolic demands. Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) are a family of inositol lipid kinases linked with a broad range of cellular functions in T lymphocytes that include cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, survival, and migration. Initial research described a critical role for PI3K signaling through Akt (also called protein kinase B) for the increased glucose uptake and glycolysis that accompanies T cell activation. This review article relates this original research with more recent data and discusses the evidence for and against a role for PI3K in regulating the metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis in T cells. PMID:22891069

  15. Structure-based Analyses Reveal Distinct Binding Sites for Atg2 and Phosphoinositides in Atg18*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Hayashi; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Noda, Nobuo N.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system by which cytoplasmic materials are enclosed by an autophagosome and delivered to a lysosome/vacuole. Atg18 plays a critical role in autophagosome formation as a complex with Atg2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P). However, little is known about the structure of Atg18 and its recognition mode of Atg2 or PtdIns(3)P. Here, we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces marxianus Hsv2, an Atg18 paralog, at 2.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a seven-bladed β-propeller without circular permutation. Mutational analyses of Atg18 based on the K. marxianus Hsv2 structure suggested that Atg18 has two phosphoinositide-binding sites at blades 5 and 6, whereas the Atg2-binding region is located at blade 2. Point mutations in the loops of blade 2 specifically abrogated autophagy without affecting another Atg18 function, the regulation of vacuolar morphology at the vacuolar membrane. This architecture enables Atg18 to form a complex with Atg2 and PtdIns(3)P in parallel, thereby functioning in the formation of autophagosomes at autophagic membranes. PMID:22851171

  16. Differential regulatory functions of three classes of phosphatidylinositol and phosphoinositide 3-kinases in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved and exquisitely regulated self-eating cellular process with important biological functions. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PtdIns3Ks) and phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are involved in the autophagic process. Here we aim to recapitulate how 3 classes of these lipid kinases differentially regulate autophagy. Generally, activation of the class I PI3K suppresses autophagy, via the well-established PI3K-AKT-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1 (MTORC1) pathway. In contrast, the class III PtdIns3K catalytic subunit PIK3C3/Vps34 forms a protein complex with BECN1 and PIK3R4 and produces phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P), which is required for the initiation and progression of autophagy. The class II enzyme emerged only recently as an alternative source of PtdIns3P and autophagic initiator. However, the orthodox paradigm is challenged by findings that the PIK3CB catalytic subunit of class I PI3K acts as a positive regulator of autophagy, and PIK3C3 was thought to be an amino acid sensor for MTOR, which curbs autophagy. At present, a number of PtdIns3K and PI3K inhibitors, including specific PIK3C3 inhibitors, have been developed for suppression of autophagy and for clinical applications in autophagy-related human diseases.

  17. Control of Cardiac Repolarization by Phosphoinositide 3-kinase Signaling to Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, Lisa M.; Lin, Richard Z.; Cohen, Ira S.

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling is a common alteration in human cancer, and numerous drugs that target this pathway have been developed for cancer treatment. However, recent studies have implicated inhibition of the PI3K signaling pathway as the cause of a drug-induced long QT syndrome in which alterations in several ion currents contribute to arrhythmogenic drug activity. Surprisingly, some drugs that were thought to induce long QT syndrome by direct block of the rapid delayed rectifier (IKr) also appear to inhibit PI3K signaling, an effect that may contribute to their arrhythmogenicity. The importance of PI3K in regulating cardiac repolarization is underscored by evidence that QT interval prolongation in diabetes also may result from changes in multiple currents due to decreased insulin activation of PI3K in the heart. How PI3K signaling regulates ion channels to control the cardiac action potential is poorly understood. Hence, this review summarizes what is known about the impact of PI3K and its downstream effectors including Akt on sodium, potassium and calcium currents in cardiac myocytes. We also refer to some studies in non-cardiac cells that provide insight into potential mechanisms of ion channel regulation by this signaling pathway in the heart. Drug development and safety could be improved with a better understanding of the mechanisms by which PI3K regulates cardiac ion channels and the extent to which PI3K inhibition contributes to arrhythmogenic susceptibility. PMID:25552692

  18. Differential regulatory functions of three classes of phosphatidylinositol and phosphoinositide 3-kinases in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved and exquisitely regulated self-eating cellular process with important biological functions. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PtdIns3Ks) and phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are involved in the autophagic process. Here we aim to recapitulate how 3 classes of these lipid kinases differentially regulate autophagy. Generally, activation of the class I PI3K suppresses autophagy, via the well-established PI3K-AKT-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1 (MTORC1) pathway. In contrast, the class III PtdIns3K catalytic subunit PIK3C3/Vps34 forms a protein complex with BECN1 and PIK3R4 and produces phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P), which is required for the initiation and progression of autophagy. The class II enzyme emerged only recently as an alternative source of PtdIns3P and autophagic initiator. However, the orthodox paradigm is challenged by findings that the PIK3CB catalytic subunit of class I PI3K acts as a positive regulator of autophagy, and PIK3C3 was thought to be an amino acid sensor for MTOR, which curbs autophagy. At present, a number of PtdIns3K and PI3K inhibitors, including specific PIK3C3 inhibitors, have been developed for suppression of autophagy and for clinical applications in autophagy-related human diseases. PMID:26018563

  19. Evaluation of variation in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha oncogene and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, K N; Garcia-Closas, M; Fredericksen, Z; Kosel, M; Pankratz, V S; Hopper, J L; Dite, G S; Apicella, C; Southey, M C; Schmidt, M K; Broeks, A; Van ‘t Veer, L J; Tollenaar, R A E M; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Hein, A; Ekici, A B; Johnson, N; Peto, J; dos Santos Silva, I; Gibson, L; Sawyer, E; Tomlinson, I; Kerin, M J; Chanock, S; Lissowska, J; Hunter, D J; Hoover, R N; Thomas, G D; Milne, R L; Pérez, JI Arias; González-Neira, A; Benítez, J; Burwinkel, B; Meindl, A; Schmutzler, R K; Bartrar, C R; Hamann, U; Ko, Y D; Brüning, T; Chang-Claude, J; Hein, R; Wang-Gohrke, S; Dörk, T; Schürmann, P; Bremer, M; Hillemanns, P; Bogdanova, N; Zalutsky, J V; Rogov, Y I; Antonenkova, N; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kataja, V; Kosma, V-M; Hartikainen, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Chen, X; Peterlongo, P; Bonanni, B; Bernard, L; Manoukian, S; Wang, X; Cerhan, J; Vachon, C M; Olson, J; Giles, G G; Baglietto, L; McLean, C A; Severi, G; John, E M; Miron, A; Winqvist, R; Pylkäs, K; Jukkola-Vuorinen, A; Grip, M; Andrulis, I; Knight, J A; Glendon, G; Mulligan, A M; Cox, A; Brock, I W; Elliott, G; Cross, S S; Pharoah, P P; Dunning, A M; Pooley, K A; Humphreys, M K; Wang, J; Kang, D; Yoo, K-Y; Noh, D-Y; Sangrajrang, S; Gabrieau, V; Brennan, P; McKay, J; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Couch, F J; Easton, D F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Somatic mutations in phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) are frequent in breast tumours and have been associated with oestrogen receptor (ER) expression, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpression, lymph node metastasis and poor survival. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between inherited variation in this oncogene and risk of breast cancer. Methods: A single-nucleotide polymorphism from the PIK3CA locus that was associated with breast cancer in a study of Caucasian breast cancer cases and controls from the Mayo Clinic (MCBCS) was genotyped in 5436 cases and 5280 controls from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) study and in 30 949 cases and 29 788 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Results: Rs1607237 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer in MCBCS, CGEMS and all studies of white Europeans combined (odds ratio (OR)=0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95–0.99, P=4.6 × 10−3), but did not reach significance in the BCAC replication study alone (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.96–1.01, P=0.139). Conclusion: Common germline variation in PIK3CA does not have a strong influence on the risk of breast cancer PMID:22033276

  20. Role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in adhesion of platelets to fibrinogen stimulated by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Olas, B; Wachowicz, B; Mielicki, W P

    2001-11-01

    Cancer procoagulant, cysteine proteinase (CP; EC 3.4.22.26) activates factor X and functions in the absence of factor VII. CP may also change the platelet function. It induces an increase of platelet adhesion to collagen and fibrinogen. Using wortmannin--the inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K)--we studied the role of this enzyme in the action of cancer procoagulant on blood platelet adhesion in vitro. Wortmannin (25, 50 and 100 nM, 30 min, 37 degrees C) caused a reduction of platelet adhesion to fibrinogen (P<0.01) when blood platelets were stimulated by both 0.2 U/ml thrombin (IC(50)approximately 75 nM) and by 1 microM ADP (IC(50)approximately 60 nM). We observed that after CP treatment the adhesion of thrombin-activated and ADP-stimulated platelets to fibrinogen was augmented. The potentiated by CP adhesion of activated platelets to fibrinogen was reduced after preincubation of platelets with wortmannin (50 nM, 30 min, 37 degrees C). We conclude that in adhesion of platelets to fibrinogen stimulated by CP PI 3-K take place.

  1. Chronic ethanol inhibits receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat liver slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, R.A.; Crews, F.T. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on norepinephrine (NE)- and arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat liver slices was determined. The maximum NE-stimulated PI response was significantly reduced by 40% in liver slices from 8-month-old rats which had been treated for 5 months with a liquid diet containing ethanol compared to pair-fed controls. The maximum AVP-stimulated PI response was decreased by 39% in liver slices from the ethanol-fed rats compared to control. EC50 values for NE- and AVP-stimulated PI hydrolysis in liver slices were not affected by the chronic ethanol treatment. Similar reductions in the maximal NE- and AVP-stimulated PI hydrolysis (28% and 27%, respectively) were found in 22-month-old rats which had been maintained on an ethanol containing diet for 5 months compared to pair-fed controls. The binding of (3H)prazosin and (3H)AVP to liver plasma membranes from 8-month-old ethanol-fed rats was not significantly different from binding to liver membranes from sucrose-fed controls. Our data suggest that chronic ethanol ingestion may lead to a reduction in PI-linked signal transduction in liver.

  2. Effects of Novel Isoform-Selective Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Inhibitors on Natural Killer Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Yea, Sung Su; So, Lomon; Mallya, Sharmila; Lee, Jongdae; Rajasekaran, Kamalakannan; Malarkannan, Subramaniam; Fruman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are promising targets for therapeutic development in cancer. The class I PI3K isoform p110α has received considerable attention in oncology because the gene encoding p110α (PIK3CA) is frequently mutated in human cancer. However, little is known about the function of p110α in lymphocyte populations that modulate tumorigenesis. We used recently developed investigational inhibitors to compare the function of p110α and other isoforms in natural killer (NK) cells, a key cell type for immunosurveillance and tumor immunotherapy. Inhibitors of all class I isoforms (pan-PI3K) significantly impaired NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against tumor cells, whereas p110α-selective inhibitors had no effect. In NK cells stimulated through NKG2D, p110α inhibition modestly reduced PI3K signaling output as measured by AKT phosphorylation. Production of IFN-γ and NK cell-derived chemokines was blocked by a pan-PI3K inhibitor and partially reduced by a p110δinhibitor, with lesser effects of p110α inhibitors. Oral administration of mice with MLN1117, a p110α inhibitor in oncology clinical trials, had negligible effects on NK subset maturation or terminal subset commitment. Collectively, these results support the targeting of PIK3CA mutant tumors with selective p110α inhibitors to preserve NK cell function. PMID:24915189

  3. Expression and localization of the diacylglycerol kinase family and of phosphoinositide signaling molecules in adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Yasukazu; Akimoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Akihito; Otani, Koichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Goto, Kaoru

    2015-11-01

    Adrenal glands play a central role in the secretion of steroid hormones and catecholamines. Previous studies have revealed that molecules engaged in phosphoinositide (PI) turnover are expressed in the adrenal gland, suggesting the importance of PI signaling in adrenal signal transduction. Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG), a major second messenger in the PI signaling cascade. The DGK family is expressed in distinct patterns in endocrine organs at the mRNA and protein levels. Nevertheless, little is known about the characteristics and morphological aspects of DGKs in the adrenal gland. We have performed immunohistochemical analyses to investigate the expression and localization of DGK isozymes, together with PI signaling molecules, in the adrenal gland at the protein level. Our results show that the DGK family and a set of PI signaling molecules are expressed intensely in zona glomerulosa cells and medullary chromaffin cells in the adrenal gland. In adrenal cells, DGKγ localizes to the Golgi complex, DGKε to the plasma membrane, and DGKζ to the nucleus. These findings show the distinct expression and subcellular localization of DGK isozymes and PI signaling molecules in the adrenal gland, suggesting that each DGK isozyme has a role in signal transduction in adrenal cells, especially in the zona glomerulosa and medulla.

  4. Ablation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase class II alpha suppresses hepatoma cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Stanley K.L.; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yap, Yann-Wan; Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Loh, Evelyn S.L.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Ren, Ee-Chee

    2009-09-18

    Cancer such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by complex perturbations in multiple signaling pathways, including the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) pathways. Herein we investigated the role of PI3K catalytic isoforms, particularly class II isoforms in HCC proliferation. Among the siRNAs tested against the eight known catalytic PI3K isoforms, specific ablation of class II PI3K alpha (PIK3C2{alpha}) was the most effective in impairing cell growth and this was accompanied by concomitant decrease in PIK3C2{alpha} mRNA and protein levels. Colony formation ability of cells deficient for PIK3C2{alpha} was markedly reduced and growth arrest was associated with increased caspase 3 levels. A small but significant difference in gene dosage and expression levels was detected between tumor and non-tumor tissues in a cohort of 19 HCC patients. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time that in addition to class I PI3Ks in cancer, class II PIK3C2{alpha} can modulate HCC cell growth.

  5. Applying conformational selection theory to improve crossdocking efficiency in 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Kotasthane, Anuja; Mulakala, Chandrika; Viswanadhan, Vellarkad N

    2014-03-01

    The emerging picture of biomolecular recognition is that of conformational selection followed by induced-fit. Conformational selection theory states that binding partners exist in various conformations in solution, with binding involving a "selection" between complementary conformers. In this study, we devise a docking protocol that mimics conformational selection in protein-ligand binding and demonstrate that it significantly enhances crossdocking accuracy over Glide's flexible docking protocol, which is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. Our protocol uses a pregenerated conformational ensemble to simulate ligand flexibility. The ensemble was generated by thorough conformational sampling coupled with conformer minimization. The generated conformers were then rigidly docked in the active site of the protein along with a postdocking minimization step that allows limited induced fit effects to be modeled for the ligand. We illustrate the improved performance of our protocol through crossdocking of 31 ligands to cocomplexed proteins of the kinase 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1 extracted from the crystal structures 1H1W (ATP bound), 1OKY (staurosporine bound) and 3QD0 (bound to a potent inhibitor). Consistent with conformational selection theory, the performance of our protocol was the best for crossdocking to the cognate protein bound to the natural ligand, ATP.

  6. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. ({sup 3}H)PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 {mu}M. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRP{gamma}S and GDP{beta}S, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).

  7. Optogenetic evocation of field inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in hippocampal slices: a simple and reliable approach for studying pharmacological effects on GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Kühne, Claudia; Deussing, Jan M.; Eder, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The GABAergic system is the main source of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Consequently, much effort is still made to develop new modulators of GABAergic synaptic transmission. In contrast to glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), accurate monitoring of GABA receptor-mediated PSPs (GABAR-PSPs) and their pharmacological modulation in brain tissue invariably requires the use of intracellular recording techniques. However, these techniques are expensive, time- and labor-consuming, and, in case of the frequently employed whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, impact on intracellular ion concentrations, signaling cascades, and pH buffering systems. Here, we describe a novel approach to circumvent these drawbacks. In particular, we demonstrate in mouse hippocampal slices that selective optogenetic activation of interneurons leads to prominent field inhibitory GABAAR- and GABABR-PSPs in area CA1 which are easily and reliably detectable by a single extracellular recording electrode. The field PSPs exhibit typical temporal and pharmacological characteristics, display pronounced paired-pulse depression, and remain stable over many consecutive evocations. Additionally validating the methodological value of this approach, we further show that the neuroactive steroid 5α-THDOC (5 μM) shifts the inhibitory GABAAR-PSPs towards excitatory ones. PMID:24478627

  8. Adiponectin receptor-mediated signaling ameliorates cerebral cell damage and regulates the neurogenesis of neural stem cells at high glucose concentrations: an in vivo and in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Song, J; Kang, S M; Kim, E; Kim, C-H; Song, H-T; Lee, J E

    2015-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), hyperglycemia leads to neuronal damage and cognitive decline. Recent research has focused on revealing alterations in the brain in hyperglycemia and finding therapeutic solutions for alleviating the hyperglycemia-induced cognitive dysfunction. Adiponectin is a protein hormone with a major regulatory role in diabetes and obesity; however, its role in the CNS has not been studied yet. Although the presence of adiponectin receptors has been reported in the CNS, adiponectin receptor-mediated signaling in the CNS has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated adiponectin receptor (AdipoR)-mediated signaling in vivo using a high-fat diet and in vitro using neural stem cells (NSCs). We showed that AdipoR1 protects cell damage and synaptic dysfunction in the mouse brain in hyperglycemia. At high glucose concentrations in vitro, AdipoR1 regulated the survival of NSCs through the p53/p21 pathway and the proliferation- and differentiation-related factors of NSCs via tailless (TLX). Hence, we suggest that further investigations are necessary to understand the cerebral AdipoR1-mediated signaling in hyperglycemic conditions, because the modulation of AdipoR1 might alleviate hyperglycemia-induced neuropathogenesis. PMID:26247729

  9. CD36 is not involved in scavenger receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of glycolaldehyde- and methylglyoxal-modified proteins by liver endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajou, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Sakai, Masakazu; Hirata, Kenshiro; Tanaka, Makiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Kai, Toshiya; Otagiri, Masaki

    2005-05-01

    Circulating proteins modified by advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are mainly taken up by liver endothelial cells (LECs) via scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis. Endocytic uptake of chemically modified proteins by macrophages and macrophage-derived cells is mediated by class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) and CD36. In a previous study using SR-A knockout mice, we demonstrated that SR-A is not involved in endocytic uptake of AGE proteins by LECs [Matsumoto et al. (2000) Biochem. J. 352, 233-240]. The present study was conducted to determine the contribution of CD36 to this process. Glycolaldehyde-modified BSA (GA-BSA) and methylglyoxal-modified BSA (MG-BSA) were used as AGE proteins. 125I-GA-BSA and 125I-MG-BSA underwent endocytic degradation by these cells at 37 degrees C, and this process was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptors. However, this endocytic uptake of 125I-GA-BSA by LECs was not inhibited by a neutralizing anti-CD36 antibody. Similarly, hepatic uptake of (111)In-GA-BSA after its intravenous injection was not significantly attenuated by co-administration of the anti-CD36 antibody. These results clarify that CD36 does not play a significant role in elimination of GA-BSA and MG-BSA from the circulation, suggesting that the receptor involved in endocytic uptake of circulating AGE proteins by LEC is not SR-A or CD36.

  10. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Dzal, Yvonne A; Milsom, William K

    2015-02-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O₂ for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O₂ min(-1) kg(-1), and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min(-1) kg(-1), respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg(-1), in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR.

  11. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Dzal, Yvonne A.; Milsom, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O2 for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O2 min−1 kg−1, and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min−1 kg−1, respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg−1, in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR. PMID:25520355

  12. Specific Endocytosis Blockade of Trypanosoma cruzi Exposed to a Poly-LAcNAc Binding Lectin Suggests that Lectin-Sugar Interactions Participate to Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Brosson, Sébastien; Fontaine, Frédéric; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne; Bousbata, Sabrina; Salmon, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite transmitted by a triatomine insect, and causing human Chagas disease in South America. This parasite undergoes a complex life cycle alternating between non-proliferative and dividing forms. Owing to their high energy requirement, replicative epimastigotes of the insect midgut display high endocytic activity. This activity is mainly restricted to the cytostome, by which the cargo is taken up and sorted through the endosomal vesicular network to be delivered to reservosomes, the final lysosomal-like compartments. In African trypanosomes tomato lectin (TL) and ricin, respectively specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine (poly-LacNAc) and β-D-galactose, allowed the identification of giant chains of poly-LacNAc in N-glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway. We show that in T. cruzi epimastigote forms also, glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway are characterized by the presence of N-linked glycans binding to both ricin and TL. Affinity chromatography using both TL and Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSLII), specific to non-reducing terminal residue of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), led to an enrichment of glycoproteins of the trypanosomal endocytic pathway. Incubation of live parasites with TL, which selectively bound to the cytostome/cytopharynx, specifically inhibited endocytosis of transferrin (Tf) but not dextran, a marker of fluid endocytosis. Taken together, our data suggest that N-glycan modification of endocytic components plays a crucial role in receptor-mediated endocytosis of T. cruzi. PMID:27685262

  13. Cell Type-Specific Delivery of RNAi by Ligand-Functionalized Curdlan Nanoparticles: Balancing the Receptor Mediation and the Charge Motivation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yinga; Cai, Jia; Han, Jingfen; Baigude, Huricha

    2015-09-30

    Tissue-specific delivery of therapeutic RNAi has great potential for clinical applications. Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in targeted delivery of biotherapeutics including short interfering RNA (siRNA). Previously we reported a novel Curdlan-based nanoparticle for intracellular delivery of siRNA. Here we designed a nanoparticle based on ligand-functionalized Curdlan. Disaccharides were site-specifically conjugated to 6-deoxy-6-amino Curdlan, and the cell line specificity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and siRNA delivery efficiency of the corresponding disaccharide-modified 6-deoxy-6-amino-Curdlan were investigated. Observation by fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry showed that galactose-containing Curdlan derivatives delivered fluorescently labeled short nucleic acid to HepG2 cells expressing ASGPR receptor but not in other cells lacking surface ASGPR protein. Moreover, highly galactose-substituted Curdlan derivatives delivered siRNA specifically to ASGPR-expressing cells and induced RNAi activities, silencing endogenous GAPDH gene expression. Our data demonstrated that galactose-functionalized 6-deoxy-6-amino-Curdlan is a promising carrier for short therapeutic nucleic acids for clinical applications.

  14. Reduction of α1GABAA receptor mediated by tyrosine kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weidong; Wang, Jiaqin; Song, Shunyi; Li, Fang; Yuan, Fangfang

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) caused by lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (Fmr1) is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and characterized by many cognitive disturbances like attention deficit, autistic behavior, and audiogenic seizure and have region-specific altered expression of some gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor subunits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot experiments were performed in the cultured cortical neurons and forebrain obtained from wild-type (WT) and Fmr1 KO mice demonstrate the reduction in the expression of α1 gamma-aminobutyric acid (α1GABAA) receptor, phospho-α1GABAA receptor, PKC and phosphor-PKC in Fmr1 KO mice comparing with WT mice, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we found that the phosphorylation of the α1GABAA receptor was mediated by PKC. Our results elucidate that the lower phosphorylation of the α1GABAA receptor mediated by PKC neutralizes the seizure-promoting effects in Fmr1 KO mice and point to the potential therapeutic targets of α1GABAA agonists for the treatment of fragile X syndrome. PMID:26550246

  15. Ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in isolated rat hepatocytes: Time course of impairments and recovery after ethanol withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    Chronic ethanol administration markedly impairs the process of receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) of a representative asialoglycoprotein, asialoorosomucoid (ASOR), by the liver. In this study, we further characterized these impairments by identifying the time of onset for ethanol-induced changes in RME as well as establishing the time course for recovery to normal endocytotic values after ethanol withdrawal. Ethanol administration for 3 days did not alter any aspect of endocytosis examined in this study. After feeding ethanol to rats for 7 days, however, significant decreases in amounts of ligand bound, internalized, and degraded were apparent. These impairments persisted throughout the 5-week feeding study although the effects were somewhat attenuated with more prolonged ethanol feeding. In addition, an accumulation of intracellular receptors was observed in ethanol-fed animals relative to controls after 7 days of ethanol feeding. In all cases, recovery of endocytotic values to control levels was partially completed after 2 to 3 days of refeeding control diet and was fully completed after 7 days of refeeding. These results indicate that ethanol feeding for as little as 7 days profoundly impairs the process of RME by the liver. These impairments can be reversed after refeeding control diet for 7 days.

  16. Somatostatin Receptor-Mediated Tumor-Targeting Nanocarriers Based on Octreotide-PEG Conjugated Nanographene Oxide for Combined Chemo and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuyuan; Yang, Chongyin; Zhou, Jianping; Huo, Meirong

    2016-07-01

    Nano-sized in vivo active targeting drug delivery systems have been developed to a high anti-tumor efficacy strategy against certain cancer-cells-specific. Graphene based nanocarriers with unique physical and chemical properties have shown significant potentials in this aspect. Here, octreotide (OCT), an efficient biotarget molecule, is conjugated to PEGylated nanographene oxide (NGO) drug carriers for the first time. The obtained NGO-PEG-OCT complex shows low toxicity and excellent stability in vivo and is able to achieve somatostatin receptor-mediated tumor-specific targeting delivery. Owing to the high loading efficiency and accurate targeting delivery of anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX), our DOX loaded NGO-PEG-OCT complex offers a remarkably improved cancer-cell-specific cellular uptake, chemo-cytotoxicity, and decreased systemic toxicity compared to free DOX or NGO-PEG. More importantly, due to its strong near-infrared absorption, the NGO-PEG-OCT complex further enhances efficient photothermal ablation of tumors, delivering combined chemo and photothermal therapeutic effect against cancer cells. PMID:27244649

  17. Metabolism of glycosylated human salivary amylase: in vivo plasma clearance by rat hepatic endothelial cells and in vitro receptor mediated pinocytosis by rat macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Niesen, T.E.; Alpers, D.H.; Stahl, P.D.; Rosenblum, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Salivary-type amylase normally comprises about 60% of the amylase activity in human serum, but only a small fraction is a glycosylated isoenzyme (amylase A). In contrast, 1/3 of amylase in human saliva is glycosylated. Since glycosylation can affect circulatory clearance, we studied the clearance of amylase A in rats and its uptake by rat alveolar macrophages. Following intravenous injection, /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A disappeared rapidly from plasma (t 1/2 . 9 min) and accumulated in the liver. Simultaneous injection of mannose-albumin slowed its clearance to a rate comparable to that of /sup 125/I-labeled nonglycosylated salivary amylase (t 1/2 . 45 min). In contrast, galactose-albumin had no effect. Electron microscope autoradiography of the liver following injection of /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A revealed a localization of grains over the hepatic endothelial cells. In vitro studies indicated that amylase A is taken up by alveolar macrophages via receptor-mediated pinocytosis. Uptake was linear over time, saturable, and inhibited by mannan and mannose-albumin, but not by galactose-albumin. We conclude that amylase A, which is a naturally occurring human glycoprotein with at most three terminal L-fucose residues per molecule, is recognized in rats by a mannose receptor located on hepatic endothelial cells. We speculate that this receptor, by rapidly clearing circulating amylase A, may be responsible for the low level of amylase A in human serum.

  18. Escitalopram attenuates β-amyloid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Juan; Ren, Qing-Guo; Gong, Wei-Gang; Wu, Di; Tang, Xiang; Li, Xiao-Li; Wu, Fang-Fang; Bai, Feng; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-03-22

    Tau hyperphosphorylation is an important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether escitalopram could inhibit amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the underlying mechanisms, we treated the rat primary hippocampal neurons with Aβ1-42 and examined the effect of escitalopram on tau hyperphosphorylation. Results showed that escitalopram decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, escitalopram activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Moreover, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT also activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway and decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Furthermore, the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 blocked the activation of Akt/GSK-3β pathway and the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Finally, escitalopram improved Aβ1-42 induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and spine density, and reversed Aβ1-42 induced reduction of synaptic proteins. Our results demonstrated that escitalopram attenuated Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26950279

  19. Phosphoinositide system-linked serotonin receptor subtypes and their pharmacological properties and clinical correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, S C; Davis, J M; Pandey, G N

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission represents a complex mechanism involving pre- and post-synaptic events and distinct 5-HT receptor subtypes. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors have been classified into several categories, and they are termed as 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 type receptors. 5-HT1 receptors have been further subdivided into 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F. 5-HT2 receptors have been divided into 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors. All 5-HT2 receptor subtypes are linked to the multifunctional phosphoinositide (PI) signalling system. 5-HT3 receptors are considered ion-gated receptors and are also linked to the PI signalling system by an unknown mechanism. The 5-HT2A receptor subtype is the most widely studied of the 5-HT receptors in psychiatric disorders (for example, suicide, depression and schizophrenia) as well as in relation to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. The roles of 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors in psychiatric disorders are less clear. These 5-HT receptors also play an important role in alcoholism. It has been shown that 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 antagonists cause attenuation of alcohol intake in animals and humans. However, the exact mechanisms are unknown. The recent cloning of the cDNAs for 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors provides the opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alterations in these receptors during illness as well as pharmacotherapy. This review article will focus on the current research into the pharmacological properties, molecular biology, and clinical correlates of 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:7786883

  20. Rapamycin increases CCN2 expression of lung fibroblasts via phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefeng; Dai, Huaping; Geng, Jing; Wan, Xuan; Huang, Xiaoxi; Li, Fei; Jiang, Dianhua; Wang, Chen

    2015-08-01

    Excessive production of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCN2) and increased motor ability of the activated fibroblast phenotype contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, molecules and signal pathways regulating CCN2 expression and migration of lung fibroblasts are still elusive. We hypothesize that rapamycin, via binding and blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex (mTORC), affects CCN2 expression and migration of lung fibroblasts in vitro. Primary normal and fibrotic human lung fibroblasts were isolated from lung tissues of three patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax and three with IPF. Cells were incubated with regular medium, or medium containing rapamycin, human recombinant transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, or both. CCN2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression in cells or supernatant was detected. Wound healing and migration assay was used to measure the migratory potential. TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI)/Smad inhibitor, SB431542 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002 were used to determine rapamycin's mechanism of action. We demonstrated that rapamycin amplified basal or TGF-β1-induced CCN2 mRNA and protein expression in normal or fibrotic fibroblasts by Smad-independent but PI3K-dependent pathway. Additionally, rapamycin also enhanced TIMP-1 expression as indicated by ELISA. However, wound healing and migrating assay showed rapamycin did not affect the mobility of fibroblasts. Collectively, this study implies a significant fibrogenic induction activity of rapamycin by activating AKT and inducing CCN2 expression in vitro and provides the possible mechanisms for the in vivo findings which previously showed no antifibrotic effect of rapamycin on lung fibrosis. PMID:26192087

  1. The Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Pathway in Human Cancer: Genetic Alterations and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Arcaro, Alexandre; Guerreiro, Ana S

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is frequently activated in human cancer and represents an attractive target for therapies based on small molecule inhibitors. PI3K isoforms play an essential role in the signal transduction events activated by cell surface receptors including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). There are eight known PI3K isoforms in humans, which have been subdivided into three classes (I-III). Therefore PI3Ks show considerable diversity and it remains unclear which kinases in this family should be targeted in cancer. The class IA of PI3K comprises the p110α, p110β and p110δ isoforms, which associate with activated RTKs. In human cancer, recent reports have described activating mutations in the PIK3CA gene encoding p110α, and inactivating mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) gene, a tumour suppressor and antagonist of the PI3K pathway. The PIK3CA mutations described in cancer constitutively activate p110α and, when expressed in cells drive oncogenic transformation. Moreover, these mutations cause the constitutive activation of downstream signaling molecules such as Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) that is commonly observed in cancer cells. In addition to p110α, the other isoforms of the PI3K family may also play a role in human cancer, although their individual functions remain to be precisely identified. In this review we will discuss the evidence implicating individual PI3K isoforms in human cancer and their potential as drug targets in this context. PMID:19384426

  2. PLCgamma is enriched on poly-phosphoinositide-rich vesicles to control nuclear envelope assembly.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Richard D; Garnier-Lhomme, Marie; Han, Kevin; Dowicki, Michael; Michael, Nick; Totty, Nick; Zhendre, Vanessa; Cho, Aeri; Pettitt, Trevor R; Wakelam, Michael J; Poccia, Dominic L; Larijani, Banafshé

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear envelope assembly is an essential event in each cell cycle but the proteins and lipids involved in its regulation remain mostly unknown. Assembly involves membrane fusions but neither specific SNAREs nor Rab GTPases have been identified in its control. We report that a precursor membrane population (MV1) required for NE assembly has a unique lipid composition consisting prominently of poly-phosphatidylinositides. The lipid composition was determined by adapting HPLC electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry to phosphoinositide analysis, revealing the capacity of this technique to document dynamic lipid transitions of functional importance in natural membrane populations. MV1 is >100-fold enriched in endogenous PLCgamma and >25-fold enriched in the PLC substrate phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PtdInsP2) compared to the second membrane population, derived largely from endoplasmic reticulum (ER), that contributes most of the NE. During NE formation PLCgamma becomes transiently phosphorylated at the tyrosine 783 site indicative of its activation. In addition specific inhibition of PLCgamma blocks nuclear envelope formation. In vivo, PLCgamma is concentrated on vesicles of similar size to purified MV1. These associate with nuclei during the period of NE formation and are distinct from ER membranes. The unprecedented concentration of PLCgamma and its substrate PtdInsP2 in a subset of membranes that binds to only two regions of the nucleus, and activation of PLCgamma by GTP during initial stages of NE formation provide a mechanism for temporal control of NE assembly and offer an explanation for how such a process of membrane fusion can be spatially regulated. PMID:17184973

  3. PPARδ Activation Acts Cooperatively with 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Protein Kinase-1 to Enhance Mammary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Claire B.; Yin, Yuzhi; Yuan, Hongyan; Zeng, Xiao; King, Sruthi; Li, Xin; Kopelovich, Levy; Albanese, Chris; Glazer, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorδ (PPARδ) is a transcription factor that is associated with metabolic gene regulation and inflammation. It has been implicated in tumor promotion and in the regulation of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). PDK1 is a key regulator of the AGC protein kinase family, which includes the proto-oncogene AKT/PKB implicated in several malignancies, including breast cancer. To assess the role of PDK1 in mammary tumorigenesis and its interaction with PPARδ, transgenic mice were generated in which PDK1 was expressed in mammary epithelium under the control of the MMTV enhancer/promoter region. Transgene expression increased pT308AKT and pS9GSK3β, but did not alter phosphorylation of mTOR, 4EBP1, ribosomal protein S6 and PKCα. The transgenic mammary gland also expressed higher levels of PPARδ and a gene expression profile resembling wild-type mice maintained on a diet containing the PPARδ agonist, GW501516. Both wild-type and transgenic mice treated with GW501516 exhibited accelerated rates of tumor formation that were more pronounced in transgenic animals. GW501516 treatment was accompanied by a distinct metabolic gene expression and metabolomic signature that was not present in untreated animals. GW501516-treated transgenic mice expressed higher levels of fatty acid and phospholipid metabolites than treated wild-type mice, suggesting the involvement of PDK1 in enhancing PPARδ-driven energy metabolism. These results reveal that PPARδ activation elicits a distinct metabolic and metabolomic profile in tumors that is in part related to PDK1 and AKT signaling. PMID:21297860

  4. Exocyst SEC3 and Phosphoinositides Define Sites of Exocytosis in Pollen Tube Initiation and Growth.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Daria; Pleskot, Roman; Pejchar, Přemysl; Potocký, Martin; Trpkošová, Pavlína; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Vukašinović, Nemanja; Sternberg, Hasana; Yalovsky, Shaul; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-10-01

    Polarized exocytosis is critical for pollen tube growth, but its localization and function are still under debate. The exocyst vesicle-tethering complex functions in polarized exocytosis. Here, we show that a sec3a exocyst subunit null mutant cannot be transmitted through the male gametophyte due to a defect in pollen tube growth. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-SEC3a fusion protein is functional and accumulates at or proximal to the pollen tube tip plasma membrane. Partial complementation of sec3a resulted in the development of pollen with multiple tips, indicating that SEC3 is required to determine the site of pollen germination pore formation. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that SEC3a and SEC8 were highly dynamic and that SEC3a localization on the apical plasma membrane predicts the direction of growth. At the tip, polar SEC3a domains coincided with cell wall deposition. Labeling of GFP-SEC3a-expressing pollen with the endocytic marker FM4-64 revealed the presence of subdomains on the apical membrane characterized by extensive exocytosis. In steady-state growing tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes, SEC3a displayed amino-terminal Pleckstrin homology-like domain (SEC3a-N)-dependent subapical membrane localization. In agreement, SEC3a-N interacted with phosphoinositides in vitro and colocalized with a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) marker in pollen tubes. Correspondingly, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that SEC3a-N associates with the membrane by interacting with PIP2 However, the interaction with PIP2 is not required for polar localization and the function of SEC3a in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Taken together, our findings indicate that SEC3a is a critical determinant of polar exocytosis during tip growth and suggest differential regulation of the exocytotic machinery depending on pollen tube growth modes.

  5. Changes in phosphoinositide turnover, Ca sup 2+ mobilization, and protein phosphorylation in platelets from NIDDM patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H.; Umeda, F.; Hashimoto, T.; Nawata, H. )

    1990-12-01

    Enhanced platelet functions have been demonstrated in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). This study evaluated abnormalities in platelet signal transduction in diabetic patients, including turnover of phosphoinositides, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, and phosphorylation of 20,000- and 47,000-Mr proteins (P20 and P47). Washed platelets were obtained from 6 patients with NIDDM whose platelet aggregation rates were abnormally elevated (DM-A group), 11 NIDDM patients with normal platelet aggregation rates (DM-B group), and 8 age-matched healthy control subjects. The mass and specific radioactivity of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidic acid (PA) in 32P-labeled platelets were not different among the three groups. Hydrolysis of PIP2, PIP, and PI; accumulation of PA; and phosphorylation of P20 in platelets stimulated by 0.05 U/ml thrombin were significantly increased in the DM-A group compared with the control or DM-B group. There was no difference in P47 phosphorylation among the three groups. On the contrary, P20 and P47 phosphorylation induced by 50 nM of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, an activator of protein kinase C, was significantly decreased in the DM-A group. Additionally, the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (( Ca2+)i) was measured with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura 2. Although the basal (Ca2+)i value was similar in the three groups, the rise in (Ca2+)i induced by 0.05 U/ml thrombin in the presence and the absence of extracellular Ca2+ was significantly higher in the DM-A group than the other groups.

  6. Initiation of human astrovirus type 1 infection was blocked by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon initial contact with a virus, host cells activate a series of cellular signaling cascades that facilitate viral entry and viral propagation within the cell. Little is known about how the human astrovirus (HAstV) exploits signaling cascades to establish an infection in host cells. Recent studies showed that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is important for HAstV infection, though the involvement of other signaling cascades remains unclear. Methods A panel of kinase blockers was used to search for cellular signaling pathways important for HAstV1 infection. To determine their impact on the infectious process, we examined viral gene expression, RNA replication, and viral RNA and capsid protein release from host cells. Results Inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation interfered with the infection, independent of their effect on ERK 1/2 activation. Activation of the PI3K signaling cascade occurred at an early phase of the infection, judging from the timeframe of Akt phosphorylation. PI3K inhibition at early times, but not at later times, blocked viral gene expression. However, inhibiting the downstream targets of PI3K activation, Akt and Rac1, did not block infection. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activation was found to block a later phase of HAstV1 production. Conclusions Our results reveal a previously unknown, essential role of PI3K in the life cycle of HAstV1. PI3K participates in the early stage of infection, possibly during the viral entry process. Our results also reveal the role of PKA in viral production. PMID:23680019

  7. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase γ Restrains Neurotoxic Effects of Microglia After Focal Brain Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Caroline; Frahm, Christiane; Schneble, Nadine; Müller, Jörg P; Brodhun, Michael; Franco, Irene; Witte, Otto W; Hirsch, Emilio; Wetzker, Reinhard; Bauer, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) is linked to neuroinflammation and phagocytosis. This study was conducted to elucidate conjectural differences of lipid kinase-dependent and kinase-independent functions of PI3Kγ in the evolvement of brain damage induced by focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Therefore, PI3Kγ wild-type, knockout, and kinase-dead mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Tissue damage and cellular composition were assessed by immunohistochemical stainings. In addition, microglial cells derived from respective mouse genotypes were used for analysis of PI3Kγ effects on phagocytic activity, matrix metalloproteinase-9 release, and cAMP content under conditions of oxygen/glucose deprivation and recovery. Brain infarction was more pronounced in PI3Kγ-knockout mice compared to wild-type and kinase-dead mice 48 h after reperfusion. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed a reduced amount of galectin-3/MAC-2-positive microglial cells indicating that activated phagocytosis was reduced in ischemic brains of knockout mice. Cell culture studies disclosed enhanced metalloproteinase-9 secretion in supernatants derived from microglia of PI3Kγ-deficient mice after 2-h oxygen/glucose deprivation and 48-h recovery. Furthermore, PI3Kγ-deficient microglial cells showed a failed phagocytic activation throughout the observed recovery period. Lastly, PI3Kγ-deficient microglia exhibited strongly increased cAMP levels in comparison with wild-type microglia or cells expressing kinase-dead PI3Kγ after oxygen/glucose deprivation and recovery. Our data suggest PI3Kγ kinase activity-independent control of cAMP phosphodiesterase as a crucial mediator of microglial cAMP regulation, MMP-9 expression, and phagocytic activity following focal brain ischemia/recirculation. The suppressive effect of PI3Kγ on cAMP levels appears critical for the restriction of ischemia-induced immune cell functions and in turn tissue damage.

  8. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent regulation of Kv channels in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shumilina, Ekaterina; Zahir, Naima; Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Lang, Florian

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase plays a pivotal role in the regulation of dendritic cells (DCs), antigen-presenting cells that are able to initiate primary immune responses and to establish immunological memory. PI3 kinase is an endogenous suppressor of interleukin 12 (IL-12) production in DCs that is triggered by Toll-like receptor signaling. Inhibition of IL-12 production limits T helper 1 (Th1) polarization. On the other hand, PI3 kinase is an important regulator of various ion channels. The present study aimed to explore whether ion channels in DCs are regulated by PI3 kinase and whether they are important for DC function. To this end, DCs were isolated from murine bone marrow and ion channel activity was determined by patch clamp. As a result, DCs express voltage-gated K(+) channels (Kv), which are blocked by Stichodactyla helianthus toxin (ShK, 2.5 nM). A significant upregulation of Kv currents was observed upon maturation of DCs as induced by stimulation of the cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1 microg/ml, 48 h). A dramatic increase of Kv current amplitude was observed following preincubation of the cells with LY294002 (100 nM), a specific inhibitor of PI3 kinase. PI3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin (100 nM) similarly increased Kv current. LY294002 treatment was further followed by a significant increase of IL-12 production. ShK (100 nM) significantly blunted the stimulation of IL-12 release by LPS but not when the cells were first pretreated with LY294002. The observations point to Kv channel sensitive and Kv channel insensitive regulation of DC function. PMID:17982262

  9. Endosomal maturation, Rab7 GTPase and phosphoinositides in African swine fever virus entry.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel A; Galindo, Inmaculada; Hernáez, Bruno; Quetglas, Jose Ignacio; Dalmau-Mena, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2012-01-01

    Here we analyzed the dependence of African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection on the integrity of the endosomal pathway. Using confocal immunofluorescence with antibodies against viral capsid proteins, we found colocalization of incoming viral particles with early endosomes (EE) during the first minutes of infection. Conversely, viral capsid protein was not detected in acidic late endosomal compartments, multivesicular bodies (MVBs), late endosomes (LEs) or lysosomes (LY). Using an antibody against a viral inner core protein, we found colocalization of viral cores with late compartments from 30 to 60 minutes postinfection. The absence of capsid protein staining in LEs and LYs suggested that virus desencapsidation would take place at the acid pH of these organelles. In fact, inhibitors of intraluminal acidification of endosomes caused retention of viral capsid staining virions in Rab7 expressing endosomes and more importantly, severely impaired subsequent viral protein production. Endosomal acidification in the first hour after virus entry was essential for successful infection but not thereafter. In addition, altering the balance of phosphoinositides (PIs) which are responsible of the maintenance of the endocytic pathway impaired ASFV infection. Early infection steps were dependent on the production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) which is involved in EE maturation and multivesicular body (MVB) biogenesis and on the interconversion of PtdIns3P to phosphatidylinositol 3, 5-biphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P(2)). Likewise, GTPase Rab7 activity should remain intact, as well as processes related to LE compartment physiology, which are crucial during early infection. Our data demonstrate that the EE and LE compartments and the integrity of the endosomal maturation pathway orchestrated by Rab proteins and PIs play a central role during early stages of ASFV infection.

  10. Endosomal Maturation, Rab7 GTPase and Phosphoinositides in African Swine Fever Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel A.; Galindo, Inmaculada; Hernáez, Bruno; Quetglas, Jose Ignacio; Dalmau-Mena, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2012-01-01

    Here we analyzed the dependence of African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection on the integrity of the endosomal pathway. Using confocal immunofluorescence with antibodies against viral capsid proteins, we found colocalization of incoming viral particles with early endosomes (EE) during the first minutes of infection. Conversely, viral capsid protein was not detected in acidic late endosomal compartments, multivesicular bodies (MVBs), late endosomes (LEs) or lysosomes (LY). Using an antibody against a viral inner core protein, we found colocalization of viral cores with late compartments from 30 to 60 minutes postinfection. The absence of capsid protein staining in LEs and LYs suggested that virus desencapsidation would take place at the acid pH of these organelles. In fact, inhibitors of intraluminal acidification of endosomes caused retention of viral capsid staining virions in Rab7 expressing endosomes and more importantly, severely impaired subsequent viral protein production. Endosomal acidification in the first hour after virus entry was essential for successful infection but not thereafter. In addition, altering the balance of phosphoinositides (PIs) which are responsible of the maintenance of the endocytic pathway impaired ASFV infection. Early infection steps were dependent on the production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) which is involved in EE maturation and multivesicular body (MVB) biogenesis and on the interconversion of PtdIns3P to phosphatidylinositol 3, 5-biphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2). Likewise, GTPase Rab7 activity should remain intact, as well as processes related to LE compartment physiology, which are crucial during early infection. Our data demonstrate that the EE and LE compartments and the integrity of the endosomal maturation pathway orchestrated by Rab proteins and PIs play a central role during early stages of ASFV infection. PMID:23133661

  11. Selective inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110α preserves lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    So, Lomon; Yea, Sung Su; Oak, Jean S; Lu, Mengrou; Manmadhan, Arun; Ke, Qiao Han; Janes, Matthew R; Kessler, Linda V; Kucharski, Jeff M; Li, Lian-Sheng; Martin, Michael B; Ren, Pingda; Jessen, Katti A; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A

    2013-02-22

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is essential for clonal expansion, differentiation, and effector function of B and T lymphocytes. The p110δ catalytic isoform of PI3K is highly expressed in lymphocytes and plays a prominent role in B and T cell responses. Another class IA PI3K catalytic isoform, p110α, is a promising drug target in cancer but little is known about its function in lymphocytes. Here we used highly selective inhibitors to probe the function of p110α in lymphocyte responses in vitro and in vivo. p110α inhibition partially reduced B cell receptor (BCR)-dependent AKT activation and proliferation, and diminished survival supported by the cytokines BAFF and IL-4. Selective p110δ inhibition suppressed B cell responses much more strongly, yet maximal suppression was achieved by targeting multiple PI3K isoforms. In mouse and human T cells, inhibition of single class IA isoforms had little effect on proliferation, whereas pan-class I inhibition did suppress T cell expansion. In mice, selective p110α inhibition using the investigational agent MLN1117 (previously known as INK1117) did not disrupt the marginal zone B cell compartment and did not block T cell-dependent germinal center formation. In contrast, the selective p110δ inhibitor IC87114 strongly suppressed germinal center formation and reduced marginal zone B cell numbers, similar to a pan-class I inhibitor. These findings show that although acute p110α inhibition partially diminishes AKT activation, selective p110α inhibitors are likely to be less immunosuppressive in vivo compared with p110δ or pan-class I inhibitors.

  12. Supramolecular nanoparticles that target phosphoinositide-3-kinase overcome insulin resistance and exert pronounced antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Roy, Bhaskar; Rao, Poornima S; Wyant, Gregory A; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Ramachandran, Madhumitha; Sengupta, Poulomi; Goldman, Aaron; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Basu, Sudipta; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2013-12-01

    The centrality of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer etiology is well established, but clinical translation of PI3K inhibitors has been limited by feedback signaling, suboptimal intratumoral concentration, and an insulin resistance "class effect." This study was designed to explore the use of supramolecular nanochemistry for targeting PI3K to enhance antitumor efficacy and potentially overcome these limitations. PI3K inhibitor structures were rationally modified using a cholesterol-based derivative, facilitating supramolecular nanoassembly with L-α-phosphatidylcholine and DSPE-PEG [1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polythylene glycol)]. The supramolecular nanoparticles (SNP) that were assembled were physicochemically characterized and functionally evaluated in vitro. Antitumor efficacy was quantified in vivo using 4T1 breast cancer and K-Ras(LSL/+)/Pten(fl/fl) ovarian cancer models, with effects on glucose homeostasis evaluated using an insulin sensitivity test. The use of PI103 and PI828 as surrogate molecules to engineer the SNPs highlighted the need to keep design principles in perspective; specifically, potency of the active molecule and the linker chemistry were critical principles for efficacy, similar to antibody-drug conjugates. We found that the SNPs exerted a temporally sustained inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, S6K, and 4EBP in vivo. These effects were associated with increased antitumor efficacy and survival as compared with PI103 and PI828. Efficacy was further increased by decorating the nanoparticle surface with tumor-homing peptides. Notably, the use of SNPs abrogated the insulin resistance that has been associated widely with other PI3K inhibitors. This study provides a preclinical foundation for the use of supramolecular nanochemistry to overcome current challenges associated with PI3K inhibitors, offering a paradigm for extension to other molecularly targeted therapeutics being explored for cancer

  13. The role of phosphoinositide-3 kinase and PTEN in cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Oudit, Gavin Y; Sun, Hui; Kerfant, Benoit-Gilles; Crackower, Michael A; Penninger, Josef M; Backx, Peter H

    2004-08-01

    Phosphoinositide-3 kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of evolutionary conserved lipid kinases that mediate many cellular responses in both physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Class I PI3K can be activated by either receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/cytokine receptor activation (class I(A)) or G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) (class I(B)). Once activated PI3Ks generate phosphatidylinositols (PtdIns) (3,4,5)P(3) leading to the recruitment and activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), PDK1 and monomeric G-proteins (e.g. Rac-GTPases), which then activate a range of downstream targets including glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70S6 kinase, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and several anti-apoptotic effectors. Class I(A) (PI3Kalpha, beta and delta) and class I(B) (PI3Kgamma) PI3Ks mediate distinct phenotypes in the heart and under negative control by the 3'-lipid phosphatase, phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN) which dephosphorylate PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) into PtdIns(4,5)P(2). PI3Kalpha, gamma and PTEN are expressed in cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells where they modulate cell survival/apoptosis, hypertrophy, contractility, metabolism and mechanotransduction. Several transgenic and knockout models support a fundamental role of PI3K/PTEN signaling in the regulation of myocardial contractility and hypertrophy. Consequently the PI3K/PTEN signaling pathways are involved in a wide variety of diseases including cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, preconditioning and hypertension. In this review, we discuss the biochemistry and molecular biology of PI3K (class I isoforms) and PTEN and their critical role in cardiovascular physiology and diseases.

  14. Vasopressin stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis in LLC-PK sub 1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, L.C.; Kapturczak, E.; Steiner, M.; Phillips, M.I. )

    1988-10-01

    LLC-PK{sub 1} cells have been shown to possess vasopressin (VP) receptors (V{sub 2} type) that are coupled to adenyl cyclase to generate adenosine 3,5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). To determine whether VP also stimulates phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis to generate inositol phosphate (IP) and diacylglycerol (DAG) messenger system in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells, the authors measured the release of IP in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells in the absence and presence of various concentrations of VP. In addition, the authors also determined the effect of an increase in osmolality of the incubation medium on VP-stimulated PI hydrolysis in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells. The methods involved the incubation of LLC-PK{sub 1} cells with ({sup 3}H)inositol for its incorporation into membrane PI and the measurement of the release of ({sup 3}H)IP in the presence of LiCl which prevents dephosphorylation. The osmolality of the incubation media was increased from 300 to 600, 900, and 1,200 mosmol/kgH{sub 2}O by the addition of NaCl and urea. In an isosmotic incubation medium, VP (10{sup {minus}8} M) produced a 100% increase in PI hydrolysis in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells. The effect was much greater at higher concentrations of the hormone. The results suggest that in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells, VP stimulates PI hydrolysis probably through VP receptors that are coupled to phospholipase C. Furthermore, VP-stimulated PI messenger system in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells is influenced by osmolality of the extracellular fluid.

  15. Phosphoinositides Play Differential Roles in Regulating Phototropin1- and Phototropin2-Mediated Chloroplast Movements in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Łabuz, Justyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins are UVA/blue-light receptors involved in controlling the light-dependent physiological responses which serve to optimize the photosynthetic activity of plants and promote growth. The phototropin-induced phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism has been shown to be essential for stomatal opening and phototropism. However, the role of PIs in phototropin-induced chloroplast movements remains poorly understood. The aim of this work is to determine which PI species are involved in the control of chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis and the nature of their involvement. We present the effects of the inactivation of phospholipase C (PLC), PI3-kinase (PI3K) and PI4-kinase (PI4K) on chloroplast relocations in Arabidopsis. The inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphospahte [PI(4,5)P2]-PLC pathway, using neomycin and U73122, suppressed the phot2-mediated chloroplast accumulation and avoidance responses, without affecting movement responses controlled by phot1. On the other hand, PI3K and PI4K activities are more restricted to phot1- and phot2-induced weak-light responses. The inactivation of PI3K and PI4K by wortmannin and LY294002 severely affected the weak blue-light-activated accumulation response but had little effect on the strong blue-light-activated avoidance response. The inhibitory effect observed with PI metabolism inhibitors is, at least partly, due to a disturbance in Ca2+(c) signaling. Using the transgenic aequorin system, we show that the application of these inhibitors suppresses the blue-light-induced transient Ca2+(c) rise. These results demonstrate the importance of PIs in chloroplast movements, with the PI(4,5)P2-PLC pathway involved in phot2 signaling while PI3K and PI4K are required for the phot1- and phot2-induced accumulation response. Our results suggest that these PIs modulate cytosolic Ca2+ signaling during movements. PMID:23405144

  16. The involvement of intracellular Ca2+ in 5-HT1B/1D receptor-mediated contraction of the rabbit isolated renal artery

    PubMed Central

    Hill, P B; Dora, K A; Hughes, A D; Garland, C J

    2000-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine1B/1D (5-HT1B/1D) receptor coupling to contraction was investigated in endothelium-denuded rabbit isolated renal arteries, by simultaneously measuring tension and intracellular [Ca2+], and tension in permeabilized smooth muscle cells.In intact arterial segments, 1 nM–10 μM 5-HT failed to induce contraction or increase the fura-2 fluorescence ratio (in the presence of 1 μM ketanserin and prazosin to block 5-HT2 and α1-adrenergic receptors, respectively). However, in vessels pre-exposed to either 20 mM K+ or 30 nM U46619, 5-HT stimulated concentration-dependent increases in both tension and intracellular [Ca2+].1 nM–10 μM U46619 induced concentration-dependent contractions. In the presence of nifedipine (0.3 and 1 μM) the maximal contraction to U46619 (10 μM) was reduced by around 70%. The residual contraction was abolished by the putative receptor operated channel inhibitor, SKF 96365 (2 μM).With 0.3 μM nifedipine present, 100 nM U46619 evoked similar contraction to 30 nM U46619 in the absence of nifedipine, but contraction to 5-HT (1 nM–10 μM) was abolished.In permeabilized arterial segments, 10 mM caffeine, 1 μM IP3 or 100 μM phenylephrine, each evoked transient contractions by releasing Ca2+ from intracellular stores, whereas 5-HT had no effect. In intact arterial segments pre-stimulated with 20 mM K+, 5-HT-evoked contractions were unaffected by 1 μM thapsigargin, which inhibits sarco- and endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPases.In vessels permeabilized with α-toxin and then pre-contracted with Ca2+ and GTP, 5-HT evoked further contraction, reflecting increased myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity.Contraction linked to 5-HT1B/1D receptor stimulation in the rabbit renal artery can be explained by an influx of external Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and sensitization of the contractile myofilaments to existing levels of Ca2+, with no release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. PMID

  17. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  18. Stimulatory effects of maitotoxin on insulin release in insulinoma HIT cells: Role of calcium uptake and phosphoinositide breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Soergel, D.G.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-12-01

    In hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells, maitotoxin (MTX) induces a time-dependent and concentration-dependent release of insulin that requires the presence of extracellular calcium. The response is nearly completely blocked by cinnarizine and cadmium, but is not inhibited by the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine or by manganese. MTX induces 45Ca+ uptake in these cells in a dose-dependent mode, and the uptake is blocked with cinnarizine, nifedipine and cadmium, and is partially inhibited by manganese. MTX induces phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells, and the response is partially blocked by cadmium, but is not affected by nifedipine, cinnarizine or manganese. High concentrations of potassium ions also induce insulin release and calcium uptake in HIT cells. Both effects of potassium are blocked partially by nifedipine, cadmium and cinnarizine. High concentrations of potassium do not induce phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells. The results suggest that MTX-elicited release of insulin is attained by two mechanisms: (1) a nifedipine-sensitive action, which results from MTX-induced activation of L-type calcium channels, which can be mimicked with high potassium concentrations; and (2) a nifedipine-insensitive action, which may be initiated by the activation of phosphoinositide breakdown by MTX. Such an activation of phospholipase C would result in the formation of 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate, a release of intracellular calcium and then release of insulin to the extracellular space. Cinnarizine is proposed to block both MTX-elicited mechanisms, the first by blockade of calcium channels and the second by blocking 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate-induced release of internal calcium. Either mechanism alone appears capable of eliciting release of insulin.

  19. F-actin waves, actin cortex disassembly and focal exocytosis driven by actin-phosphoinositide positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Sheetz, Michael P; Gauthier, Nils C

    2016-04-01

    Actin polymerization is controlled by the phosphoinositide composition of the plasma membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spatiotemporal regulation of actin network organization over extended length scales are still unclear. To observe phosphoinositide-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics we combined the model system of frustrated phagocytosis, total internal reflection microscopy and manipulation of the buffer tonicity. We found that macrophages interacting with IgG-coated glass substrates formed circular F-actin waves on their ventral surface enclosing a region of plasma membrane devoid of cortical actin. Plasma membrane free of actin cortex was strongly depleted of PI(4,5)P2 , but enriched in PI(3,4)P2 and displayed a fivefold increase in exocytosis. Wave formation could be promoted by application of a hypotonic shock. The actin waves were characteristic of a bistable wavefront at the boundary between the regions of membrane containing and lacking cortical actin. Phosphoinositide modifiers and RhoGTPase activities dramatically redistributed with respect to the wavefronts, which often exhibited spatial oscillations. Perturbation of either lipid or actin cytoskeleton-related pathways led to rapid loss of both the polarized lipid distribution and the wavefront. As waves travelled over the plasma membrane, wavefront actin was seen to rapidly polymerize and depolymerize at pre-existing clusters of FcγRIIA, coincident with rapid changes in lipid composition. Thus the potential of receptors to support rapid F-actin polymerization appears to depend acutely on the local concentrations of multiple lipid species. We propose that interdependence through positive feedback from the cytoskeleton to lipid modifiers leads to coordinated local cortex remodeling, focal exocytosis, and organizes extended actin networks. PMID:26915738

  20. F-actin waves, actin cortex disassembly and focal exocytosis driven by actin-phosphoinositide positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Sheetz, Michael P; Gauthier, Nils C

    2016-04-01

    Actin polymerization is controlled by the phosphoinositide composition of the plasma membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spatiotemporal regulation of actin network organization over extended length scales are still unclear. To observe phosphoinositide-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics we combined the model system of frustrated phagocytosis, total internal reflection microscopy and manipulation of the buffer tonicity. We found that macrophages interacting with IgG-coated glass substrates formed circular F-actin waves on their ventral surface enclosing a region of plasma membrane devoid of cortical actin. Plasma membrane free of actin cortex was strongly depleted of PI(4,5)P2 , but enriched in PI(3,4)P2 and displayed a fivefold increase in exocytosis. Wave formation could be promoted by application of a hypotonic shock. The actin waves were characteristic of a bistable wavefront at the boundary between the regions of membrane containing and lacking cortical actin. Phosphoinositide modifiers and RhoGTPase activities dramatically redistributed with respect to the wavefronts, which often exhibited spatial oscillations. Perturbation of either lipid or actin cytoskeleton-related pathways led to rapid loss of both the polarized lipid distribution and the wavefront. As waves travelled over the plasma membrane, wavefront actin was seen to rapidly polymerize and depolymerize at pre-existing clusters of FcγRIIA, coincident with rapid changes in lipid composition. Thus the potential of receptors to support rapid F-actin polymerization appears to depend acutely on the local concentrations of multiple lipid species. We propose that interdependence through positive feedback from the cytoskeleton to lipid modifiers leads to coordinated local cortex remodeling, focal exocytosis, and organizes extended actin networks.

  1. Brain tumor-targeted therapy by systemic delivery of siRNA with Transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin; Guo, Xi-Ying; Yang, Ting; Yu, Min-Zhi; Chen, Da-Wei; Wang, Jian-Cheng

    2016-08-20

    Treatment of brain tumor remains a great challenge worldwide. Development of a stable, safe, and effective siRNA delivery system which is able to cross the impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) and target glioma cells is necessary. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effects of intravenous administration of T7 peptide modified core-shell nanoparticles (named T7-LPC/siRNA NPs) on brain tumors. Layer-by-layer assembling of protamine/chondroitin sulfate/siRNA/cationic liposomes followed by T7 peptide modification has been carried out in order to obtain a targeted siRNA delivery system. In vitro cellular uptake experiments demonstrated a higher intracellular fluorescence intensity of siRNA in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) and U87 glioma cells when treated with T7-LPC/siRNA NPs compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In the co-culture model of BMVECs and U87 cells, a significant down-regulation of EGFR protein expression occurred in the U87 glioma cells after treatment with the T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs. Moreover, the T7-LPC/siRNA NPs had an advantage in penetrating into a deep region of the tumor spheroid compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In vivo imaging revealed that T7-LPC/siRNA NPs accumulated more specifically in brain tumor tissues than the non-targeted NPs. Also, in vivo tumor therapy experiments demonstrated that the longest survival period along with the greatest downregulation of EGFR expression in tumor tissues was observed in mice with an intracranial U87 glioma treated with T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs compared with mice receiving other formulations. Therefore, we believe that these transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles are an important potential siRNA delivery system for brain tumor-targeted therapy.

  2. Does ligand-receptor mediated competitive effect or penetrating effect of iRGD peptide when co-administration with iRGD-modified SSL?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Ke-Fu; Zhong, Ting; Luo, Li-Min; Du, Ruo; Ren, Wei; Huang, Dan; Song, Ping; Li, Dan; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-mediated targeting of anticancer therapeutic agents is a useful strategy for improving anti-tumor efficacy. It has been reported that co-administration of a tumor-penetrating peptide iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC) enhances the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here, we designed an experiment involving co-administration of iRGD-SSL-DOX with free iRGD to B16-F10 tumor bearing mice to examine the action of free iRGD. We also designed an experiment to investigate the location of iRGD-modified SSL when co-administered with free iRGD or free RGD to B16-F10 tumor bearing nude mice. Considering the sequence of iRGD, we selected the GPDC, RGD and CRGDK as targeting ligands to investigate the targeting effect of these peptides compared with iRGD on B16-F10 and MCF-7 cells, with or without enzymatic degradation. Finally, we selected free RGD, free CRGDK and free iRGD as ligand to investigate the inhibitory effect on RGD-, CRGDK- or iRGD-modified SSL on B16-F10 or MCF-7 cells. Our results indicated that iRGD targeting to tumor cells was ligand-receptor mediated involving RGD to αv-integrin receptor and CRGDK to NRP-1 receptor. Being competitive effect, the administration of free iRGD would not be able to further enhance the anti-tumor activity of iRGD-modified SSL. There is no need to co-administrate of free iRGD with the iRGD-modified nanoparticles for further therapeutic benefit.

  3. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated toxicity in nonneuronal cell lines: characterization using fluorescent measures of cell viability and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Anegawa, N J; Guttmann, R P; Grant, E R; Anand, R; Lindstrom, J; Lynch, D R

    2000-05-01

    Cells transfected with specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtypes undergo cell death that mimics glutamate-induced excitotoxicity pharmacologically. We have further characterized the mechanisms of cell death resulting from NMDA receptor activation in such cells through development of cell counting methods based on co-transfection with green fluorescent protein. When co-transfected with NMDA receptors, GFP expression was limited to live cells as indicated by the observation that GFP was only detected in cells which were positive for markers of live cells, and was found in no cells which were trypan blue or propidium iodide positive. Using co-transfection with green fluorescent protein and cell counting of viable cells with a fluorescence activated cells sorter, we confirmed the subunit-specific profile of NMDA receptor-mediated cell death in cells transfected with NMDA receptors. Toxicity was greatest in the NR1A/2A receptor, less in the NR1A/2B receptor, and least in NR1A/2C receptors. Cell death also differed pharmacologically between subunit combinations. Cell death in cells transfected with NR 1A/2A was blocked by amino-phosphonovaleric acid at lower concentrations than in cells transfected with NR 1A/2B. In cells transfected with the NR1A/2A or NR1A/2B combinations but not NR1A/2C, cell death was also associated with production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, removal of the final 400 amino acids of the C-terminal region of NR2A decreased cell death. The use of GFP based cell counting provides a sensitive mechanism for assessing the mechanism of excitotoxicity in transfected cell models.

  4. Inhibition of isoproterenol-induced lipolysis in rat inguinal adipocytes in vitro by physiological melatonin via a receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zalatan, F; Krause, J A; Blask, D E

    2001-09-01

    Because the pineal hormone melatonin has been implicated in affecting adiposity in rats and fatty acid transport in certain rat tumor models, we tested whether melatonin regulates lipolysis in a normal cell system in vitro. Adipocytes were isolated from the inguinal fat pads (i.e. sc fat) of Sprague Dawley male rats during mid-light phase. Lipolysis was stimulated with isoproterenol (3 microM), and cells were incubated for 4 h in the presence or absence of a physiological circulating concentration of melatonin (1 nM). Lipolysis was measured by determining the amount of glycerol present in the incubation buffer, expressed as nmol glycerol/mg cellular fatty acid. We observed a 20- to 30-fold stimulation of basal lipolysis by isoproterenol, and this stimulation was inhibited 50--70% by melatonin. Melatonin exhibited this effect over a wide range of concentrations tested (100 pM-1 microM) with an IC(50) of approximately 500 pM. The effect by melatonin (1 nM) was completely blocked by pertussis toxin (50 ng/ml), by 8-bromo-cAMP (10 nM), and by the melatonin receptor antagonist S-20928 (1 nM). These results suggest that the antilipolytic effect occurs through one of the G(i) protein-coupled melatonin receptors because we have shown that both the mt(1) (Mel 1a) and MT(2) (Mel 1b) melatonin receptors are expressed in inguinal adipocytes. Melatonin inhibition of lipolysis was not observed in adipocytes isolated from rat epididymal fat pads (i.e. visceral fat), even though these cells also express both the mt(1) and MT(2) receptors. The results indicate that physiological circulating concentrations of melatonin inhibit isoproterenol-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes via a G protein-coupled melatonin receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway in a site-specific manner.

  5. Mode of action and dose-response framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a case study.

    PubMed

    Budinsky, R A; Schrenk, D; Simon, T; Van den Berg, M; Reichard, J F; Silkworth, J B; Aylward, L L; Brix, A; Gasiewicz, T; Kaminski, N; Perdew, G; Starr, T B; Walker, N J; Rowlands, J C

    2014-01-01

    Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds are tumor promoters that cause liver cancer in rats and mice. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has been implicated as a key component in this tumor promotion response. Despite extensive knowledge of the toxicology of dioxins, no mode of action (MOA) hypothesis for their tumorigenicity has been formally documented using the Human Relevance MOA framework developed by the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS). To address this information gap, an expert panel was convened as part of a workshop on receptor-mediated liver tumorigenicity. Liver tumors induced by ligands of the AHR were assessed using data for dioxins and related chemicals as a case study. The panel proposed a MOA beginning with sustained AHR activation, eventually leading to liver tumors via a number of other processes, including increased cell proliferation of previously initiated altered hepatic foci, inhibition of intrafocal apoptosis and proliferation of oval cells. These processes have been identified and grouped as three key events within the hepatocarcinogenic MOA: (1) sustained AHR activation, (2) alterations in cellular growth and homeostasis and (3) pre-neoplastic tissue changes. These key events were identified through application of the Bradford-Hill considerations in terms of both their necessity for the apical event/adverse outcome and their human relevance. The panel identified data supporting the identification and dose-response behavior of key events, alteration of the dose-response by numerous modulating factors and data gaps that potentially impact the MOA. The current effort of applying the systematic frameworks for identifying key events and assessing human relevance to the AHR activation in the tumorigenicity of dioxins and related chemicals is novel at this time. The results should help direct future regulatory efforts and research activities aimed at better understanding the potential human cancer risks associated with dioxin

  6. Neuroprotective effects of preconditioning ischaemia on ischaemic brain injury through inhibition of mixed-lineage kinase 3 via NMDA receptor-mediated Akt1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Quan-Guang; Miao, Bei; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2005-05-01

    A number of works show that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway responds actively in cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion. We undertook our present studies to clarify the role of mixed-lineage kinase 3 (MLK3), a MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) in MAPK cascades, in global ischaemia and ischaemic tolerance. The mechanism concerning NMDA receptor-mediated Akt1 activation underlying ischaemic tolerance, was also investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6 min of ischaemia and differing times of reperfusion. Our results showed MLK3 was activated in the hippocampal CA1 region with two peaks occurring at 30 min and 6 h, respectively. This activation returned to base level 3 days later. Both preconditioning with 3 min of sublethal ischaemia and NMDA pretreatment inhibited the 6-h peak of activation. However, pretreatment of ketamine before preconditioning reversed the inhibiting effect of preconditioning on MLK3 activation at 6 h of reperfusion. In the case of Akt1, however, preconditioning and NMDA pretreatment enhanced Akt1 activation at 10 min of reperfusion. Furthermore, ketamine pretreatment reversed preconditioning-induced increase of Akt1 activation. We also noted that pretreatment of LY294002 before preconditioning reversed both the inhibition of MLK3 activation at 6 h of reperfusion and the increase in Akt1 activation at 10 min of reperfusion. The above-mentioned results lead us to conclude that, in the hippocampal CA1 region, preconditioning inhibits MLK3 activation after lethal ischaemia and reperfusion and, furthermore, this effect is mediated by Akt1 activation through NMDA receptor stimulation.

  7. Corticosterone suppresses vasotocin-enhanced clasping behavior in male rough-skinned newts by novel mechanisms interfering with V1a receptor availability and receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Audrey; Abraham, Emily; McEvoy, Erin; Sonnenfeld, Sarah; Lewis, Christine; Hubbard, Catherine S; Dolence, E Kurt; Rose, James D; Coddington, Emma

    2015-03-01

    In rough-skinned newts, Taricha granulosa, exposure to an acute stressor results in the rapid release of corticosterone (CORT), which suppresses the ability of vasotocin (VT) to enhance clasping behavior. CORT also suppresses VT-induced spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness of clasp-controlling neurons in the rostromedial reticular formation (Rf). The cellular mechanisms underlying this interaction remain unclear. We hypothesized that CORT blocks VT-enhanced clasping by interfering with V1a receptor availability and/or VT-induced endocytosis. We administered a physiologically active fluorescent VT conjugated to Oregon Green (VT-OG) to the fourth ventricle 9 min after an intraperitoneal injection of CORT (0, 10, 40 μg/0.1mL amphibian Ringers). The brains were collected 30 min post-VT-OG, fixed, and imaged with confocal microscopy. CORT diminished the number of endocytosed vesicles, percent area containing VT-OG, sum intensity of VT-OG, and the amount of VT-V1a within each vesicle; indicating that CORT was interfering with V1a receptor availability and VT-V1a receptor-mediated endocytosis. CORT actions were brain location-specific and season-dependent in a manner that is consistent with the natural and context-dependent expression of clasping behavior. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the Rf to CORT was much higher in animals during the breeding season, arguing for ethologically appropriate seasonal variation in CORT's ability to prevent VT-induced endocytosis. Our data are consistent with the time course and interaction effects of CORT and VT on clasping behavior and neurophysiology. CORT interference with VT-induced endocytosis may be a common mechanism employed by hormones across taxa for mediating rapid context- and season-specific behavioral responses.

  8. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  9. The heterogeneity in GABAA receptor-mediated IPSC kinetics reflects heterogeneity of subunit composition among inhibitory and excitatory interneurons in spinal lamina II

    PubMed Central

    Labrakakis, Charalampos; Rudolph, Uwe; De Koninck, Yves

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition displays rich functional diversity throughout the CNS, which arises from variations in the nature of inputs, subunit composition, subcellular localization of receptors and synapse geometry, or reuptake mechanisms. In the spinal dorsal horn (SDH), GABAA and glycine receptors play a major role in the control of excitability and accuracy of nociceptive processing. Identifying which components shape the properties of the inhibitory synapses in different cell types is necessary to understand how nociceptive information is integrated. To address this, we used transgenic mice where inhibitory interneurons express GAD65-EGFP. We found that GABAA, but not glycine receptor-mediated evoked IPSCs displayed slower kinetics in EGFP+ vs. EGFP− interneurons. GABAA miniature IPSC decay kinetics showed a large variability in both populations, however the distribution of decays differed between EGFP+ and EGFP− interneurons. The range of mIPSC decay kinetics observed was replicated in experiments using rapid application of GABA on outside-out patches taken from SDH neurons in slices. Furthermore, GABAA decay kinetics were not affected by uptake blockers and were not different in mice lacking δ or α5 subunits, indicating that intrinsic channel properties likely underlie the heterogeneity. To identify whether other α subunits shape the various kinetic properties observed we took advantage of knock-in mice carrying point mutations in either the α1, α2, or α3 subunits rendering Ro 15-4513 a selective agonist at the benzodiazepine modulatory site. We found that α1 and α2 subunit underlie the fast decaying component of IPSCs while the slow component is determined by the α3 subunit. The differential distribution of GABAA subunits at inhibitory synapses thus sculpts the heterogeneity of the SDH inhibitory circuitry. This diversity of inhibitory elements can be harnessed to selectively modulate different components of the spinal nociceptive circuitry for

  10. Evidence for the involvement of PECAM-1 in a receptor mediated signal-transduction pathway regulating capacitation-associated tyrosine phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Paul, Jonathan W; Spiller, Cassy M; Attwell-Heap, Abigail G; Ashman, Leonie K; Aitken, R John

    2005-10-15

    Mammalian spermatozoa must become ;capacitated' in the female reproductive tract before they gain the ability to fertilize the oocyte. The attainment of a capacitated state has been correlated with a number of biochemical changes, the most notable of which is a dramatic increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation status of these cells. Despite its biological importance, the mechanisms responsible for initiating this tyrosine phosphorylation cascade in vivo are unknown. Here, we report that this signalling pathway can be elicited in a rapid, dose-dependent and lectin-specific manner by wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), but none of 18 other lectins assessed. This response was abrogated by prior enzymatic cleavage of either sialic acid or GlcNAc residues from the sperm surface and by treatment with a range of pharmacological inhibitors directed against protein kinase A, protein tyrosine kinases and intermediates including Src. Proteomic analysis of the WGA-binding sites on the sperm surface identified the putative cognate receptor as platelet cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31). This conclusion was supported by the following evidence: (i) anti-PECAM-1 antibodies identified a molecule of the correct molecular mass in human spermatozoa, (ii) PECAM-1 could be isolated from a pool of sperm surface proteins using WGA immobilized on a solid phase support, (iii) PECAM-1 and WGA co-localized to the sperm surface and (iv) anti-PECAM-1 antibodies could completely block the ability of WGA to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells. Collectively, these data provide the first evidence that a receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway triggers human sperm capacitation and identifies PECAM-1 as the probable initiator of this second messenger cascade. PMID:16219692

  11. Effects of prostaglandin E{sub 2} on the subcellular localization of Epac-1 and Rap1 proteins during Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Thomas G.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Carstens, Jennifer K.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Aronoff, David M.

    2008-01-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated a central role for the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) in the inhibition of Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and bacterial killing by prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in macrophages. However, the subcellular localization of Epac, and its primary target Rap1, has yet to be determined in primary macrophages. Therefore, we used immunofluorescent techniques and phagosome isolation to localize Epac-1 and Rap1 in alveolar macrophages. Epac-1 was predominantly expressed on punctate and tubular membranes throughout the cell body; on the plasma membrane; and co-localized with microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Rap1 was abundant on punctate membranes, less abundant on plasma membrane, and also found on MTOCs. Following PGE{sub 2} treatment, Epac-1, but not Rap1, accumulated on the nuclear envelope and disappeared from MTOCs. By immunofluorescent microscopy, both Epac-1 and Rap1 were seen to associate with phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized beads, but this association appeared weak, as we failed to observe such interactions in phagosomes isolated from cells at various time points after bead ingestion. Strikingly, however, Epac-1, but not Rap1, appeared to accumulate on maturing phagosomes, but only after PGE{sub 2} treatment (or treatment with a selective Epac-1 agonist). This association was confirmed in isolated phagosome preparations. The changes in Epac-1 localization were too slow to account for the inhibitory effects of PGE{sub 2} on phagocytosis. However, the appearance of Epac-1 on late phagosomes following PGE{sub 2} treatment might be important for suppressing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production and inhibiting the killing of intraphagosomal pathogens. The absence of Rap1 on late phagosomes suggests that the effect of Epac-1 might not require Rap1.

  12. D2 dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms in the medial preoptic-anterior hypothalamus regulate effective defense behavior in the cat.

    PubMed

    Sweidan, S; Edinger, H; Siegel, A

    1991-05-17

    The role of the dopaminergic innervation of the medial preoptic-anterior hypothalamus (mPO-AH) in regulating the expression of affective defense behavior in the cat has been investigated in the present study. Feline affective defense behavior, characterized mainly by autonomic arousal, ear retraction, growling, hissing and paw striking, was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). Following the establishment of a stable threshold current for eliciting the hissing response of the behavior, the effect of injecting various DAergic agonists and antagonists into the mPO-AH on the hissing threshold was determined. The microinjection of the non-selective DA agonist apomorphine (0.03, 0.16, 0.33, 0.66, 1.56 and 3.3 nmol) into the mPO-AH facilitated hissing in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This effect was mimicked by the D2-selective agonist LY 171555 (0.2 and 1.0 nmol) but not by the D1-selective agonist SKF 38393 (1.7 and 17 nmol), and was blocked by the non-selective and the D2-selective antagonists haloperidol (1.3 nmol) and sulpiride (14.5 nmol), respectively. The injection of the D1-selective antagonist SCH 23390 (0.3 nmol), however, did not inhibit apomorphine-induced facilitation of hissing. In addition, the injection of haloperidol (1.3 nmol) and sulpiride (14.5 nmol), but not SCH 23390 (0.3 nmol), alone inhibited the behavior. It was therefore concluded that dopaminergic stimulation of the mPO-AH may facilitate the expression of affective defense behavior in the cat via a D2 receptor-mediated mechanism. The physiological significance of this effect and the interaction between dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic innervation of the mPO-AH in modulating the expression of affective defense behavior in response to threatening stimuli are discussed. PMID:1680019

  13. Dopamine D2-Receptor-Mediated Increase in Vascular and Endothelial NOS Activity Ameliorates Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caudell, Danielle N.; Cooper, Matthew; Clark, Joseph F.; Shutter, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious complication resulting in delayed neurological deficit, increased morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stays, and rehabilitation time. It afflicts approximately 35 per 100,000 Americans per year, and there is currently no effective therapy. We present in vitro data suggesting that increasing intrinsic nitric oxide relaxation pathways in vascular smooth muscle via dopaminergic agonism ameliorates cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Methods Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with cerebral vasospasm after SAH (CSFV) was used to induce vasospasm in porcine carotid artery in vitro. Dopamine was added to test its ability to reverse spasm, and specific dopamine receptor antagonists were used to determine which receptor mediated the protection. Immunohistochemical techniques confirmed the presence of dopamine receptor subtypes and the involvement of NOS in the mechanism of dopamine protection. Results Dopamine receptor 1, 2, and 3 subtypes are all present in porcine carotid artery. Dopamine significantly reversed spasm in vitro (67% relaxation), and this relaxation was prevented by Haloperidol, a D2R antagonist (10% relaxation, P < 0.05), but not by D1 or D3-receptor antagonism. Both eNOS and iNOS expression were increased significantly in response to CSFV alone, and this was significantly enhanced by addition of dopamine, and blocked by Haloperidol. Conclusion Cerebral vasospasm is significantly reversed in a functional measure of vasospasm in vitro by dopamine, via a D2R-mediated pathway. The increase in NOS protein seen in both the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle in response to CSFV is enhanced by dopamine, also in a D2R-dependent mechanism. PMID:18807216

  14. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  15. ERK/Egr-1 signaling pathway is involved in CysLT2 receptor-mediated IL-8 production in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kana; Fang, Sanhua; Cai, Beilei; Huang, Xueqin; Zhang, Xiayan; Lu, Yunbi; Zhang, Weiping; Wei, Erqing

    2014-07-01

    The CysLT2 receptor is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, differentiation of colorectal cancers, bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. However, the signal transduction of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CysLT2) in inflammatory responses remains to be clarified. In HEK293 cells stably expressing hCysLT1, hCysLT2 and rGPR17, we determined the signaling pathways for interleukin-8 (IL-8) production after CysLT2 receptor activation. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with the recombinant plasmids of pcDNA3.1(+)-hCysLT1, pcDNA3.1(+)-hCysLT2 and pcDNA3.1-rGPR17. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and LTD4 were used as the agonists to induce IL-8 production and the related changes in signal molecules. We found that LTC4 and LTD4 significantly induced IL-8 promoter activation in the HEK293 cells stably expressing hCysLT2, but not in those expressing hCysLT1 and rGPR17. In hCysLT2-HEK293 cells, LTC4 induced elevation of intracellular calcium, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and Egr-1 expression, and stimulated IL-8 expression and release. These responses were blocked by the selective CysLT2 receptor antagonist HAMI3379. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 inhibited Egr-1 and IL-8 expression as well as IL-8 release, but the JNK and p38 inhibitors did not have the inhibitory effects. Down-regulation of Egr-1 by RNA interference with its siRNA inhibited the LTC4-induced IL-8 expression and release. In conclusion, these findings indicate the ERK-Egr-1 pathway of CysLT2 receptors mediates IL-8 production induced by the pro-inflammatory mediators LTC4 and LTD4.

  16. Kainate receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells is attenuated by mitogen-activated protein and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Sarah F; Beart, Philip M

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that neuronal apoptosis is the result of an abortive attempt to re-enter the cell cycle, and more recently the cyclin-dependent (CDKs) and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, two superfamilies of kinases that influence and control cell cycle progression, have been implicated in neuronal apoptosis. Here, to examine whether CDK/MAPK related pathways are involved in excitotoxicity, we studied the actions of various kinase inhibitors on apoptosis induced by the ionotropic glutamate (Glu) receptor agonist, kainate (KA), in primary cultures of murine cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). KA-mediated neurotoxicity was concentration-dependent, as determined by a cell viability assay monitoring the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and largely apoptotic in nature, as shown by morphological examination and labelling of DNA fragmentation in situ using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling (TUNEL). KA-mediated neurotoxicity and apoptosis was completely attenuated by the mixed CDK and MAP kinase inhibitor, olomoucine, in a concentration-dependent manner (50 – 600 μM), and partially by roscovitine (1 – 100 μM), a more selective CDK inihibitor. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB203580 (1 – 100 μM), partially attenuated KA receptor-mediated apoptosis, as did the MAP kinase kinase inhibitors PD98509 (1 – 100 μM) and U0126 (1 – 100 μM). These findings provide new evidence for a complex network of interacting pathways involving CDK/MAPK that control apoptosis downstream of KA receptor activation in excitotoxic neuronal cell death. PMID:11934814

  17. CB1 Receptor-Mediated Signaling Underlies the Hippocampal Synaptic, Learning and Memory Deficits Following Treatment with JWH-081, a New Component of Spice/K2 Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.; Subbanna, Shivakumar

    2014-01-01

    Recently, synthetic cannabinoids have been sprayed onto plant material, which is subsequently packaged and sold as “Spice” or “K2” to mimic the effects of marijuana. A recent report identified several synthetic additives in samples of “Spice/K2”, including JWH-081, a synthetic ligand for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). The deleterious effects of JWH-081 on brain function are not known, particularly on CB1 signaling, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Here, we evaluated the effects of JWH-081 on pCaMKIV, pCREB and pERK1/2 signaling events followed by long-term potentiation (LTP), hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tasks using CB1 receptor wild type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Acute administration of JWH-081 impaired CaMKIV phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas inhibition of CREB phosphorylation in CB1 receptor WT mice was observed only at higher dose of JWH-081 (1.25 mg/kg). JWH-081 at higher dose impaired CaMKIV and CREB phosphorylation in a time –dependent manner in CB1 receptor WT mice but not in KO mice and failed to alter ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, SR treated or CB1 receptor KO mice have a lower pCaMKIV/CaMKIV ratio and higher pCREB/CREB ratio compared to vehicle or WT littermates. In hippocampal slices, JWH-081 impaired LTP in CB1 receptor WT but not in KO littermates. Furthermore, JWH-081 at higher dose impaired object recognition, spontaneous alternation and spatial memory on the Y-maze in CB1 receptor WT mice but not in KO mice. Collectively our findings suggest that deleterious effects of JWH-081 on hippocampal function involves CB1 receptor mediated impairments in CaMKIV and CREB phosphorylation, LTP, learning and memory in mice. PMID:24123667

  18. Pharmacologic Profiling of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Inhibitors as Mitigators of Ionizing Radiation–Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Epperly, Michael W.; Lira, Ana; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Skoda, Erin M.; Wipf, Peter; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces genotoxic stress that triggers adaptive cellular responses, such as activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade. Pluripotent cells are the most important population affected by IR because they are required for cellular replenishment. Despite the clear danger to large population centers, we still lack safe and effective therapies to abrogate the life-threatening effects of any accidental or intentional IR exposure. Therefore, we computationally analyzed the chemical structural similarity of previously published small molecules that, when given after IR, mitigate cell death and found a chemical cluster that was populated with PI3K inhibitors. Subsequently, we evaluated structurally diverse PI3K inhibitors. It is remarkable that 9 of 14 PI3K inhibitors mitigated γIR-induced death in pluripotent NCCIT cells as measured by caspase 3/7 activation. A single intraperitoneal dose of LY294002 [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one], administered to mice at 4 or 24 hours, or PX-867 [(4S,4aR,5R,6aS,9aR,Z)-11-hydroxy-4-(methoxymethyl)-4a,6a-dimethyl-2,7,10-trioxo-1-(pyrrolidin-1-ylmethylene)-1,2,4,4a,5,6,6a,7,8,9,9a,10-dodecahydroindeno[4,5-H]isochromen-5-yl acetate (CID24798773)], administered 4 hours after a lethal dose of γIR, statistically significantly (P < 0.02) enhanced in vivo survival. Because cell cycle checkpoints are important regulators of cell survival after IR, we examined cell cycle distribution in NCCIT cells after γIR and PI3K inhibitor treatment. LY294002 and PX-867 treatment of nonirradiated cells produced a marked decrease in S phase cells with a concomitant increase in the G1 population. In irradiated cells, LY294002 and PX-867 treatment also decreased S phase and increased the G1 and G2 populations. Treatment with LY294002 or PX-867 decreased γIR-induced DNA damage as measured by γH2AX, suggesting reduced DNA damage. These results indicate pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K after

  19. Insulin-induced Drosophila S6 kinase activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Jose M; Alrubaie, Saif; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Deak, Maria; Leevers, Sally J; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    An important mechanism by which insulin regulates cell growth and protein synthesis is through activation of the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K). In mammalian cells, insulin-induced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) activation, generates the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), which is thought to play a key role in triggering the activation of S6K. Although the major components of the insulin-signalling pathway are conserved in Drosophila, recent studies suggested that S6K activation does not require PI3K in this system. To investigate further the role of dPI3K (Drosophila PI3K) in dS6K (Drosophila S6K) activation, we examined the effect of two structurally distinct PI3K inhibitors on insulin-induced dS6K activation in Kc167 and S2 Drosophila cell lines. We found that both inhibitors prevented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation and activation of dS6K. To investigate further the role of the dPI3K pathway in regulating dS6K activation, we also used dsRNAi (double-stranded RNA-mediated interference) to decrease expression of dPI3K and the PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) phosphatase dPTEN ( Drosophila phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in Kc167 and S2 cells. Knock-down of dPI3K prevented dS6K activation, whereas knock-down of dPTEN, which would be expected to increase PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) levels, stimulated dS6K activity. Moreover, when the expression of the dPI3K target, dPKB (Drosophila protein kinase B), was decreased to undetectable levels, we found that insulin could no longer trigger dS6K activation. This observation provides the first direct demonstration that dPKB is required for insulin-stimulated dS6K activation. We also present evidence that the amino-acid-induced activation of dS6K in the absence of insulin, thought to be mediated by dTOR (Drosophila target of rapamycin), which is unaffected by the inhibition of dPI3K by wortmannin. The results of the present study support the view that, in Drosophila cells, dPI3K and dPKB, as well d

  20. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ting; Ruan, Nan-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Yung

    2012-09-24

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation.

  1. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Ting; Ruan, Nan-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Yung

    2012-01-01

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation. PMID:22909302

  2. Functional Anatomy of Phospholipid Binding And Regulation of Phosphoinositide Homeostasis By Proteins of the Sec14 Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, G.; Ortlund, E.A.; Tyeryar, K.R.; Mousley, C.J.; Ile, K.E.; Garrett, T.A.; Ren, J.; Woolls, M.J.; Raetz, C.R.H.; Redinbo, M.R.; Bankaitis, V.A.

    2009-05-27

    Sec14, the major yeast phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein, regulates essential interfaces between lipid metabolism and membrane trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN). How Sec14 does so remains unclear. We report that Sec14 binds PtdIns and PtdCho at distinct (but overlapping) sites, and both PtdIns- and PtdCho-binding activities are essential Sec14 activities. We further show both activities must reside within the same molecule to reconstitute a functional Sec14 and for effective Sec14-mediated regulation of phosphoinositide homeostasis in vivo. This regulation is uncoupled from PtdIns-transfer activity and argues for an interfacial presentation mode for Sec14-mediated potentiation of PtdIns kinases. Such a regulatory role for Sec14 is a primary counter to action of the Kes1 sterol-binding protein that antagonizes PtdIns 4-OH kinase activity in vivo. Collectively, these findings outline functional mechanisms for the Sec14 superfamily and reveal additional layers of complexity for regulating phosphoinositide homeostasis in eukaryotes.

  3. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110δ promotes lumen formation through enhancement of apico-basal polarity and basal membrane organization

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Sokhavuth; Komaiha, Ola Hamze; Moyano, Romina; Rayal, Amel; Samuel, Didier; Shewan, Annette; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Mostov, Keith; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-01-01

    Signaling triggered by adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a key role in the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and formation of lumens in glandular tissues. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in particular is known to influence the polarization process during epithelial cell morphogenesis. Here, using Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, we show that the p110δ isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinase colocalizes with focal adhesion proteins at the basal surface of polarized cells. Pharmacological, siRNA- or kinase-dead mediated inhibition of p110δ impair the early stages of lumen formation, resulting in inverted polarized cysts, with no laminin or type IV collagen assembly at cell/extracellular matrix contacts. p110δ also regulates the organization of focal adhesions and membrane localization of dystroglycan. Thus, we uncover a previously unrecognized role for p110δ in epithelial cells in the orientation of the apico-basal axis and lumen formation. PMID:25583025

  4. Anxiolytic-like actions of BW 723C86 in the rat Vogel conflict test are 5-HT2B receptor mediated.

    PubMed

    Kennett, G A; Trail, B; Bright, F

    1998-12-01

    The 5-HT2B receptor agonist, BW 723C86 (10, 30(mg/kg i.p. 30 min pre-test), increased the number of punishments accepted in a rat Vogel drinking conflict paradigm over 3 min, as did the benzodiazepine anxiolytics, chlordiazepoxide (2.5-10 mg/kg p.o. 1 h pre-test) and alprazolam (0.2-5 mg/kg p.o. 1 h pre-test), but not the 5-HT2C/2B receptor agonist, m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP, 0.3-3 mg/kg i.p) or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, buspirone (5-20 mg/kg p.o. 1 h pre-test). The effect of BW 723C86 was unlikely to be secondary to enhanced thirst, as BW 723C86 did not increase the time that rats with free access to water spent drinking, nor did it reduce sensitivity to shock in the apparatus. The anti-punishment effect of BW 723C86 was opposed by prior treatment with the 5-HT2/2B receptor antagonist, SB-206553 (10 and 20 mg/kg p.o. 1 h pre-test), and the selective 5-HT2B receptor antagonist, SB-215505 (1 and 3 mg/kg p.o. 1 h pre-test), but not by the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, SB-242084 (5 mg/kg p.o.), or the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY 100635 (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg s.c. 30 min pre-test). Thus, the anti-punishment action of BW 723C86 is likely to be 5-HT2B receptor mediated. This is consistent with previous reports that BW 723C86 exhibited anxiolytic-like properties in both the social interaction and Geller-Seifter conflict tests. PMID:9886683

  5. Characterization of Receptor-Mediated Signal Transduction by Escherichia coli Type IIa Heat-Labile Enterotoxin in the Polarized Human Intestinal Cell Line T84

    PubMed Central

    Wimer-Mackin, Susan; Holmes, Randall K.; Wolf, Anne A.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Jobling, Michael G.

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli type IIa heat-labile enterotoxin (LTIIa) binds in vitro with highest affinity to ganglioside GD1b. It also binds in vitro with lower affinity to several other oligosialogangliosides and to ganglioside GM1, the functional receptor for cholera toxin (CT). In the present study, we characterized receptor-mediated signal transduction by LTIIa in the cultured T84 cell model of human intestinal epithelium. Wild-type LTIIa bound tightly to the apical surface of polarized T84 cell monolayers and elicited a Cl− secretory response. LTIIa activity, unlike CT activity, was not blocked by the B subunit of CT. Furthermore, an LTIIa variant with a T14I substitution in its B subunit, which binds in vitro to ganglioside GM1 but not to ganglioside GD1b, was unable to bind to intact T84 cells and did not elicit a Cl− secretory response. These findings show that ganglioside GM1 on T84 cells is not a functional receptor for LTIIa. The LTIIa receptor on T84 cells was inactivated by treatment with neuraminidase. Furthermore, LTIIa binding was blocked by tetanus toxin C fragment, which binds to gangliosides GD1b and GT1b. These findings support the hypothesis that ganglioside GD1b, or possibly a glycoconjugate with a GD1b-like oligosaccharide, is the functional receptor for LTIIa on T84 cells. The LTIIa-receptor complexes from T84 cells were associated with detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains (lipid rafts), extending the correlation between toxin binding to lipid rafts and toxin function that was previously established for CT. However, the extent of association with lipid rafts and the magnitude of the Cl− secretory response in T84 cells were less for LTIIa than for CT. These properties of LTIIa and the previous finding that enterotoxin LTIIb binds to T84 cells but does not associate with lipid rafts or elicit a Cl− secretory response may explain the low pathogenicity for humans of type II enterotoxin-producing isolates of E. coli. PMID:11705889

  6. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor mediates depot-specific effects on differentiation, inflammation and oxidative metabolism in inguinal and epididymal white adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, I V; Perwitz, N; Drenckhan, M; Lehnert, H; Klein, J

    2011-01-01

    differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative metabolism in CB1-receptor knockout cells. Thus, CB1-receptor-mediated pathways differentially target adipose tissue depots to a dual effect that minimizes cardiometabolic risk, on the one hand, by diminishing visceral fat, and that enhances thermogenesis in subcutaneous adipocytes, on the other. PMID:23455155

  7. Receptor-Mediated Uptake and Intracellular Sorting of Multivalent Lipid Nanoparticles Against the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and the Human EGFR 2 (HER2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, David Tu

    In the area of receptor-targeted lipid nanoparticles for drug delivery, efficiency has been mainly focused on cell-specificity, endocytosis, and subsequently effects on bioactivity such as cell growth inhibition. Aspects of targeted liposomal uptake and intracellular sorting are not well defined. This dissertation assessed a series of ligands as targeted functional groups against HER2 and EGFR for liposomal drug delivery. Receptor-mediated uptake, both mono-targeted and dual-targeted to multiple receptors of different ligand valence, and the intracellular sorting of lipid nanoparticles were investigated to improve the delivery of drugs to cancer cells. Lipid nanoparticles were functionalized through a new sequential micelle transfer---conjugation method, while the micelle transfer method was extended to growth factors. Through a combination of both techniques, anti-HER2 and anti-EGFR dual-targeted immunoliposomes with different combinations of ligand valence were developed for comparative studies. With the array of lipid nanoparticles, the uptake and cytotoxicity of lipid nanoparticles in relationship to ligand valence, both mono-targeting and dual-targeting, were evaluated on a small panel of breast cancer cell lines that express HER2 and EGFR of varying levels. Comparable uptake ratios of ligand to expressed receptor and apparent cooperativity were observed. For cell lines that express both receptors, additive dose-uptake effects were also observed with dual-targeted immunoliposomes, which translated to marginal improvements in cell growth inhibition with doxorubicin delivery. Colocalization analysis revealed that ligand-conjugated lipid nanoparticles settle to endosomal compartments similar to their attached ligands. Pathway transregulation and pathway saturation were also observed to affect trafficking. In the end, liposomes routed to the recycling endosomes were never observed to traffic beyond the endosomes nor to be exocytose like recycled ligands. Based on

  8. Contribution of Priority PAHs and POPs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities in Sediment Samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Otte, Jens C.; Keiter, Steffen; Faßbender, Christopher; Higley, Eric B.; Rocha, Paula Suares; Brinkmann, Markus; Wahrendorf, Dierk-Steffen; Manz, Werner; Wetzel, Markus A.; Braunbeck, Thomas; Giesy, John P.; Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner

    2013-01-01

    The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany) is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM). One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (<0.02–0.906 µg/g dw). Sediments contained relatively small concentrations of dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQ) with concentrations ranging from 15.5 to 322 pg/g dw, which were significantly correlated with dioxin equivalents calculated based on toxicity reference values and concentrations of PAH. The concentration of Bio-TEQ at the reference site exceeded 200,000 pg/g dw. In a potency balance the 16 PAHs explained between 47 and 118% of the Bio-TEQ in the luciferase assay, which can be explained by the constant input of PAHs bound to SPM from the upper course of the Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported. PMID:24146763

  9. Double-Cross-Linked Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles with pH/Reduction Dual-Responsive Triggered Release and pH-Modulated Fluorescence for Folate-Receptor-Mediated Targeting Visualized Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xubo; Jia, Xu; Liu, Lei; Zeng, Jin; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-04-11

    A versatile folate-receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics has been designed for pH/reduction dual-responsive controlled anticancer drug release and pH-modulated fluorescent tumor imaging via facile ionic (pH sensitive) and covalent (reduction responsive) double-cross-linking (DCL) of the folic acid (FA) and Rhodamine 6G modified hyaluronic acid (HA) (FA-HA-Rh 6G). After optimizing the morphology and diameter of the resultant nanoparticles (DCL FA-HA-Rh 6G NPs) via modulating the concentration of the ionic and covalent cross-linking agents, the one with Ca and S contents of 1.70 and 2.84 wt % and an average hydrodynamic diameter of 154 nm was chosen as the desired drug delivery system (DDS) for DOX. They not only had high drug loading capacity and drug encapsulation efficiency (716 ± 34 mg/g and 71.6 ± 3.4%) but also possessed perfect triggered release and strong fluorescence intensity in the stimulated tumor microenvironment. The MTT assay and CLSM analysis revealed that the proposed double-cross-linked HA-based DDS had favorable cytocompatibility and folate-receptor-mediated targeting functionality to the HeLa cells and could obviously enhance the anticancer efficiency of DOX. The integration of the pH and reduction dual-responsiveness, folate-receptor-mediated targeting functionality, and pH-dependent fluorescence intensity into the biodegradable and biocompatible HA nanoparticles make the DCL FA-HA-Rh 6G NPs significant potential for future visualized chemotherapy of cancers. PMID:27010934

  10. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 expression is not linked to nerve growth factor-induced differentiation, cell survival or cell cycle control in PC12 rat pheocromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bortul, R; Aluigi, M; Tazzari, P L; Tabellini, G; Baldini, G; Bareggi, R; Narducci, P; Martelli, A M

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports have highlighted that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 expression is linked to neuronal differentiation in different experimental models. We sought to determine whether or not this is also true for nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation of rat PC12 cells. However, we did not find differences in the expression of both the forms of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 (a and b) during sympathetic differentiation of these cells. Also, PC12 cell clones stably overexpressing phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 were not more susceptible to the differentiating effect of NGF. Furthermore, since it is well established that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 affects cell proliferation, we investigated whether or not PC12 cell clones stably overexpressing phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 showed differences in survival to serum deprivation and cell cycle, when compared to wild type cells. Nevertheless, we did not find any differences in these parameters between wild type cells and the overexpressing clones. Interestingly, in PC12 cells the overexpressed phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 did not localize to the nucleus, but by immunofluorescence analysis, was detected in the cytoplasm. Therefore, our findings may represent another important clue to the fact that only when it is located within the nucleus phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 is able to influence cell proliferation.

  11. Structure-Based Design of Potent and Selective 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1) Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Jesus R.; Becker, Christopher J.; Blackledge, Charles W.; Duquenne, Celine; Feng, Yanhong; Grant, Seth W.; Heerding, Dirk; Li, William H.; Miller, William H.; Romeril, Stuart P.; Scherzer, Daryl; Shu, Arthur; Bobko, Mark A.; Chadderton, Antony R.; Dumble, Melissa; Gardiner, Christine M.; Gilbert, Seth; Liu, Qi; Rabindran, Sridhar K.; Sudakin, Valery; Xiang, Hong; Brady, Pat G.; Campobasso, Nino; Ward, Paris; Axten, Jeffrey M.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a master regulator of the AGC family of kinases and an integral component of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. As this pathway is among the most commonly deregulated across all cancers, a selective inhibitor of PDK1 might have utility as an anticancer agent. Herein we describe our lead optimization of compound 1 toward highly potent and selective PDK1 inhibitors via a structure-based design strategy. The most potent and selective inhibitors demonstrated submicromolar activity as measured by inhibition of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates as well as antiproliferative activity against a subset of AML cell lines. In addition, reduction of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates was demonstrated in vivo in mice bearing OCl-AML2 xenografts. These observations demonstrate the utility of these molecules as tools to further delineate the biology of PDK1 and the potential pharmacological uses of a PDK1 inhibitor.

  12. Sodium butyrate induces differentiation of gastric cancer cells to intestinal cells via the PTEN/phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhongtao; Ye, Yingjiang; Wang, Shan

    2010-12-01

    NaB (sodium butyrate) inhibits cell proliferation and induces differentiation in a variety of tumour cells. In this study, we aimed to determine whether NaB induced differentiation and regulated the expression of the mucosal factor MUC2 through the PTEN/PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) pathway. BGC823 cells treated with NaB for 24-72 h showed marked inhibition of cell proliferation and alteration in cellular morphology. NaB treatment markedly increased the expression of PTEN and MUC2, but it decreased the expression of PI3K. These effects were enhanced by intervention with PI3K inhibitors and were reduced by intervention with PTEN siRNA. Hence, we conclude that NaB increased PTEN expression, promoted the expression of MUC2 and induced the differentiation of gastric cancer cells through the PTEN/PI3K signalling pathway.

  13. CAMK1 phosphoinositide signal-mediated protein sorting and transport network in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by biocomputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Chen, Qingchun; Jiang, Zhenfu; Feng, Haitao

    2014-11-01

    We data-analyzed and constructed the high-expression CAMK1 phosphoinositide signal-mediated protein sorting and transport network in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with low-expression (fold change ≥ 2) no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues (HBV or HCV infection) in GEO data set, using integration of gene regulatory network inference method with gene ontology (GO). Our result showed that CAMK1 transport subnetwork upstream KCNQ3, LCN2, NKX2_5, NUP62, SORT1, STX1A activated CAMK1, and downstream CAMK1-activated AFP, ENAH, KPNA2, SLC4A3; CAMK1 signal subnetwork upstream BRCA1, DKK1, GPSM2, LEF1, NR5A1, NUP62, SORT1, SSTR5, TBL3 activated CAMK1, and downstream CAMK1-activated MAP2K6, SFRP4, SSTR5, TSHB, UBE2C in HCC. We proposed that CAMK1 activated network enhanced endosome to lysosome transport, endosome transport via multivesicular body sorting pathway, Golgi to endosome transport, intracellular protein transmembrane transport, intracellular protein transport, ion transport, mRNA transport, plasma membrane to endosome transport, potassium ion transport, protein transport, vesicle-mediated transport, anion transport, intracellular transport, androgen receptor signaling pathway, cell surface receptor-linked signal transduction, hormone-mediated signaling, induction of apoptosis by extracellular signals, signal transduction by p53 class mediator resulting in transcription of p21 class mediator, signal transduction resulting in induction of apoptosis, phosphoinositide-mediated signaling, Wnt receptor signaling pathway, as a result of inducing phosphoinositide signal-mediated protein sorting, and transport in HCC. Our hypothesis was verified by CAMK1 functional regulation subnetwork containing positive regulation of calcium ion transport via voltage gated calcium channel, cell proliferation, DNA repair, exocytosis, I-kappaB kinase/NF-kappaB cascade, immunoglobulin-mediated immune response, mast cell activation, natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity

  14. Identification of Toxoplasma TgPH1, a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein that binds to the phosphoinositide PI(3,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Daher, Wassim; Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Alayi, Tchilabalo Dilezitoko; Tomavo, Stan; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2016-05-01

    The phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) plays crucial roles in the maintenance of lysosome/vacuole morphology, membrane trafficking and regulation of endolysosome-localized membrane channel activity. In Toxoplasma gondii, we previously reported that PI(3,5)P2 is essential for parasite survival by controlling homeostasis of the apicoplast, a particular organelle of algal origin. Here, by using a phosphoinositide pull-down assay, we identified TgPH1 in Toxoplasma a protein conserved in many apicomplexan parasites. TgPH1 binds specifically to PI(3,5)P2, shows punctate intracellular localization, but plays no vital role for tachyzoite growth in vitro. TgPH1 is a protein predominantly formed by a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. So far, PH domains have been described to bind preferentially to bis- or trisphosphate phosphoinositides containing two adjacent phosphates (i.e. PI(3,4)P2, PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,4,5)P3). Therefore, our study reveals an unusual feature of TgPH1 which binds preferentially to PI(3,5)P2. PMID:27063980

  15. Identification of Toxoplasma TgPH1, a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein that binds to the phosphoinositide PI(3,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Daher, Wassim; Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Alayi, Tchilabalo Dilezitoko; Tomavo, Stan; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2016-05-01

    The phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) plays crucial roles in the maintenance of lysosome/vacuole morphology, membrane trafficking and regulation of endolysosome-localized membrane channel activity. In Toxoplasma gondii, we previously reported that PI(3,5)P2 is essential for parasite survival by controlling homeostasis of the apicoplast, a particular organelle of algal origin. Here, by using a phosphoinositide pull-down assay, we identified TgPH1 in Toxoplasma a protein conserved in many apicomplexan parasites. TgPH1 binds specifically to PI(3,5)P2, shows punctate intracellular localization, but plays no vital role for tachyzoite growth in vitro. TgPH1 is a protein predominantly formed by a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. So far, PH domains have been described to bind preferentially to bis- or trisphosphate phosphoinositides containing two adjacent phosphates (i.e. PI(3,4)P2, PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,4,5)P3). Therefore, our study reveals an unusual feature of TgPH1 which binds preferentially to PI(3,5)P2.

  16. Phosphoinositide Metabolism Links cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase G to Essential Ca2+ Signals at Key Decision Points in the Life Cycle of Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Brochet, Mathieu; Collins, Mark O.; Smith, Terry K.; Thompson, Eloise; Sebastian, Sarah; Volkmann, Katrin; Schwach, Frank; Chappell, Lia; Gomes, Ana Rita; Berriman, Matthew; Rayner, Julian C.; Baker, David A.; Choudhary, Jyoti; Billker, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Many critical events in the Plasmodium life cycle rely on the controlled release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores to activate stage-specific Ca2+-dependent protein kinases. Using the motility of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes as a signalling paradigm, we show that the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase, PKG, maintains the elevated level of cytosolic Ca2+ required for gliding motility. We find that the same PKG-dependent pathway operates upstream of the Ca2+ signals that mediate activation of P. berghei gametocytes in the mosquito and egress of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites from infected human erythrocytes. Perturbations of PKG signalling in gliding ookinetes have a marked impact on the phosphoproteome, with a significant enrichment of in vivo regulated sites in multiple pathways including vesicular trafficking and phosphoinositide metabolism. A global analysis of cellular phospholipids demonstrates that in gliding ookinetes PKG controls phosphoinositide biosynthesis, possibly through the subcellular localisation or activity of lipid kinases. Similarly, phosphoinositide metabolism links PKG to egress of P. falciparum merozoites, where inhibition of PKG blocks hydrolysis of phosphatidylinostitol (4,5)-bisphosphate. In the face of an increasing complexity of signalling through multiple Ca2+ effectors, PKG emerges as a unifying factor to control multiple cellular Ca2+ signals essential for malaria parasite development and transmission. PMID:24594931

  17. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P₃ with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site. PMID:26857031

  18. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site. PMID:26857031

  19. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-02-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site.

  20. Glutathione depletion exacerbates impairment by o