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Sample records for 1-antichymotrypsin antithrombin iii

  1. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be due to: Bone marrow transplant Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) AT III deficiency, an inherited condition Liver ... Schmaier AH, Miller JL. Coagulation and fibrinolysis. In: McPherson ... Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  2. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research. PMID:23228672

  3. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research.

  4. Management of anti-thrombin III deficiency during pregnancy without administration of anti-thrombin III.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, J R; Geerts, W; Panju, A; Nguyen, P; Hirsh, J

    1986-02-15

    We report a patient with hereditary antithrombin III deficiency who was successfully treated with heparin throughout pregnancy. Functional antithrombin III levels fell to 0.32 U/ml during heparin treatment, but it was possible to achieve a heparin effect, measured by the activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin clotting time and heparin assay with subcutaneous heparin in doses of 30,000 U to 35,000 U/24 hours. This achieve an long term heparin effect was obtained without the need for antithrombin III infusions.

  5. Antithrombin III and the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K A; Stoffersen, E

    1979-05-01

    Plasma and urinary antithrombin III (AT-III) was measured in 15 cases of nephrotic syndrome. Plasma AT-III correlated well with serum albumin, but poorly with proteinuria, whereas urinary AT-III correlated well to proteinuria. The plasma AT-III level had a mean similar to 25 healthy controls, but the range was significantly wider. A case with nephrotic syndrome and left renal vein thrombosis is reported. The urinary output of AT-III rose and the plasma level fell with the activity of the disease. Although AT-III and albumin have similar molecule weight, their renal clearance was found to be different. It is suggested that urinary loss of AT-III plays a role in the hypercoagulable state sometimes found in the nephrotic syndrome.

  6. Recombinant human antithrombin III: rhATIII.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    GTC Biotherapeutics (formerly Genzyme Transgenics Corporation) is developing a transgenic form of antithrombin III known as recombinant human antithrombin III [rhATIII]. It is produced by inserting human DNA into the cells of goats so that the targeted protein is excreted in the milk of the female offspring. The transgenic goats have been cloned in collaboration with the Louisiana State University Agriculture Center. GTC Biotherapeutics is conducting clinical trials of rhATIII in coagulation disorders. rhATIII is believed to be both safer and more cost-effective than the currently available plasma-derived product. rhATIII is also being investigated in cancer and acute lung injury. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, originally a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation, changed its name to GTC Biotherapeutics in June 2002; it is no longer a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation. GTC Biotherapeutics is seeking partners for the commercialisation of rhATIII. Restructuring of GTC Biotherapeutics to support its commercialisation programmes was announced in February 2004. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation was developing rhATIII in association with Genzyme General (Genzyme Corporation) in the ATIII LLC joint venture, but in November 2000 a letter of intent was signed for the reacquisition of the rights by Genzyme Transgenics Corporation. It was announced in February 2001 that this reacquisition was not going to be completed and that the development of rhATIII was to continue with ATIII LLC. However, in July 2001, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired all the rights in the transgenic antithrombin III programme. SMI Genzyme Ltd, a joint venture between Sumitomo Metal Industries, Japan, and Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, USA, was set up to fund development of transgenic antithrombin III in Asia. However, in October 2000, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired, from Sumitomo Metal Industries, the rights to its technology for production of medicines from milk in 18 Asian countries

  7. [Clinical aspects of acquired antithrombin III deficiency].

    PubMed

    von Blohn, G; Hellstern, P; Köhler, M; Scheffler, P; Wenzel, E

    1986-02-01

    The significance of acquired antithrombin III (AT III) deficiency must be interpreted in close relation to the underlying disease process. In patients with acute or chronic liver impairment, the AT III activity is related to a decrease of procoagulatory factors, whereas, in protein loss syndromes such as nephrotic syndrome, the AT III indicates an increased risk of thromboembolic events. The effect of oral contraceptives (OC) on AT III levels in young healthy females (n = 30) was determined prospectively. AT III decreases during OC usage could not be related to the estrogen content of the examined oral contraceptives, and there was no parallel decrease of AT III activity and concentration in each type of OC. In a prospective study, the extent of AT III decrease was determined in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass operations (CPB) receiving different anticoagulant schedules during extracorporeal circulation (n = 49). There was no significant influence on the effectiveness of anticoagulation by the observed AT III decreases. AT III deficiency during CPB was primarily the result of hemodilution. However, the AT III kinetics were significantly influenced by the different protamin dosages and were not affected by the different heparin dosages. Correction of diminished AT III levels by substitution of AT III concentrates is beneficial in cases, in which an interruption of an enhanced coagulatory process such as disseminated intravascular coagulation is necessary or in patients requiring high dosage heparinization as in deep vein thrombosis. In those cases the quality of AT III correction correlates to the course of the disease. However, the potency of concentrates as well as the individual AT III recovery and half-life must be considered for an appropriate treatment with AT III substitution. PMID:3718407

  8. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  13. Portal vein thrombosis treated using danaparoid sodium and antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, T; Hirokazu, Takahashi; Hosono, K; Endo, H; Akiyama, T; Yoneda, K; Inamori, M; Abe, Y; Kubota, K; Saito, S; Nakajima, A

    2010-01-01

    A 45-year-old man under treatment for liver cirrhosis (LC) due to chronic hepatitis C and hemophilia A was seen in our emergency room because of a 10-kg weight gain in the previous week due to ascites. Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) was detected with computer tomography (CT) and ultrasonographic (US). Danaparoid sodium (DS) and antithrombin III (AT III) were administrated and doppler US images showed improvement of portal venous blood flow. DS or AT III may be safe and alternative therapies for PVT. PMID:20422871

  14. Expression of human antithrombin III in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Bröker, M; Ragg, H; Karges, H E

    1987-04-29

    Recombinant plasmids were constructed that direct the synthesis of human antithrombin III in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The signal sequence of antithrombin III was recognized by both yeast species, and antithrombin III was secreted into the medium. When the signal sequence was replaced by a sequence of ten arbitrary amino acids, the product expressed from such a construct stayed inside the cell. Antithrombin III was glycosylated by the baker's and fission yeast and was immunologically identical to antithrombin III isolated from human plasma. Antithrombin III isolated from the culture media of recombinant yeasts was biologically active, as could be shown by progressive inhibitor activity and heparin cofactor activity.

  15. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin helps protect tissues against proteolytic (protein-splitting) enzymes released during...

  16. Conformation of heparin pentasaccharide bound to antithrombin III.

    PubMed Central

    Hricovíni, M; Guerrini, M; Bisio, A; Torri, G; Petitou, M; Casu, B

    2001-01-01

    The interaction, in aqueous solution, of the synthetic pentasaccharide AGA*IA(M) (GlcN,6-SO(3)alpha 1-4GlcA beta 1-4GlcN,3,6-SO(3)alpha 1-4IdoA,2-SO(3)alpha 1-4GlcN,6-SO(3)alpha OMe; where GlcN,6-SO(3) is 2-deoxy-2-sulphamino-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl 6-sulphate, IdoA is l-iduronic acid and IdoA2-SO(3) is L-iduronic acid 2-sulphate), which exactly reproduces the structure of the specific binding sequence of heparin and heparan sulphate for antithrombin III, has been studied by NMR. In the presence of antithrombin there were marked changes in the chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), compared with the free state. On the basis of the optimized geometry of the pentasaccharide the transferred NOEs were interpreted with full relaxation and conformational exchange matrix analysis. An analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the pentasaccharide in the free state, and in the complex, revealed the binding to be accompanied by dihedral angle variation at the A-G and I-A(M) (where G, I, A and A(M) are beta-d-glucuronic acid, 2-O-sulphated alpha-L-iduronic acid, N,6-O-sulphated alpha-D-glucosamine and the alpha-methyl-glycoside of A respectively) glycosidic linkages. Evidence is also provided that the protein drives the conformation of the 2-O-sulphated iduronic acid residue towards the skewed (2)S(0) form. PMID:11583572

  17. Relationship between renal histology and plasma antithrombin III activity in women with early onset preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Weiner, C P; Bonsib, S M

    1990-04-01

    Renal biopsy was performed in 12 women with the clinical diagnosis of severe, early-onset preeclampsia at the time of cesarean delivery for the express purpose of aiding future counseling on the risk of recurrence. The mean gestation at delivery was 30 +/- 3 weeks. The mean birthweight was 1090 +/- 505 gm. Four women (33%) were multiparous. Antithrombin III activity was determined immediately prior to delivery unrelated to clinical care and as part of other protocols. The biopsy was performed without difficulty in each, although the sample was inadequate in one patient. The clinical diagnosis of preeclampsia was confirmed in nine (82%). However, three of the nine had underlying renal disease, as did the two women without histologic evidence of preeclampsia (42% of the total). Correlations between laboratory parameters with the histopathologic diagnoses were sought. Neither uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, platelet count, or 24-hour urinary protein measurements aided the differentiation of the various subgroups. Antithrombin III activity in women with biopsy-supported preeclampsia (77% +/- 12%) was significantly lower than that in women without histologic evidence of preeclampsia (116% +/- 8%). Antithrombin III activity correctly predicted biopsy findings in at least 9 of 11 (82%). These preliminary findings confirm the high frequency of underlying disease in women with early-onset preeclampsia. Although low antithrombin III activity does not differentiate between "pure" preeclampsia and superimposed disease, a normal antithrombin III activity is reassuring and more consistent with a nonpreeclamptic renal complication than with preeclampsia.

  18. Further studies of the turnover of dog antithrombin III. Study of /sup 131/I-labelled antithrombin protease complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, B.; Bies, R.; Carlson, T.; Reeve, E.B.

    1983-04-15

    Fresh plasma containing /sup 131/I-antithrombin III (*I-AT) was coagulated and incubated at 37 degrees C for 2 hr. A ''complex peak,'' separated on heparin-agarose contained AT and *I-AT antigen but no heparin cofactor activity. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis showed only AT complexes. SDS PAGE showed 80% of the *I-AT in a major band (approximately 80,000 daltons), 15% in a minor band (approximately 100,000 daltons) and the rest in trace bands (approximately 60,000 and/or 115,000 daltons). Ammonia treatment of the complex peak released alpha-thrombin. After i.v. injection 80% of the complexed *I-AT, chiefly as the major band, left the plasma with t 1/2 approximately 15 min and was almost immediately catabolized to low molecular weight breakdown products. A major catabolic site was the liver. A simple kinetic model describes the findings approximately.

  19. Alpha1-antichymotrypsin polymorphism in Japanese cases of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, T; Yamakawa-Kobayashi, K; Hamaguchi, H; Shoji, S

    1997-11-25

    We examined the possible involvement of alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) polymorphism in the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a Japanese population. No differences between AD and control subjects have been shown in the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of ACT. No modification of the risk for AD was observed, either alone or in combination with the apolipoprotein epsilon4 (ApoE-4) allele. Our results from a Japanese population failed to confirm the previous data in which the ACT polymorphism was shown to affect the ApoE-4-associated risk for AD.

  20. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180341

  1. Protective effects of antithrombin III supplementation on warm ischemia and reperfusion injury in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Okano, K; Kokudo, Y; Okajima, K; Hossain, M A; Ishimura, K; Yachida, S; Tsubouchi, T; Wakabayashi, H; Maeba, T; Maeta, H

    1996-10-01

    The effect of antithrombin III (AT III) supplementation on energy status, microcirculation, cytoprotection, and prostacyclin (PGI2) production during and after a period of warm ischemia of the rat liver was investigated. AT III supplementation (250 units/kg) stimulate prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) production from 1 hour after administration, with maximal production observed at 3 hours. Ischemia was induced by occluding the hepatoduodenal ligament for 30 minutes, and experiments were continued for 60 minutes after reperfusion. The rats received AT III (250 units/kg IC) 30 minutes before induction of liver ischemia (AT III group). In the AT III group, recovery of the beta-ATP/inorganic phosphate ratio measured by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance showed significant improvement (p < 0.01), and the recovery of tissue blood flow markedly improved (p < 0.01) compared to the saline-treated group (control group). Leakages of aspartame aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase were mitigated in the AT III group (p < 0. 05). Ultrastructural alterations of sinusoidal endothelial cells were markedly reduced in the AT III group. The PGI2 level at the end of reperfusion was significantly elevated (p < 0.01) in the AT III group compared to the control group. The results of this study indicated that pretreatment with AT III significantly improved the energy status and microcirculation, as well as histologic damage, after liver ischemia and reperfusion. One of the fundamental effects of AT III might be mediated through the production of prostacyclin.

  2. Implication of alpha1-antichymotrypsin polymorphism in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nacmias, B; Marcon, G; Tedde, A; Forleo, P; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Amaducci, L; Sorbi, S

    1998-03-13

    A common polymorphism in the alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene has been shown to modify the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon4-associated Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk identifying the combination of the ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes as a potential susceptibility marker for AD. Using the polymerase chain reaction, we analyzed the segregation of the ACT and ApoE polymorphisms in familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) patients carrying mutations in Presenilin (PS) and APP genes and in both early onset (EO) and late onset (LO) FAD patients without known mutations. Our data suggest that ACT does not represent an additional risk factor for PS and APP mutated families. However, in LOFAD patients a high frequency of the combined ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes suggest that ACT may interact with ApoE and play a role in LOFAD. PMID:9572591

  3. Apolipoprotein E and alpha1-antichymotrypsin polymorphism in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nacmias, B; Tedde, A; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Bracco, L; Amaducci, L; Guarnieri, B M; Petruzzi, C; Ortenzi, L; Sorbi, S

    1996-10-01

    A recent observation has shown that a common polymorphism in the alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene modifies the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon4-associated Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk identifying the combination of the ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes as a potential susceptibility marker for AD. We analyzed the segregation of the ApoE and ACT polymorphism in sporadic and familial AD patients. In none of the sporadic AD patients did we find the combination of the ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes. The frequency of ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 homozygosity in the AD sample resulted highest for the ACT/ TT genotype (17.6%). Our data fail to confirm any additional association with AD beyond the ApoE epsilon4 allele with any ACT genotype, suggesting that ACT does not represent an additional risk factor for AD. PMID:8871590

  4. Decrease in antithrombin III and prothrombin serum levels contribute to coagulation disorders during leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-08-01

    Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira are the causative agent of leptospirosis, an emergent infectious disease that affects humans and animals worldwide. Severe forms of the disease in humans include jaundice, multiple organ failure and intense haemorrhage. Up to now, mechanisms associated with the haemorrhage foci are poorly understood. We report in this work that, despite the low levels of antithrombin III in convalescent human serum samples, virulent, culture-attenuated and saprophyte strains of Leptospira are unable to bind and/or degrade this thrombin inhibitor, suggesting an indirect mechanism of pathogenesis. Lower levels of prothrombin were found in serum samples at the onset and convalescent phase of the disease when compared to normal human sera. The concomitant decreased levels of antithrombin III and prothrombin suggest a process of stimulated coagulation, which is corroborated by the increase of prothrombin fragment F1+2 in the serum samples. Data obtained with hamsters experimentally infected with virulent Leptospira interrogans serovars Kennewicki and Canicola strongly point out that haemorrhage is correlated with decreased levels of thrombin inhibitors and prothrombin. Activated coagulation might lead to an overconsumption of coagulation factors ultimately leading to bleeding and organ failure. PMID:27260249

  5. Decrease in antithrombin III and prothrombin serum levels contribute to coagulation disorders during leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-08-01

    Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira are the causative agent of leptospirosis, an emergent infectious disease that affects humans and animals worldwide. Severe forms of the disease in humans include jaundice, multiple organ failure and intense haemorrhage. Up to now, mechanisms associated with the haemorrhage foci are poorly understood. We report in this work that, despite the low levels of antithrombin III in convalescent human serum samples, virulent, culture-attenuated and saprophyte strains of Leptospira are unable to bind and/or degrade this thrombin inhibitor, suggesting an indirect mechanism of pathogenesis. Lower levels of prothrombin were found in serum samples at the onset and convalescent phase of the disease when compared to normal human sera. The concomitant decreased levels of antithrombin III and prothrombin suggest a process of stimulated coagulation, which is corroborated by the increase of prothrombin fragment F1+2 in the serum samples. Data obtained with hamsters experimentally infected with virulent Leptospira interrogans serovars Kennewicki and Canicola strongly point out that haemorrhage is correlated with decreased levels of thrombin inhibitors and prothrombin. Activated coagulation might lead to an overconsumption of coagulation factors ultimately leading to bleeding and organ failure.

  6. Protective effect of antithrombin III in acute experimental pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Agterberg, J; Rigter, G; Hack, C E; Gool, J V

    1992-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the therapeutic action of antithrombin III (AT III) in taurocholate-induced experimental pancreatitis with high lethality in rats. High-dose AT III treatment greatly improved the survival rate not only when given as pretreatment but also when given 2 hr after induction. No favorable effect on survival rate was observed on administration after 5 hr. Both intravascular and intraperitoneal AT III administration locally restored decreased AT III levels in the peritoneal cavity and increased plasma AT III to supranormal levels. The primary pancreatic insult seemed to be unaffected by the treatment, because neither the rise in plasma lipase nor the development of ascites or the extension of the pancreatic necrosis were diminished. Because heparin pretreatment of the rats was also effective, the mechanism of the beneficial action was probably mediated by inhibition of the proteases of the coagulation cascade, thereby preventing intravascular coagulation in the pancreas and distant organs and subsequent systemic complications. The high efficacy of AT III treatment in this experimental model may stimulate clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of AT III treatment in an early stage of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Control of the cultivation process of antithrombin III and its characterization by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Reif, O W; Freitag, R

    1994-10-01

    The production by baby hamster kidney cells of recombinant antithrombin III (r-AT III), the main inhibitor of thrombin, factor Xa and other proteases of the clotting cascade, was monitored by capillary isotachophoresis using mixtures of continuous spacers. The results were compared with those obtained by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The downstream process, which incorporated anion-exchange and heparin affinity chromatography, was monitored by CZE under acidic conditions and voltage ramping. The purified product was characterized by its isoelectric point and molecular mass. Isoelectric points of the three major and three minor isoforms of AT III were evaluated by capillary isoelectric focusing using a pH range of 4-6 and various mobilization procedures. The molecular mass of AT III was investigated by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE), applying removable dextran gels. Both parameters could be determined within 30 min using only one coated capillary. The results showed an excellent correspondence with those achieved with conventional slab gels. The affinity complex between AT III and thrombin could also be detected by CGE and the heparin dependence of the affinity reaction could be investigated.

  8. Association of α1-antichymotrypsin deficiency with milder lung disease in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeva, R; Sharples, L; Ross-Russell, R; Webb, A; Bilton, D; Lomas, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterised by an excess of free proteinases that destroy lung tissue. Despite this, previous studies have shown that patients with CF with a mild deficiency variant of the proteinase inhibitor α1-antitrypsin have less, rather than more, severe pulmonary disease. Alpha1-antichymotrypsin is another important serine proteinase inhibitor that protects the lung against proteolytic attack, and point mutations in the α1-antichymotrypsin gene that result in plasma deficiency are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
METHODS—The effect of α1-antichymotrypsin deficiency and the -15 α1-antichymotrypsin signal peptide genotype on lung function was assessed in patients with CF.
RESULTS—One hundred and fifty seven patients with CF were screened and 10 were identified with a plasma deficiency of α1-antichymotrypsin (plasma concentration <0.2 g/l). In a multivariate analysis these individuals had significantly less severe lung disease than those who had normal or raised levels of α1-antichymotrypsin: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 69.9% predicted versus 53.2% predicted (p=0.04) and chest radiographic score of 7.2 versus 9.7 (p=0.03) for those with and without α1-antichymotrypsin deficiency, respectively. The -15 signal peptide genotype did not affect plasma levels, but the -15 Ala/Ala signal peptide genotype was over-represented in individuals with CF compared with healthy blood donor controls.
CONCLUSION—These data indicate that deficiency of α1-antichymotrypsin is associated with less severe pulmonary disease in patients with CF, and support our previous observations that mild genetic deficiency of a proteinase inhibitor is associated with an improved outcome.

 PMID:11120905

  9. Purified radiolabeled antithrombin III metabolism in three families with hereditary AT III deficiency: application of a three-compartment model

    SciTech Connect

    Knot, E.A.; de Jong, E.; ten Cate, J.W.; Iburg, A.H.; Henny, C.P.; Bruin, T.; Stibbe, J.

    1986-01-01

    Purified human radioiodinated antithrombin III (125I-AT III) was used to study its metabolism in six members from three different families with a known hereditary AT III deficiency. Six healthy volunteers served as a control group. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) showed the purified AT III to be homogeneous. Amino acid analysis of the protein revealed a composition identical to a highly purified internal standard. The specific activity was 5.6 U/mg. Analysis of plasma radioactivity data was performed, using a three-compartment model. Neither plasma disappearance half-times nor fractional catabolic rate constants differed significantly between patients and control subjects. The mean absolute catabolic rate in the patient group was significantly lower than that of the control group at 2.57 +/- 0.44 and 4.46 +/- 0.80 mg/kg/day, respectively. In addition, the mean patient alpha 1-phase, flux ratio (k1,2 and k2,1) of the second compartment alpha 2-phase and influx (k3,1) of the third compartment were significantly reduced as compared with control values. It has been tentatively concluded that the observed reduction in the second compartment may be caused by a decrease in endothelial cell surface binding.

  10. Serine protease inhibitor antithrombin III and its messenger RNA in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, R. N.; Golde, T.; Kroon, S. N.; Perry, G.

    1993-01-01

    The classical plasma protein antithrombin III (ATIII), an inhibitor of the blood coagulation cascade, is a member of the serpins that are gaining import in the nervous system. In this study, we examined the presence of ATIII in the pathological lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Antibodies to ATIII consistently detected approximately 58-kd protein(s) on immunoblots of cerebral cortex and brain microvessels. Immunocytochemical studies showed ATIII reactivity within amyloid deposits, neurites associated with plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles in neocortex and hippocampus of virtually all the AD cases examined. In some cases, astrocytes were also stained, suggesting ATIII in these cells. ATIII immunoreactivity in neurofibrillary tangles was further defined by electron microscopy, which showed it to be associated with paired helical filaments. Using the polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify ATIII complementary DNA, we found low levels of messenger RNA expression, relative to liver, in control human brain samples, and these were increased in AD samples, particularly in the white matter. Our results suggest the increased presence of ATIII commensurate with astrogliosis and association with the neurofibrillary pathology of AD. We conclude that in concert with other amyloid-associated serine protease inhibitors, ATIII may play a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral amyloidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8362984

  11. Resolution of preoperative portal vein thrombosis after administration of antithrombin III in living donor liver transplantation: case report.

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Egawa, H; Kajiwara, M; Nakajima, A; Ogura, Y; Hatano, E; Ueda, M; Kawaguchi, Y; Kaido, T; Takada, Y; Uemoto, S

    2009-11-01

    A 59-year-old man with hepatitis C virus-associated liver cirrhosis was transferred to our hospital to undergo living donor liver transplantation. Coagulation was impaired (prothrombin time [International Normalized Ratio], 3.27), and antithrombin III (AT-III) activity was 23% (normal, 87%-115%). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans revealed portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from the junction between the splenic and superior mesenteric vein to the porta hepatica; the portal vein was completely obstructed (PVT). To prevent further development of PVT, 1500 U of AT-III was administered for 3 days, elevating the AT-III activity to 50%. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan obtained 9 days after AT-III administration showed resolution of PVT. Living donor liver transplantation was safely performed without portal vein grafting. Thus, a low AT-III concentration may have an important role in the pathogenesis of PVT in patients with cirrhosis.

  12. Antithrombin III in patients admitted to intensive care units: a multicenter observational study

    PubMed Central

    Messori, Andrea; Vacca, Franca; Vaiani, Monica; Trippoli, Sabrina

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The administration of antithrombin III (ATIII) is useful in patients with congenital deficiency, but evidence for the other therapeutic indications of this drug is still uncertain. In Italy, the use of ATIII is very common in intensive care units (ICUs). For this reason we undertook an observational study to determine the pattern of use of ATIII in ICUs and to assess the outcome of patients given this treatment. Methods From 20 May to 20 July 2001 all consecutive patients admitted to ICUs in 20 Italian hospitals and treated with ATIII were enrolled. The following information was recorded from each patient: congenital deficiency, indication for use of ATIII, daily dose and duration of ATIII treatment, outcome of hospitalization (alive or dead). The outcome data of our observational study were compared with those reported in previously published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results Two hundred and sixteen patients were enrolled in the study. The clinical indications for using ATIII were sepsis (25.9%), disseminated intravascular coagulation (23.1%), and other clinical conditions (46.8%). At the end of the study, 65.3% of the patients were alive, 24.5% died and 10.2% were still in the hospital. Among the patients with sepsis (n = 56), 19 died during the observation period (33.9%; 95% confidence interval 22.1–47.5%). Discussion Our study described the pattern of use of ATIII in Italian hospitals and provided information on the outcome of the subgroup treated with sepsis. A meta-analysis of current data from RCTs, together with our findings, indicates that there is no sound basis for using this drug in ICU patients with sepsis. PMID:12398786

  13. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. In situ growth of nanogold on quartz crystal microbalance and its application in the interaction between heparin and antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qundan; Huang, Yanyan; Zhao, Rui; Liu, Guoquan; Chen, Yi

    2008-03-01

    A novel biosensor for detecting antithrombin III (AT III) was constructed based on in situ growth of nanogold on the gold electrode of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The growth process of nanogold was monitored by QCM in real time. Heparin was used as the affinity ligand and immobilized onto the nanogold modified gold electrode. A flow injection analysis-quartz crystal microbalance (FIA-QCM) system was used to investigate the relationship between nanogold growth and the AT III response. Along with the nanogold particle growth within initial 5 min, the amount of heparin immobilized onto the nanogold modified electrode increased quickly. Correspondingly, the frequency response to AT III binding increased rapidly at the same time. After that, both the immobilized amount of heparin and the sensor response to AT III decreased gradually. Compared with the directly immobilized large nanogold particles, the in situ grown particles with the same size occupy more sensor surface, resulting in higher frequency shifts to AT III in the interaction study between heparin and AT III. The obtained constants of AT III binding to immobilized heparin are k(ass)=(1.65+/-0.12)x10(3) L/mols, k diss=(2.63+/-0.18)x10(-2) 1/s and K(A)=(6.27+/-0.42)x10(4) L/mol.

  18. Antithrombin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency. (For more about excessive clotting (such as deep vein thrombosis, DVT) and antithrombin deficiency, see the " ... affected person may bleed and/or clot. DVT (deep vein thrombosis – a blood clot usually in a ...

  19. The efficacy of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) vs antithrombin III (at III) vs heparin, in the healing process of partial-thickness burns: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kritikos, O.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.; Kittas, C.; Gorgoulis, V.; Papalois, A.; Giannopoulos, A.; Kakiopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This is an experimental study regarding the positive effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in the healing process of partial-thickness burns, in comparison to antithrombin III and heparin. On a porcine model we induced superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burns and performed intravenous administration of the elements of study during the first 48 h. The progress of the condition of the injured tissues was evaluated by histopathological examination at specific time intervals. The results showed an improved healing response of the specimens treated with rhAPC compared to those treated with antithrombin III, heparin, and placebo. PMID:23233823

  20. D-dimer and thrombin-antithrombin III complexes in patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Demers, C; Ginsberg, J S; Johnston, M; Brill-Edwards, P; Panju, A

    1992-04-01

    One hundred and fifty-six consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) had blood drawn to measure levels of D-dimer and thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes and underwent ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scanning and bilateral impedance plethysmography (IPG); pulmonary angiography was performed in 10 patients. Patients were classified as: PE-positive (positive pulmonary angiography or high probability lung scan or non-high probability lung scan and abnormal IPG) or, PE-negative (normal lung scan or normal pulmonary angiography) or PE-unlikely (non-high probability lung scan and normal serial IPG and absence of venous thromboembolism in follow-up). Thirty patients were classified as PE-positive, 64 as PE-negative and 62 patients as PE-unlikely. PE-positive patients were treated with anticoagulants, whereas PE-negative and PE-unlikely patients were not. PE-unlikely patients were followed for 3 months with repeat IPG and clinical evaluation for the occurrence of venous thromboembolism. The sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values and negative predictive values of the D-dimer and TAT complex assays were calculated for patients classified as PE-positive and PE-negative. In addition, the prevalences of normal D-dimer and TAT complex assays were calculated for PE-unlikely patients. Cutoffs of 300 ng/ml for D-dimer and 3.5 micrograms/ml for TAT complexes provided sensitivities of 96% for both assays, negative predictive values of 97% for D-dimer and 96% for TAT complexes and specificities of 52% for D-dimer and 51% for TAT complexes. The specificities of the assays were higher in patients without comorbid conditions and in outpatients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Recombinant human antithrombin III improves survival and attenuates inflammatory responses in baboons lethally challenged with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Chang, A C; Jansen, P M; Lubbers, Y T; Pratt, B M; Whittaker, B G; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E; Friedman, B

    2000-02-15

    Plasma-derived antithrombin III (ATIII) prevents the lethal effects of Escherichia coli infusion in baboons, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not clear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of recombinant human ATIII (rhATIII) on the clinical course and the inflammatory cytokine and coagulation responses in baboons challenged with lethal dose of E coli. Animals in the treatment group (n = 5) received high doses of rhATIII starting 1 hour before an E coli challenge. Those in the control group were administered saline. Survival was significantly improved in the treatment group (P =.002). Both groups had similar hemodynamic responses to E coli challenge but different coagulation and inflammatory responses. The rhATIII group had an accelerated increase of thrombin-ATIII complexes and significantly less fibrinogen consumption compared to controls. In addition, the rhATIII group had much less severe thrombotic pathology on autopsy and virtually no fibrinolytic response to E coli challenge. Furthermore, the rhATIII group had a significantly attenuated inflammatory response as evidenced by marked reduction of the release of various cytokines. We conclude that the early administration of high doses of rhATIII improves the outcome in baboons lethally challenged with E coli, probably due to the combined anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory effects of this therapy. (Blood. 2000;95:1117-1123)

  2. Developmental expression of chicken antithrombin III is regulated by increased RNA abundance and intracellular processing.

    PubMed

    Amrani, D L; Rosenberg, J; Samad, F; Bergtrom, G; Banfield, D K

    1993-01-23

    We isolated and sequenced a 432 bp cDNA to cAT-III, that encoded 115 nucleotides of 5' untranslated sequence, a 17 amino acid long signal peptide and residues 1-88 of the mature protein, and used it to prepare a probe for measuring and correlating the developmental changes of steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels with known changes in antigen levels. Densitometric analysis of nuclease protection (n = 2), Northern blot (n = 4), and slot blots (n = 3) of total RNA from chick livers of 16-day-old embryos to 6-day-old chicks showed a 2.6 +/- 0.5-fold increase in steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels. Assay of functional mRNA levels by in vitro translation of poly(A)+ RNA and specific immunoprecipitation of 35S-Met-labelled cAT-III was comparable to RNA analysis (16-day-old embryos vs. 10-day-old hatchlings). We evaluated whether there were developmental differences in post-translational secretion which may also contribute to the regulation of the circulating level of this protein. Pulse-chase studies of freshly-isolated hepatocytes from 16-day-old embryos and 10-day-old hatchlings maintained in suspension demonstrated a approx. 5.0-5.5-fold increase in cAT-III levels at steady-state secretion. The above findings indicate that changes in circulating cAT-III levels during late embryonic development are primarily due to increased abundance of cAT-III mRNA. In addition, we postulate that post-translational intracellular processing may account for further differences in circulating protein levels. PMID:8424948

  3. Effect of NaC1 on inactivation of bovine thrombin by antithrombin III in the presence of low affinity-heparin or dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Oshima, G; Nagasawa, K

    1986-02-01

    Heparin with low affinity (LA-heparin) to antithrombin III (AT III) enhanced the rate of inactivation of thrombin by AT III. The enhancement of the rate was saturable with AT III and was proportional to the LA-heparin concentration. Although the rate-enhancement in the presence of LA-heparin decreased with increase in NaC1 concentration, it was comparable with that in the presence of high affinity-heparin (HA-heparin) in the absence of NaC1. Inactivation of thrombin by AT III in the presence of dextran sulfate (DS) was also sensitive to NaC1 concentration. These findings indicate that free AT III is favorable for binding to the complexes of thrombin and highly sulfated polysaccharides having low affinities to AT III in the absence of NaC1.

  4. No genetic effect of {alpha}{sub 1}-antichymotrypsin in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.L.; Pritchard, M.L.; Saunders, A.M.

    1996-04-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder for individuals over the age of 40.AD has a complex etiology, and it is likely that multiple genes, acting independently and/or interacting, affect the risk of developing AD. Several genes involved with AD have been described already, but only the APOE gene on chromosome 19q has been shown to affect the risk of the common late onset form of AD. {alpha}{sub 1}-Antichymotrypsin (AACT) is a major component of the amyloid plaques found in the brains of AD patients, and an allele in its gene has been proposed to increase the risk of developing AD when also associated with the APOE-4 allele. We have examined the role of this AACT polymorphism in a large set of families and sporadic cases, and do not see any effect, either alone or in combination with the APOE-4 allele. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. No effect of the α1-antichymotrypsin A allele in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Didierjean, O; Martinez, M; Campion, D; Hannequin, D; Dubois, B; Martin, C; Puel, M; Anterion, C; Pasquier, F; Moreau, O; Babron, M; Penet, C; Agid, Y; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Frebourg, T; Brice, A

    1997-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-ε4 allele is associated in a dose dependent manner to an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. However, the ApoE-ε4 allele effect does not account for all patients with Alzheimer's disease, and the existence of other genetic risk factors has been postulated. Kamboh et al reported an association between Alzheimer's disease and the A allele of α1-antichymotrypsin (Aact) gene, which was not confirmed in a larger series more recently analysed. The ApoE and Aact genotypes were analysed in 314 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 173 healthy controls, confirming the dose dependent effect of the ApoE-ε4 allele. Nevertheless, even using odds ratios adjusted for age and sex, there was no significant effect of the Aact genotype on Alzheimer's disease or on the ApoE-ε4 allele associated risk for Alzheimer's disease.

 PMID:9221977

  6. Effect of thrombin and endotoxin on the in vivo metabolism of antithrombin III (AT III) in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Kobayashi, N.; Maekawa, T.

    1985-11-01

    Effect of thrombin and endotoxin on the metabolism of I-125-labelled canine AT III was studied in mongrel dogs. Under control condition, mean total amount of intravascular AT III with standard deviation was 23.4 +/- 2.4 mg/kg, plasma half life of i.v. injected I-125-AT III was 1.7 +/- 0.2 days, and the fractional catabolic flux (j3x) was 16.3 +/- 1.6 mg/kg/day. The total amount of intra- and extra-vascular AT III was 36.0 +/- 0.34 mg/kg. Neither a 3 hour infusion of a small dose (30 units/kg/hr) of thrombin nor i.v. injection of a large amount of thrombin (5,000-15,000 units/day) with heparin significantly affected AT III metabolism except for a transient decrease in AT III concentration in the latter case, although decrease in plasma fibrinogen concentration and platelet count was observed in both cases. Two injections with 200 micrograms/kg of endotoxin resulted in an evident acceleration of AT III metabolism with significant decrease in the plasma AT III, fibrinogen concentrations and platelet count. More marked changes in AT III metabolism were induced by a single infusion with 1 mg/kg of endotoxin. Changes in hemostatic system coincided with those observed in DIC.

  7. Congenital atresia of the inferior vena cava and antithrombin III deficiency in a young adult: compounding risk factors for deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Muscianese, Laura; Seese, Ronald R; Graham, William; Williams, James H

    2015-01-01

    Atresia, or absence, of the inferior vena cava (AIVC) is a rare, usually fortuitous finding on advanced imaging that predisposes patients to deep venous thrombosis (DVT). In young adults who lack predisposing risk factors but nonetheless develop extensive or bilateral DVTs, AIVC should be considered. We describe a case of a previously healthy 17-year-old male patient who developed an extensive renal vein thrombus due to the absence of the superior portion of his IVC compounded with previously undiagnosed antithrombin III deficiency. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this complicated condition.

  8. Congenital antithrombin III deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Anderson JA, Weitz JI. Hypercoagulable states. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  9. Molecular characterization of antithrombin III (ATIII) variants using polymerase chain reaction. Identification of the ATIII Charleville as an Ala 384 Pro mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Molho-Sabatier, P; Aiach, M; Gaillard, I; Fiessinger, J N; Fischer, A M; Chadeuf, G; Clauser, E

    1989-01-01

    The genes of seven structural mutants of antithrombin III (ATIII), presenting either defective serine protease reactivity or abnormal heparin binding, were analyzed. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the corresponding gene exon and the mutation was identified by either dot blot analysis using a battery of allele-specific oligonucleotide probes or sequencing. Variants Paris and Paris 2 were identified as Arg 47 Cys mutations, and Clichy, Clichy 2, and Franconville were found to be Pro 41 Leu mutations. All five are heparin binding-site variants. ATIII Avranches is an Arg 393 His mutation and ATIII Charleville is an Ala 384 Pro mutation. These two mutations impair the reactive site of the molecule. ATIII Charleville is a new mutation of the reactive center, as predicted by previous biochemical data. The position of this new mutation, together with the other previously described mutations of the reactive center, sheds light on the molecular function of this site in inhibiting thrombin. Finally, genomic amplification by PCR is a powerful technique for the fast identification of antithrombin III mutations and their homozygous/heterozygous status, and should be useful for predicting thrombotic risk. Images PMID:2794060

  10. The N-terminal domain of antithrombin-III is essential for heparin binding and complex-formation with, but not cleavage by, alpha-thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, R C; Sheffield, W P; Rachubinski, R A; Blajchman, M A

    1992-01-01

    Normal and mutant forms of human antithrombin-III (AT-III) were synthesized in a cell-free system in order to identify putative functional domains required for heparin binding and complex-formation with alpha-thrombin. Heparin-Sepharose chromatography resulted in the elution of approx. 70% of cell-free-derived normal AT-III-(1-432)-polypeptide as a peak between 0.2 M- and 0.7 M-NaCl. The cell-free-derived normal AT-III also reacted with alpha-thrombin. Approx. 15% of this AT-III formed covalent complexes with alpha-thrombin in 2 min. Unfractionated heparin accelerated the rate of formation of such complexes. Two truncated forms of AT-III (amino acid residues 219-432 and 251-432), containing only the putative thrombin-binding domain, were synthesized independently in this cell-free system. These truncated AT-III polypeptides did not bind heparin and were unable to form stable covalent complexes with alpha-thrombin. However, both of these AT-III polypeptides were cleaved by alpha-thrombin, presumably at the reactive centre Arg-393-Ser-394. The formation of the disulphide bond between Cys-247 and Cys-430 in AT-III-(219-432)-polypeptide had no effect on the results obtained. Mutations in full-length AT-III at Cys-430 had no effect on the ability of AT-III to bind heparin. There was, however, a slight decrease in the formation of stable inhibitory complexes with alpha-thrombin. A cell-free-derived AT-III mutant, devoid of amino acid residues 41-49, which comprise heparin-binding region 1 of AT-III, had slightly decreased heparin binding compared with cell-free-derived normal AT-III-(1-432)-polypeptide. This mutant AT-III polypeptide was unable, however, to form a stable complex with alpha-thrombin. We conclude therefore that the N-terminal domain of AT-III is essential for both heparin binding and complex-formation with alpha-thrombin, but not for the cleavage of AT-III at its reactive centre by alpha-thrombin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID

  11. Alpha1-antichymotrypsin, an inflammatory protein overexpressed in Alzheimer's disease brain, induces tau phosphorylation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Jaya; Levy, Monique; Dickson, Dennis W; Potter, Huntington

    2006-11-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are key pathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease pathology is also characterized by neuroinflammation and neuronal degeneration, with the proteins associated with inflammatory responses being found in tight association with the plaques. One such protein is the serine protease inhibitor alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT). ACT has been shown to promote Abeta polymerization in vitro and in vivo, and levels of ACT protein in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from Alzheimer's patients have been found to correlate with progression of dementia. Here we investigated the possible involvement of ACT in tau phosphorylation and tangle formation. As was previously found for Alzheimer's disease, brains from patients with non-Alzheimer's tauopathies exhibited an enhanced expression of ACT, which correlated with the level of tau hyperphosphorylation. Transgenic mice expressing human ACT alone or ACT along with mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) showed a significant increase in tau phosphorylation, suggesting that this inflammatory protein can induce tau hyperphosphorylation. The increase in phosphorylation was observed at PHF-1 (P-Ser396/P-Thr404), P-Ser202 and P-Thr231 sites on tau, the P-tau epitopes that are associated with tangles in the patients. This result was further confirmed by the finding that addition of purified ACT induced the same Alzheimer's disease-related tau hyperphosphorylation in cortical neurons cultured in vitro. This correlated with an increase in extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 activation, indicating their involvement in ACT-induced tau phosphorylation. The ACT-treated neurons showed neurite loss and subsequently underwent apoptosis. Approximately 40-50% of neurons were TUNEL positive by 6 and at 24 h >70% of the neurons showed staining suggesting that ACT was inducing apoptosis in these neurons. These findings indicate that inappropriate

  12. Distribution pattern and functional state of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in plaques and vascular amyloid in Alzheimer's disease. A immunohistochemical study with monoclonal antibodies against native and inactivated alpha 1-antichymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Rozemuller, J M; Abbink, J J; Kamp, A M; Stam, F C; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were raised against inactivated alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) to study the presence and functional state of the serine protease inhibitor alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in cerebral amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease. A panel of seven different mAbs was obtained; six of them were directed against neoepitopes that are expressed on ACT after interaction with proteases (inactivated ACT) and one mAb was directed against an epitope that is exposed both on native and inactivated ACT. The mAbs against neoepitopes could discriminate native ACT from complexed and inactivated ACT in vitro as shown in binding experiments in the presence of either native or inactivated ACT. With the mAbs against ACT we found that: (a) besides classical congophilic plaques, amorphous noncongophilic beta/A4-positive plaques were stained; (b) amorphous and classical plaques reacted with both types of mAbs against ACT indicating that this ACT was either complexed to a protease or proteolytically inactivated; (c) vascular amyloid was not stained for ACT. The presence of ACT in amorphous and classical plaques and its absence in vascular amyloid may indicate differences in the proteolytic degradation of preamyloid into amyloid fibrils. Our study strongly suggests that ACT is biologically active in amyloid plaques from an early stage.

  13. Antithrombin III, but not C1 esterase inhibitor reduces inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes in an ex-vivo whole blood setting.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Patrick; Nestler, Frank; Leimert, Anja; Bucher, Michael; Czeslick, Elke; Sablotzki, Armin; Raspè, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    In order to examine the immunomodulatory effects of antithrombin III (AT-III) and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) in human monocytes, we investigated the intracellular expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in an ex-vivo laboratory study in a whole blood setting. Heparinized whole blood samples from 23 healthy male and female volunteers (mean age: 27±7years) were pre-incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of AT-III (n=11) and C1-INH (n=12), then stimulated with 0.2 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3h. After phenotyping CD14⁺ monocytes, intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was assessed using flow cytometry. In addition, 12 whole blood samples (AT-III and C1-INH, n=6 each) were examined using hirudin for anticoagulation; all samples were processed in the same way. To exclude cytotoxicity effects, 7-amino-actinomycin D and Nonidet P40 staining were used to investigate probes. This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of C1-INH and AT-III on the monocytic inflammatory response in a whole blood setting, which mimics the optimal physiological setting. Cells treated with AT-III exhibited significant downregulation of the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes for IL-6 and IL-8, in a dose-dependent manner; downregulation for TNF-α did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant effects on mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). In contrast, C1-INH did not significantly reduce the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes or the MFI regarding IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-8. When using hirudin for anticoagulation, no difference in the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III and C1-INH in monocytes occurs. Taken together, in contrast to TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly downregulated in monocytes in an ex-vivo setting of human whole blood when treated with AT-III. This finding implicates monocytes as an important point of action regarding the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III in sepsis. C1

  14. Deendothelialization in vivo initiates a thrombogenic reaction at the rabbit aorta surface. Correlation of uptake of fibrinogen and antithrombin III with thrombin generation by the exposed subendothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, M. W.; Moar, S. L.; Richardson, M.

    1989-01-01

    Purified radiolabeled fibrinogen and antithrombin III (ATIII) were injected intravenously into rabbits before a deendothelializing injury to the aorta, and allowed to circulate for 0.1 to 6 hours before exsanguination, excision of the aorta, and quantification of each protein/unit area of subendothelium (intima-media). Uptake of fibrinogen was rapid (saturation 10 minutes after injury was approximately 13.0 pmol/cm2) compared with that of ATIII (45 to 60 minutes; 3.5 to 4.3 pmol/cm2). Both proteins associated primarily (greater than 90%) with the subendothelium rather than the platelet monolayer. The avidity of the deendothelialized vessel of these proteins was measured after a 20-minute circulation time at various intervals after injury. Whereas turnover of fibrinogen was fairly constant (approximately 100% per hour), that of ATIII was maximal (approximately 200% per hour) at 1 hour, decreasing to approximately 105% per hour at 5 hours after injury. The profile of ATIII turnover mirrored that of thrombin released in vitro from the deendothelialized aorta up to 10 days after injury, whereas the uninjured aorta and the aorta deendothelialized ex vivo adsorbed fibrinogen poorly and released negligible thrombin. Pretreatment of the aorta, deendothelialized ex vivo with thrombin in vitro increased fibrinogen uptake significantly. It is possible that, after deendothelialization in vivo, fibrinogen adsorption is determined largely by thrombin generation at the vessel wall. ATIII binding is limited by the availability of binding sites in the subendothelium, although the rate of thrombin generation influences ATIII turnover. Images Figure 1 PMID:2782381

  15. Cathepsin G and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in the local host reaction to loosening of total hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Takagi, M; Konttinen, Y T; Santavirta, S; Kangaspunta, P; Suda, A; Rokkanen, P

    1995-01-01

    The tissue localization and content of the proteolytic enzyme cathepsin G and its inhibitor alpha 1-antichymotrypsin were studied in the local host reaction to loosening of total hip-replacement prostheses in eleven patients and were compared with those in samples of non-inflammatory tissue from the synovial capsule obtained during arthroscopies of the knee. Immunostaining demonstrated cellular localization of cathepsin G in 71 per cent of monocyte or macrophage-like cells and in 46 per cent of fibroblast-like cells in the samples of interface tissue between the bone and the loose acetabular component obtained at the time of the total hip replacements, and in 59 and 42 per cent, respectively, in the samples of pseudocapsular tissue obtained at the same time, whereas the synovial lining cells in the samples of non-inflammatory tissue from the synovial capsule revealed only a slight immunoreactivity to cathepsin G. Cathepsin-G activity was also measured with synthetic succinyl-alanine-alanine-proline-phenylalanine-paranitroanilide as a substrate, the degradation of which was monitored spectrophotometrically. In accordance with results from immunohistochemical studies, cathepsin-G activity was found in the samples of interface tissue (31.6 international units per liter) and the samples of pseudocapsular tissue (15.5 international units per liter) obtained during the total hip replacements, whereas the level of cathepsin-G was low in the samples of non-inflammatory synovial capsular tissue (2.5 international units per liter). Cathepsin-G activity in the samples of pseudosynovial fluid obtained at the time of the total hip replacements was low (2.4 international units per liter), although immunoblot analysis showed marked immunoreactive cathepsin G in the samples of pseudosynovial fluid. This low activity of cathepsin G might be explained by the presence of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, which was detected by laser nephlometric immunoassay and immunoblot analysis. These

  16. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg's test and Egger's regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  17. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg’s test and Egger’s regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  18. Investigating changes in the gas-phase conformation of Antithrombin III upon binding of Arixtra using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Woods, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    We validate the utility of ion mobility to measure protein conformational changes induced by the binding of glycosaminoglycan ligands, using the well characterized system of Antithrombin III (ATIII) and Arixtra, a pharmaceutical agent with heparin (Hp) activity. Heparin has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant drug for several decades through its interaction with ATIII, a serine protease inhibitor that plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. This interaction induces conformational changes within ATIII that dramatically enhance the ATIII-mediated inhibition rate. Arixtra is the smallest synthetic Hp containing the specific pentasaccharide sequence required to bind with ATIII. Here we report the first travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) investigation of the conformational changes in ATIII induced by its interaction with Arixtra. Native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the gentle transfer of the native topology of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex. IM measurements of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex showed a single structure, with well-defined collisional cross section (CCS) values. An average 3.6% increase in CCS of ATIII occurred as a result of its interaction with Arixtra, which agrees closely with the theoretical estimation of the change in CCS based on protein crystal structures. A comparison of the binding behavior of ATIII under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions confirmed the significance of a folded tertiary structure of ATIII for its biological activity. A Hp oligosaccharide whose structure is similar to Arixtra but missing the 3-O sulfo group on the central glucosamine residue showed a dramatic decrease in binding affinity towards ATIII, but no change in the mobility behavior of the complex, consistent with prior studies that suggested that 3-O sulfation affects the equilibrium constant for binding to ATIII, but not the mode of interaction. In contrast, nonspecific binding by a Hp

  19. Immunohistochemical demonstration of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and alpha 1-antitrypsin in salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas of children.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Fujita, S; Tsuda, N; Tezuka, F; Okabe, H

    1990-09-01

    Twenty-five benign pleomorphic adenomas of salivary glands in children were studied with immunohistochemical techniques in order to characterize the cell types comprising the epithelial and so-called "mesenchymal" regions of the tumors. The antisera against alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (alpha 1-ACT) and alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) were used to stain in normal salivary gland tissue as well as in pleomorphic adenoma. In normal salivary glands, alpha 1-ACT was localized to the intercalated duct and serous acinar cells. On the other hand, there was positive staining for alpha 1-AT in the intercalated and striated duct cells. Twenty-five cases (100%) of pleomorphic adenomas in children displayed positivity to alpha 1-ACT staining and 22 cases (88%) showed a positive staining for alpha 1-AT. alpha 1-ACT staining was particularly intense in chondrocyte-like cells of 20 cases (80%), in inner tubular cells of 16 (64%) and cyst-lining cells of 12 (52%). The limited number of tumor cells which were called plasmatoid or hyaline cells and squamous epithelial cells, were positive for alpha 1-ACT. None of the outer tubular cells and hyalinous material was positively stained for alpha 1-ACT. A strong positive reaction for alpha 1-AT was observed in chondrocyte-like cells of 15 cases (60%). Inner tubular cells were positive for alpha 1-AT in 12 cases (48%), plasmatoid or hyaline cells in 10 (40%) and cyst-lining cells in 8 (35%). Squamous epithelial cells, clear cells, secretory product and hyalinous material were positive for alpha 1-AT in some cases. Chondroid matrix and myxoid stroma had no reaction with both antibodies. The biological role of alpha 1-ACT and alpha 1-AT with a wide immunohistochemical distribution in pleomorphic adenomas of children may be associated with a self regulating mechanism which inhibits degradation by tissue proteinases.

  20. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and soluble IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor from MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Confort, C; Rochefort, H; Vignon, F

    1995-09-01

    The growth of hormone-responsive MCF7 human breast cancer cells is controlled by steroid hormones and growth factors. By metabolic labeling of cells grown in steroid- and growth factor-stripped serum conditions, we show that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) increase by approximately 5-fold the release of several proteins including cathepsin D, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and soluble forms of the multifunctional IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor. Two soluble forms of IGF-II/M6P receptors were detected, one major (approximately 260 kilodaltons) and one minor (approximately 85 kilodaltons) that probably represents a proteolytic fragment of the larger soluble molecule. IGFs increased receptor release in a dose-dependent fashion with 50-60% of newly synthesized receptor released at 5-10 nM IGFs. The release of IGF-II/M6P receptors correlated with the levels of secreted cathepsin D in different human breast cancer cells or in rats stable transfectants that are constitutively expressing variable levels of human cathepsin D. IGFs had a stronger effect on IGF-II/M6P receptor release, whereas estradiol treatment preferentially enhanced the release of protease and antiprotease. We thus demonstrate that in human breast cancer cells, IGFs not only act as strong mitogens but also regulate release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, IGF-II/M6P-soluble receptor, and cathepsin D; three proteins that potentially regulate cell proliferation and/or invasion.

  1. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  2. Manufacturing process of anti-thrombin III concentrate: viral safety validation studies and effect of column re-use on viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Morrica, Antonietta; Nardini, Claudia; Falbo, Anna; Bailey, Andrew C; Bucci, E

    2003-09-01

    A manufacturing process for the production of Anti-thrombin IIII concentrate is described, which is based primarily on Heparin Sepharose affinity chromatography. The process includes two sequential viral inactivation/removal procedures, applied to the fraction eluted from the column, the first by heating in aqueous solution at 60 degrees C for 10 h and the second by nanofiltration. Using viral validation on a scaled-down process both treatments proved to be effective steps; able to inactivate or remove more than 4 logs of virus, and their combined effect (>8 logs) assured the safety of the final product. Viral validation studies of the Heparin Sepharose chromatographic step demonstrated a consistency of the affinity of the resin for viruses over repeated use (16 runs), thus providing evidence of absence of cross-contamination from one batch to the next. It was concluded that the process of ATIII manufacturing provides a high level of confidence that the product will not transmit viruses.

  3. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and soluble IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor from MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Confort, C; Rochefort, H; Vignon, F

    1995-09-01

    The growth of hormone-responsive MCF7 human breast cancer cells is controlled by steroid hormones and growth factors. By metabolic labeling of cells grown in steroid- and growth factor-stripped serum conditions, we show that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) increase by approximately 5-fold the release of several proteins including cathepsin D, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and soluble forms of the multifunctional IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor. Two soluble forms of IGF-II/M6P receptors were detected, one major (approximately 260 kilodaltons) and one minor (approximately 85 kilodaltons) that probably represents a proteolytic fragment of the larger soluble molecule. IGFs increased receptor release in a dose-dependent fashion with 50-60% of newly synthesized receptor released at 5-10 nM IGFs. The release of IGF-II/M6P receptors correlated with the levels of secreted cathepsin D in different human breast cancer cells or in rats stable transfectants that are constitutively expressing variable levels of human cathepsin D. IGFs had a stronger effect on IGF-II/M6P receptor release, whereas estradiol treatment preferentially enhanced the release of protease and antiprotease. We thus demonstrate that in human breast cancer cells, IGFs not only act as strong mitogens but also regulate release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, IGF-II/M6P-soluble receptor, and cathepsin D; three proteins that potentially regulate cell proliferation and/or invasion. PMID:7649082

  4. Manufacturing process of anti-thrombin III concentrate: viral safety validation studies and effect of column re-use on viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Morrica, Antonietta; Nardini, Claudia; Falbo, Anna; Bailey, Andrew C; Bucci, E

    2003-09-01

    A manufacturing process for the production of Anti-thrombin IIII concentrate is described, which is based primarily on Heparin Sepharose affinity chromatography. The process includes two sequential viral inactivation/removal procedures, applied to the fraction eluted from the column, the first by heating in aqueous solution at 60 degrees C for 10 h and the second by nanofiltration. Using viral validation on a scaled-down process both treatments proved to be effective steps; able to inactivate or remove more than 4 logs of virus, and their combined effect (>8 logs) assured the safety of the final product. Viral validation studies of the Heparin Sepharose chromatographic step demonstrated a consistency of the affinity of the resin for viruses over repeated use (16 runs), thus providing evidence of absence of cross-contamination from one batch to the next. It was concluded that the process of ATIII manufacturing provides a high level of confidence that the product will not transmit viruses. PMID:12935804

  5. Antithrombin activities in childhood malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, R A; Jiménez, E; Ingram, G I; Mora, L A; Atmetlla, F; Carrillo, J M; Vargas, W

    1979-01-01

    Antithrombin activities in 30 severely malnourished children and 40 normal children were estimated in clotting tests by thrombin neutralisation as anti-Xa and by a heparin antithrombin assay; and by immunodiffusion as alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin. The patients' mean alpha 2-globulin was severely depressed, and there were less marked depletions in mean values for thrombin neutralisation, anti-Xa, and in the heparin antithrombin assay (which showed the flat curve thought to reflect a thrombotic tendency). The alpha 1-antitrypsin values were normal. The findings support the concept of antithrombin as the summation of alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin (with alpha 2-macroglobulin); and the low values may be related to the high incidence of thrombosis reported in childhood malnutrition, although it was not seen in these patients. PMID:118190

  6. Magnetic particles as affinity matrix for purification of antithrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercês, A. A. D.; Maciel, J. C.; Carvalho Júnior, L. B.

    2015-11-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto insoluble supports is an important tool for the fabrication of a diverse range of functional materials. It provides advantages: enhanced stability and easy separation. In this work two different magnetic composites were synthesized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) to human antithrombin purification. The magnetic particles (MAG) were obtained by co-precipitation method of iron salts II and III and subsequently coated with polyaniline (MAG-PANI particles). Dacron (polyethylene terephthalate) suffered a hydrazinolysis reaction to obtain a powder (Dacron hydrazide) which was subsequently magnetized (mDAC particles) also by co-precipitation method. Heparan sulfate (HS) was immobilized to MAG-PANI and mDAC retained respectively 35μg and 38.6μg per of support. The magnetic composite containing HS immobilized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) was incubated with human blood plasma (1mL) and then washed with NaCl gradients. Electrophoresis of proteins present in eluates showed bands of antithrombin (58kDa). A reduction in the antithrombin activity was detected in plasma that were incubated in the composites magnetic with HS immobilized, suggesting that the antithrombin was removed of the human blood plasma and then purified. Therefore, the above results suggest that both preparations: MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS are able to affinity purify antithrombin, an important component of blood coagulation.

  7. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Comparison of planar SDS-PAGE, CGE-on-a-chip, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for analysis of the enzymatic de-N-glycosylation of antithrombin III and coagulation factor IX with PNGase F.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Marchetti, M; Kratzmeier, M; Elgass, H; Kuschel, M; Zenker, A; Allmaier, G

    2007-11-01

    Three different analytical techniques (planar SDS-PAGE, CGE-on-a-chip and MALDI-TOF-MS) applied for determination of the molecular weight of intact and partly and completely de-N-glycosylated human serum glycoproteins (antithrombin III and coagulation factor IX) have been compared. N-Glycans were removed from the protein backbone of both complex glycoproteins using PNGase F, which cleaves all types of asparagine-attached N-glycan provided the oligosaccharide has at least the length of a chitobiose core unit. Two of the applied techniques were based on gel electrophoretic separation in the liquid phase while the third technique was the gas-phase technique mass spectrometry. It was demonstrated that the enzymatic de-N-glycosylation generally worked well (completely or partially) with both glycoproteins (one containing only N-glycans and the second N- and O-glycans). All three methods were suitable for monitoring the de-N-glycosylation progress. While the molecular weights determined with MALDI-TOF-MS were most accurate, both gel electrophoretic methods provided molecular weights that were too high because of the attached glycan structures.

  9. The structure of heparin oligosaccharide fragments with high anti-(factor Xa) activity containing the minimal antithrombin III-binding sequence. Chemical and 13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance studies.

    PubMed Central

    Casu, B; Oreste, P; Torri, G; Zoppetti, G; Choay, J; Lormeau, J C; Petitou, M; Sinäy, P

    1981-01-01

    The chemical composition and the 13C n.m.r. spectra of heparin oligosaccharides (essentially octasaccharides), having high affinity for antithrombin III and high anti-(Factor Xa) activity, prepared by three independent approaches (extraction, partial deaminative cleavage with HNO2 and partial depolymerization with bacterial heparinase), leading to different terminal residues, have been studied and compared with those of the corresponding inactive species. Combined wit chemical data, the spectra of the active oligosaccharides and of their fragmentation products afforded information on composition and sequence. The three types of active oligosaccharides were shown to have the common hexasaccharide core I-Aa-G-As*-Is-As, where I and alpha-L-idopyranosyl-uronic acid, Aa = 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranose, G = beta-D-glucopyranosyl-uronic acid, Is = alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid 2-O-sulphate, As = 2-deoxy-2-sulphamino-alpha-D-glucopyranose 6-O-sulphate. The fourth residue (As*) is an unusually substituted amino sugar resistant to mild deamination. The 13C spectra of the active species are characterized by signals from the above atypical amino sugar, the most evident of which is at 57.7 p.p.m. These signals, compared with those of appropriate synthetic model compounds, are compatible with the recently proposed 3-O-sulphation of the residue As* [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555]. PMID:7325974

  10. Antithrombin and near-fatal exertional heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, Ch; Kaneider, Nicole C; Djanani, Angela; Sandhofer, A; Schratzberger, P; Patsch, J R

    2002-01-01

    Heat waves result in excess deaths, excess emergency department visits, and intensive care unit admissions for heat stroke. We describe the clinical features and 3-month outcome of a patient with near-fatal heat stroke, admitted to our intensive care unit in July, 2001. After heavily working for hours at a construction site during a heat wave, the 28-year-old male presented with 41.4 degrees C body temperature and multiorgan failure, consisting of neurological impairment, rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the first week there was no evidence of infection. Treatment included cooling, aggressive volume resuscitation, administration of antithrombin-III concentrates and steroids. The patient survived and recovered normal neurological, renal, respiratory and haematological function, and no disability persisted. This case illustrates survival and complete recovery after multiorgan failure in heat stroke with vigorous intensive care. Treatment with antithrombin and steroids and may well have contributed to the favourable outcome. Correction of reduced antithrombin III levels to supranormal by therapeutic administration of antithrombin III concentrate in disseminated intravascular coagulation of heat stroke was not associated with any bleeding complications. PMID:12168565

  11. Is Alpha-1 Antichymotrypsin Gene Polymorphism a Risk Factor for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage? A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Li, Yunke; Li, Hao; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) signal peptide A/T polymorphism has been suggested to play a role in various brain diseases with arterial wall pathology. We conducted a case-control study and a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between this polymorphism and risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage. Material/Methods A total of 188 patients and 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in our case-control study. The ACT polymorphism was genotyped by PCR-LDR. Further meta-analysis was conducted by searching literature from PUBMED, EMBASE, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases until December 2014, then combining data using STATA10.0. Results Similar genotype distribution was detected between PICH patients and healthy controls (p=0.523). Further analysis based on hypertension and location of hemorrhage did not observe significant association. Multiple logistic regression analysis also failed to identify ACT polymorphism as an independent risk factor for PICH. With regard to meta-analysis, a total of 6 case-control studies including 932 PICH patients and 1140 controls were enrolled. Pooled ORs failed to detect a significant association of ACT signal peptide A/T polymorphism with PICH (dominant model: OR=1.03, 95%CI=0.72–1.46; recessive model: OR=1.08, 95%CI=0.88–1.32). Subgroup analysis based on hypertension revealed no association in hypertensive PICH or in normotensive PICH. Conclusions Our case-control study in a Chinese population did not detect a significant association between ACT signal peptide A/T polymorphism and PICH. Moreover, meta-analysis combining data from relevant studies failed to provide evidence for the association. Further well-designed studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to verify our findings. PMID:26210716

  12. Antithrombin abnormalities and perinatal management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-08-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is an important regulator of the coagulation cascade because of its ability to efficiently inhibit proteases such as Factor (F) Xa and thrombin. Type I hereditary AT deficiency is characterized by a quantitative deficiency in the antigen and activity of AT to about 50% of normal. Type II hereditary AT deficiency is characterized by a normal antigenic level of AT, with a low level of activity due to a dysfunctional protein. Impaired synthesis, consumptive coagulopathy including pregnancy-induced AT deficiency in multiple pregnancies, and urinary protein loss are associated with acquired AT deficiencies. Inherited thrombophilias are the leading cause of maternal thromboembolism and are associated with increased risk of second- and third-trimester fetal loss, abruptions, severe intrauterine growth restriction, and early-onset severe preeclampsia. Among thrombophilias, AT deficiency has long been associated with a significant thrombotic tendency throughout gestation and the puerperium. Treatment for this disorder includes antithrombotic therapy with unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin, followed by an oral vitamin K antagonist, such as warfarin. Some patients with very low AT levels may be resistant to heparin therapy and may require increased doses of heparin or AT concentrates. In addition, an acquired decrease of AT plasma levels is a common finding in patients with preeclampsia. It is suggested that the administration of AT concentrates improves uteroplacental circulation and influence the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that hereditary AT deficiency is associated with fetal loss. In women with a severe thrombotic tendency and recurrent fetal loss, thromboprophylaxis may offer more benefits.

  13. Antithrombin, an Important Inhibitor in Blood Clots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qing-Wei; Liu, Yue; Wan, Chun-Ling; Yu, Tao; He, Guang; He, Lin; Cai, Lei; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Blood coagulation is healthy and lifesaving because it can stop bleeding. It can, however, be a troublemaker as well, causing serious medical problems including heart attack and stroke. Body has complex blood coagulation cascade to modulate the blood clots. In the environment of plasma, the blood coagulation cascade is regulated by antithrombin, which is deemed one of the most important serine protease inhibitors. It inhibits thrombin; it can inhibit factors IXa and Xa as well. Interestingly, its inhibitory ability will be significantly increased with the existence of heparin. In this minireview paper, we are to summarize the structural features of antithrombin, as well as its heparin binding modes and anti-coagulation mechanisms, in hopes that the discussion and analysis presented in this paper can stimulate new strategies to find more effective approaches or compounds to modulate the antithrombin. PMID:26411319

  14. Physical mapping of four serpin genes: [alpha][sub 1]-antitrypsin, [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin, corticosteroid-binding globulin, and protein C inhibitor, within a 280-kb region on chromosome 14q32. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, G.D.; Cox, D.W. Univ. of Toronto, Ontario ); Walter, M.A. ); Hammond, G.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Alpha[sub 1]-antitrypsin ([alpha]1AT; protease inhibitor [PI] locus), [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin ([alpha]1ACT; AACT locus), corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG; CBG locus), and protein C inhibitor (PCI; PCI locus) are members of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. A noncoding PI-like (PIL) gene has been located 12 kb 3[prime] of the PI gene. The PI, PIL, and AACT loci have been localized to 14q32.1, the CBG locus has been localized to 14q31-14q32.1, and PCI has been mapped to chromosome 14. Genetic linkage analysis suggests tight linkage between PI and AACT. The authors have used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to generate a physical map linking these five serpin genes. The order of the genetic loci is AACT/PCI-PI-PIL-CBG, with a maximum distance of about 220 kb between the AACT/PCI and PI genes. These genes form a PI cluster at 14q32.1, similar to that of the homologous genes on murine chromosome 12. The close proximity of these genes has implications for disease-association studies. 44 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Initial experience with recombinant antithrombin to treat antithrombin deficiency in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kevin S; Fanning, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Acquired antithrombin (AT) deficiency has been associated with patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a result of hemodilution, blood coagulation activation, and the use of heparin. Replacement of AT has been typically utilized through the use of fresh-frozen plasma or AT concentrate. Antithrombin alfa (ATryn) is a recombinant form of AT (rAT) with an identical amino acid sequence as that of plasma-derived antithrombin. The primary objective of this study is to examine the relationship of rAT dose to measured plasma antithrombin activity in a small series of patients who received rAT while on ECMO. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients at Medical City Children's Hospital who received ATryn while supported on ECMO between December 2011 and April 2012. Five patients were identified and the patients' weight, bolus dose of ATryn, drip rate of ATryn, and AT blood levels were collected for analysis. The median age of these patients was 1 month (range, 1 day to 3.75 years). Because no dosing guidelines exist for pediatric ECMO, a starting dose of ATryn was chosen based on the manufacturer's labeled indication (prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with AT hereditary deficiency). The median dose of rAT was 368 IU/kg/day (range, 104-520 IU/kg/day) to obtain AT activity level of 80-120%. The average time to reach the targeted AT activity level (80-120%) was 12.7 hours (range, 11-17 hours). Our findings suggest that the published ATryn dose may be inadequate to reach desired AT activity concentrations for pediatric patients on ECMO. Difference in patient population, use of extracorporeal circuits, and the use of heparin are likely explanations for this finding. We would also recommend frequent checking of AT levels while delivering this drug because making timely adjustments is necessary for achieving and maintaining the target AT activity level. PMID:24779124

  16. The infective polymerization of conformationally unstable antithrombin mutants may play a role in the clinical severity of antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Miñano, Antonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; De La Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Ordóñez, Adriana; Martínez, Constantino; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Mutations affecting mobile domains of antithrombin induce conformational instability resulting in protein polymerization that associates with a severe clinical phenotype, probably by an unknown gain of function. By homology with other conformational diseases, we speculated that these variants might infect wild-type (WT) monomers reducing the anticoagulant capacity. Infective polymerization of WT polymers and different P1 mutants (p.R425del, p.R425C and p.R425H) were evaluated by using native gels and radiolabeled WT monomers and functional assays. Human embryonic kidney cells expressing the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (HEK-EBNA) cells expressing inducible (p.R425del) or two novel constitutive (p.F271S and p.M370T) conformational variants were used to evaluate intracellular and secreted antithrombin under mild stress (pH 6.5 and 39°C for 5 h). We demonstrated the conformational sensitivity of antithrombin London (p.R425del) to form polymers under mild heating. Under these conditions purified antithrombin London recruited WT monomers into growing polymers, reducing the anticoagulant activity. This process was also observed in the plasma of patients with p.R425del, p.R425C and p.R425H mutations. Under moderate stress, coexpression of WT and conformational variants in HEK-EBNA cells increased the intracellular retention of antithrombin and the formation of disulfide-linked polymers, which correlated with impaired secretion and reduction of anticoagulant activity in the medium. Therefore, mutations inducing conformational instability in antithrombin allow its polymerization with the subsequent loss of function, which under stress could sequestrate WT monomers, resulting in a new prothrombotic gain of function, particularly relevant for intracellular antithrombin. The in vitro results suggest a temporal and severe plasma antithrombin deficiency that may contribute to the development of the thrombotic event and to the clinical severity of these mutations. PMID

  17. Antithrombin Dublin (p.Val30Glu): a relatively common variant with moderate thrombosis risk of causing transient antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Fernández, José; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Padilla, José; Miñano, Antonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Águila, Sonia; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Sevivas, Teresa S; de Cos, Carmen; Fernández-Mosteirín, Nuria; Llamas, Pilar; Asenjo, Susana; Medina, Pilar; Souto, Juan Carlos; Overvad, Kim; Kristensen, Søren R; Corral, Javier; Vicente, Vicente

    2016-07-01

    The key haemostatic role of antithrombin and the risk of thrombosis associated with its deficiency support that the low incidence of antithrombin deficiency among patients with thrombosis might be explained by underestimation of this disorder. It was our aim to identify mutations in SERPINC1 causing transient antithrombin deficiency. SERPINC1 was sequenced in 214 cases with a positive test for antithrombin deficiency, including 67 with no deficiency in the sample delivered to our laboratory. The p.Val30Glu mutation (Antithrombin Dublin) was identified in five out of these 67 cases, as well as in three out of 127 cases with other SERPINC1 mutations. Genotyping in 1593 patients with venous thrombosis and 2592 controls from two populations, revealed a low prevalent polymorphism (0.3 %) that moderately increased the risk of venous thrombosis (OR: 2.9; 95 % CI: 1.07-8.09; p= 0.03) and identified one homozygous patient with an early thrombotic event. Carriers had normal anti-FXa activity, and plasma antithrombin was not sensitive to heat stress or proteolytic cleavage. Analysis of one sample with transient deficit revealed a type I deficiency, without aberrant or increased latent forms. The recombinant variant, which lacked the two amino-terminal residues, had reduced secretion from HEK-EBNA cells, formed hyperstable disulphide-linked polymers, and had negligible activity. In conclusion, p.Val30Glu by affecting the cleavage of antithrombin's signal peptide, results in a mature protein lacking the N-terminal dipeptide with no functional consequences in normal conditions, but that increases the sensitivity to be folded intracellularly into polymers, facilitating transient antithrombin deficiency and the subsequent risk of thrombosis.

  18. Cloning, Characterization and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Bothrops jararaca Snake Antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Morais-Zani, Karen de; Grego, Kathleen F; Torquato, Ricardo J S; Silva, Caroline S; Tanaka, Aparecida S; Tanaka-Azevedo, Anita M

    2015-01-01

    Antithrombin inhibits blood coagulation through the interaction with serine proteases in both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In addition, antithrombin also shows anti-inflammatory properties, which are independent of its effects on coagulation. This work shows for the first time the cloning and sequencing of antithrombin from a snake species. This predicted protein is composed by 430 amino acids and presents about 64.5% sequence identity to human antithrombin. Biacore experiments revealed that the binding affinity of Bothrops jararaca snake antithrombin to heparin was ~30 times higher than that of human antithrombin. Furthermore, Bothrops jararaca antithrombin is more effective in preventing acute inflammation induced by carrageenan when compared to human antithrombin. Hence, the results showed herein suggest that Bothrops jararaca antithrombin can play a key role in the control of acute inflammation and that this molecule might be used as a pharmacological tool and as a prototype for drug development. PMID:25687119

  19. Characterization of the Conformational Alterations, Reduced Anticoagulant Activity, and Enhanced Antiangiogenic Activity of Prelatent Antithrombin*

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Olson, Steven T.

    2008-01-01

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996–12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071–36081), since the 1H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  20. Inherited antithrombin deficiency and end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hara, Tomohiko; Naito, Katsusuke

    2005-11-01

    Antithrombin is a potent inhibitor of the coagulant effect of thrombin. In the latter half of 20th century, many families have been described in which an autosomaly dominant inherited antithrombin deficiency has caused severe venous thromboembolic disease in successive generations. The important complication is severe venoocclusive disease by deep venous thrombus. Some inherited antithrombin deficient patients developed renal failure because of fibrin deposition in the kidney glomeruli or renal vein thrombus, and therefore the need for replacement therapy for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Although an inherited antithrombin deficiency with renal failure is rare, prevention against renal failure in such patients, and their renal replacement therapy for ESRD are important. Proteinuria decreases plasma antithrombin level leading to more severe hyper-coagulation state. Therefore early in renal disease, it may be prudent for adaptation of anti-coagulation therapy even if recurrent thrombosis has not occurred. All replacement therapy (hemodialysis, transplantation or peritoneal dialysis) for ESRD are available for such thrombophilic disorders. Anticoagulation agents working without aggravation of antithrombin effects (Argatroban, Nafamostat mesilate etc.) are useful for hemodialysis. The renal allograft recipients with thrombophilia seem to be at risk of developing an acute rejection or other vascular event. Peritoneal dialysis is potentially a good adaptation for such thrombophilic disorders. However which therapy has the best mortality and morbidity outcomes is not clear. Physicians and Surgeons must pay attention to the coagulation state and thrombophilia in ESRD patients, give strong consideration for adequate anti-coagulation therapy and review the best renal replacement modality for each patient.

  1. Is there evidence that fresh frozen plasma is superior to antithrombin administration to treat heparin resistance in cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Beattie, Gwyn W; Jeffrey, Robert R

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was, 'in [patients with heparin resistance] is [treatment with FFP] superior [to antithrombin administration] in [achieving adequate anticoagulation to facilitate safe cardiopulmonary bypass]?' More than 29 papers were found using the reported search, of which six represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Antithrombin (AT) binds to heparin and increases the rate at which it binds to thrombin. The levels of antithrombin in the blood are an important aspect of the heparin dose-response curve. When the activated clotting time (ACT) fails to reach a target >480, this is commonly defined as heparin resistance (HR). Heparin resistance is usually treated with a combination of supplementary heparin, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or antithrombin III concentrate. There is a paucity of evidence on the treatment of heparin resistance with FFP, with only five studies identified, including one retrospective study, one in vitro trial and three case reports. AT has been studied more extensively with multiple studies, including a crossover trial comparing AT to supplemental heparin and a multicentre, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Antithrombin (AT) concentrate is a safe and efficient treatment for heparin resistance to elevate the activated clotting time (ACT). It avoids the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), volume overload, intraoperative time delay and viral or vCJD transmission. Antithrombin concentrates are more expensive than fresh frozen plasma and may put patients at risk of heparin rebound in the early postoperative period. Patients treated with AT have a lower risk of further FFP transfusions during their stay in hospital. We conclude that the treatment of

  2. [Antithrombin resistance: a new mechanism of inherited thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito; Takagi, Akira; Murata, Moe; Takagi, Yuki

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a multifactorial disease resulting from complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors. To date, numerous genetic defects have been found in families with hereditary thrombophilia, but there may still be many undiscovered causative gene mutations. We investigated a possible causative gene defect in a large Japanese family with inherited thrombophilia, and found a novel missense mutation in the prothrombin gene (p.Arg596Leu) resulting in a variant prothrombin (prothrombin Yukuhashi). The mutant prothrombin had moderately lower activity than wild type prothrombin in clotting assays, but formation of the thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex was substantially impaired resulting in prolonged thrombin activity. A thrombin generation assay revealed that the peak activity of the mutant prothrombin was fairly low, but its inactivation was extremely slow in reconstituted plasma. The Leu596 substitution caused a gain-of-function mutation in the prothrombin gene, resulting in resistance to antithrombin and susceptibility to thrombosis. We also showed the effects of the prothrombin Yukuhashi mutation on the thrombomodulin-protein C anticoagulation system, recent development of a laboratory test detecting antithrombin resistance in plasma, and another antithrombin resistant mutation found in other thrombophilia families. PMID:26256872

  3. Thrombectomy and Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Combined With Antithrombin Concentrate for Treatment of Antithrombin Deficiency Complicated by Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis That Is Refractory to Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Maeba, Hirofumi; Seno, Takeshi; Shiojima, Ichiro

    2016-09-28

    A 22-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with deep vein thrombosis that was complicated by antithrombin deficiency. This deficiency was refractory to anticoagulation therapy. Although catheter-directed thrombolysis could not reperfuse the total occlusion in the left deep vein, a combination of thrombectomy, catheter-directed thrombolysis, and antithrombin concentrate treatment was able to dissolve the clots and ameliorate the blood flow into the left deep vein. Antithrombin concentrate administration would be effective in the treatment of antithrombin deficiency with medical refractory deep vein thrombosis.

  4. Inherited antithrombin deficiency and anabolic steroids: a risky combination.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hannah; Elfil, Mohamed; DeSancho, Maria T

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old male with asymptomatic inherited type 1 antithrombin deficiency and a family history of thrombosis started injecting himself with testosterone 250 mg intramuscularly twice weekly for 5 weeks. He presented to the hospital with progressive dyspnea on exertion, chest pain and hemoptysis. Workup revealed bilateral submassive pulmonary embolism and proximal right lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. He was treated with intravenous (IV) unfractionated heparin and underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase to the main pulmonary arteries. Postprocedure, he remained on IV alteplase infusion for 24 h and unfractionated heparin in the intensive care unit. Concomitantly he received plasma-derived antithrombin concentrate. He was transitioned to subcutaneous enoxaparin twice daily and discharged from the hospital on oral rivaroxaban 15 mg twice a day. This case highlights the heightened thrombogenic effect of anabolic steroids in the setting of underlying thrombophilia especially in younger subjects.

  5. Inherited antithrombin deficiency and anabolic steroids: a risky combination.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hannah; Elfil, Mohamed; DeSancho, Maria T

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old male with asymptomatic inherited type 1 antithrombin deficiency and a family history of thrombosis started injecting himself with testosterone 250 mg intramuscularly twice weekly for 5 weeks. He presented to the hospital with progressive dyspnea on exertion, chest pain and hemoptysis. Workup revealed bilateral submassive pulmonary embolism and proximal right lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. He was treated with intravenous (IV) unfractionated heparin and underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase to the main pulmonary arteries. Postprocedure, he remained on IV alteplase infusion for 24 h and unfractionated heparin in the intensive care unit. Concomitantly he received plasma-derived antithrombin concentrate. He was transitioned to subcutaneous enoxaparin twice daily and discharged from the hospital on oral rivaroxaban 15 mg twice a day. This case highlights the heightened thrombogenic effect of anabolic steroids in the setting of underlying thrombophilia especially in younger subjects. PMID:26588446

  6. Hydration effects of heparin on antithrombin probed by osmotic stress.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Maria P; Liang, Jie; Luba, James

    2002-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of blood coagulation proteases and a prototype metastable protein. Heparin binding to antithrombin induces conformational transitions distal to the binding site. We applied osmotic stress techniques and rate measurements in the stopped flow fluorometer to investigate the possibility that hydration changes are associated with these transitions. Water transfer was identified from changes in the free energy of activation, Delta G(++), with osmotic pressure pi. The Delta G(++) was determined from the rate of fluorescence enhancement/decrease associated with heparin binding/release. The volume of water transferred, Delta V, was determined from the relationship, Delta G/pi = Delta V. With an osmotic probe of 4 A radius, the volumes transferred correspond to 158 +/- 11 water molecules from reactants to bulk during association and 162 +/- 22 from bulk to reactants during dissociation. Analytical characterization of water-permeable volumes in x-ray-derived bound and free antithrombin structures were correlated with the volumes measured in solution. Volume changes in water permeable pockets were identified at the loop-insertion and heparin-binding regions. Analyses of the pockets' atomic composition indicate that residues Ser-79, Ala-86, Val-214, Leu-215, Asn-217, Ile-219, and Thr-218 contribute atoms to both the heparin-binding pockets and to the loop-insertion region. These results demonstrate that the increases and decreases in the intrinsic fluorescence of antithrombin during heparin binding and release are linked to dehydration and hydration reactions, respectively. Together with the structural analyses, results also suggest a direct mechanism linking heparin binding/release to loop expulsion/insertion. PMID:11806943

  7. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I.; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  8. Acute mesenteric and aortic thrombosis associated with antithrombin deficiency: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Domenico; Martin, Jeremiah T; Ferneini, Antoine M; De Natale, Ralph W

    2010-04-01

    Antithrombin is a potent inhibitor of the coagulation cascade exerting its primary effects on activated factors X, IX and II. It is the mechanism by which heparin and low-molecular weight heparin cause anti-coagulation. Deficiency of antithrombin presents as a hypercoagulable state, and may result in unexplained deep venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis and systemic embolization.

  9. Identification of Regulatory Mutations in SERPINC1 Affecting Vitamin D Response Elements Associated with Antithrombin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Toderici, Mara; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Padilla, José; Miñano, Antonia; Antón, Ana Isabel; Iniesta, Juan Antonio; Herranz, María Teresa; Fernández, Nuria; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a crucial anticoagulant serpin whose even moderate deficiency significantly increases the risk of thrombosis. Most cases with antithrombin deficiency carried genetic defects affecting exons or flanking regions of SERPINC1.We aimed to identify regulatory mutations inSERPINC1 through sequencing the promoter, intron 1 and 2 of this gene in 23 patients with antithrombin deficiency but without known genetic defects. Three cases with moderate antithrombin deficiency (63–78%) carried potential regulatory mutations. One located 200 bp before the initiation ATG and two in intron 1. These mutations disrupted two out of five potential vitamin D receptor elements (VDRE) identified in SERPINC1 with different software. One genetic defect, c.42-1060_-1057dupTTGA, was a new low prevalent polymorphism (MAF: 0.01) with functional consequences on plasma antithrombin levels. The relevance of the vitamin D pathway on the regulation of SERPINC1 was confirmed in a cell model. Incubation of HepG2 with paricalcitol, a vitamin D analog, increased dose-dependently the levels of SERPINC1transcripts and antithrombin released to the conditioned medium. This study shows further evidence of the transcriptional regulation of SERPINC1 by vitamin D and first describes the functional and pathological relevance of mutations affecting VDRE of this gene. Our study opens new perspectives in the search of new genetic defects involved in antithrombin deficiency and the risk of thrombosis as well as in the design of new antithrombotic treatments. PMID:27003919

  10. Importance of lysine 125 for heparin binding and activation of antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Desai, Umesh R; Bock, Susan C; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T; Björk, Ingemar

    2002-04-16

    The anticoagulant sulfated polysaccharide, heparin, binds to the plasma coagulation proteinase inhibitor, antithrombin, and activates it by a conformational change that results in a greatly increased rate of inhibition of target proteinases. Lys125 of antithrombin has previously been implicated in this binding by chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis and by the crystal structure of a complex between antithrombin and a pentasaccharide constituting the antithrombin-binding region of heparin. Replacement of Lys125 with Met or Gln in this work reduced the affinity of antithrombin for full-length heparin or the pentasaccharide by 150-600-fold at I = 0.15, corresponding to a loss of 25-33% of the total binding energy. The affinity decrease was due both to disruption of approximately three ionic interactions, indicating that Lys125 and two other basic residues of antithrombin act cooperatively in binding to heparin, and to weakened nonionic interactions. The mutations caused a 10-17-fold decrease in the affinity of the initial, weak binding step of the two-step mechanism of heparin binding to antithrombin. They also increased the reverse rate constant of the second, conformational change step by 10-50-fold. Lys125 is thus a major heparin-binding residue of antithrombin, contributing an amount of binding energy comparable to that of Arg129, but less energy than Lys114. It is the first residue identified so far that has a critical role in the initial recognition of heparin by antithrombin, but also appreciably stabilizes the heparin-induced activated state of the inhibitor. These effects are exerted by interactions of Lys125 with the nonreducing end of the heparin pentasaccharide. PMID:11939772

  11. Heparin Dodecasaccharide Containing Two Antithrombin-binding Pentasaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Viskov, Christian; Elli, Stefano; Urso, Elena; Gaudesi, Davide; Mourier, Pierre; Herman, Frederic; Boudier, Christian; Casu, Benito; Torri, Giangiacomo; Guerrini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The antithrombin (AT) binding properties of heparin and low molecular weight heparins are strongly associated to the presence of the pentasaccharide sequence AGA*IA (ANAc,6S-GlcUA-ANS,3,6S-I2S-ANS,6S). By using the highly chemoselective depolymerization to prepare new ultra low molecular weight heparin and coupling it with the original separation techniques, it was possible to isolate a polysaccharide with a biosynthetically unexpected structure and excellent antithrombotic properties. It consisted of a dodecasaccharide containing an unsaturated uronate unit at the nonreducing end and two contiguous AT-binding sequences separated by a nonsulfated iduronate residue. This novel oligosaccharide was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and its binding with AT was determined by fluorescence titration, NMR, and LC-MS. The dodecasaccharide displayed a significantly increased anti-FXa activity compared with those of the pentasaccharide, fondaparinux, and low molecular weight heparin enoxaparin. PMID:23843463

  12. [Discovery and prospects of a novel thrombophilia: antithrombin resistance].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuki; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2014-07-01

    Pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) known to be complex and multifactorial process involves the interaction of acquired factors and genetic predisposing conditions. Deficiency of natural anticoagulant factors such as antithrombin (AT), protein C and protein S increases the risk of a VTE. Recently, we have reported novel mechanism of hereditary thrombosis in a Japanese family, in which AT resistance was associated with a missense mutation (p.Arg596Leu) in the prothrombin gene named prothrombin Yukuhashi. The mutant thrombin showed a low clotting activity, but a severely impaired inactivation by AT, resulting in a susceptibility to thrombosis. We have developed a new laboratory test to evaluate AT resistance in plasma. Prothrombin mutation causing AT resistance has found in Caucasian, not only in Japanese. PMID:25163329

  13. Clinical review: molecular mechanisms underlying the role of antithrombin in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Christian J

    2006-02-01

    In disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) there is extensive crosstalk between activation of inflammation and coagulation. Endogenous anticoagulatory pathways are downregulated by inflammation, thus decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. Supportive strategies aimed at inhibiting activation of coagulation and inflammation may theoretically be justified and have been found to be beneficial in experimental and initial clinical studies. This review assembles the available experimental and clinical data on biological mechanisms of antithrombin in inflammatory coagulation activation. Preclinical research has demonstrated partial interference of heparin--administered even at low doses--with the therapeutic effects of antithrombin, and has confirmed--at the level of cellular mechanisms--a regulatory role for antithrombin in DIC. Against this biological background, re-analyses of data from randomized controlled trials of antithrombin in sepsis suggest that antithrombin has the potential to be developed further as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of DIC. Even though there is a lack of studies employing satisfactory methodology, the results of investigations conducted thus far into the mechanisms of action of antithrombin allow one to infer that there is biological plausibility in the value of this agent. Final assessment of the drug's effectiveness, however, must await the availability of positive, prospective, randomized and placebo-controlled studies. PMID:16542481

  14. Detection of conformational transformation of antithrombin in blood with crossed immunoelectrophoresis: new application for a classical method.

    PubMed

    Corral, Javier; Rivera, José; Martínez, Constantino; González-Conejero, Rocio; Miñano, Antonia; Vicente, Vicente

    2003-11-01

    The structural flexibility of antithrombin is essential for its molecular trapping mechanism but also makes it vulnerable to even minor changes affecting its conformational stability, which influences hemostasis significantly. The conformational transformation of this serpin has been poorly investigated in biologic samples because available immunologic methods hardly differentiate between different conformations of this protein. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) in presence of heparin has been classically used to identify mutant antithrombins with low heparin affinity. We demonstrate that this method also separates native and relaxed antithrombin, permitting the analysis of conformational variations of this potent anticoagulant with just a few microliters of plasma. However, CIE does not distinguish between antithrombin conformations with reduced heparin affinity: latent, cleaved, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, or heparin-binding mutants. Therefore, clinical interpretation of CIE results should be examined with caution. Using this and other methods, and evaluating the functional activity of antithrombin, we analyzed the conformational transformation of antithrombin in biologic samples. We confirmed its transformation to the latent configuration by incubating it at 50 degrees C. This conformational change also occurs at 37 degrees C, supporting the idea that this process is involved in the senescence of antithrombin. However, fresh plasma contains only traces of latent antithrombin, suggesting that this conformation is rapidly cleared in vivo. Finally, small increases in temperature (to 40 degrees C) resulted in a faster conformational transformation of antithrombin. Fever has been suggested to have key structural, functional, and clinical consequences in patients with conformational mutations in antithrombin. Our results support a role for small changes in temperature in nonmutated antithrombin, suggesting that fever is a general risk factor for thrombosis.

  15. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  16. Supplemental dose of antithrombin use in disseminated intravascular coagulation patients after abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Takashi; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-08-31

    The effectiveness of supplemental dose antithrombin administration (1,500 to 3,000 IU/ day) for patients with sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), especially sepsis due to abdominal origin, remains uncertain. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with mechanically ventilated septic shock and DIC after emergency surgery for perforation of the lower intestinal tract using a nationwide administrative database, Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination inpatient database. A total of 2,164 patients treated at 612 hospitals during the 33-month study period between 2010 and 2013 were divided into an antithrombin group (n=1,021) and a control group (n=1,143), from which 518 propensity score-matched pairs were generated. Although there was no significant 28-day mortality difference between the two groups in the unmatched groups (control vs antithrombin: 25.7 vs 22.9 %; difference, 2.8 %; 95 % confidence interval [CI], -0.8-6.4), a significant difference existed between the two groups in propensity-score weighted groups (26.3 vs 21.7 %; difference, 4.6 %; 95 % CI, 2.0-7.1) and propensity-score matched groups (27.6 vs 19.9 %; difference, 7.7 %; 95 % CI, 2.5-12.9). Logistic regression analyses showed a significant association between antithrombin use and lower 28-day mortality in propensity-matched groups (odds ratio, 0.65; 95 % CI, 0.49-0.87). Analysis using the hospital antithrombin-prescribing rate as an instrumental variable showed that receipt of antithrombin was associated with a 6.5 % (95 % CI, 0.05-13.0) reduction in 28-day mortality. Supplemental dose of antithrombin administration may be associated with reduced 28-day mortality in sepsis-associated DIC patients after emergency laparotomy for intestinal perforation.

  17. Thromboembolic disease due to thermolabile conformational changes of antithrombin Rouen-VI (187 Asn-->Asp)

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, D; Perry, D J; Borg, J Y; Carrell, R W; Wardell, M R

    1994-01-01

    A new variant of antithrombin (Rouen-VI, 187 Asn-->Asp) with increased heparin affinity was shown to have normal inhibitory activity which decreased slowly at 4 degrees C and rapidly at 41 degrees C. On electrophoresis the freshly isolated variant had an anodal shift relative to native antithrombin due to the mutation. A further anodal transition occurred after either prolonged storage at 4 degrees C or incubation at 41 degrees C due to the formation of a new inactive uncleaved component with properties characteristic of L-form (latent) antithrombin. At the same time, polymerization also occurred with a predominance of di-, tri-, and tetra-mers. These findings fit with the observed mutation of the conserved asparagine (187) in the F-helix destabilizing the underlying A-sheet of the molecule. Evidence of A-sheet perturbation is provided by the increased rate of peptide insertion into the A-sheet and by the decreased vulnerability of the reactive loop to proteolysis. The spontaneous formation of both L-antithrombin and polymers is consistent with our crystal structure of intact antithrombin where L-form and active antithrombin are linked together as dimers. The nature of this linkage favors a mechanism of polymerization whereby the opening of the A-sheet, to give incorporation of the reactive center loop, is accompanied by the bonding of the loop of one molecule to the C-sheet of the next. The accelerated lability of antithrombin Rouen-VI at 41 versus 37 degrees C provides an explanation for the clinical observation that episodes of thrombosis were preceded by unrelated pyrexias. Images PMID:7989582

  18. A heparin binding site Arg79Cys missense mutation in the SERPINC1 gene in a Korean patient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong-Ha; Maeng, Ho-Young; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Kyung-A; Choi, Jong-Rak; Song, Jaewoo

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of heparin binding site Arg79Cys mutation in the gene encoding antithrombin, SERPINC1, in a Korean patient with hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency. The patient was a 34-year-old Korean man who presented with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in his right leg without precipitating factors. On outpatient evaluation, coagulation tests without anticoagulation revealed a decreased AT III activity level at 48%, but normal AT III antigen level at 103%, indicating type II AT deficiency. Family studies revealed that his father (62 years of age) had decreased AT activity (48%) but had normal AT antigen levels (116%), indicating that the proband had a paternally inherited type II AT deficiency. Direct sequencing of the SERPINC1 gene in the patient and his father revealed a heterozygotic missense mutation, a cytosine to thymine substitution at nucleotide position 235 in exon 2 of the SERPINC1 gene (p.Arg79Cys). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Arg79Cys heterozygote mutation in family members with venous thromboembolism.

  19. Molecular basis of antithrombin deficiency in four Japanese patients with antithrombin gene abnormalities including two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Kyotani, Mayu; Okumura, Kaoru; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Yamamoto, Koji; Matsushita, Tadashi; Sugimura, Motoi; Kanayama, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2007-08-01

    We analyzed the antithrombin (AT) gene in four unrelated Japanese patients with an AT deficiency, and individually identified four distinct mutations in the heterozygous state. There were two novel mutations, 2417delT leading to a frameshift with a premature termination at amino acid -3 (FS-3Stop) and C2640T resulting in a missense mutation (Ala59Val). Previously reported mutations, T5342C (Ser116Pro) and T72C (Met-32Thr), were also found in the other two patients. To understand the molecular basis responsible for the AT deficiency in these patients, in vitro expression experiments were performed using HEK293 cells transfected with either wild type or respective mutant AT expression vector. We found that -3Stop-AT and -32Thr-AT were not secreted into the culture media, whereas 116Pro-AT and 59Val-AT were secreted normally. We further studied the heparin cofactor activity and the binding to heparin of each recombinant AT molecule. Ser116Pro mutation significantly impaired the binding affinity to heparin resulting in a reduced heparin cofactor activity. In contrast, we found that Ala59Val mutant AT unexpectedly showed a normal affinity to heparin, but severely impaired the heparin cofactor activity. Our findings suggested that FS-3Stop and Met-32Thr mutations are responsible for type I AT deficiency, whereas Ser116Pro and Ala59Val mutations contribute to type II AT deficiency, confirming that there were diverse molecular mechanisms of AT deficiency depend upon discrete AT gene abnormalities as reported previously.

  20. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P < 0.0001). In DVT patients, eight cases were identified as primary antithrombin deficiency, accounting for an incidence of 6.7%. No significant difference was found for antithrombin activity between cerebral infarction group and controls. These results suggest that antithrombin Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  1. Electrostatic interactions in the heparin-enhanced reaction between human thrombin and antithrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, L C; Jørgensen, M

    1983-01-01

    Binding of heparin to thrombin is monitored by means of an aqueous two-phase partition system, and binding of heparin to antithrombin is monitored by means of heparin induced enhancement of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein. Both types of binding are studied at various electrolyte compositions of the medium. Heparin is displaced from thrombin at lower concentrations of electrolyte than those necessary for its displacement from antithrombin. K+ is more efficient than Na+, which is again more efficient than Li+ in displacing heparin from these proteins. The kinetics of the reaction between thrombin and antithrombin in the presence of heparin were studied by using an assay where synthetic peptide substrate is present in the reaction mixture during the reaction between proteinase and inhibitor. The kinetics are studied at various electrolyte compositions of the medium and the results are compared with those obtained from the binding studies performed under similar conditions. The results are consistent with a model where binding of heparin to antithrombin causes enhancement of the reaction rate, and where this enhancement is abolished again when additional binding of heparin to thrombin takes place on further addition of heparin. PMID:6870832

  2. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  3. Inhibition of thrombin generation in plasma by fibrin formation (Antithrombin I).

    PubMed

    de Bosch, N B; Mosesson, M W; Ruiz-Sáez, A; Echenagucia, M; Rodriguez-Lemoin, A

    2002-08-01

    The adsorption of thrombin to fibrin during clotting defines "Antithrombin I" activity. We confirmed that thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or in Reptilase defibrinated normal plasma was higher than in normal plasma. Repletion of these fibrinogen-deficient plasmas with fibrinogen 1 (gamma A/gamma A), whose fibrin has two "low affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding sites, resulted in moderately reduced thrombin generation by 29-37%. Repletion with fibrinogen 2 (gamma'/gamma A), which in addition to low affinity thrombin-binding sites in fibrin, has a "high affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding site in the carboxy-terminal region of its gamma' chain, was even more effective and reduced thrombin generation by 57-67%. Adding peptides that compete for thrombin binding to fibrin [S-Hir53-64 (hirugen) or gamma'414-427] caused a transient delay in the onset of otherwise robust thrombin generation, indicating that fibrin formation is necessary for full expression of Antithrombin I activity. Considered together, 1) the increased thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or fibrinogen-depleted normal plasma that is mitigated by fibrinogen replacement; 2) evidence that prothrombin activation is increased in afibrinogenemia and normalized by fibrinogen replacement; 3) the severe thrombophilia that is associated with defective thrombin-binding in dysfibrinogenemias Naples I and New York I, and 4) the association of afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia with venous or arterial thromboembolism, indicate that Antithrombin I (fibrin) modulates thromboembolic potential by inhibiting thrombin generation in blood.

  4. Heparin coating durability on artificial heart valves studied by XPS and antithrombin binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, E M E; Larsson, R; Sánchez, J; Rensmo, H; Gelius, U; Siegbahn, H

    2006-04-15

    The durability and functionality of a heparin coating on artificial heart valve leaflets were evaluated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by the coatings' capacity to bind antithrombin. Current methods for accelerated life-time testing are based on exposing leaflets to water solutions. In this paper a method is explored, in which heart valve leaflets were exposed to a continuous high shear rate (4 L/min) of human citrated plasma. It was found that the heparin coating was stable and wear resistant enough to still be present after 3 weeks and to have about the same antithrombin uptake as coatings not exposed to circulating plasma. It was, however, partly destroyed by the test as found using XPS. We suggest that heparin chains from the upper layer of heparin have been torn off from the carrier chain, in combination with loss of heparin conjugate and plasma deposition in patches. This study showed that XPS provides additional information to biological measurements such as antithrombin uptake. XPS is therefore a valuable technique not only to characterize biomaterials but also to evaluate the effect of a performance test.

  5. Synthesis of heparin fragments. A chemical synthesis of the pentasaccharide O-(2-deoxy-2-sulfamido-6-O-sulfo-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-4 )-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyluronic acid)-(1-4)-O-(2-deoxy-2-sulfamido-3,6-di-O-sulfo-alpha-D-glu copyranosyl)-(1-4)-O-(2-O-sulfo-alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid)-(1-4)-2-deoxy-2-sulfamido-6-O-sulfo-D-glucopyranose decasodium salt, a heparin fragment having high affinity for antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Petitou, M; Duchaussoy, P; Lederman, I; Choay, J; Sinaÿ, P; Jacquinet, J C; Torri, G

    1986-03-15

    -(beta-D-glucopyranosyluronic acid)-(1----4)-O-(2-deoxy-2-sulfamido-3,6-di-O-sulfo-alpha-D-gl ucopyranosyl)-(1----4)-O-(2-O-sulfo-alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic+ ++ acid)-(1----4)-2-deoxy-2-sulfamido-6-O-sulfo-D-glucopyranose. This synthetic pentasaccharide binds to antithrombin III with an association constant similar to that of high-affinity heparin and elicits a potent anti-factor Xa activity in plasma. PMID:3708627

  6. Recombinant human antithrombin expressed in the milk of non-transgenic goats exhibits high efficiency on rat DIC model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai; Li, Qing-Wang; Han, Zeng-Sheng; Hu, Jian-Hong; Li, Wen-Ye; Liu, Zhi-Bin

    2009-11-01

    Plasma-derived antithrombin (pAT) is often used for the treatments of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) patients. In this paper, the recombinant adenovirus vector encoding human antithrombin (AT) cDNA was constructed and directly infused into the mammary gland of two goats. The recombinant human antithrombin (rhAT) was purified by heparin affinity chromatography from the goat milk, and then used in the treatment of thirty lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced DIC rats. A high expression level of rhAT up to 2.8 g/l was obtained in the milk of goats. After purification, the recovery rate and the purity of the rhAT were up to 54.7 +/- 3.2% and 96.2 +/- 2.7%, respectively. In blood of the DIC rat model treated with rhAT, the levels of antithrombin and thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) were augmented significantly; meanwhile the consumption of fibrinogen and platelet was reduced significantly, and the increase of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentration was restrained modest and non-significant. For the above DIC indexes, there were no differences between pAT and rhAT (P > 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the way we established is a pragmatic tool for large-scale production of rhAT, and the rhAT produced with this method has potential as a substitute for pAT in the therapy of DIC patients.

  7. Lysine 114 of antithrombin is of crucial importance for the affinity and kinetics of heparin pentasaccharide binding.

    PubMed

    Arocas, V; Bock, S C; Raja, S; Olson, S T; Bjork, I

    2001-11-23

    Lys(114) of the plasma coagulation proteinase inhibitor, antithrombin, has been implicated in binding of the glycosaminoglycan activator, heparin, by previous mutagenesis studies and by the crystal structure of antithrombin in complex with the active pentasaccharide unit of heparin. In the present work, substitution of Lys(114) by Ala or Met was shown to decrease the affinity of antithrombin for heparin and the pentasaccharide by approximately 10(5)-fold at I 0.15, corresponding to a reduction in binding energy of approximately 50%. The decrease in affinity was due to the loss of two to three ionic interactions, consistent with Lys(114) and at least one other basic residue of the inhibitor binding cooperatively to heparin, as well as to substantial nonionic interactions. The mutation minimally affected the initial, weak binding of the two-step mechanism of pentasaccharide binding to antithrombin but appreciably (>40-fold) decreased the forward rate constant of the conformational change in the second step and greatly (>1000-fold) increased the reverse rate constant of this step. Lys(114) is thus of greater importance for the affinity of heparin binding than any of the other antithrombin residues investigated so far, viz. Arg(47), Lys(125), and Arg(129). It contributes more than Arg(47) and Arg(129) to increasing the rate of induction of the activating conformational change, a role presumably exerted by interactions with the nonreducing end trisaccharide unit of the heparin pentasaccharide. However, its major effect, also larger than that of these two residues, is in maintaining antithrombin in the activated state by interactions that most likely involve the reducing end disaccharide unit. PMID:11567021

  8. The signature 3-O-sulfo group of the anticoagulant heparin sequence is critical for heparin binding to antithrombin but is not required for allosteric activation.

    PubMed

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Olson, Steven T

    2009-10-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans allosterically activate the serpin, antithrombin, by binding through a specific pentasaccharide sequence containing a critical 3-O-sulfo group. To elucidate the role of the 3-O-sulfo group in the activation mechanism, we compared the effects of deleting the 3-O-sulfo group or mutating the Lys(114) binding partner of this group on antithrombin-pentasaccharide interactions by equilibrium binding and rapid kinetic analyses. Binding studies over a wide range of ionic strength and pH showed that loss of the 3-O-sulfo group caused a massive approximately 60% loss in binding energy for the antithrombin-pentasaccharide interaction due to the disruption of a cooperative network of ionic and nonionic interactions. Despite this affinity loss, the 3-O-desulfonated pentasaccharide retained the ability to induce tryptophan fluorescence changes and to enhance factor Xa reactivity in antithrombin, indicative of normal conformational activation. Rapid kinetic studies showed that loss of the 3-O-sulfo group affected both the ability of the pentasaccharide to recognize native antithrombin and its ability to preferentially bind and stabilize activated antithrombin. By contrast, mutation of Lys(114) solely affected the preferential interaction of the pentasaccharide with activated antithrombin. These findings demonstrate that the 3-O-sulfo group functions as a key determinant of heparin pentasaccharide activation of antithrombin both by contributing to the Lys(114)-independent recognition of native antithrombin and by triggering a Lys(114)-dependent induced fit interaction with activated antithrombin that locks the serpin in the activated state. PMID:19661062

  9. Effect of rabbit thrombomodulin on thrombin inhibition by antithrombin in the presence of heparin.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M C

    1989-04-01

    Thrombomodulin acts as a cofactor for protein C activation by thrombin (PC activation cofactor activity) and inhibits thrombin-induced fibrinogen clotting (direct anticoagulant activity). In addition, rabbit thrombomodulin has been shown to promote thrombin inactivation by antithrombin (AT-dependent anticoagulant activity). However, a non-acidic form (i.e. non-retarded on ion-exchange chromatography) of thrombomodulin generated by limited proteolysis retained only the PC activation cofactor activity. The acidic form (retarded on ion-exchange chromatography) of thrombomodulin is now shown to prevent the rapid inactivation of thrombin by antithrombin in the presence of heparin, presumably by preventing the formation of the ternary thrombin-AT-heparin complex. This effect was not observed with non-acidic thrombomodulin. When submitted to chondroitinase digestion, thrombomodulin was converted into an essentially non-acidic form that lacked both the AT-dependent and the direct anticoagulant activities but showed a PC activation cofactor function indistinguishable from that of native thrombomodulin. This chondroitinase-digested form did not prevent the catalytic effect of heparin on the inhibition of thrombin by AT. It is concluded that the acidic domain of rabbit thrombomodulin, a chondroitin (dermatan) sulfate glycosaminoglycan, interacts with a site of the thrombin molecule that is not involved in the protein C activation cofactor function, but is essential to the cleavage of fibrinogen or binding of heparin.

  10. Hypersulfated low molecular weight heparin with reduced affinity for antithrombin acts as an anticoagulant by inhibiting intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J A; Fredenburgh, J C; Stafford, A R; Guo, Y S; Hirsh, J; Ghazarossian, V; Weitz, J I

    2001-03-30

    In buffer systems, heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) directly inhibit the intrinsic factor X-activating complex (intrinsic tenase) but have no effect on the prothrombin-activating complex (prothrombinase). Although chemical modification of LMWH, to lower its affinity for antithrombin (LA-LMWH) has no effect on its ability to inhibit intrinsic tenase, N-desulfation of LMWH reduces its activity 12-fold. To further explore the role of sulfation, hypersulfated LA-LMWH was synthesized (sLA-LMWH). sLA-LMWH is not only a 32-fold more potent inhibitor of intrinsic tenase than LA-LMWH; it also acquires prothrombinase inhibitory activity. A direct correlation between the extent of sulfation of LA-LMWH and its inhibitory activity against intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase is observed. In plasma-based assays of tenase and prothrombinase, sLA-LMWH produces similar prolongation of clotting times in plasma depleted of antithrombin and/or heparin cofactor II as it does in control plasma. In contrast, heparin has no effect in antithrombin-depleted plasma. When the effect of sLA-LMWH on various components of tenase and prothrombinase was examined, its inhibitory activity was found to be cofactor-dependent (factors Va and VIIIa) and phospholipid-independent. These studies reveal that sLA-LMWH acts as a potent antithrombin-independent inhibitor of coagulation by attenuating intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase.

  11. Dynamic properties of the native free antithrombin from molecular dynamics simulations: computational evidence for solvent- exposed Arg393 side chain.

    PubMed

    Tóth, László; Fekete, Attila; Balogh, Gábor; Bereczky, Zsuzsanna; Komáromi, István

    2015-09-01

    While antithrombin (AT) has small basal inhibitory activity, it reaches its full inhibitory potential against activated blood coagulation factors, FXa, FIXa, and FIIa (thrombin), via an allosteric and/or template (bridging) mechanism by the action of heparin, heparan sulfate, or heparin-mimetic pentasaccharides (PS). From the numerous X-ray structures available for different conformational states of AT, only indirect and incomplete conclusions can be drawn on the inherently dynamic properties of AT. As a typical example, the basal inhibitory activity of AT cannot be interpreted on the basis of "non-activated" free antithrombin X-ray structures since the Arg393 side chain, playing crucial role in antithrombin-proteinase interaction, is not exposed. In order to reveal the intrinsic dynamic properties and the reason of basal inhibitory activity of antithrombin, 2 μs molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on its native free-forms. It was shown from the simulation trajectories that the reactive center loop which is functioning as "bait" for proteases, even without any biasing potential can populate conformational state in which the Arg393 side chain is solvent exposed. It is revealed from the trajectory analysis that the peptide sequences correspond to the helix D extension, and new helix P formation can be featured with especially large root-mean-square fluctuations. Mutual information analyses of the trajectory showed remarkable (generalized) correlation between those regions of antithrombin which changed their conformations as the consequence of AT-PS complex formation. This suggests that allosteric information propagation pathways are present even in the non-activated native form of AT. PMID:25483839

  12. Antithrombin acts as a negative acute phase protein as established with studies on HepG2 cells and in baboons.

    PubMed

    Niessen, R W; Lamping, R J; Jansen, P M; Prins, M H; Peters, M; Taylor, F B; de Vijlder, J J; ten Cate, J W; Hack, C E; Sturk, A

    1997-09-01

    Patients with sepsis or after major surgery have decreased plasma levels of the anticoagulant protein antithrombin. In such patients elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) are present and this interleukin is known to induce positive and negative acute phase responses. To investigate the possibility that antithrombin acts as a negative acute phase response-protein we performed studies on the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 in vitro and baboons in vivo. HepG2 cells were treated with recombinant human IL-6, IL-1beta, or combinations of the latter two, and tested for production of antithrombin, fibrinogen and prealbumin (transthyretin). This treatment resulted in a dose dependent increase in fibrinogen concentration (with a maximum effect of 2.8-2.9-fold) and a dose dependent decrease in prealbumin (with a maximum effect of 0.6-0.7-fold) and antithrombin concentrations (with a maximum effect of 0.6-0.8-fold). Simultaneous treatment of the HepG2 cells with IL-6 (1,000 pg/ml or 2,500 pg/ml) and IL-1beta (25 pg/ml), provided more extensively decreased prealbumin (0.8 and 0.6-fold, respectively) and antithrombin concentration (0.7 and 0.6-fold, respectively) compared to the single interleukin treatment at these concentrations. Baboons treated with 2 microg IL-6 x kg body-weight(-1) x day(-1) showed increased plasma CRP levels (59-fold, p <0.05) and decreased prealbumin (0.9-fold, p <0.05) and antithrombin (0.8-fold, p <0.05) plasma levels, without evidence for coagulation activation. Our results indicate that antithrombin acts as a negative acute phase protein, which may contribute to the decreased antithrombin plasma levels observed after major surgery or in sepsis.

  13. High prevalence of protein C, protein S, antithrombin deficiency, and Factor V Leiden mutation as a cause of hereditary thrombophilia in patients of venous thromboembolism and cerebrovascular accident

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nadir; Ayyub, Muhammad; Khan, Saleem Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of Protein C, Protein S (PC & PS), antithrombin deficiency (AT III) and Factor V Leiden mutation (FVL) as a cause of thrombophilia in the patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) and cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Methods: It was an observational study conducted at Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, Pakistan. All patients referred for thrombophilia screening from July 2009 to June 2012 were screened. Patients with evidence of VTE or CVA were screened for PC & PS, AT III deficiency, and FVL. Results: Total 404 patients of age between 1-71 years mean 33 ± 14 with male to female ratio of 2.4:1 had evidence of thrombophilia. Two hundred eighteen (54%) patients presented with CVA, 116 (29%) with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), 42 (10.5%) with pulmonary embolism (PE), and 28 (7.5%) with portal or mesenteric vein thrombosis (PV). Protein C & S deficiency was detected in 35/404 (8.7%), ATIII in 9/404 (2%), and FVL in 25/173 patients (14.5%). The findings were suggestive of a significant association of FVL mutation for developing DVT (OR=11.0, 95% C I 4.6-26.3), CVA (OR=5.7, 95% C I 2.1-15.1), and PV (OR=5.4, 95% C I 1.3-21.9). PC & PS deficiency was a significant risk factor for developing PE (OR=3, 95% C I 0.8-11.4). Conclusion: FVL mutation and Protein C & S are the leading causes of thrombophilia with strong association of Factor V Leiden mutation as risk for developing DVT. PMID:25674132

  14. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  15. A recurrent deletion in the antithrombin gene, AT106-108(-6 bp), identified by DNA heteroduplex detection

    SciTech Connect

    Olds, R.J.; Thein, S.L. ); Lane, D.A. ); Beresford, C.H.; Hughes, P.M. ); Abildgaard, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Antithrombin is the major physiological inhibitor of the activated serine proteinases of the coagulation system. Hereditary deficiency of the inhibitor is transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern and is associated with a risk of venous thromboembotic disease in affected individuals. In the classical form of deficiency, type Ia, plasma antithrombin is reduced to approximately half normal in both functional and immunological assays. The authors report here the identification of a recurrent mutation as the basis for type Ia deficiency in two independent kindreds, one from New Zealand and the other from Norway, and demonstrate the utility of DNA heteroduplex detection as a method for screening for the presence of mutations. Standard functional and immunological assays for plasma antithrombin showed levels of approximately half normal in several members of both kindreds, consistent with the classification as type Ia deficiency. The plasma of the proband from the Norwegian kindred was examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis, in the presence or absence of heparin in the first dimension, and an abnormal component that may have represented a variant form of the inhibitor was not identified. In both families affected members have had episodes of venous thrombosis, although some carriers of the abnormal allele, as confirmed in the current study, so far have not had clinical thrombotic disease. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Antithrombin therapy in pancreas retransplantation and pancreas-after-kidney/pancreas-transplantation-alone patients.

    PubMed

    Fertmann, Jan M; Arbogast, Helmut P; Illner, Wolf-Dieter; Tarabichi, Anwar; Dieterle, Christoph; Land, Walter; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hoffmann, Johannes N

    2011-01-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a coagulatory inhibitor with pleiotropic activities. AT reduces ischemia/reperfusion injury and has been successfully used in patients with simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation. This study retrospectively analyzes prophylactic high-dose AT application in patients with solitary pancreas transplantation traditionally related to suboptimal results. In our center, 31 patients received solitary pancreas transplantation between 7/1994 and 7/2005 (pancreas retransplantation, PAK/PTA). The perioperative treatment protocol was modified in 5/2002 now including application of 3000 IU. AT was given intravenously before pancreatic reperfusion (AT, n = 18). Patients receiving standard therapy served as controls (n = 13). Daily blood sampling was performed during five postoperative days. Standard coagulatory parameters and number of transfused red blood cell units were not altered by AT. In AT patients serum amylase (p < 0.01) and lipase (p < 0.01) on postoperative days 1, 2 and 3 were significantly reduced. Our actual perioperative management protocol including high dose AT application in human solitary pancreas transplantation reduced postoperative liberation of pancreatic enzymes in this pilot study. Prophylactic AT application should deserve further clinical testing in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:21999781

  17. Prevention, management and extent of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rogenhofer, Nina; Bohlmann, Michael K; Beuter-Winkler, Petra; Würfel, Wolfgang; Rank, Andreas; Thaler, Christian J; Toth, Bettina

    2014-03-01

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is a rare hereditary thrombophilia with a mean prevalence of 0.02 % in the general population, associated with a more than ten-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Within this multicenter retrospective clinical analysis, female patients with inherited AT deficiency were evaluated concerning the type of inheritance and extent of AT deficiency, medical treatment during pregnancy and postpartally, VTE risk as well as maternal and neonatal outcome. Statistical analysis was performed with SPPS for Windows (19.0). A total of 18 pregnancies in 7 patients were evaluated, including 11 healthy newborns ≥37th gestational weeks (gw), one small for gestational age premature infant (25th gw), two late-pregnancy losses (21st and 28th gw) and four early miscarriages. Despite low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) administration, three VTE occurred during pregnancy and one postpartally. Several adverse pregnancy outcomes occurred including fetal and neonatal death, as well as severe maternal neurologic disorders occurred. Patients with substitution of AT during pregnancy in addition to LMWH showed the best maternal and neonatal outcome. Close monitoring with appropriate anticoagulant treatment including surveillance of AT levels might help to optimize maternal and fetal outcome in patients with hereditary AT deficiency.

  18. European community and US-FDA approval of recombinant human antithrombin produced in genetically altered goats.

    PubMed

    Adiguzel, Cafer; Iqbal, Omer; Demir, Muzaffer; Fareed, Jawed

    2009-12-01

    Thrombin and factor Xa play a central role in thrombogenesis in both medical and surgical patients. Antithrombin (AT) is the key inhibitor, which controls the action of these enzymes in hypercoagulable states. The AT concentrates prepared from human blood have been used to treat patients with thrombotic disorders and heparin resistance. The AT concentrates are prepared from pooled human plasma and beside limited supply, suffer from viral and other biological contaminants. The availability of recombinant human AT (rhAT) obtained from genetically engineered goats provide a biologically equivalent product that can be used in practically all indications where human AT is indicated including heparin resistance. Moreover, because of its high affinity to heparin and related drugs, recombinant AT can also be developed in further indications. On review of the preclinical and clinical data on the safety and efficacy, the European Union and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) have recently approved the use of rhAT in specified clinical indications.

  19. New immunocapture enzyme (ICE) assay for quantification of cancer procoagulant activity: studies of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mielicki, W P; Tagawa, M; Gordon, S G

    1994-04-01

    A new, sensitive and specific immunocapture enzyme (ICE) assay for quantitation of the enzymatic activity of cancer procoagulant (CP) has been developed. The assay had good reproducibility (inter- and intra-assay CV were 6.4% and 5.7% respectively) and was linear for concentrations of CP from 0.5 microgram/ml to 10 micrograms/ml (r2 = 0.995). Using this assay the inhibition of CP by iodoacetamide, mercuric chloride, E-64, leupeptin and antipain was demonstrated. There was no significant effect of cystatin and natural plasma proteinase inhibitors alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, alpha 2-macroglobulin and antithrombin-III/heparin, on the activity of the CP.

  20. [Effect of rabbit thrombomodulin on the inhibition of thrombin by the antithrombin-heparin complex: role of the acid domain of thrombomodulin].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M C

    1987-01-01

    Acidic and non-acidic forms of rabbit thrombomodulin were studied with regard to their effects on the inhibition of thrombin by antithrombin in the presence of exogenous heparin. The non acidic form was obtained by proteolytic cleavage of a polyanionic component (presumably a sulfated polysaccharide) from the parent acidic form of thrombomodulin, and purified by ion-exchange chromatography. It was previously found that the acidic form of thrombomodulin increases the rate of thrombin inactivation by antithrombin. The present study showed that thrombin bound to acidic thrombomodulin was inactivated at a lower rate by antithrombin in the presence of exogenous heparin than was free thrombin or thrombin bound to the non-acidic form of thrombomodulin. The data suggest that the acidic component of thrombomodulin is primarily responsible for the retardation of thrombin-antithrombin complex formation in the presence of exogenous heparin. It is proposed that the polyanionic component of thrombomodulin blocks a site on thrombin required for heparin binding, thus rendering the antithrombin-heparin complex ineffective.

  1. Antithrombin Regulates Matriptase Activity Involved in Plasmin Generation, Syndecan Shedding, and HGF Activation in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Xu, Zhenghong; Baksh, Adrienne N. H.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Swanson, Richard; Olson, Steve T.; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Johnson, Michael D.; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Matriptase, a membrane-associated serine protease, plays an essential role in epidermal barrier function through activation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease prostasin. The matriptase-prostasin proteolytic cascade is tightly regulated by hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 such that matriptase autoactivation and prostasin activation occur simultaneously and are followed immediately by the inhibition of both enzymes by HAI-1. However, the mechanisms whereby matriptase acts on extracellular substrates remain elusive. Here we report that some active matriptase can escape HAI-1 inhibition by being rapidly shed from the cell surface. In the pericellular environment, shed active matriptase is able to activate hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), accelerate plasminogen activation, and shed syndecan 1. The amount of active matriptase shed is inversely correlated with the amount of antithrombin (AT) bound to the surface of the keratinocytes. Binding of AT to the surface of keratinocytes is dependent on a functional heparin binding site, Lys-125, and that the N-glycosylation site Asn-135 be unglycosylated. This suggests that β-AT, and not α-AT, is responsible for regulation of pericellular matriptase activity in keratinocytes. Keratinocytes appear to rely on AT to regulate the level of pericellular active matriptase much more than breast and prostate epithelial cells in which AT regulation of matriptase activity occurs at much lower levels than keratinocytes. These results suggest that keratinocytes employ two distinct serine protease inhibitors to control the activation and processing of two different sets of matriptase substrates leading to different biological events: 1) HAI-1 for prostasin activation/inhibition, and 2) AT for the pericellular proteolysis involved in HGF activation, accelerating plasminogen activation, and shedding of syndecans. PMID:23675430

  2. Antithrombin up-regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signalling during myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yina; Wang, Jinli; Gao, Junjie; Yang, Hui; Wang, Yanqing; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Li, Ji; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2015-02-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a protein of the serpin superfamily involved in regulation of the proteolytic activity of the serine proteases of the coagulation system. AT is known to exhibit anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective properties when it binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on vascular cells. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important cardioprotective role during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R). To determine whether the cardioprotective signaling function of AT is mediated through the AMPK pathway, we evaluated the cardioprotective activities of wild-type AT and its two derivatives, one having high affinity and the other no affinity for heparin, in an acute I/R injury model in C57BL/6J mice in which the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded. The serpin derivatives were given 5 minutes before reperfusion. The results showed that AT-WT can activate AMPK in both in vivo and ex vivo conditions. Blocking AMPK activity abolished the cardioprotective function of AT against I/R injury. The AT derivative having high affinity for heparin was more effective in activating AMPK and in limiting infraction, but the derivative lacking affinity for heparin was inactive in eliciting AMPK-dependent cardioprotective activity. Activation of AMPK by AT inhibited the inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway during I/R. Further studies revealed that the AMPK activity induced by AT also modulates cardiac substrate metabolism by increasing glucose oxidation but inhibiting fatty acid oxidation during I/R. These results suggest that AT binds to HSPGs on heart tissues to invoke a cardioprotective function by triggering cardiac AMPK activation, thereby attenuating JNK inflammatory signalling pathways and modulating substrate metabolism during I/R. PMID:25230600

  3. Specificity of the basic side chains of Lys114, Lys125, and Arg129 of antithrombin in heparin binding.

    PubMed

    Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Arocas, Véronique; Bock, Susan C; Olson, Steven T; Björk, Ingemar

    2002-10-15

    The anticoagulant polysaccharide heparin binds and activates the plasma proteinase inhibitor antithrombin through a pentasaccharide sequence. Lys114, Lys125, and Arg129 are the three most important residues of the inhibitor for pentasaccharide binding. To elucidate to what extent another positively charged side chain can fulfill the role of each of these residues, we have mutated Lys114 and Lys125 to Arg and Arg129 to Lys. Lys114 could be reasonably well replaced with Arg with only an approximately 15-fold decrease in pentasaccharide affinity, in contrast to an approximately 10(5)-fold decrease caused by substitution with an noncharged amino acid of comparable size. However, a loss of approximately one ionic interaction on mutation to Arg indicates that the optimal configuration of the network of basic residues of antithrombin that together interact with the pentasaccharide requires a Lys in position 114. Replacement of Lys125 with Arg caused an even smaller, approximately 3-fold, decrease in pentasaccharide affinity, compared with that of approximately 400-fold caused by mutation to a neutral amino acid. An Arg in position 125 is thus essentially equivalent to the wild-type Lys in pentasaccharide binding. Substitution of Arg129 with Lys decreased the pentasaccharide affinity an appreciable approximately 100-fold, a loss approaching that of approximately 400-fold caused by substitution with a neutral amino acid. Arg is thus specifically required in position 129 for high-affinity pentasaccharide binding. This requirement is most likely due to the ability of Arg to interact with other residues of antithrombin, primarily, Glu414 and Thr44, in a manner that appropriately positions the Arg side chain for keeping the pentasaccharide anchored to the activated state of the inhibitor. PMID:12369826

  4. Deficiencies of proteins C, S and Antithrombin and factor V Leiden and the risk of ischemic strokes

    PubMed Central

    Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    Although hypercoagulable states are most often associated with venous thromboses, arterial thromboses are reported in protein C, protein S, antithrombin deficient patients and in those with factor V Leiden, components of hereditary thrombophilia. Because these arterial thromboses (peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, and cerebral infarction) mostly affect young persons, aged below 45 years, it is important to test and treat these thrombophilic defects. Because the relation thrombophilia – arterial thromboses is still under debate, due to conflicting data, this article is a review of studies published in literature regarding the implication of the above–mentioned thrombophilic defects in cerebral infarcts. PMID:20945813

  5. The region of antithrombin interacting with full-length heparin chains outside the high-affinity pentasaccharide sequence extends to Lys136 but not to Lys139.

    PubMed

    Arocas, V; Turk, B; Bock, S C; Olson, S T; Björk, I

    2000-07-25

    The interaction of a well-defined pentasaccharide sequence of heparin with a specific binding site on antithrombin activates the inhibitor through a conformational change. This change increases the rate of antithrombin inhibition of factor Xa, whereas acceleration of thrombin inhibition requires binding of both inhibitor and proteinase to the same heparin chain. An extended heparin binding site of antithrombin outside the specific pentasaccharide site has been proposed to account for the higher affinity of the inhibitor for full-length heparin chains by interacting with saccharides adjacent to the pentasaccharide sequence. To resolve conflicting evidence regarding the roles of Lys136 and Lys139 in this extended site, we have mutated the two residues to Ala or Gln. Mutation of Lys136 decreased the antithrombin affinity for full-length heparin by at least 5-fold but minimally altered the affinity for the pentasaccharide. As a result, the full-length heparin and pentasaccharide affinities were comparable. The reduced affinity for full-length heparin was associated with the loss of one ionic interaction and was caused by both a lower overall association rate constant and a higher overall dissociation rate constant. In contrast, mutation of Lys139 affected neither full-length heparin nor pentasaccharide affinity. The rate constants for inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa by the complexes between antithrombin and full-length heparin or pentasaccharide were unaffected by both mutations, indicating that neither Lys136 nor Lys139 is involved in heparin activation of the inhibitor. Together, these results show that Lys136 forms part of the extended heparin binding site of antithrombin that participates in the binding of full-length heparin chains, whereas Lys139 is located outside this site. PMID:10913257

  6. The conformational activation of antithrombin. A 2.85-A structure of a fluorescein derivative reveals an electrostatic link between the hinge and heparin binding regions.

    PubMed

    Huntington, J A; McCoy, A; Belzar, K J; Pei, X Y; Gettins, P G; Carrell, R W

    2000-05-19

    Antithrombin is unique among the serpins in that it circulates in a native conformation that is kinetically inactive toward its target proteinase, factor Xa. Activation occurs upon binding of a specific pentasaccharide sequence found in heparin that results in a rearrangement of the reactive center loop removing constraints on the active center P1 residue. We determined the crystal structure of an activated antithrombin variant, N135Q S380C-fluorescein (P14-fluorescein), in order to see how full activation is achieved in the absence of heparin and how the structural effects of the substitution in the hinge region are translated to the heparin binding region. The crystal structure resembles native antithrombin except in the hinge and heparin binding regions. The absence of global conformational change allows for identification of specific interactions, centered on Glu(381) (P13), that are responsible for maintenance of the solution equilibrium between the native and activated forms and establishes the existence of an electrostatic link between the hinge region and the heparin binding region. A revised model for the mechanism of the allosteric activation of antithrombin is proposed.

  7. [Preparation and antithrombogenicity of oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin complex coated-polyvinyl chloride tubing].

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Liu, Weiyong; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Hua; Cao, Ruijun; Yang, Jian

    2011-02-01

    Based on non-enzymatic protein glycated reaction, the sodium periodate-oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin covalent complex (SPLMWATH) was produced. By using polyethyleneimine-glutaraldehyde bonding technique, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubings were coated with SPLMWATH, heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Spectrophotometry and dynamic clotting time experiment were used to determine the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH, graft density, coating leaching ratio and to evaluate the antithrombogenicity of different coating on the PVC tubings. The results showed that the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH was approximately 55%, and compared with heparin coating and LMWH coating, the graft density of SPLMWATH coating on the PVC tubing was smaller, but its coating stability and antithrombogenicity were significantly better than that of heparin coating and LMWH coating on the PVC tubings.

  8. Modification of polyurethane surface with an antithrombin-heparin complex for blood contact: influence of molecular weight of polyethylene oxide used as a linker/spacer.

    PubMed

    Sask, Kyla N; Berry, Leslie R; Chan, Anthony K C; Brash, John L

    2012-01-31

    Polyurethane (PU) was modified using isocyanate chemistry to graft polyethylene oxide (PEO) of various molecular weights (range 300-4600). An antithrombin-heparin (ATH) covalent complex was subsequently attached to the free PEO chain ends, which had been functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) groups. Surfaces were characterized by water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the modifications. Adsorption of fibrinogen from buffer was found to decrease by ~80% for the PEO-modified surfaces compared to the unmodified PU. The surfaces with ATH attached to the distal chain end of the grafted PEO were equally protein resistant, and when the data were normalized to the ATH surface density, PEO in the lower MW range showed greater protein resistance. Western blots of proteins eluted from the surfaces after plasma contact confirmed these trends. The uptake of ATH on the PEO-modified surfaces was greatest for the PEO of lower MW (300 and 600), and antithrombin binding from plasma (an indicator of heparin anticoagulant activity) was highest for these same surfaces. The PEO-ATH- and PEO-modified surfaces also showed low platelet adhesion from flowing whole blood. It is concluded that for the PEO-ATH surfaces, PEO in the low MW range, specifically MW 600, may be optimal for achieving an appropriate balance between resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and the ability to take up ATH and bind antithrombin in subsequent blood contact.

  9. The thrombin E192Q-BPTI complex reveals gross structural rearrangements: implications for the interaction with antithrombin and thrombomodulin.

    PubMed Central

    van de Locht, A; Bode, W; Huber, R; Le Bonniec, B F; Stone, S R; Esmon, C T; Stubbs, M T

    1997-01-01

    Previous crystal structures of thrombin indicate that the 60-insertion loop is a rigid moiety that partially occludes the active site, suggesting that this structural feature plays a decisive role in restricting thrombin's specificity. This restricted specificity is typified by the experimental observation that thrombin is not inhibited by micromolar concentrations of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). Surprisingly, a single atom mutation in thrombin (E192Q) results in a 10(-8) M affinity for BPTI. The crystal structure of human thrombin mutant E192Q has been solved in complex with BPTI at 2.3 A resolution. Binding of the Kunitz inhibitor is accompanied by gross structural rearrangements in thrombin. In particular, thrombin's 60-loop is found in a significantly different conformation. Concomitant reorganization of other surface loops that surround the active site, i.e. the 37-loop, the 148-loop and the 99-loop, is observed. Thrombin can therefore undergo major structural reorganization upon strong ligand binding. Implications for the interaction of thrombin with antithrombin and thrombomodulin are discussed. PMID:9214615

  10. Synthesis and anticoagulant activity of bioisosteric sulfonic-Acid analogues of the antithrombin-binding pentasaccharide domain of heparin.

    PubMed

    Herczeg, Mihály; Lázár, László; Bereczky, Zsuzsanna; Kövér, Katalin E; Timári, István; Kappelmayer, János; Lipták, András; Antus, Sándor; Borbás, Anikó

    2012-08-20

    Two pentasaccharide sulfonic acids that were related to the antithrombin-binding domain of heparin were prepared, in which two or three primary sulfate esters were replaced by sodium-sulfonatomethyl moieties. The sulfonic-acid groups were formed on a monosaccharide level and the obtained carbohydrate sulfonic-acid esters were found to be excellent donors and acceptors in the glycosylation reactions. Throughout the synthesis, the hydroxy groups to be methylated were masked in the form of acetates and the hydroxy groups to be sulfated were masked with benzyl groups. The disulfonic-acid analogue was prepared in a [2+3] block synthesis by using a trisaccharide disulfonic acid as an acceptor and a glucuronide disaccharide as a donor. For the synthesis of the pentasaccharide trisulfonic acid, a more-efficient approach, which involved elongation of the trisaccharide acceptor with a non-oxidized precursor of the glucuronic acid followed by post-glycosidation oxidation at the tetrasaccharide level and a subsequent [1+4] coupling reaction, was elaborated. In vitro evaluation of the anticoagulant activity of these new sulfonic-acid derivatives revealed that the disulfonate analogue inhibited the blood-coagulation-proteinase factor Xa with outstanding efficacy; however, the introduction of the third sulfonic-acid moiety resulted in a notable decrease in the anti-Xa activity. The difference in the biological activity of the disulfonic- and trisulfonic-acid counterparts could be explained by the different conformation of their L-iduronic-acid residues.

  11. Depolymerized holothurian glycosaminoglycan and heparin inhibit the intrinsic tenase complex by a common antithrombin-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, John P; Walke, Erik N

    2006-05-15

    Depolymerized holothurian glycosaminoglycan (DHG) is a fucosylated chrondroitin sulfate that possesses antithrombin-independent antithrombotic properties and inhibits factor X activation by the intrinsic tenase complex (factor IXa-factor VIIIa). The mechanism and molecular target for intrinsic tenase inhibition were determined and compared with inhibition by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). DHG inhibited factor X activation in a noncompetitive manner (reduced V(max(app))), with 50-fold higher apparent affinity than LMWH. DHG did not affect factor VIIIa half-life or chromogenic substrate cleavage by factor IXa-phospholipid but reduced the affinity of factor IXa for factor VIIIa. DHG competed factor IXa binding to immobilized LMWH with an EC(50) 35-fold lower than soluble LWMH. Analysis of intrinsic tenase inhibition, employing factor IXa with mutations in the heparin-binding exosite, demonstrated that relative affinity (K(i)) for DHG was as follows: wild type > K241A > H92A > R170A > > R233A, with partial rather than complete inhibition of the mutants. This rank order for DHG potency correlated with the effect of these mutations on factor IXa-LMWH affinity and the potency of LMWH for intrinsic tenase. DHG also accelerated decay of the intact intrinsic tenase complex. Thus, DHG binds to an exosite on factor IXa that overlaps with the binding sites for LMWH and factor VIIIa, disrupting critical factor IXa-factor VIIIa interactions.

  12. [Study on antiplatelet and antithrombin activitives and effective components variation of Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility].

    PubMed

    Su, Shu-lan; Xue, Ping; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhou, Wei; Duan, Jin-ao

    2015-08-01

    The changes of bioactive constituents were analyzed for Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility and the antiplatelet and antithrombin activitives were evaluated in order to elucidate the scientific and reasonable of Puhuang-Wulingzhi compatibility. UPLC-QTOF-MA-Markerlynx, principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis were used for data analysis and tracking changes of chemical composition during the decocting process. In vitro platelet aggregation induced by ADP, thrombin time(TT) and prothrombin time (PT) were investigated for Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility. The results showed that significant differences were found between the mixed decoction and codecoction of Wulingzhi and Puhuang. Five compounds changed obviously were identified as typhaneoside, naringenin, isorhamnetin-3-O-ruinoside, quercetin-3-O-neohesperidoside, kaempferol-3-O-neohesperidoside. The codecoction, comparing with the single decoction, was more significant in antiplatelet aggregation and could prolong thrombin time. In the same crude drug dose, the thrombin time (TT) elongation were greater. These data could provide references for elucidation of bioactive components for this herb pair. PMID:26790290

  13. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  14. Plasma centrifugation does not influence thrombin-antithrombin and plasmin-antiplasmin levels but determines platelet microparticles count

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyński, Krzysztof; Kapusta, Przemysław; Kowalik, Artur; Wybrańska, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Centrifugation is an essential step for plasma preparation to remove residual elements in plasma, especially platelets and platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs). Our working hypothesis was that centrifugation as a preanalytical step may influence some coagulation parameters. Materials and methods Healthy young men were recruited (N = 17). For centrifugation, two protocols were applied: (A) the first centrifugation at 2500 x g for 15 min and (B) at 2500 x g for 20 min at room temperature with a light brake. In protocol (A), the second centrifugation was carried out at 2500 x g for 15 min, whereas in protocol (B), the second centrifugation involved a 10 min spin at 13,000 x g. Thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) and plasmin-antiplasmin (PAP) complexes concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. PMPs were stained with CD41 antibody and annexin V, and analyzed by flow cytometry method. Procoagulant activity was assayed by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method as a slope of thrombin formation (CAT velocity). Results Median TAT and PAP concentrations did not differ between the centrifugation protocols. The high speed centrifugation reduced the median (IQR) PMP count in plasma from 1291 (841-1975) to 573 (391-1010) PMP/µL (P = 0.001), and CAT velocity from 2.01 (1.31-2.88) to 0.97 (0.82-1.73) nM/min (P = 0.049). Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed correlation between TAT and PMPs in the protocol A plasma which was (rho = 0.52, P < 0.050) and between PMPs and CAT for protocol A (rho = 0.74, P < 0.050) and protocol B (rho = 0.78, P < 0.050). Conclusion Centrifugation protocols do not influence the markers of plasminogen (PAP) and thrombin (TAT) generation but they do affect the PMP count and procoagulant activity. PMID:26110034

  15. Comparison of biological activities of human antithrombins with high-mannose or complex-type nonfucosylated N-linked oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Kanda, Yutaka; Takayama, Makoto; Hashimoto, Akitoshi; Sugihara, Tsutomu; Satoh-Kubota, Ai; Suzuki-Takanami, Eri; Yano, Keiichi; Iida, Shigeru; Satoh, Mitsuo

    2016-05-01

    The structure of the N-linked oligosaccharides attached to antithrombin (AT) has been shown to affect its anticoagulant activity and pharmacokinetics. Human AT has biantennary complex-type oligosaccharides with the unique feature of lacking a core fucose, which affects its biological activities by changing its heparin-binding affinity. In human plasma, AT circulates as a mixture of the α-form bearing four oligosaccharides and the β-form lacking an oligosaccharide at Asn135. However, it remains unclear how the immature high-mannose-type oligosaccharides produced by mammalian cells affect biological activities of AT. Here, we succeeded in directly comparing the activities between the high-mannose and complex types. Interestingly, although there were no substantial differences in thrombin inhibitory activity, the high-mannose type showed higher heparin-binding affinity. The anticoagulant activities were increased by heparin and correlated with the heparin-binding affinity, resulting in the strongest anticoagulant activity being displayed in the β-form with the high-mannose type. In pharmacokinetic profiling, the high-mannose type showed a much shorter plasma half-life than the complex type. The β-form was found to have a prolonged plasma half-life compared with the α-form for the high-mannose type; conversely, the α-form showed a longer half-life than the β-form for the complex-type. The present study highlights that AT physiological activities are strictly controlled not only by a core fucose at the reducing end but also by the high-mannose-type structures at the nonreducing end. The β-form with the immature high-mannose type appears to function as a more potent anticoagulant than the AT typically found in human plasma, once it emerges in the blood. PMID:26747427

  16. Engineering D-helix of antithrombin in alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor confers antiinflammatory properties on the chimeric serpin.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Dinarvand, P; Qureshi, S H; Rezaie, A R

    2014-07-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a heparin-binding serpin in plasma which regulates the proteolytic activity of procoagulant proteases of the clotting cascade. In addition to being an anticoagulant, AT also exhibits antiinflammatory activities when it binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the endothelium via its basic residues of D-helix to elicit intracellular signalling responses. By contrast to AT, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) is a non-heparin-binding serpin that exhibits very slow reactivity with coagulation proteases and possesses no HSPG-dependent antiinflammatory properties. To determine whether the antiinflammatory signaling specificity of AT can be transferred to α1-PI, we replaced the D-helix of human α1-PI with the corresponding sequence of human AT and expressed the chimeric serpin α1-PI/D-helix) in a bacterial expression system. High molecular weight heparin bound to α1-PI/D-helix and accelerated the inhibition of thrombin by the serpin mutant by a template mechanism reminiscent of the cofactor effect of heparin on inhibition of thrombin by AT. Like AT, α1-PI/D-helix exhibited antiinflammatory properties in both cellular and animal models. Thus, α1-PI/D-helix inhibited the barrier-disruptive effect of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB transcription factor in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated endothelial cells by a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the chimeric serpin reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated lethality, elicited a vascular protective effect and inhibited infiltration of activated leukocytes to the peritoneal cavity of mice in an HMGB1-mediated inflammatory model. These results suggest that grafting the D-helix of AT to α1-PI confers antiinflammatory properties on the serpin and that the chimeric serpin may have therapeutic utility for treating inflammatory disorders. PMID:24522239

  17. Circulating microparticles and the risk of thrombosis in inherited deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C and protein S.

    PubMed

    Campello, Elena; Spiezia, Luca; Radu, Claudia M; Bulato, Cristiana; Gavasso, Sabrina; Tormene, Daniela; Woodhams, Barry; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Many subjects carrying inherited thrombophilic defects will never experience venous thromboembolism (VTE) while other individuals developed recurrent VTE with no known additional risk factors. High levels of circulating microparticles (MP) have been associated with increased risk of VTE in patients with factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutation, suggesting a possible contribution of MP in the hypercoagulability of mild genetic thrombophilia. The role of MP as additional risk factor of VTE in carriers of natural clotting inhibitors defects (severe thrombophilia) has never been assessed. Plasma levels of annexin V-MP, endothelial-derived MP (EMP), platelet-derived MP (PMP), tissue factor-bearing MP (TF+) and the MP procoagulant activity (PPL) were measured in 132 carriers of natural anticoagulant deficiencies (25 antithrombin, 63 protein C and 64 protein S defect) and in 132 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Carriers of natural anticoagulant deficiencies, overall and separately considered, presented with higher median levels of annexin V-MP, EMP, PMP, TF+MP and PPL activity than healthy controls (p< 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.01, 0.025 and 0.03, respectively). Symptomatic carriers with a previous episode of VTE had significantly higher median levels of annexin-V MP than those without VTE (p=0.027). Carriers with high levels of annexin V-MP, EMP and PMP had an adjusted OR for VTE of 3.36 (95% CI, 1.59 to 7.11), 9.26 (95% CI, 3.55 to 24.1) and 2.72 (95%CI, 1.16 to 6.38), respectively. Elevated levels of circulating MP can play a role in carriers of mild and severe inherited thrombophilia. The clinical implications of this association remain to be defined. PMID:26354831

  18. Linkage disequilibrium between polymorphisms at the 5{prime} untranslated region and intron 5 (Dde I) of the antithrombin III (ATIII) gene in the Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.S.H.; Liu, Y.; Low, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    A length polymorphism at the 5{prime} untranslated region of exon 1 and an RFLP (Dde I) in intron 5 (nt 160) of the ATIII gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with primers of published sequences. DNA fragments were size-fractionated by agarose gel electrophoresis (3% NuSieve and 1% Seakem GTG) and photographed over a UV transilluminator. A strong linkage disequilibrium was observed between these two polymorphisms of the ATIII gene in the Chinese ({chi}{sup 2} = 63.7; {triangle} 0.42, P < 0.001). The estimated frequencies of the three haplotypes were found to be 0.37 for SD+, 0.40 for LD+ and 0.23 for LD-.

  19. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  20. Rat heparan sulphates. A study of the antithrombin-binding properties of heparan sulphate chains from rat adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1990-01-01

    Adult male rats were given [35S]sulphate intraperitoneally. Heparan [35S]sulphate (HS) chains were recovered from adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen by digestion with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride, digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase and DNAase and gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel. Purity was confirmed by agarose-gel electrophoresis and degradation with HNO2. Fractionation by gradient elution from antithrombin-agarose indicated that the proportion of HS with high binding affinity for antithrombin (HA-HS) ranged from 4.7% (kidneys) to 21.5% (brain). On a mass basis the major sources of HA-HS were carcase, skin and intestine. HA-HS from intestine was arbitrarily divided into subfractions I-VI, with anticoagulant activities ranging from 1 to 60 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor IIa) assay] and from 4 to 98 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor Xa) assay], indicating that the antithrombin-binding-site densities of HA-HS chains covered a wide range, as shown previously for rat HA-heparin chains [Horner, Kusche, Lindahl & Peterson (1988) Biochem. J. 251, 141-145]. HA-HS subfractions II, IV and VI were mixed with samples of HA-[3H]heparin chains and rechromatographed on antithrombin-agarose. Affinity for matrix-bound antithrombin did not correlate with anticoagulant activity, e.g. HA-HS subfraction IV [38 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg] was co-eluted with HA-heparin chains [127 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg]. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2138457

  1. Surface-loop residue Lys316 in blood coagulation Factor IX is a major determinant for Factor X but not antithrombin recognition.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, J A; Mertens, K

    2000-09-15

    The active site of activated Factor IX (FIXa) and related blood-coagulation enzymes is surrounded by a number of highly variable surface loops, which contribute to the characteristic substrate specificity of each individual enzyme. FIX residue Lys(316) is located in one of these loops and mutation of this residue to Glu is associated with haemophilia B. In the present study we investigated the functional role of Lys(316) in human FIXa by analysing the purified and activated FIX mutants FIXa-K316E and FIXa-K316A. FIXa-K316E was indistinguishable from normal FIXa in binding the competitive active-site inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine. In addition, substitution of Glu for Lys(316) had no significant effect on the reactivity towards various synthetic tripeptide substrates. Inhibition by the macromolecular inhibitor antithrombin was only slightly reduced for both FIXa mutants (less than 2-fold). In contrast, proteolytic activity of FIXa-K316E towards the natural substrate Factor X (FX) was virtually lacking, while the Lys(316) to Ala mutation resulted in a more than 10-fold reduction in FX activation. Thus residue Lys(316) plays a key role in FIXa activity towards FX. The requirement for Lys at position 316 for FX activation was also evident in the presence of the cofactor activated Factor VIII, although to a lesser extent than in its absence. These data demonstrate that Lys(316) specifically determines the reactivity of FIXa towards its natural substrate FX, but not to synthetic peptide substrates or antithrombin. PMID:10970782

  2. Rat heparins. A study of the relative sizes and antithrombin-binding characteristics of heparin proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products from rat adipose tissue, heart, lungs, peritoneal cavity and skin.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1986-01-01

    35S-labelled heparins were recovered from adipose tissue, hearts, lungs, peritoneal cavities and skins of rats given H2(35)SO4. Their purification involved incubation with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride in 1.0 M-NaCl, gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel and incubation with chondroitinase ABC. Each product was divided into proteoglycan and "depolymerization products' fractions by gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-15m. Heparin chains were released from a portion of each proteoglycan fraction by beta-elimination with NaOH. Proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products were separated by gradient elution from a column of antithrombin-agarose into fractions with no affinity, low affinity and high affinity for antithrombin. The relative sizes of the products were determined by gel filtration on columns of Bio-Gel A-50m, A-15m, A-1.5m and A-0.5m. Skin was the major source of heparin and contained the largest proteoglycans and the lowest proportion of depolymerization products. Lungs contained the smallest proteoglycans, the smallest depolymerization products and the highest proportion of depolymerization products. The highest proportions of proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products with high affinity for antithrombin were found in adipose tissue. The lowest proportions of each of these fractions were found in the peritoneal cavity. The data suggest that there was relatively little biosynthesis of sites with high affinity for antithrombin in peritoneal-cavity mast cells and that heparin catabolism was most active in lungs. Each source of heparin was unique with respect to both biosynthesis and subsequent breakdown of its proteoglycans. PMID:3827837

  3. A study on proteins contained in urine of gestosis patients.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, S; Saitoh, M

    1983-01-01

    Immunologic analyses of urinary proteins in patients with gestosis and related obstetrical conditions were performed and urinary protein patterns were compared with blood plasma protein patterns. Many kinds of proteins could be detected in urine of patients with gestosis beside albumin. Therefore, "proteinuria" should be chosen to characterise this state instead of the term "albuminuria". Generally speaking, when a total volume of protein contained in urine increases, its types or subfractions also increase in urine. Next to albumin, the most commonly detected proteins in urine of patients with gestosis were transferrin, IgG, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor, alpha 1-antitrypsin, IgA, alpha 2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, Gc-globulin, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, hemopexin, ceruloplasmin, prealbumin, haptoglobin, anti-thrombin III, Cl-inactivator, IgM, and alpha 2-macroglobulin, in the descending order of their occurrence. Proteins that promptly became negative in urine of gestosis patients after delivery were inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor, IgA, and ceruloplasmin. On the other hand, proteins most apt to persist in urine were albumin, alpha 2-HS-glycoprotein, and IgG. Generally speaking, lower molecular weight proteins were likely to persist in urine after delivery. Simultaneous determination of blood plasma and urinary proteins was performed for 18 kinds or subfractions of protein. A prognostic value of renal protein clearance was discussed. PMID:6418221

  4. Inactivation of Factor VIIa by Antithrombin In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo: Role of Tissue Factor and Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Rit; Kothari, Hema; Mackman, Nigel; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that antithrombin (AT) could act as a significant physiologic regulator of FVIIa. However, in vitro studies showed that AT could inhibit FVIIa effectively only when it was bound to tissue factor (TF). Circulating blood is known to contain only traces of TF, at best. FVIIa also binds endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), but the role of EPCR on FVIIa inactivation by AT is unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the role of TF and EPCR in inactivation of FVIIa by AT in vivo. Low human TF mice (low TF, ∼1% expression of the mouse TF level) and high human TF mice (HTF, ∼100% of the mouse TF level) were injected with human rFVIIa (120 µg kg−1 body weight) via the tail vein. At varying time intervals following rFVIIa administration, blood was collected to measure FVIIa-AT complex and rFVIIa antigen levels in the plasma. Despite the large difference in TF expression in the mice, HTF mice generated only 40–50% more of FVIIa-AT complex as compared to low TF mice. Increasing the concentration of TF in vivo in HTF mice by LPS injection increased the levels of FVIIa-AT complexes by about 25%. No significant differences were found in FVIIa-AT levels among wild-type, EPCR-deficient, and EPCR-overexpressing mice. The levels of FVIIa-AT complex formed in vitro and ex vivo were much lower than that was found in vivo. In summary, our results suggest that traces of TF that may be present in circulating blood or extravascular TF that is transiently exposed during normal vessel damage contributes to inactivation of FVIIa by AT in circulation. However, TF’s role in AT inactivation of FVIIa appears to be minor and other factor(s) present in plasma, on blood cells or vascular endothelium may play a predominant role in this process. PMID:25102166

  5. The factor IXa heparin-binding exosite is a cofactor interactive site: mechanism for antithrombin-independent inhibition of intrinsic tenase by heparin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiu-Ping; Walke, Erik N; Sheehan, John P

    2005-03-01

    Therapeutic heparin concentrations selectively inhibit the intrinsic tenase complex in an antithrombin-independent manner. To define the molecular target and mechanism for this inhibition, recombinant human factor IXa with alanine substituted for solvent-exposed basic residues (H92, R170, R233, K241) in the protease domain was characterized with regard to enzymatic activity, heparin affinity, and inhibition by low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). These mutations only had modest effects on chromogenic substrate hydrolysis and the kinetics of factor X activation by factor IXa. Likewise, factor IXa H92A and K241A showed factor IXa-factor VIIIa affinity similar to factor IXa wild type (WT). In contrast, factor IXa R170A demonstrated a 4-fold increase in apparent factor IXa-factor VIIIa affinity and dramatically increased coagulant activity relative to factor IXa WT. Factor IXa R233A demonstrated a 2.5-fold decrease in cofactor affinity and reduced ability to stabilize cofactor half-life relative to wild type, suggesting that interaction with the factor VIIIa A2 domain was disrupted. Markedly (R233A) or moderately (H92A, R170A, K241A) reduced binding to immobilized LMWH was observed for the mutant proteases. Solution competition demonstrated that the EC(50) for LMWH was increased less than 2-fold for factor IXa H92A and K241A but over 3.5-fold for factor IXa R170A, indicating that relative heparin affinity was WT > H92A/K241A > R170A > R233A. Kinetic analysis of intrinsic tenase inhibition demonstrated that relative affinity for LMWH was WT > K241A > H92A > R170A > R233A, correlating with heparin affinity. Thus, LMWH inhibits intrinsic tenase by interacting with the heparin-binding exosite in the factor IXa protease domain, which disrupts interaction with the factor VIIIa A2 domain.

  6. Analytical comparison of a US generic enoxaparin with the originator product: The focus on comparative assessment of antithrombin-binding components.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Pierre A J; Herman, Fréderic; Sizun, Philippe; Viskov, Christian

    2016-09-10

    Enoxaparin sodium, a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) prepared from porcine intestinal heparin, is widely used for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. The antithrombotic activity of heparin is mediated mainly through its activation of antithrombin (AT) and subsequent inhibition of coagulation factors. Heparin is a complex heteropolymer and the sulfation pattern of its alternating uronic acid and glucosamine sugar units is a major factor influencing its biological activity. The manufacturing process itself is associated with the introduction of exogenous microheterogeneities that may further affect its biological efficacy. This is important since enoxaparin is prepared by depolymerizing the heparin with the aim of optimizing its biological activity and safety. Changes during its manufacture could thus affect its biological activity and safety. The current study was performed to assess potential differences between the originator enoxaparin and a new generic enoxaparin commercialized by Teva. Heparinase digestion, AT affinity chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, anion exchange chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance methodologies were used. The results indicated differences in oligosaccharides related to the cleavage selectivity around the heparin AT-binding sequences of the Teva Enoxaparin Sodium Injection, USP and the originator Sanofi enoxaparin. These differences influence the strength of the AT-binding affinity of the individual oligosaccharides, their ability to activate AT and, therefore, the inhibitory potency on the proteases of the coagulation cascade. This study, together with other published analytical reports, describes specific compositional differences between generics and originator LWMHs. However, it is yet to be established whether such variations might have any clinical relevance. PMID:27497655

  7. Molecular basis of factor IXa recognition by heparin-activated antithrombin revealed by a 1.7-A structure of the ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Daniel J D; Langdown, Jonathan; Huntington, James A

    2010-01-12

    Factor (f) IXa is a critical enzyme for the formation of stable blood clots, and its deficiency results in hemophilia. The enzyme functions at the confluence of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways by binding to fVIIIa and rapidly generating fXa. In spite of its importance, little is known about how fIXa recognizes its cofactor, its substrate, or its only known inhibitor, antithrombin (AT). However, it is clear that fIXa requires extensive exosite interactions to present substrates for efficient cleavage. Here we describe the 1.7-A crystal structure of fIXa in its recognition (Michaelis) complex with heparin-activated AT. It represents the highest resolution structure of both proteins and allows us to address several outstanding issues. The structure reveals why the heparin-induced conformational change in AT is required to permit simultaneous active-site and exosite interactions with fIXa and the nature of these interactions. The reactive center loop of AT has evolved to specifically inhibit fIXa, with a P2 Gly so as not to clash with Tyr99 on fIXa, a P4 Ile to fit snugly into the S4 pocket, and a C-terminal extension to exploit a unique wall-like feature of the active-site cleft. Arg150 is at the center of the exosite interface, interacting with AT residues on beta-sheet C. A surprising crystal contact is observed between the heparin pentasaccharide and fIXa, revealing a plausible mode of binding that would allow longer heparin chains to bridge the complex. PMID:20080729

  8. Biopsy Quantitative Patohistology and Seral Values of Prostate Specific Antigen-Alpha (1) Antichymotrypsine Complex in Prediction of Adverse Pathology Findings after Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Tomasković, Igor; Milicić, Valerija; Tomić, Miroslav; Ruzić, Boris; Ulamec, Monika

    2015-09-01

    In this prospective study we examined the utility of parameters obtained on prostate needle biopsy and prostate specific antigen-alpha(1)-antichymotripsine complex (PSA-ACT) to predict adverse pathologic findings after radical prostatectomy. 45 consecutive patients assigned for radical prostatectomy due to clinically localized prostate cancer were included in the study. Prostate biopsy parameters such as number of positive cores, the greatest percentage of tumor in the positive cores, Gleason score, perineural invasion, unilaterality or bilaterality of the tumor were recorded. PSA-ACT was determined using sandwich immunoassay chemiluminiscent method (Bayer, Tarrytown, New York). We analyzed relationship of preoperative PSA, PSA-ACTand quantitative biopsy parameters with final pathology after prostatectomy. Adverse findings were considered when extracapsular extension of cancer (pT3) was noted. Postoperatively, 29 (64.4%) patients were diagnosed with pT2 disease and 16 (35.6%) with pT3 disease. There was a significant difference in localized vs. locally advanced disease in number of positive biopsy cores (p<0.001), greatest percentage of tumor in the core (p=0.008), localization of the tumor (p=0.003) and perineural invasion (p=0.004). Logistic regression was used to develop a model on the multivariate level. It included number of positive cores and PSA-ACT and was significant on our cohort with the reliability of 82.22%. The combination of PSA-ACT and a large scale of biopsy parameters could be used in prediction of adverse pathologic findings after radical prostatectomy. Clinical decisions and patients counselling could be influenced by these predictors but further confirmation on a larger population is necessary. PMID:26898067

  9. CITY III Operator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game of an urban system involving player operation of and interaction with economic, social, and government components. The role of operator in the game is to take the handwritten inputs (decisions) from the CITY III participants, process them, and return output which initiates the next round of…

  10. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  11. Non-essential genes in the vaccinia virus HindIII K fragment: a gene related to serine protease inhibitors and a gene related to the 37K vaccinia virus major envelope antigen.

    PubMed

    Boursnell, M E; Foulds, I J; Campbell, J I; Binns, M M

    1988-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a cloned copy of the HindIII K fragment of the WR strain of vaccinia virus has been determined. Eight open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified, on the basis of size and codon usage. The predicted amino acid sequences of the putative genes have been compared to the Protein Identification Resource and to published vaccinia virus sequences. One gene, predicted to encode a 42.2K protein, is highly related to the family of serine protease inhibitors. It shows approximately 25% identity to human antithrombin III and 19% identity to the cowpox virus 38K protein gene which is also related to serine protease inhibitors. The product of another gene shows a similar high level of identity to the 37K vaccinia virus major envelope antigen. The existence of viable deletion mutants and recombinants containing foreign DNA inserted into both these genes indicates that they are non-essential.

  12. Roles of N-terminal region residues Lys11, Arg13, and Arg24 of antithrombin in heparin recognition and in promotion and stabilization of the heparin-induced conformational change.

    PubMed

    Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Desai, Umesh R; Bock, Susan C; Olson, Steven T; Björk, Ingemar

    2004-01-27

    The N-terminal region residues, Lys11, Arg13, and Arg24, of the plasma coagulation inhibitor, antithrombin, have been implicated in binding of the anticoagulant polysaccharide, heparin, from the identification of natural mutants with impaired heparin binding or by the X-ray structure of a complex of the inhibitor with a high-affinity heparin pentasaccharide. Mutations of Lys11 or Arg24 to Ala in this work each reduced the affinity for the pentasaccharide approximately 40-fold, whereas mutation of Arg13 to Ala led to a decrease of only approximately 7-fold. All three substitutions resulted in the loss of one ionic interaction with the pentasaccharide and those of Lys11 or Arg24 also in 3-5-fold losses in affinity of nonionic interactions. Only the mutation of Lys11 affected the initial, weak interaction step of pentasaccharide binding, decreasing the affinity of this step approximately 2-fold. The mutations of Lys11 and Arg13 moderately, 2-7-fold, altered both rate constants of the second, conformational change step, whereas the substitution of Arg24 appreciably, approximately 25-fold, reduced the reverse rate constant of this step. The N-terminal region of antithrombin is thus critical for high-affinity heparin binding, Lys11 and Arg24 being responsible for maintaining appreciable and comparable binding energy, whereas Arg13 is less important. Lys11 is the only one of the three residues that is involved in the initial recognition step, whereas all three residues participate in the conformational change step. Lys11 and Arg13 presumably bind directly to the heparin pentasaccharide by ionic, and in the case of Lys11, also nonionic interactions. However, the role of Arg24 most likely is indirect, to stabilize the heparin-induced P-helix by interacting intramolecularly with Glu113 and Asp117, thereby positioning the crucial Lys114 residue for optimal ionic and nonionic interactions with the pentasaccharide. Together, these findings show that N-terminal residues of

  13. Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. Purification by affinity chromatography, characterization and isolation of an active fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Gounaris, A D; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor (alpha CPI) was purified by a two-stage method: affinity chromatography on S-carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose, and high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography. The protein was obtained as a form of Mr about 64 000 and material of higher Mr (about 100 000). In sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with reduction, both forms showed a major component of Mr 64 000. An antiserum was raised against alpha CPI, and 'rocket' immunoassays showed the mean concentration in sera from 19 individuals to be 35.9 mg/dl. Both low-Mr and high-Mr forms of alpha CPI were confirmed to be sialoglycoproteins by the decrease in electrophoretic mobility after treatment with neuraminidase. alpha CPI was shown immunologically to be distinct from antithrombin III and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, two serine proteinase inhibitors from plasma with somewhat similar Mr values. alpha CPI was also distinct from cystatins A and B, the two intracellular low-Mr cysteine proteinase inhibitors from human liver. Complexes of alpha CPI with papain were detectable in immunoelectrophoresis, but dissociated to free enzyme and intact inhibitor in sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The stoichiometry of binding of papain was close to 1:1 for both low-Mr and high-Mr forms. alpha CPI was found to be a tight-binding inhibitor of papain and human cathepsins H and L (Ki 34 pM, 1.1 nM and 62 pM respectively). By contrast, inhibition of cathepsin B was much weaker, Ki being about 35 microM. Dipeptidyl peptidase I also was weakly inhibited. Digestion of alpha CPI with bromelain gave rise to an inhibitory fragment of Mr about 22 000, which was isolated. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6548132

  14. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  15. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000692.htm Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial mononeuropathy III -- diabetic type -- is usually a complication of diabetes that causes ...

  16. A novel splice-site mutation c.42-2A>T (IVS1-2A>T) of SERPINC1 in a Korean family with inherited antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moon Ju; Lee, Jeong-Guil; Chong, So Young; Huh, Ji Young; Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Hee-Jin; Oh, Doyeun

    2011-12-01

    Inherited antithrombin (AT) deficiency (OMIM 107300) is an autosomal dominant disorder and causes a 20-fold increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism. Herein, we describe a case of a novel splice-site mutation in the SERPINC1 gene in a Korean patient with inherited AT deficiency. The patient was a 35-year-old woman who presented with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism and was without a recent history of any precipitating factors. The obtaining of her family history revealed that her mother had an ischemic stroke and a pulmonary embolism and her two sisters both had an episode of DVT during pregnancy. DNA sequencing of SERPINC1 revealed the novel variant IVS1-2A>T (c.42-2A>T), a substitution in intron 1, in the proband and her daughter. The mutation IVS1-2A>T eliminates the acceptor splice-site of intron 1. The present case is the first novel splice-site mutation of SERPINC1 in a Korean family with inherited AT deficiency.

  17. Type III Hyperlipoproteinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Eighteen patients with type III hyperlipoproteinaemia, diagnosed on the basis of skin lesions, serum lipids, and lipoprotein electrophoresis, have been fully investigated over a period of 15 years. The incidence of coronary artery disease was only slightly increased, and was not increased at all among first-degree relatives. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease was probably more common. An increased incidence of carbohydrate intolerance was found in neither the patients nor their relatives. The effects of treatment on the skin were uniformly good. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5783124

  18. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  19. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  20. Functional role of the polysaccharide component of rabbit thrombomodulin proteoglycan. Effects on inactivation of thrombin by antithrombin, cleavage of fibrinogen by thrombin and thrombin-catalysed activation of factor V.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M C; Lindahl, U

    1990-09-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM), a major anticoagulant protein at the vessel wall, serves as a potent cofactor for the activation of Protein C by thrombin. Previous work has indicated that (rabbit) TM is a proteoglycan that contains a single polysaccharide chain, tentatively identified as a sulphated galactosaminoglycan, and furthermore suggested that this component may be functionally related to additional anticoagulant activities expressed by the TM molecule [Bourin, Ohlin, Lane, Stenflo & Lindahl (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 8044-8052]. Results of the present study establish that (enzymic) removal of the polysaccharide chain abolishes the inhibitory effect of TM on thrombin-induced fibrinogen clotting as well as the promoting effect of TM on the inactivation of thrombin by antithrombin, but does not affect the ability of TM to serve as a cofactor in the activation of Protein C. Studies of yet another biological activity of rabbit TM, namely the ability to prevent the activation of Factor V by thrombin [Esmon, Esmon & Harris (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 7944-7947], confirmed that TM markedly delays the conversion of the native 330 kDa Factor V precursor into polypeptide intermediates, and further into the 96 kDa heavy chain and 71-74 kDa light-chain components of activated Factor Va. In contrast, the activation kinetics of a similar sample of Factor V incubated with thrombin in the presence of chondroitinase ABC-digested TM did not differ from that observed in the absence of TM. It is concluded that the inhibitory effect of TM on Factor V activation also depends on the presence of the polysaccharide component on the TM molecule.

  1. SUPERSTARS III: 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  2. SUPERSTARS III: 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  3. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  4. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  5. Outcome of tyrosinaemia type III.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, C J; Holme, E; Standing, S; Preece, M A; Green, A; Ploechl, E; Ugarte, M; Trefz, F K; Leonard, J V

    2001-12-01

    Tyrosinaemia type III is a rare disorder caused by a deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, the second enzyme in the catabolic pathway of tyrosine. The majority of the nine previously reported patients have presented with neurological symptoms after the neonatal period, while others detected by neonatal screening have been asymptomatic. All have had normal liver and renal function and none has skin or eye abnormalities. A further four patients with tyrosinaemia type III are described. It is not clear whether a strict low tyrosine diet alters the natural history of tyrosinaemia type III, although there remains a suspicion that treatment may be important, at least in infancy.

  6. Insertion devices for Doris III

    SciTech Connect

    Pfluger, J.; Heintze, G. ); Baran, W.; Fernow, D.; Kuntze, K. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical and magnetic layout of the first three insertion devices for DORIS III, an upgraded reconstruction of DORIS II, is described and results of the magnetic characterization are given as well.

  7. Impact analysis of Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbis, P.P.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of the impact of the Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III into a nonyielding target at 46 m.p.h. and 30 m.p.h., and into a yielding target at 46 m.p.h. is presented. The analysis considers the structural response of the tiedown system which secures the Minuteman III re-entry system to the floor of the payload transporter. A finite element model of the re-entry system, its tiedown system, which includes tie-rods and shear pins, and the pallet plate which is attached to the transporter floating plate, was constructed. Because accelerations of the payload transporter are not known, acceleration data from one-quarter scale testing of the Safe Secure Trailer was used to investigate the response of the tiedown system. These accelerations were applied to the pallet plate. The ABAQUS computer code was used to predict the forces in the members of the tiedown system.

  8. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  9. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  10. Chromium(III), insoluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( III ) , insoluble salts ; CASRN 16065 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments

  11. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  12. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  13. Terrain Perception for DEMO III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, R.; Bellutta, P.; Matthies, L.; Owens, K.; Rankin, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Demo III program has as its primary focus the development of autonomous mobility for a small rugged cross country vehicle. In this paper we report recent progress on both stereo-based obstacle detection and terrain cover color-based classification.

  14. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements. PMID:27442286

  15. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  16. Silver europium(III) polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Mounir; Férid, Mokhtar; Moine, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Europium(III) silver polyphosphate, AgEu(PO3)4, was prepared by the flux method. The atomic arrangement is built up by infinite (PO3)n chains (periodicity of 4) extending along the c axis. These chains are joined to each other by EuO8 dodeca­hedra. The Ag+ cations are located in the voids of this arrangement and are surrounded by five oxygen atoms in a distorted [4+1] coordination. PMID:21582031

  17. Bursts of Type III and Type V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Dulk, G. A.

    The observational database on Types III and V solar radio bursts is summarized and used as a basis for developing analytical models of the observed phenomena. Type III events are characterized by a rapid drift from high to low frequencies, a harmonic structure consisting of F-H pairs, and circular polarization. Type V events last longer than Type III bursts and have a broader bandwidth. Both bursts are thought to arise from the same mechanism. Probable sources of the F-H pairs are characterized, along with the brightness temperature, time profiles, and polarization features typical of Type III and IIIb, structureless Type III and storm Type III bursts. Attention is also given to the interaction between Type III bursts and the coronal magnetic field and to similarities between Type III events and inverted-U and J bursts.

  18. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  19. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  20. Optical properties of the Eu(III)-La(III)-complex-doped polyolefine film and rod samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogreb, Roman; Popov, Oleg; Lirtsman, Vlad; Pyshkin, Oleg; Kazachkov, Alexander; Musin, Albina; Finkelshtein, Binyamin; Shmukler, Yuri; Davidov, Dan; Bormashenko, Edward

    2005-04-01

    The work is devoted to luminescent properties of trivalent lanthanide complexes dispersed in thermoplastic host matrices. Polyethylene-based film and polypropylene-based rod both doped with these complexes were manufactured using an extrusion technique. Two kinds of dopants were used: Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)) and Eu(III)-La(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)-La(III)). Comparison was made between these samples regarding absorption, excitation, emission and a lifetime of luminescence. Dependence of emission intensity on the excitation energy was determined. Emission spectra of the films were studied at room and helium temperatures. Optical properties of Eu(III) samples are different from Eu(III)-La(III) samples. Significant difference in spectra of these two types of samples may be attributed to the La(III) action.

  1. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant.

  2. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant. PMID:16768593

  3. Structural and photophysical studies on ternary Sm(III), Nd(III), Yb(III), Er(III) complexes containing pyridyltriazole ligands

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexey N.; Shul’gin, Victor F.; Meshkova, Svetlana B.; Hasegawa, Miki; Alexandrov, Grigory G.; Eremenko, Igor L.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Two bidentate pyridine-triazole ligands (3-(pyridine-2-yl)-5-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole (L1) and 5-phenyl-2-(2′-pyridyl)-7,8-benzo-6,5-dihydro-1,3,6-triazaindolizine (L2)), have been synthesized and used for Ln(Dbm)3 (Ln = Sm(III), Nd(III), Yb(III) and Er(III)) coordination. The structures of the ligands and resulting Sm(III) complex were determined in the solid state by X-ray diffraction. The title complexes were characterized by UV, fluorescent, IR-spectroscopy and thermogravimetric and elemental analyses. Photophysical studies on the Ln(III) complexes were carried out showing luminescence in the region typical for Ln(III). The effect of various factors on the enhancement luminescence of complexes is discussed. PMID:23470984

  4. Implementing Title III -- Air toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) is taking three basic approaches to implementing the new National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) from the Title III program: accept and implement, as written, the NESHAPs where few sources are located in the South Coast Air Basin; incorporate with simplification of the NESHAP requirements into AQMD rules when many sources are involved; then seek equivalency by the US EPA; and incorporate with a market-based rule (VOC RECLAIM), part of many NESHAPs which control volatile organic compound as HAPs. Whatever the approach, emphasis will be placed on: streamlining and simplification; helping sources understand requirements and comply; and common sense.

  5. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  6. Zinc in +III oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Jena, Puru

    2012-02-01

    The possibility of Group 12 elements, such as Zn, Cd, and Hg existing in an oxidation state of +III or higher has fascinated chemists for decades. Significant efforts have been made in the past to achieve higher oxidation states for the heavier congener mercury (since the 3^rd ionization potential of the elements decrease as we go down the periodic table). It took nearly 20 years before experiment could confirm the theoretical prediction that Hg indeed can exist in an oxidation state of +IV. While this unusual property of Hg is attributed to the relativistic effects, Zn being much lighter than Hg has not been expected to have an oxidation state higher than +II. Using density functional theory we show that an oxidation state of +III for Zn can be realized by choosing specific ligands with large electron affinities i.e. superhalogens. We demonstrate this by a systematic study of the interaction of Zn with F, BO2, and AuF6 ligands whose electron affinities are progressively higher, namely, 3.4 eV, 4.4 eV, and 8.4 eV, respectively. Discovery of higher oxidation states of elements can help in the formulation of new reactions and hence in the development of new chemistry.

  7. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that emit

  8. III-nitride nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key figure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical confinement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve single-mode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode operation. The first method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-off condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter efficiency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, specifically a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip

  9. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  10. The type III secretion injectisome.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guy R

    2006-11-01

    The type III secretion injectisome is a complex nanomachine that allows bacteria to deliver protein effectors across eukaryotic cellular membranes. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of its structure, assembly and mode of operation. The principal structural components of the injectisome, from the base located in the bacterial cytosol to the tip of the needle protruding from the cell surface, have been investigated in detail. The structures of several constituent proteins were solved at the atomic level and important insights into the assembly process have been gained. However, despite the ongoing concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, the role of many of the constituent components of this nanomachine remain unknown. PMID:17041629

  11. III-Nitride UV Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif Khan, M.; Shatalov, M.; Maruska, H. P.; Wang, H. M.; Kuokstis, E.

    2005-10-01

    The need for efficient, compact and robust solid-state UV optical sources and sensors had stimulated the development of optical devices based on III-nitride material system. Rapid progress in material growth, device fabrication and packaging enabled demonstration of high efficiency visible-blind and solar-blind photodetectors, deep-UV light-emitting diodes with emission from 400 to 250 nm, and UV laser diodes with operation wavelengths ranging from 340 to 350 nm. Applications of these UV optical devices include flame sensing; fluorescence-based biochemical sensing; covert communications; air, water and food purification and disinfection; and biomedical instrumentation. This paper provides a review of recent advances in the development of UV optical devices. Performance of state-of-the-art devices as well as future prospects and challenges are discussed.

  12. DSM-III-R and religion.

    PubMed

    Post, S G

    1992-07-01

    The interpretation of religion in DSM-III-R contains considerable negative bias and contributes to unfair stereotypes of religious persons. Particularly new religious movements and religious conversion are unfairly interpreted under the DSM-III-R heading, 'Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified'. It is suggested that a more balanced and respectful interpretation of religion is needed in DSM-III-R, since psychiatry through its official nomenclature should not contribute to social intolerance of religious nonconformity.

  13. On Type III plessite in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, R., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    Questions are raised concerning the possible sources of heat necessary for converting martensite to coarse Type III plessite in ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the unusual Type III plesite in the Kingfisher, Oklahoma black chondrite was formed by partial homogenization of preexisting Type III plessite as a result of shock reheating of the metal into the gamma field of the Fe-Ni phase diagram, rather than by decomposition of shock reheated prior martensite in the alpha + gamma field, as originally proposed by Taylor and Heymann. Because martensite is sporadically distributed within Kingfisher plessite it is suggested that microstructures of this kind be called Type II-III plessite.

  14. Spectrofluorimetric determination of Er (III) with diantipyrylmethane.

    PubMed

    Sungur, S

    2001-02-01

    The optimum fluorescence conditions for erbium (III) are obtained by irradiating this lanthanide at 435 nm in 0.04 microg ml(-1) diantipyrylmethane solution at pH = 8 (lambdaem = 510 nm). The method proposed is satisfactory for the determination of erbium (III) in the range of 0.001 to 1 microg ml(-1). The relative standard deviation 0.02 microg ml(-1) Er (III) in 0.04 microg ml(-1) diantipyrylmethane solution is 1.1%. The effect of other rare earths upon the intensity of the fluorescence emitted by erbium (III) is discussed. PMID:11206569

  15. M(III)Dy(III)3 (M = Fe(III), Co(III)) complexes: three-blade propellers exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gong-Feng; Gamez, Patrick; Tang, Jinkui; Clérac, Rodolphe; Guo, Yun-Nan; Guo, Yang

    2012-05-21

    [Dy(III)(HBpz(3))(2)](2+) moieties (HBpz(3)(-) = hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate) and a 3d transition-metal ion (Fe(III) or Co(III)) have been rationally assembled using an dithiooxalato dianion ligand into 3d-4f [MDy(3)(HBpz(3))(6)(dto)(3)]·4CH(3)CN·2CH(2)Cl(2) (M = Fe (1), Co (2) complexes. Single-crystal X-ray studies reveal that three eight-coordinated Dy(III) centers in a square antiprismatic coordination environment are connecting to a central octahedral trivalent Fe or Co ion forming a propeller-type complex. The dynamics of the magnetization in the two isostructural compounds, modulated by the nature of the central M(III) metal ion, are remarkably different despite their analogous direct current (dc) magnetic properties. The slow relaxation of the magnetization observed for 2 mainly originates from isolated Dy ions, since a diamagnetic Co(III) metal ion links the magnetic Dy(III) ions. In the case of 1, the magnetic interaction between S = 1/2 Fe(III) ion and the three Dy(III) magnetic centers, although weak, generates a complex energy spectrum of magnetic states with low-lying excited states that induce a smaller energy gap than for 2 and thus a faster relaxation of the magnetization.

  16. Comparative adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) on TPD.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Zhao, X L; Ma, X X; Yang, Y B; Wu, W S; Zheng, G D; Wang, D L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative adsorption behaviors of Eu(III) and Am(III) on thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD), i.e., Th4(PO4)4P2O7, have been studied using a batch approach and surface complexation model (SCM) in this study. The results showed that Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption increased to a large extent with the increase in TPD dose. Strong pH-dependence was observed in both Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption processes, suggesting that inner-sphere complexes (ISCs) were possibly responsible for the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III). Meanwhile, the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) decreased to a different extent with the increase in ion strength, which was possibly related to outer-sphere complexes and/or ion exchange. In the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) showed high enhancement mainly due to the ternary surface complexes of TPD-FA-Eu(3+) and TPD-FA-Am(3+). The SCM showed that one ion exchange (≡S3Am/Eu) and two ISCs (≡(XO)2Am/EuNO3 and ≡(YO)2Am/EuNO3) seemed more reasonable to quantitatively describe the adsorption edges of both Eu(III) and Am(III). Our findings obviously showed that Eu(III) could be a good analogue to study actinide behaviors in practical terms. However, it should be kept in mind that there are still obvious differences between the characteristics of Eu(III) and Am(III) in some special cases, for instance, the complex ability with organic matter and adsorption affinity to a solid surface. PMID:26198355

  17. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence and Electroluminescence of Neodymium(III), Erbium(III), and Ytterbium(III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yuichiro; Wada, Yuji; Yanagida, Shozo

    2001-01-01

    Tris(dibenzoylmethanato)(monobathophenanthroline)lanthanide(III) complex [Ln(DBM)3 bath (Ln: Nd, Er and Yb)] both in solutions and thin films at room temperature showed narrow band photoluminescence (PL) due to the f-f transitions in the near-IR region: 890, 1070 and 1350 nm for Nd(III), 980 and 1540 nm for Er(III), and 985 nm for Yb(III). The PL efficiencies in solution were determined [φPL=3.3× 10-3 for Nd(III), 7.0× 10-5 for Er(III), and 1.4× 10-2 for Yb(III)]. Organic electroluminescent (EL) devices having the structure of glass substrate/indium-tin oxide/N,N\\prime-diphenyl-N,N\\prime-di(m-tolyl)benzidine{\\slash}Ln(DBM)3bath(Ln: Nd, Er and Yb)/bathocuproine/Mg:Ag/Ag were fabricated, giving the EL bands around 900-1600 nm at room temperature. The external near-IR EL efficiencies at low current density were estimated by comparing with that of the Eu(III) device having the same structure. The saturation of near-IR EL intensity observed at the high current density suggested that the near-IR EL should suffer the T-T annihilation.

  18. Heterotrimetallic coordination polymers: {Cu(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} chains and {Ni(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} layers: synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Maria-Gabriela; Visinescu, Diana; Andruh, Marius; Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; Cano, Joan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2015-03-27

    The use of the [Fe(III) (AA)(CN)4](-) complex anion as metalloligand towards the preformed [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) or [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) heterometallic complex cations (AA=2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenathroline (phen); H2 valpn=1,3-propanediyl-bis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxyphenol)) allowed the preparation of two families of heterotrimetallic complexes: three isostructural 1D coordination polymers of general formula {[Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (H2O)3 (μ-NC)2 Fe(III) (phen)(CN)2 {(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3}]NO3 ⋅7 H2O}n (Ln=Gd (1), Tb (2), and Dy (3)) and the trinuclear complex [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2 )3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ]⋅NO3 ⋅H2O⋅CH3 CN (4) were obtained with the [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) assembling unit, whereas three isostructural heterotrimetallic 2D networks, {[Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (ONO2 )2 (H2 O)(μ-NC)3 Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)]⋅2 H2 O⋅2 CH3 CN}n (Ln=Gd (5), Tb (6), and Dy (7)) resulted with the related [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) precursor. The crystal structure of compound 4 consists of discrete heterotrimetallic complex cations, [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2)3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ](+), nitrate counterions, and non-coordinate water and acetonitrile molecules. The heteroleptic {Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)4} moiety in 5-7 acts as a tris-monodentate ligand towards three {Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III)} binuclear nodes leading to heterotrimetallic 2D networks. The ferromagnetic interaction through the diphenoxo bridge in the Cu(II)-Ln(III) (1-3) and Ni(II)-Ln(III) (5-7) units, as well as through the single cyanide bridge between the Fe(III) and either Ni(II) (5-7) or Cu(II) (4) account for the overall ferromagnetic behavior observed in 1-7. DFT-type calculations were performed to substantiate the magnetic interactions in 1, 4, and 5. Interestingly, compound 6 exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization with maxima of the out-of-phase ac signals below 4.0 K in the lack of a dc field, the values of the pre

  19. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-01

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters. PMID:27267512

  20. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  1. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S; Kobeasy, Mohamed I

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E(∗), ΔH(∗), ΔS(∗) and ΔG(∗) were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  3. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4'-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  4. Modal Profiles for the WISC-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, David A.; Livingston, Ronald B.; Reynolds, Cecil R.; Moses, James A., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a normative typology for classifying the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) factor index profiles according to profile shape. Current analyses indicate that overall profile level accounted for a majority of the variance in WISC-III index scores, but a considerable proportion of the variance was because of…

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  6. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4‧-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  7. Title III and toxic torts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnehausen, G.A.

    1989-07-01

    In July the second annual Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) report under Section 313 of Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and the computerized, national TRI data-base will be issued. Although the Environmental Protection Agency will not be able to aggregate the July, 1989 reports and issue its own annual report until early next year, we can expect political attention to focus quickly on whether total releases to air, land and water, and in particular total emissions to the air, have increased or decreased from 1987 to 1988. Because the reporting threshold for chemical manufacturing and processing facilities will drop from 75,000 to 50,000 pounds per year, the number of facilities reporting and number of chemicals reported should increase significantly, forcing up total releases. Bringing the totals down will be waste and release reduction efforts already underway in the chemical industry and elsewhere, and perhaps improved accuracy in measurement and estimation of releases. Additions to and deletions from the list of reportable chemicals will also have an effect. Nevertheless, any significant increase in aggregate totals, no matter what the explanation, will be bound to have a political impact on air toxics legislation, and spur public concern with the health risks of air pollution.

  8. DHS Phase III activities underway.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Activities and improvements in the third round of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) are described for the first year of the five year DHS-III project during 1992-97. Underway are data quality assessments, identification of data needs, development of a new core questionnaire and modules, and fieldwork survey implementation. Data quality studies are conducted on respondent age, age at first marriage, birth history, knowledge and use of contraception, and health of children aged under 5 years. An analysis of reinterview subsamples for Pakistan and Nigeria will test reliability of data. Emerging data needs for the decade are identified through consultations with data users in the population and health fields. A variety of organizational representatives and recognized experts provide valuable inputs on questionnaire content and module topics. This article also reveals that a shorter questionnaire length will be considered. There will be new questionnaire topics on reliance on breast feeding for contraception, induced abortion and complications, and quality of care. Reductions are made in little used data and retrospective data longer than 3-5 years preceding the survey date. Revisions are made in the Interviewer's and Supervisor's Manuals, the Service Availability Questionnaire, the Male/Husbands Questionnaire, and fifteen modules. Fieldwork is either in progress of completion in Ghana, Kenya, the Philippines, and Turkey. Bangladesh and Bolivia are scheduled for 1993. In 1994 surveys will be administered in Burundi, Central African Republic, Cote d'Ivoire, Guatemala, Haiti, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Mali, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. PMID:12287320

  9. Standards in neurosonology. Part III.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  10. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  11. Standards in neurosonology. Part III.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity).

  12. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  13. Subcellular location of horseradish peroxidase in horseradish leaves treated with La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III).

    PubMed

    Ye, Yaxin; Wang, Lihong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Zhou, Qing; Guo, Shaofen

    2008-11-01

    The agricultural application of rare-earth elements (REEs) would promote REEs inevitably to enter in the environment and then to threaten the environmental safety and human health. Therefore, the distribution of the REEs ion, (141)Ce(III) and effects of La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III) on the distribution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in horseradish mesophyll cells were investigated with electron microscopic radioautography and transmission electron microscopic cytochemistry. It was found for the first time that REEs ions can enter into the mesophyll cells, deposit in both extra and intra-cellular. Compared to the normal condition, after the horseradish leaves treated with La(III) or Tb(III), HRP located on the tonoplast is decreased and HRP is mainly located on the cell wall, while HRP is mainly located on the plasma membrane after the horseradish leaves were treated with Ce(III). This also indicated that REEs ions may regulate the plant growth through changing the distribution of enzymes.

  14. Large Hexadecametallic {Mn(III) -Ln(III) } Wheels: Synthesis, Structural, Magnetic, and Theoretical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Kuduva R; Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis, gas sorption studies, magnetic properties, and theoretical studies of new molecular wheels of core type {Mn(III) 8 Ln(III) 8 } (Ln=Dy, Ho, Er, Y and Yb), using the ligand mdeaH2 , in the presence of ortho-toluic or benzoic acid are reported. From the seven wheels studied the {Mn8 Dy8 } and {Mn8 Y8 } analogues exhibit SMM behavior as determined from ac susceptibility experiments in a zero static magnetic field. From DFT calculations a S=16 ground state was determined for the {Mn8 Y8 } complex due to weak ferromagnetic Mn(III) -Mn(III) interactions. Ab initio CASSCF+RASSI-SO calculations on the {Mn8 Dy8 } wheel estimated the Mn(III) -Dy(III) exchange interaction as -0.1 cm(-1) . This weak exchange along with unfavorable single-ion anisotropy of Dy(III) /Mn(III) ions, however, led to the observation of SMM behavior with fast magnetic relaxation. The orientation of the g-anisotropy of the Dy(III) ions is found to be perpendicular to the plane of the wheel and this suggests the possibility of toroidal magnetic moments in the cluster. The {Mn8 Ln8 } clusters reported here are the largest heterometallic Mn(III) Ln(III) wheels and the largest {3d-4f} wheels to exhibit SMM behavior reported to date.

  15. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) in the presence of different Fe(III) species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang; Hu, Xingyun

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity and mobility of antimony (Sb) are strongly influenced by the redox processes associated with Sb. Dissolved iron (Fe) is widely distributed in the environment as different species and plays a significant role in Sb speciation. However, the mechanisms of Sb(III) oxidation in the presence of Fe have remained unclear because of the complexity of Fe and Sb speciation. In this study, the mechanisms of Sb(III) photooxidation in the presence of different Fe species were investigated systematically. The photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred over a wide pH range, from 1 to 10. Oxygen was not a predominant or crucial factor in the Sb(III) oxidation process. The mechanism of Sb(III) photooxidation varied depending on the Fe(III) species. In acidic solution (pH 1-3), dichloro radicals (radCl2-) and hydroxyl radicals (radOH) generated by the photocatalysis of FeCl2+ and FeOH2+ were the main oxidants for Sb(III) oxidation. Fe(III) gradually transformed into the colloid ferric hydroxide (CFH) and ferrihydrite in circumneutral and alkaline solutions (pH 4-10). Photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred through electron transfer from Sb(III) to Fe(III) along with the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) through a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) process. The photocatalysis of different Fe(III) species may play an important role in the geochemical cycle of Sb(III) in surface soil and aquatic environments.

  16. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Yelampalli, M R; Rachala, M R

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  17. Neptunium(III) application in extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Nadeau, Kenny; Larivière, Dominic

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a novel strategy for actinide separation by extraction chromatography with Np(III) valence adjustment. Neptunium(IV) was reduced to Np(III) using Cr(II) and then selectively separated from uranium (IV) on a TEVA resin. After elution, Np(III) was retained on a DGA resin in order to remove any detrimental chromium impurities. Neptunium(III) formation was demonstrated by the complete and selective elution of Np from TEVA resin (99 ± 7%) in less than 12 mL of 9M HCl from U(IV) (0.7 ± 0.7%). It was determined by UV-visible and kinetic studies that Cr(II) was the only species responsible for the elution of Np(IV) as Np(III) and that the Cr(II) solution could be prepared from 2 to 30 min before its use without the need of complex degassing systems to prevent the oxidation of Np(III) by oxygen. The methodology proposed here with TEVA/DGA resins provides removal of Cr(III) impurities produced at high decontamination factors (2.8 × 10(3) and 7.3 × 10(4) respectively).

  18. Recruitment of RNA polymerase III in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Marshall, Lynne; White, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III contains a dissociable subcomplex that is required for initiation, but not for elongation or termination of transcription. This subcomplex is composed of subunits RPC3, RPC6 and RPC7, and interacts with TFIIIB, a factor that is necessary and sufficient to support accurate pol III transcription in vitro. Direct binding of TFIIIB to RPC6 is believed to recruit pol III to its genetic templates. However, this has never been tested in vivo. Here we combine chromatin immunoprecipitation with RNA interference to demonstrate that the RPC3/6/7 subcomplex is required for pol III recruitment in mammalian cells. Specific knockdown of RPC6 by RNAi results in post-transcriptional depletion of the other components of the subcomplex, RPC3 and RPC7, without destabilizing core pol III subunits or TFIIIB. The resultant core enzyme is defective in associating with TFIIIB and target genes in vivo. Promoter occupancy by pol II is unaffected, despite sharing five subunits with the pol III core. These observations provide evidence for the validity in vivo of the model for pol III recruitment that was built on biochemical data.

  19. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  20. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  1. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis III alpha/beta

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions mucolipidosis III alpha/beta mucolipidosis III alpha/beta Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mucolipidosis III alpha/beta is a slowly progressive disorder that affects ...

  3. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  4. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves.

  5. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-07-15

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves.

  6. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  7. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  8. The Mark III Hypercube-Ensemble Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C.; Tuazon, Jesus O.; Lieberman, Don; Pniel, Moshe

    1988-01-01

    Mark III Hypercube concept applied in development of series of increasingly powerful computers. Processor of each node of Mark III Hypercube ensemble is specialized computer containing three subprocessors and shared main memory. Solves problem quickly by simultaneously processing part of problem at each such node and passing combined results to host computer. Disciplines benefitting from speed and memory capacity include astrophysics, geophysics, chemistry, weather, high-energy physics, applied mechanics, image processing, oil exploration, aircraft design, and microcircuit design.

  9. Solar type III radio burst emission process

    SciTech Connect

    Wentzel, D.G.

    1982-05-01

    The interplanetary type III radio emission has been explained by two qualitatively different nonlinear plasma processes, invoking respectively one- and two-dimensional evolution of plasma wave packets. This paper asks: Is solar coronal type III emission consistent with plasma solitons evolving in one dimension. Although the answer is at best a qualified yes, the theory suggests observational questions that have attracted little attention so far.

  10. Population III Stars Around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop III) stars, born of primordial gas. Pop III stars with masses below 0.8 M⊙ should survive to date though are not yet observed, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]\\lt -5 in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press-Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor stars also escaped from the mini-halos. We discuss the spatial distributions of these escaped stars by evaluating the distances between the mini-halos in the branches of merger trees under the spherical collapse model of dark matter halos. It is demonstrated that the escaped stars distribute beyond the stellar halo with a density profile close to the dark matter halo, while Pop III stars are slightly more centrally concentrated. 6%-30% of the escaped stars leave the Milky Way and go out into the intergalactic space. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of observing the Pop III stars with the pristine surface abundance.

  11. SAGE III solar ozone measurements: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Jui; Cunnold, Derek M.; Trepte, Chip; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Results from two retrieval algorithms, o3-aer and o3-mlr , used for SAGE III solar occultation ozone measurements in the stratosphere and upper troposphere are compared. The main differences between these two retrieved (version 3.0) ozone are found at altitudes above 40 km and below 15 km. Compared to correlative measurements, the SAGE II type ozone retrievals (o3-aer) provide better precisions above 40 km and do not induce artificial hemispheric differences in upper stratospheric ozone. The multiple linear regression technique (o3_mlr), however, can yield slightly more accurate ozone (by a few percent) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. By using SAGE III (version 3.0) ozone from both algorithms and in their preferred regions, the agreement between SAGE III and correlative measurements is shown to be approx.5% down to 17 km. Below 17 km SAGE III ozone values are systematically higher, by 10% at 13 km, and a small hemispheric difference (a few percent) appears. Compared to SAGE III and HALOE, SAGE II ozone has the best accuracy in the lowest few kilometers of the stratosphere. Estimated precision in SAGE III ozone is about 5% or better between 20 and 40 km and approx.10% at 50 km. The precision below 20 km is difficult to evaluate because of limited coincidences between SAGE III and sondes. SAGE III ozone values are systematically slightly larger (2-3%) than those from SAGE II but the profile shapes are remarkably similar for altitudes above 15 km. There is no evidence of any relative drift or time dependent differences between these two instruments for altitudes above 15-20 km.

  12. Terbium(III), europium(III), and mixed terbium(III)-europium(III) mucicate frameworks: hydrophilicity and stoichiometry-dependent color tunability.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sudip; Adhikari, Sangita; Riju, Hiranya; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2012-05-01

    Two 3D porous terbium(III) mucicate frameworks, {[Tb(2)(Mu(2-))(3)(H(2)O)(2)]·4H(2)O}(n) (1) and {[Tb(Mu(2-))(Ox(2-))(0.5)(H(2)O)]·H(2)O}(n) (2), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions by changing the pH of the reaction medium. Isostructural europium(III) and seven mixed terbium(III)-europium(III) mucicates were synthesized by doping different percentages of Eu(III) under similar reaction conditions and unveiling different emission colors ranging from green to red under the same wavelength. Both dehydrated Tb(III) metal-organic frameworks exhibit selective H(2)O vapor sorption over other solvent molecules (MeOH, MeCN, and EtOH) of less polarity and bigger size and have been correlated to the highly hydrophilic pore surfaces decorated with -OH groups and O atoms from the carboxyl groups of mucicate.

  13. Subunit arrangement in beef heart complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Halphen, D.; Lindorfer, M.A.; Capaldi, R.A.

    1988-09-06

    Beef heart mitochondrial complex III was separated into 12 polypeptide bands representing 11 different subunits by using the electrophoresis conditions described previously. Eight of the 12 polypeptide bands were identified from their NH/sub 2/-terminal sequences as obtained by electroblotting directly from the NaDodSO/sub 4/-polyacrylamide gel onto a solid support. The topology of the subunits in complex III was explored by three different approaches. (1) Protease digestion experiments of submitochrondial particles in the presence and absence of detergent showed that subunits II and VI are on the M side of the inner membrane and subunits V and XI on the C side. (2) Labeling experiments with the membrane-intercalated probes (/sup 125/I)TID and arylazidoPE indicated that cytochrome b is the predominant bilayer embedded subunit of complex III, while the non-heme iron protein appears to be peripherally located. (3) Cross-linking studies with carbodiimides and homobifunctional cleavable reagents demonstrated that near-neighbor pairs include subunits I+II, II+VI, III+VI, IV+V, V+X, and V+VII. The cytochrome c binding site was found to include subunits IV, VII, and X. The combined data are used to provide an updated model of the topology of beef heart complex III.

  14. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from α-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H 2O] n have been obtained (where Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); L = barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 °C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr 3+.

  15. Gallium(iii) and iron(iii) complexes of quinolone antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Polishchuk, Elena; Abrams, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2016-08-16

    Iron is an essential nutrient for many microbes. According to the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis", biological systems have difficulties distinguishing between Fe(3+) and Ga(3+), which constitutes the antimicrobial efficacy of the gallium(iii) ion. Nine novel tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes and their corresponding iron(iii) analogs have been synthesized and fully characterized. Quinolone antimicrobial agents from three drug generations were used in this study: ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, oxolinic acid, and pipemidic acid. The antimicrobial efficacy of the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes was studied against E. faecalis and S. aureus (both Gram-positive), as well as E. coli, K. pneumonia, and P. aeruginosa (all Gram-negative) in direct comparison to the tris(quinolono)iron(iii) complexes and the corresponding free quinolone ligands at various concentrations. For the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes, no combinational antimicrobial effects between Ga(3+) and the quinolone antimicrobial agents were observed. PMID:27315225

  16. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K; Pandey, Om P

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H2O]n have been obtained (where Ln=La(III) or Pr(III); L=barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 degrees C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr3+.

  17. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample.

  18. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. PMID:16895854

  19. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  20. An EGFR wild type-EGFRvIII-HB-EGF feed forward loop regulates the activation of EGFRvIII

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Yang, Chin-Rang; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Cipher, Daisha J.; Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar Thidil; Rehman, Alizeh; Jiwani, Ameena J.; Mickey, Bruce; Madden, Christopher; Raisanen, Jack; Burma, Sandeep; Saha, Debabrata; Wang, Zhixiang; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Kesari, Santosh; Boothman, David A.; Habib, Amyn A.

    2014-01-01

    EGFRvIII is a key oncogene in glioblastoma (GBM). EGFRvIII results from an in frame deletion in the extracellular domain of EGFR, does not bind ligand, and is thought to be constitutively active. While EGFRvIII dimerization is known to activate EGFRvIII, the factors that drive EGFRvIII dimerization and activation are not well understood. Here we present a new model of EGFRvIII activation and propose that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in glioma cells is driven by co-expressed activated EGFR wild type (EGFRwt). Increasing EGFRwt leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation and activation while silencing EGFRwt inhibits EGFRvIII activation. Both the dimerization arm and the kinase activity of EGFRwt are required for EGFRvIII activation. EGFRwt activates EGFRvIII by facilitating EGFRvIII dimerization. We have previously identified HB-EGF, a ligand for EGFRwt, as a gene induced specifically by EGFRvIII. In this study we show that HB-EGF, is induced by EGFRvIII only when EGFRwt is present. Remarkably, altering HB-EGF recapitulates the effect of EGFRwt on EGFRvIII activation. Thus, increasing HB-EGF leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation while silencing HB-EGF attenuates EGFRvIII phosphorylation, suggesting that an EGFRvIII-HB-EGF-EGFRwt feed forward loop regulates EGFRvIII activation. Silencing EGFRwt or HB-EGF leads to a striking inhibition of EGFRvIII induced tumorigenicity, while increasing EGFRwt or HB-EGF levels resulted in accelerated EGFRvIII mediated oncogenicity in an orthotopic mouse model. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of this loop in human GBM. Thus, our data demonstrate that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in GBM is likely maintained by a continuous EGFRwt-EGFRvIII-HBEGF loop, potentially an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24077285

  1. Sparkle/PM3 Parameters for the Modeling of Neodymium(III), Promethium(III), and Samarium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ricardo O; da Costa, Nivan B; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M

    2007-07-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to neodymium(III), promethium(III), and samarium(III) complexes. The unsigned mean error, for all Sparkle/PM3 interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.074 Å for Nd(III); 0.057 Å for Pm(III); and 0.075 Å for Sm(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.076 Å, 0.059 Å, and 0.075 Å, respectively, indicating they are all comparable models. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective potential calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Hence, the choice of which model to utilize will depend on the assessment of the effect of either AM1 or PM3 on the quantum chemical description of the organic ligands. Finally, we present a preliminary attempt to verify the geometry prediction consistency of Sparkle/PM3. Since lanthanide complexes are usually flexible, we randomly generated 200 different input geometries for the samarium complex QIPQOV which were then fully optimized by Sparkle/PM3. A trend appeared in that, on average, the lower the total energy of the local minima found, the lower the unsigned mean errors, and the higher the accuracy of the model. These preliminary results do indicate that attempting to find, with Sparkle/PM3, a global minimum for the geometry of a given complex, with the understanding that it will tend to be closer to the experimental geometry, appears to be warranted. Therefore, the sparkle model is seemingly a trustworthy semiempirical quantum chemical model for the prediction of lanthanide complexes geometries.

  2. Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) With Halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Takenaka, Y.; Ohnuki, T.; Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    Halophiles live in high ionic strength brine. The mechanisms of metal association with these microorganisms are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the distribution of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on halophiles, Halomonas sp. (WIPP1A) which was isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository in Carlsbad, US., Halomonas elongata (ATCC33173), Halobacterium salinarum (ATCC19700), and Halobacterium halobium (ATCC43214) and examined the coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The cells of Halomonas sp. and H. elongata were grown in media containing 10 - 15 w/v% and 3.5 - 30 w/v% NaCl, respectively. Halobacterium salinarum and H. halobium were grown in media containing 25 w/v% NaCl. The logarithmic distribution coefficient (log Kd) was measured by using the cells at the late exponential phase. After washing the cells with the same concentrations of NaCl, the cells were mixed with 1x10-6 mol dm-3 Eu(III) and 1x10-8 mol dm-3 Cm(III) at pH 5 in the same concentrations of NaCl and log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) was determined. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd was determined as a function of NaCl concentrations. The coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells was estimated by TRLFS. For TRLFS measurements, samples were prepared by adding cells to a solution of 1x10-3 mol dm-3 Eu(III) with the same concentrations of NaCl as the culture media. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd of Cm(III) was apparently larger than that of Eu(III) at all the NaCl concentrations examined. On the other hand, log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) for H. salinarum and H. halobium was almost identical. Our previous study demonstrated that non-halophiles, Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas fluorescens show no preferences between these elements. Chemical properties of Eu(III) and Cm(III) are almost identical. Our findings suggest that the difference in log Kd

  3. SAGE III on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, M. C.; Thomason, L. W.; Zawodny, J.; Hill, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) has recently been selected for a flight on the International Space Station (ISS) beginning in 2014. Since the instrument was constructed in the early 2000s, the instrument will require extensive testing and refurbishment prior to deliver to ISS. The project will also include the refurbishment of the ESA Hexapod which is a high-accuracy pointing system developed to support ISS external payloads particularly SAGE III. SAGE III refurbishment may also include the replacement of the neutral density filter that has been associated with some instrument response issues during the METEOR/3M mission. We are also exploring options for expanding the science targets to include additional gas species including IO, BrO, and other solar, lunar, and limb-scatter species. In this presentation, we will discuss our plans for SAGE III - ISS refurbishment including results from Sun-look testing, revisions to the science measurements, and discuss expected measurement accuracies in part by examining SAGE III - METEOR/3M measurement data quality. We will also discuss potential mission science goals enabled by the mid-inclination ISS orbit.

  4. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  5. The Berkeley SETI Program: SERENDIP III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, C.; Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Ng, D.; Cobb, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Berkeley SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) program, named SERENDIP, was begun in the late 1970's. It is aimed at detecting narrow band radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. The SERENDIP I, II and III systems have operated autonomously in a piggyback search mode, conducting unobtrusive, long-term observations on the world's largest radio telescopes. The latest generation SERENDIP instrument, SERENDIP III, is a four million channel FFT-based spectrum analyzer operating at 0.6 Hz resolution with a 1.7 second integration time. SERENDIP III has been operating at the NAIC Arecibo Observatory since April, 1992. Several independent criteria suggest that this search is the most sensitive SETI search in operation. To date SERENDIP III has accumulated over 3600 hours of high quality telescope time, observing 75% of the sky visible by the Arecibo telescope. Over this period SERENDIP III has analyzed over 30 trillion spectral bins, and recorded information on 110 million strong narrow band signals in the 424--435 MHz band. A handful of these signals have survived our RFI rejection and signal detection algorithms, and have thus been added to our list of ETI candidate signals. A follow-up observation program will be conducted next year in an attempt to verify each of these candidate signals. This work has been supported by NASA grant NAGW-2722.

  6. Far-infrared absorption spectra of cobalt(III), rhodium(III), and iridium(III). beta. -diketonates

    SciTech Connect

    Oglezneva, I.M.; Isakova, V.G.; Igumenov, I.K.

    1987-03-01

    The IR absorption spectra of the complexes of Co(II), Rh(III), and Ir(III) with acetylacetone, trifluoroacetylacetone, hexafluoroactylacetone, dipivaloylmethane, and pivaloyltrifluoroacetylacetone in the region from 30 to 700 cm/sup -1/ have been examined for the first time. The frequencies of the intramolecular vibrations associated with in-plane and out-of-plane deformations of the chelate rings and deformations of the radicals in the ligands have been assigned. The frequencies of the predominantly stretching nu(MO) vibrations of the metal-oxygen bonds have been identified. Their variation has been compared with NMR data on the redistribution of the electron density in the chelate rings.

  7. Hexaammine Complexes of Cr(III) and Co(III): A Spectral Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. R.; Pavlis, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures are provided for experiments containing complex ions with octahedral symmetry, hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride and hexaamminechromium(III) nitrate, so students can interpret fully the ultra violet/visible spectra of the complex cations in terms of the ligand field parameters, 10 "Dq," the Racah interelectron repulsion parameters, "B,"…

  8. Luminescent xerogels obtained through embedding Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes in silica matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Corneliu S.; Marcotte, Nathalie; Secula, Marius S.; Popa, Marcel

    2013-07-01

    The paper reports the preparation of two luminescent xerogels through embedding in a silica matrix of Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes using succinimide (SI) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHSI) as ligands. In the first stage, Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes with N-hydroxysuccinimide and succinimide were prepared at 1:3 metal to ligand ratio. Strong luminescent emission was observed only in case of Eu(III)-SI and Tb(III)-NHSI complexes while the Eu(III)-NHSI and Tb(III)-SI complexes exhibited none or weak photoluminescent properties. In the second stage, the selected highly luminescent complexes were embedded in silica matrices via a sol-gel procedure leading to the formation of xerogels with transparent-glassy aspect which keep the remarkable photoluminescence properties of the free complexes. The selected, highly luminescent free complexes and their correspondent silica xerogels were investigated through thermal analysis, powder XRD, SEM, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Their excellent photoluminescent properties and excitation spectra, conveniently located in UV-A region, might recommend these materials for applications in optoelectronic devices where photonic conversion layers are required.

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetism of iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinates with pyridinemethanols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrecký, Róbert; Pavlik, Ján; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Dlháň, Ľubor; Koman, Marian; Boča, Roman; Moncoľ, Ján

    2014-11-01

    Four ionic iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinato complexes of the formula (2-pymeH) [FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ[FeIII(H2O)2Cl(dipic)]ṡ2H2O, (3-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ1.5H2O, (4-pymeH)[FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O and (4-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O, where H2dipic = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, 2-pyme = 2-pyridinemethanol, 3-pyme = 3-pyridinemethanol, 4-pyme = 4-pyridinemethanol, have been prepared and characterized by the single-crystal X-ray structure analysis, infrared spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The magnetic data were fitted to a zero-field splitting model revealing a slight magnetic anisotropy for Mn(III) systems. The molecular field correction was consistently formulated and included in the analysis for both, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data.

  11. Psychometric Testing of the FACES III with Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Bette; Dingmann, Colleen; Cuevas, Elizabeth; Meehan, Maurita

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the validity and reliability of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) in two samples of rural adolescents. The underlying theory is the linear 3-D circumplex model. The FACES III was administered to 1,632 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 in two counties in a rural western state. The FACES III Scale and the…

  12. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  13. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  14. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  15. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  16. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  17. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  18. Blood folate status and expression of proteins involved in immune function, inflammation, and coagulation: biochemical and proteomic changes in the plasma of humans in response to long-term synthetic folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Susan J; Horgan, Graham; de Roos, Baukje; Rucklidge, Garry; Reid, Martin; Duncan, Gary; Pirie, Lynn; Basten, Graham P; Powers, Hilary J

    2010-04-01

    We used plasma proteomics to identify human proteins responsive to folate status. Plasma was collected from subjects treated with placebo or 1.2 mg of folic acid daily for 12 weeks in a randomized controlled trial. Homocysteine and folate were measured by immunoassay and uracil misincorporation by electrophoresis. The plasma proteome was assessed by 2-D gel electrophoresis, and proteins were identified by LC MS/MS. 5-methylTHF increased 5-fold (P = 0.000003) in response to intervention. Red cell folate doubled (P = 0.013), and lymphocyte folate increased 44% (P = 0.0001). Hcy and uracil dropped 22% (P = 0.0005) and 25% (P = 0.05), respectively. ApoE A-1, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, antithrombin, and serum amyloid P were downregulated, while albumin, IgM C, and complement C3 were upregulated (P < 0.05). More than 60 proteins were significantly associated with folate pre- and postintervention (P < 0.01). These were categorized into metabolic pathways related to complement fixation (e.g., C1, C3, C4, Factor H, Factor 1, Factor B, clusterin), coagulation (e.g., antithrombin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, kininogen) and mineral transport (e.g., transthyretin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin). Low folate status pre- and post-treatment were associated with lower levels of proteins involved in activation and regulation of immune function and coagulation. Supplementation with synthetic folic acid increased expression of these proteins but did not substantially disrupt the balance of these pathways.

  19. Evolution of Class III treatment in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Peter; Moon, Won

    2015-07-01

    Angle, Tweed, and Moyers classified Class III malocclusions into 3 types: pseudo, dentoalveolar, and skeletal. Clinicians have been trying to identify the best timing to intercept a Class III malocclusion that develops as early as the deciduous dentition. With microimplants as skeletal anchorage, orthopedic growth modification became more effective, and it also increased the scope of camouflage orthodontic treatment for patients who were not eligible for orthognathic surgery. However, orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery remains the only option for patients with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion or a craniofacial anomaly. Distraction osteogenesis can now be performed intraorally at an earlier age. The surgery-first approach can minimize the length of time that the malocclusion needs to worsen before orthognathic surgery. Finally, the use of computed tomography scans for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning together with advances in imaging technology can improve the accuracy of surgical movements and the esthetic outcomes for these patients.

  20. Practical management of grade III acromioclavicular separations.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Gabriel; Arciero, Robert A; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2008-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (AC) injuries are common in the young athletic population. There is general agreement that grade I and grade II separations are best managed nonoperatively, whereas grades IV to VI warrant surgical stabilization. In contrast, considerable controversy exists surrounding the best method of treatment for grade III AC separations. The trend in recent literature is toward the initial nonoperative management of these injuries. However, consideration of other factors such as type of sport, timing of injury relative to athletic season, or the throwing demands in an injured dominant arm may play a role in the decision to treat grade III injuries operatively or nonoperatively. We offer a protocol algorithm for treating grade III AC separations for managing this controversial injury.

  1. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  2. A mixed iron(III)/lithium alkoxide.

    PubMed

    Barley, Helen R L; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E

    2005-07-01

    The heterometallic alkoxide catena-poly[[tetra-mu2-tert-butoxo-1:2kappa4O:O;1:3kappa4O:O-bis(tetrahydrofuran)-2kappaO,3kappaO-iron(III)dilithium(I)]-mu-bromo], [FeLi2Br(C4H9O)4(C4H8O)2]n, forms a one-dimensional chain through an a-glide. This conformation is achieved through the formation of Fe(III)/O/Li/O rings and Li-Br-Li bridges. PMID:15997061

  3. Extraoral traction and class III treatment.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, G

    1981-12-01

    True Class III malocclusions are difficult to treat because they reflect basal bone discrepancies and there are many limitations to conventional treatment mechanisms. For example, Class III elastics may adversely affect the inclination of the occlusal plane and bite depth. On the other hand, extraoral appliances can be used advantageously. One important application is to move a retrognathically positioned maxilla forward orthopedically by means of the facial mask of Delaire. In addition, extraoral appliances placed against the lower incisor segment can also be used to retract the mandibular incisors and control bite depth during the retraction procedure.

  4. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  5. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  6. Quantum chemical study of arsenic (III, V) adsorption on Mn-oxides: implications for arsenic(III) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Paul, Kristian W; Kubicki, James D; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate As(V) and As(III) surface complex structures and reaction energies on both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) sites in an attempt to better understand As(III) oxidation bybirnessite, a layered Mn-dioxide mineral. Edge-sharing dioctahedral Mn(III) and Mn(IV) clusters with different combinations of surface functional groups (>MnOH and >MnOH2) were employed to mimic pH variability. Results show that As(V) adsorption was more thermodynamically favorable than As(III) adsorption on both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) surface sites under simulated acidic pH conditions. Therefore, we propose that As(V) adsorption inhibits As(III) oxidation by blocking adsorption sites. Under simulated acidic pH conditions, Mn(IV) sites exhibited stronger adsorption affinity than Mn(III) sites for both As(III) and As(V). Overall, we hypothesize that Mn(III) sites are less reactive in terms of As(III) oxidation due to their lower affinity for As(III) adsorption, higher potential to be blocked by As(V) complexes, and slower electron transfer rates with adsorbed As(III). Results from this study offer an explanation regarding the experimental observations of Mn(III) accumulation on birnessite and the long residence time of As(III) adsorption complexes on manganite (r-MnOOH) during As(III) oxidation. PMID:19764231

  7. Anisotropy barrier enhancement via ligand substitution in tetranuclear {Co(III)2Ln(III)2} single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2013-08-11

    The replacement of coordinated acetylacetonate for nitrate around a Dy(III) ion results in the enhancement of the single molecule magnet properties of a {Co(III)2Dy(III)2} complex, resulting in a large thermal energy barrier and reduced quantum tunnelling at low temperatures. The analogous Tb(III) complex displays field induced SMM behaviour.

  8. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  9. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology. PMID:26824274

  10. 19-Tungstodiarsenate(III) Functionalized by Organoantimony(III) Groups: Tuning the Structure-Bioactivity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Lin, Zhengguo; Alfaro-Espinoza, Gabriela; Ullrich, Matthias S; Raţ, Ciprian I; Silvestru, Cristian; Kortz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A family of three discrete organoantimony(III)-functionalized heteropolyanions-[Na{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](10-) (1), [{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}2As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](8-) (2), and [{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}{WO2(H2O)}{WO(H2O)}2(B-β-As(III)W8O30)(B-α-As(III)W9O33)2](14-) (3)-have been prepared by one-pot reactions of the 19-tungstodiarsenate(III) precursor [As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](14-) with 2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4SbCl2. The three novel polyanions crystallized as the hydrated mixed-alkali salts Cs3KNa6[Na{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}As(III)2W19O67(H2O)]·43H2O (CsKNa-1), Rb2.5K5.5[{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}2As(III)2W19O67(H2O)]·18H2O·Me2NCH2C6H5 (RbK-2), and Rb2.5K11.5[{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}{WO2(H2O)}{WO(H2O)}2(B-β-As(III)W8O30)(B-α-As(III)W9O33)2]·52H2O (RbK-3), respectively. The number of incorporated {2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)} units could be tuned by careful control of the experimental parameters. Polyanions 1 and 2 possess a dimeric sandwich-type topology, whereas 3 features a trimeric, wheel-shaped structure, representing the largest organoantimony-containing polyanion. All three compounds were fully characterized in the solid state via single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, and their aqueous solution stability was validated by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (183)W) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective inhibition against six different types of bacteria was observed for 1 and 2, and we could extract a structure-bioactivity relationship for these polyanions.

  11. Hydration of lanthanoids(III) and actinoids(III): an experimental/theoretical saga.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Spezia, Riccardo

    2012-09-01

    The latest experimental and theoretical studies on structural and dynamical properties of lanthanoid(III) and actinoid(III) ions in water have been reviewed. In the last years, most of the issues about lanthanoid(III) hydration have been resolved combining X-ray absorption experiments and different theoretical methods. Since 2008 an effort has been made to treat the entire series thus obtaining coherent sets of experimental and theoretical results that were lately put together in such a way that it was possible to derive new basic properties, such as effective ionic radii, across the series. While for the hydration of lanthanoids(III) many experiments and simulations have been reported, the hydration of actinoids(III) was less investigated. There are some experiments performed by different research groups and few simulations that we discuss in this review. Currently, there are enough results that it is possible to gain some understanding of the hydration behavior of lanthanoids(III) and actinoids(III). The ultimate goal of this review is to provide clues on the analogies and differences between the two series. These aspects are connected to several issues: 1) technological: the separation of these elements that is necessary for recycling and stocking of nuclear waste, 2) practical: because experiments on actinoids need particular care, the definition of possible analogies will give the possibility to use the correct lanthanoid when the information on a specific actinoid is needed, 3) fundamental: related to chemical similarities between the two series.

  12. Interpreting change on the WAIS-III/WMS-III in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Iverson, G L

    2001-02-01

    Clinicians should note that there is considerable variability in the reliabilities of the index and subtest scores derived from the third editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III). The purpose of this article is to review these reliabilities and to illustrate how they can be used to interpret change in patients' performances from test to retest. The WAIS-III IQ and Index scores are consistently the most reliable scores, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The most internally consistent WAIS-III subtests are Vocabulary, Information, Digit Span, Matrix Reasoning, and Arithmetic. Information and Vocabulary have the highest test-retest reliability. On the WMS-III, the Auditory Immediate Index, Immediate Memory Index, Auditory Delayed Index, and General Memory Index are the most reliable, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The Logical Memory I and Verbal Paired Associates I subtests are the most reliable. Data from three clinical groups (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, chronic alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia) were extracted from the Technical Manual [Psychological Corporation (1997). WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. San Antonio: Harcourt Brace] for the purpose of calculating reliable change estimates. A table of confidence intervals for test-retest measurement error is provided to help the clinician determine if patients have reliably improved or deteriorated on follow-up testing.

  13. Academic Achievement of NCAA Division III Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Kathy A.; Hickey, Ann

    2014-01-01

    A study of 215 athletes at a small private liberal arts Division III college revealed that athletes (a) begin their college experience with SATs no different from non-athletes; (b) attain GPAs that do not significantly differ from those of nonathletes; (c) achieve GPAs that do not significantly differ between their "in-season" semester…

  14. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena

    2013-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of ~36%, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at ~900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, ~50% are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and ~50% of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  15. Constraining the statistics of Population III binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2013-08-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the 10 minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 au. We find a binary fraction of ˜35 per cent, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 au. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at ≲ 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the 10 minihaloes, ˜50 per cent are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and ˜50 per cent of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming discs. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  16. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of approx. 36, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at approx. < 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, approx. 50 are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and 50 of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  17. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present document describes key discussion points and outcomes of a Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshop, entitled FutureTox III1,2 that was held in Crystal City, Virginia, November 19-20, 2015. The workshop built on the many lessons l...

  18. ESEA Title III 1972 - PACE in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Information Services for Education, King of Prussia, PA.

    This document is a collection of abstracts of all ESEA Title III educational innovation projects funded or operating in Pennsylvania during 1972. Each abstract contains the name of the local supporting agency, the project number, financial information, target population, major objectives, activities, evaluation design, findings to date,…

  19. Gold(III)-Catalyzed Hydration of Phenylacetylene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, J. Michelle; Tzeel, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    A guided inquiry-based experiment exploring the regioselectivity of the hydration of phenylacetylene is described. The experiment uses an acidic gold(III) catalyst in a benign methanol/water solvent system to introduce students to alkyne chemistry and key principles of green chemistry. The experiment can be easily completed in approximately 2 h,…

  20. District Practices Study. Phase III Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Reston, VA.

    Following up on the first two phases (1976-82) of the "District Practices Study" of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as presented in a resource book and seven special reports, this report is devoted to the study's third and final phase. During phase III (1982-83), researchers visited 14 sites to describe their solutions…

  1. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  2. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  3. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  4. Cosmological Impact of Population III Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Bromm, Volker; Heger, Alexander; Jeon, Myoungwon; Woosley, Stan

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of the stellar feedback from Population III (Pop III) binaries by employing improved, more realistic Pop III evolutionary stellar models. To facilitate a meaningful comparison, we consider a fixed mass of 60 {{M}⊙ } incorporated in Pop III stars, either contained in a single star, or split up in binary stars of 30 {{M}⊙ } each or an asymmetric case of one 45 and one 15 {{M}⊙ } star. Whereas the sizes of the resulting H ii regions are comparable across all cases, the He iii regions around binary stars are significantly smaller than that of the single star. Consequently, the He+ 1640 \\overset{\\circ}A recombination line is expected to become much weaker. Supernova (SN) feedback exhibits great variety due to the uncertainty in possible explosion pathways. If at least one of the component stars dies as a hypernova about 10 times more energetic than conventional core-collapse SNe, the gas inside the host minihalo is effectively blown out, chemically enriching the intergalactic medium (IGM) to an average metallicity of {{10}-4}-{{10}-3} {{Z}⊙ }, out to ˜ 2 kpc. The single star, however, is more likely to collapse into a black hole, accompanied by at most very weak explosions. The effectiveness of early chemical enrichment would thus be significantly reduced, in contrast to the lower mass binary stars, where at least one component is likely to contribute to heavy element production and dispersal. Important new feedback physics is also introduced if close binaries can form high-mass X-ray binaries, leading to the pre-heating and -ionization of the IGM beyond the extent of the stellar H ii regions.

  5. Rhodium(i), rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) carbaporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Adiraju, Venkata A K; Ferrence, Gregory M; Lash, Timothy D

    2016-09-21

    Treatment of a benzocarbaporphyrin with [Rh(CO)2Cl]2 in refluxing dichloromethane gave a rhodium(i) dicarbonyl complex, and further reaction in refluxing pyridine afforded an organometallic rhodium(iii) derivative. The carbaporphyrin also reacted with [Ir(COD)Cl]2 and pyridine in refluxing p-xylene to generate a related iridium(iii) compound. These novel metalated porphyrinoids retained strongly diatropic characteristics and were fully characterized by XRD. PMID:27529466

  6. A XAFS study of plain and composite iron(III) and chromium(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Papassiopi, N; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Antipas, G S E; Christou, C; Xenidis, A; Paloura, E C

    2014-09-01

    Reduction of hexavalent Cr(VI) to the trivalent state is the common strategy for remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated waters and soils. In the presence of Fe the resulting compounds are usually mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) phases, while, under iron-free conditions, reduction leads to formation of plain Cr(III) hydroxides. Environmental stability of these compounds depends on their structure and is important to understand how different precipitation conditions affect the local atomic order of resulting compounds and thus their long term stability. In current study, typical Cr(VI) environmental remediation products, i.e. plain and mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides, were synthesized by hydrolysis and redox reactions and their structure was studied by X ray diffraction and X ray absorption fine structure techniques. Plain Cr(III) hydroxide was found to correspond to the molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O and was identified as crystalline in XRD. However, the same compound when examined by EXAFS did not exhibit any clear local order in the range of EXAFS detectable distances, i.e. between 0 and 5Å. Namely, EXAFS spectroscopy detected only contribution from the first nearest neighboring (Cr-O) shell, suggesting that CrO6 octahedra interconnection is loose, in accordance with the suggested anti-bayerite structure of this compound. Mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) systems resembled 2-line ferrihydrite irrespective of the synthesis route. Analysis of Fe-K-EXAFS and Cr-K-EXAFS spectra indicated that FeO6 octahedra are bonded by sharing both edges and corners, while CrO6 octahedra seem to prefer edge sharing linkage. EXAFS data also suggest that Fe-Cr hydroxide produced by hydrolysis presents a better arrangement of CrO6 octahedra compared to the redox product.

  7. Theoretical insights into the separation of Am(III) over Eu(III) with PhenBHPPA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-10-14

    Due to the similar chemical properties of actinides An(iii) and lanthanides Ln(iii), their separation in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is extremely challenging. A 1,10-phenanthroline dipicolinamide-based ligand (PhenBHPPA) has been identified to possess a selectivity for Am(iii) over Eu(iii) and could potentially be used for group actinide extraction. In this study, quasi-relativistic density functional theoretical calculations have been used to disclose the interaction mechanisms of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA. The electronic structures, bonding nature, QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) analyses and thermodynamic behaviors of the Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA have been explored in detail. According to the Wiberg bond indices (WBIs) and QTAIM analyses, interactions between the ligand and metal cations (Am(iii) and Eu(iii)) exhibit a weakly covalent character. Thermodynamic analyses show that the charged complexes [ML(NO3)2](+) appear to be the most stable species in the complexation processes. Moreover, it is more energetically favorable for PhenBHPPA to bind to Am(iii) compared to Eu(iii). Our study could render new insights into understanding the selectivity of the ligand towards minor actinides and the separation of An(iii) from Ln(iii) via liquid-liquid extraction. PMID:26332357

  8. Theoretical insights into the separation of Am(III) over Eu(III) with PhenBHPPA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-10-14

    Due to the similar chemical properties of actinides An(iii) and lanthanides Ln(iii), their separation in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is extremely challenging. A 1,10-phenanthroline dipicolinamide-based ligand (PhenBHPPA) has been identified to possess a selectivity for Am(iii) over Eu(iii) and could potentially be used for group actinide extraction. In this study, quasi-relativistic density functional theoretical calculations have been used to disclose the interaction mechanisms of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA. The electronic structures, bonding nature, QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) analyses and thermodynamic behaviors of the Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA have been explored in detail. According to the Wiberg bond indices (WBIs) and QTAIM analyses, interactions between the ligand and metal cations (Am(iii) and Eu(iii)) exhibit a weakly covalent character. Thermodynamic analyses show that the charged complexes [ML(NO3)2](+) appear to be the most stable species in the complexation processes. Moreover, it is more energetically favorable for PhenBHPPA to bind to Am(iii) compared to Eu(iii). Our study could render new insights into understanding the selectivity of the ligand towards minor actinides and the separation of An(iii) from Ln(iii) via liquid-liquid extraction.

  9. III-V nanowire growth mechanism: V/III ratio and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the dependence of Au-assisted InAs nanowire (NW) growth on InAs(111)B substrates as a function of substrate temperature and input V/III precursor ratio using organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Temperature-dependent growth was observed within certain temperature windows that are highly dependent on input V/III ratios. This dependence was found to be a direct consequence of the drop in NW nucleation and growth rate with increasing V/III ratio at a constant growth temperature due to depletion of indium at the NW growth sites. The growth rate was found to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature, and substrate decomposition. These studies advance understanding of the key processes involved in III-V NW growth, support the general validity of the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism for III-V NWs, and improve rational control over their growth morphology. PMID:17608541

  10. The Behavior of Thallium(III) During Jarosite Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Dutrizac,J.; Chen, T.; Beauchemin, S.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of thallium(III) under the general conditions employed for jarosite precipitation in the zinc industry was investigated in a series of laboratory experiments. Thallium(III) does not appear to form end-member jarosite-type compounds, MTl{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}, where M is Na, K, NH{sub 4}, etc. In acid solutions at pH > 0.7, the thallium(III) hydrolyzes to Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}; in more strongly acid media, two K-Tl(III) sulphate phases crystallize at temperatures < 90 C. The K-Tl(III) sulphate phases were investigated by chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses and by thermogravimetry. Although end-member Tl(III) analogues of jarosite-type compounds could not be synthesized, it is possible to incorporate significant amounts of Tl(III) in potassium jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6), and over 20 at.% substitution of Tl(III) for Fe(III) was achieved. The presence of Tl(III) in the potassium jarosite structure was confirmed by microscopic methods, electron microprobe analyses and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The Tl(III)-bearing species forms rapidly, and excess Fe(III) precipitates as nearly Tl-free potassium jarosite which envelops the initially formed Tl(III)-bearing potassium jarosite phase.

  11. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, M.F.

    1997-12-01

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  12. BES-III distributed computing status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S. D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Korenkov, V. V.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Ma, Z. T.; Nicholson, C.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Suo, B.; Trofimov, V. V.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. U.; Uzhinskiy, A. V.; Yan, T.; Yan, X. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The BES-III experiment at the Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing, China) is aimed at the precision measurements in e+e- annihilation in the energy range from 2.0 till 4.6 GeV. The world's largest samples of J/psi and psi' events and unique samples of XYZ data have been already collected. The expected increase of the data volume in the coming years required a significant evolution of the computing model, namely shift from a centralized data processing to a distributed one. This report summarizes a current design of the BES-III distributed computing system, some of key decisions and experience gained during 2 years of operations.

  13. LSPRAY-III: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    LSPRAY-III is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-III, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  14. Background investigation in EDELWEISS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, Silvia

    2015-08-17

    Protection from and rejection of backgrounds is a key issue for the EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter detection experiment which aims at exploring the 10{sup −9} pb cross-section region for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction. The detector is located in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory and consists of 36 advanced FID germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will discuss the background and the methods of rejecting it with the FID detectors. Detector performances and the first analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign will be presented as well. The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can further be employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.

  15. [Early treatment of Class III malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Michel; Philip, Camille; Salvadori, André

    2011-09-01

    Optimum treatment timing for orthodontic problems continues to be one of the more controversial topics in orthodontics. Especially regarding the correction of Class III malocclusion, there is little consensus as to proper timing or methods for correcting these problems. The orthopedic approach for growth modification is usually limited to children with growth remaining subjected to non hereditary pattern. If the skeletal malocclusion is within the range of an orthodontic treatment, fixed orthodontic appliances with dentoalveolar compensation mechanism can achieve a normal occlusion. Otherwise in patients with a severe skeletal discrepancy, it will be necessary to consider a combined surgical and orthodontic approach. The purpose of this study was to describe treatment planning according to the age and to the initial diagnosis. The management of skeletal Class III malocclusion is still a challenge to orthodontists especially because of relapse due to the late growth of the mandible.

  16. Luminescence of europium (III) complexes for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Pozharov, Mikhail V.; Korolovich, Vladimir F.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Kirdyanova, Anna N.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Zakharova, Tamara V.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    With the purpose to develop bright non-toxic luminescent label for theranostic application we have studied complexation of lanthanide dipicolinates (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylates) by sodium alginate and effect of thermal exposure of synthesized micro-capsules on their luminescent properties. Synthesized micro-capsules are stable in acidic medium but dissolve at pH ~ 4 due to transformation of cationic europium dipicolinate complex to anionic. Luminescence studies have shown that emission spectra of europium(III)-alginate complexes (both chloride and dipicolinate) contain two intensive bands characteristic to Eu3+ ion (5D0 --> 7F1 (590 nm) and 5D0 --> 7F1 (612 nm)). We have also found that at 160ºC europium(III)- alginate micro-capsules decompose to black, soot-like substance, therefore, their thermal treatment must be performed in closed environment (i.e., sealed ampoules).

  17. Engineering design of ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.; Cheng, E.

    1993-07-01

    An efficient organic cooled low activation ferritic steel first wall and shield has been designed for the D-{sup 3}He power reactor ARIES-III. The design allows removal of the large surface heat load without exceeding temperature and stress design limits. The structure is expected to last for the whole reactor life. The major concerns regarding using the organic coolant in fusion reactors have been greatly alleviated.

  18. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-01

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites ( III V q) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites ( V I I I q) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III V q defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V I I I q under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  19. Mechanistic insights into type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-01-01

    Type III restriction-modification (R-M) enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in indirectly repeated, head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location next to only one of the two sites. However, cleavage of sites that are not in head-to-head orientation have been observed to occur under certain reaction conditions in vitro. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites prior to cleavage. Type III R-M enzymes comprise two subunits, Res and Mod that form a homodimeric Mod2 and a heterotetrameric Res2Mod2 complex. The Mod subunit in M2 or R2M2 complex recognizes and methylates DNA while the Res subunit in R2M2 complex is responsible for ATP hydrolysis, DNA translocation and cleavage. A vast majority of biochemical studies on Type III R-M enzymes have been undertaken using two closely related enzymes, EcoP1I and EcoP15I. Divergent opinions about how the long-distance interaction between the recognition sites exist and at least three mechanistic models based on 1D- diffusion and/or 3D- DNA looping have been proposed.

  20. First heterometallic Ga(III)-Dy(III) single-molecule magnets: implication of Ga(III) in extracting Fe-Dy interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sihuai; Mereacre, Valeriu; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-05-31

    The compounds of the system [M4M'2(μ3-OH)2(nbdea)4(C6H5CO2)8]·MeCN, where M = Ga(III), M' = Dy(III) (), M = Fe(III), M' = Y(III) () are isostructural to the known [Fe4Dy2] compound (). Those of the system [M4M'4(μ3-OH)4(nbdea)4(m-CH3C6H4CO2)12]·nMeCN, where M = Ga(III), M' = Dy(III), n = 4 (), M = Fe(III), M' = Y(III), n = 1 () are isostructural to the [Fe4Dy4] compound (). This allows for comparisons between single ion effects of the paramagnetic ions. The structures were determined using single crystal analysis. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that the Ga(III)-Dy(III) compounds and are SMMs. The energy barrier for is close to that for the known isostructural Fe4Dy2 compound (), but with a significantly increased relaxation time. PMID:27184869

  1. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-01

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)). PMID:27326667

  2. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-01

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)).

  3. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of yttrium(iii), dysprosium(iii), erbium(iii), and europium(ii,iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and EPR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongli; Guo, Wenzhen; Liu, Dongling; Yang, Ying; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    Several structurally characterized heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metal ate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide Y(iii), Dy(iii), Er(iii), Eu(iii), and Eu(ii) were prepared via the reaction of MCl3 and K[3,5-R2dp] in varied ratios at 200-220 °C (M = Y, Dy, Er, Eu; R = tBu, Ph). PMID:26666366

  4. Korean Cultural Influences on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunsalus, Ae-Jung Chang; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of Korean culture on the results of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) by comparing profiles of 147 Korean and 132 American college students. Results indicate that MCMI-III personality profile differences exist between Korean and American college students. Discusses implications for mental health…

  5. 75 FR 14575 - Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III AGENCY: National... Phase III of the benchmark research for voting equipment used in an election in 2008 or later and/ or... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will be conducting Phase III research on voting equipment...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261...

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  8. Microbial As(III) Oxidation in Water Treatment Plant Filters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exists in two oxidation states in water - arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is relatively mobile in water and difficult to remove by arsenic-removal treatment processes. Source waters that contain As(III) must add a strong oxidant such as free chlorine or p...

  9. 29 CFR 452.8 - Trusteeship provisions, title III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trusteeship provisions, title III. 452.8 Section 452.8... AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Other Provisions of the Act Affecting Title IV § 452.8 Trusteeship provisions, title III. Placing a labor organization under trusteeship consistent with title III, may have...

  10. 40 CFR 300.220 - Related Title III issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.220 Related Title III issues. Other related Title III requirements are found in 40 CFR part 355. ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Related Title III issues....

  11. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  12. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  13. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  14. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  15. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  16. WAIS-III and WMS-III performance in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Corbera, Kathy; Slavov, Iordan; Taylor, Michael J; Sackeim, Harold A; Fallon, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the nature and degree of intellectual and memory deficits in chronic Lyme disease. In this study, 81 participants with rigorously diagnosed chronic Lyme disease were administered the newest revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), and compared to 39 nonpatients. On the WAIS-III, Lyme disease participants had poorer Full Scale and Performance IQ's. At the subtest level, differences were restricted to Information and the Processing Speed subtests. On the WMS-III, Lyme disease participants performed more poorly on Auditory Immediate, Immediate, Auditory Delayed, Auditory Recognition Delayed, and General Memory indices. Among WMS-III subtests, however, differences were restricted to Logical Memory (immediate and delayed) and Family Pictures (delayed only), a Visual Memory subtest. Discriminant analyses suggest deficits in chronic Lyme are best characterized as a combination of memory difficulty and diminished processing speed. Deficits were modest, between one-third and two-thirds of a standard deviation, consistent with earlier studies. Depression severity had a weak relationship to processing speed, but little other association to test performance. Deficits in chronic Lyme disease are consistent with a subtle neuropathological process affecting multiple performance tasks, although further work is needed to definitively rule out nonspecific illness effects.

  17. Luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkin, V. T.; Mutuzova, M. Kh.; Shamsutdinova, M. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    The luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids are studied. The excitation energies of the triplet states of ligands are determined, a hypothesis is made about the efficient luminescence of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes, the geometry of the coordination polyhedron of a europium complex is established, and the luminescence quantum yields of the complexes in solution are determined.

  18. Does As(III) interact with Fe(II), Fe(III) and organic matter through ternary complexes?

    PubMed

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Demangeat, Edwige; Gruau, Gérard

    2016-05-15

    Up until now, only a small number of studies have been dedicated to the binding processes of As(III) with organic matter (OM) via ionic Fe(III) bridges; none was interested in Fe (II). Complexation isotherms were carried out with As(III), Fe(II) or Fe(III) and Leonardite humic acid (HA). Although PHREEQC/Model VI, implemented with OM thiol groups, reproduced the experimental datasets with Fe(III), the poor fit between the experimental and modeled Fe(II) data suggested another binding mechanism for As(III) to OM. PHREEQC/Model VI was modified to take various possible As(III)-Fe(II)-OM ternary complex conformations into account. The complexation of As(III) as a mononuclear bidentate complex to a bidentate Fe(II)-HA complex was evidenced. However, the model needed to be improved since the distribution of the bidentate sites appeared to be unrealistic with regards to the published XAS data. In the presence of Fe(III), As(III) was bound to thiol groups which are more competitive with regards to the low density of formed Fe(III)-HA complexes. Based on the new data and previously published results, we propose a general scheme describing the various As(III)-Fe-MO complexes that are able to form in Fe and OM-rich waters. PMID:26939079

  19. The role of Ce(III) in BZ oscillating reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Paulo A.; Varela, Hamilton; Faria, Roberto B.

    2012-03-01

    Herein we present results on the oscillatory dynamics in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system in batch and also in a CSTR. We show that Ce(III) is the necessary reactant to allow the emergence of oscillations. In batch, oscillations occur with Ce(III) and also with Ce(IV), but no induction period is observed with Ce(III). In a CSTR, no oscillations were found using a freshly prepared Ce(IV), but only when the cerium-containing solution was aged, allowing partial conversion of Ce(IV) to Ce(III) by reaction with acetone.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of bioactive carboxyamide with trinuclear lanthanide (III) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bibhesh K.; Prakash, Anant; Adhikari, Devjani

    2009-10-01

    Complexes of La(III), Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) with bioactive carboxyamide ligands N',N″-bis(3-caboxy-1-oxophenelenyl)2-amino-N-arylbenzamidine have been synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. Mass spectrum explains the successive degradation of the molecular species in solution and justifies ML complexes. Vibrational spectra indicate coordination of Ln(III) with amide and carboxylate oxygen of the ligand along with nitrate ions. The magnetic moment of Sm(III) and Eu(III) complexes showed slightly higher-values which originated due to low J- J separation leading to thermal population of next higher energy J levels and susceptibility due to first order Zeeman effect. The strong luminescence emitting peaks at 587 nm for Eu(III) and 543 nm for Tb(III) can be observed, which could be attributed to the ligand have an enhanced effect to the luminescence intensity of the Eu(III) and Tb(III). The thermal behaviour of complexes shows that water molecules and nitrate ion are removed in first step followed by the removal of two molecules of nitrate ions and then decomposition of the ligand molecule in subsequent step. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were computed from the thermal data using Coats and Redferm method, which confirm first order kinetics.

  1. Approaching actinide(+III) hydration from first principles.

    PubMed

    Wiebke, J; Moritz, A; Cao, X; Dolg, M

    2007-01-28

    A systematic computational approach to An(III) hydration on a density-functional level of theory, using quasi-relativistic 5f-in-core pseudopotentials and valence-only basis sets for the An(III) subsystems, is presented. Molecular structures, binding energies, hydration energies, and Gibbs free energies of hydration have been calculated for [An(III)(OH(2))(h)](3+) (h = 7, 8, 9) and [An(III)(OH(2))(h-1) * OH(2)](3+) (h = 8, 9), using large (7s6p5d2f1g)/[6s5p4d2f1g] An(III) and cc-pVQZ O and H basis sets within the COSMO implicit solvation model. An(III) preferred primary hydration numbers are found to be 8 for all An(III) at the gradient-corrected density-functional level of theory. Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory predicts preferred primary hydration numbers of 9 and 8 for Ac(III)-Md(III) and No(III)-Lr(III), respectively.

  2. Expression of CA III in rodent models of obesity.

    PubMed

    Stanton, L W; Ponte, P A; Coleman, R T; Snyder, M A

    1991-06-01

    To achieve a better understanding of the biochemical basis of obesity, we have undertaken comparative analyses of adipose tissue of lean and obese mice. By two-dimensional gel analysis, carbonic anhydrase-III (CA III) has been identified as a major constituent of murine adipose tissue. Quantitative comparisons of CA III protein and mRNA levels indicate that this enzyme is expressed at lower levels in adipose tissue from animals that were either genetically obese or had experimentally induced obesity compared to levels in the corresponding lean controls. This decrease in CA III expression was unique to adipose tissue, since other CA III-containing organs and tissues did not show a change when lean and obese animals were compared. Additionally, levels of CA III in adipose tissue from obese animals responded to acute changes in energy balance of the animal. These results are discussed in light of possible metabolic roles for CA III.

  3. Synthesis and Structural Studies of Gallium(III) and Iron(III) Hemicryptophane Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gosse, Isabelle; Robeyns, Koen; Bougault, Catherine; Martinez, Alexandre; Tinant, Bernard; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    New gallium(III) and iron(III) endohedral complexes were obtained from a hemicryptophane ligand bearing suitable binding sites for octahedral metal coordination. The solid-state structures of the free host and of the complexes were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The metal ion is linked to the hydrazone nitrogen and the phenolate oxygen atoms, yielding a distorted octahedral geometry around the encapsulated metal. The two isomorphous structures of the metal complexes reveal the exclusive formation of PΔ/MΛ enantiomeric pairs.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on unexpected complex azides of lanthanum(III) and neodymium(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popitsch, A.; Mautner, A.; Fritzer, H. P.

    Solid azides of the types Cs 3La(N 3) 6, Cs 2Nd(N 3) 5, and Cs 4Nd(N 3) 7 can be prepared by metathetical reactions under special precautions. Electronic spectra in diffuse reflectance, infrared and Raman spectra, and magnetic susceptibilities versus temperature and field strength were measured on microcrystalline samples. The data of these new compounds are primarily discussed in view of vibrational properties of the azide ion N 3-, as ligand and in relation to first insights into the nature of the metal-nitrogen bonds within the coordination polyhedra of La(III) and Nd(III).

  5. III Astronomy School: the world of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivielso, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Astronomy School is an activity organized by the Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón. It is celebrated every year at the end of the summer or the beginning of autumn with the purpose of bringing Astronomy and Astrophysics to the population from an educational and a training point of view. Its III Edition, held in October 2013, has been financed by the Spanish Astronomical Society and was focused on stellar physics. This contribution describes the School and the results.

  6. Doubly Excited States in Be III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T.; Bentzen, S. M.; Poulsen, O.

    1980-01-01

    The triplet spectrum of doubly excited Be III has been studied in the wavelength region of 75-5000 Å in order to test the validity of the theoretical term values reported by Lipsky et al. The beam-foil excitation technique was applied to effectively populate the doubly excited states. The identified lower-lying, doubly excited states 2p2 3P, 2pnp 3P, or 3D, and 2pnd 3P, or 3D (n = 3, 4) show that the theoretical term values should be slightly modified.

  7. The crystal structure of methane phase III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Marcus A.; Press, Werner; Nöldeke, Christian; Asmussen, Bernd; Prager, Michael; Ibberson, Richard M.

    2003-07-01

    Methane is the simplest organic molecule, and like many supposedly simple molecular materials it has a rich phase diagram. While crystal structures could be determined for two of the solid phases, that of the low temperature phase III remained unsolved. Using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and a direct-space Monte Carlo simulated annealing approach, this fundamental structure has now finally been solved. It is orthorhombic with space group Cmca, and 16 molecules in the unit cell. The structure is closely related to that of phase II, yet is no subgroup of it.

  8. Space Processing Applications Rocket project SPAR III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F.

    1978-01-01

    This document presented the engineering report and science payload III test report and summarized the experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of five scientific experiments conducted during the third Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight flown by NASA in December 1976. The five individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: Liquid Mixing, Interaction of Bubbles with Solidification Interfaces, Epitaxial Growth of Single Crystal Film, Containerless Processing of Beryllium, and Contact and Coalescence of Viscous Bodies.

  9. Treatment of Class III with Facemask Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Snigdha; Mishra, Sumita

    2016-01-01

    Class III malocclusion is one of the most difficult problems to treat in the mixed dentition. It has a multifactorial etiology involving both genetic and environmental causes. The dental and skeletal effects of maxillary protraction with a facemask are well documented in several studies. Although treatment in the late mixed or early permanent dentition can be successful, results are generally better in the deciduous or early mixed dentition. The following case shows early treatment of a young patient with severe sagittal and transverse discrepancy of the maxilla and mandible, using a facemask. PMID:26925273

  10. Have We Finally Found Pop III Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Elusive Population: Population III stars — the theoretical generation of extremely metal-poor stars that should have been formed in the early universe before metals existed — have been conspicuously absent in observations. But a team led by David Sobral (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of Lisbon, and Leiden Observatory) may have changed this paradigm with their recent detection of an extremely bright galaxy in the early universe. The team's broad survey of distant galaxies using ESO's Very Large Telescope provides a glimpse of the universe as it was only 800 million years after the Big Bang. The survey uncovered several unusually bright galaxies — including the brightest galaxy ever seen at this distance, an important discovery by itself. But further scrutiny of this galaxy, named CR7, produced an even more exciting find: a bright pocket of the galaxy contained no sign of any metals. Follow-up with other telescopes confirmed this initial detection. Formation Waves: Sobral and his team postulate that we are observing this galaxy at just the right time to have caught a cluster of Population III stars — the bright, metal-free region of the galaxy — at the end of a wave of early star formation. The observations of CR7 also suggest the presence of regular stars in clumps around the metal-free pocket. These older, surrounding clusters may have formed stars first, helping to ionize a local bubble in the galaxy and allowing us to now observe the light from CR7. It was previously thought that Population III stars might only be found in small, dim galaxies, making them impossible for us to detect. But CR7 provides an interesting alternative: this galaxy is bright, and the candidate Population III stars are surrounded by clusters of normal stars. This suggests that these first-generation stars might in fact be easier to detect than was originally thought. Additional follow-up observations with other telescopes will help to confirm the

  11. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  12. White Light Emissive Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets Sensitized by Diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) Linkers.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Rams, Michał; Nakabayashi, Koji; Sieklucka, Barbara; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-23

    The self-assembly of Dy(III) -3-hydroxypyridine (3-OHpy) complexes with hexacyanidocobaltate(III) anions in water produces cyanido-bridged {[Dy(III) (3-OHpy)2 (H2 O)4 ] [Co(III) (CN)6 ]}⋅H2 O (1) chains. They reveal a single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a large zero direct current (dc) field energy barrier, ΔE=266(12) cm(-1) (≈385 K), originating from the single-ion property of eight-coordinated Dy(III) of an elongated dodecahedral geometry, which are embedded with diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) ions into zig-zag coordination chains. The SMM character is enhanced by the external dc magnetic field, which results in the ΔE of 320(23) cm(-1) (≈460 K) at Hdc =1 kOe, and the opening of a butterfly hysteresis loop below 6 K. Complex 1 exhibits white Dy(III) -based emission realized by energy transfer from Co(III) and 3-OHpy to Dy(III) . Low temperature emission spectra were correlated with SMM property giving the estimation of the zero field ΔE. 1 is a unique example of bifunctional magneto-luminescent material combining white emission and slow magnetic relaxation with a large energy barrier, both controlled by rich structural and electronic interplay between Dy(III) , 3-OHpy, and [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) . PMID:26990787

  13. Defining the RNA polymerase III transcriptome: Genome-wide localization of the RNA polymerase III transcription machinery in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Donatella; Praz, Viviane; Reina, Jaime H.; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    Our view of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription machinery in mammalian cells arises mostly from studies of the RN5S (5S) gene, the Ad2 VAI gene, and the RNU6 (U6) gene, as paradigms for genes with type 1, 2, and 3 promoters. Recruitment of Pol III onto these genes requires prior binding of well-characterized transcription factors. Technical limitations in dealing with repeated genomic units, typically found at mammalian Pol III genes, have so far hampered genome-wide studies of the Pol III transcription machinery and transcriptome. We have localized, genome-wide, Pol III and some of its transcription factors. Our results reveal broad usage of the known Pol III transcription machinery and define a minimal Pol III transcriptome in dividing IMR90hTert fibroblasts. This transcriptome consists of some 500 actively transcribed genes including a few dozen candidate novel genes, of which we confirmed nine as Pol III transcription units by additional methods. It does not contain any of the microRNA genes previously described as transcribed by Pol III, but reveals two other microRNA genes, MIR886 (hsa-mir-886) and MIR1975 (RNY5, hY5, hsa-mir-1975), which are genuine Pol III transcription units. PMID:20413673

  14. White Light Emissive Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets Sensitized by Diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) Linkers.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Rams, Michał; Nakabayashi, Koji; Sieklucka, Barbara; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-23

    The self-assembly of Dy(III) -3-hydroxypyridine (3-OHpy) complexes with hexacyanidocobaltate(III) anions in water produces cyanido-bridged {[Dy(III) (3-OHpy)2 (H2 O)4 ] [Co(III) (CN)6 ]}⋅H2 O (1) chains. They reveal a single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a large zero direct current (dc) field energy barrier, ΔE=266(12) cm(-1) (≈385 K), originating from the single-ion property of eight-coordinated Dy(III) of an elongated dodecahedral geometry, which are embedded with diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) ions into zig-zag coordination chains. The SMM character is enhanced by the external dc magnetic field, which results in the ΔE of 320(23) cm(-1) (≈460 K) at Hdc =1 kOe, and the opening of a butterfly hysteresis loop below 6 K. Complex 1 exhibits white Dy(III) -based emission realized by energy transfer from Co(III) and 3-OHpy to Dy(III) . Low temperature emission spectra were correlated with SMM property giving the estimation of the zero field ΔE. 1 is a unique example of bifunctional magneto-luminescent material combining white emission and slow magnetic relaxation with a large energy barrier, both controlled by rich structural and electronic interplay between Dy(III) , 3-OHpy, and [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) .

  15. Performance characteristics of postacute traumatic brain injury patients on the WAIS-III and WMS-III.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, B N; Fichtenberg, N L; Liethen, P C; Czarnota, M A; Stucky, K

    2001-12-01

    Publication of the third editions of the Wechsler intelligence and memory batteries in 1997 created a need for research identifying Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition/Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III/WMS-III) profile patterns associated with neuropathology. The WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual offers data on various diagnostic groups, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Hawkins (1998) employed Technical Manual data to propose certain diagnostic guidelines. In order to validate the conclusions put forth by Hawkins as they apply to brain injury, we examined WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles in an independent sample of 46 TBI cases. As expected, the WAIS-III Processing Speed Index (PSI) was more sensitive to brain injury than other WAIS-III composites; and specific WAIS-III scores were stronger than certain WMS-III scores. On the other hand, the predicted relationship for WMS-III auditory and visual indexes was not found. The lack of specificity for TBI of the proposed index comparisons confirms the need to validate such hypotheses in independent samples.

  16. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  17. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with isatin thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2005-09-01

    Ten new lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes of the general formula Na[La(L) 2H 2O] (Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); LH 2 = thiosemicarbazones) derived from the condensation of isatin with 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazide, 4-(4-chlorophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-nitrophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-bromophenyl) thiosemicarbazide and 4-(2-methylphenyl) thiosemicarbazide, have been synthesized in methanol in presence of sodium hydroxide. The XRD spectra of the complexes were monitored to verify complex formation. The complexes have also been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies. Thermal studies of these complexes have been carried out in the temperature range 25-800 °C using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. All these complexes decompose gradually with the formation of Ln 2O 3 as the end product. The Judd-ofelt intensity parameter, oscillator strength, transition probability, stimulated emission cross section for different transitions of Pr 3+ for 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones have been calculated.

  18. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with isatin thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K; Pandey, Om P

    2005-09-01

    Ten new lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes of the general formula Na[La(L)2H2O] (Ln=La(III) or Pr(III); LH2=thiosemicarbazones) derived from the condensation of isatin with 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazide, 4-(4-chlorophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-nitrophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-bromophenyl) thiosemicarbazide and 4-(2-methylphenyl) thiosemicarbazide, have been synthesized in methanol in presence of sodium hydroxide. The XRD spectra of the complexes were monitored to verify complex formation. The complexes have also been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies. Thermal studies of these complexes have been carried out in the temperature range 25-800 degrees C using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. All these complexes decompose gradually with the formation of Ln2O3 as the end product. The Judd-ofelt intensity parameter, oscillator strength, transition probability, stimulated emission cross section for different transitions of Pr3+ for 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones have been calculated.

  19. Electrochemistry and spectroscopy of ortho-metalated complexes of Ir(III) and Rh(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, Y.; Sprouse, S.; King, K.A.; DeArmond, M.K.; Hanck, K.W.; Watts, R.J.

    1987-02-26

    The electrochemical and UV-visible spectroscopic properties of Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes of the ortho-metalating (NC) ligands, 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) and benzo(h)quinone (bzq), have been studied. Cyclic voltammetric studies of several of the dimeric species, (M(NC)/sub 2/Cl)/sub 2/, indicate metal-centered oxidation occurs at moderate potentials. Cationic monomers of the type M(NC)/sub 2/(NN)/sup +/ where (NN) = 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline have been prepared by reaction of the chelating ligands with the parent dimers. Cyclic voltammetric studies of these monomers indicate that several reversible ligand-centered reductions are generally observed and that the chelating ligand is more easily reduced than is the ortho-metalating ligand. Spectroscopic studies of the mixed ligand monomers indicate that dual emissions from MLCT states associated with the ortho-metalating and chelating ligands occur in the Ir(III) complexes whereas a single emission from a ligand-localized excited state is observed in the Rh(III) complexes. These results are discussed in terms of electronic and nuclear coupling factors analogous to those encountered in descriptions of bimolecular energy and electron-transfer processes.

  20. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  1. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  2. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittner, David; Pitts, Michael; Zawodny, Joe; Hill, Charles; Damadeo, Robert; Moore, Randy; Cisewski, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Avaiation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M (M3M) platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the International Space Station (ISS) in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observations in the second half of this decade. This exciting mission utilizes contributions from both the Science Mission Directorate and the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the European Space Agency to enable scientific measurements that will provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. A related paper by Anderson et al. discusses the. Presented here is an overview of the mission architecture, its implementation and the data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water

  3. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Papassiopi, N; Vaxevanidou, K; Christou, C; Karagianni, E; Antipas, G S E

    2014-01-15

    Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH)3·xH2O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe(1-x)Crx(OH)3 phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fex,Cr1-x)(OH)3 hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH)3. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH)3(am) phase. Mixed Fe0.75Cr0.25(OH)3 hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH)3, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides are more effective enhancers of groundwater quality, in comparison to the plain amorphous or crystalline Cr(III) hydroxides, the latter found to have a solubility typically higher than 50μg/l (maximum EU permitted Cr level in drinking water), while the amorphous Cr(OH)3(am) phase was within the drinking water threshold in the range 5.7

  4. Apolipophorin III from honeybees (Apis cerana) exhibits antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Yeon; Jin, Byung Rae

    2015-04-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is involved in lipid transport and innate immunity in insects. In this study, an apoLp-III protein that exhibits antibacterial activity was identified in honeybees (Apis cerana). A. cerana apoLp-III cDNA encodes a 193 amino acid sequence that shares high identity with other members of the hymenopteran insect apoLp-III family. A. cerana apoLp-III is expressed constitutively in the fat body, epidermis, and venom gland and is detected as a 23-kDa protein. A. cerana apoLp-III expression is induced in the fat body after injection with Escherichia coli, Bacillus thuringiensis, or Beauveria bassiana. However, recombinant A. cerana apoLp-III (expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells) binds directly to E. coli and B. thuringiensis but not to B. bassiana. Consistent with these findings, A. cerana apoLp-III exhibited antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These results provide insight into the role of A. cerana apoLp-III during the innate immune response following bacterial infection.

  5. Molecular magnets based on homometallic hexanuclear lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sourav; Hossain, Sakiat; Dey, Atanu; Biswas, Sourav; Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-05-19

    The reaction of lanthanide(III) chloride salts (Gd(III), Dy(III), Tb(III), and Ho(III)) with the hetero donor chelating ligand N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-6-(hydroxymethyl)picolinohydrazide (LH3) in the presence of triethylamine afforded the hexanuclear Ln(III) complexes [{Ln6(L)2(LH)2}(μ3-OH)4][MeOH]p[H2O]q[Cl]4·xH2O·yCH3OH (1, Ln = Gd(III), p = 4, q = 4, x = 8, y = 2; 2, Ln = Dy(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 8, y = 4; 3, Ln = Tb(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 4; 4, Ln = Ho(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 2). X-ray diffraction studies revealed that these compounds possess a hexanuclear [Ln6(OH)4](14+) core consisting of four fused [Ln3(OH)](8+) subunits. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties of 1-4 have been studied. Single-molecule magnetic behavior has been observed in compound 2 with an effective energy barrier and relaxation time pre-exponential parameters of Δ/kB = 46.2 K and τ0 = 2.85 × 10(-7) s, respectively. PMID:24766539

  6. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kirandeep

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one. PMID:25294978

  7. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Baral, Minati

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one. PMID:25294978

  8. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Baral, Minati

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one.

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart A reference...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart...

  11. Variation in plasmonic (electronic) spectral parameters of Pr (III) and Nd (III) with varied concentration of moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Shubha; Limaye, S. N.

    2015-07-31

    It is said that the -4f shells behave as core and are least perturbed by changes around metal ion surrounding. However, there are evidences that-4f shells partially involved in direct moderator interaction. A systematic investigation on the plasmonic (electronic) spectral studies of some Rare Earths[RE(III).Mod] where, RE(III) = Pr(III),Nd(III) and Mod(moderator) = Y(III),La(III),Gd(III) and Lu(III), increased moderator concentration from 0.01 mol dm{sup −3} to 0.025 mol dm{sup −3} keeping the metal ion concentration at 0.01mol dm{sup −3} have been carried out. Variations in oscillator strengths (f), Judd-Ofelt parameters (T{sub λ}),inter-electronic repulsion Racah parameters (δE{sup k}),nephelauxetic ratio (β), radiative parameters (S{sub ED},A{sub T},β{sub R},T{sub R}). The values of oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters have been discussed in the light of coordination number of RE(III) metal ions, denticity and basicity of the moderators. The [RE(III).Mod] bonding pattern has been studies in the light of the change in Racah parameters and nephelauxetic ratio.

  12. Europium (III) coordination complex with a novel phosphonated ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemin, E.; Elias, B.; Marchand-Brynaert, J.

    2013-02-01

    An original Eu(III) complex with a phosphonated half-cage ligand (CCNPh) was synthesized and characterized. Coordination between Eu(III) and the selected ligand was investigated by FT-IR, 1H, 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The stoichiometry of the Eu(III) complex in acetonitrile was determined by titrations using 1H, 31P NMR and photoluminescence. The 1M:2L stoichiometry, i.e. two CCNPh ligands for one Eu(III), has been measured. In contrast, the 1M:3L stoichiometry occurred in the solid state, from the elemental analysis. This particular behavior may be explained by the addition of a third CCNPh ligand to Eu(III) metallic core during the treatment and evaporation process for the obtention of the solid sample. An antenna effect has been observed consisting in the energy transfer from N-Ph (λexc = 276 nm) to Eu(III) (λem = 618 nm).

  13. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  14. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve high

  15. J/psi spectroscopy from Mark III

    SciTech Connect

    Mallik, U.

    1987-02-01

    The Mark III detector at the SPEAR e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at SLAC has accumulated a data sample of 5.8 x 10/sup 6/ J/psi produced. The status of the xi(2230) observed in the radiative J/psi decay is described. The status of the glueball candidates eta(1440) (iota(1440)) and f/sub 2/(1720) (theta(1720)) are probed with a systematic comparison between the radiative and the hadronic decays of J/psi. Finally, an understanding of quark correlations is attempted from a systematic study of the J/psi decaying into Vector-Pseudoscalar, Vector-Tensor and Vector-Scalar nonets.

  16. Type III secretion systems and pathogenicity islands.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, C; Hart, C A

    2001-02-01

    Some bacterial pathogens have evolved by acquiring pathogenicity islands (PIs), which are clusters of genes encoding virulence traits. PIs encoding the secretion of effector molecules via type III secretion (TTS) systems have been discovered in several gram-negative pathogens. TTS systems are involved in contact-dependent secretion of virulence factors and can facilitate delivery of toxins directly into target cells. The expanding list of bacteria found to contain clusters of TTS genes includes members of the genera Yersinia, Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Bordetella, Burkholderia, Chlamydia and a number of plant pathogens or symbionts. This review discusses the current knowledge of the role of TTS PIs in pathogenicity, the genetic organisation and evolution of such systems,and the potential for using TTS systems as targets for novel treatments.

  17. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Laville, Cedric; Dyrda, James; Mennerdahl, Dennis; Golovko, Yury; Raskach, Kirill; Tsiboulia, Anatoly; Lee, Gil Soo; Woo, Sweng-Woong; Bidaud, Adrien; Patel, Amrit; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T; Gulliford, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  18. The NATO III 5 MHz Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vulcan, A.; Bloch, M.

    1981-01-01

    A high performance 5 MHz distribution system is described which has extremely low phase noise and jitter characteristics and provides multiple buffered outputs. The system is completely redundant with automatic switchover and is self-testing. Since the 5 MHz reference signals distributed by the NATO III distribution system are used for up-conversion and multiplicative functions, a high degree of phase stability and isolation between outputs is necessary. Unique circuit design and packaging concepts insure that the isolation between outputs is sufficient to quarantee a phase perturbation of less than 0.0016 deg when other outputs are open circuited, short circuited or terminated in 50 ohms. Circuit design techniques include high isolation cascode amplifiers. Negative feedback stabilizes system gain and minimizes circuit phase noise contributions. Balanced lines, in lieu of single ended coaxial transmission media, minimize pickup.

  19. AUTOCLASS III - AUTOMATIC CLASS DISCOVERY FROM DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, P. C.

    1994-01-01

    The program AUTOCLASS III, Automatic Class Discovery from Data, uses Bayesian probability theory to provide a simple and extensible approach to problems such as classification and general mixture separation. Its theoretical basis is free from ad hoc quantities, and in particular free of any measures which alter the data to suit the needs of the program. As a result, the elementary classification model used lends itself easily to extensions. The standard approach to classification in much of artificial intelligence and statistical pattern recognition research involves partitioning of the data into separate subsets, known as classes. AUTOCLASS III uses the Bayesian approach in which classes are described by probability distributions over the attributes of the objects, specified by a model function and its parameters. The calculation of the probability of each object's membership in each class provides a more intuitive classification than absolute partitioning techniques. AUTOCLASS III is applicable to most data sets consisting of independent instances, each described by a fixed length vector of attribute values. An attribute value may be a number, one of a set of attribute specific symbols, or omitted. The user specifies a class probability distribution function by associating attribute sets with supplied likelihood function terms. AUTOCLASS then searches in the space of class numbers and parameters for the maximally probable combination. It returns the set of class probability function parameters, and the class membership probabilities for each data instance. AUTOCLASS III is written in Common Lisp, and is designed to be platform independent. This program has been successfully run on Symbolics and Explorer Lisp machines. It has been successfully used with the following implementations of Common LISP on the Sun: Franz Allegro CL, Lucid Common Lisp, and Austin Kyoto Common Lisp and similar UNIX platforms; under the Lucid Common Lisp implementations on VAX/VMS v5

  20. Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Directivity Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Type III radio bursts are a group of fast drifting radio emissions associated with solar flares. These radio emissions are believed to be excited at the fundamental and second harmonic of the electron plasma frequency, fpe by the electron beam excited Langmuir waves through a mechanism called the plasma mechanism. This mechanism attributes the dipole and quadrupole beam patterns for the fundamental and harmonic emissions. To verify these predictions, we analyze the simultaneous observations of type III radio bursts by the STEREO A, B and Wind spacecraft located at different vantage points in the ecliptic plane, and determine their normalized peak intensities (directivity factors) at each spacecraft using their time profiles. Assuming that the sources of these bursts are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions, we estimate the angles between the magnetic field directions and the lines connecting the sources to the spacecraft (viewing angles). Based on the plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles, one can divide these bursts into (1) intense bursts emitted into a narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field, and (2) relatively weaker bursts emitting into a wider cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field. We compute the distributions of ray trajectories emitted by an isotropic point source and show that the refraction focuses the fundamental and harmonic emissions into narrow and wider cones, respectively. The comparison of these distributions with observations indicates that the intense bursts visible to a narrow range of angles around the tangent to the magnetic field probably correspond to the fundamental, and the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles probably are the harmonic emissions.

  1. IFU spectroscopy of southern planetary nebulae - III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Dopita, M. A.; Basurah, H. M.; Amer, M. A.; Alsulami, R.; Alruhaili, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we describe integral field spectroscopic observations of four southern Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe), M3-4, M3-6, Hen2-29 and Hen2-37 covering the spectral range 3400-7000 Å. We derive the ionization structure, the physical conditions, the chemical compositions and the kinematical characteristics of these PNe and find good agreement with previous studies that relied upon the long-slit technique in their co-spatial area. From their chemical compositions as well as their spatial and kinematic characteristics, we determined that Hen2-29 is of the Peimbert type I (He- and N-rich), while the other three are of type II. The strength of the nebular He II line reveals that M3-3, Hen2-29 and Hen2-37 are of mid to high excitation classes while M3-6 is a low-excitation PN. A series of emission-line maps extracted from the data cubes were constructed for each PN to describe its overall structure. These show remarkable morphological diversity. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of M3-6 shows that the recombination lines of C II, C III, C IV and N III are of nebular origin, rather than arising from the central star as had been previously proposed. This result increases doubts regarding the weak emission-line star (WELS) classification raised by Basurah et al. In addition, they reinforce the probability that most genuine cases of WELS arise from irradiation effects in close binary central stars.

  2. DECIMETRIC TYPE III BURSTS: GENERATION AND PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Yan, Y. H.

    2011-09-01

    Simulations are presented for decimetric type III radio bursts at 2f{sub p} , where f{sub p} is the local electron plasma frequency. The simulations show that 2f{sub p} radiation can be observed at Earth in two scenarios for the radiation's generation and propagation. In Scenario A, radiation is produced and propagates in warm plasmas in the lower corona that are caused by previous magnetic reconnection outflows and/or chromospheric evaporation. In Scenario B radiation is generated in normal plasmas, then due to its natural directivity pattern and refraction, radiation partly propagates into nearby regions, which are hot because of previous reconnection/evaporation. The profiles of plasma density n{sub e} (r) and electron temperature T{sub e} (r) in the lower corona (r - R{sub sun} {approx}< 100 Mm) are found to be crucial to whether radiation can be produced and escape at observable levels against the effects of free-free absorption, where r is the heliocentric distance. Significantly, the observed wide ranges of radiation properties (e.g., drift rates) require n{sub e} (r) with a large range of scale heights h{sub s} , consistent nonetheless for Scenario B with short observed EUV loops. This is relevant to problems with large h{sub s} inferred from tall EUV loops. The simulations suggest: (1) n{sub e} (r) with small h{sub s} , such as n{sub e} (r){proportional_to}(r - R{sub sun}){sup -2.38} for flaring regions, are unexpectedly common deep in the corona. This result is consistent with recent work on n{sub e} (r) for r {approx} (1.05-2)R{sub sun} extracted from observed metric type IIIs. (2) The dominance of reverse-slope bursts over normal bursts sometimes observed may originate from asymmetric reconnection/acceleration, which favors downgoing beams.

  3. Apolipophorin III: a lipid-triggered molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Weers, Paul M M; Ryan, Robert O

    2003-12-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is a low molecular weight exchangeable apolipoprotein that plays an important role in the enhanced neutral lipid transport during insect flight. The protein exists in lipid-free and lipid-bound states. The lipid-bound state is the active form of the protein and occurs when apoLp-III associates with lipid-enriched lipophorins. ApoLp-III is well characterized in two evolutionally divergent species: Locusta migratoria and Manduca sexta. The two apolipoproteins interact in a similar manner with model phospholipid vesicles, and transform them into discoidal particles. Their low intrinsic stability in the lipid-free state likely facilitates interaction with lipid surfaces. Low solution pH also favors lipid binding interaction through increased exposure of hydrophobic surfaces on apoLp-III. While secondary structure is maintained under acidic conditions, apoLp-III tertiary structure is altered, adopting molten globule-like characteristics. In studies of apoLp-III interaction with natural lipoproteins, we found that apoLp-III is readily displaced from the surface of L. migratoria low-density lipophorin by recombinant apoLp-III proteins from either L. migratoria or M. sexta. Thus, despite important differences between these two apoLp-IIIs (amino acid sequence, presence of carbohydrate), their functional similarity is striking. This similarity is also illustrated by the recently published NMR solution structure of M. sexta apoLp-III wherein its molecular architecture closely parallels that of L. migratoria apoLp-III. PMID:14599497

  4. Photocatalytic oxidation of arsenic(III): evidence of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Paritam K; Pehkonen, S O; Sharma, Virender K; Ray, Ajay K

    2005-03-15

    Arsenic contamination has been found in the groundwater of several countries. Photocatalysis can rapidly oxidize arsenite (As(III)) to less labile and less toxic arsenate (As(V)), which then can be removed by adsorption onto photocatalyst surfaces. This study investigates the photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) to As(V) as a function of As(III) concentration, pH, catalyst loading, light intensity, dissolved oxygen concentration, type of TiO2 surfaces, and ferric ions to understand the kinetics and the mechanism of As(III) oxidation in the UV/TiO2 system. Photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) to As(V) takes place in minutes and follows zero-order kinetics. Benzoic acid (BA) was used as a hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavenger to provide evidence for the .OH as the main oxidant for oxidation of As(III). The .OH radical was independently generated by nitrate photolysis, and kinetics of As(III) oxidation by the .OH radical was determined. Formation of salicylic acid (SA) from the oxidation of BA by .OH also demonstrates the involvement of .OH in the mechanism of As(III) oxidation. The effect of Fe(III) on As(III) oxidation at different pH values with and without TiO2 under UV light was examined. The results suggest that .OH is the dominant oxidant for As(III) oxidation. Two commercially available TiO2 suspensions, Degussa P25 and Hombikat UV100, were tested for the removal of arsenic through oxidation of As(III) to As(V) followed by adsorption of As(V) onto TiO2 surfaces. Results showed that complete removal of arsenic below the World Health Organization drinking water limit of 10 microg/L could be achieved.

  5. Characterization of the biochemical properties of Campylobacter jejuni RNase III

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nabila; Saramago, Margarida; Matos, Rute G.; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne bacterial pathogen, which is now considered as a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The information regarding ribonucleases in C. jejuni is very scarce but there are hints that they can be instrumental in virulence mechanisms. Namely, PNPase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) was shown to allow survival of C. jejuni in refrigerated conditions, to facilitate bacterial swimming, cell adhesion, colonization and invasion. In several microorganisms PNPase synthesis is auto-controlled in an RNase III (ribonuclease III)-dependent mechanism. Thereby, we have cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized Cj-RNase III (C. jejuni RNase III). We have demonstrated that Cj-RNase III is able to complement an Escherichia coli rnc-deficient strain in 30S rRNA processing and PNPase regulation. Cj-RNase III was shown to be active in an unexpectedly large range of conditions, and Mn2+ seems to be its preferred co-factor, contrarily to what was described for other RNase III orthologues. The results lead us to speculate that Cj-RNase III may have an important role under a Mn2+-rich environment. Mutational analysis strengthened the function of some residues in the catalytic mechanism of action of RNase III, which was shown to be conserved. PMID:24073828

  6. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, molecular docking and DNA binding studies of Al(III), Ga(III) and In(III) water-soluble complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorkaei, Mohammad Ranjkesh; Asadi, Zahra; Asadi, Mozaffar

    2016-04-01

    In this work three new water-soluble aluminum(III), gallium(III) and indium(III) Schiff base complexes; Na2[M(L)NO3]; where L denotes; N,N'-bis(5-sulfosalicyliden)-1,2-phenylendiamin (salsophen) were synthesized and characterized by UV-vis, 1HNMR, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetry (TG) and elemental analysis. To study the biological preference with the molecular target DNA, interaction of these complexes with DNA have been explored by employing various biophysical methods including absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurement. The Kb values at 298 K were found to be 1.17 × 104 for Al(III), 1.35 × 104 for Ga(III) and 1.64 × 104 M-1 for In(III) complexes, respectively. These results suggesting the greater binding propensity of In(III) complexes. Additionally molecular docking was carried out to ascertain the mode of action towards the molecular target DNA.

  8. Oxalate complexation with aluminum(III) and iron(III) at moderately elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R.; Clark, D.L.; Bennett, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    To add to our understanding of the weathering of rocks in organic rich environments such as sedimentary brines and oil field waters, we have examined the temperature dependent complexation of aluminum with oxalate. Raman vibrational studies show that even the association constant for the highly charged Al(ox){sub 3}{sup 3{minus}} unexpectedly increases with moderate temperature increases to 80{degrees}C. To evaluate the potential importance of these Al-oxalate species in complex natural systems, temperature dependent competition experiments Fe(III) and Al(III) for oxalate have been initiated. Similar to aluminum, ferric oxalates show increases in association constants at higher temperatures. In competition experiments, the first association constant for Fe(ox){sup +} increases faster than that for Al(ox){sup +} to 90{degrees}C.

  9. Poly[[diaqua-hexa-μ-cyanido-cerium(III)ferrate(III)] dihydrate].

    PubMed

    Yu, Deng-Yong; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Yuan, Ai-Hua

    2012-05-01

    In the structure of the title complex, {[CeFe(CN)(6)(H(2)O)(2)]·2H(2)O}(n), the Ce(III) and Fe(III) atoms exhibit square anti-prismatic [CeN(6)(H(2)O)(2)] (site symmetry m2m) and octahedral [FeC(6)] (site symmetry 2/m) coordination geometries, respectively. The metal atoms are linked alternately through the cyanide groups, forming a three-dimensional framework in which the {Ce(2)Fe(2)(CN)(4)} puckered square unit is the basic building block. The crystal packing is enforced by O-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, including the uncoordinated water molecule which is located on a mirror plane.

  10. A qualitative study of recovery from type III-B and III-C tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Shauver, Melissa S; Aravind, Maya S; Chung, Kevin C

    2011-01-01

    The literature has shown that long-term outcomes for both below-knee amputation and reconstruction after type III-B and III-C tibial fracture are poor. Yet, patients often report satisfaction with their treatment and outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between patient outcomes and satisfaction after open tibial fractures via qualitative methodology. Twenty patients who were treated for open tibial fractures at one institution were selected using purposeful sampling and interviewed in-person in a semi-structured manner. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Despite reporting marked physical and psychosocial deficits, participants relayed high satisfaction. We hypothesize that the use of adaptive coping techniques successfully reduces stress, which leads to an increase in coping self-efficacy that results in the further use of adaptive coping strategies, culminating in personal growth. This stress reduction and personal growth leads to satisfaction despite poor functional and emotional outcomes.

  11. Preparation and spectroscopic studies of antimony(III) and bismuth(III) halodithiocarbamate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Aleardo; Preti, Carlo; Tosi, Giuseppe; Zannini, Paolo

    1983-04-01

    The complexes of antimony(III) and bismuth(III) with piperidine (Pipdtc), morpholine (Morphdtc) and thiomorpholinedithiocarbamate (Timdtc) of general formula Sb 2-(Rdtc) 3X 3 and M(Rdtc)X 2 (M is antimony or bismuth, X a halogen and Rdtc the dithiocarbamates) have been prepared and characterized by spectroscopic methods. The IR spectra suggest that the dithiocarbamate group coordinates as a bidentate ligand; the metal-sulphur and metal-halide stretching modes have also been assigned. The spectral data are discussed and compared with those of the corresponding trisdithiocarbamate and monohalobisdithiocarbamate derivatives. The molecular weight determinations indicate that all these dithiocarbamate complexes are dimeric. Tentative stereochemistries are proposed and discussed on the basis of the results obtained.

  12. Selective Extraction of Americium(III) over Europium(III) with the Pyridylpyrazole Based Tetradentate Ligands: Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieru; Su, Dongping; Wang, Dongqi; Ding, Songdong; Huang, Chao; Huang, Huang; Hu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Zhipeng; Li, Shimeng

    2015-11-16

    1,3-Bis[3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazol-1-yl]propane (Bippp) and 1,2-bis[3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazyl-1-methyl]benzene (Dbnpp), the pyridylpyrazole based tetradentate ligands, were synthesized and characterized by MS, NMR, and FT-IR. The solvent extraction and complexation behaviors of Am(III) and Eu(III) with the ligands were investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the presence of 2-bromohexanoic acid, the two ligands can effectively extract Am(III) over Eu(III) and other rare earth(III) metals (RE(III)) in HNO3 solution with the separation factors (SFAm/RE) ranging from 15 to 60. Slope analyses showed that both Am(III) and Eu(III) were extracted as monosolvated species, which agrees well with the results observed from X-ray crystallography and MS analyses. The stability constants (log K) obtained from UV-vis titration for Eu(III) complexes with Bippp and Dbnpp are 4.75 ± 0.03 and 4.45 ± 0.04, respectively. Both UV-vis titration and solvent extraction studies indicated that Bippp had stronger affinity for Eu(III) than Dbnpp, which is confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations revealed that the AmL(NO3)3 (L = Bippp and Dbnpp) complexes are thermodynamically more stable in water than their Eu(III) analogues, which is caused by greater covalency of the Am-N than Eu-N bonds. Theoretical studies gave an insight into the nature of the M(III)-ligand bonding interactions. PMID:26517736

  13. Chemical and biological reduction of Mn (III)-pyrophosphate complexes: Potential importance of dissolved Mn (III) as an environmental oxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, Joel E.; Luther, George W., III; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1995-03-01

    Dissolved Mn (III) is a strong oxidant which could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of aquatic environments, but little is known about this form of Mn. Mn(III) was shown to form a stable complex with pyrophosphate which is easily measured by uv-vis spectrophotometry. The Mn(III)-pyrophosphate complex was produced at concentrations of 5 μM to 10 mM Mn at neutral pH. Inorganic electron donors, Fe(II) and sulfide, abiotically reduced Mn(III)-pyrophosphate in seconds with a stoichiometry of 1:1 and near 1:2 reductant:Mn (III), respectively. Shewanella putrefaciens strain MR-1 catalyzed the reduction of Mn(III)-pyrophosphate with formate or lactate as electron donors. Reduction of Mn(III) catalyzed by MR-1 was inhibited under aerobic conditions but only slightly under anaerobic conditions upon addition of the alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. MR-1 catalyzed reduction was also inhibited by metabolic inhibitors including formaldehyde, tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 2- n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO), but not antimycin A. When formate or lactate served as electron donor for Mn(III) reduction, carbon oxidation to CO 2 was coupled to the respiration of Mn (III). Using the incorporation of 3H-leucine into the TCA-insoluble fraction of culture extracts, it was shown that Mn (III) reduction was coupled to protein synthesis in MR-1. These data indicate that Mn (III) complexes may be produced under conditions found in aquatic environments and that the reduction of Mn(III) can be coupled to the cycling of Fe, S, and C.

  14. Synthesis and structural characterization of new dithiocarbamate complexes from Sb(III) and Bi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaluddin, Nur Amirah; Baba, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    Twenty new antimony and bismuth dithiocarbamate complexes which employed ten different type of amines have been successfully synthesized. The synthesized complexes with metal to dithiocarbamate ratio at 1:3. Elemental analysis of the complexes gave the general formula of MCl[S2CNR'R"]2 where M = Sb(III), Bi(III); R' = methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec-butyl, benzyl; R" = ethanol, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl. The complexes were analysed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of five-coordinated antimony (III) complex have been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on SbCl[S2CN(C4H9)(C2H5)]2 adopted a triclinic system with a space group P1 with a = 10.0141(8) Å, b = 10.1394(7) Å, c = 11.8665(9) Å, α = 67.960°, β =87.616°, γ = 80.172°.

  15. Synthesis and structural characterization of new dithiocarbamate complexes from Sb(III) and Bi(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, Nur Amirah; Baba, Ibrahim

    2013-11-27

    Twenty new antimony and bismuth dithiocarbamate complexes which employed ten different type of amines have been successfully synthesized. The synthesized complexes with metal to dithiocarbamate ratio at 1:3. Elemental analysis of the complexes gave the general formula of MCl[S{sub 2}CNR’R”]{sub 2} where M = Sb(III), Bi(III); R’ = methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec-butyl, benzyl; R” = ethanol, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl. The complexes were analysed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of five-coordinated antimony (III) complex have been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on SbCl[S{sub 2}CN(C{sub 4}H{sub 9})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 2} adopted a triclinic system with a space group P1 with a = 10.0141(8) Å, b = 10.1394(7) Å, c = 11.8665(9) Å, α = 67.960°, β =87.616°, γ = 80.172°.

  16. Structural characterization of Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor III (SOTI-III).

    PubMed

    Glotzbach, Bernhard; Schmelz, Stefan; Reinwarth, Michael; Christmann, Andreas; Heinz, Dirk W; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, several canonical serine protease inhibitor families have been classified and characterized. In contrast to most trypsin inhibitors, those from garden four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) do not share sequence similarity and have been proposed to form the new Mirabilis serine protease inhibitor family. These 30-40-amino-acid inhibitors possess a defined disulfide-bridge topology and belong to the cystine-knot miniproteins (knottins). To date, no atomic structure of this inhibitor family has been solved. Here, the first structure of S. oleracea trypsin inhibitor III (SOTI-III), in complex with bovine pancreatic trypsin, is reported. The inhibitor was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis on a multi-milligram scale and was assayed to test its inhibitory activity and binding properties. The structure confirmed the proposed cystine-bridge topology. The structural features of SOTI-III suggest that it belongs to a new canonical serine protease inhibitor family with promising properties for use in protein-engineering and medical applications.

  17. Soluble Manganese(III) in the Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, G. W., III; Oldham, V.; Madison, A.; Tebo, B.; Jones, M.; Jensen, L.; Owings, S.; Mucci, A.; Sundby, B.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies have confirmed the presence of soluble manganese(III), which along with Mn(II) passes through a 0.2 μm filter, in suboxic marine waters. Here we applied a spectrophotometric method using a soluble porphyrin as a competitive ligand to calculate the concentrations and kinetics of Mn(II) and Mn(III) recovery. Data will be presented from the suboxic porewaters of the Saint Lawrence estuary, the suboxic and anoxic waters of the Chesapeake Bay and the oxygenated surface waters of a coastal waterway bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. Soluble Mn(III) accounts for up to 100% of the dissolved Mn pool with concentrations ranging from the detection limit of 50 nM to 80 μM at the oxic/anoxic interface of the non-sulfidic porewaters from the hemipelagic sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary. Data indicate weak-ligand complexation of Mn(III) formed from Mn(II) oxidation as well as reduction of MnO2. Complexation of Mn(III) in the anoxic waters of Chesapeake Bay appears stronger as the porphyrin could not outcompete the natural ligands binding Mn(III). Mn(III) complexes were reduced in the presence of hydroxylamine or hydrogen sulfide and detected as Mn(II). Soluble Mn(III) comprised up to 52 % of total dissolved Mn. Profiles over the course of a five day cruise showed that high Mn(III) concentrations (7.3 μM) were observed at low H2S (4.9 μM) whereas low Mn(III) (1.1 μM) was detected at high H2S (40 μM). The presence of Mn(III) in sulfidic waters indicated that it is kinetically stabilized in situ by strong ligands so reduction to Mn(II) was incomplete. One electron reductive dissolution of solid MnO2 particles formed at the oxic-anoxic interface appear to be the source of Mn(III). Lastly, soluble Mn(III) was detected in the oxygenated surface waters of a coastal waterway (salinity ranging from freshwater to 31) bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. Soluble Mn(III) made up 0-49 % of the total dissolved Mn (maximum of 1.92

  18. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  19. POTENT Reconstruction from Mark III Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, A.; Eldar, A.; Kolatt, T.; Yahil, A.; Willick, J. A.; Faber, S. M.; Courteau, S.; Burstein, D.

    1999-09-01

    We present an improved version of the POTENT method for reconstructing the cosmological velocity and mass density fields from radial peculiar velocities, test it with mock catalogs, and apply it to the Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities. The method is improved in several ways: (1) the inhomogeneous Malmquist bias is reduced by grouping and corrected statistically in either forward or inverse analyses of inferred distances, (2) the smoothing into a radial velocity field is optimized such that window and sampling biases are reduced, (3) the density field is derived from the velocity field using an improved weakly nonlinear approximation in Eulerian space, and (4) the computational errors are made negligible compared to the other errors. The method is carefully tested and optimized using realistic mock catalogs based on an N-body simulation that mimics our cosmological neighborhood, and the remaining systematic and random errors are evaluated quantitatively. The Mark III catalog, with ~3300 grouped galaxies, allows a reliable reconstruction with fixed Gaussian smoothing of 10-12 h-1 Mpc out to ~60 h-1 Mpc and beyond in some directions. We present maps of the three-dimensional velocity and mass-density fields and the corresponding errors. The typical systematic and random errors in the density fluctuations inside 40 h-1 Mpc are +/-0.13 and +/-0.18 (for Ω=1). In its gross features, the recovered mass distribution resembles the galaxy distribution in redshift surveys and the mass distribution in a similar POTENT analysis of a complementary velocity catalog (SFI), including such features as the Great Attractor, Perseus-Pisces, and the large void in between. The reconstruction inside ~40 h-1 Mpc is not affected much by a revised calibration of the distance indicators (VM2, tailored to match the velocities from the IRAS 1.2 Jy redshift survey). The volume-weighted bulk velocity within the sphere of radius 50 h-1 Mpc about the Local Group is V50=370+/-110 km s-1

  20. Rapid thermal processing of III-nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.; Lee, J.W.; Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Donovan, S.M.; Pearton, S.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    High-temperature annealing is necessary in a number of applications for III-nitrides, including activation of Si{sup +} or Mg{sup +} implants for doping, maximization of implant-isolated regions, and Ohmic contact sintering. We have compared two methods for protection against surface dissociation of GaN, AlN, InN, In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N, and In{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}N during rapid thermal processing in N{sub 2} ambients. In the first method, AlN or InN powder is placed in the reservoirs of a SiC-coated graphite susceptor and provides a N{sub 2} overpressure for the nitride samples within the susceptor. In the second method, the nitrides are placed face down on other III{endash}V substrates during annealing. In both techniques N loss from the nitride surface is found to occur at {ge}1050{degree}C for GaN and {ge}1100{degree}C for AlN and {ge}InN, as measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. Real surface roughening is generally significant only for the In-containing materials, with GaN and AlN retaining smooth morphologies even up to 1150{degree}C unless H{sub 2} is present in the annealing ambient. When InN powder is used in the susceptor, there is In droplet condensation on the surfaces of all samples above {approximately}750{degree}C leading to higher root-mean-square surface roughness measured by atomic force microscopy. The N{sub 2}-deficient surfaces of the binary nitrides become strongly n type, while those of ternaries become less conducting. At temperature of 850{endash}900{degree}C, the In droplets on thermally degraded ternaries also begin to evaporate, leading to an apparent improvement in morphology. The presence of H{sub 2} or O{sub 2} in the annealing ambient lowers the dissociation temperature of each of the nitrides by 100{endash}200{degree}C, due to an enhancement in N{sub 2} removal. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  1. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  2. Gd(III)-Gd(III) distance measurements with chirp pump pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Andrin; Qi, Mian; Wili, Nino; Pribitzer, Stephan; Godt, Adelheid; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2015-10-01

    The broad EPR spectrum of Gd(III) spin labels restricts the dipolar modulation depth in distance measurements between Gd(III) pairs to a few percent. To overcome this limitation, frequency-swept chirp pulses are utilized as pump pulses in the DEER experiment. Using a model system with 3.4 nm Gd-Gd distance, application of one single chirp pump pulse at Q-band frequencies leads to modulation depths beyond 10%. However, the larger modulation depth is counteracted by a reduction of the absolute echo intensity due to the pump pulse. As supported by spin dynamics simulations, this effect is primarily driven by signal loss to double-quantum coherence and specific to the Gd(III) high spin state of S = 7/2. In order to balance modulation depth and echo intensity for optimum sensitivity, a simple experimental procedure is proposed. An additional improvement by 25% in DEER sensitivity is achieved with two consecutive chirp pump pulses. These pulses pump the Gd(III) spectrum symmetrically around the observation position, therefore mutually compensating for dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase shifts at the observer spins. The improved sensitivity of the DEER data with modulation depths on the order of 20% is due to mitigation of the echo reduction effects by the consecutive pump pulses. In particular, the second pump pulse does not lead to additional signal loss if perfect inversion is assumed. Moreover, the compensation of the dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase prevents signal loss due to spatial dependence of the dynamical phase, which is caused by inhomogeneities in the driving field. The new methodology is combined with pre-polarization techniques to measure long distances up to 8.6 nm, where signal intensity and modulation depth become attenuated by long dipolar evolution windows. In addition, the influence of the zero-field splitting parameters on the echo intensity is studied with simulations. Herein, larger sensitivity is anticipated for Gd(III) complexes with zero

  3. The SAGE III's mission aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Michael; Thomason, Larry; Zawodny, Joseph; Flittner, David; Hill, Charles; Roell, Marilee; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) is being prepared for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2015. Constructed in the early 2000s, the instrument is undergoing extensive testing and refurbishment prior to delivery to ISS. In addition, ESA is refurbishing their Hexapod which is a high-accuracy pointing system developed to support ISS external payloads, particularly SAGE III. The SAGE III instrument refurbishment also includes the replacement of the neutral density filter that has been associated with some instrument performance degradation during the SAGE III mission aboard METEOR/3M mission (2002-2005). We are also exploring options for expanding the science targets to include additional gas species including IO, BrO, and other solar, lunar, and limb-scatter species. In this presentation, we will discuss SAGE III-ISS refurbishment including results from Sun-look testing. We also will discuss potential revisions to the science measurements and the expected measurement accuracies determined in part through examination of the SAGE III-METEOR/3M measurement data quality. In addition, we will discuss potential mission science goals enabled by the mid-inclination ISS orbit. No dedicated field campaign for SAGE III validation is anticipated. Instead, validation will primarily rely on a collaborative effort with international groups making in situ and ground-based measurements of aerosol, ozone, and other SAGE III data products. A limited balloon-based effort with a yet-to-be-determined validation partner is also in the planning stages.

  4. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  5. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  6. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  7. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  8. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  9. 32 CFR 2003.3 - Functions (Article III).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Functions (Article III). 2003.3 Section 2003.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.3 Functions (Article III). In carrying out its...

  10. 32 CFR 2003.3 - Functions (Article III).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Functions (Article III). 2003.3 Section 2003.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.3 Functions (Article III). In carrying out its...

  11. Genome sequesnce of lineage III Listeria monocytogenes strain HCC23

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotypes within lineages I and II. Serotypes within lineage III (4a and 4c) are commonly isolated from environmental and food specimens. We report the first complete genome sequence of a lineage III isolate, HCC2...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart III of... - Emission Limitations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... appendix A of part 60). Sulfur dioxide 20 parts per million by dry volume 3-run average (1 hour minimum... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission Limitations 1 Table 1 to... Before November 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. III, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart III of Part...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart III of... - Emission Limitations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... appendix A of part 60). Sulfur dioxide 20 parts per million by dry volume 3-run average (1 hour minimum... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission Limitations 1 Table 1 to... Before November 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. III, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart III of Part...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart III of... - Emission Limitations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... appendix A of part 60). Sulfur dioxide 20 parts per million by dry volume 3-run average (1 hour minimum... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Limitations 1 Table 1 to... Before November 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. III, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart III of Part...

  15. An Inventory of ESEA Title III Projects, FY 1974 [Delaware].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John S.

    Forty-eight projects funded by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title III, and providing the funds to public school districts to demonstrate the feasibility of educational innovations, are the focus of this inventory of ESEA Title III projects for the State of Delaware, fiscal year 1974. Sixteen operating projects are described in Part I…

  16. 7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDING NO. 10, PRODUCER GAS & EXHAUSTER BLDG., PLANT A.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant A, Parts I, II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  17. 30 CFR 57.22223 - Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines). 57.22223 Section 57.22223 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... abandonment (III mines). A means of ventilating faces shall be provided before workings are abandoned...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22223 - Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines). 57.22223 Section 57.22223 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... abandonment (III mines). A means of ventilating faces shall be provided before workings are abandoned...

  19. 30 CFR 57.22223 - Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines). 57.22223 Section 57.22223 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... abandonment (III mines). A means of ventilating faces shall be provided before workings are abandoned...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22223 - Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines). 57.22223 Section 57.22223 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... abandonment (III mines). A means of ventilating faces shall be provided before workings are abandoned...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22223 - Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines). 57.22223 Section 57.22223 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... abandonment (III mines). A means of ventilating faces shall be provided before workings are abandoned...

  2. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of air... longwall and continuous miner sections. The quantity of air across each face at a work place shall be...

  3. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  4. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  7. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  8. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  9. Radioimmunoassay of carbonic anhydrase III in rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, A; Jeffery, S; Wilson, C; Carter, N

    1984-01-01

    A specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay for the rat carbonic anhydrase III isoenzyme was developed. High concentrations of carbonic anhydrase III were detected in soleus muscle and male liver. Female liver and other skeletal muscles contained significantly lower concentrations, and only trace amounts were found in heart, prostate, kidney, brain, plasma, urine and, possibly, erythrocytes. PMID:6424658

  10. Extrapyramidal Symptoms and Medication Use in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchan, Michel C.; Sillence, David

    2009-01-01

    Background: We report the case of a 16-year-old male with Mucopolysaccharidosis III type A (Sanfilippo syndrome) who was commenced on risperidone for behaviour management. He rapidly developed extrapyramidal symptoms that have not resolved. Method: The medication histories of 20 patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis III seen at a Lysosomal Storage…

  11. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  12. 76 FR 13984 - Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop III AGENCY: National... announces the Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop III to be held on April 7 and 8, 2011. The event will include... tactical Cloud Computing program, including progress on the NIST efforts to advance open standards...

  13. Molecular structures of unbound and transcribing RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Niklas A.; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Moreno-Morcillo, Maria; Glatt, Sebastian; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Sachse, Carsten; Müller, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of genes encoding small structured RNAs such as tRNAs, spliceosomal U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA is carried out by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), the largest yet structurally least characterized eukaryotic RNA polymerase. The cryo-EM structures of the S. cerevisiae Pol III elongating complex at 3.9 Å resolution and the apo Pol III enzyme in two different conformations at 4.6 and 4.7 Å resolution, respectively, allow for the first time to build a 17-subunit atomic model of Pol III. The reconstructions reveal the precise orientation of the C82/C34/C31 heterotrimer in close proximity to the stalk. The C53/C37 heterodimer positions residues involved in transcription termination close to the non-template DNA strand. In the apo Pol III structures, the stalk adopts different orientations coupled with closed and open conformations of the clamp. Our results provide novel insights into Pol III-specific transcription and the adaptation of Pol III towards its small transcriptional targets. PMID:26605533

  14. Individualized Testing System: Performance Objectives, ISCS Level III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation material for Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program. The manual contains a composite list of selected measurable objectives of Level III of the ISCS program. It is…

  15. SAGE III L2 Monthly Cloud Presence Data (Binary)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-14

    SAGE III L2 Monthly Cloud Presence Data Project Title:  SAGE III ... FTP Access:  Data Pool Parameters:  Cloud Amount/Frequency Cloud Height Cloud Vertical Distribution ... Order Data: Contact User Services:  Order Data Temporal Coverage: ...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  17. 77 FR 64397 - Order of Succession for HUD Region III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... of Succession supersedes all prior Orders of Succession for HUD Region III. DATES: Effective Date.... Director, Community Planning and Development. 2. Baltimore Field Office Order of Succession a. Associate... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for HUD Region III AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and...

  18. An Exploration of Challenges Facing Division III Athletic Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engbers, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a basic understanding of the challenges associated with directing athletic programs at NCAA Division III Institutions. Specifically, this study identified the frequency, intensity, and time allocated to common challenges facing the position of the NCAA Division III AD. The challenges were examined using…

  19. Occurrence and speciation of polymeric chromium(III), monomeric chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ligang; Cai, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in aqueous solution for a relative long period of time. However, the occurrence of polymeric Cr(III) has not been reported in environmental media due partially to the lack of method for speciating polymeric Cr. We observed an unknown Cr species during the course of study on speciation of Cr in the leachates of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Efforts were made to identify structure of the unknown Cr species. Considering the forms of Cr existed in the CCA-treated woods, we mainly focused our efforts to determine if the unknown species were polymeric Cr(III), complex of Cr/As or complex of Cr with dissolved organic matter (DOM). In order to evaluate whether polymeric Cr(III) largely exist in wood leachates, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS was used) for simultaneous speciation of monomeric Cr(III), polymeric Cr(III), and Cr(VI). In addition to wood leachates where polymeric Cr (III) ranged from 39.1 to 67.4%, occurrence of the unknown Cr species in other environmental matrices, including surface waters, tap and waste waters, was also investigated. It was found that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in environmental samples containing μg/L level of Cr, at a level up to 60% of total Cr, suggesting that polymeric Cr(III) could significantly exist in natural environments. Failure in quantifying polymeric Cr(III) would lead to the underestimation of total Cr and bias in Cr speciation. The environmental implication of the presence of polymeric Cr(III) species in the environment deserves further study. PMID:27156211

  20. Fe(III) and S0 reduction by Pelobacter carbinolicus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lonergan, D.J.; Widma, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    There is a close phylogenetic relationship between Pelobacter species and members of the genera Desulfuromonas and Geobacter, and yet there has been a perplexing lack of physiological similarities. Pelobacter species have been considered to have a fermentative metabolism. In contrast, Desulfuromonas and Geobacter species have a respiratory metabolism with Fe(III) serving as the common terminal electron acceptor in all species. However, the ability of Pelobacter species to reduce Fe(III) had not been previously evaluated. When a culture of Pelobacter carbinolicus that had grown by fermentation of 2,3- butanediol was inoculated into the same medium supplemented with Fe(III), the Fe(III) was reduced. There was less accumulation of ethanol and more production of acetate in the presence of Fe(III). P. carbinolicus grew with ethanol as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. Ethanol was metabolized to acetate. Growth was also possible on Fe(III) with the oxidation of propanol to propionate or butanol to butyrate if acetate was provided as a carbon source. P. carbinolicus appears capable of conserving energy to support growth from Fe(III) respiration as it also grew with H2 or formate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Once adapted to Fe(III) reduction, P. carbinolicus could also grow on ethanol or H2 with S0 as the electron acceptor. P. carbinolicus did not contain detectable concentrations of the c-type cytochromes that previous studies have suggested are involved in electron transport to Fe(III) in other organisms that conserve energy to support growth from Fe(III) reduction. These results demonstrate that P. carbinolicus may survive in some sediments as an Fe(III) or S0 reducer rather than growing fermentatively on rare substrates or syntrophically as an ethanol-oxidizing acetogen. These studies also suggest that the ability to use Fe(III) as a terminal electron acceptor may be an important unifying feature of the

  1. Cerium(III), europium(III), and ytterbium(III) complexes with alcohol donor groups as chemical exchange saturation transfer agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Morrow, Janet R

    2009-08-01

    Lanthanide(III) complexes of macrocycles 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (THED) and (1S,4S,7S,10S)-1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (S-THP) were studied as chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. The four hyperfine-shifted alcohol protons of these Ln(III) complexes gave rise to a single (1)H resonance in wet d(3)-acetonitrile that was separated from the bulk water resonance (Delta omega) by 8 ppm (Ce), 2 ppm (Nd), 7 ppm (Eu), or 17 ppm (Yb). A CEST peak corresponding to the alcohol protons was observed for all Ln(THED)(3+) or Ln(S-THP)(3+) complexes except Nd(III) at low water concentrations (<1%). In 100% aqueous buffered solutions, the CEST hydroxyl peak is observed for the Eu(III), Ce(III), and Yb(III) complexes over a range of pH values. The optimal pH range for the CEST effect of each complex is related to the pK(a) of the hydroxyl/water ligands of the complex. Optimum pH values for the CEST effect from alcohol proton exchange are pH = 6.0 for Ce(S-THP)(3+), pH = 4.5 for Eu(THED)(3+), and pH = 3.0 for Yb(S-THP)(3+).

  2. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  3. The Evolution of Population III Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. N.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Estudiamos el enfriamiento y colapso de las perturbaciones iso- termicas de masa M % Mj (masa de Jeans en la era de recombinaci6n) y M « Mj tomando en consideraci5n la expansi6n del Universo, presi6n, arrastre de fotones, enfriamiento de fotones (calentamiento), fotoioni- zaci6n, ionizaci5n por colisiones y la formaci6n y enfriamiento de mo- leculas de hidr6geno. Tambien estudiamos el efecto de no-esfericidad, rotaci6n y campos magneticos en el colapso de M % Mj debido a perturbaciones residuales que sobreviven para N « Mj. ABSTRACT. We study the cooling and collapse of isothermal perturbations of mass N % Nj (Jeans mass at recombination era) and N « NJ taking into account the expansion of the Universe, pressure, photon-drag, photon -cooling (heating), photoionization, collisional ionization and the formation and cooling of hydrogen molecules. We also study the effect of the nonsphericity, rotation and magnetic fields in the collapse of N % NJ. The formation of protostars from the fragmentation of clouds of mass M % MJ due to the residual perturbations that survive for N « NJ is also investigated. K ok : HYDRODYNANICS - STARS-POPULATION III

  4. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  5. Joint Eglin Acoustic Week III Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Conner, David A.; Smith, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    A series of three flight tests have been conducted at an Eglin Air Force Base remote test range located in the Florida panhandle. The first was the "Acoustics Week" flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustic Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. The most recent was the Eglin Acoustic Week III test conducted in August-September 2007. This series of tests acquired acoustic data for a number of rotary and fixed wing aircraft and are used to generate noise semi-spheres used in predicting the acoustic footprint for prescribed flight operations. This extensive database can be used to determine the impact of flight operations on communities around a terminal area as well as for prediction code validations. Another valuable use of the semi-spheres is determining the long-range propagation of noise for civilian and military purposes. This paper describes the third test in this series. Data described in this report were acquired during testing of the MD-902 and Mi-8M aircraft. In addition, data acquired during a set of atmospheric propagation tests is also described.

  6. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  7. Stellar populations in Active Galactic Nuclei III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, C.; Joly, M.; Pelat, D.; Ward, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we apply the stellar population synthesis method previously described in Boisson et al. (\\cite{Boisson2000}) to five more AGN. The analysis of these new data strengthen our previous conclusions: i) homogeneity of the stellar population within a class of nuclear activity regardless of the morphological type of the host galaxy; ii) populations within the nuclear regions of LINERs and Seyfert 2s are different: LINERs have a very old metal-rich population while in the Seyfert 2s a contribution of a weak burst of star formation is observed together with the old high metallicity component; iii) in the circum-nuclar region (200 pc ≤D≤1 kpc) of all the active galaxies in our sample, except for NGC 2992, we detect an old burst of star formation (0.2-1 Gyr),which is contrary to what is observed in normal galaxies. We note that the broad OIλ8446 Å emission line detected in the spectrum of the nucleus of NGC 2992 confirms its classification as a Seyfert 1. Based on observations collected at the New Technology Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  8. Space Phase III - The commercial era dawns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allnutt, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    After the 'Phase I' of space activities, the period bounded by Sputnik and Apollo, 'Phase II', has been entered, a phase in which concerns over the use and the protection of space assets which support national security predominate. However, it is only when the commercial motive becomes prominent that human activity in new regions truly prospers and enters periods of exponential growth. It is believed that there are increasing signs that such a period, called 'Space Phase III', may be coming soon. A description is presented of developments and results upon which this conclusion is based. Since 1980, there have been three developments of great importance for the future of space activities. Six highly successful flights have demonstrated that the Space Shuttle concept works. A series of Soviet missions are related to the emergence of a capability to construct and service modular space stations. Successful tests of the European Ariane 1 indicate an end to U.S. monopoly with respect to the provision of launch services to the Western World.

  9. Structural Characterization of Sm(III)(EDTMP).

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Pushie, M J; Cooper, D M L; Doschak, M R

    2015-11-01

    Samarium-153 ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(methylenephosphonic acid) ((153)Sm-EDTMP, or samarium lexidronam), also known by its registered trademark name Quadramet, is an approved therapeutic radiopharmaceutical used in the palliative treatment of painful bone metastases. Typically, patients with prostate, breast, or lung cancer are most likely to go on to require bone pain palliation treatment due to bone metastases. Sm(EDTMP) is a bone-seeking drug which accumulates on rapidly growing bone, thereby delivering a highly region-specific dose of radiation, chiefly through β particle emission. Even with its widespread clinical use, the structure of Sm(EDTMP) has not yet been characterized at atomic resolution, despite attempts to crystallize the complex. Herein, we prepared a 1:1 complex of the cold (stable isotope) of Sm(EDTMP) under alkaline conditions and then isolated and characterized the complex using conventional spectroscopic techniques, as well as with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional structure calculations, using natural abundance Sm. We present the atomic resolution structure of [Sm(III)(EDTMP)-8H](5-) for the first time, supported by the EXAFS data and complementary spectroscopic techniques, which demonstrate that the samarium coordination environment in solution is in agreement with the structure that has long been conjectured.

  10. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Gregory W.; Kravitz, Neal D.

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable option for older children as well. But what about young adults? Can the skeletal and dental changes seen in expansion/facemask therapy in children and adolescents be demonstrated in this age group as well, possibly eliminating the need for orthodontic dental camouflage treatment or orthognathic surgery? A case report is presented of an adult class III malocclusion with a Class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Treatment was with nonextraction, comprehensive edgewise mechanics with slow maxillary expansion with a bonded expander and protraction facemask. PMID:24715991

  11. Periodicities of Interplanetary Solar Type III radio bursts occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Milan; Navrer-Agasson, Anyssa; Sperone-Longin, Damien; Bonnin, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    We have analyzed 15 years of solar radio observations by the Wind spacecraft in order to detect automatically the Interplanetary Solar Type III radio bursts occurrence. We then compare the daily number of type III radio emissions with the daily number of sunspots. We find, as expected, a very good correlation between the two quantities. We investigate then for periodicities in the daily occurrence of type III bursts by applying a wavelet analysis and compare these periodicities to the ones obtained with the sunspots. We observe a typical Rieger-Type period of about 150 days for both the Type IIIs and the sunspots, with a temporal location of the maximum of this periodicity which is however different for the two data sets. We discuss this difference and compare our results to previous similar studies applied on ground based observations of Type III activity.

  12. Imprints of coronal temperature disturbances on type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Robinson, Peter

    The electron temperature Te and ion temperature Ti in the corona vary with time and loca-tion, due to transient and persistent activity on the Sun. The effects of spatially localized disturbances in Te and Ti on coronal type III radio bursts are simulated. The disturbances are superimposed on monotonically varying temperature backgrounds and arise from spatially confined solar activity. Qualitatively and quantitatively different imprints are found on the curve of the maximum flux versus frequency of type III bursts, because of the disturbances in Te and Ti . The results indicate that nonthermal coronal type III bursts offer a new tool to probe and distinguish between spatially localized structures of Te and Ti along the paths of type III beams. Furthermore, localized temperature disturbances may be responsible for some fine structures in type III bursts, e.g., striae in type IIIb bursts in the presence of multiple, localized temperature disturbances.

  13. Methods for forming group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  14. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  15. Solvation structure and thermodynamics for Pr(III), Nd(III) and Dy(III) complexes in ionic liquids evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribara, Keita; Matsumiya, Masahiko; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    The coordination states of trivalent praseodymium, neodymium, and dysprosium complexes in the ionic liquid, triethyl-n-pentylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) amide ([P2225][TFSA]) were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The effect of the concentration of rare earth ions on the Raman spectra was investigated, ranging from 0.23 to 0.45 mol kg-1 of Pr(III), Nd(III), and Dy(III) in [P2225][TFSA]. Based on a conventional analysis, the solvation numbers, n, of Pr(III), Nd(III), and Dy(III) in [P2225][TFSA] were determined to be 4.99, 5.01, and 5.00 at 298 K and 5.04, 5.06, and 5.07 at 373 K, respectively. Thermodynamic properties such as ΔisoG, ΔisoH, and ΔisoS for the isomerism of [TFSA]- from trans- to cis-coordinated isomer in the bulk and the first solvation sphere of the central RE3+ (RE = Pr, Nd, and Dy) cation in [P2225][TFSA] were evaluated from the temperature dependence of the Raman bands, measured at temperatures ranging from 298 to 398 K. Regarding the bulk properties, ΔisoG(bulk), ΔisoH(bulk), and TΔisoS(bulk) at 298 K were found to be -1.06, 6.86, and 7.92 kJ mol-1, respectively. The trans-[TFSA]- was a dominant contributor to the enthalpy, as shown by the positive value of ΔisoH(bulk). The value of TΔisoS(bulk) was slightly larger than that of ΔisoH(bulk), and cis-[TFSA]- was, therefore, entropy-controlled in [P2225][TFSA]. In contrast, in the first solvation sphere of the RE3+ cation, ΔisoH(RE) became remarkably negative, suggesting that cis-[TFSA]- isomers were stabilized by enthalpic contributions. Furthermore, ΔisoH(RE) contributed to the remarkable decrease in ΔisoG(RE), and this result clearly indicates that cis-[TFSA]- conformers bound to RE3+ cations are the preferred coordination state of [RE(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2- in [P2225][TFSA]. Moreover, optimized geometries and binding energies of [Pr(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2-, [Nd(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2-, and [Dy(III)(cis-TFSA)5]2- clusters were also investigated by DFT calculations using the ADF

  16. Systematic Study of a Family of Butterfly-Like {M2Ln2} Molecular Magnets (M = Mg(II), Mn(III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II); Ln = Y(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III), and Er(III)).

    PubMed

    Moreno Pineda, Eufemio; Chilton, Nicholas F; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E P; McInnes, Eric J L

    2015-06-15

    A family of 3d-4f [M(II)2Ln(III)2(μ3-OH)2(O2C(t)Bu)10](2-) "butterflies" (where M(II) = Mg, Co, Ni, and Cu; Ln(III) = Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er) and [Mn(III)2Ln(III)2(μ3-O)2(O2C(t)Bu)10](2-) molecules (where Ln(III) = Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er) has been synthesized and characterized through single-crystal X-ray diffraction, SQUID magnetometry, and ab initio calculations. All dysprosium- and some erbium-containing tetramers showed frequency-dependent maxima in the out-of-phase component of the susceptibility associated with slow relaxation of magnetization, and hence, they are single-molecule magnets (SMMs). AC susceptibility measurements have shown that the SMM behavior is entirely intrinsic to the Dy and Er sites and the magnitude of the energy barrier is influenced by the interactions between the 4f and the 3d metal. A trend is observed between the strength of the 3d-4f exchange interaction between and the maximum observed in the χ″M(T). PMID:26016421

  17. The Distribution of Scaled Scores and Possible Floor Effects on the WISC-III and WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Simon; Wood, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Objective: It has been suggested that, as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) give a scaled score of one even if a client scores a raw score of zero, these assessments may have a hidden floor effect at low IQ levels. The study looked for…

  18. Ditopic CMPO-pillar[5]arenes as unique receptors for efficient separation of americium(III) and europium(III).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuyu; Yuan, Xiangyang; Wu, Lei; Peng, Zhiyong; Feng, Wen; Liu, Ning; Xu, Dingguo; Li, Shoujian; Sengupta, Arijit; Mohapatra, Prasanta K; Yuan, Lihua

    2015-03-11

    A unique host-guest recognition process involving a new class of homoditopic CMPO-pillar[5]arenes and lanthanides was revealed to proceed in a stepwise manner, and correlated with the efficient separation of americium(III) and europium(III) under acidic feed conditions. PMID:25671799

  19. Heteronuclear Ir(III)-Ln(III) Luminescent Complexes: Small-Molecule Probes for Dual Modal Imaging and Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Jana, Atanu; Crowston, Bethany J; Shewring, Jonathan R; McKenzie, Luke K; Bryant, Helen E; Botchway, Stanley W; Ward, Andrew D; Amoroso, Angelo J; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Ward, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent, mixed metal d-f complexes have the potential to be used for dual (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and luminescence) in vivo imaging. Here, we present dinuclear and trinuclear d-f complexes, comprising a rigid framework linking a luminescent Ir center to one (Ir·Ln) or two (Ir·Ln2) lanthanide metal centers (where Ln = Eu(III) and Gd(III), respectively). A range of physical, spectroscopic, and imaging-based properties including relaxivity arising from the Gd(III) units and the occurrence of Ir(III) → Eu(III) photoinduced energy-transfer are presented. The rigidity imposed by the ligand facilitates high relaxivities for the Gd(III) complexes, while the luminescence from the Ir(III) and Eu(III) centers provide luminescence imaging capabilities. Dinuclear (Ir·Ln) complexes performed best in cellular studies, exhibiting good solubility in aqueous solutions, low toxicity after 4 and 18 h, respectively, and punctate lysosomal staining. We also demonstrate the first example of oxygen sensing in fixed cells using the dyad Ir·Gd, via two-photon phosphorescence lifetime imaging (PLIM). PMID:27219675

  20. III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, Mark; Martin, Trevor; Smowton, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductor devices with silicon is one of the most topical challenges in current electronic materials research. The combination has the potential to exploit the unique optical and electronic functionality of III-V technology with the signal processing capabilities and advanced low-cost volume production techniques associated with silicon. Key industrial drivers include the use of high mobility III-V channel materials (InGaAs, InAs, InSb) to extend the performance of Si CMOS, the unification of electronics and photonics by combining photonic components (GaAs, InP) with a silicon platform for next-generation optical interconnects and the exploitation of large-area silicon substrates and high-volume Si processing capabilities to meet the challenges of low-cost production, a challenge which is particularly important for GaN-based devices in both power management and lighting applications. The diverse nature of the III-V and Si device approaches, materials technologies and the distinct differences between industrial Si and III-V processing have provided a major barrier to integration in the past. However, advances over the last decade in areas such as die transfer, wafer fusion and epitaxial growth have promoted widespread renewed interest. It is now timely to bring some of these topics together in a special issue covering a range of approaches and materials providing a snapshot of recent progress across the field. The issue opens a paper describing a strategy for the epitaxial integration of photonic devices where Kataria et al describe progress in the lateral overgrowth of InP/Si. As an alternative, Benjoucef and Reithmaier report on the potential of InAs quantum dots grown direct onto Si surfaces whilst Sandall et al describe the properties of similar InAs quantum dots as an optical modulator device. As an alternative to epitaxial integration approaches, Yokoyama et al describe a wafer bonding approach using a buried oxide concept, Corbett

  1. Iron(III) hydroxide-loaded coral limestone as an adsorbent for arsenic(III) and arsenic (V)

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Shigeru; Ohki, Akira; Saikoji, Shunsuke; Naka, Kensuke )

    1992-04-01

    Trace levels of As(III) and As(V) in aqueous media were effectively adsorbed onto a coral limestone loaded by Fe(OH){sub 3}. The adsorption of As(III) was almost comparable to that of As(V). The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was almost independent of the pH of the aqueous phase (pH range: 3-10) because of a self-buffering effect of the coral. The addition of such anions as chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and acetate in the aqueous phase did not significantly affect the adsorption of As(III), whereas the addition of phosphate brought about a great decrease in the adsorption. The arsenic adsorption was effectively applied to the column method. Unloaded coral itself was effective as an adsorbent for As(V) when Fe(III) coexisted in the aqueous solutions.

  2. Pleiotropic developmental expression of HasPOU-III, a class III POU gene, in the gastropod Haliotis asinina.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Elizabeth K; Degnan, Bernard M

    2002-06-01

    HasPOU-III is expressed in multiple cell types during the first 3 days of development of the gastropod Haliotis asinina. HasPOU-III expression begins in two bilaterally symmetrical sets of cells on the ventral ectodermal surface of the trochophore larva; one set are putative foot mucous cells. After torsion, HasPOU-III transcripts transiently appear in the developing ganglia of the central nervous system. At the end of larval morphogenesis, HasPOU-III expression is initiated in dorsoposterior cells of the visceral mass, in the posterior cells of the statocyst and in the developing radular sac. These expression patterns in Haliotis, a spiralian lophotrochozoan, are similar to POU Class III genes in other bilaterians where expression occurs in secretory cells and the developing nervous system.

  3. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  4. PREFACE: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemmerer, D.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Europhysics Conference `Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III' (NPA3) took place from 26 31 March 2007 in Dresden, Germany, hosted by Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The present special issue of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics contains all peer-reviewed contributions to the proceedings of this conference. NPA3 is the third conference in the Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics series of conferences devoted to the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics. The first and second editions of the series were held in 2002 and 2005 in Debrecen, Hungary. NPA3 has been organized under the auspices of the Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society as its XXI Divisional Conference. The conference marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark paper B2FH published in 1957 by E M Burbidge, G R Burbidge, W A Fowler and F Hoyle. A public lecture by Claus Rolfs (Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany) commemorated the progress achieved since 1957. NPA3 aimed to bring together experimental and theoretical nuclear physicists, astrophysicists and astronomers to address the important part played by nuclear physics in current astrophysical problems. A total of 130 participants from 71 institutions in 26 countries attended the conference, presenting 33 invited and 38 contributed talks and 25 posters on six subject areas. The astrophysical motivation and the nuclear tools employed to address it are highlighted by the titles of the subject areas: Big Bang Nucleosynthesis Stellar Nucleosynthesis and Low Cross Section Measurement Explosive Nucleosynthesis and Nuclear Astrophysics with Photons Nuclei far from Stability and Radioactive Ion Beams Dense Matter in Neutron Stars and Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Neutrinos in Nuclear Astrophysics The presentations and discussions proved that Nuclear Astrophysics is a truly interdisciplinary subject. The remarkable progress in astronomical observations achieved in recent years is matched by advances in

  5. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  6. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  7. EXCEDE technology development III: first vacuum tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Lozi, Julien; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Hix, Troy T.; Bendek, Eduardo; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Lynch, Dana H.; Mihara, Roger; Irwin, J. Wes; Duncan, Alan L.; Greene, Thomas P.; Guyon, Olivier; Kendrick, Richard L.; Smith, Eric H.; Witteborn, Fred C.; Schneider, Glenn

    2014-08-01

    This paper is the third in the series on the technology development for the EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer) mission concept, which in 2011 was selected by NASA's Explorer program for technology development (Category III). EXCEDE is a 0.7m space telescope concept designed to achieve raw contrasts of 1e6 at an inner working angle of 1.2 l/D and 1e7 at 2 l/D and beyond. This will allow it to directly detect and spatially resolve low surface brightness circumstellar debris disks as well as image giant planets as close as in the habitable zones of their host stars. In addition to doing fundamental science on debris disks, EXCEDE will also serve as a technological and scientific precursor for any future exo-Earth imaging mission. EXCEDE uses a Starlight Suppression System (SSS) based on the PIAA coronagraph, enabling aggressive performance. Previously, we reported on the achievement of our first milestone (demonstration of EXCEDE IWA and contrast in monochromatic light) in air. In this presentation, we report on our continuing progress of developing the SSS for EXCEDE, and in particular (a) the reconfiguration of our system into a more flight-like layout, with an upstream deformable mirror and an inverse PIAA system, and (b) testing this system in a vacuum chamber, including IWA, contrast, and stability performance. Even though this technology development is primarily targeted towards EXCEDE, it is also germane to any exoplanet direct imaging space-based telescopes because of the many challenges common to different coronagraph architectures and mission requirements. This work was supported in part by the NASA Explorer program and Ames Research Center, University of Arizona, and Lockheed Martin SSC.

  8. Rotation and internal structure of Population III protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Greif, Thomas H.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-05-01

    We analyse the cosmological simulations performed in the recent work of Greif et al., which followed the early growth and merger history of Population III (Pop III) stars while resolving scales as small as 0.05 R⊙. This is the first set of cosmological simulations to self-consistently resolve the rotation and internal structure of Pop III protostars. We find that Pop III stars form under significant rotational support which is maintained for the duration of the simulations. The protostellar surfaces spin from ˜50 per cent to nearly 100 per cent of Keplerian rotational velocity. These rotation rates persist after experiencing multiple stellar merger events. In the brief time period simulated (˜10 yr), the protostars show little indication of convective instability, and their properties furthermore show little correlation with the properties of their host minihaloes. If Pop III protostars within this range of environments generally form with high degrees of rotational support, and if this rotational support is maintained for a sufficient amount of time, this has a number of crucial implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the possibility for Pop III pair-instability supernovae, and the question of whether the first stars produced gamma-ray bursts.

  9. Detection of COL III in parchment by amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dorte V P; Larsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Cultural heritage parchments made from the reticular dermis of animals have been subject to studies of deterioration and conservation by amino acid analysis. The reticular dermis contains a varying mixture of collagen I and III (COL I and III). When dealing with the results of the amino acid analyses, till now the COL III content has not been taken into account. Based on the available amino acid sequences, we present a method for determining the amount of COL III in the reticular dermis of new and historical parchments calculated from the ratio of Ile/Val. We find COL III contents between 7 and 32 % in new parchments and between 0.2 and 40 % in the historical parchments. This is consistent with results in the literature. The varying content of COL III has a significant influence on the uncertainty of the amino acid analysis. Although we have not found a simple correlation between the COL III content and the degree of deterioration, our results show that this question must be taken into consideration in future studies of the chemical and physical deterioration of parchment measured by amino acid analysis and other analytical methods.

  10. TYPE III RADIO BURSTS PERTURBED BY WEAK CORONAL SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2012-07-10

    Some type III bursts are observed to undergo sudden flux modifications, e.g., reductions and intensifications, when type III beams cross shocks in the upper corona or solar wind. First simulations are presented for type III bursts perturbed by weak coronal shocks, which type III beams traverse. The simulations incorporate spatially localized jumps in plasma density and electron and ion temperatures downstream of a shock. A shock is predicted to produce significant modulations to a type III burst: (1) a broadband flux reduction or frequency gap caused by the shock's density jump, (2) a narrowband flux intensification originating from where the downstream plasma density locally has a small gradient, (3) a possible intensification from the shock front or just upstream, and (4) changes in the frequency drift rate profile and the temporal evolution of radiation flux at frequencies corresponding to the shocked plasma. The modulations are caused primarily by fundamental modifications to the radiation processes in response to the shocked density and temperatures. The predicted intensifications and reductions appear qualitatively consistent with the available small number of reported observations, although it is unclear how representative these observations are. It is demonstrated that a weak shock can cause an otherwise radio-quiet type III beam to produce observable levels of narrowband radio emission. The simulations suggest that type III bursts with frequency-time fine structures may provide a tool to probe shocks in the corona and solar wind, especially for weak shocks that do not radiate by themselves.

  11. Assessment of Sleep in Children with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Louise Victoria; Lomax, Michelle; Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Hare, Dougal Julian; Wraith, James Ed; Jones, Simon; Bigger, Brian; Langford-Smith, Kia; Canal, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in mucopolysaccharidosis Type III (MPS III), yet there is a lack of objective, ecologically valid evidence detailing sleep quantity, quality or circadian system. Eight children with MPS III and eight age-matched typically developing children wore an actigraph for 7–10 days/nights. Saliva samples were collected at three time-points on two separate days, to permit analysis of endogenous melatonin levels. Parents completed a sleep questionnaire and a daily sleep diary. Actigraphic data revealed that children with MPS III had significantly longer sleep onset latencies and greater daytime sleep compared to controls, but night-time sleep duration did not differ between groups. In the MPS III group, sleep efficiency declined, and sleep onset latency increased, with age. Questionnaire responses showed that MPS III patients had significantly more sleep difficulties in all domains compared to controls. Melatonin concentrations showed an alteration in the circadian system in MPS III, which suggests that treatment for sleep problems should attempt to synchronise the sleep-wake cycle to a more regular pattern. Actigraphy was tolerated by children and this monitoring device can be recommended as a measure of treatment success in research and clinical practice. PMID:24504123

  12. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  13. Retrotransposon profiling of RNA polymerase III initiation sites.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaojie; Daily, Kenneth; Nguyen, Kim; Wang, Haoyi; Mayhew, David; Rigor, Paul; Forouzan, Sholeh; Johnston, Mark; Mitra, Robi David; Baldi, Pierre; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    Although retroviruses are relatively promiscuous in choice of integration sites, retrotransposons can display marked integration specificity. In yeast and slime mold, some retrotransposons are associated with tRNA genes (tDNAs). In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, the long terminal repeat retrotransposon Ty3 is found at RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription start sites of tDNAs. Ty1, 2, and 4 elements also cluster in the upstream regions of these genes. To determine the extent to which other Pol III-transcribed genes serve as genomic targets for Ty3, a set of 10,000 Ty3 genomic retrotranspositions were mapped using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Integrations occurred at all known tDNAs, two tDNA relics (iYGR033c and ZOD1), and six non-tDNA, Pol III-transcribed types of genes (RDN5, SNR6, SNR52, RPR1, RNA170, and SCR1). Previous work in vitro demonstrated that the Pol III transcription factor (TF) IIIB is important for Ty3 targeting. However, seven loci that bind the TFIIIB loader, TFIIIC, were not targeted, underscoring the unexplained absence of TFIIIB at those sites. Ty3 integrations also occurred in two open reading frames not previously associated with Pol III transcription, suggesting the existence of a small number of additional sites in the yeast genome that interact with Pol III transcription complexes. PMID:22287102

  14. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart...

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment...—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart A reference Applies tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources...

  17. Chemical Properties And Toxicity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-19

    The status of Cr(III) as an essential micronutrient for humans is currently under question. No functional Cr(III)-containing biomolecules have been definitively described as yet, and accumulated experience in the use of Cr(III) nutritional supplements (such as [Cr(pic){sub 3}], where pic = 2-pyridinecarboxylato) has shown no measurable benefits for nondiabetic people. Although the use of large doses of Cr(III) supplements may lead to improvements in glucose metabolism for type 2 diabetics, there is a growing concern over the possible genotoxicity of these compounds, particularly of [Cr(pic){sub 3}]. The current perspective discusses chemical transformations of Cr(III) nutritional supplements in biological media, with implications for both beneficial and toxic actions of Cr(III) complexes, which are likely to arise from the same biochemical mechanisms, dependent on concentrations of the reactive species. These species include: (1) partial hydrolysis products of Cr(III) nutritional supplements, which are capable of binding to biological macromolecules and altering their functions; and (2) highly reactive Cr(VI/V/IV) species and organic radicals, formed in reactions of Cr(III) with biological oxidants. Low concentrations of these species are likely to cause alterations in cell signaling (including enhancement of insulin signaling) through interactions with the active centers of regulatory enzymes in the cell membrane or in the cytoplasm, while higher concentrations are likely to produce genotoxic DNA lesions in the cell nucleus. These data suggest that the potential for genotoxic side-effects of Cr(III) complexes may outweigh their possible benefits as insulin enhancers, and that recommendations for their use as either nutritional supplements or antidiabetic drugs need to be reconsidered in light of these recent findings.

  18. Where are the Low-mass Population III Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Sudo, Kae; Yokoi, Shingo; Hasegawa, Kenji; Tominaga, Nozomu; Susa, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    We study the number and the distribution of low-mass Population III (Pop III) stars in the Milky Way. In our numerical model, hierarchical formation of dark matter minihalos and Milky-Way-sized halos are followed by a high-resolution cosmological simulation. We model the Pop III formation in H2 cooling minihalos without metal under UV radiation of the Lyman-Werner bands. Assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF) from 0.15 to 1.0 M ⊙ for low-mass Pop III stars, as a working hypothesis, we try to constrain the theoretical models in reverse by current and future observations. We find that the survivors tend to concentrate on the center of halo and subhalos. We also evaluate the observability of Pop III survivors in the Milky Way and dwarf galaxies, and constraints on the number of Pop III survivors per minihalo. The higher latitude fields require lower sample sizes because of the high number density of stars in the galactic disk, the required sample sizes are comparable in the high- and middle-latitude fields by photometrically selecting low-metallicity stars with optimized narrow-band filters, and the required number of dwarf galaxies to find one Pop III survivor is less than 10 at <100 kpc for the tip of red giant stars. Provided that available observations have not detected any survivors, the formation models of low-mass Pop III stars with more than 10 stars per minihalo are already excluded. Furthermore, we discuss the way to constrain the IMF of Pop III stars at a high mass range of ≳10 M ⊙.

  19. Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, D R

    1991-01-01

    The oxidation of organic matter coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) is one of the most important biogeochemical reactions in aquatic sediments, soils, and groundwater. This process, which may have been the first globally significant mechanism for the oxidation of organic matter to carbon dioxide, plays an important role in the oxidation of natural and contaminant organic compounds in a variety of environments and contributes to other phenomena of widespread significance such as the release of metals and nutrients into water supplies, the magnetization of sediments, and the corrosion of metal. Until recently, much of the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction in sedimentary environments was considered to be the result of nonenzymatic processes. However, microorganisms which can effectively couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) have recently been discovered. With Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor, these organisms can completely oxidize fatty acids, hydrogen, or a variety of monoaromatic compounds. This metabolism provides energy to support growth. Sugars and amino acids can be completely oxidized by the cooperative activity of fermentative microorganisms and hydrogen- and fatty-acid-oxidizing Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reducers. This provides a microbial mechanism for the oxidation of the complex assemblage of sedimentary organic matter in Fe(III)- or Mn(IV)-reducing environments. The available evidence indicates that this enzymatic reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) accounts for most of the oxidation of organic matter coupled to reduction of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) in sedimentary environments. Little is known about the diversity and ecology of the microorganisms responsible for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and only preliminary studies have been conducted on the physiology and biochemistry of this process. PMID:1886521

  20. Pseudo-Class III treatment with reverse traction: case report.

    PubMed

    dos Santos-Pinto, A; Paulin, R F; Melo, A C

    2001-01-01

    The pseudo-Class III can be defined as a functional reflex of an anterior positioning of the mandible, an acquired muscular position that simulates a mesiocclusion. The diagnosis and treatment plan of this condition must be based on a cephalometric evaluation that provides information about the relative contributions of the skeletal and dental components to the malocclusion. There is still great controversies about when is the best moment to start the Class III treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe a case report in which a Class III patient was successfully treated with reverse traction. PMID:11497006

  1. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1998-01-01

    Three SAGE III instruments are being built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado (USA). SAGE III is a fourth generation instrument that incorporates robust elements of its predecessors [SAM II, SAGE, SAGE II] while incorporating new design elements. The first of these will be launched aboard a Russian Meteor/3M platform in May 1999. SAGE III will add measurements of O2-A band from which density and temperature profiles are retrieved. This feature should improve refraction and Rayleigh computations over earlier. Additionally, the linear array of detectors will permit on-orbit wavelength calibration from observations of the exo-atmospheric solar Fraunhofer spectrum.

  2. Surprising Coordination for Plutonium in the First Plutonium (III) Borate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-02-22

    The first plutonium(III) borate, Pu2[B12O18(OH)4Br2(H2O)3]·0.5H2O, has been prepared by reacting plutonium(III) with molten boric acid under strictly anaerobic conditions. This compound contains a three-dimensional polyborate network with triangular holes that house the plutonium(III) sites. The plutonium sites in this compound are 9- and 10-coordinate and display atypical geometries.

  3. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  4. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  5. Quantitation of heparosan with heparin lyase III and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haichan; Zhao, Yingying; Lv, Shencong; Zhong, Weihong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-02-15

    Heparosan is Escherichia coli K5 capsule polysaccharide, which is the key precursor for preparing bioengineered heparin. A rapid and effective quantitative method for detecting heparosan is important in the large-scale production of heparosan. Heparin lyase III (Hep III) effectively catalyzes the heparosan depolymerization, forming unsaturated disaccharides that are measurable using a spectrophotometer at 232 nm. We report a new method for the quantitative detection of heparosan with heparin lyase III and spectrophotometry that is safer and more specific than the traditional carbazole assay. In an optimized detection system, heparosan at a minimum concentration of 0.60 g/L in fermentation broth can be detected.

  6. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F

    2015-03-24

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  7. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  8. Am(III) and Eu(III) extraction by substituted quaternary ammonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Gatrone, R.C.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    The extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from HNO{sub 3}-LiNO{sub 3} or from HCOOH-NH{sub 4}SCN solutions by different quaternary ammonium salts dissolved in o-xylene was investigated as function of the aqueous phase composition. As extractants, the nitrate or thiocyanate salts of Aliquat{sm_bullet}336, tridodecylmethylammonium, benzyldimethyldodecylammonium, p-methoxybenzyldimethyidodecylammonium and p-trifluoromethylbenzyldimethyldodecylammonium were used. The extraction data were interpreted by a reaction scheme that takes into account the aqueous metal complexation and the competition between aqueous acid and metal species for the extractant reaction center. The effect of the benzyl group (whether substituted or not) on the metal and acid extraction by the different quaternary ammonium salts was interpreted on the basis of the inductive effect of the substituents. In the thiocyanate system, Aliquat{sm_bullet}336 provided the highest Am/Eu separation factors. In the nitrate system, the highest Am/Eu separation factors were exhibited by the benzyl substituted quaternary ammonium salts.

  9. Sorption of La(III) and Ce(III) by oxidized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Sh. T.; Rakov, E. G.

    2016-10-01

    The ion-exchange sorption of La(III) and Ce(III) from nitrate solutions using oxidized carbon nanotubes with a solubility of 4.2 g/L is studied at metal concentration C = 5-160 mg/L, pH 2.5-6.0, ratio S: L = 0.002-0.06, and room temperature. At C = 35 mg/L, the equilibrium capacity is shown to grow dramatically with pH rising from 3.0 to 4.0-4.5 and reaching 840 mg/g in La and 950 mg/g in Ce when S: L < 0.006 and pH ; > 4.0-4.5. The introduction of ionic salts is found to reduce the capacity (at pH > 4 and concentrations of 0.01 M and 0.1 M NaCl, the Ce capacity is reduced to ~500 and ~200 mg/g). It is concluded that the sorption equilibrium is better described by the Langmuir equation, while the process kinetics, by pseudo-first and pseudo-second order equations.

  10. Updating to the WAIS-III and WMS-III: considerations for research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, D S; Ledbetter, M F

    2000-09-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) are the most commonly used intelligence and memory scales in both clinical and neuropsychology. In 1997, updated versions of these instruments (the WAIS-III and WMS-III) were published. Because of the extensive use of the WAIS-R and WMS-R in the field and the body of accumulated research, there is naturally some reluctance by clinicians and researchers to update to the new versions. It is sometimes difficult for clinicians who test individuals on repeated occasions to switch over to the new versions of the scales because of the difficulty of interpreting score discrepancy between the 2 versions. Researchers, especially those conducting longitudinal research, have a similar difficulty in changing measurement devices because of the possible threat of internal validity. This article reviews the substantive revisions of the scales and outlines those issues that users should take into consideration when updating to the new versions.

  11. Bioactivity of pyridine-2-thiolato-1-oxide metal complexes: Bi(III), Fe(III) and Ga(III) complexes as potent anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis prospective agents.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ignacio; Marino, Leonardo Biancolino; Demoro, Bruno; Echeverría, Gustavo A; Piro, Oscar E; Leite, Clarice Q F; Pavan, Fernando R; Gambino, Dinorah

    2014-11-24

    In the search for new therapeutic tools against tuberculosis and to further address the therapeutic potential of pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide (Hmpo) metal complexes, two new octahedral [M(III)(mpo)3] complexes, with M = Ga or Bi, were synthesized and characterized in the solid state and in solution. Attempts to crystallize [Ga(III)(mpo)3] in CH2Cl2 led to single crystals of the reaction product [GaCl(mpo)2], where the gallium(III) ion is in a square basis pyramidal environment, trans-coordinated at the basis to two pyridine-2-thiolato 1-oxide anions acting as bidentate ligands through their oxygen and sulfur atoms. The biological activity of the new [M(III)(mpo)3] complexes together with that of the previously reported Fe(III) analogous compound and the pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide sodium salt (Na mpo) was evaluated on Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The compounds showed excellent activity, both in the standard strain H37Rv ATCC 27294 (pan-susceptible) and in five clinical isolates that are resistant to the standard first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid and rifampicin. These pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide derivatives are promising compounds for the treatment of resistant tuberculosis.

  12. Bioactivity of pyridine-2-thiolato-1-oxide metal complexes: Bi(III), Fe(III) and Ga(III) complexes as potent anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis prospective agents.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ignacio; Marino, Leonardo Biancolino; Demoro, Bruno; Echeverría, Gustavo A; Piro, Oscar E; Leite, Clarice Q F; Pavan, Fernando R; Gambino, Dinorah

    2014-11-24

    In the search for new therapeutic tools against tuberculosis and to further address the therapeutic potential of pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide (Hmpo) metal complexes, two new octahedral [M(III)(mpo)3] complexes, with M = Ga or Bi, were synthesized and characterized in the solid state and in solution. Attempts to crystallize [Ga(III)(mpo)3] in CH2Cl2 led to single crystals of the reaction product [GaCl(mpo)2], where the gallium(III) ion is in a square basis pyramidal environment, trans-coordinated at the basis to two pyridine-2-thiolato 1-oxide anions acting as bidentate ligands through their oxygen and sulfur atoms. The biological activity of the new [M(III)(mpo)3] complexes together with that of the previously reported Fe(III) analogous compound and the pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide sodium salt (Na mpo) was evaluated on Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The compounds showed excellent activity, both in the standard strain H37Rv ATCC 27294 (pan-susceptible) and in five clinical isolates that are resistant to the standard first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid and rifampicin. These pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide derivatives are promising compounds for the treatment of resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25261824

  13. Removal of arsenic from water using manganese (III) oxide: Adsorption of As(III) and As(V).

    PubMed

    Babaeivelni, Kamel; Khodadoust, Amid P

    2016-01-01

    Removal of arsenic from water was evaluated with manganese (III) oxide (Mn2O3) as adsorbent. Adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto Mn2O3 was favorable according to the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption equilibrium equations, while chemisorption of arsenic occurred according to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Adsorption parameters from the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations showed a greater adsorption and removal of As(III) than As(V) by Mn2O3. Maximum removal of As(III) and As(V) occurred at pH 3-9 and at pH 2, respectively, while removal of As(V) in the pH range of 6-9 was 93% (pH 6) to 61% (pH 9) of the maximum removal. Zeta potential measurements for Mn2O3 in As(III) was likely converted to As(V) solutions indicated that As(III) was likely converted to As(V) on the Mn2O3 surface at pH 3-9. Overall, the effective Mn2O3 sorbent rapidly removed As(III) and As(V) from water in the pH range of 6-9 for natural waters.

  14. Exploring the Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization in Co(III) -Decorated {Dy(III) 2 } Units.

    PubMed

    Funes, Alejandro V; Carrella, Luca; Rentschler, Eva; Alborés, Pablo

    2016-09-26

    We have prepared and structurally characterized a new member of the butterfly-like {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } single-molecule magnets (SMMs) through further Co(III) decoration, with the formula [Co(III) 4 Dy(III) 2 (OH)2 (teaH)2 (tea)2 (Piv)6 ] (teaH3 =triethanolamine; Piv=trimethylacetate or pivalate). Direct current (DC) susceptibility and magnetization measurements were performed allowing the extraction of possible crystal-field parameters. A simple electrostatic modeling shows reasonable agreement with experimental data. Alternating current (AC) susceptibility measurements under a zero DC field and under small applied fields were performed at different frequencies (i.e., 10-1500 Hz) and at low temperatures (i.e., 2-10 K). Multiple magnetization relaxation pathways are observed. Comparison with previously reported {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } complex measurements allows an overall discussion about the origin of the dynamic behavior and its relationship with crystal-field split ground multiplet sublevels.

  15. Comparison of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions' binding to calf thymus DNA: spectroscopic characterization and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Omer Faruk; Tekiner-Gursacli, Refiye; Ozdemir, Ayse; Tekinay, Turgay

    2014-09-01

    Metals have been studied as potential chemotherapeutic agents for cancer therapies due to their high reactivity toward a wide variety of substances. The characterization of metal ion-binding capacities is essential to understand the possible effects of metals on target biomolecules. In the present study, biochemical effects of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions on calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were studied comparatively via bioanalytical, spectroscopic, and thermal methods. Briefly, UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were utilized for spectroscopic characterization, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements were performed for thermal analysis. Our results reveal that both Au(III) and Ga(III) ions are capable of interacting with ctDNA, and Au(III) ions display a more favorable interaction and a higher binding affinity. ITC analyses indicate that the Au(III)-DNA interaction displays a binding affinity (Ka) around 1.43 × 10(6) M(-1), while a Ka around 1.17 × 10(5) M(-1) was observed for the Ga(III)-DNA binding. It was suggested that both metal ions are unlikely to change the structural B-conformation while interacting with ctDNA.

  16. Exploring the Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization in Co(III) -Decorated {Dy(III) 2 } Units.

    PubMed

    Funes, Alejandro V; Carrella, Luca; Rentschler, Eva; Alborés, Pablo

    2016-09-26

    We have prepared and structurally characterized a new member of the butterfly-like {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } single-molecule magnets (SMMs) through further Co(III) decoration, with the formula [Co(III) 4 Dy(III) 2 (OH)2 (teaH)2 (tea)2 (Piv)6 ] (teaH3 =triethanolamine; Piv=trimethylacetate or pivalate). Direct current (DC) susceptibility and magnetization measurements were performed allowing the extraction of possible crystal-field parameters. A simple electrostatic modeling shows reasonable agreement with experimental data. Alternating current (AC) susceptibility measurements under a zero DC field and under small applied fields were performed at different frequencies (i.e., 10-1500 Hz) and at low temperatures (i.e., 2-10 K). Multiple magnetization relaxation pathways are observed. Comparison with previously reported {Co(III) 2 Dy(III) 2 } complex measurements allows an overall discussion about the origin of the dynamic behavior and its relationship with crystal-field split ground multiplet sublevels. PMID:27529474

  17. [Mn(III)4Ln(III)4] calix[4]arene clusters as enhanced magnetic coolers and molecular magnets.

    PubMed

    Karotsis, Georgios; Kennedy, Stuart; Teat, Simon J; Beavers, Christine M; Fowler, Drew A; Morales, Juan J; Evangelisti, Marco; Dalgarno, Scott J; Brechin, Euan K

    2010-09-22

    The use of methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes in 3d/4f chemistry produces a family of clusters of general formula [Mn(III)(4)Ln(III)(4)(OH)(4)(C4)(4)(NO(3))(2)(DMF)(6)(H(2)O)(6)](OH)(2) (where C4 = calix[4]arene; Ln = Gd (1), Tb (2), Dy (3)). The molecular structure describes a square of Ln(III) ions housed within a square of Mn(III) ions. Magnetic studies reveal that 1 has a large number of molecular spin states that are populated even at the lowest investigated temperatures, while the ferromagnetic limit S = 22 is being approached only at the highest applied fields. This, combined with the high magnetic isotropy, makes the complex an excellent magnetic refrigerant for low-temperature applications. Replacement of the isotropic Gd(III) ions with the anisotropic Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions "switches" the magnetic properties of the cluster so that 2 and 3 behave as low-temperature molecular magnets, displaying slow relaxation of the magnetization.

  18. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  19. Sparkle/AM1 Parameters for the Modeling of Samarium(III) and Promethium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ricardo O; da Costa, Nivan B; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M

    2006-01-01

    The Sparkle/AM1 model is extended to samarium(III) and promethium(III) complexes. A set of 15 structures of high crystallographic quality (R factor < 0.05 Å), with ligands chosen to be representative of all samarium complexes in the Cambridge Crystallographic Database 2004, CSD, with nitrogen or oxygen directly bonded to the samarium ion, was used as a training set. In the validation procedure, we used a set of 42 other complexes, also of high crystallographic quality. The results show that this parametrization for the Sm(III) ion is similar in accuracy to the previous parametrizations for Eu(III), Gd(III), and Tb(III). On the other hand, promethium is an artificial radioactive element with no stable isotope. So far, there are no promethium complex crystallographic structures in CSD. To circumvent this, we confirmed our previous result that RHF/STO-3G/ECP, with the MWB effective core potential (ECP), appears to be the most efficient ab initio model chemistry in terms of coordination polyhedron crystallographic geometry predictions from isolated lanthanide complex ion calculations. We thus generated a set of 15 RHF/STO-3G/ECP promethium complex structures with ligands chosen to be representative of complexes available in the CSD for all other trivalent lanthanide cations, with nitrogen or oxygen directly bonded to the lanthanide ion. For the 42 samarium(III) complexes and 15 promethium(III) complexes considered, the Sparkle/AM1 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the Ln(III) ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.07 and 0.06 Å, respectively, a level of accuracy comparable to present day ab initio/ECP geometries, while being hundreds of times faster.

  20. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation.

    PubMed

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development.

  1. Gold(III)-mediated contraction of benzene to cyclopentadiene: from p-benziporphyrin to gold(III) true tetraarylcarbaporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Szyszko, Bartosz; Kupietz, Kamil; Szterenberg, Ludmiła; Latos-Grażyński, Lechosław

    2014-01-27

    The reaction of p-benziporphyrin, sodium tetrachloroaurate(III) dihydrate, and potassium carbonate in dichloromethane yielded gold(III) 5,10,15,20-tetraaryl-21-carbaporphyrin owing to the contraction of p-phenylene to cyclopentadiene. This molecule is the very first representative of a true 5,10,15,20-tetraaryl-21-carbaporphyrin complex where four trigonal donor atoms are involved in equatorial coordination. The contraction adds an unprecedented route to numerous organic transformations of aromatic compounds catalyzed by simple gold(III) compounds. p-Benziporphyrin provided the unique environment to alter the fundamental reactivity of the benzene unit facilitating its contraction to cyclopentadiene.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Pol III-related leukodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pol III-related leukodystrophy often have abnormalities in eye movement, such as progressive vertical gaze palsy, which is restricted up-and-down eye movement that worsens over time. Nearsightedness is common in ...

  3. 76 FR 60511 - Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose Chapter 16 of Volume III of the Marine Safety Manual... have questions about this notice, call or e-mail Luke B. Harden, Mariner Credentialing Program...

  4. Membrane-disrupting iridium(iii) oligocationic organometallopeptides.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Iria; Gamba, Ilaria; Montenegro, Javier; Martínez-Costas, José; Brea, Jose Manuel; Loza, María Isabel; Vázquez López, Miguel; Vázquez, M Eugenio

    2016-09-21

    A series of oligoarginine peptide derivatives containing cyclometallated iridium(iii) units display remarkable cytotoxicity, comparable to that of cisplatin. In vitro studies with unilamellar vesicles support a membrane-disrupting mechanism of action.

  5. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  6. An oxygen-sensitive luminescent Dy(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hidetaka; Seo, Juncheol; Kitagawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-06-21

    This paper presents the first dysprosium(iii) complex, [{((MeMe)ArO)3tacn}Dy(III)(THF)] (1(Dy)), that shows oxygen-sensitive luminescence. The synthesis, structure and oxygen-sensitive luminescence properties of 1(Dy) are reported (Φ = 0.050 and τ = 17.7 μs under N2, Φ = 0.011 and τ = 4.1 μs under O2 and KSV = 305 M(-1) in THF; KSV = 0.0077%(-1) in polystyrene film). The oxygen sensitive mechanism of 1(Dy) is discussed based on the photophysical properties of the corresponding gadolinium(iii) complex, [{((MeMe)ArO)3tacn}Gd(III)(THF)]. PMID:27191980

  7. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  8. Sample exchange/evaluation (SEE) report - Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase III of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) program. The SEE program is used to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high level waste tanks.

  9. Hot carrier relaxation in highly excited III V compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, H.; Kuett, W.; Seibert, K.; Strahnen, M.

    1988-04-01

    The transition from nonthermal to thermalized carrier distributions and their subsequent cooling via phonon emission is investigated in III-V compounds by time resolved optical measurements with femtosecond laser pulses.

  10. MODELING NATURAL ATTENUATION OF FUELS WITH BIOPLUME III

    EPA Science Inventory

    A natural attenuation model that simulates the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons was developed. The resulting model, BIOPLUME III, demonstrates the importance of biodegradation in reducing contaminant concentrations in ground water. In hypothetical simulat...

  11. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate Type III Interferon expression from peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M.; Fiegen, Ann; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Type I Interferon (IFN) responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of Type I IFNs. The mechanisms controlling Type I IFN-independent responses are undefined. We have found that RIG-I like Receptors (RLRs) induce Type III IFN expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate Type I and III IFN expression. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site that initiates Type III IFN expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust Type III IFN responses in human cells. These findings highlight the interconnections between innate immunity and cell biology. PMID:24952503

  12. Plotting Formula for Pearson Type III Distribution Considering Historical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Van Thanh-Van; In-na, Nophadol

    1992-01-01

    Proposes a plotting position formula for the Pearson type III distribution in the analysis of historical flood information. Presents results of a numerical example using actual flood data to confirm the appropriateness of the plotting formula. (24 references) (MDH)

  13. Power balance on the SG-III prototype facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Jing, Feng; Wu, Dengsheng; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Hai; Lin, Honghuan; Su, Jingqin

    2012-06-01

    With the methods of time-division multiplexing in Frontend and angle detuning in FOA, each beam pulse on SG-III prototype facility is controlled independently and so the systematic variations of power imbalance are eliminated entirely.

  14. Non-surgical treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Romina M; Shah, Adit P; Diyora, Shamil D; Rathva, Vandana J

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of skeletal class III malocclusion has a mean of 3% in the Caucasian population, 5% in African-American adolescents and about 14% in the Asian population. In India, the incidence of class III malocclusion is reported to be 3.4%. A patient having class III malocclusion shows findings ranging from edge-to-edge bite to large reverse overjet, with extreme variations of underlying skeletal jaw bases and craniofacial form. This is a case report of a 20-year-old man having skeletal class III malocclusion with concave profile, anterior crossbite and a negative overjet of 3 mm treated non-surgically with extraction of only one lower left first premolar. PMID:24722711

  15. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EPOCH OF POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-10

    We investigate the transition from primordial Population III (Pop III) star formation to normal Pop II star formation in the first galaxies using new cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We find that while the first stars seed their host galaxies with metals, they cannot sustain significant outflows to enrich the intergalactic medium, even assuming a top-heavy initial mass function. This means that Pop III star formation could potentially continue until z Almost-Equal-To 6 in different unenriched regions of the universe, before being ultimately shut off by cosmic reionization. Within an individual galaxy, the metal production and stellar feedback from Pop II stars overtake Pop III stars in 20-200 Myr, depending on galaxy mass.

  16. Decametric and hectometric Solar Type III bursts at Saturn's orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Maksimovic, Milan

    2015-04-01

    We report on solar radio bursts observed by RPWS experiment onboard Cassini spacecraft. We consider Type III solar bursts observed in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 16 MHz. Those bursts are probably generated in the solar corona and the interplanetary medium. We show that the Type III burst occurrence is depending on the solar activity. We attempt to localize the regions where the Type III burst is probably emitted. We consider that the electrons at the origin of the Solar Type III bursts follow the interplanetary magnetic field. The trajectory is an Archimedean spiral contained in the ecliptic plane. We discuss our results taking into consideration on the one hand the spacecraft positions with regards to the source location, and on the other hand the temporal and spectral radio beam variation when combining Cassini and Wind observations.

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey George Harkness III, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey George Harkness III, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW OF DOME AND LANTERN FROM NORTH - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  18. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey George Harkness III, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey George Harkness III, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW OF DOME AND DRUM FROM NORTH - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  19. Synthesis, structure and luminescence studies of Eu(III), Tb(III), Sm(III), Dy(III) cationic complexes with acetylacetone and bis(5-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)propane☆

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexey N.; Hasegawa, Miki; Shimizu, Tomohito; Fukawa, Tomonori; Sakurai, Shoya; Nishchymenko, Galyna A.; Shul’gin, Victor F.; Meshkova, Svetlana B.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Studies concerning synthesis, structure and luminescence of eight-coordinate Eu, Tb, Sm and Dy complexes of the type [Ln(acac)2(L)]Cl (Hacac = pentanedione-2,4 and L = bis(5-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)propane) are reported in detail. The obtained complexes were investigated by various means including elemental- and thermogravimetric analysis, IR- and electron transition spectroscopy. The structure of the Tb complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography: Tb is eight-coordinate, and L acting only as a tetradentate chelate together with two bidentate acac ligands. Photophysical studies of the complexes were carried out. The Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes show strong emissions both in solid state and solution. The intensity of the luminescence of Dy(III) and Sm(III) are relatively weak. The factors determining the intensity of the photoluminescence are discussed. PMID:24068839

  20. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographer, Robert Fulton III, June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographer, Robert Fulton III, June 1967 INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST - Third Congregational Society, Church of the Redeemer, 292 Orange Street, New Haven, New Haven County, CT