Science.gov

Sample records for 1-d homogeneous systems

  1. Homogenization of spatially dispersive 1D fractal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini, Samaneh

    2016-04-01

    A layered uniaxial dielectric structure is considered. The layers in the structure are distributed according to a one-dimensional fractal set. The resulting fractal metamaterial is homogenized with an original source-driven homogenization approach which is suitable for both numerical and analytical calculations. Due to the fact that the considered metamaterial is nonmagnetic, the only effective parameter which needs to be calculated is the effective permittivity dyadic e(ω, k). The effective permittivity is obtained analytically (by using a transfer matrix approach) and numerically (by using a Finite-Difference Time-Domain solver).

  2. Turing Instabilities in Homogeneous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei; Horsthemke, Werner

    Alan Turing's paper entitled "The Chemical Basis of Morphogenesis" [440] ranks without doubt among the most important papers of the last century. In that seminal work Turing laid the foundation for the theory of chemical pattern formation. Turing showed that diffusion can have nontrivial effects in nonequilibrium systems. The interplay of diffusion with nonlinear kinetics can destabilize the uniform steady state of reaction-diffusion systems and generate stable, stationary concentration patterns.

  3. Uniform Propagation of Chaos for Kac's 1D Particle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we study Kac's 1D particle system, consisting of the velocities of N particles colliding at constant rate and randomly exchanging energies. We prove uniform (in time) propagation of chaos in Wasserstein distance with explicit polynomial rates in N, for both the squared (i.e., the energy) and non-squared particle system. These rates are of order N^{-1/3} (almost, in the non-squared case), assuming that the initial distribution of the limit nonlinear equation has finite moments of sufficiently high order (4+ɛ is enough when using the 2-Wasserstein distance). The proof relies on a convenient parametrization of the collision recently introduced by Hauray, as well as on a coupling technique developed by Cortez and Fontbona.

  4. Plasmonic Excitations of 1D Metal-Dielectric Interfaces in 2D Systems: 1D Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Daniel R.; Menabde, Sergey G.; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-04-01

    Surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) excitations of metal-dielectric interfaces are a fundamental light-matter interaction which has attracted interest as a route to spatial confinement of light far beyond that offered by conventional dielectric optical devices. Conventionally, SPPs have been studied in noble-metal structures, where the SPPs are intrinsically bound to a 2D metal-dielectric interface. Meanwhile, recent advances in the growth of hybrid 2D crystals, which comprise laterally connected domains of distinct atomically thin materials, provide the first realistic platform on which a 2D metal-dielectric system with a truly 1D metal-dielectric interface can be achieved. Here we show for the first time that 1D metal-dielectric interfaces support a fundamental 1D plasmonic mode (1DSPP) which exhibits cutoff behavior that provides dramatically improved light confinement in 2D systems. The 1DSPP constitutes a new basic category of plasmon as the missing 1D member of the plasmon family: 3D bulk plasmon, 2DSPP, 1DSPP, and 0D localized SP.

  5. Nonconstant Positive Steady States and Pattern Formation of 1D Prey-Taxis Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Song, Yang; Shao, Lingjie

    2016-08-01

    Prey-taxis is the process that predators move preferentially toward patches with highest density of prey. It is well known to have an important role in biological control and the maintenance of biodiversity. To model the coexistence and spatial distributions of predator and prey species, this paper concerns nonconstant positive steady states of a wide class of prey-taxis systems with general functional responses over 1D domain. Linearized stability of the positive equilibrium is analyzed to show that prey-taxis destabilizes prey-predator homogeneity when prey repulsion (e.g., due to volume-filling effect in predator species or group defense in prey species) is present, and prey-taxis stabilizes the homogeneity otherwise. Then, we investigate the existence and stability of nonconstant positive steady states to the system through rigorous bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we provide detailed and thorough calculations to determine properties such as pitchfork and turning direction of the local branches. Our stability results also provide a stable wave mode selection mechanism for thee reaction-advection-diffusion systems including prey-taxis models considered in this paper. Finally, we provide numerical studies of prey-taxis systems with Holling-Tanner kinetics to illustrate and support our theoretical findings. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that the 2× 2 prey-taxis system is able to model the formation and evolution of various striking patterns, such as spikes, periodic oscillations, and coarsening even when the domain is one-dimensional. These dynamics can model the coexistence and spatial distributions of interacting prey and predator species. We also give some insights on how system parameters influence pattern formation in these models.

  6. Nonconstant Positive Steady States and Pattern Formation of 1D Prey-Taxis Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Song, Yang; Shao, Lingjie

    2017-02-01

    Prey-taxis is the process that predators move preferentially toward patches with highest density of prey. It is well known to have an important role in biological control and the maintenance of biodiversity. To model the coexistence and spatial distributions of predator and prey species, this paper concerns nonconstant positive steady states of a wide class of prey-taxis systems with general functional responses over 1D domain. Linearized stability of the positive equilibrium is analyzed to show that prey-taxis destabilizes prey-predator homogeneity when prey repulsion (e.g., due to volume-filling effect in predator species or group defense in prey species) is present, and prey-taxis stabilizes the homogeneity otherwise. Then, we investigate the existence and stability of nonconstant positive steady states to the system through rigorous bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we provide detailed and thorough calculations to determine properties such as pitchfork and turning direction of the local branches. Our stability results also provide a stable wave mode selection mechanism for thee reaction-advection-diffusion systems including prey-taxis models considered in this paper. Finally, we provide numerical studies of prey-taxis systems with Holling-Tanner kinetics to illustrate and support our theoretical findings. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that the 2× 2 prey-taxis system is able to model the formation and evolution of various striking patterns, such as spikes, periodic oscillations, and coarsening even when the domain is one-dimensional. These dynamics can model the coexistence and spatial distributions of interacting prey and predator species. We also give some insights on how system parameters influence pattern formation in these models.

  7. Multiple-state quantum Otto engine, 1D box system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifah, E.; Purwanto, A.

    2014-03-01

    Quantum heat engines produce work using quantum matter as their working substance. We studied adiabatic and isochoric processes and defined the general force according to quantum system. The processes and general force are used to evaluate a quantum Otto engine based on multiple-state of one dimensional box system and calculate the efficiency. As a result, the efficiency depends on the ratio of initial and final width of system under adiabatic processes.

  8. Multiple-state quantum Otto engine, 1D box system

    SciTech Connect

    Latifah, E.; Purwanto, A.

    2014-03-24

    Quantum heat engines produce work using quantum matter as their working substance. We studied adiabatic and isochoric processes and defined the general force according to quantum system. The processes and general force are used to evaluate a quantum Otto engine based on multiple-state of one dimensional box system and calculate the efficiency. As a result, the efficiency depends on the ratio of initial and final width of system under adiabatic processes.

  9. Search and tracking system architecture using 1-D scanning sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Sanghoon; Choi, Byungin; Joung, Shichang; Kim, Jaein

    2010-04-01

    In the maritime environment, It is necessary for ship's self protection to search ad track approaching targets. We developed high performance search and tracking system with Infrared sensors. Our system can obtain high performance with several FPGAs and COTS processing boards. Dual band IR sensor (MWIR and LWIR) also gives two types of target detection and tracing abilities. Our system designed to automatically detect and track both air and surface targets such as sea skimming missiles, small ships, and aircrafts at a long range. In this paper, we describe technologies in our search and tracking system architecture. We describe software architecture for signal processing and target detection and tracking algorithms as well.

  10. Partical Simulation of Bounded 1D Plasma Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, William S.

    1989-02-01

    The physical and numerical problems of kinetic simulation of a bounded electrostatic plasma system in one planar dimension are examined, and solutions to them are presented. These problems include particle absorption, reflection and emission at boundaries, the solution of Poisson's equation under non-periodic boundary conditions, and the treatment of an external circuit connecting the boundaries. The methods which are described here are immlemented in a code named PDW1, which is available from Professor C. K. Birdsall, Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Cory Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

  11. NATRAN2. Fluid Hammer Analysis 1D & 2D Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Valentin, R.A.

    1992-03-03

    NATRAN2 analyzes short-term pressure-pulse transients in a closed hydraulic system consisting of a two-dimensional axisymmetric domain connected to a one-dimensional piping network. The one-dimensional network may consist of series or parallel piping, pipe junctions, diameter discontinuities, junctions of three to six branches, closed ends, surge tanks, far ends, dummy junctions, acoustic impedance discontinuities, and rupture disks. By default, the working fluid is assumed to be liquid sodium without cavitation; but another working fluid can be specified in terms of its density, sonic speed, and viscosity. The source pressure pulse can arise from one of the following: a pressure-time function specified at some point in the two-dimensional domain, a pressure-time function or a sodium-water reaction specified at some point in the one-dimensional domain. The pressure pulse from a sodium-water reaction is assumed to be generated according to the dynamic model of Zaker and Salmon.

  12. Magnetic properties driven by local structure in quasi-1D Ising chain system cobaltate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjae; Kim, Beom Hyun; Kim, Kyoo; Choi, Hong Chul; Park, Sang-Yeon; Jeong, Y.-H.; Min, B. I.

    2012-02-01

    Using ab-initio band structure method and the microscopic model calculation, the origins of the large orbital magnetic moment and unique magnetic anisotropy in the quasi-1D magnetic cobaltate, α-CoV2O6, is investigated. Unique crystal electric field effect in α-CoV2O6 is combined with the strong spin-orbit coupling, results in intriguing magnetic properties of the system. Based on the estimated strengths of the intra- and the inter-chain exchange interaction, experimentally found 1/3 magnetization plateau in the MH curve can be attributed to spin-flop mechanism. Origin of the reduced magnetic entropy behavior is found to be the strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the quasi-1D Ising chain system.

  13. Electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer efficiency in the O/1 D/-N2 and O/1 D/-CO systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1974-01-01

    With the aid of a molecular resonance fluorescence technique, which utilizes optical pumping from the v = 1 level of the ground state of CO by A 1 Pi-X 1 Sigma radiation, a study is made of the efficiency of E-V transfer from O(1 D) to CO. O(1 D) is generated at a known rate by O2 photodissociation at 1470 A in an intermittent mode, and the small modulation of the fluorescent signal associated with CO (v = 1) above the normal thermal background is interpreted in terms of E-V transfer efficiency. The CO (v = 1) lifetime in this system is determined mainly by resonance trapping of the IR fundamental band, and is found to be up to ten times longer than the natural radiative lifetime. For CO, (40 plus or minus 8)% of the O(1 D) energy is converted into vibrational energy. By observing the effect of N2 on the CO (v = 1) fluorescent intensity and lifetime, it is possible to obtain the E-V transfer efficiency for the system O(1 D)-N2 relative to that for O(1 D)-CO. The results indicate that the efficiency for N2 is (83 plus or minus 10)% of that for CO.

  14. Neutronic analysis of the 1D and 1E banks reflux detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-12-21

    Two H Canyon neutron monitoring systems for early detection of postulated abnormal reflux conditions in the Second Uranium Cycle 1E and 1D Mixer-Settle Banks have been designed and built. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations using the general purpose, general geometry, n-particle MCNP code have been performed to model expected response of the monitoring systems to varying conditions.The confirmatory studies documented herein conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to achieve adequate neutron count rates for various neutron source and detector configurations, thereby eliminating excessive integration count time. Neutron count rate sensitivity studies are also performed. Conversely, the transport studies concluded that the neutron count rates are statistically insensitive to nitric acid content in the aqueous region and to the transition region length. These studies conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to predict the postulated reflux conditions for all examined perturbations in the neutron source and detector configurations. In the cases examined, the relative change in the neutron count rates due to postulated transitions from normal {sup 235}U concentration levels to reflux levels remain satisfactory detectable.

  15. Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay: a novel homogeneous assay for antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, David A.

    1993-05-01

    A novel immunoassay, Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay (PORSCHA), is described. This assay relies upon the change in fluorescent spectral properties that pyrene and its derivatives show with varying concentration. Because antibodies and other biomolecules can bind two molecules simultaneously, they can change the local concentration of the molecules that they bind. This concentration change may be detected spectrally as a change in the fluorescence emission wavelength of an appropriately labeled biomolecule. Several tests of PORSCHA have been performed which demonstrate this principle. For example: with streptavidin as the binding biomolecule and a biotin labeled pyrene derivative, the production of the excimer emitting at 470 nm is observed. Without the streptavidin present, only the monomer emitting at 378 and 390 nm is observed. The ratio of monomer to excimer provides the concentration of unlabeled biotin in the sample. Approximately 1 ng/mL of biotin may be detected with this system using a 50 (mu) l sample (2 X 10-16 moles biotin). The principles behind PORSCHA, the results with the streptavidin/biotin system are discussed and extensions of the PORSCHA concept to antibodies as the binding partner and DNA in homogeneous assays are suggested.

  16. Microstates of the D1-D5-Kaluza-Klein monopole system

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Kraus, Per

    2005-07-15

    We find supergravity solutions corresponding to all U(1)xU(1) invariant chiral primaries of the D1-D5-KK system. These solutions are 1/8 BPS, carry angular momentum, and are asymptotically flat in the 3+1 dimensional sense. They can be thought of as representing the ground states of the four-dimensional black hole constructed from the D1-D5-KK-P system. Demanding the absence of unphysical singularities in our solutions determines all free parameters, and gives precise agreement with the quantum numbers expected from the CFT point of view. The physical mechanism behind the smoothness of the solutions is that the D1 branes and D5 branes expand into a KK-monopole supertube in the transverse space of the original KK monopole.

  17. Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in many component systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reiss's classical treatment of the kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in a system containing two chemical components is extended to many-component systems. The formulation is analogous to the pseudo-stationary state theory of chemical reaction rates with the free energy as a function of the composition of the embryo taking the place of the potential energy as a function of interatomic distances.

  18. Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation on many-component systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reiss's (1950) classical treatment of the kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in a system containing two chemical components is extended to many-component systems. The formulation is analogous to the pseudostationary-state theory of chemical reaction rates, with the free energy as a function of the composition of the embryo taking the place of the potential energy as a function of interatomic distances.

  19. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Extreme Nanowires and Other 1D Systems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Spencer, Joseph H.; Sloan, Jeremy; McDonnell, Liam P.; Trewhitt, Harrison; Kashtiban, Reza J.; Faulques, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how nanowires with diameters corresponding to 1 to 5 atoms can be produced by melting a range of inorganic solids in the presence of carbon nanotubes. These nanowires are extreme in the sense that they are the limit of miniaturization of nanowires and their behavior is not always a simple extrapolation of the behavior of larger nanowires as their diameter decreases. The paper then describes the methods required to obtain Raman spectra from extreme nanowires and the fact that due to the van Hove singularities that 1D systems exhibit in their optical density of states, that determining the correct choice of photon excitation energy is critical. It describes the techniques required to determine the photon energy dependence of the resonances observed in Raman spectroscopy of 1D systems and in particular how to obtain measurements of Raman cross-sections with better than 8% noise and measure the variation in the resonance as a function of sample temperature. The paper describes the importance of ensuring that the Raman scattering is linearly proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation intensity. It also describes how to use the polarization dependence of the Raman scattering to separate Raman scattering of the encapsulated 1D systems from those of other extraneous components in any sample. PMID:27168195

  20. Potential energy surface intersections in the C(1D)H2 reactive system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Bian, Wensheng; Zhao, Xian; Tao, Xutang

    2006-08-21

    Potential energy surface (PES) intersection seams of two or more electronic states from the 1 1A', 2 1A', 3 1A', 1 1A", and 2 1A" states in the C(1D)H2 reactive system are investigated using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method and the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. Intersection seams with energies less than 20 kcal/mol relative to the C(1D) + H2 asymptote are searched systematically, and finally several seam lines (at the linear H-C-H, linear C-H-H, and C(2v), geometries, respectively) and a seam surface (at Cs geometries) are discovered and determined. The minimum energy crossing points on these seams are reported and the influences of the PES intersections, in particular, conical intersections, on the CH2 spectroscopy and the C(1D) + H2 reaction dynamics are discussed. In addition, geometries and energies of the 1 1A2 and 1 1B2 states of methylene biradical CH2 are reported in detail for the first time.

  1. Review of Zero-D and 1-D Models of Blood Flow in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zero-dimensional (lumped parameter) and one dimensional models, based on simplified representations of the components of the cardiovascular system, can contribute strongly to our understanding of circulatory physiology. Zero-D models provide a concise way to evaluate the haemodynamic interactions among the cardiovascular organs, whilst one-D (distributed parameter) models add the facility to represent efficiently the effects of pulse wave transmission in the arterial network at greatly reduced computational expense compared to higher dimensional computational fluid dynamics studies. There is extensive literature on both types of models. Method and Results The purpose of this review article is to summarise published 0D and 1D models of the cardiovascular system, to explore their limitations and range of application, and to provide an indication of the physiological phenomena that can be included in these representations. The review on 0D models collects together in one place a description of the range of models that have been used to describe the various characteristics of cardiovascular response, together with the factors that influence it. Such models generally feature the major components of the system, such as the heart, the heart valves and the vasculature. The models are categorised in terms of the features of the system that they are able to represent, their complexity and range of application: representations of effects including pressure-dependent vessel properties, interaction between the heart chambers, neuro-regulation and auto-regulation are explored. The examination on 1D models covers various methods for the assembly, discretisation and solution of the governing equations, in conjunction with a report of the definition and treatment of boundary conditions. Increasingly, 0D and 1D models are used in multi-scale models, in which their primary role is to provide boundary conditions for sophisticate, and often patient-specific, 2D and 3D models

  2. Development and tests of x-ray multifoil optical system for 1D imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pína, Ladislav; Hudec, René; Inneman, Adolf J.; Baca, Tomas; Blazek, M.; Platkevic, M.; Sieger, Ladislav; Doubravova, Daniela; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Schultz, Ted B.; Dániel, Vladimír.

    2016-09-01

    The proposed wide-field optical system has not been used yet. Described novel approach is based on the use of 1D "Lobster eye" optics in combination with Timepix X-ray detector in the energy range 3 - 40 keV. The proposed project includes theoretical study and a functional sample of the Timepix X-ray detector with multifoil wide-field X-ray "Lobster eye" optics. Using optics to focus X-rays on a detector is necessary in cases where the intensity of impinging X-ray radiation is below the sensitivity of the detector without optic. Generally this is the case of very low light phenomena, or e.g. monitoring astrophysical objects in space. Namely, such optical system could find applications in laboratory spectroscopy systems or in a rocket space experiment. Designed wide-field optical system combined with Timepix X-ray detector is described together with experimental results obtained during laboratory tests.

  3. Exponential decay of spatial correlation in driven diffusive system: A universal feature of macroscopic homogeneous state

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Driven diffusive systems have been a paradigm for modelling many physical, chemical, and biological transport processes. In the systems, spatial correlation plays an important role in the emergence of a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and exhibits rich features such as pronounced oscillations. However, the lack of analytical results of spatial correlation precludes us from fully understanding the effect of spatial correlation on the dynamics of the system. Here we offer precise analytical predictions of the spatial correlation in a typical driven diffusive system, namely facilitated asymmetric exclusion process. We find theoretically that the correlation between two sites decays exponentially as their distance increases, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find the exponential decay is a universal property of macroscopic homogeneous state in a broad class of 1D driven diffusive systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of many nonequilibrium phenomena resulting from spatial correlation in driven diffusive systems. PMID:26804770

  4. Exponential decay of spatial correlation in driven diffusive system: A universal feature of macroscopic homogeneous state.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-25

    Driven diffusive systems have been a paradigm for modelling many physical, chemical, and biological transport processes. In the systems, spatial correlation plays an important role in the emergence of a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and exhibits rich features such as pronounced oscillations. However, the lack of analytical results of spatial correlation precludes us from fully understanding the effect of spatial correlation on the dynamics of the system. Here we offer precise analytical predictions of the spatial correlation in a typical driven diffusive system, namely facilitated asymmetric exclusion process. We find theoretically that the correlation between two sites decays exponentially as their distance increases, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find the exponential decay is a universal property of macroscopic homogeneous state in a broad class of 1D driven diffusive systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of many nonequilibrium phenomena resulting from spatial correlation in driven diffusive systems.

  5. Homogeneous vs. heterogeneous nucleation in water-dicarboxylic acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Vehkamäki, H.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-03-01

    Binary heterogeneous nucleation of water-succinic/glutaric/malonic/adipic acid on nanometer-sized particles is investigated within the frame of classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. Homogeneous nucleation is also included for comparison. It is found that the nucleation probabilities depend on the contact angle and on the size of the seed particles. New thermodynamical properties, such as saturation vapor pressure, density and surface tension for all the dicarboxylic acid aqueous solutions are included in the calculations. While the new surface tension and density formulations do not bring any significant difference in the computed nucleation rate for homogeneous nucleation for succinic and glutaric acids, the use of the newly derived equations for the vapor pressure decrease the acid concentrations in gas phase by 3 orders of magnitude. According to our calculations, the binary heterogeneous nucleation of succinic acid-water and glutaric acid-water - although it requires a 3-4 orders of magnitude lower vapor concentrations than the homogeneous nucleation - cannot take place under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand binary homogeneous nucleation of adipic acid-water systems might be possible under conditions occuring in upper boundary layer. However, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between the surface and the molecules of the nucleating vapor should be considered in the future.

  6. Extensional Elastica in large deformation as $Gamma $ Γ -limit of a discrete 1D mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Jean-Jacques; Della Corte, Alessandro; Giorgio, Ivan; Battista, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The present paper deals with the rigorous homogenization of a discrete system consisting of extensible rods linked by rotational springs. Specifically, a Γ -convergence result is proven for a sequence of discrete measure functionals En, describing the energy of the discrete system, toward the continuous energy functional for the extensible Euler beam model ( Elastica) in large deformation regime. A relative compactness result for the sequence En is also proven. Moreover, numerical results are shown on the deformed shape and on the total energy of the system when the number of elements of the discrete system increases. The numerical convergence of the energy to a definite value is shown in two cases. The results provide rigorous justification of a very commonly used algorithm for the discretization of the extensible Euler beam, namely Hencky-type beam model.

  7. Homogeneous UVA system for corneal cross-linking treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres Pereira, Fernando R.; Stefani, Mario A.; Otoboni, José A.; Richter, Eduardo H.; Ventura, Liliane

    2010-02-01

    The treatment of keratoconus and corneal ulcers by collagen cross-linking using ultraviolet type A irradiation, combined with photo-sensitizer Riboflavin (vitamin B2), is a promising technique. The standard protocol suggests instilling Riboflavin in the pre-scratched cornea every 5min for 30min, during the UVA irradiation of the cornea at 3mW/cm2 for 30 min. This process leads to an increase of the biomechanical strength of the cornea, stopping the progression, or sometimes, even reversing Keratoconus. The collagen cross-linking can be achieved by many methods, but the utilization of UVA light, for this purpose, is ideal because of its possibility of a homogeneous treatment leading to an equal result along the treated area. We have developed a system, to be clinically used for treatment of unhealthy corneas using the cross-linking technique, which consists of an UVA emitting delivery device controlled by a closed loop system with high homogeneity. The system is tunable and delivers 3-5 mW/cm2, at 365nm, for three spots (6mm, 8mm and 10mm in diameter). The electronics close loop presents 1% of precision, leading to an overall error, after the calibration, of less than 10% and approximately 96% of homogeneity.

  8. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of monoacylglycerol in a homogeneous system.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Julieta B; Nascimento, Maria G; Ninow, Jorge L

    2003-04-01

    The 1,3-regiospecifique lipase, Lipozyme IM, catalyzed the esterification of lauric acid and glycerol in a homogeneous system. To overcome the drawback of the insolubility of glycerol in hexane, which is extensively used in enzymatic synthesis, a mixture of n-hexane/tert-butanol (1:1, v/v) was used leading to a monophasic system. The conversion of lauric acid into monolaurin was 65% in 8 h, when a molar ratio of glycerol to fatty acid (5:1) was used with the fatty acid at 0.1 M, and the phenomenon of acyl migration was minimized.

  9. Modelling Hydrology of a Single Bioretention System with HYDRUS-1D

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yingying; Wang, Huixiao; Chen, Jiangang; Zhang, Shuhan

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was further analyzed under the optimized parameters. The study reveals that bioretention systems with underdrains and impervious boundaries do have some detention capability, while their total water retention capability is extremely limited. Better detention capability is noted for smaller rainfall events, deeper filter media, and design storms with a return period smaller than 2 years, and a cost-effective filter media depth is recommended in bioretention design. Better hydrologic effectiveness is achieved with a higher hydraulic conductivity and ratio of the bioretention surface area to the catchment area, and filter media whose conductivity is between the conductivity of loamy sand and sandy loam, and a surface area of 10% of the catchment area is recommended. In the long-term simulation, both infiltration volume and evapotranspiration are critical for the total rainfall treatment in bioretention systems. PMID:25133240

  10. Modelling hydrology of a single bioretention system with HYDRUS-1D.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yingying; Wang, Huixiao; Chen, Jiangang; Zhang, Shuhan

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was further analyzed under the optimized parameters. The study reveals that bioretention systems with underdrains and impervious boundaries do have some detention capability, while their total water retention capability is extremely limited. Better detention capability is noted for smaller rainfall events, deeper filter media, and design storms with a return period smaller than 2 years, and a cost-effective filter media depth is recommended in bioretention design. Better hydrologic effectiveness is achieved with a higher hydraulic conductivity and ratio of the bioretention surface area to the catchment area, and filter media whose conductivity is between the conductivity of loamy sand and sandy loam, and a surface area of 10% of the catchment area is recommended. In the long-term simulation, both infiltration volume and evapotranspiration are critical for the total rainfall treatment in bioretention systems.

  11. A tiny gas-sensor system based on 1D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzidi, A.; Bria, D.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a gas monitoring system for detecting the gas concentration in ambient air. This sensor is based on a 1D photonic crystal formed by alternating layers of magnesium fluoride (MgF2) and silicon (Si) with an empty layer in the middle. The lamellar cavity (defect layer) will be filled with polluted air that has a refractive index close to that of pure air, varying between n 0  =  1.00 to n 0  =  1.01. The transmission spectrum of this sensor is calculated by the Green function approach. The numerical results show that the transmission peak, which appears in the gap, is caused by the infiltration of impure air into the empty middle layer. This transmission peak can be used for detection purposes in real-time environmental monitoring. The peak frequency is sensitive to the air-gas mixture, and a variation in the refractive index as small as Δn  =  10-5 can be detected. A sensitivity, Δλ/Δn, of 700 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) is achieved with this sensor.

  12. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems.

    PubMed

    Krakoviack, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  13. Distributed LQR control for discrete-time homogeneous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Fangfang; Han, Chunyan

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the distributed linear quadratic regulation (LQR) controller design method for discrete-time homogeneous scalar systems. Based on the optimal centralised control theory, the existence condition for distributed optimal controller is firstly proposed. It shows that the globally optimal distributed controller is dependent on the structure of the penalty matrix. Such results can be used in consensus problems and used to find under which communication topology (may not be an all-to-all form) the optimal distributed controller exists. When the proposed condition cannot hold, a suboptimal design method with the aid of the decomposition of discrete algebraic Riccati equations and robustness of local controllers is proposed. The computation complexity and communication load for each subsystem are only dependent on the number of its neighbours.

  14. Some sufficient conditions for the asymptotic stabilizability of three dimensional homogeneous polynomial systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayawansa, W. P.; Martin, C. F.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to three-dimensional homogeneous polynomial systems, and some sufficient conditions for their asymptotic stability are derived by using homogeneous feedback. The tests given are geometric in nature.

  15. Quantum propagation and confinement in 1D systems using the transfer-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Olivier; Carles, Robert; Pérez, José-Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to provide some Matlab scripts to the teaching community in quantum physics. The scripts are based on the transfer-matrix formalism and offer a very efficient and versatile tool to solve problems of a physical object (electron, proton, neutron, etc) with one-dimensional (1D) stationary potential energy. Resonant tunnelling through a multiple-barrier or confinement in wells of various shapes is particularly analysed. The results are quantitatively discussed with semiconductor heterostructures, harmonic and anharmonic molecular vibrations, or neutrons in a gravity field. Scripts and other examples (hydrogen-like ions and transmission by a smooth variation of potential energy) are available freely at http://www-loa.univ-lille1.fr/˜pujol in three languages: English, French and Spanish.

  16. National Geothermal Data System Hub Deployment Timeline (Appendix E-1-d)

    SciTech Connect

    Caudill, Christy

    2015-12-20

    Excel spreadsheet describing activity, spending, and development for the four data hubs (Arizona Geoloical Survey, Kentucky Geological Survey, Illinois Geological Survey, and Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology) serving data for the National Geothermal Data System under the State Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System Project.

  17. New way to produce dense double-antikaonic dibaryon system, 𝐾̄𝐾̄NN, through Λ(1405)-doorway sticking in p + p collisions

    PubMed Central

    YAMAZAKI, Toshimitsu; AKAISHI, Yoshinori; HASSANVAND, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    A recent successful observation of a dense and deeply bound 𝐾̄ nuclear system, K−pp, in the p + p → K+ + K−pp reaction in a DISTO experiment indicates that the double-𝐾̄ dibaryon, K−K−pp, which was predicted to be a dense nuclear system, can also be formed in p + p collisions. We find theoretically that the K−-K− repulsion plays no significant role in reducing the density and binding energy of K−K−pp and that, when two Λ(1405) resonances are produced simultaneously in a short-range p + p collision, they act as doorways to copious formation of K−K−pp, if and only if K−K−pp is a dense object, as predicted. PMID:21670568

  18. Read-out optical schemes for holographic memory system based on multiplexed computer generated 1D Fourier holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchenko, Sergey S.; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bobrinev, Vladimir I.; Betin, Alexandr Y.; Zlokazov, Evgenie Y.

    2015-05-01

    Computer holographic synthesis allows to significantly simplify the recording scheme of microholograms in holographic memory system as the classic high precision holographic setup based on two-beam interference is removed by simple scale reduction projection scheme. Application of computer generated 1D-Fourier holograms provides the possibility of selective reconstruction of the multiplexed holograms with different orientation of data lines by corresponding rotation of anamorphic objective (cylindrical lens), used in the read-out systems. Two configurations of read-out optical scheme were investigated by our team: full-page scheme and line-by-line scheme. In the present article we report the specificities of these schemes and consider their advantages and disadvantages. The results of experimental modeling of both read-out configurations are also presented.

  19. Calibration of photometric systems from homogeneous spectrophotometric data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, L.; Buser, R.

    The atlas of stellar spectrophotometric data published by Gunn and Stryker (1983) constitutes an extremely valuable tool for the evaluation and calibration of photometric systems. Since RGU photometry is tightly linked to UBV data the Gunn-Stryker atlas has been used in the present paper to evaluate these two systems and subsequently investigate the resulting calibration of the RGU colors in terms of MK spectral classification.

  20. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J

    2013-10-01

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  1. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James

    2016-05-03

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  2. Frequency bands of strongly nonlinear homogeneous granular systems.

    PubMed

    Lydon, Joseph; Jayaprakash, K R; Ngo, Duc; Starosvetsky, Yuli; Vakakis, Alexander F; Daraio, Chiara

    2013-07-01

    Recent numerical studies on an infinite number of identical spherical beads in Hertzian contact showed the presence of frequency bands [Jayaprakash, Starosvetsky, Vakakis, Peeters, and Kerschen, Nonlinear Dyn. 63, 359 (2011)]. These bands, denoted here as propagation and attenuation bands (PBs and ABs), are typically present in linear or weakly nonlinear periodic media; however, their counterparts are not intuitive in essentially nonlinear periodic media where there is a complete lack of classical linear acoustics, i.e., in "sonic vacua." Here, we study the effects of PBs and ABs on the forced dynamics of ordered, uncompressed granular systems. Through numerical and experimental techniques, we find that the dynamics of these systems depends critically on the frequency and amplitude of the applied harmonic excitation. For fixed forcing amplitude, at lower frequencies, the oscillations are large in amplitude and governed by strongly nonlinear and nonsmooth dynamics, indicating PB behavior. At higher frequencies the dynamics is weakly nonlinear and smooth, in the form of compressed low-amplitude oscillations, indicating AB behavior. At the boundary between the PB and the AB large-amplitude oscillations due to resonance occur, giving rise to collisions between beads and chaotic dynamics; this renders the forced dynamics sensitive to initial and forcing conditions, and hence unpredictable. Finally, we study asymptotically the near field standing wave dynamics occurring for high frequencies, well inside the AB.

  3. Method for separation of homogeneous and inhomogeneous components of spectral broadening of rigid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinyuk, I.V.

    1997-01-30

    A method is suggested that allows separation of the contributions from homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening (IB) to a total spectral contour of rigid systems. Based upon a simple convolution model of inhomogeneous broadening, the method allows calculation of homogeneously broadened spectra and an inhomogeneous distribution function (IDF) from the measured excitation-wavelength-dependent fluorescence spectra of the system. The method is applied successfully to the solid solution of coumarin 334 (C334) in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) glass at 293 K. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Evolving controllers for a homogeneous system of physical robots: structured cooperation with minimal sensors.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Matt; Smith, Lincoln; Mayley, Giles; Husbands, Phil

    2003-10-15

    We report on recent work in which we employed artificial evolution to design neural network controllers for small, homogeneous teams of mobile autonomous robots. The robots were evolved to perform a formation-movement task from random starting positions, equipped only with infrared sensors. The dual constraints of homogeneity and minimal sensors make this a non-trivial task. We describe the behaviour of a successful system in which robots adopt and maintain functionally distinct roles in order to achieve the task. We believe this to be the first example of the use of artificial evolution to design coordinated, cooperative behaviour for real robots.

  5. Polynomial integrability of Hamiltonian systems with homogeneous potentials of degree -k

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Regilene; Valls, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we shall answer positively two open problems proposed by Llibre-Mahdi-Valls (2011) in [9]. More precisely, we characterize the polynomial integrability of Hamiltonian system with potentials given by the inverse of a homogeneous potential of degree k.

  6. Global bifurcation analysis and pattern formation in homogeneous diffusive predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Wei, Junjie; Shi, Junping

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a general diffusive predator-prey system is considered. Existence and nonexistence of non-constant positive steady state solutions are shown to identify the ranges of parameters of spatial pattern formation. Bifurcations of spatially homogeneous and nonhomogeneous periodic solutions as well as non-constant steady state solutions are studied.

  7. HOMOGENEOUS CLASSROOM GROUPING BASED ON CONCEPTUAL SYSTEMS THEORY IN AN EDUCATION ENRICHMENT PROJECT -- AN EXPLORATORY STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HUNT, DAVID E.

    EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS, HIGHLY STRUCTURED OR UNSTRUCTURED, WERE DIFFERENTIALLY EFFECTIVE WITH STUDENTS OF VARYING PERSONALITIES. THE REPORT CONSIDERED THE UTILITY AND RELEVANCE OF THE CONCEPTUAL SYSTEMS MODEL BY DESCRIBING A SPECIFIC PROJECT IN WHICH THE MODEL SERVED AS THE BASIS FOR FORMING HOMOGENEOUS CLASSROOM GROUPS. THE PROJECT WAS…

  8. Many-atom-cavity QED system with homogeneous atom-cavity coupling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongmin; Vrijsen, Geert; Teper, Igor; Hosten, Onur; Kasevich, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a many-atom-cavity system with a high-finesse dual-wavelength standing wave cavity in which all participating rubidium atoms are nearly identically coupled to a 780-nm cavity mode. This homogeneous coupling is enforced by a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by the field of a 1560-nm cavity mode.

  9. A pulsed THz imaging system with a line focus and a balanced 1-D detection scheme with two industrial CCD line-scan cameras.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Christian; Herrmann, Michael; Bachtler, Sebastian; Klier, Jens; Molter, Daniel; Jonuscheit, Joachim; Beigang, René

    2010-03-15

    We present a pulsed THz Imaging System with a line focus intended to speed up measurements. A balanced 1-D detection scheme working with two industrial line-scan cameras is used. The instrument is implemented without the need for an amplified laser system, increasing the industrial applicability. The instrumental characteristics are determined.

  10. Boundary Korn Inequality and Neumann Problems in Homogenization of Systems of Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jun; Shen, Zhongwei; Song, Liang

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with a family of elliptic systems of linear elasticity with rapidly oscillating periodic coefficients, arising in the theory of homogenization. We establish uniform optimal regularity estimates for solutions of Neumann problems in a bounded Lipschitz domain with L 2 boundary data. The proof relies on a boundary Korn inequality for solutions of systems of linear elasticity and uses a large-scale Rellich estimate obtained in Shen (Anal PDE, arXiv:1505.00694v2).

  11. Homogeneous piecewise polynomial Lyapunov function for robust stability of uncertain piecewise linear system

    SciTech Connect

    BenAbdallah, Abdallah; Hammami, Mohamed Ali; Kallel, Jalel

    2009-03-05

    In this paper we present some sufficient conditions for the robust stability and stabilization of time invariant uncertain piecewise linear system using homogenous piecewise polynomial Lyapunov function. The proposed conditions are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities which can be numerically solved. An application of the obtained result is given. It consists in resolving the stabilization of piecewise uncertain linear control systems by using a state piecewise linear feedback.

  12. Mechanical properties of particle systems using a molecular dynamics approach inspired by continuum homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andia, Pedro C.

    The topic of this dissertation is the study of the mechanical properties of solid material systems at the nanoscale. At such length scales, materials can be viewed as particle systems, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations help one understand their behavior as well as quantify their properties. However, mechanical concepts such as strain, stress and moduli were originally developed in continuum models, which are typically applied in space scales that range from the microscopic to the macroscopic. For this reason, a careful translation of ideas from continuum scales to the nanoscale is necessary. In essence, this thesis reviews and refines the continuum notions of average mechanical properties, such as stress and strain, and the meaning of such notions when MD is used to compute them. A Lagrangian-based approach is utilized for the purpose of determining the stress-deformation behavior of continua as well as of particle systems. At the continuum level, the mentioned Lagrangian-based approach is applied within homogenization theory for developing a nonlinear continuum homogenization model, which includes a novel constitutive relation for the stress. At the nanoscale, an MD method is presented as the extension of the continuum homogenization model. This MD method is able to simulate the behavior of particle systems under a given type of deformation as well as to generate stress-strain curves. In the process of developing the MD method, some concepts and techniques commonly used in MD, such as the virial stress and the Parrinello-Rahman method, are clarified.

  13. Note on integrability of certain homogeneous Hamiltonian systems in 2D constant curvature spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Szumiński, Wojciech; Przybylska, Maria

    2017-02-01

    We formulate the necessary conditions for the integrability of a certain family of Hamiltonian systems defined in the constant curvature two-dimensional spaces. Proposed form of potential can be considered as a counterpart of a homogeneous potential in flat spaces. Thanks to this property Hamilton equations admit, in a general case, a particular solution. Using this solution we derive necessary integrability conditions investigating differential Galois group of variational equations.

  14. Solar fuels generation and molecular systems: is it homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysis?

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc

    2013-03-21

    Catalysis is a key enabling technology for solar fuel generation. A number of catalytic systems, either molecular/homogeneous or solid/heterogeneous, have been developed during the last few decades for both the reductive and oxidative multi-electron reactions required for fuel production from water or CO(2) as renewable raw materials. While allowing for a fine tuning of the catalytic properties through ligand design, molecular approaches are frequently criticized because of the inherent fragility of the resulting catalysts, when exposed to extreme redox potentials. In a number of cases, it has been clearly established that the true catalytic species is heterogeneous in nature, arising from the transformation of the initial molecular species, which should rather be considered as a pre-catalyst. Whether such a situation is general or not is a matter of debate in the community. In this review, covering water oxidation and reduction catalysts, involving noble and non-noble metal ions, we limit our discussion to the cases in which this issue has been directly and properly addressed as well as those requiring more confirmation. The methodologies proposed for discriminating homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis are inspired in part by those previously discussed by Finke in the case of homogeneous hydrogenation reaction in organometallic chemistry [J. A. Widegren and R. G. Finke, J. Mol. Catal. A, 2003, 198, 317-341].

  15. Prediction of seasonal summer monsoon rainfall over homogenous regions of India using dynamical prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Dandi A.; Rao, Suryachadra A.; Pillai, Prasanth A.; Pradhan, M.; George, G.; Rao, D. Nagarguna; Mahapatra, S.; Pai, D. S.; Rajeevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    Seasonal prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall is a challenging task for the modeling community and predicting seasonal mean rainfall at smaller regional scale is much more difficult than predicting all India averaged seasonal mean rainfall. The regional scale prediction of summer monsoon mean rainfall at longer lead time (e.g., predicting 3-4 months in advance) can play a vital role in planning of hydrological and agriculture aspects of the society. Previous attempts for predicting seasonal mean rainfall at regional level (over 5 Homogeneous regions) have resulted with limited success (anomaly correlation coefficient is low, ACC ≈ 0.1-0.4, even at a short lead time of one month). The high resolution Climate Forecast System, version 2 (CFSv2) model, with spectral resolution of T382 (∼38 km), can predict the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) at lead time of 3-4 months, with a reasonably good prediction skill (ACC ≈ 0.55). In the present study, we have investigated whether the seasonal mean rainfall over different homogenous regions is predictable using the same model, at 3-4 months lead time? Out of five homogeneous regions of India three regions have shown moderate prediction skill, even at 3 months lead time. Compared to lower resolution model, high resolution model has good skill for all the regions except south peninsular India. High resolution model is able to capture the extreme events and also the teleconnections associated with large scale features at four months lead time and hence shows better skill (ACC ≈ 0.45) in predicting the seasonal mean rainfall over homogeneous regions.

  16. A novel, compact disk-like centrifugal microfluidics system for cell lysis and sample homogenization.

    PubMed

    Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Smith, David; Zoval, Jim; Norton, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characterization of a novel platform for mechanical cell lysis of even the most difficult to lyse cell types on a micro or nanoscale (maximum 70 microL total volume). The system incorporates a machined plastic circular disk assembly, magnetic field actuated microfluidics, centrifugal cells and tissue homogenizer and centrifugation system. The mechanism of tissue disruption of this novel cell homogenization apparatus derives from the relative motion of ferromagnetic metal disks and grinding matrices in a liquid medium within individual chambers of the disk in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The oscillation of the ferromagnetic disks or blades produces mechanical impaction and shear forces capable of disrupting cells within the chamber both by direct action of the blade and by the motion of the surrounding lysis matrix, and by motion induced vortexing of buffer fluid. Glass beads or other grinding media are integrated into each lysis chamber within the disk to enhance the transfer of energy from the oscillating metal blade to the cells. The system also achieves the centrifugal elimination of solids from each liquid sample and allows the elution of clarified supernatants via siphoning into a collection chamber fabricated into the plastic disk assembly. This article describes system design, implementation and validation of proof of concept on two samples--Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae representing model systems for cells that are easy and difficult to lyse, respectively.

  17. Constitutive modeling and control of 1D smart composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Jonathan P.; Ostrowski, James P.; Ponte-Castaneda, Pedro

    1998-07-01

    Homogenization techniques for determining effective properties of composite materials may provide advantages for control of stiffness and strain in systems using hysteretic smart actuators embedded in a soft matrix. In this paper, a homogenized model of a 1D composite structure comprised of shape memory alloys and a rubber-like matrix is presented. With proportional and proportional/integral feedback, using current as the input state and global strain as an error state, implementation scenarios include the use of tractions on the boundaries and a nonlinear constitutive law for the matrix. The result is a simple model which captures the nonlinear behavior of the smart composite material system and is amenable to experiments with various control paradigms. The success of this approach in the context of the 1D model suggests that the homogenization method may prove useful in investigating control of more general smart structures. Applications of such materials could include active rehabilitation aids, e.g. wrist braces, as well as swimming/undulating robots, or adaptive molds for manufacturing processes.

  18. Practical Aerobic Oxidations of Alcohols and Amines with Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO and Related Catalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and amine oxidations are common reactions in laboratory and industrial synthesis of organic molecules. Aerobic oxidation methods have long been sought for these transformations, but few practical methods exist that offer advantages over traditional oxidation methods. Recently developed homogeneous Cu/TEMPO (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl) and related catalyst systems appear to fill this void. The reactions exhibit high levels of chemoselectivity and broad functional-group tolerance, and they often operate efficiently at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. These advances, together with their historical context and recent applications, are highlighted in this minireview. PMID:25044821

  19. Stability analysis of discrete-time switched systems: a switched homogeneous Lyapunov function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingwen; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses the stability issue of discrete-time switched systems with guaranteed dwell-time. The approach of switched homogeneous Lyapunov function of higher order is formally proposed. By means of this approach, a necessary and sufficient condition is established to check the exponential stability of the considered system. With the observation that switching signal is actually arbitrary if the dwell time is one sample time, a necessary and sufficient condition is also presented to verify the exponential stability of switched systems under arbitrary switching signals. Using the augmented argument, a necessary and sufficient exponential stability criterion is given for discrete-time switched systems with delays. A numerical example is provided to show the advantages of the theoretical results.

  20. Decolorization of Reactive Red 2 by advanced oxidation processes: Comparative studies of homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Hsin; Chang, Chung-Liang

    2006-02-06

    This study investigated the decolorization of the Reactive Red 2 in water using advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): UV/TiO2, UV/SnO2, UV/TiO2+SnO2, O3, O3+MnO2, UV/O3 and UV/O3+TiO2+SnO2. Kinetic analyses indicated that the decolorization rates of Reactive Red 2 could be approximated as pseudo-first-order kinetics for both homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. The decolorization rate at pH 7 exceeded pH 4 and 10 in UV/TiO2 and UV/TiO2+SnO2 systems, respectively. However, the rate constants in the systems (including O3) demonstrated the order of pH 10>pH 7>pH 4. The UV/TiO2+SnO2 and O3+MnO2 systems exhibited a greater decolorization rate than the UV/TiO2 and O3 systems, respectively. Additionally, the promotion of rate depended on pH. The variation of dye concentration influenced the decolorization efficiency of heterogeneous systems more significant than homogeneous systems. Experimental results verified that decolorization and desulfuration occurred at nearly the same rate. Moreover, the decolorization rate constants at pH 7 in various systems followed the order of UV/O3 > or = O3+MnO2 > or = UV/O3+TiO2+SnO2 > O3 > UV/TiO2+SnO2 > or = UV/TiO2 > UV/SnO2.

  1. 3D homogeneity study in PMMA layers using a Fourier domain OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones-R., Manuel de J.; Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H. De La; Tavera, Cesar G.; Luna H., Juan M.; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Micro-metallic particles embedded in polymers are now widely used in several industrial applications in order to modify the mechanical properties of the bulk. A uniform distribution of these particles inside the polymers is highly desired for instance, when a biological backscattering is simulated or a bio-framework is designed. A 3D Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system to detect the polymer's internal homogeneity is proposed. This optical system has a 2D camera sensor array that records a fringe pattern used to reconstruct with a single shot the tomographic image of the sample. The system gathers the full 3D tomographic and optical phase information during a controlled deformation by means of a motion linear stage. This stage avoids the use of expensive tilting stages, which in addition are commonly controlled by piezo drivers. As proof of principle, a series of different deformations were proposed to detect the uniform or non-uniform internal deposition of copper micro particles. The results are presented as images coming from the 3D tomographic micro reconstruction of the samples, and the 3D optical phase information that identifies the in-homogeneity regions within the Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) volume.

  2. Longevity of duct tape in residential air distribution systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D joints

    SciTech Connect

    Abushakra, Bass

    2002-05-30

    The aging tests conducted so far showed that duct tape tends to degrade in its performance as the joint it is applied to requires a geometrical description of a higher number of space dimensions (1-D, 2-D, 3-D). One-dimensional joints are the easiest to seal with duct tape, and thus the least to experience failure. Two-dimensional joints, such as the flexible duct core-to-collar joints tested in this study, are less likely to fail than three-dimensional collar-to-plenum joints, as the shrinkage could have a positive effect in tightening the joint. Three-dimensional joints are the toughest to seal and the most likely to experience failure. The 2-D flexible duct core-to-collar joints passed the six-month period of the aging test in terms of leakage, but with the exception of the foil-butyl tape, showed degradation in terms hardening, brittleness, partial peeling, shrinkage, wrinkling, delamination of the tape layers, flaking, cracking, bubbling, oozing and discoloration. The baking test results showed that the failure in the duct tape joints could be attributed to the type of combination of the duct tape and the material it is applied to, as the duct tape behaves differently with different substrates. Overall, the foil-butyl tape (Tape 4) had the best results, while the film tape (Tape 3) showed the most deterioration. The conventional duct tapes tested (Tape 1 and Tape 2) were between these two extremes, with Tape 2 performing better than Tape 1. Lastly, we found that plastic straps became discolored and brittle during the tests, and a couple of straps broke completely. Therefore, we recommend that clamping the duct-taped flexible core-to-collar joints should be done with metallic adjustable straps.

  3. Highly Sensitive Homogeneous Immunoassays Based on Construction of Silver Triangular Nanoplates-Quantum Dots FRET System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qinghui; Li, Qin; Ji, Wenyu; Bin, Xue; Song, Jie

    2016-05-01

    With growing concerns about health issues worldwide, elegant sensors with high sensitivity and specificity for virus/antigens (Ag) detection are urgent to be developed. Homogeneous immunoassays (HIA) are an important technique with the advantages of small sample volumes requirement and pretreatment-free process. HIA are becoming more favorable for the medical diagnosis and disease surveillance than heterogeneous immunoassays. An important subset of HIA relies on the effect of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) via a donor-acceptor (D–A) platform, e.g., quantum dots (QDs) donor based FRET system. Being an excellent plasmonic material, silver triangular nanoplates (STNPs) have unique advantages in displaying surface plasmon resonance in the visible to near infrared spectral region, which make them a better acceptor for pairing with QDs in a FRET-based sensing system. However, the reported STNPs generally exhibited broad size distributions, which would greatly restrict their application as HIA acceptor for high detection sensitivity and specificity purpose. In this work, uniform STNPs and red-emitting QDs are firstly applied to construct FRET nanoplatform in the advanced HIA and further be exploited for analyzing virus Ag. The uniform STNPs/QDs nanoplatform based medical sensor provides a straightforward and highly sensitive method for Ag analysis in homogeneous form.

  4. A colorimetric homogeneous immunoassay system for the C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ju-Young; Shin, Yong-Beom; Kim, Dong-Myung; Kim, Min-Gon

    2013-03-07

    The C-reactive protein (CRP), which has a five repeat pentameric structure, is known to be a marker for acute inflammation and a potential risk predictor for cardiovascular disease. A simple and rapid homogeneous assay method for the detection of CRP, based on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) aggregation induced colorimetric response, has been developed. In the technique, aggregation of CRP antibody-conjugated AuNPs is induced by addition of CRP as a consequence of its unique pentameric structure. CRP-promoted aggregation of the antibody-conjugated AuNPs results in a change of the wavelength maximum in the UV/Vis-spectrum. This homogeneous assay displays a typical hook effect, in which the signal level is directly proportional to CRP concentration until a critical concentration of CRP (the hook point) is reached. Above this concentration, the signal level decreases as the CRP concentration increases. The maximum shift in the absorption maximum was found to occur when the CRP antigen concentration is 100 ng mL(-1). In order to improve the linearity of the method, we employed a procedure, which takes advantage of a saturation phenomenon that leads to the hook effect, to increase the dynamic range of the CRP assay. Specifically, the use of CRP pre-spiked serum promotes maximum aggregation at the low CRP concentrations and, as a result, leads to an increase in the dynamic range for CRP detection. The applicability of the new homogenous assay system was demonstrated by its utilization for qualitative analysis of CRP in serum samples. The combined observations made in this effort show that the method using CRP antibody-conjugated AuNPs is both rapid and simple and, consequently, it can potentially be applied to onsite diagnosis.

  5. THE HOMOGENEOUS STUDY OF TRANSITING SYSTEMS (HoSTS). I. THE PILOT STUDY OF WASP-13

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Cargile, Phillip; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan G.; Faedi, Francesca; Pollacco, Don; Doyle, Amanda P.; Smalley, Barry; Ghezzi, Luan; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Sousa, Sergio; Santos, Nuno C.; Barros, Susana C. C.; Schuler, Simon C.; Collier Cameron, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    We present the fundamental stellar and planetary properties of the transiting planetary system WASP-13 within the framework of the Homogeneous Study of Transiting Systems (HoSTS). HoSTS aims to derive the fundamental stellar (T{sub eff}, [Fe/H], M{sub *}, R{sub *}) and planetary (M{sub pl}, R{sub pl}, T{sub eq}) physical properties of known transiting planets using a consistent methodology and homogeneous high-quality data set. Four spectral analysis techniques are independently applied to a Keck+HIRES spectrum of WASP-13 considering two distinct cases: unconstrained parameters and constrained log g from transit light curves. We check the derived stellar temperature against that from a different temperature diagnostic based on an INT+IDS H{alpha} spectrum. The four unconstrained analyses render results that are in good agreement, and provide an improvement of 50% in the precision of T{sub eff}, and of 85% in [Fe/H] with respect to the WASP-13 discovery paper. The planetary parameters are then derived via the Monte Carlo Markov Chain modeling of the radial velocity and light curves, in iteration with stellar evolutionary models to derive realistic uncertainties. WASP-13 (1.187 {+-} 0.065 M{sub Sun }; 1.574 {+-} 0.048 R{sub Sun }) hosts a Saturn-mass, transiting planet (0.500 {+-} 0.037 M{sub Jup}; 1.407 {+-} 0.052 R{sub Jup}), and is at the end of its main-sequence lifetime (4-5.5 Gyr). Our analysis of WASP-13 showcases that both a detailed stellar characterization and transit modeling are necessary to well determine the fundamental properties of planetary systems, which are paramount in identifying and determining empirical relationships between transiting planets and their hosts.

  6. Controlling a class of chaotic quantum system under disturbances and noisy measurements: Application to 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-López, Ricardo; López-Pérez, Pablo A.; Lara-Cisneros, Gerardo; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a robust nonlinear feedback control scheme with adaptive gain is proposed to control the chaotic behavior in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The control goal concerns the track or regulation purposes. The BEC system is represented as stochastic ordinary differential equations with measured output perturbed by Gaussian noise, which represents the nature of the quantum systems. The convergence of the BEC control law is analyzed under the frame of the Lyapunov stability theory. Numerical experiments show an adequate performance of the proposed methodology under the required conditions. The results are applicable when the shape of the condensate is sufficiently simple.

  7. Timing and extent of Mg and Al isotopic homogenization in the early inner Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ritesh Kumar; Chaussidon, Marc

    2014-03-01

    The first million years of the Solar System is a key period when the first solids were formed from the nebula gas. The chronology of the different processes at the origin of these solids is still largely unknown and relies strongly on the assumption made of homogeneous distribution for short-lived radioactive nuclides such as 26Al. This assumption is questioned. In this study, in situ 26Al-26Mg isotope systematics was studied with high precision in 12 calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) (1 type A, 2 type B, 5 type C, and 4 fine grained spinel-rich), 2 amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs), and 2 Al-rich chondrules from Efremovka and Vigarano. The (26Al/27Al)i in these early Solar System solids (the subscript ‘i’ stands for the initial isotope ratio obtained from the mineral 26Al isochron) range from ∼6.5×10-5 to 0.2×10-5 with δMgi*26 from -0.08 to +0.37‰. The (26Al/27Al)i and δMgi*26 of CAIs and chondrules can be explained by formation of their precursors from a homogeneous reservoir (Solar System Initial, noted hereafter SSI) with initial magnesium isotopic composition of δMgSSI*26=-0.052±0.013‰ and initial (26Al/27Al)SSI abundance of (5.62±0.42)×10-5. The high precision magnesium isotope data obtained in the present study and literature data allows identifying a few epochs of formation/reprocessing of CAIs. The time periods of these epochs correspond well with the median life times of the pre-main sequence evolution of stars of Solar mass if we anchor the (Al26/Al27)SSI=(5.62±0.42)×10-5 to the beginning of class I phase. This provides a natural explanation to the range of (26Al/27Al)i - (∼6 to 0.02) × 10-5 seen in corundum grains, FUN (Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear Effects) CAIs, ultrarefractory CAIs, normal CAIs, and chondrules, and suggests a possible relationship between the astrophysical conditions and the formation of these early solids. Corundum grains, FUN CAIs, ultrarefractory CAIs would have formed during the class 0 of

  8. Profile homogenization and monitoring for a multiple 100 J diode-laser pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebold, M.; Podleska, S.; Hein, J.; Bödefeld, R.; Hornung, M.; Schnepp, M.; Sauerbrey, R.

    2005-09-01

    Multi-pass amplification to the 10 joule level for a femto-second CPA laser system is aimed at diode-pumping Yb3+ doped fluoride-phosphate glass with an energy of 240 J at 940 nm. Collimated pump light of 1000 laser diode bars is focussed onto an a circular glass disk with 28mm diameter. A two-sided ring shaped assembly of diode stacks and attached optics is applied for longitudinal pumping. We developed a computer aided optimization routine for positioning single pump foci with size of 4 × 8mm2 to achieve a smooth homogeneously distributed top-hat shaped pump profile with a diameter of 18 mm. For monitoring purpose the pulse energy of each diode stack is measured with a solar panel placed behind a reflecting mirror.

  9. Symmetry Violations in Partially Oxidized One-Dimensional (1D) Transition Metal Polymers. Metal-Ligand-Metal (M-L-M) Bridged Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Michael C.

    1984-09-01

    The band structure of the metal-ligand-metal (M-L-M) bridged quasi one-dimensional (1D) cyclopentadienylmanganese polymer, MnCp 1, has been studied in the unoxidized state and in a partly oxidized modification with one electron removed from each second MnCp fragment. The tight-binding approach is based on a semiempirical self-consistent-field (SCF) Hartree-Fock (HF) crystal orbital (CO) model of the INDO-type (intermediate neglect of differential overlap) combined with a statistical averaging procedure which has its origin in the grand canonical ensemble. The latter approximation allows for an efficient investigation of violations of the translation symmetries in the oxidized 1D material. The oxidation process in 1 is both ligand- and metal-centered (Mn 3d-2 states). The mean-field minimum corresponds to a charge density wave (CDW) solution with inequivalent Mn sites within the employed repeat-units. The symmetry adapted solution with electronically identical 3d centers is a maximum in the variational space. The coupling of this electronic instability to geometrical deformations is also analyzed. The ligand amplitudes encountered in the hole-state wave function prevent extremely large charge separations between the 3d centers which are found in ID systems without bridging moieties (e.g. Ni(CN)2-5 chain). The symmetry reduction in oxidized 1 is compared with violations of spatial symmetries in finite transition metal derivatives and simple solids. The stabilization of the valence bond-type (VB) solution is physically rationalized (i.e. left-right correlations between the 3d centers). The computational results derived for 1 are generalized to oxidized transition metal chains with band occupancies that are simple fractions of the number of stacking units and to 1D systems that deviate from this relation. The entropy-influence for temperatures T ≠ 0 is shortly discussed (stabilization of domain or cluster structures).

  10. Evidence of linked biogeochemical and hydrological processes in homogeneous and layered vadose zone systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T.; Hansen, D. J.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding chemical fate and transport in the vadose zone is critical to protect groundwater resources and preserve ecosystem health. However, prediction can be challenging due to the dynamic hydrologic and biogeochemical nature of the vadose zone. Additional controls on hydrobiogeochemical processes are added by subsurface structural heterogeneity. This study uses repacked soil column experiments to quantify linkages between microbial activity, geochemical cycling and hydrologic flow. Three “short” laboratory soil columns were constructed to evaluate the effects of soil layering: a homogenized medium-grained sand, homogenized organic-rich loam, and a sand-over-loam layered column. In addition, two “long” columns were constructed using either gamma-irradiated (sterilized) or untreated sediments to evaluate the effects of both soil layers and the presence of microorganisms. The long columns were packed identically; a medium-grained sand matrix with two vertically separated and horizontally offset lenses of organic-rich loam. In all 5 columns, downward and upward infiltration of water was evaluated to simulate rainfall and rising water table events respectively. In-situ colocated probes were used to measure soil water content, matric potential, Eh, major anions, ammonium, Fe2+, and total sulfide. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed in the short layered column versus the short, homogeneous columns, and enumerations of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria were 1-2 orders of magnitude greater. In the long columns, microbial activity caused mineral bands and produced insoluble gases that impeded water flow through the pores of the sediment. Capillary barriers, formed around the lenses due to soil textural differences, retarded water flow rates through the lenses. This allowed reducing conditions to develop, evidenced by the production of Fe2+ and S2-. At the fringes of the lenses, Fe2+ oxidized to form Fe(III)-oxide bands that further retarded water

  11. How does money memorize social interactions? Understanding time-homogeneity in monetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Schmitt, Matthias; Schacker, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how money shapes and memorizes our social interactions is central to modern life. There are many schools of thought on as to how monetary systems contribute to crises or boom/bust cycles and how monetary policy can try to avert them. We find that statistical physics gives a refreshing perspective. We analyze how credit mechanisms introduce non-locality and time-heterogeneity to the monetary memory. Motivated by an analogy to particle physics, locality and time-homogeneity can be imposed to monetary systems. As a result, a full reserve banking system is complemented with a bi-currency system of non-bank assets (``money'') and bank assets (``antimoney''). Payment can either be made by passing on money or by receiving antimoney. As a result, a free floating exchange rate between non-bank assets and bank assets is established. Interestingly, this monetary memory allows for credit creation by the simultaneous transfer of money and antimoney at a negotiated exchange rate. We analyze this novel mechanism of liquidity transfer in a model of random social interactions, yielding analytical results for all relevant distributions and the price of liquidity under the conditions of a fully transparent credit market.

  12. Statistical mechanics of a time-homogeneous system of money and antimoney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Matthias; Schacker, Andreas; Braun, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    Financial crises appear throughout human history. While there are many schools of thought on what the actual causes of such crises are, it has been suggested that the creation of credit money might be a source of financial instability. We discuss how the credit mechanism in a system of fractional reserve banking leads to non-local transfers of purchasing power that also affect non-involved agents. To overcome this issue, we impose the local symmetry of time homogeneity on the monetary system. A bi-currency system of non-bank assets (money) and bank assets (antimoney) is considered. A payment is either made by passing on money or by receiving antimoney. As a result, a free floating exchange rate between non-bank assets and bank assets is established. Credit creation is replaced by the simultaneous transfer of money and antimoney at a negotiated exchange rate. This is in contrast to traditional discussions of full reserve banking, which stalls creditary lending. With money and antimoney, the problem of credit crunches is mitigated while a full time symmetry of the monetary system is maintained. As a test environment for such a monetary system, we discuss an economy of random transfers. Random transfers are a strong criterion to probe the stability of monetary systems. The analysis using statistical physics provides analytical solutions and confirms that a money-antimoney system could be functional. Equally important to the probing of the stability of such a monetary system is the question of how to implement the credit default dynamics. This issue remains open.

  13. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  14. Characterization of a Digital Microwave Radiometry System for Noninvasive Thermometry using Temperature Controlled Homogeneous Test Load

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, K; Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, PF; Jacobsen, S; Sterzer, F

    2009-01-01

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. Performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7–4.2GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30–50°C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6mm thickness is also investigated. To assess clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075°C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217°C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32–45°C. Within the 3.7–4.2GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial hyperthermia applicators. PMID

  15. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO[sub 2]F[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF[sub 6] and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % [sup 235]U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  16. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF{sub 6} and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  17. Calibration of a 1D/1D urban flood model using 1D/2D model results in the absence of field data.

    PubMed

    Leandro, J; Djordjević, S; Chen, A S; Savić, D A; Stanić, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently increased flood events have been prompting researchers to improve existing coupled flood-models such as one-dimensional (1D)/1D and 1D/two-dimensional (2D) models. While 1D/1D models simulate sewer and surface networks using a one-dimensional approach, 1D/2D models represent the surface network by a two-dimensional surface grid. However their application raises two issues to urban flood modellers: (1) stormwater systems planning/emergency or risk analysis demands for fast models, and the 1D/2D computational time is prohibitive, (2) and the recognized lack of field data (e.g. Hunter et al. (2008)) causes difficulties for the calibration/validation of 1D/1D models. In this paper we propose to overcome these issues by calibrating a 1D/1D model with the results of a 1D/2D model. The flood-inundation results show that: (1) 1D/2D results can be used to calibrate faster 1D/1D models, (2) the 1D/1D model is able to map the 1D/2D flood maximum extent well, and the flooding limits satisfactorily in each time-step, (3) the 1D/1D model major differences are the instantaneous flow propagation and overestimation of the flood-depths within surface-ponds, (4) the agreement in the volume surcharged by both models is a necessary condition for the 1D surface-network validation and (5) the agreement of the manholes discharge shapes measures the fitness of the calibrated 1D surface-network.

  18. Homogeneity Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Tracy; Fan, Jianqing; Wu, Yichao

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the homogeneity of coefficients in high-dimensional regression, which extends the sparsity concept and is more general and suitable for many applications. Homogeneity arises when regression coefficients corresponding to neighboring geographical regions or a similar cluster of covariates are expected to be approximately the same. Sparsity corresponds to a special case of homogeneity with a large cluster of known atom zero. In this article, we propose a new method called clustering algorithm in regression via data-driven segmentation (CARDS) to explore homogeneity. New mathematics are provided on the gain that can be achieved by exploring homogeneity. Statistical properties of two versions of CARDS are analyzed. In particular, the asymptotic normality of our proposed CARDS estimator is established, which reveals better estimation accuracy for homogeneous parameters than that without homogeneity exploration. When our methods are combined with sparsity exploration, further efficiency can be achieved beyond the exploration of sparsity alone. This provides additional insights into the power of exploring low-dimensional structures in high-dimensional regression: homogeneity and sparsity. Our results also shed lights on the properties of the fussed Lasso. The newly developed method is further illustrated by simulation studies and applications to real data. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:26085701

  19. Coastal fog prediction with a coupled model (1D+3D) system using the data from a 300 m met tower as input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Yum, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Visibility degradation due to fog can be very hazardous both to ground transportation and aviation traffic. However, prediction of fog using numerical models is difficult because fog formation is usually determined by local meteorological conditions that are hard to be measured and modeled with sufficient resolution. For this reason, there have been several attempts to build a coupled system of a fine resolution 1D model and a 3D mesoscale model with a usual grid resolution. In this study we uses the coupled system of the 1D PAFOG model and the 3D WRF model to simulate fogs formed at a southern coastal region of Korea, where the National Center for Intensive Observation of Severe Weather (NCIO) is located. Unique to NCIO is that it has a 300 m meteorological tower on which some basic meteorological variables (temperature, dew point temperature and winds) are measured at eleven different altitudes. In addition comprehensive cloud physics measurements are made with various remote sensing instruments such as cloud radar, wind profiler, microwave radiometer, micro rain radar. Several fog cases are identified during 2015 and will be simulated by the coupled system. The comprehensive set of measurement data from NCIO will be utilized as input to the model system and for evaluating the results. Particularly the data for initial and boundary conditions, which are tightly connected to the coupled model predictability, are extracted from the tower measurement. Furthermore, various sensitivity experiments will be done to enhance our understanding of the coastal fog formation mechanism. Detailed results will be discussed at the conference.

  20. Free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of binary hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Ganagalla, Srinivasa Rao; Punnathanam, Sudeep N

    2013-05-07

    In this study, the free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a system that exhibits a eutectic point are computed using Monte Carlo simulations. The system studied is a binary hard sphere mixture with a diameter ratio of 0.85 between the smaller and larger hard spheres. The simulations of crystal nucleation are performed for the entire range of fluid compositions. The free energy barrier is found to be the highest near the eutectic point and is nearly five times that for the pure fluid, which slows down the nucleation rate by a factor of 10(-31). These free energy barriers are some of highest ever computed using simulations. For most of the conditions studied, the composition of the critical nucleus corresponds to either one of the two thermodynamically stable solid phases. However, near the eutectic point, the nucleation barrier is lowest for the formation of the metastable random hexagonal closed packed (rhcp) solid phase with composition lying in the two-phase region of the phase diagram. The fluid to solid phase transition is hypothesized to proceed via formation of a metastable rhcp phase followed by a phase separation into respective stable fcc solid phases.

  1. Homogeneous studies of transiting extrasolar planets - IV. Thirty systems with space-based light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2011-11-01

    I calculate the physical properties of 32 transiting extrasolar planet and brown-dwarf systems from existing photometric observations and measured spectroscopic parameters. The systems studied include 15 observed by the CoRoT satellite, 10 by Kepler and five by the Deep Impact spacecraft. Inclusion of the objects studied in previous papers leads to a sample of 58 transiting systems with homogeneously measured properties. The Kepler data include observations from Quarter 2, and my analyses of several of the systems are the first to be based on short-cadence data from this satellite. The light curves are modelled using the JKTEBOP code, with attention paid to the treatment of limb darkening, contaminating light, orbital eccentricity, correlated noise and numerical integration over long exposure times. The physical properties are derived from the light-curve parameters, spectroscopic characteristics of the host star and constraints from five sets of theoretical stellar model predictions. An alternative approach using a calibration from eclipsing binary star systems is explored and found to give comparable results whilst imposing a much smaller computational burden. My results are in good agreement with published properties for most of the transiting systems, but discrepancies are identified for CoRoT-5, CoRoT-8, CoRoT-13, Kepler-5 and Kepler-7. Many of the error bars quoted in the literature are underestimated. Refined orbital ephemerides are given for CoRoT-8 and for the Kepler planets. Asteroseismic constraints on the density of the host stars are in good agreement with the photometric equivalents for HD 17156 and TrES-2, but not for HAT-P-7 and HAT-P-11. Complete error budgets are generated for each transiting system, allowing identification of the observations best-suited to improve measurements of their physical properties. Whilst most systems would benefit from further photometry and spectroscopy, HD 17156, HD 80606, HAT-P-7 and TrES-2 are now extremely well

  2. Bilingual effects on deployment of the attention system in linguistically and culturally homogeneous children and adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sujin; Yang, Hwajin

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the impact of early childhood and adulthood bilingualism on the attention system in a group of linguistically and culturally homogeneous children (5- and 6-year olds) and young adults. We administered the child Attention Network Test (ANT) to 63 English monolingual and Korean-English bilingual children and administered the adult ANT to 39 language- and culture-matched college students. Advantageous bilingual effects on attention were observed for both children and adults in global processing levels of inverse efficiency, response time, and accuracy at a magnitude more pronounced for children than for adults. Differential bilingualism effects were evident at the local network level of executive control and orienting in favor of the adult bilinguals only. Notably, however, bilingual children achieved an adult level of accuracy in the incongruent flanker condition, implying enhanced attentional skills to cope with interferences. Our findings suggest that although both child and adult bilinguals share cognitive advantages in attentional functioning, age-related cognitive and linguistic maturation differentially shapes the outcomes of attentional processing at a local network level.

  3. Cutoff radius effect of the isotropic periodic sum method in homogeneous system. II. Water.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuaki; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2010-07-07

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been applied for water to compare the isotropic periodic sum (IPS) method [X. Wu and B. R. Brooks, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 044107 (2005)] with the Ewald sum based on the diffusion coefficient and liquid structure. The IPS method gives a good estimation for the self-diffusion coefficient at a cutoff radius, r(c), greater than 2.2 nm; however, the radial distribution function g(r) has a notable deviation. The peak of this deviation appears at specific intermolecular distances which are near each cutoff radius and decrease in proportion to the inverse of the cube of r(c). Thus the deviation becomes insignificant (less than 1%) at r(c) greater than 2.2 nm. The distance dependent Kirkwood factor G(k)(r) was also calculated, and since the truncation of a long-range interaction of the cutofflike method (such as cutoff with or without the switch function and the reaction field) shows serious shortcomings for dipole-dipole correlations in bulk water systems, this was observed by comparing the shape to that of the Ewald sum [Y. Yonetani, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 204501 (2006); D. van der Spoel and P. J. van Maaren, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2, 1 (2006)]. The G(k)(r) of cutofflike method greatly deviate from that of the Ewald sum. However, the discrepancy of G(k)(r) for the IPS method was found to be much less than that of other typical cutofflike methods. In conclusion, the IPS method is an adequately accurate technique for estimating transport coefficients and the liquid structure of water in a homogeneous system at long cutoff distances.

  4. Development of a Numerical Method for Patient-Specific Cerebral Circulation Using 1D-0D Simulation of the Entire Cardiovascular System with SPECT Data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Fujiwara, Naoya; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Yamada, Shigeki; Liang, Fuyou; Takagi, Shu; Oshima, Marie

    2016-08-01

    The detailed flow information in the circle of Willis (CoW) can facilitate a better understanding of disease progression, and provide useful references for disease treatment. We have been developing a one-dimensional-zero-dimensional (1D-0D) simulation method for the entire cardiovascular system to obtain hemodynamics information in the CoW. This paper presents a new method for applying 1D-0D simulation to an individual patient using patient-specific data. The key issue is how to adjust the deviation of physiological parameters, such as peripheral resistance, from literature data when patient-specific geometry is used. In order to overcome this problem, we utilized flow information from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. A numerical method was developed to optimize physiological parameters by adjusting peripheral cerebral resistance to minimize the difference between the resulting flow rate and the SPECT data in the efferent arteries of the CoW. The method was applied to three cases using different sets of patient-specific data in order to investigate the hemodynamics of the CoW. The resulting flow rates in the afferent arteries were compared to those of the phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC-MRA) data. Utilization of the SPECT data combined with the PC-MRA data showed a good agreement in flow rates in the afferent arteries of the CoW with those of PC-MRA data for all three cases. The results also demonstrated that application of SPECT data alone could provide the information on the ratios of flow distributions among arteries in the CoW.

  5. Simulation of homogeneous condensation of small polyatomic systems in high pressure supersonic nozzle flows using Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, Deborah A

    2011-03-28

    In the present work, we have simulated the homogeneous condensation of carbon dioxide and ethanol using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook based approach. In an earlier work of Gallagher-Rogers et al. [J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer 22, 695 (2008)], it was found that it was not possible to simulate condensation experiments of Wegener et al. [Phys. Fluids 15, 1869 (1972)] using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Therefore, in this work, we have used the statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approach, which was found to be numerically more efficient than direct simulation Monte Carlo method in our previous studies [Kumar et al., AIAA J. 48, 1531 (2010)], to model homogeneous condensation of two small polyatomic systems, carbon dioxide and ethanol. A new weighting scheme is developed in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook framework to reduce the computational load associated with the study of homogeneous condensation flows. The solutions obtained by the use of the new scheme are compared with those obtained by the baseline Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook condensation model (without the species weighting scheme) for the condensing flow of carbon dioxide in the stagnation pressure range of 1-5 bars. Use of the new weighting scheme in the present work makes the simulation of homogeneous condensation of ethanol possible. We obtain good agreement between our simulated predictions for homogeneous condensation of ethanol and experiments in terms of the point of condensation onset and the distribution of mass fraction of ethanol condensed along the nozzle centerline.

  6. High pressure homogenization to improve the stability of casein - hydroxypropyl cellulose aqueous systems

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ran; Harte, Federico

    2013-01-01

    The effect of high pressure homogenization on the improvement of the stability hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and micellar casein was investigated. HPC with two molecular weights (80 and 1150 kDa) and micellar casein were mixed in water to a concentration leading to phase separation (0.45% w/v HPC and 3% w/v casein) and immediately subjected to high pressure homogenization ranging from 0 to 300 MPa, in 100 MPa increments. The various dispersions were evaluated for stability, particle size, turbidity, protein content, and viscosity over a period of two weeks and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) at the end of the storage period. The stability of casein-HPC complexes was enhanced with the increasing homogenization pressure, especially for the complex containing high molecular weight HPC. The apparent particle size of complexes was reduced from ~200nm to ~130nm when using 300 MPa, corresponding to the sharp decrease of absorbance when compared to the non-homogenized controls. High pressure homogenization reduced the viscosity of HPC-casein complexes regardless of the molecular weight of HPC and STEM imagines revealed aggregates consistent with nano-scale protein polysaccharide interactions. PMID:24159250

  7. Developing an automated water emitting-sensing system, based on integral tensiometers placed in homogenous environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabach, Sharon; Shani, Uri

    2010-05-01

    As the population grows, irrigated agriculture is using more water and fertilizers to supply the growing food demand. However, the uptake by various plants is only 30 to 50% of the water applied. The remaining water flows to surface water and groundwater and causes their contamination by fertilizers or other toxins such as herbicides or pesticides. To improve the water use efficiency of crops and decrease the drainage below the root zone, irrigation water should be applied according to the plant demand. The aim of this work is to develop an automated irrigation system based on real-time feedback from an inexpensive and reliable integrated sensing system. This system will supply water to plants according to their demand, without any user interference during the entire growth season. To achieve this goal a sensor (Geo-Tensiometer) was designed and tested. This sensor has better contact with the surrounding soil, is more reliable and much cheaper than the ceramic cup tensiometer. A lysimeter experiment was conducted to evaluate a subsurface drip irrigation regime based on the Geo-Tensiometer and compare it to a daily irrigation regime. All of the drippers were wrapped in Geo-textile. By integrating the Geo-Tensiometer within the Geo-textile which surrounds the drippers, we created a homogenous media in the entire lysimeter in which the reading of the matric potential takes place. This media, the properties of which are set and known to us, encourages root growth therein. Root density in this media is very high; therefore most of the plant water uptake is from this area. The irrigation system in treatment A irrigated when the matric potential reached a threshold which was set every morning automatically by the system. The daily treatment included a single irrigation each morning that was set to return 120% of the evapotranspiration of the previous day. All Geo-Tensiometers were connected to an automated washing system, that flushed air trapped in the Geo

  8. The isotopic homogeneity in the early solar system: Revisiting the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Yamada, A.

    2009-12-01

    Since the first discovery of the mass-independently fractionated oxygen isotopes in anhydrous, high temperature Ca-Al rich inclusion minerals in carbonaceous meteorites (CAIs) by Clayton et al. (1), their common occurrence in primitive meteorites has generally been regarded to reflect some fundamental process prevalent in the early solar nebula. The CAI oxygen isotopic composition is uniquely characterized by (i) large mass independent isotopic fractionation and (ii) their isotopic data in an oxygen three isotope plot (δ17O - δ18O (δ17O ≡ {(17O/16O)/(17O/16O)SMOW - 1} × 1000) yield nearly a straight line with a slope 1.0. In establishing these characteristics, ion microprobe analyses has played a central role, especially an isotopic mapping technique (isotopography) was crucial (e.g., 2). The extraordinary oxygen isotopic ratio in CAIs is widely attributed to the self-shielding absorption of UV radiation in CO, one of the dominant chemical compounds in the early solar nebula (3). However, the self-shielding scenario necessarily leads to the unusual prediction that a mean solar oxygen isotopic composition differs from most of planetary bodies including Earth, Moon, and Mars. If the self-shielding process were indeed responsible to the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly, this would require a fundamental revision of the current theory of the origin of the solar system, which generally assumes the initial total vaporization of nebula material to give rise to isotopic homogenization. The GENESIS mission launched in 2001(4), which collected oxygen in the solar wind was hoped to resolve the isotopic composition of the Sun. However, because of difficulties in correcting for instrumental and more importantly for intrinsic isotopic fractionation between the SW and the Sun, a final answer is yet to be seen (5). Here, we show on the basis of the oxygen isotopic fractionation systematics that the self shielding hypothesis cannot explain the key characteristics of the CAI oxygen

  9. 11-kW direct diode laser system with homogenized 55 × 20 mm2 Top-Hat intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Noeske, Axel; Kindervater, Tobias; Wessollek, Armin; Brand, Thomas; Biesenbach, Jens

    2007-02-01

    In comparison with other laser systems diode lasers are characterized by a unique overall efficiency, a small footprint and high reliability. However, one major drawback of direct diode laser systems is the inhomogeneous intensity distribution in the far field. Furthermore the output power of current commercially available systems is limited to about 6 kW. We report on a diode laser system with 11 kW output power at a single wavelength of 940 nm aiming for customer specific large area treatment. To the best of our knowledge this is the highest output power reported so far for a direct diode laser system. In addition to the high output power the intensity distribution of the laser beam is homogenized in both axes leading to a 55 x 20 mm2 Top-Hat intensity profile at a working distance of 400 mm. Homogeneity of the intensity distribution is better than 90%. The intensity in the focal plane is 1 kW/cm2. We will present a detailed characterization of the laser system, including measurements of power, power stability and intensity distribution of the homogenized laser beam. In addition we will compare the experimental data with the results of non-sequential raytracing simulations.

  10. Evaluation of the ocean technology system's MK 1-S wireless surface unit, MK 1 DCI two diver air radio, MK 1-D-A wireless diver unit, MK 1-D-H hardwire diver unit and MK 1-D/S unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyle, B. E.

    1985-05-01

    The OTS was evaluated for intelligibility, reliability and human engineering. The test subjects possessed various levels of experience with wireless or hardwire communication and SCUBA. The conditions under which the equipment was tested varied. Surface air temperatures ranged from 37 to 85 F; water temperatures from 65 to 80 F; and water depths from 8 feet of seawater (FSW) to greater than 60 FSW. The tests were conducted inside a circular 30 foot deep ascent tower, in shallow open bay water, and finally in an open ocean environment. The equipment was evaluated in areas of both high and low noise levels on the surface as well as in water. The OTS produced an overall intelligibility of 89.24% during manned open water testing using the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) as the evaluation criteria, with a minimum effective range of 330 yards at 12 FSW and at least 875 yards, although it appears that the range of the MK 1-D-A is somewhat greater. Human engineering aspects of the OTS were found to be more than satisfactory, with no material failures encountered during testing. It is interesting to note that whenever the equipment required minor adjustments, these could be effected by the diver in the water (on the surface) and in most cases in less than 5 minutes. The amount of maintenance required on the OTS was minimal.

  11. Homogeneous assay for biotin based on Aequorea victoria bioluminescence resonance energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Rudenko, Natalia V; Marchenkov, Victor V; Skosyrev, Vitaly S; Arzhanov, Maxim A; Burkhardt, Nils; Zakharov, Mikhail V; Semisotnov, Gennady V; Vinokurov, Leonid M; Alakhov, Yuli B

    2003-02-01

    Here we describe a homogeneous assay for biotin based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between aequorin and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The fusions of aequorin with streptavidin (SAV) and EGFP with biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) were purified after expression of the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli cells. Association of SAV-aequorin and BCCP-EGFP fusions was followed by BRET between aequorin (donor) and EGFP (acceptor), resulting in significantly increasing 510 nm and decreasing 470 nm bioluminescence intensity. It was shown that free biotin inhibited BRET due to its competition with BCCP-EGFP for binding to SAV-aequorin. These properties were exploited to demonstrate competitive homogeneous BRET assay for biotin.

  12. Helical Floquet Channels in 1D Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, Jan Carl; Hu, Ying; Zoller, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show how dispersionless channels exhibiting perfect spin-momentum locking can arise in a 1D lattice model. While such spectra are forbidden by fermion doubling in static 1D systems, here we demonstrate their appearance in the stroboscopic dynamics of a periodically driven system. Remarkably, this phenomenon does not rely on any adiabatic assumptions, in contrast to the well known Thouless pump and related models of adiabatic spin pumps. The proposed setup is shown to be experimentally feasible with state-of-the-art techniques used to control ultracold alkaline earth atoms in optical lattices.

  13. Exponential-fitted methods for integrating stiff systems of ordinary differential equations: Applications to homogeneous gas-phase chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional algorithms for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are based on the use of polynomial functions as interpolants. However, the exact solutions of stiff ODEs behave like decaying exponential functions, which are poorly approximated by polynomials. An obvious choice of interpolant are the exponential functions themselves, or their low-order diagonal Pade (rational function) approximants. A number of explicit, A-stable, integration algorithms were derived from the use of a three-parameter exponential function as interpolant, and their relationship to low-order, polynomial-based and rational-function-based implicit and explicit methods were shown by examining their low-order diagonal Pade approximants. A robust implicit formula was derived by exponential fitting the trapezoidal rule. Application of these algorithms to integration of the ODEs governing homogenous, gas-phase chemical kinetics was demonstrated in a developmental code CREK1D, which compares favorably with the Gear-Hindmarsh code LSODE in spite of the use of a primitive stepsize control strategy.

  14. 1D Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Reactive transport modeling for deep geothermal systems: A case study of Groß Schönebeck reservoir, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driba, D. L.; De Lucia, M.; Peiffer, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-rock interactions in geothermal reservoirs are driven by the state of disequilibrium that persists among solid and solutes due to changing temperature and pressure. During operation of enhanced geothermal systems, injection of cooled water back into the reservoir disturbs the initial thermodynamic equilibrium between the reservoir and its geothermal fluid, which may induce modifications in permeability through changes in porosity and pore space geometry, consequently bringing about several impairments to the overall system.Modeling of fluid-rock interactions induced by injection of cold brine into Groß Schönebeck geothermal reservoir system situated in the Rotliegend sandstone at 4200m depth have been done by coupling geochemical modeling Code Phreeqc with OpenGeoSys. Through batch modeling the re-evaluation of the measured hydrochemical composition of the brine has been done using Quintessa databases, the results from the calculation indicate that a mineral phases comprising of K-feldspar, hematite, Barite, Calcite and Dolomite was found to match the hypothesis of equilibrium with the formation fluid, Reducing conditions are presumed in the model (pe = -3.5) in order to match the amount of observed dissolved Fe and thus considered as initial state for the reactive transport modeling. based on a measured composition of formation fluids and the predominant mineralogical assemblage of the host rock, a preliminary 1D Reactive transport modeling (RTM) was run with total time set to 30 years; results obtained for the initial simulation revealed that during this period, no significant change is evident for K-feldspar. Furthermore, the precipitation of calcite along the flow path in the brine results in a drop of pH from 6.2 to a value of 5.2 noticed over the simulated period. The circulation of cooled fluid in the reservoir is predicted to affect the temperature of the reservoir within the first 100 -150m from the injection well. Examination of porosity change in

  15. An Expert System to Analyze Homogeneity in Fuel Element Plates for Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolosa, S.C.; Marajofsky, A.

    2004-10-06

    In the manufacturing control of Fuel Element Plates for Research Reactors, one of the problems to be addressed is how to determine the U-density homogeneity in a fuel plate and how to obtain qualitative and quantitative information in order to establish acceptance or rejection criteria for such, as well as carrying out the quality follow-up. This paper is aimed at developing computing software which implements an Unsupervised Competitive Learning Neural Network for the acknowledgment of regions belonging to a digitalized gray scale image. This program is applied to x-ray images. These images are generated when the x-ray beams go through a fuel plate of approximately 60 cm x 8 cm x 0.1 cm thick. A Nuclear Fuel Element for Research Reactors usually consists of 18 to 22 of these plates, positioned in parallel, in an arrangement of 8 x 7 cm. Carrying out the inspection of the digitalized x-ray image, the neural network detects regions with different luminous densities corresponding to U-densities in the fuel plate. This is used in quality control to detect failures and verify acceptance criteria depending on the homogeneity of the plate. This modality of inspection is important as it allows the performance of non-destructive measurements and the automatic generation of the map of U-relative densities of the fuel plate.

  16. Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been made to understand the organizational principles of human brain function using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods, among which resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) is an increasingly recognized technique for measuring the intrinsic dynamics of the human brain. Functional connectivity (FC) with rfMRI is the most widely used method to describe remote or long-distance relationships in studies of cerebral cortex parcellation, interindividual variability, and brain disorders. In contrast, local or short-distance functional interactions, especially at a scale of millimeters, have rarely been investigated or systematically reviewed like remote FC, although some local FC algorithms have been developed and applied to the discovery of brain-based changes under neuropsychiatric conditions. To fill this gap between remote and local FC studies, this review will (1) briefly survey the history of studies on organizational principles of human brain function; (2) propose local functional homogeneity as a network centrality to characterize multimodal local features of the brain connectome; (3) render a neurobiological perspective on local functional homogeneity by linking its temporal, spatial, and individual variability to information processing, anatomical morphology, and brain development; and (4) discuss its role in performing connectome-wide association studies and identify relevant challenges, and recommend its use in future brain connectomics studies. PMID:26170004

  17. Lognormality of gradients of diffusive scalars in homogeneous, two-dimensional mixing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstein, A. R.; Ashurst, W. T.

    1984-12-01

    Kolmogorov's third hypothesis, as extended by Gurvich and Yaglom, is found to be obeyed by a diffusive scalar for a class of homogeneous, two-dimensional mixing models. The mixing models all involve the advection of fluid by discrete vortices distributed in a square region with periodic boundary conditions. By computer simulation, it is found that the squared gradient of a diffusive scalar so advected is lognormally distributed, obeys the predicted scaling when a spatial smoothing is applied, and exhibits a power-law range in the spatial autocorrelation. In addition, it is found that the scaling property cuts off at the Batchelor length, as predicted by Gibson. Since the mixing models employed do not incorporate the dynamical features of high-Reynolds-number turbulence, these results suggest that scalar lognormality and associated scaling behavior may be more robust or persistent than the scaling laws of the flow field.

  18. An integrated healthcare information system for end-to-end standardized exchange and homogeneous management of digital ECG formats.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Jesús Daniel; Martínez, Ignacio; Alesanco, Alvaro; Kollmann, Alexander; Escayola, Javier; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Günter; García, José

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the application of the enterprise information system (EIS) paradigm to standardized cardiovascular condition monitoring. There are many specifications in cardiology, particularly in the ECG standardization arena. The existence of ECG formats, however, does not guarantee the implementation of homogeneous, standardized solutions for ECG management. In fact, hospital management services need to cope with various ECG formats and, moreover, several different visualization applications. This heterogeneity hampers the normalization of integrated, standardized healthcare information systems, hence the need for finding an appropriate combination of ECG formats and a suitable EIS-based software architecture that enables standardized exchange and homogeneous management of ECG formats. Determining such a combination is one objective of this paper. The second aim is to design and develop the integrated healthcare information system that satisfies the requirements posed by the previous determination. The ECG formats selected include ISO/IEEE11073, Standard Communications Protocol for Computer-Assisted Electrocardiography, and an ECG ontology. The EIS-enabling techniques and technologies selected include web services, simple object access protocol, extensible markup language, or business process execution language. Such a selection ensures the standardized exchange of ECGs within, or across, healthcare information systems while providing modularity and accessibility.

  19. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  20. Hermite WENO limiting for multi-moment finite-volume methods using the ADER-DT time discretization for 1-D systems of conservation laws

    DOE PAGES

    Norman, Matthew R.

    2014-11-24

    New Hermite Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (HWENO) interpolants are developed and investigated within the Multi-Moment Finite-Volume (MMFV) formulation using the ADER-DT time discretization. Whereas traditional WENO methods interpolate pointwise, function-based WENO methods explicitly form a non-oscillatory, high-order polynomial over the cell in question. This study chooses a function-based approach and details how fast convergence to optimal weights for smooth flow is ensured. Methods of sixth-, eighth-, and tenth-order accuracy are developed. We compare these against traditional single-moment WENO methods of fifth-, seventh-, ninth-, and eleventh-order accuracy to compare against more familiar methods from literature. The new HWENO methods improve upon existingmore » HWENO methods (1) by giving a better resolution of unreinforced contact discontinuities and (2) by only needing a single HWENO polynomial to update both the cell mean value and cell mean derivative. Test cases to validate and assess these methods include 1-D linear transport, the 1-D inviscid Burger's equation, and the 1-D inviscid Euler equations. Smooth and non-smooth flows are used for evaluation. These HWENO methods performed better than comparable literature-standard WENO methods for all regimes of discontinuity and smoothness in all tests herein. They exhibit improved optimal accuracy due to the use of derivatives, and they collapse to solutions similar to typical WENO methods when limiting is required. The study concludes that the new HWENO methods are robust and effective when used in the ADER-DT MMFV framework. Finally, these results are intended to demonstrate capability rather than exhaust all possible implementations.« less

  1. Hermite WENO limiting for multi-moment finite-volume methods using the ADER-DT time discretization for 1-D systems of conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Matthew R.

    2014-11-24

    New Hermite Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (HWENO) interpolants are developed and investigated within the Multi-Moment Finite-Volume (MMFV) formulation using the ADER-DT time discretization. Whereas traditional WENO methods interpolate pointwise, function-based WENO methods explicitly form a non-oscillatory, high-order polynomial over the cell in question. This study chooses a function-based approach and details how fast convergence to optimal weights for smooth flow is ensured. Methods of sixth-, eighth-, and tenth-order accuracy are developed. We compare these against traditional single-moment WENO methods of fifth-, seventh-, ninth-, and eleventh-order accuracy to compare against more familiar methods from literature. The new HWENO methods improve upon existing HWENO methods (1) by giving a better resolution of unreinforced contact discontinuities and (2) by only needing a single HWENO polynomial to update both the cell mean value and cell mean derivative. Test cases to validate and assess these methods include 1-D linear transport, the 1-D inviscid Burger's equation, and the 1-D inviscid Euler equations. Smooth and non-smooth flows are used for evaluation. These HWENO methods performed better than comparable literature-standard WENO methods for all regimes of discontinuity and smoothness in all tests herein. They exhibit improved optimal accuracy due to the use of derivatives, and they collapse to solutions similar to typical WENO methods when limiting is required. The study concludes that the new HWENO methods are robust and effective when used in the ADER-DT MMFV framework. Finally, these results are intended to demonstrate capability rather than exhaust all possible implementations.

  2. Hermite WENO limiting for multi-moment finite-volume methods using the ADER-DT time discretization for 1-D systems of conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Matthew R.

    2015-02-01

    New Hermite Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (HWENO) interpolants are developed and investigated within the Multi-Moment Finite-Volume (MMFV) formulation using the ADER-DT time discretization. Whereas traditional WENO methods interpolate pointwise, function-based WENO methods explicitly form a non-oscillatory, high-order polynomial over the cell in question. This study chooses a function-based approach and details how fast convergence to optimal weights for smooth flow is ensured. Methods of sixth-, eighth-, and tenth-order accuracy are developed. These are compared against traditional single-moment WENO methods of fifth-, seventh-, ninth-, and eleventh-order accuracy to compare against more familiar methods from literature. The new HWENO methods improve upon existing HWENO methods (1) by giving a better resolution of unreinforced contact discontinuities and (2) by only needing a single HWENO polynomial to update both the cell mean value and cell mean derivative. Test cases to validate and assess these methods include 1-D linear transport, the 1-D inviscid Burger's equation, and the 1-D inviscid Euler equations. Smooth and non-smooth flows are used for evaluation. These HWENO methods performed better than comparable literature-standard WENO methods for all regimes of discontinuity and smoothness in all tests herein. They exhibit improved optimal accuracy due to the use of derivatives, and they collapse to solutions similar to typical WENO methods when limiting is required. The study concludes that the new HWENO methods are robust and effective when used in the ADER-DT MMFV framework. These results are intended to demonstrate capability rather than exhaust all possible implementations.

  3. On the Hopf Bifurcation in Control Systems with a Bounded Nonlinearity Asymptotically Homogeneous at Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, P.; Kuznetsov, N.; Rachinskii, D.

    2001-09-01

    The paper studies existence, uniqueness, and stability of large-amplitude periodic cycles arising in Hopf bifurcation at infinity of autonomous control systems with bounded nonlinear feedback. We consider systems with functional nonlinearities of Landesman-Lazer type and a class of systems with hysteresis nonlinearities. The method is based on the technique of parameter functionalization and methods of monotone concave and convex operators.

  4. A non-homogeneous dynamic Bayesian network with sequentially coupled interaction parameters for applications in systems and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk

    2012-07-12

    An important and challenging problem in systems biology is the inference of gene regulatory networks from short non-stationary time series of transcriptional profiles. A popular approach that has been widely applied to this end is based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), although traditional homogeneous DBNs fail to model the non-stationarity and time-varying nature of the gene regulatory processes. Various authors have therefore recently proposed combining DBNs with multiple changepoint processes to obtain time varying dynamic Bayesian networks (TV-DBNs). However, TV-DBNs are not without problems. Gene expression time series are typically short, which leaves the model over-flexible, leading to over-fitting or inflated inference uncertainty. In the present paper, we introduce a Bayesian regularization scheme that addresses this difficulty. Our approach is based on the rationale that changes in gene regulatory processes appear gradually during an organism's life cycle or in response to a changing environment, and we have integrated this notion in the prior distribution of the TV-DBN parameters. We have extensively tested our regularized TV-DBN model on synthetic data, in which we have simulated short non-homogeneous time series produced from a system subject to gradual change. We have then applied our method to real-world gene expression time series, measured during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster, under artificially generated constant light condition in Arabidopsis thaliana, and from a synthetically designed strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to a changing environment.

  5. Latent curing systems stabilized by reaction equilibrium in homogeneous mixtures of benzoxazine and amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Ya Zhen; Fu, Ya Fei; Liu, Xiang Dong

    2016-12-01

    Latent curing systems are widely used in industrial thermosets in applications such as adhesion, coating, and composites. Despite many attempts to improve the practicality of this dormant reaction system, the majority of commercially available latent products still use particulate hardeners or liquid compounds with blocked active groups. These formulations generally lack fluidity or rapid reaction characteristics and thus are problematic in some industry applications. Here we describe a novel concept that stabilizes highly reactive benzoxazine/amine mixtures by reaction equilibrium. These new latent benzoxazine curing systems have a long storable lifetime but very short gel time at 150 °C. The reversible reaction between benzoxazine and amine is further demonstrated by FT-IR spectral measurements and rheological experiments, and it is shown that the overall characteristics of the latent system are promising for many industrial applications.

  6. Latent curing systems stabilized by reaction equilibrium in homogeneous mixtures of benzoxazine and amine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Ya Zhen; Fu, Ya Fei; Liu, Xiang Dong

    2016-01-01

    Latent curing systems are widely used in industrial thermosets in applications such as adhesion, coating, and composites. Despite many attempts to improve the practicality of this dormant reaction system, the majority of commercially available latent products still use particulate hardeners or liquid compounds with blocked active groups. These formulations generally lack fluidity or rapid reaction characteristics and thus are problematic in some industry applications. Here we describe a novel concept that stabilizes highly reactive benzoxazine/amine mixtures by reaction equilibrium. These new latent benzoxazine curing systems have a long storable lifetime but very short gel time at 150 °C. The reversible reaction between benzoxazine and amine is further demonstrated by FT-IR spectral measurements and rheological experiments, and it is shown that the overall characteristics of the latent system are promising for many industrial applications. PMID:27917932

  7. Effect of concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient on homogenization kinetics in multiphase binary alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Unnam, J.

    1978-01-01

    Diffusion calculations were performed to establish the conditions under which concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient was important in single, two, and three phase binary alloy systems. Finite-difference solutions were obtained for each type of system using diffusion coefficient variations typical of those observed in real alloy systems. Solutions were also obtained using average diffusion coefficients determined by taking a logarithmic average of each diffusion coefficient variation considered. The constant diffusion coefficient solutions were used as reference in assessing diffusion coefficient variation effects. Calculations were performed for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries in order to compare the effect of diffusion coefficient variations with the effect of interface geometries. In most of the cases considered, the diffusion coefficient of the major-alloy phase was the key parameter that controlled the kinetics of interdiffusion.

  8. Homogeneous systems with quadratic integrals, Lie-Poisson quasibrackets, and Kovalevskaya's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizyaev, I. A.; Kozlov, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    We consider differential equations with quadratic right-hand sides that admit two quadratic first integrals, one of which is a positive-definite quadratic form. We indicate conditions of general nature under which a linear change of variables reduces this system to a certain 'canonical' form. Under these conditions, the system turns out to be divergenceless and can be reduced to a Hamiltonian form, but the corresponding linear Lie-Poisson bracket does not always satisfy the Jacobi identity. In the three-dimensional case, the equations can be reduced to the classical equations of the Euler top, and in four-dimensional space, the system turns out to be superintegrable and coincides with the Euler-Poincaré equations on some Lie algebra. In the five-dimensional case we find a reducing multiplier after multiplying by which the Poisson bracket satisfies the Jacobi identity. In the general case for n>5 we prove the absence of a reducing multiplier. As an example we consider a system of Lotka-Volterra type with quadratic right-hand sides that was studied by Kovalevskaya from the viewpoint of conditions of uniqueness of its solutions as functions of complex time. Bibliography: 38 titles.

  9. On the diagnosability of multicomputer systems with homogeneous and incomplete tests

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, H.; Kozlowski, W.E. )

    1988-11-01

    A generalized PMC model, where only a subset of possible unit faults (the same for each unit) can be detected by unit tests, is considered. A category of visible faults is introduced and the necessary and sufficient condition for the new class of tupsilon-diagnosable system is determined. Moreover, an O(absolute value T ) diagnosis algorithm is presented.

  10. EXAFS investigations of metal organic molecules with the goal of studying homogeneously catalytic systems in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, T. S.; Hörner, W.; Hückmann, S.; Kolb, U.; Abraham, I.; Bertagnolli, H.

    1995-02-01

    The investigations of Grignard compounds are very instructive for understanding the principles of getting structural information on highly complex and simultaneously metal activated systems by means of EXAFS spectroscopy. The structural investigations of a model system for Friedel-Crafts alkylation and some metal complexes (metal = Zr, Mo, W, Re), which activate carbonyl groups selectively with respect to the subsequent ring cleavage of axially prosterogenic biaryl lactones, are reported. As an actual field of metal organic research temperature dependent in situ EXAFS studies of the CH-activation of substituted olefins are presented. It was possible to observe the course of the rearrangement reaction of an iridium olefin complex to the corresponding hydrido (vinyl) iridium complex.

  11. Uniform regularity estimates in homogenization theory of elliptic systems with lower order terms on the Neumann boundary problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we mainly employed the idea of the previous paper [34] to study the sharp uniform W 1 , p estimates with 1 < p ≤ ∞ for more general elliptic systems with the Neumann boundary condition on a bounded C 1 , η domain, arising in homogenization theory. Based on the skills developed by Z. Shen in [27] and by T. Suslina in [31,32], we also established the L2 convergence rates on a bounded C 1 , 1 domain and a Lipschitz domain, respectively. Here we found a "rough" version of the first order correctors (see (1.12)), which can unify the proof in [27] and [32]. It allows us to skip the corresponding convergence results on Rd that are the preconditions in [31,32]. Our results can be regarded as an extension of [23] developed by C. Kenig, F. Lin, Z. Shen, as well as of [32] investigated by T. Suslina.

  12. An empirical relationship for homogenization in single-phase binary alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.; Stein, B. A.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical formula is developed for describing the extent of interaction between constituents in single-phase binary alloy systems with planar, cylindrical, or spherical interfaces. The formula contains two parameters that are functions of mean concentration and interface geometry of the couple. The empirical solution is simple, easy to use, and does not involve sequential calculations, thereby allowing quick estimation of the extent of interactions without lengthy calculations. Results obtained with this formula are in good agreement with those from a finite-difference analysis.

  13. Distributed computing feasibility in a non-dedicated homogeneous distributed system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Scott T.; Sun, Xian-He

    1993-01-01

    The low cost and availability of clusters of workstations have lead researchers to re-explore distributed computing using independent workstations. This approach may provide better cost/performance than tightly coupled multiprocessors. In practice, this approach often utilizes wasted cycles to run parallel jobs. The feasibility of such a non-dedicated parallel processing environment assuming workstation processes have preemptive priority over parallel tasks is addressed. An analytical model is developed to predict parallel job response times. Our model provides insight into how significantly workstation owner interference degrades parallel program performance. A new term task ratio, which relates the parallel task demand to the mean service demand of nonparallel workstation processes, is introduced. It was proposed that task ratio is a useful metric for determining how large the demand of a parallel applications must be in order to make efficient use of a non-dedicated distributed system.

  14. A mandible arresting system in neotropical social wasps (Vespidae; Polistinae): structural diversity within homogeneous functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Cubillos, Sofía; Sarmiento, Carlos E.

    2013-05-01

    Microtrichia are epidermal protuberances that may serve as temporary adhesive devices. Several insects possess these structures; however, they have not previously been reported in social wasps. With scanning electron microscopy, we characterize the shape and abundance of microtrichia in ten species of social wasps (Vespidae: Polistinae) and three species of related taxa (Vespidae: Eumeninae, Pompilidae, and Scoliidae). Semi-thin sections of the head of Leipomeles spilogastra and Apoica albimacula were also studied. We found microtrichia on a thin, flexible membrane connected to the mandible in all the Vespidae specimens. The flexible membrane can be divided into three regions: the basal region that covers the mandibular mesial emargination, the medial region located around the height of the mandibular condyles, and the distal region that appears anterior to the apodeme folding. Basal and distal regions of the membrane are extensively covered by microtrichia while the medial region has either less microtrichia or is entirely devoid of them. The shape and density of the microtrichia differed between species, and these traits are unrelated with nest material construction or phylogenetic closeness. We propose that the microtrichial membrane described is a passive mechanism to keep the wasps' mandibles retracted through a mechanical interlocking system. It is possible that this energy-saving mechanism is present in other mandibulate insects.

  15. A mandible arresting system in neotropical social wasps (Vespidae; Polistinae): structural diversity within homogeneous functionality.

    PubMed

    López-Cubillos, Sofía; Sarmiento, Carlos E

    2013-05-01

    Microtrichia are epidermal protuberances that may serve as temporary adhesive devices. Several insects possess these structures; however, they have not previously been reported in social wasps. With scanning electron microscopy, we characterize the shape and abundance of microtrichia in ten species of social wasps (Vespidae: Polistinae) and three species of related taxa (Vespidae: Eumeninae, Pompilidae, and Scoliidae). Semi-thin sections of the head of Leipomeles spilogastra and Apoica albimacula were also studied. We found microtrichia on a thin, flexible membrane connected to the mandible in all the Vespidae specimens. The flexible membrane can be divided into three regions: the basal region that covers the mandibular mesial emargination, the medial region located around the height of the mandibular condyles, and the distal region that appears anterior to the apodeme folding. Basal and distal regions of the membrane are extensively covered by microtrichia while the medial region has either less microtrichia or is entirely devoid of them. The shape and density of the microtrichia differed between species, and these traits are unrelated with nest material construction or phylogenetic closeness. We propose that the microtrichial membrane described is a passive mechanism to keep the wasps' mandibles retracted through a mechanical interlocking system. It is possible that this energy-saving mechanism is present in other mandibulate insects.

  16. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, I.; Kalyabin, D.; Osokin, S.; Klos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.; Nikitov, S.

    2015-03-01

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films.

  17. Graphene oxide-Ag nanoparticles-pyramidal silicon hybrid system for homogeneous, long-term stable and sensitive SERS activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jia; Xu, Shicai; Liu, Xiaoyun; Li, Zhe; Hu, Litao; Li, Zhen; Chen, Peixi; Ma, Yong; Jiang, Shouzhen; Ning, Tingyin

    2017-02-01

    In our work, few layers graphene oxide (GO) were directly synthesized on Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) by spin-coating method to fabricate a GO-AgNPs hybrid structure on a pyramidal silicon (PSi) substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The GO-AgNPs-PSi substrate showed excellent Raman enhancement effect, the minimum detected concentration for Rhodamine 6G (R6G) can reach 10-12 M, which is one order of magnitude lower than the AgNPs-PSi substrate and two order of magnitude lower than the GO-AgNPs-flat-Si substrate. The linear fit calibration curve with error bars is presented and the value of R2 of 612 and 773 cm-1 can reach 0.986 and 0.980, respectively. The excellent linear response between the Raman intensity and R6G concentrations prove that the prepared GO-AgNPs-PSi substrates can serve as good SERS substrate for molecule detection. The maximum deviations of SERS intensities from 20 positions of the GO-AgNPs-PSi substrate are less than 8%, revealing the high homogeneity of the SERS substrate. The excellent homogeneity of the enhanced Raman signals can be attributed to well-separated pyramid arrays of PSi, the uniform morphology of AgNPs and multi-functions of GO layer. Besides, the uniform GO film can effectively protect AgNPs from oxidation and endow the hybrid system a good stability and long lifetime. This GO-AgNPs-PSi substrate may provide a new way toward practical applications for the ultrasensitive and label-free SERS detection in areas of medicine, food safety and biotechnology.

  18. Characterization of a digital microwave radiometry system for noninvasive thermometry using a temperature-controlled homogeneous test load.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, K; Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, P F; Jacobsen, S; Sterzer, F

    2008-07-21

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. The performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7-4.2 GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30-50 degrees C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6 mm thickness is also investigated. To assess the clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075 degrees C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217 degrees C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32-45 degrees C. Within the 3.7-4.2 GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6 mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial

  19. The ocean quasi-homogeneous layer model and global cycle of carbon dioxide in system of atmosphere-ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Alexander; Glushkov, Alexander; Loboda, Nataliya; Khokhlov, Valery; Serbov, Nikoly; Svinarenko, Andrey

    The purpose of this paper is carrying out the detailed model of the CO2 global turnover in system of "atmosphere-ocean" with using the ocean quasi-homogeneous layer model. Practically all carried out models are functioning in the average annual regime and accounting for the carbon distribution in bio-sphere in most general form (Glushkov et al, 2003). We construct a modified model for cycle of the carbon dioxide, which allows to reproduce a season dynamics of carbon turnover in ocean with account of zone ocean structure (up quasi-homogeneous layer, thermocline and deepest layer). It is taken into account dependence of the CO2 transfer through the bounder between atmosphere and ocean upon temperature of water and air, wind velocity, buffer mechanism of the CO2 dissolution. The same program is realized for atmosphere part of whole system. It is obtained a tempo-ral and space distribution for concentration of non-organic carbon in ocean, partial press of dissolute CO2 and value of exchange on the border between atmosphere and ocean. It is estimated a role of the wind intermixing of the up ocean layer. The increasing of this effect leads to increasing the plankton mass and further particles, which are transferred by wind, contribute to more quick immersion of microscopic shells and organic material. It is fulfilled investigation of sen-sibility of the master differential equations system solutions from the model parameters. The master differential equa-tions system, describing a dynamics of the CO2 cycle, is numerically integrated by the four order Runge-Cutt method under given initial values of valuables till output of solution on periodic regime. At first it is indicated on possible real-zation of the chaos scenario in system. On our data, the difference of the average annual values for the non-organic car-bon concentration in the up quasi-homogeneous layer between equator and extreme southern zone is 0.15 mol/m3, be-tween the equator and extreme northern zone is 0

  20. Systemic transplantation of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells-educated T regulatory cells improved the impaired cognition in AβPPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongna; Yang, Hui; Xie, Zhaohong; Wei, Lifei; Bi, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of most prevalent dementias, which is characterized by the deposition of extracellular amyloid-beta protein (Aβ) and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles within neurons. Although stereotaxic transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the hippocampus of AD animal model as immunomodulatory cells has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach to prevent the progress of AD, it is invasive and difficult for clinical perform. Systemic and central nervous system inflammation play an important role in pathogenesis of AD. T regulatory cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in maintaining systemic immune homeostasis, indicating that transplantation of Tregs could prevent the progress of the inflammation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether systemic transplantation of purified autologous Tregs from spleens of AβPPswe/PS1dE9 double-transgenic mice after MSCs from human umbilical cords (UC-MSCs) education in vitro for 3 days could improve the neuropathology and cognition deficits in AβPPswe/PS1dE9 double-transgenic mice. We observed that systemic transplantation of autologous Tregs significantly ameliorate the impaired cognition and reduced the Aβ plaque deposition and the levels of soluble Aβ, accompanied with significantly decreased levels of activated microglia and systemic inflammatory factors. In conclusion, systemic transplantation of autologous Tregs may be an effective and safe intervention to prevent the progress of AD.

  1. Development of a web-based support system for both homogeneous and heterogeneous air quality control networks: process and product.

    PubMed

    Andrade, J; Ares, J; García, R; Presa, J; Rodríguez, S; Piñeiro-Iglesias, M; López-Mahía, P; Muniategui, S; Prada, D

    2007-10-01

    The Environmental Laboratories Automation Software System or PALMA (Spanish abbreviation) was developed by a multidisciplinary team in order to support the main tasks of heterogeneous air quality control networks. The software process for PALMA development, which can be perfectly applied to similar multidisciplinary projects, was (a) well-defined, (b) arranged between environmental technicians and informatics, (c) based on quality guides, and (d) clearly user-centred. Moreover, it introduces some interesting advantages with regard to the classical step-by-step approaches. PALMA is a web-based system that allows 'off-line' and automated telematic data acquisition from distributed inmission stations belonging not only to homogeneous but also to heterogeneous air quality control networks. It provides graphic and tabular representations for a comprehensive and centralised analysis of acquired data, and considers the daily work that is associated with such networks: validation of the acquired data, alerts with regard to (periodical) tasks (e.g., analysers verification), downloading of files with environmental information (e.g., dust forecasts), etc. The implantation of PALMA has provided qualitative and quantitative improvements in the work performed by the people in charge of the considered control network.

  2. Willis elastodynamic homogenization theory revisited for periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, H.; He, Q.-C.; Auffray, N.

    2015-04-01

    The theory of elastodynamic homogenization initiated by J.R. Willis is revisited for periodically inhomogeneous media through a careful scrutiny of the main aspects of that theory in the 3D continuum context and by applying it to the thorough treatment of a simple 1D discrete periodic system. The Bloch theorem appears to be central to appropriately defining and interpreting effective fields. Based on some physical arguments, three necessary conditions are derived for the transition from the microscopic description to the macroscopic description of periodic media. The parameters involved in the Willis effective constitutive relation are expressed in terms of two localization tensors and specified with the help of the corresponding Green function in the spirit of micromechanics. These results are illustrated and discussed for the 1D discrete periodic system considered. In particular, inspired by Brillouin's study, the dependency of the effective constitutive parameters on the frequency is physically interpreted in terms of oscillation modes of the underlying microstructure.

  3. Homogeneous Liquid–Liquid Extraction of Rare Earths with the Betaine—Betainium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide Ionic Liquid System

    PubMed Central

    Hoogerstraete, Tom Vander; Onghena, Bieke; Binnemans, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Several fundamental extraction parameters such as the kinetics and loading were studied for a new type of metal solvent extraction system with ionic liquids. The binary mixture of the ionic liquid betainium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and water shows thermomorphic behavior with an upper critical solution temperature (UCST), which can be used to avoid the slower mass transfer due to the generally higher viscosity of ionic liquids. A less viscous homogeneous phase and mixing on a molecular scale are obtained when the mixture is heated up above 55 °C. The influence of the temperature, the heating and cooling times, were studied for the extraction of neodymium(III) with betaine. A plausible and equal extraction mechanism is proposed in bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, nitrate, and chloride media. After stripping of the metals from the ionic liquid phase, a higher recovery of the ionic liquid was obtained by salting-out of the ionic liquid fraction lost by dissolution in the aqueous phase. The change of the upper critical solution temperature by the addition of HCl or betaine was investigated. In addition, the viscosity was measured below and above the UCST as a function of the temperature. PMID:24169434

  4. Optimization and application of homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction in preconcentration of copper (II) in a ternary solvent system.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Bahram, Morteza; Zorita, Saioa; Mehr, Behzad Ghorbani

    2009-01-30

    In this study a homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction based on the Ph-dependent phase-separation process was investigated using a ternary solvent system (water-acetic acid-chloroform) for the preconcentration of Cu(2+) ions. 8-Hydroxy quinoline was used as the chelating agent prior to its extraction. Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry using acetylene-air flame was used for the quantitation of analyte after preconcentration. The effect of various experimental parameters in extraction step was investigated using two optimization methods, one variable at a time and central composite design. The experimental design was done at five levels of operating parameters. Nearly the same optimized results were obtained using both methods: sample size, 5 mL; volume of NaOH 10 M, 2 mL; chloroform volume, 300 microL; 8-hydroxy quinoline concentration more than 0.01 M and salt amount did not affect the extraction significantly. Under the optimum conditions the calibration graph was linear over the range 10-2000 microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 7.6% for six repeated determinations (C = 500 microg L(-1)). Furthermore, the limit of detection (S/N=3) and limit of quantification (S/N=10) of the method were obtained as 1.74 and 6 microg L(-1), respectively.

  5. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  6. Low-dimensional systems investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy: a selection of 2D, 1D and 0D cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, Lorenzo; Agostini, Giovanni; Borfecchia, Elisa; Gianolio, Diego; Piovano, Andrea; Gallo, Erik; Lamberti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    Over the last three decades low-dimensional systems have attracted increasing interest both from the fundamental and technological points of view due to their unique physical and chemical properties. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful tool for the characterization of such kinds of systems, owing to its chemical selectivity and high sensitivity in interatomic distance determination. Moreover, XAS does not require long-range ordering, that is usually absent in low-dimensional systems. Finally, this technique can simultaneously provide information on electronic and local structural properties of the nanomaterials, significantly contributing to clarify the relation between their atomic structure and their peculiar physical properties. This review provides a general introduction to XAS, discussing the basic theory of the technique, the most used detection modes, the related experimental setups and some complementary relevant characterization techniques (diffraction anomalous fine structure, extended energy-loss fine structure, pair distribution function, x-ray emission spectroscopy, high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS and x-ray Raman scattering). Subsequently, a selection of significant applications of XAS to two-, one- and zero-dimensional systems will be presented. The selected low-dimensional systems include IV and III-V semiconductor films, quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots; carbon-based nanomaterials (epitaxial graphene and carbon nanotubes); metal oxide films, nanowires, nanorods and nanocrystals; metal nanoparticles. Finally, the future perspectives for the application of XAS to nanostructures are discussed.

  7. Localized states in 1D Frenkel exciton systems: a comparison between infinite-range and nearest-neighbor transfer for normal and inverted bands.

    PubMed

    Avgin, I; Huber, D L

    2009-10-29

    We investigate localized states in one-dimensional Frenkel exciton systems that are created by a shift in the optical transition frequency of a single chromophore. In this paper, we focus on localized states lying below the exciton band that can act as exciton traps. A comparison is made between systems with infinite-range (r(-n), n = 2, 3, ...) transfer and those with nearest-neighbor (n = infinity) transfer. A distinction is also made between normal bands (minimum exciton energy at k = 0) and inverted bands (minimum energy at k = pi). The position of the localized state relative to the bottom of the band is calculated as a function of the shift in the single-chromophore transition frequency. The nature of the localized state is displayed in calculations of the participation ratio and the effective oscillator strength. Similarities and differences in localized states between normal and inverted band systems and between infinite-range and nearest-neighbor transfer are analyzed.

  8. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  9. Homogeneous one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate in the Bogoliubov’s regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Elías

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the corrections caused by finite size effects upon the ground state properties of a homogeneous one-dimensional (1D) Bose-Einstein condensate. We assume from the very beginning that the Bogoliubov’s formalism is valid and consequently, we show that in order to obtain a well-defined ground state properties, finite size effects of the system must be taken into account. Indeed, the formalism described in the present paper allows to recover the usual properties related to the ground state of a homogeneous 1D Bose-Einstein condensate but corrected by finite size effects of the system. Finally, this scenario allows us to analyze the sensitivity of the system when the Bogoliubov’s regime is valid and when finite size effects are present. These facts open the possibility to apply these ideas to more realistic scenarios, e.g. low-dimensional trapped Bose-Einstein condensates.

  10. A synergistic passive and active shimming system to optimize B0 field homogeneity in micro MR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewal, Rahul P.

    . The technique was validated in a 7T Bruker MRI system in a customized susceptibility phantom and in in vivo mice by using it to improve the B0 magnetic field homogeneity and spectral water line widths from predetermined regions of interest within the mouse brain. These pilot data demonstrate the feasibility of using such a system to improve MR spectroscopy data quality. Future work could extend the technique to human applications, which would be of great benefit to human neurological studies of regions near the sinuses.

  11. Efficiency of rejection-free dynamic Monte Carlo methods for homogeneous spin models, hard disk systems, and hard sphere systems.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Novotny, M A; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2006-08-01

    We construct asymptotic arguments for the relative efficiency of rejection-free Monte Carlo (MC) methods compared to the standard MC method. We find that the efficiency is proportional to exp(constbeta) in the Ising, sqrt[beta] in the classical XY, and beta in the classical Heisenberg spin systems with inverse temperature beta, regardless of the dimension. The efficiency in hard particle systems is also obtained, and found to be proportional to (rho(cp)-rho)(-d) with the closest packing density rho(cp), density rho, and dimension d of the systems. We construct and implement a rejection-free Monte Carlo method for the hard-disk system. The RFMC has a greater computational efficiency at high densities, and the density dependence of the efficiency is as predicted by our arguments.

  12. Validating a 1-D SVAT model in a range of USA and Australian ecosystems: evidence towards its use as a tool to study Earth's system interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, G. P.; North, M. R.; Ireland, G.; Srivastava, P. K.; Rendall, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the validation of the SimSphere SVAT model conducted at different ecosystem types in the USA and Australia. Specific focus was given to examining the models' ability in predicting Shortwave Incoming Solar Radiation (Rg), Net Radiation (Rnet), Latent Heat (LE), Sensible Heat (H), Air Temperature at 1.3 m (Tair 1.3 m) and Air Temperature at 50 m (Tair 50 m). Model predictions were compared against corresponding in situ measurements acquired for a total of 72 selected days of the year 2011 obtained from 8 sites belonging to the AmeriFlux (USA) and OzFlux (Australia) monitoring networks. Selected sites were representative of a variety of environmental, biome and climatic conditions, to allow for the inclusion of contrasting conditions in the model evaluation. The application of the model confirmed its high capability in representing the multifarious and complex interactions of the Earth system. Comparisons showed a good agreement between modelled and measured fluxes, especially for the days with smoothed daily flux trends. A good to excellent agreement between the model predictions and the in situ measurements was reported, particularly so for the LE, H, T1.3 m and T 50 m parameters (RMSD = 39.47, 55.06 W m-2, 3.23, 3.77 °C respectively). A systematic underestimation of Rg and Rnet (RMSD = 67.83, 58.69 W m-2, MBE = 67.83, 58.69 W m-2 respectively) was also found. Highest simulation accuracies were obtained for the open woodland savannah and mulga woodland sites for most of the compared parameters. Very high values of the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency index were also reported for all parameters ranging from 0.720 to 0.998, suggesting a very good model representation of the observations. To our knowledge, this study presents the first comprehensive validation of SimSphere, particularly so in USA and Australian ecosystem types. Findings are important and timely, given the rapidly expanding use of this model worldwide both as an educational and research

  13. Pepsin extraction from bovine stomach using aqueous two-phase systems: molecular mechanism and influence of homogenate mass and phase volume ratio.

    PubMed

    Imelio, Natalia; Marini, Analía; Spelzini, Darío; Picó, Guillermo; Farruggia, Beatriz

    2008-10-01

    Pepsin partitioning, a gastric acid protease, in aqueous two-phase systems of polyethyleneglycol/potassium phosphate, sodium citrate and ammonium sulphate was assayed using polyethylenglycol of different molecular mass. Pepsin was found to be partitioned towards the polymer-rich phase in all the systems, which suggests an important protein-polymer interaction due to the highly hydrophobic character of the protein surface exposed to the solvent. The pepsin partitioning behavior was explained according to Timasheff's preferential interaction theory. The process was driven entropically with participation of structured water around the polyethyleneglycol ethylenic chains. The best pepsin recovery was observed in the systems polyethyleneglycol molecular mass 600. These systems were chosen in order to assay the bovine stomach homogenate partition and to compare different working conditions such as the top-bottom phase volume ratio and homogenate proportions in the total system. The best purification factors were obtained with PEG600/potassium phosphate with low top-bottom volume ratio using 15% of bovine stomach homogenate in the system total mass.

  14. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  15. Orthogonality Measurement for Homogenous Projects-Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivan, Ion; Sandu, Andrei; Popa, Marius

    2009-01-01

    The homogenous projects-base concept is defined. Next, the necessary steps to create a homogenous projects-base are presented. A metric system is built, which then will be used for analyzing projects. The indicators which are meaningful for analyzing a homogenous projects-base are selected. The given hypothesis is experimentally verified. The…

  16. Non-cooperative Brownian donkeys: A solvable 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez de Cisneros, B.; Reimann, P.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A paradigmatic 1D model for Brownian motion in a spatially symmetric, periodic system is tackled analytically. Upon application of an external static force F the system's response is an average current which is positive for F < 0 and negative for F > 0 (absolute negative mobility). Under suitable conditions, the system approaches 100% efficiency when working against the external force F.

  17. EMODEL_1D v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2016-07-06

    Program EMODEL_1D is an electromagnetic earth model construction utility designed to generate a three-dimensional (3D) uniformly-gridded representation of one-dimensional (1D) layered earth model. Each layer is characterized by the isotropic EM properties electric permittivity ?, magnetic permeability ?, and current conductivity ?. Moreover, individual layers of the model may possess a linear increase/decrease of any or all of these properties with depth.

  18. Influence of homogeneous magnetic fields on the flow of a ferrofluid in the Taylor-Couette system.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, S; Hoffmann, Ch; Leschhorn, A; Lücke, M

    2010-07-01

    We investigate numerically the influence of a homogeneous magnetic field on a ferrofluid in the gap between two concentric, independently rotating cylinders. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a combination of a finite difference method and a Galerkin method. Structure, dynamics, symmetry properties, bifurcation, and stability behavior of different vortex structures are investigated for axial and transversal magnetic fields, as well as combinations of them. We show that a transversal magnetic field modulates the Taylor vortex flow and the spiral vortex flow. Thus, a transversal magnetic field induces wavy structures: wavy Taylor vortex flow (wTVF) and wavy spiral vortex flow. In contrast to the classic wTVF, which is a secondarily bifurcating structure, these magnetically generated wavy Taylor vortices are pinned by the magnetic field, i.e., they are stationary and they appear via a primary forward bifurcation out of the basic state of circular Couette flow.

  19. Is the Universe homogeneous?

    PubMed

    Maartens, Roy

    2011-12-28

    The standard model of cosmology is based on the existence of homogeneous surfaces as the background arena for structure formation. Homogeneity underpins both general relativistic and modified gravity models and is central to the way in which we interpret observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the galaxy distribution. However, homogeneity cannot be directly observed in the galaxy distribution or CMB, even with perfect observations, since we observe on the past light cone and not on spatial surfaces. We can directly observe and test for isotropy, but to link this to homogeneity we need to assume the Copernican principle (CP). First, we discuss the link between isotropic observations on the past light cone and isotropic space-time geometry: what observations do we need to be isotropic in order to deduce space-time isotropy? Second, we discuss what we can say with the Copernican assumption. The most powerful result is based on the CMB: the vanishing of the dipole, quadrupole and octupole of the CMB is sufficient to impose homogeneity. Real observations lead to near-isotropy on large scales--does this lead to near-homogeneity? There are important partial results, and we discuss why this remains a difficult open question. Thus, we are currently unable to prove homogeneity of the Universe on large scales, even with the CP. However, we can use observations of the cosmic microwave background, galaxies and clusters to test homogeneity itself.

  20. The relationship between the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) structure and the effectiveness of homogeneous and heterogeneous solar hydrogen-generating systems as well as DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Geng-Geng; Lu, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Dai, Jing-Cao; Wu, Ji-Huai; Wu, Jia-Jia

    2015-04-21

    A series of boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes (B1–B5) having H atoms at 2,6-positions or heavy-atom I at 2-/2,6-positions, and an ortho- or a para-COOH substituted phenyl moiety at the 8-position on the BODIPY core were synthesized and characterized. These organic dyes were applied for investigating the relationship between the BODIPY structure and the effectiveness of homogeneous and heterogeneous visible-light-driven hydrogen production as well as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). For the homogeneous photocatalytic hydrogen production systems with a cobaloxime catalyst, the efficiency of hydrogen production could be tuned by substituting with heavy atoms and varying carboxyl group orientations of BODIPYs. As a result, B5 containing two I atoms and an ortho-COOH anchoring group was the most active one (TONs = 197). The activity of hydrogen generation followed the order B5 > B3 > B2 > B1 = B4 = 0. An interesting “ortho-position effect” was observed in the present homogeneous systems, i.e., substitution groups were located at the ortho-position and higher hydrogen production activities were obtained. For the heterogeneous hydrogen production systems with a platinized TiO2 catalyst, the effectiveness of hydrogen evolution was highly influenced by the intersystem crossing efficiency, molar absorptivity and positions of the anchoring group of dyes. Thus, B3 having two core iodine atoms and a para-COOH group with TONs of 70 excelled other BODIPYs and the TONs of hydrogen generation showed the trend of B3 > B5 > B2 > B1 = B4 = 0. The results demonstrate that the present photocatalytic H2 production proceeds with higher efficiency and stability in the homogeneity than in the heterogeneity. In the case of DSSCs, the overall cell performance of BODIPY chromophores was highly dependent on both the absence or the presence of iodine atoms on the BODIPY core and –COOH anchoring positions. The B1–TiO2 system showed the best cell performance, because the most

  1. Parameter and observation importance in modelling virus transport in saturated porous media - Investigations in a homogenous system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, G.R.; Hill, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper evaluates the importance of seven types of parameters to virus transport: hydraulic conductivity, porosity, dispersivity, sorption rate and distribution coefficient (representing physical-chemical filtration), and in-solution and adsorbed inactivation (representing virus inactivation). The first three parameters relate to subsurface transport in general while the last four, the sorption rate, distribution coefficient, and in-solution and adsorbed inactivation rates, represent the interaction of viruses with the porous medium and their ability to persist. The importance of four types of observations to estimate the virus-transport parameters are evaluated: hydraulic heads, flow, temporal moments of conservative-transport concentrations, and virus concentrations. The evaluations are conducted using one- and two-dimensional homogeneous simulations, designed from published field experiments, and recently developed sensitivity-analysis methods. Sensitivity to the transport-simulation time-step size is used to evaluate the importance of numerical solution difficulties. Results suggest that hydraulic conductivity, porosity, and sorption are most important to virus-transport predictions. Most observation types provide substantial information about hydraulic conductivity and porosity; only virus-concentration observations provide information about sorption and inactivation. The observations are not sufficient to estimate these important parameters uniquely. Even with all observation types, there is extreme parameter correlation between porosity and hydraulic conductivity and between the sorption rate and in-solution inactivation. Parameter estimation was accomplished by fixing values of porosity and in-solution inactivation.

  2. Polar discontinuities and 1D interfaces in monolayered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Gordillo, Rafael; Pruneda, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Interfaces are the birthplace of a multitude of fascinating discoveries in fundamental science, and have enabled modern electronic devices, from transistors, to lasers, capacitors or solar cells. These interfaces between bulk materials are always bi-dimensional (2D) 'surfaces'. However the advent of graphene and other 2D crystals opened up a world of possibilities, as in this case the interfaces become one-dimensional (1D) lines. Although the properties of 1D nanoribbons have been extensively discussed in the last few years, 1D interfaces within infinite 2D systems had remained mostly unexplored until very recently. These include grain boundaries in polycrystalline samples, or interfaces in hybrid 2D sheets composed by segregated domains of different materials (as for example graphene/BN hybrids, or chemically different transition metal dichalcogenides). As for their 2D counterparts, some of these 1D interfaces exhibit polar characteristics, and can give rise to fascinating new physical properties. Here, recent experimental discoveries and theoretical predictions on the polar discontinuities that arise at these 1D interfaces will be reviewed, and the perspectives of this new research topic, discussed.

  3. Heat Capacity of 1D Molecular Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Barabashko, M. S.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Jeżowski, A.; Stachowiak, P.

    2017-04-01

    The heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen and methane molecules (adsorbed in the outer grooves of bundles of closed-cap single-walled carbon nanotubes) has been studied in the temperature ranges 2-40 and 2-60 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen molecules below 3 K is close to a linear. It was found that the rotational heat capacity of methane molecules is a significant part of the total heat capacity of the chains throughout the whole investigated temperature range, whereas in the case of nitrogen, the librations are significant only above 15 K. The dependence of the heat capacity for methane below 10 K indicates the presence of a Schottky anomaly caused by the tunneling between the lowest energy levels of the CH4 molecule rotational spectra. Characteristic features observed in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D methane crystals are also discussed.

  4. Upstream Design and 1D-CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroyuki

    Recently, engineering design environment of Japan is changing variously. Manufacturing companies are being challenged to design and bring out products that meet the diverse demands of customers and are competitive against those produced by rising countries(1). In order to keep and strengthen the competitiveness of Japanese companies, it is necessary to create new added values as well as conventional ones. It is well known that design at the early stages has a great influence on the final design solution. Therefore, design support tools for the upstream design is necessary for creating new added values. We have established a research society for 1D-CAE (1 Dimensional Computer Aided Engineering)(2), which is a general term for idea, methodology and tools applicable for the upstream design support, and discuss the concept and definition of 1D-CAE. This paper reports our discussion about 1D-CAE.

  5. Open system Hf isotope homogenization by a DISPOREP process under amphibolite-facies conditions, an example from the Limpopo Belt (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, Armin; Gerdes, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Isotope homogenization in metamorphic rock is a prerequisite for precise isochrone dating. However, whether or not homogenisation occurs during a metamorphic overprint dependent on several parameters and processes, which compete with each other and comprise at least (i) volume diffusion, (ii) dissolution-re-precipitation, (iii) intergranular diffusive or fluid enhanced transport, and (iv) metamorphic mineral reaction(s). Isotope homogenisation is commonly reached in high-grade (granulite-facies) metamorphic rocks, where diffusion is fast, and mineral reactions and dissolution-re-precipitation accompanied or maintained by a melt phase, but it is incomplete in low-grade to amphibolite-facies rocks, in the presence of an aqueous fluid phase. This holds true, in particular, for the Lu-Hf isotope system, which is mainly controlled by accessory zircon, which is very resistant against dissolution in aqueous fluids and has slow diffusivity for Hf, U, Pb. Thus zircon often maintains it primary U-Pb-Hf isotope composition obtained during previous magmatic crystallisation (i.e, magmatic grains in orthogneisses or detrital magmatic grains in paragneisses), even under very high-grade metamorphic conditions >1000° C. However, results of recent isotope studies show, that the U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope systems of zircon-bearing ortho- and paragneisses can homogenize completely (on hand specimen scale) even under amphibolite facies T - P conditions of

  6. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  7. Evaluation of a hydrophilic ionic liquid as a salting-out phase separation agent to a water-tetrahydrofuran homogeneous system for aqueous biphasic extraction separation.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Naoki; Higo, Takaaki; Imura, Hisanori

    2012-01-01

    The use of a hydrophilic ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C(4)mimCl), as a salting-out phase separation agent to a water-tetrahydrofuran homogeneous system was studied for possible applications to novel aqueous biphasic extraction separation. The IL showed a salting-out phase-separation ability. Also, differences in the polarity between the formed two phases were smaller than that when using NaCl as a salting-out agent. This result suggested that C(4)mimCl remaining in water-rich phase acts not only as a salting-out agent, but also a component of a mixed-solvent. Possible uses of C(4)mimCl/NaCl mixed salting-out agent system were also discussed.

  8. Phosphorylation of a Herpes Simplex Virus 1 dUTPase by a Viral Protein Kinase, Us3, Dictates Viral Pathogenicity in the Central Nervous System but Not at the Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Akihisa; Shindo, Keiko; Maruzuru, Yuhei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) encodes Us3 protein kinase, which is critical for viral pathogenicity in both mouse peripheral sites (e.g., eyes and vaginas) and in the central nervous systems (CNS) of mice after intracranial and peripheral inoculations, respectively. Whereas some Us3 substrates involved in Us3 pathogenicity in peripheral sites have been reported, those involved in Us3 pathogenicity in the CNS remain to be identified. We recently reported that Us3 phosphorylated HSV-1 dUTPase (vdUTPase) at serine 187 (Ser-187) in infected cells, and this phosphorylation promoted viral replication by regulating optimal enzymatic activity of vdUTPase. In the present study, we show that the replacement of vdUTPase Ser-187 by alanine (S187A) significantly reduced viral replication and virulence in the CNS of mice following intracranial inoculation and that the phosphomimetic substitution at vdUTPase Ser-187 in part restored the wild-type viral replication and virulence. Interestingly, the S187A mutation in vdUTPase had no effect on viral replication and pathogenic effects in the eyes and vaginas of mice after ocular and vaginal inoculation, respectively. Similarly, the enzyme-dead mutation in vdUTPase significantly reduced viral replication and virulence in the CNS of mice after intracranial inoculation, whereas the mutation had no effect on viral replication and pathogenic effects in the eyes and vaginas of mice after ocular and vaginal inoculation, respectively. These observations suggested that vdUTPase was one of the Us3 substrates responsible for Us3 pathogenicity in the CNS and that the CNS-specific virulence of HSV-1 involved strict regulation of vdUTPase activity by Us3 phosphorylation. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) encodes a viral protein kinase Us3 which is critical for pathogenicity both in peripheral sites and in the central nervous systems (CNS) of mice following peripheral and intracranial inoculations, respectively. Whereas some Us3

  9. Glass-based 1-D dielectric microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Valligatla, Sreeramulu; Varas, Stefano; Jasieniak, Jacek; Criante, Luigino; Lukowiak, Anna; Ristic, Davor; Gonçalves, Rogeria Rocha; Taccheo, Stefano; Ivanda, Mile; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Martucci, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a reliable RF sputtering techniques allowing to fabricate glass-based one dimensional microcavities, with high quality factor. This property is strongly related to the modification of the density of states due to the confinement of the gain medium in a photonic band gap structure. In this short review we present some of the more recent results obtained by our team exploiting these 1D microcavities. In particular we present: (1) Er3+ luminescence enhancement of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition; (2) broad band filters based on disordered 1-D photonic structures; (3) threshold defect-mode lasing action in a hybrid structure.

  10. A methodology for defining homogeneous water bodies in estuaries Application to the transitional systems of the EU Water Framework Directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J. G.; Nobre, A. M.; Simas, T. C.; Silva, M. C.; Newton, A.; Bricker, S. B.; Wolff, W. J.; Stacey, P. E.; Sequeira, A.

    2006-02-01

    A methodology is developed and tested for division of estuarine and coastal systems into water bodies for monitoring and management purposes. This division is often implicit in the choice of sampling stations and in pollution abatement measures applied to different locations - it is now an explicit requirement of European Union Directive 2000/60/EC (Water Framework Directive) and recommended by United States Agencies such as EPA and NOAA. The approach considers both natural characteristics and the human dimension, by means of a stepwise methodology, which considers, on the one hand, morphology and salinity distribution, and, on the other, appropriate indicators of pressure and state. In the present application, nitrogen and phosphorus loading was used as the pressure component and chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen as indicators of state. The criteria for system division were defined based on (1) an adimensional shape factor and salinity classes for the natural component; and (2) a normalised pressure index and (ASSETS) eutrophication symptom classes for the human dimension. Water quality databases and GIS were used to develop spatial distributions for the various components, and the results were aggregated into a final water body division, using tidal excursion as a "common sense" test. The methodology was applied to three well-studied systems in Portugal, a tubular estuary (Mondego), a wide lagunal estuary (Sado) and a coastal barrier island system (Ria Formosa). Although a final definition of water bodies will usually be a policy decision, this type of approach for the division of coastal systems into management units scientifically informs the decision-making process.

  11. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  12. Free energy calculations along entropic pathways. I. Homogeneous vapor-liquid nucleation for atomic and molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-11-01

    Using the entropy S as a reaction coordinate, we determine the free energy barrier associated with the formation of a liquid droplet from a supersaturated vapor for atomic and molecular fluids. For this purpose, we develop the μ V T -S simulation method that combines the advantages of the grand-canonical ensemble, that allows for a direct evaluation of the entropy, and of the umbrella sampling method, that is well suited to the study of an activated process like nucleation. Applying this approach to an atomic system such as Ar allows us to test the method. The results show that the μ V T -S method gives the correct dependence on supersaturation of the height of the free energy barrier and of the size of the critical droplet, when compared to predictions from the classical nucleation theory and to previous simulation results. In addition, it provides insight into the relation between the entropy and droplet formation throughout this process. An additional advantage of the μ V T -S approach is its direct transferability to molecular systems, since it uses the entropy of the system as the reaction coordinate. Applications of the μ V T -S simulation method to N2 and CO2 are presented and discussed in this work, showing the versatility of the μ V T -S approach.

  13. Why lower diatremes in kimberlitic and non-kimberlitic systems are non-stratified, homogenized, and contain steep internal contacts: episodic bursts and debris jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P.; White, J. D.; Kurszlaukis, S.; Lorenz, V.; Zimanowski, B.; Buettner, R.; McClintock, M.

    2009-05-01

    In both kimberlitic and non-kimberlitic systems, the volcaniclastic fill of the lower diatreme zone is often described as "homogenized" or "well mixed". Although the components come from different sources, the deposits display "a crude degree of textural and lithological consistency" (Clement and Reid, 1989, "Kimberlites and related rocks", p. 632-646). Bedding is typically absent from the lower diatreme but in some pipes, columnar bodies of volcaniclastic material occur. These bodies have steep contacts with, and a different grain size, componentry, etc. than, the enclosing host. Sometimes the difference can be subtle and the contacts gradational, making recognition difficult. Good examples are documented from Arizona and Antarctica in basaltic systems and such columnar bodies are also known in kimberlites, where they are sometimes called "feeder conduits". Both the homogenized aspect of many diatremes, and the generation of steep internal contacts, have been attributed to whole-pipe fluidization by some recent workers. This process is unlikely to occur in large pipes because it would take a huge amount of gas being emitted at a sufficient rate to fluidize the whole pipe. Other recent models call for Plinian-scale eruptions. However it is clear that small episodic bursts, not sustained Plinian plumes, must explain the genesis of the hundreds of relatively thin beds in maar tephra rims (maar- diatreme volcanoes do not generate large ignimbrites or thick widespread pyroclastic fall layers). Here we examine what these episodic bursts may do to the underground part of the maar-diatreme volcano. An explosion at deep levels in the pipe will generate enough gas to mobilize newly fragmented magma and existing debris upward into a "debris jet", typically much narrower than the width of the diatreme. Debris jets propagate within the existing diatreme fill and may or may not reach the surface. Experimental studies can be used to illustrate the processes at work. With time

  14. Relations between environmental noise and electronic coupling for optimal exciton transfer in one- and two-dimensional homogeneous and inhomogeneous quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Forgy, Charles C.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2014-12-14

    Recent studies have indicated that environmental noise may increase energy-transfer efficiency in quantum systems. For homogeneous networks of chromophores previous studies have primarily considered excitonic transport in one-dimensional (linear) networks. In our study, we expand previous research to a two-dimensional fully coupled topology of chromophore molecules. We demonstrate that not only does an optimal dephasing rate exist in both one- and two-dimensional networks but also that it increases in magnitude with increasing coupling strength between chromophores. Optimal transport occurs when the noise quenches the entanglement between local modes that prevent the exciton from moving efficiently to the target site. We find that these results are insensitive to minor site defects such as those found in realistic systems. We contrast these findings to systems with a high degree of inhomogeneity, in which the optimal dephasing rate is largely set by the system topology and does not vary significantly with respect to coupling strength. Our findings have potential applications to systems such as quantum dot arrays and carbon nanotube structures.

  15. The alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Koshimizu, Takaaki; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Kawai, Takayuki; Sunada, Sachie; Takeo, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the physiological role of the alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1D)-AR) subtype, we created mice lacking the alpha(1D)-AR (alpha(1D)(-/-)) by gene targeting and characterized their cardiovascular function. In alpha(1D)-/- mice, the RT-PCR did not detect any transcript of the alpha(1D)-AR in any tissue examined, and there was no apparent upregulation of other alpha(1)-AR subtypes. Radioligand binding studies showed that alpha(1)-AR binding capacity in the aorta was lost, while that in the heart was unaltered in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Non-anesthetized alpha(1D)-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, relative to wild-type mice, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. Besides hypotension, the pressor responses to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were decreased by 30-40% in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to alpha(1)-AR stimulation were markedly reduced in alpha(1D)-/- mice. We conclude that the alpha(1D)-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction.

  16. Homogeneity and Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tignanelli, H. L.; Vazquez, R. A.; Mostaccio, C.; Gordillo, S.; Plastino, A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Presentamos una metodologia de analisis de la homogeneidad a partir de la Teoria de la Informaci6n, aplicable a muestras de datos observacionales. ABSTRACT:Standard concepts that underlie Information Theory are employed in order design a methodology that enables one to analyze the homogeneity of a given data sample. Key : DATA ANALYSIS

  17. Oxygen isotope homogeneity and trace element variations in glass within 250-79 ka Central Plateau Member rhyolite lavas from the Yellowstone Volcanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewen, M.; Bindeman, I. N.; Befus, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    The 250-79 ka Central Plateau Member CPM) rhyolites are represented mostly by large volume lava flows with less than 10% crystals and are the youngest eruptive products inside of the 620 ka Yellowstone Caldera, formed after eruption of Lava Creek Tuff (LCT). These flows are low-δ18O requiring tens of percent of shallowly remelted hydrothermally-altered material and provide evidence into how large silicic magma systems evolve before and after major caldera-forming cycles. We have developed a technique to directly analyze small micro-domains of rhyolite glass for precise (better than 0.1 ‰) δ18O determination coupled with D/H, [H2O], trace elements, and Pb isotopes. We present evidence for striking δ18O homogeneity (4.48 ± 0.12 ‰, 2 standard deviations of all analyses) both across small (1 km3) and large (up to 70 km3) flows and between flows erupted over almost 200 ka. D/H analyses in the glasses are highly degassed and are not affected by secondary hydration (H2O = 0.05 to 0.28 wt. %, δD = -99 to -171 ‰). Trace element analyses show broad temporal compositional evolution consistent with increasing feldspar fractionation over time: the oldest Scaup Lake flow contains 8 ppm Sr, 330 ppm Rb, and 270 ppm Ba to the youngest Pitchstone Plateau flow contains 0.7-1.9 ppm Sr, 180-250 ppm Rb, 18-25 ppm Ba. We also show small but recognizable trace element heterogeneity within lava flows unrelated to long-term geochemical trends. Homogeneity of oxygen in melt from individual lava flows across the LCT caldera is consistent with convective homogenization of a large magma body generated by remelting of post and pre LCT hydrothermally-altered and likely highly variable, low- δ18O rocks. In combination with trace element data we show that the CPM rhyolites have also undergone a broad, caldera-wide differentiation trend with no evidence for significant recharge. We are reconciling diverse geochemical data streams to develop a comprehensive petrologic model for the

  18. Multifractal spectra in homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, A. E.; Keefe, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Employing numerical simulations of 3-D homogeneous shear flow, the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation, scalar dissipation and vorticity fields were calculated. The results for (128) cubed simulations of this flow, and those obtained in recent experiments that analyzed 1- and 2-D intersections of atmospheric and laboratory flows, are in some agreement. A two-scale Cantor set model of the energy cascade process which describes the experimental results from 1-D intersections quite well, describes the 3-D results only marginally.

  19. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  20. 1-D Numerical Analysis of ABCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ABCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engine into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Except for the heat source, the basic operation of the ABCC is similar to the basic operation of the RBCC engine. The ABCC is intended to have a higher specific impulse than the RBCC for single stage Earth to orbit vehicle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in ABCC propulsion system. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model using conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy equations that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic ABCC engine following a flight path. At specific points during the development of the 1-D numerical model a myriad of tests were performed to prove the program produced consistent, realistic numbers that follow compressible flow theory for various inlet conditions.

  1. Homogeneous Atomic Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth B.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the creation of homogeneous Fermi gases of ultracold atoms in a uniform potential. In the momentum distribution of a spin-polarized gas, we observe the emergence of the Fermi surface and the saturated occupation of one particle per momentum state: the striking consequence of Pauli blocking in momentum space for a degenerate gas. Cooling a spin-balanced Fermi gas at unitarity, we create homogeneous superfluids and observe spatially uniform pair condensates. For thermodynamic measurements, we introduce a hybrid potential that is harmonic in one dimension and uniform in the other two. The spatially resolved compressibility reveals the superfluid transition in a spin-balanced Fermi gas, saturation in a fully polarized Fermi gas, and strong attraction in the polaronic regime of a partially polarized Fermi gas.

  2. EXTENSION OF THE 1D FOUR-GROUP ANALYTIC NODAL METHOD TO FULL MULTIGROUP

    SciTech Connect

    B. D. Ganapol; D. W. Nigg

    2008-09-01

    In the mid 80’s, a four-group/two-region, entirely analytical 1D nodal benchmark appeared. It was readily acknowledged that this special case was as far as one could go in terms of group number and still achieve an analytical solution. In this work, we show that by decomposing the solution to the multigroup diffusion equation into homogeneous and particular solutions, extension to any number of groups is a relatively straightforward exercise using the mathematics of linear algebra.

  3. Full Waveform 3D Synthetic Seismic Algorithm for 1D Layered Anelastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaiger, H. F.; Aldridge, D. F.; Haney, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Numerical calculation of synthetic seismograms for 1D layered earth models remains a significant aspect of amplitude-offset investigations, surface wave studies, microseismic event location approaches, and reflection interpretation or inversion processes. Compared to 3D finite-difference algorithms, memory demand and execution time are greatly reduced, enabling rapid generation of seismic data within workstation or laptop computational environments. We have developed a frequency-wavenumber forward modeling algorithm adapted to realistic 1D geologic media, for the purpose of calculating seismograms accurately and efficiently. The earth model consists of N layers bounded by two halfspaces. Each layer/halfspace is a homogeneous and isotropic anelastic (attenuative and dispersive) solid, characterized by a rectangular relaxation spectrum of absorption mechanisms. Compressional and shear phase speeds and quality factors are specified at a particular reference frequency. Solution methodology involves 3D Fourier transforming the three coupled, second- order, integro-differential equations for particle displacements to the frequency-horizontal wavenumber domain. An analytic solution of the resulting ordinary differential system is obtained. Imposition of welded interface conditions (continuity of displacement and stress) at all interfaces, as well as radiation conditions in the two halfspaces, yields a system of 6(N+1) linear algebraic equations for the coefficients in the ODE solution. An optimized inverse 2D Fourier transform to the space domain gives the seismic wavefield on a horizontal plane. Finally, three-component seismograms are obtained by accumulating frequency spectra at designated receiver positions on this plane, followed by a 1D inverse FFT from angular frequency ω to time. Stress-free conditions may be applied at the top or bottom interfaces, and seismic waves are initiated by force or moment density sources. Examples reveal that including attenuation

  4. The stability of 1-D soliton in transverse direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepa; Bera, Ratan Kumar; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2016-12-01

    The complete characterization of the exact 1-D solitary wave solutions (both stationary and propagating) for light plasma coupled system have been studied extensively in the parameter space of light frequency and the group speed [Poornakala et al., Phys. Plasmas 9(5), 1820 (2002)]. It has been shown in 1-D that solutions with single light wave peak and paired structures are stable and hence long lived. However, solutions having multiple peaks of light wave are unstable due to Raman scattering instability [Saxena et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072307 (2007)]. Here, we have shown with the help of 2-D fluid simulation that single peak and paired solutions too get destabilized by the transverse filamentation instability. The numerical growth rates obtained from simulations is seen to compare well with the analytical values. It is also shown that multiple peaks solitons first undergo the regular 1-D forward Raman scattering instability. Subsequently, they undergo a distinct second phase of destabilization through transverse filamentation instability. This is evident from the structure as well as the plot of the perturbed energy which shows a second phase of growth after saturating initially. The growth rate of the filamentation instability being comparatively slower than the forward Raman instability this phase comes quite late and is clearly distinguishable.

  5. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  6. 75 FR 27411 - Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca Arriel 1B, 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 Turboshaft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... (that incorporate Turbomeca Modification (mod) TU 148), Arriel 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. That AD also requires initial and repetitive replacements of 2nd stage... incorporate mod TU 148), 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. We...

  7. Effect of systemic injection of heterogenous and homogenous opioids on peripheral cellular immune response in rats with bone cancer pain: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun-Ying; Liang, Yi; Fang, Jun-Fan; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Shao, Xiao-Mei; He, Xiao-Fen; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous and endogenous opioids have been shown to modulate the immune system. Morphine-induced immunosuppression has been investigated extensively. However, the immune-regulating function of endogenous opioid peptides is unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the difference in effects on cellular immune function between recombinant rat β-endorphin (β-EP; 50 µg/kg) and plant source morphine (10 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection treatment in a rat model of bone cancer pain. Walker 256 cells were injected into a tibial cavity injection to establish the bone cancer pain model. The paw withdrawal thresholds and body weights were measured prior to surgery, at 6 days after surgery, and following 1, 3,6 and 8 treatments. The spleen cells were harvested for detection of T cell proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity, and the relative quantities of T cell subtypes (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells). Plasma levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) were also determined. It was found that single or multiple treatments with β-EP (a homogenous opioid peptide) and morphine (a heterogenous opioid) had good analgesic effects on bone cancer pain, while the analgesia provided by morphine was stronger than that of β-EP. Treatment with β-EP 3, 6 and 8 times increased the body weight gain in the rat model of bone cancer pain, while morphine treatment had on effect on it. With regard to immunomodulatory functions, β-EP treatment increased T cell proliferation and NK cell cytotoxicity, and increased the relative quantities of T cell subtypes, but no effect on T cell secretion. However, morphine treatment decreased T cell proliferation and the levels of T cell subtypes. These data indicate that opioids from different sources have different effects on cellular immune function in vivo. A small dose of homogenous opioid peptide exhibited positive effects (analgesia and immune enhancement) on cancer pain. These results provide experimental evidence supporting the exploitation of

  8. Computation Results from a Parametric Study to Determine Bounding Critical Systems of Homogeneously Water-Moderated Mixed Plutonium--Uranium Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides computational results of an extensive study to examine the following: (1) infinite media neutron-multiplication factors; (2) material bucklings; (3) bounding infinite media critical concentrations; (4) bounding finite critical dimensions of water-reflected and homogeneously water-moderated one-dimensional systems (i.e., spheres, cylinders of infinite length, and slabs that are infinite in two dimensions) that were comprised of various proportions and densities of plutonium oxides and uranium oxides, each having various isotopic compositions; and (5) sensitivity coefficients of delta k-eff with respect to critical geometry delta dimensions were determined for each of the three geometries that were studied. The study was undertaken to support the development of a standard that is sponsored by the International Standards Organization (ISO) under Technical Committee 85, Nuclear Energy (TC 85)--Subcommittee 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology (SC 5)--Working Group 8, Standardization of Calculations, Procedures and Practices Related to Criticality Safety (WG 8). The designation and title of the ISO TC 85/SC 5/WG 8 standard working draft is WD 14941, ''Nuclear energy--Fissile materials--Nuclear criticality control and safety of plutonium-uranium oxide fuel mixtures outside of reactors.'' Various ISO member participants performed similar computational studies using their indigenous computational codes to provide comparative results for analysis in the development of the standard.

  9. Convergence of many-body wave-function expansions using a plane-wave basis: From homogeneous electron gas to solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.; Grüneis, Andreas; Booth, George H.; Kresse, Georg; Alavi, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Using the finite simulation-cell homogeneous electron gas (HEG) as a model, we investigate the convergence of the correlation energy to the complete-basis-set (CBS) limit in methods utilizing plane-wave wave-function expansions. Simple analytic and numerical results from second-order Møller-Plesset theory (MP2) suggest a 1/M decay of the basis-set incompleteness error where M is the number of plane waves used in the calculation, allowing for straightforward extrapolation to the CBS limit. As we shall show, the choice of basis-set truncation when constructing many-electron wave functions is far from obvious, and here we propose several alternatives based on the momentum transfer vector, which greatly improve the rate of convergence. This is demonstrated for a variety of wave-function methods, from MP2 to coupled-cluster doubles theory and the random-phase approximation plus second-order screened exchange. Finite basis-set energies are presented for these methods and compared with exact benchmarks. A transformation can map the orbitals of a general solid state system onto the HEG plane-wave basis and thereby allow application of these methods to more realistic physical problems. We demonstrate this explicitly for solid and molecular lithium hydride.

  10. Deforestation homogenizes tropical parasitoid-host networks.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, Etienne; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2010-06-01

    Human activities drive biotic homogenization (loss of regional diversity) of many taxa. However, whether species interaction networks (e.g., food webs) can also become homogenized remains largely unexplored. Using 48 quantitative parasitoid-host networks replicated through space and time across five tropical habitats, we show that deforestation greatly homogenized network structure at a regional level, such that interaction composition became more similar across rice and pasture sites compared with forested habitats. This was not simply caused by altered consumer and resource community composition, but was associated with altered consumer foraging success, such that parasitoids were more likely to locate their hosts in deforested habitats. Furthermore, deforestation indirectly homogenized networks in time through altered mean consumer and prey body size, which decreased in deforested habitats. Similar patterns were obtained with binary networks, suggesting that interaction (link) presence-absence data may be sufficient to detect network homogenization effects. Our results show that tropical agroforestry systems can support regionally diverse parasitoid-host networks, but that removal of canopy cover greatly homogenizes the structure of these networks in space, and to a lesser degree in time. Spatiotemporal homogenization of interaction networks may alter coevolutionary outcomes and reduce ecological resilience at regional scales, but may not necessarily be predictable from community changes observed within individual trophic levels.

  11. Analysis of homogeneous/non-homogeneous nanofluid models accounting for nanofluid-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.

    2016-07-01

    This article reports an unbiased analysis for the water based rod shaped alumina nanoparticles by considering both the homogeneous and non-homogeneous nanofluid models over the coupled nanofluid-surface interface. The mechanics of the surface are found for both the homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, which were ignored in previous studies. The viscosity and thermal conductivity data are implemented from the international nanofluid property benchmark exercise. All the simulations are being done by using the experimentally verified results. By considering the homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, the precise movement of the alumina nanoparticles over the surface has been observed by solving the corresponding system of differential equations. For the non-homogeneous model, a uniform temperature and nanofluid volume fraction are assumed at the surface, and the flux of the alumina nanoparticle is taken as zero. The assumption of zero nanoparticle flux at the surface makes the non-homogeneous model physically more realistic. The differences of all profiles for both the homogeneous and nonhomogeneous models are insignificant, and this is due to small deviations in the values of the Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  12. Homogeneous, bioluminescent proteasome assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha A; Moravec, Richard A; Riss, Terry L; Bulleit, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is mediated predominantly through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The importance of the proteasome in regulating degradation of proteins involved in cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis led to the recognition of the proteasome as a therapeutic target for cancer. The proteasome is also essential for degrading misfolded and aberrant proteins, and impaired proteasome function has been implicated in neurodegerative and cardiovascular diseases. Robust, sensitive assays are essential for monitoring proteasome activity and for developing inhibitors of the proteasome. Peptide-conjugated fluorophores are widely used as substrates for monitoring proteasome activity, but fluorogenic substrates can exhibit significant background and can be problematic for screening because of cellular autofluorescence or interference from fluorescent library compounds. Furthermore, fluorescent proteasome assays require column-purified 20S or 26S proteasome (typically obtained from erythrocytes), or proteasome extracts from whole cells, as their samples. To provide assays more amenable to high-throughput screening, we developed a homogeneous, bioluminescent method that combines peptide-conjugated aminoluciferin substrates and a stabilized luciferase. Using substrates for the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activities in combination with a selective membrane permeabilization step, we developed single-step, cell-based assays to measure each of the proteasome catalytic activities. The homogeneous method eliminates the need to prepare individual cell extracts as samples and has adequate sensitivity for 96- and 384-well plates. The simple "add and read" format enables sensitive and rapid proteasome assays ideal for inhibitor screening.

  13. Geochemical homogeneity of a long-lived, large silicic system; evidence from the Cerro Galán caldera, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, Chris B.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Wright, Heather M.; Cas, Raymond A. F.

    2011-12-01

    place during the upper-crustal evolution of these larger volume magmas. We attribute this relationship to variations in magma chamber geometry; the younger, largest volume ignimbrites came from flat sill-like magma chambers, reducing the relative proportion of sidewall crystallization and fractionation compared to the older, smaller-volume ignimbrite eruptions. The grey pumice clasts also show evidence of silicic recharge throughout the history of the Cerro Galán system, and recharge days prior to eruption has previously been suggested based on reversely zoned (OH and Cl) apatite phenocrysts. A rare population of plagioclase phenocrysts with thin An-rich rims in juvenile clasts in many ignimbrites supports the importance of recharge in the evolution and potential triggering of eruptions. This study extends the notion that large volumes of nearly identical silicic magmas can be generated repeatedly, producing prolonged geochemical homogeneity from a long-lived magma source in a subduction zone volcanic setting. At Cerro Galán, we propose that there is a zone between mantle magma input and upper crustal chambers, where magmas are geochemically "buffered", producing the underlying geochemical and isotopic signatures. This produces the same parental magmas that are delivered repeatedly to the upper crust. A lower-crustal MASH (melting, assimilation, storage, and homogenization) zone is proposed to act as this buffer zone. Subsequent upper crustal magmatic processes serve only to slightly modify the geochemistry of the magmas.

  14. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

    1959-02-17

    Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

  15. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  16. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  17. A new potential energy surface for the H2S system and dynamics study on the S(1D) + H2(X1Σg+) reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiuchuang; He, Di; Chen, Maodu

    2015-01-01

    We constructed a new global potential energy surface (PES) for the electronic ground state (1A′) of H2S based on 21,300 accurate ab initio energy points over a large configuration space. The ab initio energies are obtained from multireference configuration interaction calculations with a Davidson correction using basis sets of quadruple zeta quality. The neural network method is applied to fit the PES, and the root mean square error of fitting is small (1.68 meV). Time-dependent wave packet studies for the S(1D) + H2(X1Σg+) → H(2S) + SH(X2Π) reaction on the new PES are conducted to study the reaction dynamics. The calculated integral cross sections decrease with increasing collision energy and remain fairly constant within the high collision energy range. Both forward and backward scatterings can be observed as expected for a barrierless reaction with a deep well on the PES. The calculated integral cross sections and differential cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:26435516

  18. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Scott

    2000-08-01

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry--something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  19. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David Scott

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry-something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  20. Cobinamide production of hydrogen in a homogeneous aqueous photochemical system, and assembly and photoreduction in a (βα)8 protein

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Wesley D.; Bovell, Adonis M.; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Components of a protein-integrated, earth-abundant metal-macrocycle catalyst, purposed for hydrogen (H2) production from aqueous protons under green conditions, are characterized. The cobalt (Co) -corrin complex, cobinamide, is demonstrated to produce H2 (4.4±1.8×10−3 turnover number per hour) in a homogeneous, photosensitizer/sacrificial electron donor system, in pure water at neutral pH. Turnover is proposed to be limited by the relatively low population of the gateway Co(III) hydride species. A heterolytic mechanism for H2 production from the Co(II) hydride is proposed. Two essential requirements for assembly of a functional protein catalyst complex are demonstrated, for interaction of cobinamide with the (βα)8, TIM-barrel protein, EutB, from the adenosylcobalamin-dependent ethanolamine ammonia-lyase from Salmonella typhimurium: (1) High affinity equilibrium binding of the cobinamide (dissociation constant, 2.1×10−7 M), and (2) in situ photoreduction of the cobinamide-protein complex to the Co(I) state. Molecular modeling of the cobinamide-EutB interaction shows that these features arise from specific hydrogen bond and apolar interactions of the protein with the alkylamide substituents and ring of the corrin, and accessibility of the binding site to solution. The results establish cobinamide-EutB as a platform for design and engineering of a robust H2 production metallo-catalyst, that operates under green conditions, and utilizes advantages of protein as a tunable medium and material support. PMID:23807763

  1. Cobinamide production of hydrogen in a homogeneous aqueous photochemical system, and assembly and photoreduction in a (βα)8 protein.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Wesley D; Bovell, Adonis M; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-08-01

    Components of a protein-integrated, earth-abundant metal macrocycle catalyst, with the purpose of H2 production from aqueous protons under green conditions, are characterized. The cobalt-corrin complex, cobinamide, is demonstrated to produce H2 (4.4 ± 1.8 × 10(-3) turnover number per hour) in a homogeneous, photosensitizer/sacrificial electron donor system in pure water at neutral pH. Turnover is proposed to be limited by the relatively low population of the gateway cobalt(III) hydride species. A heterolytic mechanism for H2 production from the cobalt(II) hydride is proposed. Two essential requirements for assembly of a functional protein-catalyst complex are demonstrated for interaction of cobinamide with the (βα)8 TIM barrel protein, EutB, from the adenosylcobalamin-dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase from Salmonella typhimurium: (1) high-affinity equilibrium binding of the cobinamide (dissociation constant 2.1 × 10(-7) M) and (2) in situ photoreduction of the cobinamide-protein complex to the Co(I) state. Molecular modeling of the cobinamide-EutB interaction shows that these features arise from specific hydrogen-bond and apolar interactions of the protein with the alkylamide substituents and the ring of the corrin, and accessibility of the binding site to the solution. The results establish cobinamide-EutB as a platform for design and engineering of a robust H2 production metallocatalyst that operates under green conditions and uses the advantages of the protein as a tunable medium and material support.

  2. Comparative antioxidant activity of tocotrienols and other natural lipid-soluble antioxidants in a homogeneous system, and in rat and human lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Suarna, C; Hood, R L; Dean, R T; Stocker, R

    1993-02-24

    The antioxidant activity of tocotrienols toward peroxyl radicals was compared with that of other natural lipid-soluble antioxidants in three different systems by measuring the temporal disappearance of antioxidants and the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. In homogeneous solution, the initial rates of consumption of the various antioxidants, assessed by competition experiments between pairs of antioxidants for radicals, decreased in the order: ubiquinol-10 approximately ubiquinol-9 > alpha-tocopherol approximately alpha-tocotrienol > beta-carotene approximately lycopene > gamma-tocopherol approximately gamma-tocotrienol. Following in vitro incubation of human plasma with alpha-tocotrienol, this form of vitamin E was present in all classes of lipoproteins isolated from the supplemented plasma. Dietary supplementation of rats and humans with a tocotrienol-rich preparation resulted in a dose-dependent appearance of alpha- and gamma-tocotrienols in plasma and all circulating lipoproteins, respectively. Exposure of such enriched rat plasma to aqueous peroxyl radicals resulted in simultaneous consumption of the alpha- and then gamma-isomers of vitamin E. The sequence of radical-induced consumption of antioxidants in freshly isolated, in vitro and in vivo tocotrienol-enriched low density lipoprotein (LDL) was again ubiquinol-10 > alpha-tocotrienol approximately alpha-tocopherol > carotenoids > gamma-tocopherol approximately gamma-tocotrienol. Under conditions where radicals were generated at constant rates, the rate of lipid hydroperoxide formation in LDL was not constant. It proceeded in at least three stages separated by the phase of ubiquinol-10 consumption and, subsequently, that of alpha-tocopherol/alpha-tocotrienol. Our results show that dietary tocotrienols become incorporated into circulating human lipoproteins where they react with peroxyl radicals as efficiently as the corresponding tocopherol isomers.

  3. 1D-1D Coulomb drag in a 6 Million Mobility Bi-layer Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, Simon; Laroche, Dominique; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Lilly, Mike; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gervais, Guillaume

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in vertically-coupled quantum wires. The wires are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer heterostructures grown from two different MBE chambers: one at Sandia National Laboratories (1.2M mobility), and the other at Princeton University (6M mobility). The previously observed positive and negative drag signals are seen in both types of devices, demonstrating the robustness of the result. However, attempts to determine the temperature dependence of the drag signal in the 1D regime proved challenging in the higher mobility heterostructure (Princeton), in part because of difficulties in aligning the wires within the same transverse subband configuration. Nevertheless, this work, performed at the Microkelvin laboratory of the University of Florida, is an important proof-of-concept for future investigations of the temperature dependence of the 1D-1D drag signal down to a few mK. Such an experiment could confirm the Luttinger charge density wave interlocking predicted to occur in the wires. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  4. Optimizing homogenization by chaotic unmixing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijs, Joost; Bartolo, Denis

    2016-11-01

    A number of industrial processes rely on the homogeneous dispersion of non-brownian particles in a viscous fluid. An ideal mixing would yield a so-called hyperuniform particle distribution. Such configurations are characterized by density fluctuations that grow slower than the standard √{ N}-fluctuations. Even though such distributions have been found in several natural structures, e.g. retina receptors in birds, they have remained out of experimental reach until very recently. Over the last 5 years independent experiments and numerical simulations have shown that periodically driven suspensions can self-assemble hyperuniformally. Simple as the recipe may be, it has one important disadvantage. The emergence of hyperuniform states co-occurs with a critical phase transition from reversible to non reversible particle dynamics. As a consequence the homogenization dynamics occurs over a time that diverges with the system size (critical slowing down). Here, we discuss how this process can be sped up by exploiting the stirring properties of chaotic advection. Among the questions that we answer are: What are the physical mechanisms in a chaotic flow that are relevant for hyperuniformity? How can we tune the flow parameters such to obtain optimal hyperuniformity in the fastest way? JW acknowledges funding by NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) through a Rubicon Grant.

  5. A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Steinke, Robert C.; Zhu, Jianting; Talbot, Cary A.; Wilson, John L.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed an alternative to the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE) attributed to Richards (1931) that describes unsaturated porous media flow in homogeneous soil layers. Our solution is a set of three ordinary differential equations (ODEs) derived from unsaturated flux and mass conservation principles. We used a hodograph transformation, the Method of Lines, and a finite water-content discretization to produce ODEs that accurately simulate infiltration, falling slugs, and groundwater table dynamic effects on vadose zone fluxes. This formulation, which we refer to as "finite water-content", simulates sharp fronts and is guaranteed to conserve mass using a finite-volume solution. Our ODE solution method is explicitly integrable, does not require iterations and therefore has no convergence limits and is computationally efficient. The method accepts boundary fluxes including arbitrary precipitation, bare soil evaporation, and evapotranspiration. The method can simulate heterogeneous soils using layers. Results are presented in terms of fluxes and water content profiles. Comparing our method against analytical solutions, laboratory data, and the Hydrus-1D solver, we find that predictive performance of our finite water-content ODE method is comparable to or in some cases exceeds that of the solution of Richards' equation, with or without a shallow water table. The presented ODE method is transformative in that it offers accuracy comparable to the Richards (1931) PDE numerical solution, without the numerical complexity, in a form that is robust, continuous, and suitable for use in large watershed and land-atmosphere simulation models, including regional-scale models of coupled climate and hydrology.

  6. Subplane-based Control Rod Decusping Techniques for the 2D/1D Method in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Aaron M; Collins, Benjamin S; Downar, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The MPACT transport code is being jointly developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Michigan to serve as the primary neutron transport code for the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator. MPACT uses the 2D/1D method to solve the transport equation by decomposing the reactor model into a stack of 2D planes. A fine mesh flux distribution is calculated in each 2D plane using the Method of Characteristics (MOC), then the planes are coupled axially through a 1D NEM-P$_3$ calculation. This iterative calculation is then accelerated using the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference method. One problem that arises frequently when using the 2D/1D method is that of control rod cusping. This occurs when the tip of a control rod falls between the boundaries of an MOC plane, requiring that the rodded and unrodded regions be axially homogenized for the 2D MOC calculations. Performing a volume homogenization does not properly preserve the reaction rates, causing an error known as cusping. The most straightforward way of resolving this problem is by refining the axial mesh, but this can significantly increase the computational expense of the calculation. The other way of resolving the partially inserted rod is through the use of a decusping method. This paper presents new decusping methods implemented in MPACT that can dynamically correct the rod cusping behavior for a variety of problems.

  7. Homogeneous nucleation kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, D. H.; Appleby, M. R.; Leedom, G. L.; Babu, S. V.; Naumann, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation kinetics are rederived in a manner fundamentally similar to the approach of classical nucleation theory with the following modifications and improvements. First, the cluster is a parent phase cluster and does not require energization to the parent state. Second, the thermodynamic potential used to describe phase stability is a continuous function along the pathway of phase decomposition. Third, the kinetics of clustering corresponds directly to the diffusional flux of monomers through the cluster distribution and are formally similar to classical theory with the resulting kinetic equation modified by two terms in the preexponential factor. These terms correct for the influence of a supersaturation dependent clustering within the parent phase and for the influence of an asymmetrical cluster concentration as a function of cluster size at the critical cluster size. Fourth, the supersaturation dependence of the nucleation rate is of the same form as that given by classical nucleation theory. This supersaturation dependence must however be interpreted in terms of a size dependent surface tension. Finally, there are two scaling laws which describe supersaturation to either constant nucleation rate or to the thermodynamically determined physical spinodal.

  8. Blood flow quantification using 1D CFD parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosig, Richard; Kowarschik, Markus; Maday, Peter; Katouzian, Amin; Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir

    2014-03-01

    Patient-specific measurements of cerebral blood flow provide valuable diagnostic information concerning cerebrovascular diseases rather than visually driven qualitative evaluation. In this paper, we present a quantitative method to estimate blood flow parameters with high temporal resolution from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) image sequences. Using a 3D DSA dataset and a 2D+t DSA sequence, the proposed algorithm employs a 1D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for estimation of time-dependent flow values along a cerebral vessel, combined with an additional Advection Diffusion Equation (ADE) for contrast agent propagation. The CFD system, followed by the ADE, is solved with a finite volume approximation, which ensures the conservation of mass. Instead of defining a new imaging protocol to obtain relevant data, our cost function optimizes the bolus arrival time (BAT) of the contrast agent in 2D+t DSA sequences. The visual determination of BAT is common clinical practice and can be easily derived from and be compared to values, generated by a 1D-CFD simulation. Using this strategy, we ensure that our proposed method fits best to clinical practice and does not require any changes to the medical work flow. Synthetic experiments show that the recovered flow estimates match the ground truth values with less than 12% error in the mean flow rates.

  9. Mechanism of deactivation of triplet-excited riboflavin by ascorbate, carotenoids, and tocopherols in homogeneous and heterogeneous aqueous food model systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Daniel R; Olsen, Karsten; Skibsted, Leif H

    2007-07-25

    Tocopherols (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) and Trolox were found to deactivate triplet-excited riboflavin in homogeneous aqueous solution (7:3 v/v tert-butanol/water) with second-order reaction rates close to diffusion control [k2 between 4.8 x 10(8) (delta-tocopherol) and 6.2 x 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1) (Trolox) at 24.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C] as determined by laser flash photolysis transient absorption spectroscopy. In aqueous buffer (pH 6.4) the rate constant for Trolox was 2.6 x 10(9) L mol(-1) s1 and comparable to the rate constant found for ascorbate (2.0 x 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1)). The deactivation rate constant was found to be inferior in heterogeneous systems as shown for alpha-tocopherol and Trolox in aqueous Tween-20 emulsion (approximately by a factor of 4 compared to 7:3 v/v tert-butanol/water). Neither beta-carotene (7:3 v/v tert-butanol/water and Tween-20 emulsion), lycopene (7:3 v/v tert-butanol/water), nor crocin (aqueous buffer at pH 6.4, 7:3 v/v tert-butanol/water, and Tween-20 emulsion) showed any quenching on the triplet excited state of riboflavin. Therefore, all carotenoids seem to reduce the formation of triplet-excited riboflavin through an inner-filter effect. Activation parameters were based on the temperature dependence of the triplet-excited deactivation between 15 and 35 degrees C, and the isokinetic behavior, which was found to include purine derivatives previously studied, confirms a common deactivation mechanism with a bimolecular diffusion-controlled encounter with electron (or hydrogen atom) transfer as rate-determining step. DeltaH for deactivation by ascorbic acid, Trolox, and homologue tocopherols (ranging from 18 kJ mol(-1) for Trolox in Tween-20 emulsion to 184 kJ mol(-1) for ascorbic acid in aqueous buffer at pH 6.4) showed a linear dependence on DeltaS (ranging from -19 J mol(-1) K(-1) for Trolox in aqueous buffer at pH 6.4 to +550 J mol(-1) K(-1) for ascorbic acid in aqueous buffer pH 6.4). Among photooxidation products from the

  10. Universum Inference and Corpus Homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Carl; Lynch, Gerard; Janssen, Jerom

    Universum Inference is re-interpreted for assessment of corpus homogeneity in computational stylometry. Recent stylometric research quantifies strength of characterization within dramatic works by assessing the homogeneity of corpora associated with dramatic personas. A methodological advance is suggested to mitigate the potential for the assessment of homogeneity to be achieved by chance. Baseline comparison analysis is constructed for contributions to debates by nonfictional participants: the corpus analyzed consists of transcripts of US Presidential and Vice-Presidential debates from the 2000 election cycle. The corpus is also analyzed in translation to Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. Adding randomized categories makes assessments of homogeneity more conservative.

  11. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  12. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Appenzeller, J

    2015-12-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  13. On the current drive capability of low dimensional semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-29

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Lastly, our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  14. Characterization of 5-HT1D receptor binding sites in post-mortem human brain cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Martial, J; de Montigny, C; Cecyre, D; Quirion, R

    1991-01-01

    The present study provides further evidence for the presence of serotonin1D (5-HT1D) receptors in post-mortem human brain. Receptor binding parameters in temporal cortex homogenates were assessed using [3H]5-HT in the presence of 100 nM 8-OH-DPAT, 1 microM propranolol and 1 microM mesulergine to prevent labelling of the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1C sites, respectively. Under these conditions, [3H]5-HT apparently bound to a class of high affinity (Kd = 5.0 +/- 1.0 nM) low capacity (Bmax = 96 +/- 23 fmol/mg protein) sites. In competition experiments, 5-HT and 5-carboxyamidotryptamine (5-CT), as well as ergotamine, lysergic acid, sumatriptan and RU-24969 exhibited high affinity for these sites. This pharmacological profile is concordant with the ligand selectivity pattern reported for 5-HT1D receptors in other species and thus provides further evidence for its existence in human temporal cortex. In addition, the competition profile of some ligands, particularly of unlabelled 5-HT, 5-CT and ergotamine, revealed the existence of a lower affinity binding site. The latter suggests receptor heterogeneity or the presence of a lower affinity state of 5-HT1D receptors. PMID:1911737

  15. Diagnostics from a 1-D atmospheric column

    SciTech Connect

    Flatley, J.M.; Mace, G.

    1996-04-01

    Various diagnostics were computed from an array of radiosondes during an intensive field operation arranged by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. The network data was centered around the site at Lamont, Oklahoma. The apparent heat source and apparent moisture sink were computed and compared to the kinematic vertical velocity for both real data and the mesoscale analysis and prediction system. Three different case studies of various weathe regimes were examined.

  16. Separable metamaterials: analytical ab-initio homogenization and chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Rago, Domenico; Rizza, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the ab-initio homogenization of separable metamaterials with factorized dielectric permittivity profiles, which can be achieved through suitable grey-scale permittivity design techniques. Separability allows such metamaterials to be physically regarded as the superposition of three fictitious 1D generating media. We prove that, in the long-wavelength limit, separable metamaterials admit a simple and analytical description of their electromagnetic bi-anisotropic response, which can be reconstructed from the properties of the 1D generating media. Our approach provides a strategy that allows the full ab-initio and flexible design of a complex bianisotropic response by using the simple and well-known properties of 1D metamaterials.

  17. 1-D ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM STEERING DEVICE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi Leung

    2011-06-05

    In this paper, we present the design and fabrication of a 1D beam steering device based on planar electro-optic thermal-plastic prisms and a collimator lens array. With the elimination of moving parts, the proposed device is able to overcome the mechanical limitations of present scanning devices, such as fatigue and low operating frequency, while maintaining a small system footprint (~0.5mm×0.5mm). From experimental data, our prototype device is able to achieve a maximum deflection angle of 5.6° for a single stage prism design and 29.2° for a cascaded three prisms stage design. The lens array shows a 4µm collimated beam diameter.

  18. Combinatorial approach to exactly solve the 1D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Swarnadeep

    2017-01-01

    The Ising model is a well known statistical model which can be solved exactly by various methods. The most familiar one is the transfer matrix method. Sometimes it can be difficult to approach the open boundary case rather than periodic boundary ones in higher dimensions. But physically it is more intuitive to study the open boundary case, as it gives a closer view of the real system. We have introduced a new method called the pairing method to determine the exact partition function for the simplest case, a 1D Ising lattice. This method simplifies the problem's complexities and reduces it to a pure combinatorial problem. The study also reveals that it is possible to apply this pairing method in the case of a 2D square lattice. The obtained results agree perfectly with the values in the literature and this new approach provides an algorithmic insight to deal with such problems.

  19. 1-D ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM STEERING DEVICE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi Leung

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and fabrication of a 1D beam steering device based on planar electro-optic thermal-plastic prisms and a collimator lens array. With the elimination of moving parts, the proposed device is able to overcome the mechanical limitations of present scanning devices, such as fatigue and low operating frequency, while maintaining a small system footprint (~0.5mm×0.5mm). From experimental data, our prototype device is able to achieve a maximum deflection angle of 5.6° for a single stage prism design and 29.2° for a cascaded three prisms stage design. The lens array shows a 4µm collimated beam diameter. PMID:22199458

  20. RELIABLE COMPUTATION OF HOMOGENEOUS AZEOTROPES. (R824731)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    It is important to determine the existence and composition of homogeneous azeotropes in the analysis of phase behavior and in the synthesis and design of separation systems, from both theoretical and practical standpoints. A new method for reliably locating an...

  1. Lanczos diagonalizations of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, E.Y.; Campbell, D.K.; Gammel, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    In studies of interacting electrons in reduced dimensions'' one is trapped between the Scylla of exponential growth of the number of states in any exact many-body basis and the Charybdis of the failure of mean-field theories to capture adequately the effects of interactions. In the present article we focus on one technique -- the Lanczos method -- which, at least in the case of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, appears to allow us to sail the narrow channel between these two hazards. In contrast to Quantum Monte Carlo methods, which circumvent the exponential growth of states by statistical techniques and importance sampling, the Lanczos approach attacks this problem head-on by diagonalizing the full Hamiltonian. Given the restrictions of present computers, this approach is thus limited to studying finite clusters of roughly 12--14 sites. Fortunately, in one dimension, such clusters are usually sufficient for extracting many of the properties of the infinite system provided that one makes full use of the ability to vary the boundary conditions. In this article we shall apply the Lanczos methodology and novel phase randomization'' techniques to study the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, with particular emphasis on the optical absorption properties, including the spectrum of absorptions as a function of photon energy. Despite the discreteness of the eigenstates in our finite clusters, we are able to obtain optical spectra that, in cases where independent tests can be made, agree well with the known exact results for the infinite system. Thus we feel that this combination of techniques represents an important and viable means of studying many interesting novel materials involving strongly correlated electrons. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Space Charge for a 1-D Bunch on an Arbitrary Planar Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, R.L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-08

    Realistic modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and the space charge force in single-pass systems and rings usually requires at least a two-dimensional (2-D) description of the charge/current density of the bunch. Since that leads to costly computations, one often resorts to a 1-D model of the bunch for first explorations. This paper provides several improvements to previous 1-D theories, eliminating unnecessary approximations and physical restrictions.

  3. A 1-D evolutionary model for icy satellites, applied to Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Uri; Prialnik, Dina

    2016-04-01

    We develop a long-term 1-D evolution model for icy satellites that couples multiple processes: water migration and differentiation, geochemical reactions and silicate phase transitions, compaction by self-gravity, and ablation. The model further considers the following energy sources and sinks: tidal heating, radiogenic heating, geochemical energy released by serpentinization or absorbed by mineral dehydration, gravitational energy and insolation, and heat transport by conduction, convection, and advection. We apply the model to Enceladus, by guessing the initial conditions that would render a structure compatible with present-day observations, assuming the initial structure to have been homogeneous. Assuming the satellite has been losing water continually along its evolution, we postulate that it was formed as a more massive, more icy and more porous satellite, and gradually transformed into its present day state due to sustained long-term tidal heating. We consider several initial compositions and evolution scenarios and follow the evolution for the age of the Solar System, testing the present day model results against the available observational constraints. Our model shows the present configuration to be differentiated into a pure icy mantle, several tens of km thick, overlying a rocky core, composed of dehydrated rock at the center and hydrated rock in the outer part. For Enceladus, it predicts a higher rock/ice mass ratio than previously assumed and a thinner ice mantle, compatible with recent estimates based on gravity field measurements. Although, obviously, the model cannot be used to explain local phenomena, it sheds light on the internal structure invoked in explanations of localized features and activities.

  4. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  5. Circadian system functionality, hippocampal oxidative stress, and spatial memory in the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic model of Alzheimer disease: effects of melatonin or ramelteon.

    PubMed

    Baño Otalora, Beatriz; Popovic, Natalija; Gambini, Juan; Popovic, Miroljub; Viña, José; Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Reiter, Russel J; Camello, Pedro Javier; Rol, Maria Ángeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily causes β-amyloid accumulation in the brain, resulting in cognitive and behavioral deficits. AD patients, however, also suffer from severe circadian rhythm disruptions, and the underlying causes are still not fully known. Patients with AD show reduced systemic melatonin levels. This may contribute to their symptoms, since melatonin is an effective chronobiotic and antioxidant with neuroprotective properties. Here, the authors critically assessed the effects of long-term melatonin treatment on circadian system function, hippocampal oxidative stress, and spatial memory performance in the APPswe/PS1 double transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. To test if melatonin MT1/MT2 receptor activation, alone, was involved, the authors chronically treated some mice with the selective MT1/MT2 receptor agonist ramelteon. The results indicate that many of the circadian and behavioral parameters measured, including oxidative stress markers, were not significantly affected in these AD mice. During the day, though, Tg controls (Tg-CON) showed significantly higher mean activity and body temperature (BT) than wild-type (WT) mice. Overall, BT rhythm amplitude was significantly lower in Tg than in WT mice. Although melatonin treatment had no effect, ramelteon significantly reduced the amplitude of the BT rhythm in Tg mice. Towards the end of the experiment, Tg mice treated with ramelteon (Tg-RAM) showed significantly higher circadian rhythm fragmentation than Tg-CON and reduced circadian BT rhythm strength. The free-running period (τ) for the BT and locomotor activity (LA) rhythms of Tg-CON was <24 h. Whereas melatonin maintained τ at 24 h for BT and LA in both genotypes, ramelteon treatment had no effect. In the behavioral tests, the number of approaches and time spent exploring novel objects were significantly higher in Tg-CON than WT controls. Brain tissue analysis revealed significant reduction in hippocampal protein

  6. Data Management Systems (DMS): Complex data types study. Volume 1: Appendices A-B. Volume 2: Appendices C1-C5. Volume 3: Appendices D1-D3 and E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibfried, T. F., Jr.; Davari, Sadegh; Natarajan, Swami; Zhao, Wei

    1992-01-01

    Two categories were chosen for study: the issue of using a preprocessor on Ada code of Application Programs which would interface with the Run-Time Object Data Base Standard Services (RODB STSV), the intent was to catch and correct any mis-registration errors of the program coder between the user declared Objects, their types, their addresses, and the corresponding RODB definitions; and RODB STSV Performance Issues and Identification of Problems with the planned methods for accessing Primitive Object Attributes, this included the study of an alternate storage scheme to the 'store objects by attribute' scheme in the current design of the RODB. The study resulted in essentially three separate documents, an interpretation of the system requirements, an assessment of the preliminary design, and a detailing of the components of a detailed design.

  7. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  8. Homogeneous Quantum Electrodynamic Turbulence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    classical Noether invariants of the system. Then the numerical method will be described, and numerical results will be presented. 2 In addition to...is also achieved by scattering particles whose ’interaction time’ is at least 10-21 seconds, i.e., ’resonant’ particles. 3. Noether Invariants The...well, fluctuating no more than 0.04 % during the run. 10 Thus, the Noether invariants of nomalization (i. e., total charge, probability, or particle

  9. Co-localization of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel alpha 1D subunit (Ca(v)1.3) and calbindin (CB) in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie Hua; Yang, Zhen Bang; Wang, Hui; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2014-02-21

    Previous study has shown that the co-localization of calbindin (CB) with L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) alpha 1C subunit (Ca(v)1.2) in the rat insulinoma 1046-38 (RIN) beta cells may play an important regulatory role in Ca(2+) influx and exocytosis of insulin granules. In the present study, L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) and calbindin (CB) were demonstrated in different regions of the mouse central nervous system (CNS). Double labeling immunofluorescence staining showed a co-localization of Ca(v)1.3 and CB. The co-localization of Ca(v)1.3 and CB in certain brain regions such as the hippocampus suggests their important roles in neuroplasticity. The relative high percentages of co-localization of Ca(v)1.3 with CB in the laminae II of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord indicate that the regulation mechanism of nociceptive transmission may be related with both VDCC and Ca(2+) binding protein.

  10. Engineered Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of a "Treelike" 1D/1D TiO2 Nanotube-CdSe Nanowire Heterostructure: Photoelectrochemical Conversion of Broad Spectrum of Solar Energy.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bratindranath; Sarker, Swagotom; Crone, Eric; Pathak, Pawan; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan R

    2016-12-07

    This work presents a hitherto unreported approach to assemble a 1D oxide-1D chalcogenide heterostructured photoactive film. As a representative system, bismuth (Bi) catalyzed 1D CdSe nanowires are directly grown on anodized 1D TiO2 nanotube (T_NT). A combination of the reductive successive-ionic-layer-adsorption-reaction (R-SILAR) and the solution-liquid-solid (S-L-S) approach is implemented to fabricate this heterostructured assembly, reported in this 1D/1D form for the first time. XRD, SEM, HRTEM, and elemental mapping are performed to systematically characterize the deposition of bismuth on T_NT and the growth of CdSe nanowires leading to the evolution of the 1D/1D heterostructure. The resulting "treelike" photoactive architecture demonstrates UV-visible light-driven electron-hole pair generation. The photoelectrochemical results highlight: (i) the formation of a stable n-n heterojunction between TiO2 nanotube and CdSe nanowire, (ii) an excellent correlation between the absorbance vis-à-vis light conversion efficiency (IPCE), and (iii) a photocurrent density of 3.84 mA/cm(2). This proof-of-concept features the viability of the approach for designing such complex 1D/1D oxide-chalcogenide heterostructures that can be of interest to photovoltaics, photocatalysis, environmental remediation, and sensing.

  11. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  12. Locally homogeneous pp-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globke, Wolfgang; Leistner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We show that every n-dimensional locally homogeneous pp-wave is a plane wave, provided it is indecomposable and its curvature operator, when acting on 2-forms, has rank greater than one. As a consequence we obtain that indecomposable, Ricci-flat locally homogeneous pp-waves are plane waves. This generalises a classical result by Jordan, Ehlers and Kundt in dimension 4. Several examples show that our assumptions on indecomposability and the rank of the curvature are essential.

  13. Operator estimates in homogenization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhikov, V. V.; Pastukhova, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    This paper gives a systematic treatment of two methods for obtaining operator estimates: the shift method and the spectral method. Though substantially different in mathematical technique and physical motivation, these methods produce basically the same results. Besides the classical formulation of the homogenization problem, other formulations of the problem are also considered: homogenization in perforated domains, the case of an unbounded diffusion matrix, non-self-adjoint evolution equations, and higher-order elliptic operators. Bibliography: 62 titles.

  14. AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTORTECHNICAL PANEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Bajorek, S.; Bakel, A.; Flanagan, G.; Mubayi, V.; Skarda, R.; Staudenmeier, J.; Taiwo, T.; Tonoike, K.; Tripp, C.; Wei, T.; Yarsky, P.

    2010-12-03

    Considerable interest has been expressed for developing a stable U.S. production capacity for medical isotopes and particularly for molybdenum- 99 (99Mo). This is motivated by recent re-ductions in production and supply worldwide. Consistent with U.S. nonproliferation objectives, any new production capability should not use highly enriched uranium fuel or targets. Conse-quently, Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors (AHRs) are under consideration for potential 99Mo production using low-enriched uranium. Although the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has guidance to facilitate the licensing process for non-power reactors, that guidance is focused on reactors with fixed, solid fuel and hence, not applicable to an AHR. A panel was convened to study the technical issues associated with normal operation and potential transients and accidents of an AHR that might be designed for isotope production. The panel has produced the requisite AHR licensing guidance for three chapters that exist now for non-power reactor licensing: Reac-tor Description, Reactor Coolant Systems, and Accident Analysis. The guidance is in two parts for each chapter: 1) standard format and content a licensee would use and 2) the standard review plan the NRC staff would use. This guidance takes into account the unique features of an AHR such as the fuel being in solution; the fission product barriers being the vessel and attached systems; the production and release of radiolytic and fission product gases and their impact on operations and their control by a gas management system; and the movement of fuel into and out of the reactor vessel.

  15. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  16. Controlled Growth of 1D MoSe2 Nanoribbons with Spatially Modulated Edge States.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Xu, Hai; Xu, Wentao; Zhou, Pinjia; Martin, Jens; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-02-08

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) possess interesting one-dimensional (1D) properties at its edges and inversion domain boundaries, where properties markedly different from the 2D basal plane, such as 1D metallicity and charge density waves, can be observed. Although 2D TMDCs crystals are widely grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the fabrication of 1D TMDCs ribbons is challenging due to the difficulty to confine growth in only one dimension. Here we report the controlled growth of MoSe2 nanoribbons with an aspect ratio >100 by using prepatterned Se reconstructions on Au(100). Using scanning tunneling microscope and spectroscopy (STM/STS), the atomic and electronic structure of MoSe2 nanoribbons are studied. The ultranarrow ribbons show metallic behavior, while wider ribbons show a crossover from metallic to semiconducting behavior going from the edge to the center of the ribbon. The observed conductance modulations of the ultranarrow ribbons are attributed to 1D Moiré pattern. Remarkably, it shows a different periodicity compared with the 2D Moiré pattern in wider ribbons indicating that the 1D system is softened due to the high ratio of edge to basal plane bonds. Further, we demonstrated that the nanoribbons are stable against ambient conditions, which suggests that 1D TMDCs can be exploited for further applications.

  17. 1D-Var assimilation of TMI and SSM/I observations in rainy areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, E.; Lopez, P.; Bauer, P.

    2003-04-01

    The assimilation of observations related to cloud and precipitation has become a very important issue for most operational weather services including ECMWF. A 1D-Var method was developed by Marécal and Mahfouf (2000) for correcting individual profiles of the model's control variables in order to decrease the discrepancies that often exist between the simulated surface rainfall rates and corresponding retrievals obtained from TMI or SSM/I microwave measurements. Instead of performing the 1D-Var on surface rainfall rates that are derived from multi-channel microwave brightness temperatures (BTs) thanks to various algorithms, the 1D-Var calculations have been applied to the BTs directly. The multiple sensitivities of the BTs to the vertically integrated amounts of rain water and cloud water should provide a stronger constraint on the 1D-Var minimization. Another advantage of this method could result from the better knowledge of the errors on observed BTs than on derived rainfall rates. The potential of applying 1D-Var directly to TMI and SSM/I microwave brightness temperatures has been investigated in this study and its results have been compared with the 1D-Var with derived rainfall rates. Results are presented for a pacific super-typhoon and for a north-atlantic extratropical front. A comparison of the retrieved rain profiles using both methods with rain information deduced from the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) is also presented. Additional direct comparisons with the PR reflectivities will be shown by A. Benedetti (2003). Following the work by Marécal and Mahfouf (2002), indirect "1D-Var + 4D-Var" assimilation experiments will be performed. In this approach, the temperature and humidity increments provided by the 1D-Var are first converted into total column water vapour pseudo-observations that are in turn assimilated in ECMWF's 4D-Var system.

  18. 1D Cole-Cole inversion of TEM transients influenced by induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Marc; Tezkan, Bülent

    2017-03-01

    Effects of induced polarization (IP) can have an impact on time-domain electromagnetic measurements (TEM) and may lead to sign reversals in the recorded transients. To study these IP effects on TEM data, a new 1D inversion algorithm was developed for both, the central-loop and the separate-loop TEM configurations using the Cole-Cole relaxation model. 1D forward calculations for a homogeneous half-space were conducted with the aim of analyzing the impacts of the Cole-Cole parameters on TEM transients with respect to possible sign reversals. The forward modelings showed that the variation of different parameters have comparable effects on the TEM transients. This leads to an increasing number of equivalent models as a result of inversion calculations. Subsequently, 1D inversions of synthetic data were performed to study the potentials and limitations of the algorithm regarding the resolution of the Cole-Cole parameters. In order to achieve optimal inversion results, it was essential to error-weight the data points in the direct vicinity of sign reversals. The obtained findings were eventually adopted on the inversion of real field data which contained considerable IP signatures such as sign reversals. One field data set was recorded at the Nakyn kimberlite field in Western Yakutiya, Russia, in the central-loop configuration. Another field data set originates from a waste site in Cologne, Germany, and was measured utilizing the separate-loop configuration.

  19. D1/D5 dopamine receptors modulate spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C N; Köhler, Cristiano C; Radiske, Andressa; Cammarota, Martín

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effect of the intra-CA1 administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and the D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF38393 on spatial memory in the water maze. When given immediately, but not 3h after training, SCH23390 hindered long-term spatial memory formation without affecting non-spatial memory or the normal functionality of the hippocampus. On the contrary, post-training infusion of SKF38393 enhanced retention and facilitated the spontaneous recovery of the original spatial preference after reversal learning. Our findings demonstrate that hippocampal D1/D5 receptors play an essential role in spatial memory processing.

  20. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Glut1D on Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Heussinger, Nicole; Lausch, Ekkehart; Bosch, Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are the only treatment available for Glut1 deficiency (Glut1D). Here, we describe an 8-year-old girl with classical Glut1D responsive to a 3:1 ketogenic diet and ethosuximide. After 3 years on the diet a gradual increase of blood lipids was followed by rapid, severe asymptomatic hypertriglyceridemia (1,910 mg/dL). Serum lipid apheresis was required to determine liver, renal, and pancreatic function. A combination of medium chain triglyceride-oil and a reduction of the ketogenic diet to 1:1 ratio normalized triglyceride levels within days but triggered severe myoclonic seizures requiring comedication with sultiam. Severe hypertriglyceridemia in children with Glut1D on ketogenic diets may be underdiagnosed and harmful. In contrast to congenital hypertriglyceridemias, children with Glut1D may be treated effectively by dietary adjustments alone.

  1. TBC1D24 genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Simona; Milh, Mathieu; Castiglioni, Claudia; Lüthy, Kevin; Finelli, Mattea J.; Verstreken, Patrik; Cardon, Aaron; Stražišar, Barbara Gnidovec; Holder, J. Lloyd; Lesca, Gaetan; Mancardi, Maria M.; Poulat, Anne L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Banka, Siddharth; Bilo, Leonilda; Birkeland, Laura E.; Bosch, Friedrich; Brockmann, Knut; Cross, J. Helen; Doummar, Diane; Félix, Temis M.; Giuliano, Fabienne; Hori, Mutsuki; Hüning, Irina; Kayserili, Hulia; Kini, Usha; Lees, Melissa M.; Meenakshi, Girish; Mewasingh, Leena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Peluso, Silvio; Mey, Antje; Rice, Gregory M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Troester, Matthew M.; Stanley, Christine M.; Ville, Dorothee; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Falace, Antonio; Fassio, Anna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Biskup, Saskia; Tardif, Jessica; Ajeawung, Norbert F.; Tolun, Aslihan; Corbett, Mark; Gecz, Jozef; Afawi, Zaid; Howell, Katherine B.; Oliver, Karen L.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; de Falco, Fabrizio A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in TBC1D24. Methods: We acquired new clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 11 previously unreported and 37 published patients. TBC1D24 mutations, identified through various sequencing methods, can be found online (http://lovd.nl/TBC1D24). Results: Forty-eight patients were included (28 men, 20 women, average age 21 years) from 30 independent families. Eighteen patients (38%) had myoclonic epilepsies. The other patients carried diagnoses of focal (25%), multifocal (2%), generalized (4%), and unclassified epilepsy (6%), and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (25%). Most patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. We detail EEG, neuroimaging, developmental, and cognitive features, treatment responsiveness, and physical examination. In silico evaluation revealed 7 different highly conserved motifs, with the most common pathogenic mutation located in the first. Neuronal outgrowth assays showed that some TBC1D24 mutations, associated with the most severe TBC1D24-associated disorders, are not necessarily the most disruptive to this gene function. Conclusions: TBC1D24-related epilepsy syndromes show marked phenotypic pleiotropy, with multisystem involvement and severity spectrum ranging from isolated deafness (not studied here), benign myoclonic epilepsy restricted to childhood with complete seizure control and normal intellect, to early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe developmental delay and early death. There is no distinct correlation with mutation type or location yet, but patterns are emerging. Given the phenotypic breadth observed, TBC1D24 mutation screening is indicated in a wide variety of epilepsies. A TBC1D24 consortium was formed to develop further research on this gene and its associated phenotypes. PMID:27281533

  2. On the origin of multi-step spin transition behaviour in 1D nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiruta, Daniel; Jureschi, Catalin-Maricel; Linares, Jorge; Dahoo, Pierre Richard; Garcia, Yann; Rotaru, Aurelian

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the spin state switching mechanism in spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles, a special attention is given to three-step thermally induced SCO behavior in 1D chains. An additional term is included in the standard Ising-like Hamiltonian to account for the border interaction between SCO molecules and its local environment. It is shown that this additional interaction, together with the short range interaction, drives the multi-steps thermal hysteretic behavior in 1D SCO systems. The relation between a polymeric matrix and this particular multi-step SCO phenomenon is discussed accordingly. Finally, the environmental influence on the SCO system's size is analyzed as well.

  3. Don't homogenize, synchronize.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, M

    2001-01-01

    To be more responsive to customers, companies often break down organizational walls between their units--setting up all manner of cross-business and cross-functional task forces and working groups and promoting a "one-company" culture. But such attempts can backfire terribly by distracting business and functional units and by contaminating their strategies and processes. Fortunately, there's a better way, says the author. Rather than tear down organizational walls, a company can make them permeable to information. It can synchronize all its data on products, filtering the information through linked databases and applications and delivering it in a coordinated, meaningful form to customers. As a result, the organization can present a single, unified face to the customer--one that can change as market conditions warrant--without imposing homogeneity on its people. Such synchronization can lead not just to stronger customer relationships and more sales but also to greater operational efficiency. It allows a company, for example, to avoid the high costs of maintaining many different information systems with redundant data. The decoupling of product control from customer control in a synchronized company reflects a fundamental fact about business: While companies have to focus on creating great products, customers think in terms of the activities they perform and the benefits they seek. For companies, products are ends, but for customers, products are means. The disconnect between how customers think and how companies organize themselves is what leads to inefficiencies and missed opportunities, and that's exactly the problem that synchronization solves. Synchronized companies can get closer to customers, sustain product innovation, and improve operational efficiency--goals that have traditionally been very difficult to achieve simultaneously.

  4. Dynamics of compact homogeneous universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, M.; Koike, T.; Hosoya, A.

    1997-01-01

    A complete description of dynamics of compact locally homogeneous universes is given, which, in particular, includes explicit calculations of Teichm{umlt u}ller deformations and careful counting of dynamical degrees of freedom. We regard each of the universes as a simply connected four-dimensional space{endash}time with identifications by the action of a discrete subgroup of the isometry group. We then reduce the identifications defined by the space{endash}time isometries to ones in a homogeneous section, and find a condition that such spatial identifications must satisfy. This is essential for explicit construction of compact homogeneous universes. Some examples are demonstrated for Bianchi II, VI{sub 0}, VII{sub 0}, and I universal covers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Rab28 is a TBC1D1/TBC1D4 substrate involved in GLUT4 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhou; Menzel, Franziska; Benninghoff, Tim; Chadt, Alexandra; Du, Chen; Holman, Geoffrey D; Al-Hasani, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The Rab-GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 play important roles in the insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane in muscle cells and adipocytes. We identified Rab28 as a substrate for the GAP domains of both TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in vitro. Rab28 is expressed in adipose cells and skeletal muscle, and its GTP-binding state is acutely regulated by insulin. We found that in intact isolated mouse skeletal muscle, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rab28 decreases basal glucose uptake. Conversely, in primary rat adipose cells, overexpression of Rab28-Q72L, a constitutively active mutant, increases basal cell surface levels of an epitope-tagged HA-GLUT4. Our results indicate that Rab28 is a novel GTPase involved in the intracellular retention of GLUT4 in insulin target cells.

  6. Recent developments in testing techniques for elastic mechanical properties of 1-D nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Li, Shuai; Zhang, Hongti; Lu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials exhibit great potentials in their applications to functional materials, nano-devices and systems owing to their excellent properties. In the past decade, considerable studies have been done, with new patents being developed, on these 1-D building blocks for for their mechanical properties, especially elastic properties, which provide a solid foundation for the design of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and predictions of reliability and longevity for their devices. This paper reviews some of the recent investigations on techniques as well as patents available for the quantitative characterization of the elastic behaviors of various 1-D nanomaterials, with particular focus on on-chip testing system. The review begins with an overview of major testing methods for 1-D nanostructures' elastic properties, including nanoindentation testing, AFM (atomic force microscopy) testing, in situ SEM (scanning electron microscopy) testing, in situ TEM (transmission electron microscopy) testing and the testing system on the basis of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology, followed by advantages and challenges of each testing approach. This review also focuses on the MEMS-based testing apparatus, which can be actuated and measured inside SEM and TEM with ease, allowing users to highly magnify the continuous images of the specimen while measuring load electronically and independently. The combination of on-chip technologies and the in situ electron microscopy is expected to be a potential testing technique for nanomechanics. Finally, details are presented on the key challenges and possible solutions in the implementation of the testing techniques referred above.

  7. Ion-sensing properties of 1D vanadium pentoxide nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The application of one-dimensional (1D) V2O5·nH2O nanostructures as pH sensing material was evaluated. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were obtained by a hydrothermal method with systematic control of morphology forming different nanostructures: nanoribbons, nanowires and nanorods. Deposited onto Au-covered substrates, 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were employed as gate material in pH sensors based on separative extended gate FET as an alternative to provide FET isolation from the chemical environment. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures showed pH sensitivity around the expected theoretical value. Due to high pH sensing properties, flexibility and low cost, further applications of 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures comprise enzyme FET-based biosensors using immobilized enzymes. PMID:22709724

  8. HOMOGENEOUS CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Homogeneous Catalytic Oxidations of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems

    Michael A. Gonzalez* and Thomas M. Becker, Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, ...

  9. Entangling strings of neutral atoms in 1D atomic pipeline structures.

    PubMed

    Dorner, U; Fedichev, P; Jaksch, D; Lewenstein, M; Zoller, P

    2003-08-15

    We study a string of neutral atoms with nearest neighbor interaction in a 1D beam splitter configuration, where the longitudinal motion is controlled by a moving optical lattice potential. The dynamics of the atoms crossing the beam splitter maps to a 1D spin model with controllable time dependent parameters, which allows the creation of maximally entangled states of atoms by crossing a quantum phase transition. Furthermore, we show that this system realizes protected quantum memory, and we discuss the implementation of one- and two-qubit gates in this setup.

  10. Localized self-heating in large arrays of 1D nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Monereo, O; Illera, S; Varea, A; Schmidt, M; Sauerwald, T; Schütze, A; Cirera, A; Prades, J D

    2016-03-07

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal efficiency was attributed to the small dimensions of the objects). Infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy were used to map the temperature profiles of films based on random arrangements of carbon nanofibers during self-heating. Both the techniques demonstrate consistently that heating concentrates in small regions, the here-called "hot-spots". On correlating dynamic temperature mapping with electrical measurements, we also observed that these minute hot-spots rule the resistance values observed macroscopically. A physical model of a random network of 1D resistors helped us to explain this observation. The model shows that, for a given random arrangement of 1D nanowires, current spreading through the network ends up defining a set of spots that dominate both the electrical resistance and power dissipation. Such highly localized heating explains the high power savings observed in larger nanostructured systems. This understanding opens a path to design highly efficient self-heating systems, based on random or pseudo-random distributions of 1D nanostructures.

  11. Pitch-based pattern splitting for 1D layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ryo; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Smayling, Michael C.; Axelrad, Valery

    2015-07-01

    The pattern splitting algorithm for 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) for sub-10 nm node logic devices is shown. It is performed with integer linear programming (ILP) based on the conflict graph created from a grid map for each designated pitch. The relation between the number of times for patterning and the minimum pitch is shown systematically with a sample pattern of contact layer for each node. From the result, the number of times for patterning for 1D layout is fewer than that for conventional 2D layout. Moreover, an experimental result including SMO and total integrated process with hole repair technique is presented with the sample pattern of contact layer whose pattern density is relatively high among critical layers (fin, gate, local interconnect, contact, and metal).

  12. Flexible Photodetectors Based on 1D Inorganic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Flexible photodetectors with excellent flexibility, high mechanical stability and good detectivity, have attracted great research interest in recent years. 1D inorganic nanostructures provide a number of opportunities and capabilities for use in flexible photodetectors as they have unique geometry, good transparency, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and excellent electronic/optoelectronic properties. This article offers a comprehensive review of several types of flexible photodetectors based on 1D nanostructures from the past ten years, including flexible ultraviolet, visible, and infrared photodetectors. High‐performance organic‐inorganic hybrid photodetectors, as well as devices with 1D nanowire (NW) arrays, are also reviewed. Finally, new concepts of flexible photodetectors including piezophototronic, stretchable and self‐powered photodetectors are examined to showcase the future research in this exciting field. PMID:27774404

  13. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. A comparison of 1D and 2D LSTM architectures for the recognition of handwritten Arabic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Mohammad Reza; Soheili, Mohammad Reza; Breuel, Thomas M.; Stricker, Didier

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Arabic handwriting recognition method based on recurrent neural network. We use the Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) architecture, that have proven successful in different printed and handwritten OCR tasks. Applications of LSTM for handwriting recognition employ the two-dimensional architecture to deal with the variations in both vertical and horizontal axis. However, we show that using a simple pre-processing step that normalizes the position and baseline of letters, we can make use of 1D LSTM, which is faster in learning and convergence, and yet achieve superior performance. In a series of experiments on IFN/ENIT database for Arabic handwriting recognition, we demonstrate that our proposed pipeline can outperform 2D LSTM networks. Furthermore, we provide comparisons with 1D LSTM networks trained with manually crafted features to show that the automatically learned features in a globally trained 1D LSTM network with our normalization step can even outperform such systems.

  15. Collective mode damping and viscosity in a 1D unitary Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punk, M.; Zwerger, W.

    2006-08-01

    We calculate the damping of the Bogoliubov Anderson mode in a one-dimensional (1D) two-component attractive Fermi gas for arbitrary coupling strength within a quantum hydrodynamic approach. Using the Bethe-ansatz solution of the 1D BCS-BEC crossover problem, we derive analytic results for the viscosity covering the full range from a Luther Emery liquid of weakly bound pairs to a Lieb Liniger gas of strongly bound bosonic dimers. At the unitarity point, the system is a Tonks Girardeau gas with a universal constant αζ = 0.38 in the viscosity ζ = αζplanck n for T = 0. For the trapped case, we calculate the Q-factor of the breathing mode and show that the damping provides a sensitive measure of temperature in 1D Fermi gases.

  16. Spatio-temporal stability of 1D Kerr cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelens, L.; Parra-Rivas, P.; Leo, F.; Gomila, D.; Matias, Manuel A.; Coen, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Lugiato-Lefever equation (LLE) has been extensively studied since its derivation in 1987, when this meanfield model was introduced to describe nonlinear optical cavities. The LLE was originally derived to describe a ring cavity or a Fabry-Perot resonator with a transverse spatial extension and partially filled with a nonlinear medium but it has also been shown to be applicable to other types of cavities, such as fiber resonators and microresonators. Depending on the parameters used, the LLE can present a monostable or bistable input-output response curve. A large number of theoretical studies have been done in the monostable regime, but the bistable regime has remained widely unexplored. One of the reasons for this was that previous experimental setups were not able to works in such regimes of the parameter space. Nowadays the possibility of reaching such parameter regimes experimentally has renewed the interest in the LLE. In this contribution, we present an in-depth theoretical study of the different dynamical regimes that can appear in parameter space, focusing on the dynamics of localized solutions, also known as cavity solitons (CSs). We show that time-periodic oscillations of a 1D CS appear naturally in a broad region of parameter space. More than this oscillatory regime, which has been recently demonstrated experimentally,1 we theoretically report on several kinds of chaotic dynamics. We show that the existence of CSs and their dynamics is related with the spatial dynamics of the system and with the presence of a codimension-2 point known as a Fold-Hopf bifurcation point. These dynamical regimes can become accessible by using devices such as microresonators, for instance widely used for creating optical frequency combs.

  17. The approach to steady state using homogeneous and Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Gochberg, D F; Ding, Z

    2013-01-01

    Repeating an arbitrary sequence of RF pulses and magnetic field gradients will eventually lead to a steady-state condition in any magnetic resonance system. While numerical methods can quantify this trajectory, analytic analysis provides significantly more insight and a means for faster calculation. Recently, an analytic analysis using homogeneous coordinates was published. The current work further develops this line of thought and compares the relative merits of using a homogeneous or a Cartesian coordinate system.

  18. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  19. Long distance transport of ultracold atoms using a 1D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stefan; Thalhammer, Gregor; Winkler, Klaus; Lang, Florian; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2006-08-01

    We study the horizontal transport of ultracold atoms over macroscopic distances of up to 20 cm with a moving 1D optical lattice. By using an optical Bessel beam to form the optical lattice, we can achieve nearly homogeneous trapping conditions over the full transport length, which is crucial in order to hold the atoms against gravity for such a wide range. Fast transport velocities of up to 6 m s-1 (corresponding to about 1100 photon recoils) and accelerations of up to 2600 m s-2 are reached. Even at high velocities the momentum of the atoms is precisely defined with an uncertainty of less than one photon recoil. This allows for construction of an atom catapult with high kinetic energy resolution, which might have applications in novel collision experiments.

  20. The trapping system for the recirculated gases at different locations of the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) pipe of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piperel, A.; Montagne, X.; Dagaut, P.

    2008-10-01

    Nowadays, in diesel engines, it is typical to recycle exhaust gases (EGR) in order to decrease pollutant emissions. However, few studies report the precisely measured composition of the recycled gases. Indeed, in order to know precisely the composition of the EGR gases, they have to be sampled hot and not diluted, in contrast to the usual practice. Thus, a new system to collect such samples was developed. With this new trapping system, it is possible to measure the concentrations of NOx, CO, CO2, O2, hydrocarbons (HCs) in the range C1-C9, aldehydes, ketones and PAHs. The trapping system and the analytical protocol used are described in this paper.

  1. Homogeneous Pt-bimetallic Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao; Chi, Miaofang; More, Karren Leslie; Markovic, Nenad; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2011-01-01

    Alloying has shown enormous potential for tailoring the atomic and electronic structures, and improving the performance of catalytic materials. Systematic studies of alloy catalysts are, however, often compromised by inhomogeneous distribution of alloying components. Here we introduce a general approach for the synthesis of monodispersed and highly homogeneous Pt-bimetallic alloy nanocatalysts. Pt{sub 3}M (where M = Fe, Ni, or Co) nanoparticles were prepared by an organic solvothermal method and then supported on high surface area carbon. These catalysts attained a homogeneous distribution of elements, as demonstrated by atomic-scale elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy. They also exhibited high catalytic activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), with improvement factors of 2-3 versus conventional Pt/carbon catalysts. The measured ORR catalytic activities for Pt{sub 3}M nanocatalysts validated the volcano curve established on extended surfaces, with Pt{sub 3}Co being the most active alloy.

  2. Characterization of the Interaction of Staphylococcal Entertoxin B with CD1d Expressed in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-04

    typical antigen recognition process that recruits the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. The immunological importance of CD1d is...underscored by its influences on the performances of natural killer T-cells and thereby mediates the innate and adaptive immune systems. Results...release of many cytokines, and thereby systematically in- fluences the hosts’ adaptive and innate immune systems [35,36]. The involvement of CD1d in

  3. Ring-diffusion mediated homogeneous melting in the superheating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Li, Mo

    2008-04-01

    Homogeneous melting in the superheating regime is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation of a Lennard-Jones model system. We show that the commonly observed catastrophic melting at the superheating limit is caused by fast heating rate. By keeping the system isothermally at temperatures below the superheating limit, we observe intense self-diffusion motions as the precursor of melting. The highly correlated atomic motions are related to the self-diffusion loops or rings. Two types of loops are observed, closed loop and open loop, where the latter is directly related to the homogeneous nucleation of the liquid phase. Homogeneous melting occurs when the number density of diffusion loops reaches a critical value. Our results suggest that homogeneous melting in the superheating regime is a first-order thermodynamic phase transition triggered by the self-diffusion loops when the kinetic constraint imposed by heating rate is lessened.

  4. Estimation of asymptotic stability regions via composite homogeneous polynomial Lyapunov functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Guochen; Zhang, Kanjian

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a new method to estimate the asymptotic stability regions for a class of nonlinear systems via composite homogeneous polynomial Lyapunov functions, where these nonlinear systems are approximated as a convex hull of some linear systems. Since level set of the composite homogeneous polynomial Lyapunov functions is a union set of several homogeneous polynomial functions, the composite homogeneous polynomial Lyapunov functions are nonconservative compared with quadratic or homogeneous polynomial Lyapunov functions. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness of our method.

  5. Pattern and process of biotic homogenization in the New Pangaea.

    PubMed

    Baiser, Benjamin; Olden, Julian D; Record, Sydne; Lockwood, Julie L; McKinney, Michael L

    2012-12-07

    Human activities have reorganized the earth's biota resulting in spatially disparate locales becoming more or less similar in species composition over time through the processes of biotic homogenization and biotic differentiation, respectively. Despite mounting evidence suggesting that this process may be widespread in both aquatic and terrestrial systems, past studies have predominantly focused on single taxonomic groups at a single spatial scale. Furthermore, change in pairwise similarity is itself dependent on two distinct processes, spatial turnover in species composition and changes in gradients of species richness. Most past research has failed to disentangle the effect of these two mechanisms on homogenization patterns. Here, we use recent statistical advances and collate a global database of homogenization studies (20 studies, 50 datasets) to provide the first global investigation of the homogenization process across major faunal and floral groups and elucidate the relative role of changes in species richness and turnover. We found evidence of homogenization (change in similarity ranging from -0.02 to 0.09) across nearly all taxonomic groups, spatial extent and grain sizes. Partitioning of change in pairwise similarity shows that overall change in community similarity is driven by changes in species richness. Our results show that biotic homogenization is truly a global phenomenon and put into question many of the ecological mechanisms invoked in previous studies to explain patterns of homogenization.

  6. Comparison of 1D stagnation solutions to 3D wire-array Z pinch simulations in absence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Velikovich, Alexander; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    In the idealized picture of a Z pinch, a cylindrically symmetric plasma shell implodes towards axis. In this 1D (radial) picture, the resulting stagnation is very efficient: all the kinetic energy of the shell converts to internal energy, as for instance in the Noh shock solution or the homogeneous stagnation flow. If we generalize the problem to 2D by deforming the shell from perfectly circular to oblate, the resulting stagnation will not be as efficient. As in the Hiemenz flow, in which a jet of fluid strikes a rigid flat boundary and squirts out to the sides, the more complicated flows allowed in 2D allow flow kinetic energy to redirect rather than stagnate. With this picture in mind, we might expect the stagnation of a wire-array Z pinch, which in actuality forms a highly distorted 3D imploding plasma, to dissipate its kinetic energy inefficiently due to the lack of symmetry, and be indescribable by means of the idealized 1D stagnation solutions. On the other hand, one might expect that if the imploding plasma is sufficiently messy, the non-uniformities might ``wash out,'' allowing a quasi-1D description of the averaged quantities of plasma. In this work we explore this idea, comparing predictions of 1D stagnation solutions with 3D simulation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC0 4-94AL85000.

  7. Morphodynamics and sediment tracers in 1-D (MAST-1D): 1-D sediment transport that includes exchange with an off-channel sediment reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. Wesley; Viparelli, Enrica; Piégay, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Bed material transported in geomorphically active gravel bed rivers often has a local source at nearby eroding banks and ends up sequestered in bars not far downstream. However, most 1-D numerical models for gravel transport assume that gravel originates from and deposits on the channel bed. In this paper, we present a 1-D framework for simulating morphodynamic evolution of bed elevation and size distribution in a gravel-bed river that actively exchanges sediment with its floodplain, which is represented as an off-channel sediment reservoir. The model is based on the idea that sediment enters the channel at eroding banks whose elevation depends on total floodplain sediment storage and on the average elevation of the floodplain relative to the channel bed. Lateral erosion of these banks occurs at a specified rate that can represent either net channel migration or channel widening. Transfer of material out of the channel depends on a typical bar thickness and a specified lateral exchange rate due either to net channel migration or narrowing. The model is implemented using an object oriented framework that allows users to explore relationships between bank supply, bed structure, and lateral change rates. It is applied to a ∼50-km reach of the Ain River, France, that experienced significant reduction in sediment supply due to dam construction during the 20th century. Results are strongly sensitive to lateral exchange rates, showing that in this reach, the supply of sand and gravel at eroding banks and the sequestration of gravel in point bars can have strong influence on overall reach-scale sediment budgets.

  8. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  9. Ultrahigh-Q nanocavity with 1D photonic gap.

    PubMed

    Notomi, M; Kuramochi, E; Taniyama, H

    2008-07-21

    Recently, various wavelength-sized cavities with theoretical Q values of approximately 10(8) have been reported, however, they all employ 2D or 3D photonic band gaps to realize strong light confinement. Here we numerically demonstrate that ultrahigh-Q (2.0x10(8)) and wavelength-sized (V(eff) approximately 1.4(lambda/n)3) cavities can be achieved by employing only 1D periodicity.

  10. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  11. Emergent 1d Ising Behavior in AN Elementary Cellular Automaton Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassebaum, Paul G.; Iannacchione, Germano S.

    The fundamental nature of an evolving one-dimensional (1D) Ising model is investigated with an elementary cellular automaton (CA) simulation. The emergent CA simulation employs an ensemble of cells in one spatial dimension, each cell capable of two microstates interacting with simple nearest-neighbor rules and incorporating an external field. The behavior of the CA model provides insight into the dynamics of coupled two-state systems not expressible by exact analytical solutions. For instance, state progression graphs show the causal dynamics of a system through time in relation to the system's entropy. Unique graphical analysis techniques are introduced through difference patterns, diffusion patterns, and state progression graphs of the 1D ensemble visualizing the evolution. All analyses are consistent with the known behavior of the 1D Ising system. The CA simulation and new pattern recognition techniques are scalable (in both dimension, complexity, and size) and have many potential applications such as complex design of materials, control of agent systems, and evolutionary mechanism design.

  12. Examining Prebiotic Chemistry Using O(^1D) Insertion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Brian M.; Laas, Jacob C.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus

    2013-06-01

    Aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol are all prebiotic molecules expected to form via photo-driven grain surface chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM). These molecules are expected to be precursors for larger, biologically-relevant molecules in the ISM such as sugars and amino acids. These three molecules have not yet been detected in the ISM because of the lack of available rotational spectra. A high resolution (sub)millimeter spectrometer coupled to a molecular source is being used to study these molecules using O(^1D) insertion reactions. The O(^1D) chemistry is initiated using an excimer laser, and the products of the insertion reactions are adiabatically cooled using a supersonic expansion. Experimental parameters are being optimized by examination of methanol formed from O(^1D) insertion into methane. Theoretical studies of the structure and reaction energies for aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol have been conducted to guide the laboratory studies once the methanol experiment has been optimized. The results of the calculations and initial experimental results will be presented.

  13. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of 1D TiO2 nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Julieta; Alarcón, Hugo; López, Alcides; Candal, Roberto; Acosta, Dwight; Rodriguez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Nanowire/nanorod TiO(2) structures of approximately 8 nm in diameter and around 1,000 nm long were synthesized by alkaline hydrothermal treatment of two different TiO(2) nanopowders. The first precursor was TiO(2) obtained by the sol-gel process (SG-TiO(2)); the second was the well-known commercial TiO(2) P-25 (P25-TiO(2)). Anatase-like 1D TiO(2) nanostructures were obtained in both cases. The one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures synthesized from SG-TiO(2) powders turned into rod-like nanostructures after annealing at 400 °C for 2 h. Conversely, the nanostructures synthesized from P25-TiO(2) preserved the tubular structure after annealing, displaying a higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area than the first system (279 and 97 m²/g, respectively). Despite the higher surface area shown by the 1D nanostructures, in both cases the photocatalytic activity was lower than for the P25-TiO(2) powder. However, the rod-like nanostructures obtained from SG-TiO(2) displayed slightly higher efficiency than the sol-gel prepared powders. The lower photocatalytic activity of the nanostructures with respect to P-25 can be associated with the lower crystallinity of 1D TiO(2) in both materials.

  15. 7 CFR 58.623 - Homogenizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE....623 Homogenizer. Homogenizer shall comply with 3-A Sanitary Standards....

  16. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric; Jackson, Matthew G.; Barrat, Jean-Alix E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  17. Emergence of Leadership within a Homogeneous Group

    PubMed Central

    Eskridge, Brent E.; Valle, Elizabeth; Schlupp, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Large scale coordination without dominant, consistent leadership is frequent in nature. How individuals emerge from within the group as leaders, however transitory this position may be, has become an increasingly common question asked. This question is further complicated by the fact that in many of these aggregations, differences between individuals are minor and the group is largely considered to be homogeneous. In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical. Using a mathematical model developed using observations of natural systems, we show that the addition of a simple concept of leadership tendencies which is inspired by observations of natural systems and is affected by experience can produce distinct leaders and followers using a nonlinear feedback loop. Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers. Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment. PMID:26226381

  18. HYPERLEDA. II. The homogenized HI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturel, G.; Theureau, G.; Bottinelli, L.; Gouguenheim, L.; Coudreau-Durand, N.; Hallet, N.; Petit, C.

    2003-12-01

    After a compilation of HI data from 611 references and new observations made in Nançay, we produce a catalog of homogenized HI data for 16781 galaxies. The homogenization is made using the EPIDEMIC method from which all data are progressively converted into the adopted standard. The result is a catalog giving: 1) the logarithm of twice the maximum rotation velocity, log 2V_Msin i, converted to the system of Mathewson et al. (\\cite{Mathewson1996}). This quantity is given without correction for inclination; 2) the HI magnitude, m21, (area of the 21-cm line width expressed in magnitude) converted to the flux system of Theureau et al. (\\cite{Theureau1998}); 3) the HI velocity, V_HI, expressed with the optical definition (i.e., using wavelengths instead frequencies). The typical uncertainties are: 0.04 for log 2V_Msin i, 0.25 mag for m21 and 9 km s-1 for V_HI. Full Tables \\ref{epidemicw}, \\ref{epidemicw2}, \\ref{epidemicf}, \\ref{epidemicf2} and Fig. \\ref{profiles} are available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org. Full Tables \\ref{references}, \\ref{cataf}, \\ref{newdata} and \\ref{notes} are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/57

  19. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  20. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1993-06-29

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  1. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, Paul; Bernhardt, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  2. Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate via a strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis in a liquid/liquid biphasic system: homogeneous catalysis, facile heterogeneous separation, and recycling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jinlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis (TPSC) is applied to the Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in a p-xylene/PEG-200 biphasic system. Initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP) are used to establish the TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system using water-soluble TPMA as a ligand, EBPA as an initiator, CuBr2 as a catalyst, and AIBN as a reducing agent. By heating to 70 °C, unlimited miscibility of both solvents is achieved and the polymerization can be carried out under homogeneous conditions; then on cooling to 25 °C, the mixture separates into two phases again. As a result, the catalyst complex remains in the PEG-200 phase while the obtained polymers stay in the p-xylene phase. The catalyst can therefore be removed from the resultant polymers by easily separating the two different layers and can be reused again. It is important that well-defined PMMA with a controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution could be obtained using this TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system.

  3. Localized self-heating in large arrays of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monereo, O.; Illera, S.; Varea, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sauerwald, T.; Schütze, A.; Cirera, A.; Prades, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal efficiency was attributed to the small dimensions of the objects). Infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy were used to map the temperature profiles of films based on random arrangements of carbon nanofibers during self-heating. Both the techniques demonstrate consistently that heating concentrates in small regions, the here-called ``hot-spots''. On correlating dynamic temperature mapping with electrical measurements, we also observed that these minute hot-spots rule the resistance values observed macroscopically. A physical model of a random network of 1D resistors helped us to explain this observation. The model shows that, for a given random arrangement of 1D nanowires, current spreading through the network ends up defining a set of spots that dominate both the electrical resistance and power dissipation. Such highly localized heating explains the high power savings observed in larger nanostructured systems. This understanding opens a path to design highly efficient self-heating systems, based on random or pseudo-random distributions of 1D nanostructures.One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal

  4. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  5. Density matrix spectra and order parameters in the 1D extended Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wing Chi; Gu, Shi-Jian; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Without any knowledge of the symmetry existing in a system, we derive the exact forms of the order parameters which show long-range correlations in the ground state of the one-dimensional (1D) extended Hubbard model using a quantum information approach. Our work demonstrates that the quantum information approach can help us to find the explicit form of the order parameter, which could not be derived systematically via traditional methods in the condensed matter theory.

  6. A conceptual translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis: homogeneous-like heterogeneous gold nanoparticle catalyst induced by ceria supporter.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Xue, Wei; Guan, Bing-Tao; Shi, Fu-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-02-07

    Translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis is a promising solution to green and sustainable development in chemical industry. For this purpose, noble metal nanoparticles represent a new frontier in catalytic transformations. Many challenges remain for researchers to transform noble metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalytic active sites into ionic species of homogeneous catalytic active sites. We report here a successful design on translating homogeneous gold catalysis into a heterogeneous system with a clear understanding of the catalytic pathway. This study initiates a novel concept to immobilize a homogeneous catalyst based on electron transfer between supporting base and supported nanoparticles. Meanwhile, on the basis of theoretical calculation, it has deepened the understanding of the interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and the catalyst support.

  7. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  8. Low band gap frequencies and multiplexing properties in 1D and 2D mass spring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the propagation of elastic waves in 1D and 2D mass spring structures. An analytical and computation model is presented for the 1D and 2D mass spring systems with different examples. An enhancement in the band gap values was obtained by modeling the structures to obtain low frequency band gaps at small dimensions. Additionally, the evolution of the band gap as a function of mass value is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the local resonance property in frequency ranges within the gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice in the 1D and 2D mass spring system. A linear defect formed of a row of specific masses produces an elastic waveguide that transmits at the narrow pass band frequency. The frequency of the waveguides can be selected by adjusting the mass and stiffness coefficients of the materials constituting the waveguide. Moreover, we pay more attention to analyze the wave multiplexer and DE-multiplexer in the 2D mass spring system. We show that two of these tunable waveguides with alternating materials can be employed to filter and separate specific frequencies from a broad band input signal. The presented simulation data is validated through comparison with the published research, and can be extended in the development of resonators and MEMS verification.

  9. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2002-01-01

    Plasmas, such as those found in the space environment or in plasma confinement devices, are often modeled as electrically conducting fluids. When fluids and plasmas are energetically stirred, regions of highly nonlinear, chaotic behavior known as turbulence arise. Understanding the fundamental nature of turbulence is a long-standing theoretical challenge. The present work describes a statistical theory concerning a certain class of nonlinear, finite dimensional, dynamical models of turbulence. These models arise when the partial differential equations describing incompressible, ideal (i.e., nondissipative) homogeneous fluid and magnetofluid (i.e., plasma) turbulence are Fourier transformed into a very large set of ordinary differential equations. These equations define a divergenceless flow in a high-dimensional phase space, which allows for the existence of a Liouville theorem, guaranteeing a distribution function based on constants of the motion (integral invariants). The novelty of these particular dynamical systems is that there are integral invariants other than the energy, and that some of these invariants behave like pseudoscalars under two of the discrete symmetry transformations of physics, parity, and charge conjugation. In this work the 'rugged invariants' of ideal homogeneous turbulence are shown to be the only significant scalar and pseudoscalar invariants. The discovery that pseudoscalar invariants cause symmetries of the original equations to be dynamically broken and induce a nonergodic structure on the associated phase space is the primary result presented here. Applicability of this result to dissipative turbulence is also discussed.

  10. ESO science data product standard for 1D spectral products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micol, Alberto; Arnaboldi, Magda; Delmotte, Nausicaa A. R.; Mascetti, Laura; Retzlaff, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    The ESO Phase 3 process allows the upload, validation, storage, and publication of reduced data through the ESO Science Archive Facility. Since its introduction, 2 million data products have been archived and published; 80% of them are one-dimensional extracted and calibrated spectra. Central to Phase3 is the ESO science data product standard that defines metadata and data format of any product. This contribution describes the ESO data standard for 1d-spectra, its adoption by the reduction pipelines of selected instrument modes for in-house generation of reduced spectra, the enhanced archive legacy value. Archive usage statistics are provided.

  11. Deconvolution/identification techniques for 1-D transient signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a variety of nonparametric deconvolution and identification techniques that we have developed for application to 1-D transient signal problems. These methods are time-domain techniques that use direct methods for matrix inversion. Therefore, they are not appropriate for large data'' problems. These techniques involve various regularization methods and permit the use of certain kinds of a priori information in estimating the unknown. These techniques have been implemented in a package using standard FORTRAN that should make the package readily transportable to most computers. This paper is also meant to be an instruction manual for the package. 25 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Breakdown of 1D water wires inside charged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Shashank

    2016-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics approach we investigated the structure and dynamics of water confined inside pristine and charged 6,6 carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This study reports the breakdown of 1D water wires and the emergence of triangular faced water on incorporating charges in 6,6 CNTs. Incorporation of charges results in high potential barriers to flipping of water molecules due to the formation of large number of hydrogen bonds. The PMF analyses show the presence of ∼2 kcal/mol barrier for the movement of water inside pristine CNT and almost negligible barrier in charged CNTs.

  13. Spatial coherence of polaritons in a 1D channel

    SciTech Connect

    Savenko, I. G.; Iorsh, I. V.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    We analyze time evolution of spatial coherence of a polariton ensemble in a quantum wire (1D channel) under constant uniform resonant pumping. Using the theoretical approach based on the Lindblad equation for a one-particle density matrix, which takes into account the polariton-phonon and excitonexciton interactions, we study the behavior of the first-order coherence function g{sup 1} for various pump intensities and temperatures in the range of 1-20 K. Bistability and hysteresis in the dependence of the first-order coherence function on the pump intensity is demonstrated.

  14. Nonlocal order parameters for the 1D Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-07

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point U(c)=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at U(c). The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  15. Nonlocal Order Parameters for the 1D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-01

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point Uc=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at Uc. The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  16. Nanofluidic sustainable energy conversion using a 1D nanofluidic network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hui; Kwak, Seungmin; Han, Sung Il; Chun, Dong Won; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Jinseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon

    2014-05-01

    We propose a 1-dimensional (1D) nanofluidic energy conversion device by implementing a surface-patterned Nafion membrane for the direct energy conversion of the pressure to electrical power. By implementing a -200-nm-thick nano-bridge with a 5-nm pore size between two microfluidic channels, we acquired an effective streaming potential of 307 mV and output power of 94 pW with 0.1 mM KCI under pressure difference of 45 MPa. The experimental results show both the effects of applied pressure differences and buffer concentrations on the effective streaming potential, and are consistent with the analytical prediction.

  17. 1-D blood flow modelling in a running human body.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Viktor; Halász, Gábor

    2017-04-10

    In this paper an attempt was made to simulate blood flow in a mobile human arterial network, specifically, in a running human subject. In order to simulate the effect of motion, a previously published immobile 1-D model was modified by including an inertial force term into the momentum equation. To calculate inertial force, gait analysis was performed at different levels of speed. Our results show that motion has a significant effect on the amplitudes of the blood pressure and flow rate but the average values are not effected significantly.

  18. Simulations of Edge Effect in 1D Spin Crossover Compounds by Atom-Phonon Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, J.; Chiruta, D.; Jureschi, C. M.; Alayli, Y.; Turcu, C. O.; Dahoo, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    We used the atom-phonon coupling model to explain and illustrate the behaviour of a linear nano-chain of molecules. The analysis of the system's behaviour was performed using Free Energy method, and by applying Monte Carlo Metropolis (MCM) method which take into account the phonon contribution. In particular we tested both the MCM algorithm and the dynamic-matrix method and we expose how the thermal behaviour of a 1D spin crossover system varies as a function of different factors. Furthermore we blocked the edge atoms of the chain in its high spin state to study the effect on the system's behaviour.

  19. Statistical mechanics of a one-component fluid of charged hard rods in 1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vericat, Fernando; Blum, Lesser

    1987-09-01

    The statistical mechanics of a classical one-component system of charged hard rods in a neutralizing background is investigated in 1D stressing on the effects of the hard-core interactions over the thermodynamics and the structure of the system. The crystalline status of the system at all temperatures and densities and the absence of phase transitions is shown by extending previous results of Baxter (1963) and Kunz (1974) on the one-component plasma of point particles. Explicit expressions for the thermodynamic functions and the one-particle correlation function are given in the limits of small and strong couplings.

  20. Spatial homogeneity of benthic macrofaunal biodiversity across small spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R S K

    2016-12-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of biodiversity has been extensively researched, but its spatial homogeneity is virtually unstudied. An intertidal seagrass system at Knysna (South Africa) known to display spatially homogeneous macrobenthic species density at scales ≥0.0275 m(2) was re-investigated at four smaller spatial grains (0.0015 m(2) - 0.0095 m(2)) via a lattice of 8 × 8 stations within a 0.2 ha area. The aim was to investigate the null hypothesis that spatial homogeneity of species density is not a fixed emergent assemblage property but breaks down at small spatial grains within given spatial extents. Although assemblage abundance was significantly heterogeneous at all spatial grains investigated, both species density and functional-group density were significantly homogeneous across those same scales; observed densities not departing from those expected on the basis of independent assortment. Spatial homogeneity is therefore an emergent assemblage property within given spatial extents at Knysna and probably at equivalent sites elsewhere. Equivalent species density in South Africa, Australia and the UK at spatial grains <0.03 m(2), however, is a scale-related sampling artefact, as may be temporal homogeneity of species density at Knysna over a 3 year period, but close similarity in shape of their species occupancy distributions remains unexplained.

  1. Pyroxene Homogenization and the Isotopic Systematics of Eucrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.

    1996-01-01

    The original Mg-Fe zoning of eucritic pyroxenes has in nearly all cases been partly homogenized, an observation that has been combined with other petrographic and compositional criteria to establish a scale of thermal "metamorphism" for eucrites. To evaluate hypotheses explaining development of conditions on the HED parent body (Vesta?) leading to pyroxene homogenization against their chronological implications, it is necessary to know whether pyroxene metamorphism was recorded in the isotopic systems. However, identifying the effects of the thermal metamorphism with specific effects in the isotopic systems has been difficult, due in part to a lack of correlated isotopic and mineralogical studies of the same eucrites. Furthermore, isotopic studies often place high demands on analytical capabilities, resulting in slow growth of the isotopic database. Additionally, some isotopic systems would not respond in a direct and sensitive way to pyroxene homogenization. Nevertheless, sufficient data exist to generalize some observations, and to identify directions of potentially fruitful investigations.

  2. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-02-01

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm3) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application.

  3. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-01-01

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm3) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application. PMID:28176799

  4. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-02-08

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm(3)) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application.

  5. Measuring the Speed of Sound in a 1D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jacob; Revelle, Melissa; Hulet, Randall

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the speed of sound in a two-spin component, 1D gas of fermionic lithium. The 1D system is an array of one-dimensional tubes created by a 2D optical lattice. By increasing the lattice depth, the tunneling between tubes is sufficiently small to make each an independent 1D system. To measure the speed of sound, we create a density notch at the center of the atom cloud using a sheet of light tuned far from resonance. The dipole force felt by both spin states will be equivalent, so this notch can be thought of as a charge excitation. Once this beam is turned off, the notch propagates to the edge of the atomic cloud with a velocity that depends on the strength of interatomic interactions. We control interactions using a magnetically tuned Feshbach resonance, allowing us to measure the speed of sound over a wide range of interaction. This method may be used to extract the Luttinger parameter vs. interaction strength. Supported by an ARO MURI Grant, NSF, and The Welch Foundation.

  6. Verification and comparison of four numerical schemes for a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Fullana, Jose-Maria; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    A reliable and fast numerical scheme is crucial for the 1D simulation of blood flow in compliant vessels. In this paper, a 1D blood flow model is incorporated with a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic arterial wall. This leads to a nonlinear hyperbolic-parabolic system, which is then solved with four numerical schemes, namely: MacCormack, Taylor-Galerkin, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation law and local discontinuous Galerkin. The numerical schemes are tested on a single vessel, a simple bifurcation and a network with 55 arteries. The numerical solutions are checked favorably against analytical, semi-analytical solutions or clinical observations. Among the numerical schemes, comparisons are made in four important aspects: accuracy, ability to capture shock-like phenomena, computational speed and implementation complexity. The suitable conditions for the application of each scheme are discussed.

  7. Derivation and Solution of Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

    2010-01-05

    Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, we derive the corresponding time-dependent multifrequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The system is coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. We are interested in modeling annealing of silica (SiO{sub 2}). We derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals leading to a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Three simulations are presented. One models cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. The other two are 1D and 2D simulations of irradiating silica with a CO{sub 2} laser, {lambda} = 10.59 {micro}m. In 2D, we anneal a disk (radius = 0.4, thickness = 0.4 cm) with a laser, Gaussian profile (r{sub 0} = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay).

  8. Homogeneous modes of cosmological instantons

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, Steven; Turok, Neil

    2001-06-15

    We discuss the O(4) invariant perturbation modes of cosmological instantons. These modes are spatially homogeneous in Lorentzian spacetime and thus not relevant to density perturbations. But their properties are important in establishing the meaning of the Euclidean path integral. If negative modes are present, the Euclidean path integral is not well defined, but may nevertheless be useful in an approximate description of the decay of an unstable state. When gravitational dynamics is included, counting negative modes requires a careful treatment of the conformal factor problem. We demonstrate that for an appropriate choice of coordinate on phase space, the second order Euclidean action is bounded below for normalized perturbations and has a finite number of negative modes. We prove that there is a negative mode for many gravitational instantons of the Hawking-Moss or Coleman{endash}De Luccia type, and discuss the associated spectral flow. We also investigate Hawking-Turok constrained instantons, which occur in a generic inflationary model. Implementing the regularization and constraint proposed by Kirklin, Turok and Wiseman, we find that those instantons leading to substantial inflation do not possess negative modes. Using an alternate regularization and constraint motivated by reduction from five dimensions, we find a negative mode is present. These investigations shed new light on the suitability of Euclidean quantum gravity as a potential description of our universe.

  9. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  10. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  11. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  12. A novel controlled release system-based homogeneous immunoassay protocol for SCCA using magnetic mesoporous Fe3O4 as a nanocontainer and aminated polystyrene microspheres as a molecular gate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhankui; Yu, Siqi; Su, Fengjie; Ma, Hongmin; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin; Pang, Xuehui

    2015-04-15

    A novel controlled release system-based homogeneous immunoassay protocol (CRSHIP) was developed for the detection of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA). The positively charged aminated polystyrene microsphere (APSM) used as molecular gate was capped on the pores of the negatively charged antibody-conjugated magnetic mesoporous Fe3O4 (Ab-Fe3O4) by electrostatic interaction to achieve encapsulation of toluidine blue (TB). With the addition of SCCA, APSM was replaced from Ab-Fe3O4 due to the specific binding of antibody to antigen, and then the trapped TB was released from the pores. The released TB could be detected by square wave voltammetry and the signal could be correlated with the amount of SCCA. The developed CRSHIP displayed a high current response, a relatively wide linear range (from 0.001 to 4.0ng/mL) and a low detection limit (0.33pg/mL) for the detection of SCCA. The method showed high selectivity and good reproducibility. In addition, the CRSHIP provided a simple, fast and sensitive approach for the detection of SCCA in serum sample.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes for the Generation and Imaging of Interacting 1D States of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waissman, Jonah

    Low-dimensional systems in condensed matter physics exhibit a rich array of correlated electronic phases. One-dimensional systems stand out in this regard. Electrons cannot avoid each other in 1D, enhancing the effects of interactions. The resulting correlations leave distinct spatial imprints on the electronic density that can be imaged with scanning probes. Disorder, however, can destroy these delicate interacting states by breaking up the electron liquid into localized pieces. Thus, to generate fragile interacting quantum states, one requires an extremely clean system in which disorder does not overcome interactions, as well as a high degree of tunability to design potential landscapes. Furthermore, to directly measure the resulting spatial correlations, one requires an exceptionally sensitive scanning probe, but the most sensitive probes presently available are also invasive, perturbing the system and screening electron-electron interactions. In this thesis, we show how carbon nanotubes allow us to create pristine 1D electronic systems with unparalleled tunability. By realizing a new approach to device fabrication based on deterministic nano-assembly, we create devices of high complexity and low disorder by selectively attaching nanotubes of chosen bandgaps and cleanliness onto devices with large numbers of local gates. Using precision nano-assembly, we also demonstrate devices with multiple nanotubes placed at pre-determined locations. We then demonstrate the use of these devices as scanning charge detectors with the ability to image electrostatic potentials and to spatially resolve charging in a second nanotube device. By placing two such nanotube devices perpendicular to each other and bringing the two nanotubes into close proximity to each other, while distancing metal electrodes using our precise control over device geometry, we can use these devices as highly sensitive, high-resolution charge detectors that are also non-invasive. The capability to make

  14. Inhibition of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation by the transforming growth factor-β/Smad signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jennifer C; Iyer, Abhirami K; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lin, Yinling; Nguyen, Hoa; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation activates a subset of innate immune lymphocytes called invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells that, by virtue of their potent cytokine production, bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) is a known immune modulator that can activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38; we have previously shown that p38 is a negative regulator of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Several studies implicate a role for TGF-β in the activation of p38. Therefore, we hypothesized that TGF-β would impair antigen presentation by CD1d. Indeed, a dose-dependent decrease in CD1d-mediated antigen presentation and impairment of lipid antigen processing was observed in response to TGF-β treatment. However, it was found that this inhibition was not through p38 activation. Instead, Smads 2, 3 and 4, downstream elements of the TGF-β canonical signalling pathway, contributed to the observed effects. In marked contrast to that observed with CD1d, TGF-β was found to enhance MHC class II-mediated antigen presentation. Overall, these results suggest that the canonical TGF-β/Smad pathway negatively regulates an important arm of the host's innate immune responses - CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation to NKT cells.

  15. Functional CD1d and/or NKT cell invariant chain transcript in horse, pig, African elephant and guinea pig, but not in ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Looringh van Beeck, Frank A.; Reinink, Peter; Hermsen, Roel; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Laven, Marielle J.; Fun, Axel; Troskie, Milana; Schoemaker, Nico J.; Morar, Darshana; Lenstra, Johannes A.; Vervelde, Lonneke; Rutten, Victor P.M.G.; van Eden, Willem; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2009-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have been well characterized in humans and mice, but it is unknown whether they are present in other species. Here we describe the invariant TCR α chain and the full length CD1d transcript of pig and horse. Molecular modeling predicts that porcine (po) invariant TCR α chain/poCD1d/α-GalCer and equine (eq) invariant TCR α chain/eqCD1d/α-GalCer form complexes that are highly homologous to the human complex. Since a prerequisite for the presence of NKT cells is the expression of CD1d protein, we performed searches for CD1D genes and CD1d transcripts in multiple species. Previously, cattle and guinea pig have been suggested to lack CD1D genes. The CD1D genes of European taurine cattle (Bos taurus) are known to be pseudogenes because of disrupting mutations in the start codon and in the donor splice site of the first intron. Here we show that the same mutations are found in six other ruminants: African buffalo, sheep, bushbuck, bongo, N’Dama cattle, and roe deer. In contrast, intact CD1d transcripts were found in guinea pig, African elephant, horse, rabbit, and pig. Despite the discovery of a highly homologous NKT/CD1d system in pig and horse, our data suggest that functional CD1D and CD1d-restricted NKT cells are not universally present in mammals. PMID:19185921

  16. The Homogenization and Optimization of Thermoelectric Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-17

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0090 The Homogenization and Optimization of Thermoelectric Composites Jiangyu Li UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Final Report 04/17/2015...SUBTITLE The Homogenization and Optimization of Thermoelectric Composites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0325 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...behavior of thermoelectric composites using rigorous homogenization technique in this project. In the last three years, our accomplishment includes: (1

  17. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-01

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  18. Statistical analysis of 1D HRR target features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David C.; Schmitz, James L.; Williams, Robert L.

    2000-08-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) and feature-aided tracking (FAT) algorithms that use one-dimensional (1-D) high range resolution (HRR) profiles require unique or distinguishable target features. This paper explores the use of statistical measures to quantify the separability and stability of ground target features found in HRR profiles. Measures of stability, such as the mean and variance, can be used to determine the stability of a target feature as a function of the target aspect and elevation angle. Statistical measures of feature predictability and separability, such as the Fisher and Bhattacharyya measures, demonstrate the capability to adequately predict the desired target feature over a specified aspect angular region. These statistical measures for separability and stability are explained in detail and their usefulness is demonstrated with measured HRR data.

  19. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    SciTech Connect

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-03

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  20. Effective theory of black holes in the 1/D expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (e.g. Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this `black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/ D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for `black droplets', i.e. black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  1. Robust PRNG based on homogeneously distributed chaotic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasym, Oleg; Lozi, René; Taralova, Ina

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to the design of new chaotic Pseudo Random Number Generator (CPRNG). Exploring several topologies of network of 1-D coupled chaotic mapping, we focus first on two dimensional networks. Two topologically coupled maps are studied: TTL rc non-alternate, and TTL SC alternate. The primary idea of the novel maps has been based on an original coupling of the tent and logistic maps to achieve excellent random properties and homogeneous /uniform/ density in the phase plane, thus guaranteeing maximum security when used for chaos base cryptography. In this aim two new nonlinear CPRNG: MTTL 2 sc and NTTL 2 are proposed. The maps successfully passed numerous statistical, graphical and numerical tests, due to proposed ring coupling and injection mechanisms.

  2. STEAM STIRRED HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-06-01

    A homogeneous nuclear reactor utilizing a selfcirculating liquid fuel is described. The reactor vessel is in the form of a vertically disposed tubular member having the lower end closed by the tube walls and the upper end closed by a removal fianged assembly. A spherical reaction shell is located in the lower end of the vessel and spaced from the inside walls. The reaction shell is perforated on its lower surface and is provided with a bundle of small-diameter tubes extending vertically upward from its top central portion. The reactor vessel is surrounded in the region of the reaction shell by a neutron reflector. The liquid fuel, which may be a solution of enriched uranyl sulfate in ordinary or heavy water, is mainiained at a level within the reactor vessel of approximately the top of the tubes. The heat of the reaction which is created in the critical region within the spherical reaction shell forms steam bubbles which more upwardly through the tubes. The upward movement of these bubbles results in the forcing of the liquid fuel out of the top of these tubes, from where the fuel passes downwardly in the space between the tubes and the vessel wall where it is cooled by heat exchangers. The fuel then re-enters the critical region in the reaction shell through the perforations in the bottom. The upper portion of the reactor vessel is provided with baffles to prevent the liquid fuel from splashing into this region which is also provided with a recombiner apparatus for recombining the radiolytically dissociated moderator vapor and a control means.

  3. Homogeneous catalysts in hypersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Harradine, D.M.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Pack, R.T.; Schott, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Density and residence time both become unfavorably small for efficient combustion of hydrogen fuel in ramjet propulsion in air at high altitude and hypersonic speed. Raising the density and increasing the transit time of the air through the engine necessitates stronger contraction of the air flow area. This enhances the kinetic and thermodynamic tendency of H/sub 2/O to form completely, accompanied only by N/sub 2/ and any excess H/sub 2/(or O/sub 2/). The by-products to be avoided are the energetically expensive fragment species H and/or O atoms and OH radicals, and residual (2H/sub 2/ plus O/sub 2/). However, excessive area contraction raises air temperature and consequent combustion-product temperature by adiabatic compression. This counteracts and ultimately overwhelms the thermodynamic benefit by which higher density favors the triatomic product, H/sub 2/O, over its monatomic and diatomic alternatives. For static pressures in the neighborhood of 1 atm, static temperature must be kept or brought below ca. 2400 K for acceptable stability of H/sub 2/O. Another measure, whose requisite chemistry we address here, is to extract propulsive work from the combustion products early in the expansion. The objective is to lower the static temperature of the combustion stream enough for H/sub 2/O to become adequately stable before the exhaust flow is massively expanded and its composition ''frozen.'' We proceed to address this mechanism and its kinetics, and then examine prospects for enhancing its rate by homogeneous catalysts. 9 refs.

  4. Evaluating 1d Seismic Models of the Lunar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.; Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    A four station seismic network was established on the Moon from 1969 to 1977 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). A total of nine 1D seismic velocity models were generated using a variety of different techniques. In spite of the fact that these models were generated from the same data set, significant differences exist between them. We evaluate these models by comparing predicted travel-times to published catalogs of lunar events. We generate synthetic waveform predictions for 1D lunar models using a modified version of the Green's Function of the Earth by Minor Integration (GEMINI) technique. Our results demonstrate that the mean square errors between predicted and measured P-wave travel times are smaller than those for S-wave travel times in all cases. Moreover, models fit travel times for artificial and meteoroid impacts better than for shallow and deep moonquakes. Overall, models presented by Nakamura [Nakamura, 1983] and Garcia et al. [Garcia et al., 2011] predicted the observed travel times better than all other models and were comparable in their explanation of travel-times. Nevertheless, significant waveform differences exist between these models. In particular, the seismic velocity structure of the lunar crust and regolith strongly affect the waveform characteristics predicted by these models. Further complexity is added by possible mantle discontinuity structure that exists in a subset of these models. We show synthetic waveform predictions for these models demonstrating the role that crustal structure has in generating long duration seismic coda inherent in the lunar waveforms.

  5. Secure information embedding into 1D biomedical signals based on SPIHT.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Oscar J; Alesanco, Alvaro; García, José

    2013-08-01

    This paper proposes an encoding system for 1D biomedical signals that allows embedding metadata and provides security and privacy. The design is based on the analysis of requirements for secure and efficient storage, transmission and access to medical tests in e-health environment. This approach uses the 1D SPIHT algorithm to compress 1D biomedical signals with clinical quality, metadata embedding in the compressed domain to avoid extra distortion, digital signature to implement security and attribute-level encryption to support Role-Based Access Control. The implementation has been extensively tested using standard electrocardiogram and electroencephalogram databases (MIT-BIH Arrhythmia, MIT-BIH Compression and SCCN-EEG), demonstrating high embedding capacity (e.g. 3 KB in resting ECGs, 200 KB in stress tests, 30 MB in ambulatory ECGs), short delays (2-3.3s in real-time transmission) and compression of the signal (by ≃3 in real-time transmission, by ≃5 in offline operation) despite of the embedding of security elements and metadata to enable e-health services.

  6. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    SciTech Connect

    Phatak, Charudatta; Knoop, Ludvig de; Houdellier, Florent; Gatel, Christophe; Hytch, Martin J.; Masseboeuf, Aurelien

    2016-03-10

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as well as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Furthermore the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures.

  7. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    DOE PAGES

    Phatak, Charudatta; Knoop, Ludvig de; Houdellier, Florent; ...

    2016-03-10

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as wellmore » as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Furthermore the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures.« less

  8. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    SciTech Connect

    Phatak, C.; Knoop, L. de; Houdellier, F.; Gatel, C.; Hÿtch, M. J.; Masseboeuf, A.

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as well as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Moreover the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures.

  9. Lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Pinliang

    2009-10-01

    Spatial scale plays an important role in many fields. As a scale-dependent measure for spatial heterogeneity, lacunarity describes the distribution of gaps within a set at multiple scales. In Earth science, environmental science, and ecology, lacunarity has been increasingly used for multiscale modeling of spatial patterns. This paper presents the development and implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) software extension for lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns. Depending on the application requirement, lacunarity analysis can be performed in two modes: global mode or local mode. The extension works for: (1) binary (1-bit) and grey-scale datasets in any raster format supported by ArcGIS and (2) 1D, 2D, and 3D point datasets as shapefiles or geodatabase feature classes. For more effective measurement of lacunarity for different patterns or processes in raster datasets, the extension allows users to define an area of interest (AOI) in four different ways, including using a polygon in an existing feature layer. Additionally, directionality can be taken into account when grey-scale datasets are used for local lacunarity analysis. The methodology and graphical user interface (GUI) are described. The application of the extension is demonstrated using both simulated and real datasets, including Brodatz texture images, a Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-C) image, simulated 1D points on a drainage network, and 3D random and clustered point patterns. The options of lacunarity analysis and the effects of polyline arrangement on lacunarity of 1D points are also discussed. Results from sample data suggest that the lacunarity analysis extension can be used for efficient modeling of spatial patterns at multiple scales.

  10. Homogenization of global radiosonde humidity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschek, Michael; Haimberger, Leopold

    2016-04-01

    The global radiosonde network is an important source of upper-air measurements and is strongly connected to reanalysis efforts of the 20th century. However, measurements are strongly affected by changes in the observing system and require a homogenization before they can be considered useful in climate studies. In particular humidity measurements are known to show spurious trends and biases induced by many sources, e.g. reporting practices or freezing of the sensor. We propose to detect and correct these biases in an automated way, as has been done with temperature and winds. We detect breakpoints in dew point depression (DPD) time series by employing a standard normal homogeneity test (SNHT) on DPD-departures from ERA-Interim. In a next step, we calculate quantile departures between the latter and the earlier part near the breakpoints of the time series, going back in time. These departures adjust the earlier distribution of DPD to the latter distribution, called quantile matching, thus removing for example a non climatic shift. We employ this approach to the existing radiosonde network. In a first step to verify our approach we compare our results with ERA-Interim data and brightness temperatures of humidity-sensitive channels of microwave measuring radiometers (SSMIS) onboard DMSP F16. The results show that some of the biases can be detected and corrected in an automated way, however large biases that impact the distribution of DPD values originating from known reporting practices (e.g. 30 DPD on US stations) remain. These biases can be removed but not corrected. The comparison of brightness temperatures from satellite and radiosondes proofs to be difficult as large differences result from for example representative errors.

  11. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M. J.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratiannil, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.; Willett, K.

    2013-09-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous values at various averaging scales, ii) the error in linear trend estimates and iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data. Moreover, state-of-the-art relative homogenization algorithms developed to work with an inhomogeneous reference are shown to perform best. The study showed that currently automatic algorithms can perform as well as manual ones.

  12. Noncommutative anisotropic oscillator in a homogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, D.; Roy, P.

    2017-02-01

    We study anisotropic oscillator in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field and other related systems in the noncommutative plane. Energy values as function of the noncommutative parameter θ and the magnetic field B have been obtained. Some features of the spectrum, for example, formation of energy bands etc. have been examined. The effect of anisotropy on the energy levels has also been discussed.

  13. Homogeneous thin film lens on LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Pisu; Laybourn, Peter J. R.; Righini, Giancarlo C.

    1991-02-01

    Problems in the fabrication of homogeneous integ ited lenses on lithium niobate were investigated. TIPE and double proton exchange waveguide . abrication methods were compared and various masking systems tested. Mode matching between a v w index single mode DMPE waveguide and a high index multi mode PE waveguide was optimized.

  14. Low-field single-sided NMR for one-shot 1D-mapping: Application to membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judeinstein, Patrick; Ferdeghini, Filippo; Oliveira-Silva, Rodrigo; Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Sakellariou, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Many single-sided permanent magnet NMR systems have been proposed over the years allowing for 1D proton-density profiling, diffusion measurements and relaxometry. In this manuscript we make use of a recently published unilateral magnet for low-field NMR exhibiting an extremely uniform magnetic field gradient with moderate strength and cylindrical symmetry, allowing for a well-defined sweet spot. Combined with a goniometer, our system is used to characterize precisely the uniformity of its gradient and to achieve micrometric precision 1D profiling, as well as spatially localized relaxometry and diffusometry on thick (∼150 μm) membrane samples. Profiling with this magnet did not require repositioning of the samples with respect to the 1D tomograph.

  15. Scaling of Lyapunov Exponents in Homogeneous, Isotropic DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Nicholas; Malaya, Nicholas; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Lyapunov exponents measure the rate of separation of initially infinitesimally close trajectories in a chaotic system. Using the exponents, we are able to probe the chaotic nature of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and study the instabilities of the chaotic field. The exponents are measured by calculating the instantaneous growth rate of a linear disturbance, evolved with the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, at each time step. In this talk, we examine these exponents in the context of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with two goals: 1) to investigate the scaling of the exponents with respect to the parameters of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and 2) to characterize the instabilities that lead to chaos in turbulence. Specifically, we explore the scaling of the Lyapunov exponents with respect to the Reynolds number and with respect to the ratio of the integral length scale and the computational domain size.

  16. Dynamic decoupling in the presence of 1D random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Arnab; Chakraborty, Ipsita; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet

    2016-05-01

    In the recent past, many dynamic decoupling sequences have been proposed for the suppression of decoherence of spins connected to thermal baths of various natures. Dynamic decoupling schemes for suppressing decoherence due to Gaussian diffusion have also been developed. In this work, we study the relative performances of dynamic decoupling schemes in the presence of a non-stationary Gaussian noise such as a 1D random walk. Frequency domain analysis is not suitable to determine the performances of various dynamic decoupling schemes in suppressing decoherence due to such a process. Thus, in this work, we follow a time domain calculation to arrive at the following conclusions: in the presence of such a noise, we show that (i) the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence outperforms Uhrig’s dynamic decoupling scheme, (ii) CPMG remains the optimal sequence for suppression of decoherence due to random walk in the presence of an external field gradient. Later, the theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on spin 1/2 particles diffusing in a liquid medium.

  17. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  18. Energy eigenfunctions of the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marojević, Želimir; Göklü, Ertan; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2013-08-01

    We developed a new and powerful algorithm by which numerical solutions for excited states in a gravito-optical surface trap have been obtained. They represent solutions in the regime of strong nonlinearities of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. In this context we also briefly review several approaches which allow, in principle, for calculating excited state solutions. It turns out that without modifications these are not applicable to strongly nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equations. The importance of studying excited states of Bose-Einstein condensates is also underlined by a recent experiment of Bücker et al. in which vibrational state inversion of a Bose-Einstein condensate has been achieved by transferring the entire population of the condensate to the first excited state. Here we focus on demonstrating the applicability of our algorithm for three different potentials by means of numerical results for the energy eigenstates and eigenvalues of the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii-equation. We compare the numerically found solutions and find out that they completely agree with the case of known analytical solutions.

  19. Control and imaging of O(1D2) precession.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiou-Min; Radenovic, Dragana Č; van der Zande, Wim J; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; Parker, David H; Vallance, Claire; Zare, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    Larmor precession of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector about an applied magnetic field forms the basis for a range of magnetic resonance techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. We have used a polarized laser pump-probe scheme with velocity-map imaging detection to visualize, for the first time, the precessional motion of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector. Photodissociation of O(2) at 157 nm provides a clean source of fast-moving O((1)D(2)) atoms, with their electronic angular momentum vector strongly aligned perpendicular to the recoil direction. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the distribution of atomic angular momenta precesses about the field direction, and polarization-sensitive images of the atomic scattering distribution recorded as a function of field strength yield 'time-lapse-photography' style movies of the precessional motion. We present movies recorded in various experimental geometries, and discuss potential consequences and applications in atmospheric chemistry and reaction dynamics.

  20. Cavitation Influence in 1D Part-load Vortex Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfler, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Residual swirl in the draft tube of Francis turbines may cause annoying low- frequency pulsation of pressure and power output, in particular during part-load operation. A 1D analytical model for these dynamic phenomena would enable simulation by some conventional method for computing hydraulic transients. The proper structure of such a model has implications for the prediction of prototype behaviour based on laboratory tests. The source of excitation as well as the dynamic transmission behaviour of the draft tube flow may both be described either by lumped or distributed parameters. The distributed version contains more information and, due to limited possibilities of identification, some data must be estimated. The distributed cavitation compliance is an example for this dilemma. In recent publications, the customary assumption of a constant wave speed has produced dubious results. The paper presents a more realistic model for distributed compressibility. The measured influence of the Thoma number is applied with the local cavitation factor. This concept is less sensitive to modelling errors and explains both the Thoma and Froude number influence. The possible effect of the normally unknown non-condensable gas content in the vortex cavity is shortly commented. Its measurement in future tests is recommended. It is also recommended to check the available analytical vortex models for possible dispersion effects.

  1. Johnson-Nyquist Noise Coupling Formulation of Near-Field Heat Transfer for 1D Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prunnila, Mika; Laakso, Sampo; Gunnarsson, David

    Near-field heat transfer has been formulated using different levels of theoretical sophistication and complexity ranging from fluctuational electrodynamics to quasi-static Coulomb interaction description. Our goal is to find a simple description for the near-field heat transfer between coupled 1D electron systems (conductors). We will show that by considering distributed Johnson-Nyquist voltage sources, arising from the dissipative part of the electron systems' response, a compact fundamental formula for the near-field heat transfer can be found. We will describe the details of the derivation and discuss the regime of validity of our approach. Several special cases will be considered and experimental configurations will be discussed. The presented analysis is especially suitable for closely spaced graphene ribbons and nanowires. We will also show that by including inductive responses, which are necessary at high frequencies, speed of light emerges in the heat flow formula, thereby showing the link between fundamental physical quantities/constants and near-field heat transfer in coupled 1D systems. Our formulation also provides the possibility to use different boundary conditions for the physical system and this enables design of near-field heat transfer circuits.

  2. Scratched-XY Universality and Phase Diagram of Disordered 1D Bosons in Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhiyuan; Pollet, Lode; Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    The superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition in a 1D system with weak links belongs to the so-called scratched-XY universality class, provided the irrenormalizable exponent ζ characterizing the distribution of weak links is smaller than 2 / 3 . With a combination of worm-algorithm Monte Carlo simulations and asymptotically exact analytics, we accurately trace the position of the scratched-XY critical line on the ground-state phase diagram of bosonic Hubbard model at unity filling. In particular, we reveal the location of the tricritical point separating the scratched-XY criticality from the Giamarchi-Schulz one.

  3. Quantum Nucleation of Phase Slips in a 1D Model of a Superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    Freire, J.A.; Arovas, D.P.; Levine, H.

    1997-12-01

    We use a 1D model of a superfluid based on the Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian to illustrate a general numerical method designed to find quantum tunneling rates in extended bosonic systems. Specifically, we study flow past an obstacle and directly solve the imaginary time dynamics to find the {open_quotes}bounce{close_quotes} solution connected with the decay of the metastable laminar state via phase slip nucleation. The action for the tunneling configuration goes to zero at the threshold (in superfluid velocity) for classical production of these slips. Applications to other processes are briefly discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Probing the Quantum State of a 1D Bose Gas Using Off-Resonant Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, A. G.; Ballagh, R. J.

    2011-12-30

    We present a theoretical treatment of coherent light scattering from an interacting 1D Bose gas at finite temperatures. We show how this can provide a nondestructive measurement of the atomic system states. The equilibrium states are determined by the temperature and interaction strength, and are characterized by the spatial density-density correlation function. We show how this correlation function is encoded in the angular distribution of the fluctuations of the scattered light intensity, thus providing a sensitive, quantitative probe of the density-density correlation function and therefore the quantum state of the gas.

  5. KAM Tori for 1D Nonlinear Wave Equationswith Periodic Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chierchia, Luigi; You, Jiangong

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) nonlinear wave equations with periodic boundary conditions are considered; V is a periodic smooth or analytic function and the nonlinearity f is an analytic function vanishing together with its derivative at u≡0. It is proved that for ``most'' potentials V(x), the above equation admits small-amplitude periodic or quasi-periodic solutions corresponding to finite dimensional invariant tori for an associated infinite dimensional dynamical system. The proof is based on an infinite dimensional KAM theorem which allows for multiple normal frequencies.

  6. Delocalization of Weakly Interacting Bosons in a 1D Quasiperiodic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, V. P.; Altshuler, B. L.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2014-07-01

    We consider weakly interacting bosons in a 1D quasiperiodic potential (Aubry-Azbel-Harper model) in the regime where all single-particle states are localized. We show that the interparticle interaction may lead to the many-body delocalization and we obtain the finite-temperature phase diagram. Counterintuitively, in a wide range of parameters the delocalization requires stronger coupling as the temperature increases. This means that the system of bosons can undergo a transition from a fluid to insulator (glass) state under heating.

  7. Nested 1D-2D approach for urban surface flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murla, Damian; Willems, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Floods in urban areas as a consequence of sewer capacity exceedance receive increased attention because of trends in urbanization (increased population density and impermeability of the surface) and climate change. Despite the strong recent developments in numerical modeling of water systems, urban surface flood modeling is still a major challenge. Whereas very advanced and accurate flood modeling systems are in place and operation by many river authorities in support of flood management along rivers, this is not yet the case in urban water management. Reasons include the small scale of the urban inundation processes, the need to have very high resolution topographical information available, and the huge computational demands. Urban drainage related inundation modeling requires a 1D full hydrodynamic model of the sewer network to be coupled with a 2D surface flood model. To reduce the computational times, 0D (flood cones), 1D/quasi-2D surface flood modeling approaches have been developed and applied in some case studies. In this research, a nested 1D/2D hydraulic model has been developed for an urban catchment at the city of Gent (Belgium), linking the underground sewer (minor system) with the overland surface (major system). For the overland surface flood modelling, comparison was made of 0D, 1D/quasi-2D and full 2D approaches. The approaches are advanced by considering nested 1D-2D approaches, including infiltration in the green city areas, and allowing the effects of surface storm water storage to be simulated. An optimal nested combination of three different mesh resolutions was identified; based on a compromise between precision and simulation time for further real-time flood forecasting, warning and control applications. Main streets as mesh zones together with buildings as void regions constitute one of these mesh resolution (3.75m2 - 15m2); they have been included since they channel most of the flood water from the manholes and they improve the accuracy of

  8. Nonlinear electrical conductivity in a 1D granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, E.; Castaing, B.; Creyssels, M.

    2004-04-01

    We report on observations of the electrical transport within a chain of metallic beads (slightly oxidized) under an applied stress. A transition from an insulating to a conductive state is observed as the applied current is increased. The voltage-current ( U- I) characteristics are nonlinear and hysteretic, and saturate to a low voltage per contact (0.4 V). Our 1D experiment allows us to understand phenomena (such as the “Branly effect”) related to this conduction transition by focusing on the nature of the contacts instead of the structure of the granular network. We show that this transition comes from an electro-thermal coupling in the vicinity of the microcontacts between each bead - the current flowing through these contact points generates their local heating which leads to an increase of their contact areas, and thus enhances their conduction. This current-induced temperature rise (up to 1050 ^{circ}C) results in the microsoldering of the contact points (even for voltages as low as 0.4 V). Based on this self-regulated temperature mechanism, an analytical expression for the nonlinear U- I back trajectory is derived, and is found to be in very good agreement with the experiments. In addition, we can determine the microcontact temperature with no adjustable parameters. Finally, the stress dependence of the resistance is found to be strongly non-hertzian due to the presence of the surface films. This dependence cannot be usually distinguished from the one due to the disorder of the granular contact network in 2D or 3D experiments.

  9. Restrained dark U (1 )d at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Fagner C.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a spontaneously broken U (1 )d gauge symmetry with a muon-specific dark Higgs. Our first goal is to verify how the presence of a new dark Higgs, ϕ , and a dark gauge boson, V , can simultaneously face the anomalies from the muon magnetic moment and the proton charge radius. Second, by assuming that V must decay to an electron-positron pair, we explore the corresponding parameter space determined with the low-energy constraints coming from K →μ X , electron (g -2 )e, K →μ νμe+e-, K →μ νμμ+μ-, and τ →ντμ νμe+e-. We focus on the scenario where the V mass is below ˜2 mμ and the ϕ mass runs from few MeV to 250 MeV, with V -photon mixing of the order ˜O (10-3). Among weak process at low energies, we check the influence of the new light vector on kaon decays as well as on the scattering e+e-→μ+μ-e+e- and discuss the impact of the dark Higgs on e+e-→μ+μ-μ+μ-. Finally, we consider contributions of the V -photon mixing in the decays π0→γ e+e-, η →γ e+e-, ρ →π e+e-, K*→K e+e-, and ϕ (1020 )→η e+e-.

  10. Modeling shear band interaction in 1D torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda; Hanina, Erez

    2017-01-01

    When two shear bands are being formed at close distance from each other they interact, and further development of one of them may be quenched down. As a result there should be a minimum distance between shear bands. In the literature there are at least three analytical models for this minimum distance. Predictions of these models do not generally agree with each other and with test results. Recently we developed a 1D numerical scheme to predict the formation of shear bands in a torsion test of a thin walled pipe. We validated our code by reproducing results of the pioneering experiments of Marchand and Duffy, and then used it to investigate the mechanics of shear localization and shear band formation. We describe our shear band code in a separate publication, and here we use it only as a tool to investigate the interaction between two neighboring shear bands during the process of their formation. We trigger the formation of shear bands by specifying two perturbations of the initial strength. We vary the perturbations in terms of their amplitude and/or their width. Usually, the stronger perturbation triggers a faster developing shear band, which then prevails and quenches the development of the other shear band. We change the distance between the two shear bands and find, that up to a certain distance one of the shear bands becomes fully developed, and the other stays only partially developed. Beyond this distance the two shear bands are both fully developed. Finally, we check the influence of certain material and loading parameters on the interaction between the two shear bands, and compare the results to predictions of the analytical models from the literature.

  11. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M. J.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2012-01-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random independent break-type inhomogeneities with normally distributed breakpoint sizes were added to the simulated datasets. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study. After the deadline at which details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed, 22 additional solutions were submitted. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  12. SCCRO3 (DCUN1D3) Antagonizes the Neddylation and Oncogenic Activity of SCCRO (DCUN1D1)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Stock, Cameron; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Weeda, Víola B.; Shah, Kushyup; Bains, Sarina; Buss, Elizabeth; Shaha, Manish; Rechler, Willi; Ramanathan, Suresh Y.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2014-01-01

    The activity of cullin-RING type ubiquitination E3 ligases is regulated by neddylation, a process analogous to ubiquitination that culminates in covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to cullins. As a component of the E3 for neddylation, SCCRO/DCUN1D1 plays a key regulatory role in neddylation and, consequently, cullin-RING ligase activity. The essential contribution of SCCRO to neddylation is to promote nuclear translocation of the cullin-ROC1 complex. The presence of a myristoyl sequence in SCCRO3, one of four SCCRO paralogues present in humans that localizes to the membrane, raises questions about its function in neddylation. We found that although SCCRO3 binds to CAND1, cullins, and ROC1, it does not efficiently bind to Ubc12, promote cullin neddylation, or conform to the reaction processivity paradigms, suggesting that SCCRO3 does not have E3 activity. Expression of SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO-promoted neddylation by sequestering cullins to the membrane, thereby blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO transforming activity. The inhibitory effects of SCCRO3 on SCCRO-promoted neddylation and transformation require both an intact myristoyl sequence and PONY domain, confirming that membrane localization and binding to cullins are required for in vivo functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that SCCRO3 functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing the neddylation activity of SCCRO. PMID:25349211

  13. Resolution-optimized NMR measurement of (1)D(CH), (1)D(CC) and (2)D(CH) residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Bryce, David L; O'neil-Cabello, Erin; Nikonowicz, Edward P; Bax, Ad

    2004-11-01

    New methods are described for accurate measurement of multiple residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases. The methods use TROSY-type pulse sequences for optimizing resolution and sensitivity, and rely on the E.COSY principle to measure the relatively small two-bond (2)D(CH) couplings at high precision. Measurements are demonstrated for a 24-nt stem-loop RNA sequence, uniformly enriched in (13)C, and aligned in Pf1. The recently described pseudo-3D method is used to provide homonuclear (1)H-(1)H decoupling, which minimizes cross-correlation effects and optimizes resolution. Up to seven (1)H-(13)C and (13)C-(13)C couplings are measured for pyrimidines (U and C), including (1)D(C5H5), (1)D(C6H6), (2)D(C5H6), (2)D(C6H5), (1)D(C5C4), (1)D(C5C6), and (2)D(C4H5). For adenine, four base couplings ((1)D(C2H2), (1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)) are readily measured whereas for guanine only three couplings are accessible at high relative accuracy ((1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)). Only three dipolar couplings are linearly independent in planar structures such as nucleic acid bases, permitting cross validation of the data and evaluation of their accuracies. For the vast majority of dipolar couplings, the error is found to be less than +/-3% of their possible range, indicating that the measurement accuracy is not limiting when using these couplings as restraints in structure calculations. Reported isotropic values of the one- and two-bond J couplings cluster very tightly for each type of nucleotide.

  14. Matrix algorithms for solving (in)homogeneous bound state equations.

    PubMed

    Blank, M; Krassnigg, A

    2011-07-01

    In the functional approach to quantum chromodynamics, the properties of hadronic bound states are accessible via covariant integral equations, e.g. the Bethe-Salpeter equation for mesons. In particular, one has to deal with linear, homogeneous integral equations which, in sophisticated model setups, use numerical representations of the solutions of other integral equations as part of their input. Analogously, inhomogeneous equations can be constructed to obtain off-shell information in addition to bound-state masses and other properties obtained from the covariant analogue to a wave function of the bound state. These can be solved very efficiently using well-known matrix algorithms for eigenvalues (in the homogeneous case) and the solution of linear systems (in the inhomogeneous case). We demonstrate this by solving the homogeneous and inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equations and find, e.g. that for the calculation of the mass spectrum it is as efficient or even advantageous to use the inhomogeneous equation as compared to the homogeneous. This is valuable insight, in particular for the study of baryons in a three-quark setup and more involved systems.

  15. Matrix algorithms for solving (in)homogeneous bound state equations

    PubMed Central

    Blank, M.; Krassnigg, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the functional approach to quantum chromodynamics, the properties of hadronic bound states are accessible via covariant integral equations, e.g. the Bethe–Salpeter equation for mesons. In particular, one has to deal with linear, homogeneous integral equations which, in sophisticated model setups, use numerical representations of the solutions of other integral equations as part of their input. Analogously, inhomogeneous equations can be constructed to obtain off-shell information in addition to bound-state masses and other properties obtained from the covariant analogue to a wave function of the bound state. These can be solved very efficiently using well-known matrix algorithms for eigenvalues (in the homogeneous case) and the solution of linear systems (in the inhomogeneous case). We demonstrate this by solving the homogeneous and inhomogeneous Bethe–Salpeter equations and find, e.g. that for the calculation of the mass spectrum it is as efficient or even advantageous to use the inhomogeneous equation as compared to the homogeneous. This is valuable insight, in particular for the study of baryons in a three-quark setup and more involved systems. PMID:21760640

  16. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, John H; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-Young; Seo, Sung S Ambrose

    2017-01-01

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr2 IrO4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials.

  17. Homogeneous cosmological models in Yang's gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Pavelle, R.

    1979-01-01

    We present a dynamic, spatially homogeneous solution of Yang's pure space gravitational field equations which is non-Einsteinian. The predictions of this cosmological model seem to be at variance with observations.

  18. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  19. Producing tritium in a homogenous reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the joint production and separation of tritium. Tritium is produced in an aqueous homogenous reactor and heat from the nuclear reaction is used to distill tritium from the lower isotopes of hydrogen.

  20. Model Misspecification: Finite Mixture or Homogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Yun, Dong; Petkova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    A common problem in statistical modelling is to distinguish between finite mixture distribution and a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. Finite mixture models are widely used in practice and often mixtures of normal densities are indistinguishable from homogenous non-normal densities. This paper illustrates what happens when the EM algorithm for normal mixtures is applied to a distribution that is a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. In particular, a population-based EM algorithm for finite mixtures is introduced and applied directly to density functions instead of sample data. The population-based EM algorithm is used to find finite mixture approximations to common homogeneous distributions. An example regarding the nature of a placebo response in drug treated depressed subjects is used to illustrate ideas. PMID:18974843

  1. GNSS meteorology for severe weather - 1D, 2D and 3D solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohm, Witold; Manning, Toby; Yuan, Yubin; Biadeglgne, Bertukan; Choy, Sue Lynn; Zhang, Kefei

    2013-04-01

    The variability of water vapour (WV) is strongly correlated with the formation, course and dissipation of the mesoscale convective storm systems, due to the large latent heat transfers in the evaporation/condensation process. Contrary to its importance WV space and time distribution remains under sampled in both domains, especially in sparsely populated countries such as Australia. GPS meteorology currently is a very important data source for meteorology, climatology and forecasting, due to the relatively dense network of receivers, operating in the unified reference frame. Point observations of troposphere delay (1D), integrated water vapour (1D), as well as maps of these parameters (2D) are highly sensitive to building up of high amount of water vapour in the troposphere, as well as storm passage. The Kalman filter based GNSS tomography is an emerging method of reconstructing dynamically changing wet refractivity fields (3D). All types of ground based GNSS products has solid scientific foundations and are routinely estimated by major GNSS processing centres with high accuracy and low latency (ie. EGVAP AC). The forthcoming challenge of for the analyse of GNSS meteorology estimates (1D, 2D and 3D) is developing a quantifiable method to predict as well as identify location, size and severity of mesoscale convective storm system. In the course of this research several spatial and temporal filter and indicators have been developed to aid in early detection, prediction and monitoring of severe weather events using all types of GNSS meteorology by-products estimates (1D, 2D and 3D). This research presents a case study based on the analysis of an extreme convective super cell storm in the Victorian region during March 2010 using GPS tomography. Integrated Perceptible Water readings collected from MOBS stations confirmed high time resolution as well as sensitivity to incoming severe weather. Another, special measure of Refractive Index adopted for GPS tomography wet

  2. Pharmacological evidence that 5-HT1D activation induces renal vasodilation by NO pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; García, Mónica; Martín, María-Luisa; Morán, Asunción

    2015-06-01

    5-HT is a powerful vasoconstrictor substance in renal vasculature (mainly by 5-HT₂ activation). Nevertheless, 5-HT is notable for its dual cardiovascular effects, producing both vasodilator and vasoconstrictor actions. This study aimed to investigate whether, behind the predominant serotonergic vasoconstrictor action, THE 5-HT system may exert renal vasodilator actions, and, if so, characterize the 5-HT receptors and possible indirect pathways. Renal perfusion pressure (PP), systemic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) measurement in in situ autoperfused rat kidney was determined in phenylephrine infused rats. Intra arterial (i.a.) bolus administration of 5-HT (0.00000125-0.1 μg/kg) decreased renal PP in the presence of a phenylephrine continuous infusion (phenylephrine-infusion group), without modifying SBP or HR. These vasodilator responses were potentiated by 5-HT₂ antagonism (ritanserin, 1 mg/kg i.v.), whereas the responses were abolished by 5-HT₁ /₇ antagonist (methiothepin, 100 μg/kg i.v.) or 5-HT1D antagonist (LY310762, 1 mg/kg i.v.). The i.a. administration (0.00000125 to 0.1 μg/kg) of 5-CT or L-694,247 (5-HT1D agonist) mimicked 5-HT vasodilator effect, while other agonists (1-PBG, α-methyl-5-HT, AS-19 (5-HT₇), 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A) or CGS-12066B (5-HT1B)) did not alter baseline haemodynamic variables. L-694,247 vasodilation was abolished by i.v. bolus of antagonists LY310762 (5-HT1D, 1 mg/kg) or L-NAME (nitric oxide, 10 mg/kg), but not by i.v. bolus of indomethacin (cyclooxygenase, 2 mg/kg) or glibenclamide (ATP-dependent K(+) channel, 20 mg/kg). These outcomes suggest that 5-HT1D activation produces a vasodilator effect in the in situ autoperfused kidney of phenylephrine-infusion rats mediated by the NO pathway.

  3. Laser-based linear and nonlinear guided elastic waves at surfaces (2D) and wedges (1D).

    PubMed

    Hess, Peter; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Mayer, Andreas P

    2014-01-01

    The characteristic features and applications of linear and nonlinear guided elastic waves propagating along surfaces (2D) and wedges (1D) are discussed. Laser-based excitation, detection, or contact-free analysis of these guided waves with pump-probe methods are reviewed. Determination of material parameters by broadband surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and other applications in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) are considered. The realization of nonlinear SAWs in the form of solitary waves and as shock waves, used for the determination of the fracture strength, is described. The unique properties of dispersion-free wedge waves (WWs) propagating along homogeneous wedges and of dispersive wedge waves observed in the presence of wedge modifications such as tip truncation or coatings are outlined. Theoretical and experimental results on nonlinear wedge waves in isotropic and anisotropic solids are presented.

  4. 1D GAS-DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF SHOCK-WAVE PROCESSES VIA INTERNET

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Levashov, P. R.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Zakharenkov, A. S.

    2009-12-28

    We present a Web-interface for 1D simulation of different shock-wave experiments. The choosing of initial parameters, the modeling itself and output data treatment can be made directly via the Internet. The interface is based upon the expert system on shock-wave data and equations of state and contains both the Eulerian and Lagrangian Godunov hydrocodes. The availability of equations of state for a broad set of substances makes this system a useful tool for planning and interpretation of shock-wave experiments. As an example of simulation with the system, results of modeling of multistep shock loading of potassium between polytetrafluoroethylene and stainless steel plates are presented in comparison with experimental data from Shakhray et al.(2005).

  5. Preliminary abatement device evaluation: 1D-2D KGM cyclone design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are predominately used in controlling cotton gin particulate matter (PM) emissions. The most commonly used cyclone designs are the 2D-2D and 1D-3D; however other designs such as the 1D-2D KGM have or are currently being used. A 1D-2D cyclone has a barrel length equal to the barrel diamete...

  6. Large Area Synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Poh, Sock Mui; Tan, Sherman J R; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Chen, Zhongxin; Abdelwahab, Ibrahim; Fu, Deyi; Xu, Hai; Bao, Yang; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-23

    Large area synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 nanoribbons on both insulating and conducting substrates via molecular beam epitaxy is presented. Dimensional controlled growth of 2D, 1D-MoSe2 , and 1D-2D-MoSe2 hybrid heterostructure is achieved by tuning the growth temperature or Mo:Se precursor ratio.

  7. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC.

  8. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  9. Quasi-1D physics in metal-organic frameworks: MIL-47(V) from first principles

    PubMed Central

    Jaeken, Jan W; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Lejaeghere, Kurt; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Summary The geometric and electronic structure of the MIL-47(V) metal-organic framework (MOF) is investigated by using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Special focus is placed on the relation between the spin configuration and the properties of the MOF. The ground state is found to be antiferromagnetic, with an equilibrium volume of 1554.70 Å3. The transition pressure of the pressure-induced large-pore-to-narrow-pore phase transition is calculated to be 82 MPa and 124 MPa for systems with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic chains, respectively. For a mixed system, the transition pressure is found to be a weighted average of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic transition pressures. Mapping DFT energies onto a simple-spin Hamiltonian shows both the intra- and inter-chain coupling to be antiferromagnetic, with the latter coupling constant being two orders of magnitude smaller than the former, suggesting the MIL-47(V) to present quasi-1D behavior. The electronic structure of the different spin configurations is investigated and it shows that the band gap position varies strongly with the spin configuration. The valence and conduction bands show a clear V d-character. In addition, these bands are flat in directions orthogonal to VO6 chains, while showing dispersion along the the direction of the VO6 chains, similar as for other quasi-1D materials. PMID:25383285

  10. Convective mixing in homogeneous porous media flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Jia-Hau; Chen, Peilong; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the flow processes in the technology of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in saline formations, we modeled a homogeneous porous media flow in a Hele-Shaw cell to investigate density-driven convection due to dissolution. We used an analogy of the fluid system to mimic the diffusion and subsequent convection when CO2 dissolves in brine, which generates a heavier solution. By varying the permeability, we examined the onset of convection, the falling dynamics, the wavelengths of fingers, and the rate of dissolution, for the Rayleigh number Ra (a dimensionless forcing term which is the ratio of buoyancy to diffusivity) in the range of 2.0 ×104≤Ra≤8.26 ×105 . Our results reveal that the effect of permeability influences significantly the initial convective speed, as well as the later coarsening dynamics of the heavier fingering plumes. However, the total dissolved mass, characterized by a nondimensional Nusselt number Nu, has an insignificant dependence on Ra. This implies that the total dissolution rate of CO2 is nearly constant in high Ra geological porous structures.

  11. Homogeneous processes of atmospheric interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, M. J.; Barker, J. R.; Golden, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Upper atmospheric research programs in the department of chemical kinetics are reported. Topics discussed include: (1) third-order rate constants of atmospheric importance; (2) a computational study of the HO2 + HO2 and DO2 + DO2 reactions; (3) measurement and estimation of rate constants for modeling reactive systems; (4) kinetics and thermodynamics of ion-molecule association reactions; (5) entropy barriers in ion-molecule reactions; (6) reaction rate constant for OH + HOONO2 yields products over the temperature range 246 to 324 K; (7) very low-pressure photolysis of tert-bytyl nitrite at 248 nm; (8) summary of preliminary data for the photolysis of C1ONO2 and N2O5 at 285 nm; and (9) heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 and H2O.

  12. 5-HT1D receptor inhibits renal sympathetic neurotransmission by nitric oxide pathway in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; García, Mónica; Martín, María-Luisa; Morán, Asunción

    2015-09-01

    Although serotonin has been shown to inhibit peripheral sympathetic outflow, serotonin regulation on renal sympathetic outflow has not yet been elucidated. This study investigated which 5-HT receptor subtypes are involved. Wistar rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital; 60mg/kg, i.p.), and prepared for in situ autoperfused rat kidney, which allows continuous measurement of systemic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and renal perfusion pressure (PP). Electrical stimulation of renal sympathetic nerves resulted in frequency-dependent increases in PP (18.3±1.0, 43.7±2.7 and 66.7±4.0 for 2, 4 and 6Hz, respectively), without altering SBP or HR. 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-HT1/7 agonist) (0.00000125-0.1μg/kg each) or l-694,247 (5-HT1D agonist; 0.0125μg/kg) i.a. bolus inhibited vasopressor responses by renal nerve electrical stimulation, unlike i.a. bolus of agonists α-methyl-5-HT (5-HT2), 1-PBG (5-HT3), cisapride (5-HT4), AS-19 (5-HT7), CGS-12066B (5-HT1B) or 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A) (0.0125μg/kg each). The effect of l-694,247 did not affect the exogenous norepinephrine-induced vasoconstrictions, whereas was abolished by antagonist LY310762 (5-HT1D; 1mg/kg) or l-NAME (nitric oxide; 10mg/kg), but not by indomethacin (COX1/2; 2mg/kg) or glibenclamide (ATP-dependent K(+) channel; 20mg/kg). These results suggest that 5-HT mechanism-induced inhibition of rat vasopressor renal sympathetic outflow is mainly mediated by prejunctional 5-HT1D receptors via nitric oxide release.

  13. Electrochemical cortisol immunosensors based on sonochemically synthesized zinc oxide 1D nanorods and 2D nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Pokhrel, Nimesh; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2015-01-15

    We report on label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical immunosensors based on one-dimensional 1D ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two-dimensional 2D ZnO nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) which were synthesized on Au-coated substrates using simple one step sonochemical approach. Selective detection of cortisol using cyclic voltammetry (CV) is achieved by immobilizing anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-C(ab)) on the ZnO nanostructures (NSs). 1D ZnO-NRs and 2D ZnO-NFs provide unique sensing advantages over bulk materials. While 1D-NSs boast a high surface area to volume ratio, 2D-NSs with large area in polarized (0001) plane and high surface charge density could promote higher Anti-C(ab) loading and thus better sensing performance. Beside large surface area, ZnO-NSs also exhibit higher chemical stability, high catalytic activity, and biocompatibility. TEM studies showed that both ZnO-NSs are single crystalline oriented in (0001) plane. The measured sensing parameters are in the physiological range with a sensitivity of 11.86 µA/M exhibited by ZnO-NRs and 7.74 µA/M by ZnO-NFs with the lowest detection limit of 1 pM which is 100 times better than conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbant immunoassay (ELISA). ZnO-NSs based cortisol immunosensors were tested on human saliva samples and the performance were validated with conventional (ELISA) method which exhibits a remarkable correlation. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat for point-of-care cortisol detection and such developed protocol can be used in personalized health monitoring/diagnostic.

  14. Natural Outbreak of BVDV-1d-Induced Mucosal Disease Lacking Intestinal Lesions.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M V; Konradt, G; de Souza, S O; Bassuino, D M; Silveira, S; Mósena, A C S; Canal, C W; Pavarini, S P; Driemeier, D

    2017-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) belongs to the Pestivirus genus, which is further divided into subgenotypes (1a-1u and 2a-c). When persistent infection occurs, the calf will be immunotolerant to BVDV and possibly develop mucosal disease. This study describes an outbreak of BVDV-1d-induced mucosal disease lacking intestinal lesions. Eleven calves presented with anorexia, sialorrhea, lameness, recumbency, and death. Three calves were necropsied, showing ulceration of the interdigital skin and the oral and nasal mucosa; linear ulcers in the tongue, esophagus, and rumen; and rounded ulcers in the abomasum. Microscopically, mucosa and skin had superficial necrosis, with single-cell necrosis and vacuolation in epithelial cells, and severe parakeratosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed BVDV antigen in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells in skin and mucosa. All 11 dead calves were positive upon reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of Pestivirus along with another 11 live calves from the herd, which were positive again by RT-PCR and IHC after a 4-week interval. Sequencing of the 5' untranslated region and N-terminal protease showed that viruses from these 22 calves were homologous and of subgenotype BVDV-1d. Cytopathic BVDV was isolated from 8 of 11 dead calves, but only noncytopathic BVDV was isolated from the 11 live animals. The findings indicate that this was an outbreak of mucosal disease caused by BVDV-1d, with high morbidity, and lesions restricted to the upper alimentary system and skin and absent from intestine. Thus, the epidemiological and pathological features in this form of mucosal disease may be similar to vesicular diseases, including foot and mouth disease.

  15. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H Irradiation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Debra J. Utterbeck; Gray Chang

    2005-09-01

    The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. The AFC-1 irradiation experiments on transmutation fuels are expected to provide irradiation performance data on non-fertile and low-fertile fuel forms specifically, irradiation growth and swelling, helium production, fission gas release, fission product and fuel constituent migration, fuel phase equilibria, and fuel-cladding chemical interaction. Contained in this report are the to-date physics evaluations performed on three of the AFC-1 experiments; AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H. The AFC-1D irradiation experiment consists of metallic non-fertile fuel compositions with minor actinides for potential use in accelerator driven systems and AFC-1G and AFC-1H irradiation experiments are part of the fast neutron reactor fuel development effort. These experiments are high burnup analogs to previously irradiated experiments and are to be irradiated to = 20 atom % burnup. Results of the evaluations show that AFC-1D will remain in the ATR for approximately 100 additional effective full power days (EFPDs), and AFC-1G and AFC-1H for approximately 300 additional EFPDs in order to reach the desired programmatic burnup. The specific irradiation schedule for these tests will be determined based on future physics evaluations and all results will be documented in subsequent reports.

  16. 1D and 2D NMR of nanocellulose in aqueous colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Dallas, Jerry L; Ahn, B Kollbe; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2014-09-22

    This is the first report on surface structural elucidation of individual nanocellulose as colloidal suspensions by 1D 1H, 2D heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) as well as 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 1H NMR of rice straw CNCs (4.7 nm thick, 143 nm long, 0.04 sulfate per AG or 19.0% surface hydroxyl to sulfate conversion) resembled that of homogeneous cellulose solution. Conventional 2D HSQC NMR of CNC, CNF 1.5 (2-14 nm thick, several micrometers long, 0.10 COOH per AG) and CNF10 (2.0 nm thick, up to 1 μm long, 0.28 COOH per AG) gave H1:H2 ratios of 1.08:1, 0.97:1 and 0.94:1, respectively, all close to the theoretical 1:1 value for cellulose. The H1:H6 ratios determined from 2D HSQC NMR for CNCs, CNF1.5 and CNF10 were 1:1.47, 1:0.88 and 1:0.14, respectively, and corresponded to 26%, 56% and 93% C6 primary hydroxyl conversion to sulfate and carboxyl groups, consistent with, but more sensitive than those by conductometric titration and X-ray diffraction. Both 1H and 2D HSQC NMR data confirm that solution-state NMR detects nanocellulose surface carbons and protons primarily, validating this technique for direct surface characterization of nanocellulose in aqueous colloidal suspensions, presenting a sensitive and meaningful NMR tool for direct characterizing individual nanocellulose surfaces in never-dried state.

  17. Nano-catalysts: Bridging the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized nanoparticles have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. We envisioned a catalyst system, which can bridge the homogenous and heterogeneous system. Postsynthetic surface modifica...

  18. Isotopic homogeneity of iron in the early solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X K; Guo, Y; O'Nions, R K; Young, E D; Ash, R D

    2001-07-19

    The chemical and isotopic homogeneity of the early solar nebula, and the processes producing fractionation during its evolution, are central issues of cosmochemistry. Studies of the relative abundance variations of three or more isotopes of an element can in principle determine if the initial reservoir of material was a homogeneous mixture or if it contained several distinct sources of precursor material. For example, widespread anomalies observed in the oxygen isotopes of meteorites have been interpreted as resulting from the mixing of a solid phase that was enriched in 16O with a gas phase in which 16O was depleted, or as an isotopic 'memory' of Galactic evolution. In either case, these anomalies are regarded as strong evidence that the early solar nebula was not initially homogeneous. Here we present measurements of the relative abundances of three iron isotopes in meteoritic and terrestrial samples. We show that significant variations of iron isotopes exist in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. But when plotted in a three-isotope diagram, all of the data for these Solar System materials fall on a single mass-fractionation line, showing that homogenization of iron isotopes occurred in the solar nebula before both planetesimal accretion and chondrule formation.

  19. Rational design of D-A1-D-A2 conjugated polymers with superior spectral coverage.

    PubMed

    Hedström, Svante; Tao, Qiang; Wang, Ergang; Persson, Petter

    2015-10-28

    The spectral coverage of a light-harvesting polymer largely determines the maximum achievable photocurrent in organic photovoltaics, and therefore constitutes a crucial parameter for improving their performance. The D-A1-D-A2 copolymer motif is a new and promising design strategy for extending the absorption range by incorporating two acceptor units with complementary photoresponses. The fundamental factors that promote an extended absorption are here determined for three prototype D-A1-D-A2 systems through a combination of experimental and computational methods. Systematic quantum chemical calculations are then used to reveal the intrinsic optical properties of ten further D-A1-D-A2 polymer candidates. These investigated polymers are all predicted to exhibit intense primary absorption peaks at 615-954 nm, corresponding to charge-transfer (CT) transitions to the stronger acceptor, as well as secondary absorption features at 444-647 nm that originate from CT transitions to the weaker acceptors. Realization of D-A1-D-A2 polymers with superior spectral coverage is thereby found to depend critically on the spatial and energetic separation between the two distinct acceptor LUMOs. Two promising D-A1-D-A2 copolymer candidates were finally selected for further theoretical and experimental study, and demonstrate superior light-harvesting properties in terms of significantly extended spectral coverage. This demonstrates great potential for enhanced light-harvesting in D-A1-D-A2 polymers via multiple absorption features compared to traditional D-A polymers.

  20. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2 and -cis-1-d1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2012-09-01

    Mixtures of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2, -cis-1-d1, and -trans-1-d1 have been synthesized. Anharmonic frequencies and harmonic intensities were predicted with the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model for the out-of-plane (a″) modes of the three isotopologues. Assignments are proposed for most of the a″ vibrational modes above 500 cm-1. Ground state (GS) rotational constants have been determined for the 1,1-d2 and cis-1-d1 species from the analysis of rotational structure of C-type bands in the high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) infrared spectra in a mixture of the three isotopologues. The GS constants for the 1,1-d2 species are A0 = 0.8018850(6), B0 = 0.0418540(6), and C0 = 0.0397997(4) cm-1. The GS constants for the cis-1-d1 species are A0 = 0.809388(1), B0 = 0.043532(2), and C0 = 0.041320(1) cm-1. Small inertial defects confirm planarity for both species. These ground state rotational constants are intended for use in determining a semiexperimental equilibrium structure and evaluating the influence of chain length on π-electron delocalization in polyenes.

  1. A fast hybrid (3-D/1-D) model for thermal radiative transfer in cirrus via successive orders of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Davis, Anthony B.; Cornet, Céline; Szczap, Fredéric; Platnick, Steven; Dubuisson, Philippe; Thieuleux, François

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneity on the direct emission by cloud or surface and on the scattering by ice particles in the thermal infrared (TIR). Realistic 3-D cirri are modeled with the 3DCLOUD code, and top-of-atmosphere radiances are simulated by the 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) algorithm 3DMCPOL for two (8.65 μm and 12.05 μm) channels of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer on CALIPSO. At nadir, comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RT show that 3-D radiances are larger than their 1-D counterparts for direct emission but smaller for scattered radiation. For our cirrus cases, 99% of the 3-D total radiance is computed by the third scattering order, which corresponds to 90% of the total computational effort, but larger optical thicknesses need more scattering orders. To radically accelerate the 3-D RT computations (using only few percent of 3-D RT time with a Monte Carlo code), even in the presence of large optical depths, we develop a hybrid model based on exact 3-D direct emission, the first scattering order from 1-D in each homogenized column, and an empirical adjustment linearly dependent on the optical thickness to account for higher scattering orders. Good agreement is found between the hybrid model and the exact 3-D radiances for two very different cirrus models without changing the empirical parameters. We anticipate that a future deterministic implementation of the hybrid model will be fast enough to process multiangle thermal imagery in a practical tomographic reconstruction of 3-D cirrus fields.

  2. A Fast Hybrid (3-D/1-D) Model for Thermal Radiative Transfer in Cirrus via Successive Orders of Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Davis, Anthony B.; Cornet, Celine; Szczap, Frederic; Platnick, Steven; Dubuisson, Philippe; Thieuleux, Francois

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneity on the direct emission by cloud or surface and on the scattering by ice particles in the thermal infrared (TIR). Realistic 3-D cirri are modeled with the 3DCLOUD code, and top-of-atmosphere radiances are simulated by the 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) algorithm 3DMCPOL for two (8.65 micrometers and 12.05 micrometers) channels of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer on CALIPSO. At nadir, comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RT show that 3-D radiances are larger than their 1-D counterparts for direct emission but smaller for scattered radiation. For our cirrus cases, 99% of the 3-D total radiance is computed by the third scattering order, which corresponds to 90% of the total computational effort, but larger optical thicknesses need more scattering orders. To radically accelerate the 3-D RT computations (using only few percent of 3-D RT time with a Monte Carlo code), even in the presence of large optical depths, we develop a hybrid model based on exact 3-D direct emission, the first scattering order from 1-D in each homogenized column, and an empirical adjustment linearly dependent on the optical thickness to account for higher scattering orders. Good agreement is found between the hybrid model and the exact 3-D radiances for two very different cirrus models without changing the empirical parameters. We anticipate that a future deterministic implementation of the hybrid model will be fast enough to process multiangle thermal imagery in a practical tomographic reconstruction of 3-D cirrus fields.

  3. From 2D graphene to 1D graphene nanoribbons: dimensional crossover signals in the structural thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobry, Ariel; Costamagna, Sebastián

    2011-03-01

    I this work, by analyzing the thermal excited rippling in the graphene honeycomb lattice, we find clear signals of an existing dimensional crossover from 2D to 1D while reducing one of the dimensions of the graphene layer. Trough a joint study, using montecarlo atomistic simulations and analytical calculation based, we find that the normal-normal correlation function G (q) does not change the power law behavior valid on the long wavelength limit, however the system size dependency of the quadratic out of plane displacement h2 shows a breakdown of its corresponding scaling law. In this case we show that a new scaling law appear which correspond to a truly 1D system. On the basis of these results, and having explored a wide number of realistic systems size, we conclude that narrow nanoribbons presents strongest corrugations than the square graphene sheets. This result could have important consequences on the electron transport properties of freestanding graphene systems.

  4. Dendritic cell recognition using template matching based on one-dimensional (1D) Fourier descriptors (FD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhd Suberi, Anis Azwani; Wan Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani; Tomari, Razali; Lau, Mei Xia

    2016-07-01

    Identification of Dendritic Cell (DC) particularly in the cancer microenvironment is a unique disclosure since fighting tumor from the harnessing immune system has been a novel treatment under investigation. Nowadays, the staining procedure in sorting DC can affect their viability. In this paper, a computer aided system is proposed for automatic classification of DC in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) images. Initially, the images undergo a few steps in preprocessing to remove uneven illumination and artifacts around the cells. In segmentation, morphological operators and Canny edge are implemented to isolate the cell shapes and extract the contours. Following that, information from the contours are extracted based on Fourier descriptors, derived from one dimensional (1D) shape signatures. Eventually, cells are classified as DC by comparing template matching (TM) of established template and target images. The results show that the proposed scheme is reliable and effective to recognize DC.

  5. Homogeneous anisotropic solutions of topologically massive gravity with a cosmological constant and their homogeneous deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutsopoulos, George

    2013-06-01

    We solve the equations of topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a potentially non-vanishing cosmological constant for homogeneous metrics without isotropy. We only reproduce known solutions. We also discuss their homogeneous deformations, possibly with isotropy. We show that de Sitter space and hyperbolic space cannot be infinitesimally homogeneously deformed in TMG. We clarify some of their Segre-Petrov types and discuss the warped de Sitter spacetime.

  6. CD1d- and MR1-Restricted T Cells in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Peter A.; Anantha, Ram V.; Shaler, Christopher R.; McCormick, John K.; Haeryfar, S.M. Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to infection, such as those encountered in sepsis, can be catastrophic. Sepsis is typically triggered by an overwhelming systemic response to an infectious agent(s) and is associated with high morbidity and mortality even under optimal critical care. Recent studies have implicated unconventional, innate-like T lymphocytes, including CD1d- and MR1-restricted T cells as effectors and/or regulators of inflammatory responses during sepsis. These cell types are typified by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, variant NKT (vNKT) cells, and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. iNKT and vNKT cells are CD1d-restricted, lipid-reactive cells with remarkable immunoregulatory properties. MAIT cells participate in antimicrobial defense, and are restricted by major histocompatibility complex-related protein 1 (MR1), which displays microbe-derived vitamin B metabolites. Importantly, NKT and MAIT cells are rapid and potent producers of immunomodulatory cytokines. Therefore, they may be considered attractive targets during the early hyperinflammatory phase of sepsis when immediate interventions are urgently needed, and also in later phases when adjuvant immunotherapies could potentially reverse the dangerous state of immunosuppression. We will highlight recent findings that point to the significance or the therapeutic potentials of NKT and MAIT cells in sepsis and will also discuss what lies ahead in research in this area. PMID:26322041

  7. NOKIN1D: one-dimensional neutron kinetics based on a nodal collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdú, G.; Ginestar, D.; Miró, R.; Jambrina, A.; Barrachina, T.; Soler, Amparo; Concejal, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    The TRAC-BF1 one-dimensional kinetic model is a formulation of the neutron diffusion equation in the two energy groups' approximation, based on the analytical nodal method (ANM). The advantage compared with a zero-dimensional kinetic model is that the axial power profile may vary with time due to thermal-hydraulic parameter changes and/or actions of the control systems but at has the disadvantages that in unusual situations it fails to converge. The nodal collocation method developed for the neutron diffusion equation and applied to the kinetics resolution of TRAC-BF1 thermal-hydraulics, is an adaptation of the traditional collocation methods for the discretization of partial differential equations, based on the development of the solution as a linear combination of analytical functions. It has chosen to use a nodal collocation method based on a development of Legendre polynomials of neutron fluxes in each cell. The qualification is carried out by the analysis of the turbine trip transient from the NEA benchmark in Peach Bottom NPP using both the original 1D kinetics implemented in TRAC-BF1 and the 1D nodal collocation method.

  8. Self-assembled 1D magnetic Ising chains: epitaxial islands of Co/Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongqi; Yu, Chengtao; Pearson, John; Bader, Samuel

    2002-03-01

    We have self-assembled magnetic Co dot chains via epitaxial island decoration of grooved Ru(0001) to create a model 1D system. Co wedge-like structures of 0-60 nm thick were deposited onto flat and grooved Ru(0001) substrates via molecular beam epitaxy at 350¢ªC and characterized ex-situ with atomic force and the magnetic force microscopy (MFM), and magneto-optic Kerr effect. The grooved substrate has a saw-tooth profile with spacing of order of 1 um, due to residual polishing scratches / step bunching. Co forms strain-induced, quasi-hexagonal dots of 70-500 nm in diameter and 1-20 nm high, depending on nominal dosage. On grooved substrate, the dots self align into chains along the groove near the top and bottom of the saw-tooth structure.[1] The dots are ferromagnetically coupled along the chain and exhibit magnetic single-domains with in-plane uniaxial anisotropy along the grooves. The inter-dot magnetic pair correlation was deduced from the MFM images of the dot-chains, and can be understood in terms of the classic 1D Ising model. * Work supported by DOE BES-MS under #W-31-109-ENG-38. 1. Chengtao Yu, Dongqi Li, J. Pearson, and S.D. Bader, Appl. Phys. Lett. 78, 1228 (2001); ibid. 79, 3848 (2001).

  9. 1D and 2D Assembly of Plant Viruses for Materials Development

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Wang

    2013-01-11

    The research focused on the development of novel bionanoparticle (BNP)-based materials, especially the assembly of chemically and genetically-tailored BNP at the interface between immiscible fluids. The chemical, physical, dynamical and mechanistic aspects have been studied in this research. In particular, rod-like tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based anisotropic nanorods were synthesized via RNA or polymer assisted assembling process. Such kind of TMV-rods offers an ideal model system for the mechanistic study of orienting and packing anisotropic nanoparticles, which may have great potential in the applications of photovoltaic and field emission devices. Specific objectives include: 1) Synthesize BNPs with controlled functionality at defined positions; 2) synthesize 1D nanorods with defined length via polymer or RNA assisted assembly of TMV or TMV coat proteins; 3) self-assemble and crosslink BNPs and TMV-nanorods at liquid-liquid interfaces; 4) quantitatively characterize the structural organization of the 1D and 2D BNP-assemblies using both small angle neutron scattering and synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering; and 5) develop methods to apply grazing incidence small angle X-ray/neutron scattering to investigate the assemblies of BNPs.

  10. Pullback, forward and chaotic dynamics in 1D non-autonomous linear-dissipative equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraballo, T.; Langa, J. A.; Obaya, R.

    2017-01-01

    The global attractor of a skew product semiflow for a non-autonomous differential equation describes the asymptotic behaviour of the model. This attractor is usually characterized as the union, for all the parameters in the base space, of the associated cocycle attractors in the product space. The continuity of the cocycle attractor in the parameter is usually a difficult question. In this paper we develop in detail a 1D non-autonomous linear differential equation and show the richness of non-autonomous dynamics by focusing on the continuity, characterization and chaotic dynamics of the cocycle attractors. In particular, we analyse the sets of continuity and discontinuity for the parameter of the attractors, and relate them with the eventually forward behaviour of the processes. We will also find chaotic behaviour on the attractors in the Li-Yorke and Auslander-Yorke senses. Note that they hold for linear 1D equations, which shows a crucial difference with respect to the presence of chaotic dynamics in autonomous systems.

  11. A multiple digital watermarking algorithm based on 1D and 2D chaotic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhen; Jiang, Lai; Jin, Jing; Zhang, Jihong

    2003-09-01

    Multiple digital watermarking is attracting more and more researchers because it is more valuable in the practical applications than single watermarking. In this paper, a multiple watermarking algorithm based on 1-D and 2-D chaotic sequences is proposed. The chaotic sequences have the advantages of massive, high security, and weakest correlation. The massive and independent digital watermark signals are generated through 1-D chaotic maps, which are determined by different initial conditions and parameters. The chaotic digital watermark signals effectively resolve the construction of massive watermarks with good performance. The embedding of multiple watermakrs is more complex than the single watermarking scheme. In this paper, each watermark is added to the middle frequency coefficients of wavelet domain randomly by exploiting 2-D chaotic system, so the embedding and extracting of each watermark would not disturb each other. Considering the parameters of 2-D chaotic systsem as the key to embedding procedure can prevent the watermarks to be removed maliciously, therefore the performance of security is better. The capacity of the multiple watermarking is also analyzed in this paper. The experimental results demonstrate that this proposed watermarking algorithm is robust to many common attacks and it is a reliable copyright protection for multiple legal owners.

  12. Homogeneity of gels and gel-derived glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    The significance and implications of gel preparation procedures in controlling the homogeneity of multicomponent oxide gels are discussed. The role of physicochemical factors such as the structure and chemical reactivities of alkoxides, the formation of double-metal alkoxides, and the nature of solvent(s) are critically analyzed in the context of homogeneity of gels during gelation. Three procedures for preparing gels in the SiO2-B2O3-Na2O system are examined in the context of cation distribution. Light scattering results for glasses in the SiO2-B2O3-Na2O system prepared by both the gel technique and the conventional technique are examined.

  13. Simulator for SUPO, a Benchmark Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-10-14

    A simulator has been developed for SUPO (Super Power) an aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) that operated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) from 1951 to 1974. During that period SUPO accumulated approximately 600,000 kWh of operation. It is considered the benchmark for steady-state operation of an AHR. The SUPO simulator was developed using the process that resulted in a simulator for an accelerator-driven subcritical system, which has been previously reported.

  14. Steps Towards a Homogenized Sub-Monthly Temperature Monitoring Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, J.; Kunkel, K.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface air temperature products have been essential for monitoring the evolution of the climate system. Before a temperature dataset is included in such reports, it is important that non-climatic influences be removed or changed so the dataset is considered homogenous. These inhomogeneities include changes in station location, instrumentation and observing practices. Very few datasets are free of these influences and therefore require homogenization schemes. While many homogenized products exist on the monthly time scale, few daily products exist, due to the complication of removing break points that are truly inhomogeneous rather than solely by chance (for example, sharp changes due to synoptic conditions). Since there is a high demand for sub-monthly monitoring tools, there is a need to address these issues. The Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily dataset provides a strong foundation of the Earth's climate on the daily scale, and is the official archive of daily data in the United States. While the dataset adheres to a strict set of quality assurance, no daily adjustments are applied. However, this dataset lays the groundwork for other products distributed at NCEI-Asheville, including the climate divisional dataset (nClimDiv), the North American monthly homogenized product (Northam) and the 1981-2010 Normals. Since these downstream products already provide homogenization and base period schemes, it makes sense to combine these datasets to provide a sub-monthly monitoring tool for the United States. Using these datasets already in existence, monthly adjustments are applied to daily data, and then anomalies are created using a base climatology defined by the 1981-2010 Normals. Station data is then aggregated to the state level and then regions defined by the National Climate Assessment. Ranks are then created to provide informational monitoring tools that could be of use for public dissemination. This presentation goes over the product, including

  15. 1D quantum simulation using a solid state platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkendall, Megan; Irvin, Patrick; Huang, Mengchen; Levy, Jeremy; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom

    Understanding the properties of large quantum systems can be challenging both theoretically and numerically. One experimental approach-quantum simulation-involves mapping a quantum system of interest onto a physical system that is programmable and experimentally accessible. A tremendous amount of work has been performed with quantum simulators formed from optical lattices; by contrast, solid-state platforms have had only limited success. Our experimental approach to quantum simulation takes advantage of nanoscale control of a metal-insulator transition at the interface between two insulating complex oxide materials. This system naturally exhibits a wide variety of ground states (e.g., ferromagnetic, superconducting) and can be configured into a variety of complex geometries. We will describe initial experiments that explore the magnetotransport properties of one-dimensional superlattices with spatial periods as small as 4 nm, comparable to the Fermi wavelength. The results demonstrate the potential of this solid-state quantum simulation approach, and also provide empirical constraints for physical models that describe the underlying oxide material properties. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from AFOSR (FA9550-12-1- 0057 (JL), FA9550-10-1-0524 (JL) and FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR N00014-15-1-2847 (JL), and NSF DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  16. Method of Mapping Anomalies in Homogenous Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electrical conductor and antenna are positioned in a fixed relationship to one another. Relative lateral movement is generated between the electrical conductor and a homogenous material while maintaining the electrical conductor at a fixed distance from the homogenous material. The antenna supplies a time-varying magnetic field that causes the electrical conductor to resonate and generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this lateral movement are indicative of a lateral location of a subsurface anomaly. Next, relative out-of-plane movement is generated between the electrical conductor and the homogenous material in the vicinity of the anomaly's lateral location. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this out-of-plane movement are indicative of a depth location of the subsurface anomaly. A recording of the disruptions provides a mapping of the anomaly.

  17. Computational Homogenization of Defect Driving Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, Sarah; Mergheim, Julia; Steinmann, Paul

    Due to the fact that many engineering materials and also biological tissues possess an underlying (heterogeneous) micro-structure it is not sufficient to simulate these materials by pre-assumed overall constitutive assumptions. Therefore, we apply a homogenization scheme, which determines the macroscopic material behavior based on analysis of the underlying micro-structure. In the work at hand focus is put on the extension of the classical computational homogenization scheme towards the homogenization of material forces. Therefore, volume forces have to incorporated which may emerge due to inhomogeneities in the material. With assistance of this material formulation and the equivalence of the J-integral and the material force at a crack tip, studies on the influence of the micro-structure onto the macroscopic crack-propagation are carried out.

  18. XPB Induces C1D Expression to Counteract UV-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Liu, Juhong; Abu-Asab, Mones; Masabumi, Shibuya; Maru, Yoshiro

    2010-01-01

    Although C1D has been shown to be involved in DNA double-strand breaks repair, how C1D expression was induced and the mechanism(s) by which C1D facilitates DNA repair in mammalian cells remain poorly understood. We and others have previously shown that expression of XPB protein efficiently compensated the UV-irradiation sensitive phenotype of 27-1 cells which lacks functional XPB. To further explore XPB-regulated genes that could be involved in UV-induced DNA repair, Differential Display analysis of mRNA level from CHO-9, 27-1 and 27-1 complemented with wild-type XPB were performed and C1D gene was identified as one of the major genes whose expression was significantly up-regulated by restoring XPB function. We found that XPB is essential to induce C1D transcription after UV-irradiation. The increase of C1D expression effectively compensates the UV-induced proteolysis of C1D and thus maintains cellular C1D level to cope with DNA damage inflicted by UV-irradiation. We further showed that although insufficient to rescue 27-1 cells from UV-induced apoptosis by itself, C1D facilitates XPB DNA repair through direct interaction with XPB. Our findings provided direct evidence that C1D is associated with DNA repair complex and may promote repair of UV-induced DNA damage. PMID:20530579

  19. Quasi 1D Modeling of Mixed Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Woolwine, Kyle J.

    2012-01-01

    The AeroServoElasticity task under the NASA Supersonics Project is developing dynamic models of the propulsion system and the vehicle in order to conduct research for integrated vehicle dynamic performance. As part of this effort, a nonlinear quasi 1-dimensional model of the 2-dimensional bifurcated mixed compression supersonic inlet is being developed. The model utilizes computational fluid dynamics for both the supersonic and subsonic diffusers. The oblique shocks are modeled utilizing compressible flow equations. This model also implements variable geometry required to control the normal shock position. The model is flexible and can also be utilized to simulate other mixed compression supersonic inlet designs. The model was validated both in time and in the frequency domain against the legacy LArge Perturbation INlet code, which has been previously verified using test data. This legacy code written in FORTRAN is quite extensive and complex in terms of the amount of software and number of subroutines. Further, the legacy code is not suitable for closed loop feedback controls design, and the simulation environment is not amenable to systems integration. Therefore, a solution is to develop an innovative, more simplified, mixed compression inlet model with the same steady state and dynamic performance as the legacy code that also can be used for controls design. The new nonlinear dynamic model is implemented in MATLAB Simulink. This environment allows easier development of linear models for controls design for shock positioning. The new model is also well suited for integration with a propulsion system model to study inlet/propulsion system performance, and integration with an aero-servo-elastic system model to study integrated vehicle ride quality, vehicle stability, and efficiency.

  20. On the Limit Cycles Bifurcating from Piecewise Quasi-Homogeneous Differential Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shimin; Wu, Kuilin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a class of piecewise smooth quasi-homogeneous differential systems are considered. Using the first order Melnikov function derived in [Liu & Han, 2010], we obtain a lower bound of the maximum number of limit cycles which bifurcate from the periodic annulus of the center under polynomial perturbation. The results reveal that piecewise smooth quasi-homogeneous differential systems can bifurcate more limit cycles than the smooth systems.

  1. Hyperelastic bodies under homogeneous Cauchy stress induced by non-homogeneous finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Neff, Patrizio

    2017-03-01

    We discuss whether homogeneous Cauchy stress implies homogeneous strain in isotropic nonlinear elasticity. While for linear elasticity the positive answer is clear, we exhibit, through detailed calculations, an example with inhomogeneous continuous deformation but constant Cauchy stress. The example is derived from a non rank-one convex elastic energy.

  2. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections.

  3. Low-Frequency Electronic Noise in Quasi-1D TaSe3 van der Waals Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanxiong; Rumyantsev, Sergey; Bloodgood, Matthew A; Salguero, Tina T; Shur, Michael; Balandin, Alexander A

    2017-01-11

    We report results of investigation of the low-frequency electronic excess noise in quasi-1D nanowires of TaSe3 capped with quasi-2D h-BN layers. Semimetallic TaSe3 is a quasi-1D van der Waals material with exceptionally high breakdown current density. It was found that TaSe3 nanowires have lower levels of the normalized noise spectral density, SI/I(2), compared to carbon nanotubes and graphene (I is the current). The temperature-dependent measurements revealed that the low-frequency electronic 1/f noise becomes the 1/f(2) type as temperature increases to ∼400 K, suggesting the onset of electromigration (f is the frequency). Using the Dutta-Horn random fluctuation model of the electronic noise in metals, we determined that the noise activation energy for quasi-1D TaSe3 nanowires is approximately EP ≈ 1.0 eV. In the framework of the empirical noise model for metallic interconnects, the extracted activation energy, related to electromigration is EA = 0.88 eV, consistent with that for Cu and Al interconnects. Our results shed light on the physical mechanism of low-frequency 1/f noise in quasi-1D van der Waals semimetals and suggest that such material systems have potential for ultimately downscaled local interconnect applications.

  4. Enhancement of long-range correlations in a 2D vortex lattice by an incommensurate 1D disorder potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillamon, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Cordoba, R.; Sese, J.; de Teresa, J. M.; Ibarra, R.

    In two dimensional (2D) systems, theory has proposed that random disorder destroys long range correlations driving a transition to a glassy state. Here, I will discuss new insights into this issue obtained through the direct visualization of the critical behaviour of a 2D superconducting vortex lattice formed in a thin film with a smooth 1D thickness modulation. Using scanning tunneling microscopy at 0.1K, we have tracked the modification in the 2D vortex arrangements induced by the 1D thickness modulation while increasing the vortex density by three orders of magnitude. Upon increasing the field, we observed a two-step order-disorder transition in the 2D vortex lattice mediated by the appearance of dislocations and disclinations and accompanied by an increase in the local vortex density fluctuations. Through a detailed analysis of correlation functions, we find that the transition is driven by the incommensurate 1D thickness modulation. We calculate the critical points and exponents and find that they are well above theoretical expectation for random disorder. Our results show that long range 1D correlations in random potentials enhance the stability range of the ordered phase in a 2D vortex lattice. Work supported by Spanish MINECO, CIG Marie Curie Grant, Axa Research Fund and FBBVA.

  5. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections. PMID:25888513

  6. Reactions of HO2 with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide and of O/1 D/ with water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the reactions of the hydroperoxyl radical with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide in a static system, and reexamination of the reaction of O(1 D) with water. The HO2 radicals were generated by the photolysis of N2O at 2139 A in the presence of excess H2O or H2 and smaller amounts of CO and O2. The O(1 D) atoms produced from the photolysis of N2O react with H2O or with H2 to give OH radicals in the case of H2O or OH radicals and H atoms in the case of H2. With H2O, two OH radicals are produced for each O(1 D) removed at low pressures, but the OH yield drops as the pressure is raised. This drop is attributed to an insertion reaction which removes from 10 to 30% of the O(1 D) atoms at about 650 torr of H2O at 200 F. The OH radicals generated can react with either CO or H2 to produce H atoms, which then add to O2 to produce HO2. In the absence of NO, the HO2 radicals could react by two routes, while with NO present NO2 is produced in a long chain process.

  7. Tandem repeats modify the structure of the canine CD1D gene.

    PubMed

    Looringh van Beeck, F A; Leegwater, P A J; Herrmann, T; Broere, F; Rutten, V P M G; Willemse, T; Van Rhijn, I

    2013-06-01

    Among the CD1 proteins that present lipid antigens to T cells, CD1d is the only one that stimulates a population of T cells with an invariant T-cell receptor known as NKT cells. Sequencing of a 722 nucleotide gap in the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome revealed that the canine CD1D gene lacks a sequence homologous to exon 2 of human CD1D, coding for the start codon and signal peptide. Also, the canine CD1D gene contains three different short tandem repeats that disrupt the expected gene structure. Because canine CD1D cDNA lacks sequences homologous to human exon 2 and 3, the functionality of canine CD1d protein may be affected, and this could have consequences for the development and activation of canine NKT cells.

  8. Statistics of scattered photons from a driven three-level emitter in 1D open space

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Dibyendu; Bondyopadhaya, Nilanjan

    2014-01-07

    We derive the statistics of scattered photons from a Λ- or ladder-type three-level emitter (3LE) embedded in a 1D open waveguide. The weak probe photons in the waveguide are coupled to one of the two allowed transitions of the 3LE, and the other transition is driven by a control beam. This system shows electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) which is accompanied with the Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) at a strong driving by the control beam, and some of these effects have been observed recently. We show that the nature of second-order coherence of the transmitted probe photons near two-photon resonance changes from bunching to antibunching to constant as strength of the control beam is ramped up from zero to a higher value where the ATS appears.

  9. GE SBWR stability analysis using TRAC-BF1 1-D kinetics model

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Baratta, A.J.; Robinson, G.E.

    1996-07-01

    GE`s simplified boiling water reactor, with its unique feature of using natural circulation to remove the heat from the reactor core, is a complicated dynamic system. Previous work by authors using the TRAC-BF1 code and a point kinetics model predicted that an SBWR may experience large amplitude power oscillation under certain low pressure and high power operating conditions. To further confirm the existence of this power oscillation and explore the dynamic spatial reactor power distribution, the TRAC-BF1 1-D kinetics model was used. The results show that an instability exists and the power oscillation starting time and maximum peak power are different from the point kinetics results.

  10. TAU: A 1D radiative transfer code for transmission spectroscopy of extrasolar planet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, M. D. J.; Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.

    2013-10-01

    The TAU code is a 1D line-by-line radiative transfer code, which is generally applicable for modelling transmission spectra of close-in extrasolar planets. The inputs are the assumed pressure-temperature profile of the planetary atmosphere, the continuum absorption coefficients and the absorption cross-sections for the trace molecular absorbers present in the model, as well as the fundamental system parameters taken from the published literature. The program then calculates the optical path through the planetary atmosphere of the radiation from the host star, and quantifies the absorption due to the modelled composition in a transmission spectrum of transit depth as a function of wavelength. The code is written in C++, parallelised using OpenMP, and is available for public download and use from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/exoplanets/. Running time: From 0:5 to 500 s, depending on run parameters

  11. TAU: A 1D radiative transfer code for transmission spectroscopy of extrasolar planet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, M. D. J.; Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.

    2014-02-01

    The TAU code is a 1D line-by-line radiative transfer code, which is generally applicable for modeling transmission spectra of close-in extrasolar planets. The inputs are the assumed temperature-pressure profile of the planetary atmosphere, the continuum absorption coefficients and the absorption cross-sections for the trace molecular absorbers present in the model, as well as the fundamental system parameters taken from the published literature. The program then calculates the optical path through the planetary atmosphere of the radiation from the host star, and quantifies the absorption due to the modeled composition in a transmission spectrum of transit depth as a function of wavelength. The code is written in C++, parallelized using OpenMP, and is available for public download and use from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/exoplanets/.

  12. Stratospheric Impact of 1D-Variation Assimilation of TOVS/ATOVS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokke, Laurie; Joiner, Joanna

    1999-01-01

    This paper will present an assessment of the impact to the stratospheric circulation of the DAO-GEOS2 (Data Assimilation Office -Goddard Earth Observing System) attributable to an improved 1D-Variational retrieval of heights. The assimilated heights are retrieved from both the TOVS (TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder) and the ATOVS (Advanced TOVS) sounders. Each sounder's sensitivity to temperature changes in the stratosphere will be addressed and its relationship to the model's background flow evaluated. Also detailed are the steps to ensure the quality of the data being assimilated. Finally the temporal and spatial scales, important to the stratospheric mean flow, will be evaluated in terms of the DAO-GEOS2 response to the assimilated heights.

  13. 1D valence bond solids in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaizzi, Adam; Sandvik, Anders W.

    2015-09-01

    A Valence bond solid (VBS) is a nonmagnetic, long-range ordered state of a quantum spin system where local spin singlets are formed in some regular pattern. We here study the competition between VBS order and a fully polarized ferromagnetic state as function of an external magnetic field in a one-dimensional extended Heisenberg model—the J-Q2 model— using stochastic series expansion (SSE) quantum Monte Carlo simulations with directed loop updates. We discuss the ground state phase diagram.

  14. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  15. Multiscale Modeling Techniques for Plasmas: 1D Scaling Results and Application to Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, M. A.; Dorland, B.; Drake, J. F.; Stantchev, G.

    2005-12-01

    We examine a novel simulation scheme called "equation free projective integration"[1] which has the potential to allow global simulations which still include microscale physics, a necessary ingredient in order to model multiscale problems. Such codes could be used to examine the global effects of reconnection and turbulence in the Earth's magnetosphere, and the solar corona, as well as in laboratory Tokamaks. Using this method to simulate the propagation and steepening of a 1D ion acoustic wave, we have already achieved excellent agreement between full particle codes and equation free with a factor of 20 speed-up. This speedup appears to scale linearly with system size, so large scale 2D and 3D simulations using this method will show a speedup of 100 or more. In this method of simulation, the global plasma variables stepped forward in time are not time-integrated directly using dynamical differential equations, hence the name "equation free." Instead, these variables are represented on a microgrid using a kinetic simulation. This microsimulation is integrated forward long enough to determine the time derivatives of the global plasma variables, which are then used to integrate forward the global variables with much larger timesteps. Results will be presented of the successful application of equation free to 1-D ion acoustic wave steepening with a PIC code serving as the underlying kinetic model. Initial results of this technique applied to magnetic reconnection will also be discussed. 1 I. G. Kevrekidis et. al., Equation-free multiscale computation: Enabling microscopic simulators to perform system-level tasks, arXiv:physics/0209043.

  16. PmTBC1D20, a Rab GTPase-activating protein from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, is involved in white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yingvilasprasert, Wanchart; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2014-02-01

    TBC (TRE2/BUB2/CDC16) domain proteins contain an ≈ 200-amino-acid motif and function as Rab GTPase-activating proteins that are required for regulating the activity of Rab proteins, and so, in turn, endocytic membrane trafficking in cells. TBC domain family member 20 (TBC1D20) has recently been reported to mediate Hepatitis C virus replication. Herein, PmTBC1D20 identified from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, was characterized and evaluated for its role in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. The full-length cDNA sequence of PmTBC1D20 contains 2003 bp with a predicted 1443 bp open reading frame encoding a deduced 480 amino acid protein. Its transcript levels were significantly up-regulated at 24 and 48 h by ≈ 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively, after systemic infection with WSSV. In addition, depletion of PmTBC1D20 transcript in shrimps by double stranded RNA interference led to a decrease in the level of transcripts of three WSSV genes (VP28, ie1 and wsv477). This suggests the importance of PmTBC1D20 in WSSV infection. This is the first report of TBC1D20 in a crustacean and reveals the possible mechanism used by WSSV to modulate the activity of the host protein, PmTBC1D20, for its benefit in viral trafficking and replication.

  17. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  18. Revisiting Shock Initiation Modeling of Homogeneous Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2013-04-01

    Shock initiation of homogeneous explosives has been a subject of research since the 1960s, with neat and sensitized nitromethane as the main materials for experiments. A shock initiation model of homogeneous explosives was established in the early 1960s. It involves a thermal explosion event at the shock entrance boundary, which develops into a superdetonation that overtakes the initial shock. In recent years, Sheffield and his group, using accurate experimental tools, were able to observe details of buildup of the superdetonation. There are many papers on modeling shock initiation of heterogeneous explosives, but there are only a few papers on modeling shock initiation of homogeneous explosives. In this article, bulk reaction reactive flow equations are used to model homogeneous shock initiation in an attempt to reproduce experimental data of Sheffield and his group. It was possible to reproduce the main features of the shock initiation process, including thermal explosion, superdetonation, input shock overtake, overdriven detonation after overtake, and the beginning of decay toward Chapman-Jouget (CJ) detonation. The time to overtake (TTO) as function of input pressure was also calculated and compared to the experimental TTO.

  19. HSTEP - Homogeneous Studies of Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a summary of the HSTEP project: an effort to calculate the physical properties of the known transiting extrasolar planets using a homogeneous approach. I discuss the motivation for the project, list the 83 planets which have already been studied, run through some important aspects of the methodology, and finish with a synopsis of the results.

  20. Homogeneous Immunoassays: Historical Perspective and Future Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, Edwin F.

    1999-06-01

    The founding and growth of Syva Company is examined in the context of its leadership role in the development of homogeneous immunoassays. The simple mix and read protocols of these methods offer advantages in routine analytical and clinical applications. Early homogeneous methods were based on insensitive detection of immunoprecipitation during antigen/antibody binding. The advent of reporter groups in biology provided a means of quantitating immunochemical binding by labeling antibody or antigen and physically separating label incorporated into immune complexes from free label. Although high sensitivity was achieved, quantitative separations were experimentally demanding. Only when it became apparent that reporter groups could provide information, not only about the location of a molecule but also about its microscopic environment, was it possible to design practical non-separation methods. The evolution of early homogenous immunoassays was driven largely by the development of improved detection strategies. The first commercial spin immunoassays, developed by Syva for drug abuse testing during the Vietnam war, were followed by increasingly powerful methods such as immunochemical modulation of enzyme activity, fluorescence, and photo-induced chemiluminescence. Homogeneous methods that quantify analytes at femtomolar concentrations within a few minutes now offer important new opportunities in clinical diagnostics, nucleic acid detection and drug discovery.

  1. Spatial Homogeneity and Redshift--Distance Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, J. F.; Segal, I. E.

    1982-06-01

    Spatial homogeneity in the radial direction of low-redshift galaxies is subjected to Kafka-Schmidt V/Vm tests using well-documented samples. Homogeneity is consistent with the assumption of the Lundmark (quadratic redshift-distance) law, but large deviations from homogeneity are implied by the assumption of the Hubble (linear redshift-distance) law. These deviations are similar to what would be expected on the basis of the Lundmark law. Luminosity functions are obtained for each law by a nonparametric statistically optimal method that removes the observational cutoff bias in complete samples. Although the Hubble law correlation of absolute magnitude with redshift is reduced considerably by elimination of the bias, computer simulations show that its bias-free value is nevertheless at a satistically quite significant level, indicating the self-inconsistency of the law. The corresponding Lundmark law correlations are quite satisfactory satistically. The regression of redshift on magnitude also involves radial spatial homogeneity and, according to R. Soneira, has slope determining the redshift-magnitude exponent independently of the luminosity function. We have, however, rigorously proved the material dependence of the regression on this function and here exemplify our treatment by using the bias-free functions indicated, with results consistent with the foregoing argument.

  2. Reduced-order modelling numerical homogenization.

    PubMed

    Abdulle, A; Bai, Y

    2014-08-06

    A general framework to combine numerical homogenization and reduced-order modelling techniques for partial differential equations (PDEs) with multiple scales is described. Numerical homogenization methods are usually efficient to approximate the effective solution of PDEs with multiple scales. However, classical numerical homogenization techniques require the numerical solution of a large number of so-called microproblems to approximate the effective data at selected grid points of the computational domain. Such computations become particularly expensive for high-dimensional, time-dependent or nonlinear problems. In this paper, we explain how numerical homogenization method can benefit from reduced-order modelling techniques that allow one to identify offline and online computational procedures. The effective data are only computed accurately at a carefully selected number of grid points (offline stage) appropriately 'interpolated' in the online stage resulting in an online cost comparable to that of a single-scale solver. The methodology is presented for a class of PDEs with multiple scales, including elliptic, parabolic, wave and nonlinear problems. Numerical examples, including wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and solute transport in unsaturated porous media, illustrate the proposed method.

  3. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1991-12-31

    It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus that can reduce the apparent coherence length of a laser beam so the beam can be used with an inexpensive homogenizer to produce an output beam with a uniform spatial intensity across its entire cross section. It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved homogenizer with a variable aperture size that is simple and easily made. It is still an additional object of the invention to provide an improved liquid filled homogenizer utilizing total internal reflection for improved efficiency. These, and other objects of the invention are realized by using a ``coherence delay line,`` according to the present invention, in series between a laser and a homogenizer. The coherence delay line is an optical ``line`` that comprises two mirrors, one partially reflecting, and one totally reflecting, arranged so that light incident from the laser first strikes the partially reflecting mirror. A portion of the beam passes through, and a portion is reflected back to the totally reflecting mirror.

  4. General Theorems about Homogeneous Ellipsoidal Inclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korringa, J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Mathematical theorems about the properties of ellipsoids are developed. Included are Poisson's theorem concerning the magnetization of a homogeneous body of ellipsoidal shape, the polarization of a dielectric, the transport of heat or electricity through an ellipsoid, and other problems. (BB)

  5. Onset of thermalization in a 1D Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riou, Jean-Felix; Reinhard, Aaron W.; Adams, Laura; Weiss, David S.

    2011-05-01

    There has been considerable theoretical debate about how nearly integrable many-body quantum systems approach thermal equilibrium. Experiments on one dimensional Bose gases in optical lattices may shed light on this issue. We have studied the time evolution of momentum distributions of Rb clouds initially prepared in ``quantum Newton's cradle'' states [T. Kinoshita, T. Wenger and David S. Weiss, ``A quantum Newton's Cradle,'' Nature 440, 900 (2006)]. The measured evolution rates are found to depend on density and lattice depth. In order to isolate the part of the approach to equilibrium due to atom-atom interactions, it has been necessary to quantify, experimentally and theoretically, the contributions of various heating and loss processes to these rates.

  6. Tunable Design of Structural Colors Produced by Pseudo-1D Photonic Crystals of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Tong, Liping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    It is broadly observed that graphene oxide (GO) films appear transparent with a thickness of about several nanometers, whereas they appear dark brown or almost black with thickness of more than 1 μm. The basic color mechanism of GO film on a sub-micrometer scale, however, is not well understood. This study reports on GO pseudo-1D photonic crystals (p1D-PhCs) exhibiting tunable structural colors in the visible wavelength range owing to its 1D Bragg nanostructures. Striking structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs could be tuned by simply changing either the volume or concentration of the aqueous GO dispersion during vacuum filtration. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between thickness and reflection wavelength of GO p1D-PhCs has been revealed, thereby providing a theoretical basis to rationally design structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs. The spectral response of GO p1D-PhCs to humidity is also obtained clearly showing the wavelength shift of GO p1D-PhCs at differently relative humidity values and thus encouraging the integration of structural color printing and the humidity-responsive property of GO p1D-PhCs to develop a visible and fast-responsive anti-counterfeiting label. The results pave the way for a variety of potential applications of GO in optics, structural color printing, sensing, and anti-counterfeiting.

  7. Physical Justification for Negative Remanent Magnetization in Homogeneous Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuo; He, Weidong; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Taisen; Jin, Yi; ElBidweihy, Hatem; Mao, Yiwu; Dickerson, James H.; Wagner, Michael J.; Torre, Edward Della; Bennett, Lawrence H.

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of negative remanent magnetization (NRM) has been observed experimentally in a number of heterogeneous magnetic systems and has been considered anomalous. The existence of NRM in homogenous magnetic materials is still in debate, mainly due to the lack of compelling support from experimental data and a convincing theoretical explanation for its thermodynamic validation. Here we resolve the long-existing controversy by presenting experimental evidence and physical justification that NRM is real in a prototype homogeneous ferromagnetic nanoparticle, an europium sulfide nanoparticle. We provide novel insights into major and minor hysteresis behavior that illuminate the true nature of the observed inverted hysteresis and validate its thermodynamic permissibility and, for the first time, present counterintuitive magnetic aftereffect behavior that is consistent with the mechanism of magnetization reversal, possessing unique capability to identify NRM. The origin and conditions of NRM are explained quantitatively via a wasp-waist model, in combination of energy calculations. PMID:25183061

  8. Interferometric homogeneity test using adaptive frequency comb illumination.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Klaus; Schwider, Johannes

    2013-03-20

    The homogeneity test of glass plates in a Fizeau interferometer requires the measurement of the glass sample in reflected as well as in transmitted light. For the measurement in transmitted light, the sample has to be inserted into the ray path of a Fizeau or Twyman-Green interferometer, which leads to a nested cavity setup. To separate the interference signals from the different cavities, we illuminate a Fizeau interferometer with an adaptive frequency comb. In this way, rigid glass plates can be measured, and linear variations in the homogeneity can also be detected. The adaptive frequency comb is provided by a variable Fabry-Perot filter under broadband illumination from a superluminescence diode. Compared to approaches using a two-beam interferometer as a filter for the broadband light source, the visibility of the fringe system is considerably higher.

  9. Canonical distributions on Riemannian homogeneous k-symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashchenko, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that distributions generated by almost product structures are applicable, in particular, to some problems in the theory of Monge-Ampère equations. In this paper, we characterize canonical distributions defined by canonical almost product structures on Riemannian homogeneous k-symmetric spaces in the sense of types AF (anti-foliation), F (foliation), TGF (totally geodesic foliation). Algebraic criteria for all these types on k-symmetric spaces of orders k = 4, 5, 6 were obtained. Note that canonical distributions on homogeneous k-symmetric spaces are closely related to special canonical almost complex structures and f-structures, which were recently applied by I. Khemar to studying elliptic integrable systems.

  10. Physical librations and possible homogeneity of natural moons from astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainey, Valery; Cooper, Nicholas; Murray, Carl; Noyelles, Benoît; Pasewladt, Andreas; Robert, Vincent; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Thuillot, William

    2016-10-01

    Astrometry is the discipline that aims to provide positions of celestial objects in space with the highest accuracy. Thanks to recent space missions like Mars Express and Cassini, astrometric measurements of moons have allowed the probing of the gravity environment of their systems with unprecedented resolution. Here we focus on the possible determination of physical librations on the rotation of the moons, by modelling their effects on the moons' orbits. Assuming a homogeneous density, a theoretical expectation of the main libration can be computed and compared with possible observed values obtained indirectly from the orbit. In this work, we obtain for Phobos a physical libration of 1.04 +/- 0.02 degrees, in agreement with a homogeneous interior. The case of some of the inner moons of Saturn will be addressed, also.

  11. Physical justification for negative remanent magnetization in homogeneous nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuo; He, Weidong; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Taisen; Jin, Yi; ElBidweihy, Hatem; Mao, Yiwu; Dickerson, James H; Wagner, Michael J; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H

    2014-09-03

    The phenomenon of negative remanent magnetization (NRM) has been observed experimentally in a number of heterogeneous magnetic systems and has been considered anomalous. The existence of NRM in homogenous magnetic materials is still in debate, mainly due to the lack of compelling support from experimental data and a convincing theoretical explanation for its thermodynamic validation. Here we resolve the long-existing controversy by presenting experimental evidence and physical justification that NRM is real in a prototype homogeneous ferromagnetic nanoparticle, an europium sulfide nanoparticle. We provide novel insights into major and minor hysteresis behavior that illuminate the true nature of the observed inverted hysteresis and validate its thermodynamic permissibility and, for the first time, present counterintuitive magnetic aftereffect behavior that is consistent with the mechanism of magnetization reversal, possessing unique capability to identify NRM. The origin and conditions of NRM are explained quantitatively via a wasp-waist model, in combination of energy calculations.

  12. An epidemic model to evaluate the homogeneous mixing assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnes, P. P.; Monteiro, L. H. A.

    2014-11-01

    Many epidemic models are written in terms of ordinary differential equations (ODE). This approach relies on the homogeneous mixing assumption; that is, the topological structure of the contact network established by the individuals of the host population is not relevant to predict the spread of a pathogen in this population. Here, we propose an epidemic model based on ODE to study the propagation of contagious diseases conferring no immunity. The state variables of this model are the percentages of susceptible individuals, infectious individuals and empty space. We show that this dynamical system can experience transcritical and Hopf bifurcations. Then, we employ this model to evaluate the validity of the homogeneous mixing assumption by using real data related to the transmission of gonorrhea, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and obesity.

  13. Double resonant processes in 1D nonlinear periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmiak, Vladimir; Konotop, Vladimir

    2001-03-01

    We consider one-dimensional periodic structure consisting of alternating layers fabricated from the materials possessing \\chi^(2) nonlinearity and assume that the filling fraction and the dielectric permittivities of the slabs are chosen in such a way that resonant contions for the generation for the second and third harmonic are satisfied simultaneously. The possibility of such process is demonstrated in the structure consisting of the alternating slabs of AlGaAs and InSb. The wave evolution is described in terms of envelope function approach. By taking account three resonant waves one obtains a system of coupled-mode differential equations. One of the solutions which is of special importance is that of having a constant amplitude and the first and third harmonic having zero amplitude. We analyze the stability of the solutions and show that the use of the double resonance allows one to obtain difference generation. A particular example of such a process is fractional conversion ω arrow (2/3)ω which takes place with the participation of the mode with the frequency ω/3.

  14. The Magical Geometry of 1D Quantum Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamadeala, Eugeniu

    We investigate the edge properties of Abelian topological phases in two spatial dimensions. We discover that many of them support multiple fully chiral edge phases, with surprising and measurable experimental consequences. Using the machinery of conformal field theory and integral quadratic forms we establish that distinct chiral edge phases correspond to genera of positive-definite integral lattices. This completes the notion of bulk-boundary correspondence for topological phases. We establish that by tuning inter-channel interactions the system can be made to transition between the different edge phases without closing the bulk gap. Separately we construct a family of one-dimensional models, called Perfect Metals, with no relevant mass-generating operators. These theories describe stable quantum critical phases of interacting fermions, bosons or spins in a quantum nanowire. These models rigorously answer a long-standing question about the existence of stable metallic phases in one and two spatial dimensions in the presence of generic disorder. Separately, they are the first example of a stable phase of an infinite parallel array of coupled Luttinger liquids. We perform a detailed study of the transport properties of Perfect Metals and show that in addition to violating the Wiedemann-Franz law, they naturally exhibit low power-law dependence of electric and thermal conductivities on temperature all the way to zero temperature. We dub this phenomenological set of properties a hyperconductor because in some sense, hyperconductors are better conductors that superconductors, which may have thermal conductivities that are exponentially small in temperature.

  15. Nanoelectronic Modeling (NEMO): Moving from commercial grade 1-D simulation to prototype 3-D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2001-03-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of commercially pursued heterostructure devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared photodetectors, and quantum well lasers are enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The creation of these heterostructure devices is realized in a vast design space of material compositions, layer thicknesses and doping profiles. The full experimental exploration of this design space is unfeasible and a reliable design tool is needed. The Nanoelectronic Modeling tool (NEMO) is one of the first commercial grade attempts for such a modeling tool. NEMO was developed as a general-purpose quantum mechanics-based 1-D device design and analysis tool from 1993-97 by the Central Research Laboratory of Texas Instruments (later Raytheon Systems). NEMO enables(R. Lake, G. Klimeck, R. C. Bowen, and D. Jovanovic, J. Appl. Phys. 81), 7845 (1997). the fundamentally sound inclusion of the required(G. Klimeck et al.), in the 1997 55th Annual Device Research Conference Digest, (IEEE, NJ, 1997), p. 92^,(R. C. Bowen et al.), J. Appl. Phys 81, 3207 (1997). physics: bandstructure, scattering, and charge self-consistency based on the non-equilibrium Green function approach. A new class of devices which require full 3-D quantum mechanics based models is starting to emerge: quantum dots, or in general semiconductor based deca-nano devices. We are currently building a 3-D modeling tool based on NEMO to include the important physics to understand electronic stated in such superscaled structures. This presentation will overview various facets of the NEMO 1-D tool such electron transport physics in RTDs, numerical technology, software engineering and graphical user interface. The lessons learned from that work are now entering the NEMO 3-D development and first results using the NEMO 3-D prototype will be shown. More information about

  16. Homogeneity and internal defects detect of infrared Se-based chalcogenide glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zupana; Wu, Ligang; Lin, Changgui; Song, Bao'an; Wang, Xunsi; Shen, Xiang; Dai, Shixunb

    2011-10-01

    Ge-Sb-Se chalcogenide glasses is a kind of excellent infrared optical material, which has been enviromental friendly and widely used in infrared thermal imaging systems. However, due to the opaque feature of Se-based glasses in visible spectral region, it's difficult to measure their homogeneity and internal defect as the common oxide ones. In this study, a measurement was proposed to observe the homogeneity and internal defect of these glasses based on near-IR imaging technique and an effective measurement system was also constructed. The testing result indicated the method can gives the information of homogeneity and internal defect of infrared Se-based chalcogenide glass clearly and intuitionally.

  17. Density of states and extent of wave function: two crucial factors for small polaron hopping conductivity in 1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakogianni, M.; Simserides, C.; Triberis, G. P.

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a theoretical model to scrutinize the conductivity of small polarons in 1D disordered systems, focusing on two crucial - as will be demonstrated - factors: the density of states and the spatial extent of the electronic wave function. The investigation is performed for any temperature up to 300 K and under electric field of arbitrary strength up to the polaron dissociation limit. To accomplish this task, we combine analytical work with numerical calculations.

  18. Therapeutic implications of CD1d expression and tumor-infiltrating macrophages in pediatric medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Teo, Wan-Yee; Elghetany, M Tarek; Shen, Jianhe; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Li, Xiaonan; Chintagumpala, Murali; Su, Jack Meng Fen; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William; Adesina, Adekunle M; Lau, Ching C

    2014-11-01

    Immunobiology of medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant brain tumor in children, is poorly understood. Although tumor cells in some MBs were recently shown to express CD1d and be susceptible to Vα24-invariant natural killer T (NKT)-cell cytotoxicity, the clinical relevance of CD1d expression in MB patients remains unknown. We investigated the expression of CD1d in pediatric MBs and correlated with molecular and clinical characteristics. Specifically, we explored if NKT cell therapy can be targeted at a subset of pediatric MBs with poorer prognosis. Particularly, infantile MBs have a worse outcome because radiotherapy is delayed to avoid neurocognitive sequelae. Immunohistochemistry for CD1d was performed on a screening set of 38 primary pediatric MBs. Gene expression of the membrane form of M2 macrophage marker, CD163, was studied in an expanded cohort of 60 tumors. Outcome data was collected prospectively. Thirteen of 38 MBs (34.2 %) expressed CD1d on immunohistochemistry. CD1d was expressed mainly on MB tumor cells, and on some tumor-associated macrophages. Majority (18/22, 82 %) of non sonic-hedgehog/Wingless-activated MBs (group 3 and 4) were CD1d-negative (p = 0.05). A subset of infantile MBs (4/9, 44.4 %) expressed CD1d. Macrophages infiltrating MB expressed CD163 apart from CD1d. Molecular subtypes demonstrated statistical differences in CD163 expression, SHH-tumors were the most enriched (p = 0.006). Molecular and clinical subtypes of pediatric MB exhibit distinct differences in CD1d expression, which have important therapeutic implications. High CD1d expression in infantile MBs offers potential new immunotherapeutic treatment with NKT cell therapy in infants, where treatment is suboptimal due delayed radiotherapy.

  19. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  20. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  1. Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectra of the TRANS-HEXATRIENE-1,1-D2 and -CIS-1-D1 Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2011-06-01

    Hexatriene-1,1-D2 with some admixture of the cis-1-D1 and trans-1-D1 species was synthesized by reaction of 2,4-pentadienal and (methyl-D3)-triphenylphosphonium iodide (Wittig reagent). The trans isomer was isolated by preparative gas chromatography, and the high-resolution (0.0015 Cm-1) infrared spectrum was recorded on a Bruker IFS 125HR instrument. The rotational structure in two C-type bands for the 1,1-D2 species was analyzed. For this species the bands at 902.043 and 721.864 Cm-1 yielded composite ground state rotational constants of A0 = 0.801882(1), B0 = 0.041850(2), and C0 = 0.039804(1) Cm-1. For the cis-1-D1 species the C-type band at 803.018 Cm-1 gave A0 = 0.809384(2), B0 = 0.043530(3), and C0 = 0.041321(2) Cm-1. By iodine-catalyzed isomerization, we have obtained some of the much less favored cis isomer and hope to obtain microwave spectra for its three deuterium-substituted species. The rotational constants reported here contribute to data needed for determining a semi-experimental structure for trans-hexatriene, which should show that the structural consequences of pi-electron delocalization increase with the chain length of polyenes.

  2. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M.

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Effects of polyamine inhibitors on zinc uptake by COMMA-1D mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.C.; Haedrich, L.H. )

    1991-03-15

    Zn uptake or transport is stimulated by glucocorticoids in many types of epithelial cells, including the COMMA-1D mouse mammary cell line. The current objective was to determine whether polyamines also mediate glucocorticoid stimulation of Zn-uptake. Initially, cells grown in lactogenic hormone supplemented-media had approximately 65% greater {sup 65}Zn-uptake over 24 h than cells in nonsupplemented growth media (GM). {sup 65}Zn-uptake from HM with 10{sup {minus}5}M methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) (s-adenosyl-methionine decarboxylase inhibitor to block polyamine synthesis) added was less than from GM. Exogenous spermidine added to the MGBG-HM media increased {sup 65}Zn-uptake. However, up to 10mM difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a more specific inhibitor of sperimidine synthesis, had no significant effect on 24-h {sup 65}Zn-uptake by cells in HM. In GM, DFMO caused a slight dose-dependent decrease in {sup 65}Zn-uptake over the range 10{sup {minus}6} to 5 {times} 10{sup 3}M. Also, with 8 h of incubation, DFMO tended to decrease {sup 65}Zn-uptake in HM-stimulated cells. These data cannot yet distinguish between the possibilities that DFMO is inactivated during the 24-h incubation or that the dramatic effects of MGBG on {sup 65}Zn-uptake in these mammary-derived cells is not related to its inhibition of polyamine synthesis. Because COMMA-1D cells alter Zn uptake in response to lactogenic hormones and MGBG, the model system is suitable for further studies of the mechanisms of zinc transport in epithelia.

  4. X(3872) as a {sup 1}D{sub 2} charmonium state

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    2010-11-01

    The {sup 1}D{sub 2} charmonium assignment for the X(3872) meson is considered, as prompted by a recent result from the BABAR Collaboration, favoring 2{sup -+} quantum numbers for X. It is shown that established properties of X(3872) are in a drastic conflict with the {sup 1}D{sub 2} cc assignment.

  5. A rational route to SCM materials based on a 1-D cobalt selenocyanato coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2011-07-07

    Thermal annealing of a discrete complex with terminal SeCN anions and monodentate coligands enforces the formation of a 1D cobalt selenocyanato coordination polymer that shows slow relaxation of the magnetization. Therefore, this approach offers a rational route to 1D materials that might show single chain magnetic behaviour.

  6. The organic anion transport polypeptide 1d1 (Oatp1d1) mediates hepatocellular uptake of phalloidin and microcystin into skate liver

    SciTech Connect

    Meier-Abt, F.; Hammann-Haenni, A.; Stieger, B.; Ballatori, N.; Boyer, J.L. . E-mail: james.boyer@yale.edu

    2007-02-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp; human OATP) mediate cellular uptake of numerous organic compounds including xenobiotic toxins into mammalian hepatocytes. In the little skate Leucoraja erinacea a liver-specific Oatp (Oatp1d1, also called sOatp) has been identified and suggested to represent an evolutionarily ancient precursor of the mammalian liver OATP1B1 (human), Oatp1b2 (rat), and OATP1B3 (human). The present study tested whether Oatp1d1 shares functional transport activity of the xenobiotic oligopeptide toxins phalloidin and microcystin with the mammalian liver Oatps/OATPs. The phalloidin analogue [{sup 3}H]-demethylphalloin was taken up into skate hepatocytes with high affinity (Km {approx} 0.4 {mu}M), and uptake could be inhibited by phalloidin and a variety of typical Oatp/OATP substrates such as bromosulfophthalein, bile salts, estrone-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A and high concentrations of microcystin-LR (Ki {approx} 150 {mu}M). When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes Oatp1d1 increased uptake of demethylphalloin (Km {approx} 2.2 {mu}M) and microcystin-LR (Km {approx} 27 {mu}M) 2- to 3-fold over water-injected oocytes, whereas the alternative skate liver organic anion transporter, the dimeric Ost{alpha}/{beta}, exhibited no phalloidin and only minor microcystin-LR transport. Also, the closest mammalian Oatp1d1 orthologue, the human brain and testis OATP1C1, did not show any phalloidin transport activity. These results demonstrate that the evolutionarily ancient Oatp1d1 is able to mediate uptake of cyclic oligopeptide toxins into skate liver. The findings support the notion that Oatp1d1 is a precursor of the liver-specific mammalian Oatps/OATPs and that its transport properties are closely associated with certain forms of toxic liver injury such as for example protein phosphatase inhibition by the water-borne toxin microcystin.

  7. Kinematical uniqueness of homogeneous isotropic LQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Hanusch, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    In a paper by Ashtekar and Campiglia, invariance under volume preserving residual diffeomorphisms has been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). In this paper, we use invariance under all residual diffeomorphisms to single out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of homogeneous isotropic LQC for both the standard configuration space {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} , as well as for the Fleischhack one {R}\\sqcup {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} . We first determine the scale invariant Radon measures on these spaces, and then show that the Haar measure on {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} is the only such measure for which the momentum operator is hermitian w.r.t. the corresponding inner product. In particular, the measure is forced to be identically zero on {R} in the Fleischhack case, so that for both approaches, the standard kinematical LQC-Hilbert space is singled out.

  8. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  9. Broken Ergodicity in Ideal, Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John; Fu, Terry; Nguyen, Phu; Shum, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the statistical mechanics of numerical models of ideal homogeneous, incompressible turbulence and their relevance for dissipative fluids and magnetofluids. These numerical models are based on Fourier series and the relevant statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. However, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We explain this phenomena in terms of broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We review the theoretical basis of broken ergodicity, apply it to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from simulations using GPU (graphical processing unit) computers.

  10. Coherent Eigenmodes in Homogeneous MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of Fourier models of ideal, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is discussed, along with their relevance for dissipative magnetofluids. Although statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic field are zero-mean random variables, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation, i.e., we have coherent structure. We use eigenanalysis of the modal covariance matrices in the probability density function to explain this phenomena in terms of `broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We provide examples from 2-D and 3-D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from long-time simulations of MHD turbulence with and without a mean magnetic field

  11. Program Logics for Homogeneous Meta-programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Martin; Tratt, Laurence

    A meta-program is a program that generates or manipulates another program; in homogeneous meta-programming, a program may generate new parts of, or manipulate, itself. Meta-programming has been used extensively since macros were introduced to Lisp, yet we have little idea how formally to reason about meta-programs. This paper provides the first program logics for homogeneous meta-programming - using a variant of MiniML_e^{square} by Davies and Pfenning as underlying meta-programming language. We show the applicability of our approach by reasoning about example meta-programs from the literature. We also demonstrate that our logics are relatively complete in the sense of Cook, enable the inductive derivation of characteristic formulae, and exactly capture the observational properties induced by the operational semantics.

  12. CUDA Simulation of Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John V.; Shum, Victor; Fu, Terry

    2011-01-01

    We discuss very fast Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) simulations of ideal homogeneous incompressible turbulence based on Fourier models. These models have associated statistical theories that predict that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. Prior numerical simulations have shown that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We review the theoretical basis of this "broken ergodicity" as applied to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence. Our new simulations examine the phenomenon of broken ergodicity through very long time and large grid size runs performed on a state-of-the-art CUDA platform. Results comparing various CUDA hardware configurations and grid sizes are discussed. NS and MHD results are compared.

  13. Non-thermal distribution of O(1D) atoms in the night-time thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    1988-01-01

    The 6300 A O(1D-3P) emission has been used for many years to remotely monitor the thermospheric temperature from the Doppler width of its line profile. The O(1D) atoms in the nighttime thermosphere are initially produced by the dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions with kinetic energy much greater than the thermal energy of the ambient neutrals. The validity of the technique to monitor neutral ambient temperature by measuring O(1D) 6300 A emission depends on the degree of thermalization of the O(1D) atoms. The object of this study is to calculate the velocity distribution of the O(1D) atoms and to examine the effect of nonthermal distribution on the nighttime thermospheric neutral temperature determined.

  14. Homogenization of soil properties map by Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde Arias, Omar; Garrido, Alberto; Villeta, Maria; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    It is widely known that extreme climatic phenomena occur with more intensity and frequency. This fact has put more pressure over farming, becoming very important to implement agriculture risk management policies by governments and institutions. One of the main strategies is transfer risk by agriculture insurance. Agriculture insurance based in indexes has gained importance in the last decade. And consist in a comparison between measured index values with a defined threshold that triggers damage losses. However, based index insurance could not be based on an isolated measurement. It is necessary to be integrated in a complete monitoring system that uses many sources of information and tools. For example, index influence areas, crop production risk maps, crop yields, claim statistics, and so on. To establish index influence area is necessary to have a secondary information that show us homogeneous climatic and soil areas, which inside of each homogeneous classes, index measurements on crops of interest are going to be similar, and in this way reduce basis risk. But it is necessary an efficient method to accomplish this aim, to get homogeneous areas that not depends on only in expert criteria and that could be widely used, for this reason this study asses two conventional agricultural and geographic methods (control and climatic maps) based in expert criteria, and one classical statistical method of multi-factorial analysis (factorial map), all of them to homogenize soil and climatic characteristics. Resulting maps were validated by agricultural and spatial analysis, obtaining very good results in statistical method (Factorial map) that proves to be an efficient and accuracy method that could be used for similar porpoises.

  15. Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization for Multiscale Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Chockalingam, K.; Perez, D. M.; Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Williamson, R. L.

    2015-03-01

    Engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations can benefit by utilizing high-fidelity models running at a lower length scale. Lower length-scale models provide a detailed view of the material behavior that is used to determine the average material response at the macroscale. These lower length-scale calculations may provide insight into material behavior where experimental data is sparse or nonexistent. This multiscale approach is especially useful in the nuclear field, since irradiation experiments are difficult and expensive to conduct. The lower length-scale models complement the experiments by influencing the types of experiments required and by reducing the total number of experiments needed. This multiscale modeling approach is a central motivation in the development of the BISON-MARMOT fuel performance codes at Idaho National Laboratory. These codes seek to provide more accurate and predictive solutions for nuclear fuel behavior. One critical aspect of multiscale modeling is the ability to extract the relevant information from the lower length-scale sim- ulations. One approach, the asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) technique, has proven to be an effective method for determining homogenized material parameters. The AEH technique prescribes a system of equations to solve at the microscale that are used to compute homogenized material constants for use at the engineering scale. In this work, we employ AEH to explore the effect of evolving microstructural thermal conductivity and elastic constants on nuclear fuel performance. We show that the AEH approach fits cleanly into the BISON and MARMOT codes and provides a natural, multidimensional homogenization capability.

  16. Homogeneous isolation of nanocellulose from sugarcane bagasse by high pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Wei, Xiaoyi; Wang, Qinghuang; Chen, Jiacui; Chang, Gang; Kong, Lingxue; Su, Junbo; Liu, Yuhuan

    2012-11-06

    Nanocellulose from sugarcane bagasse was isolated by high pressure homogenization in a homogeneous media. Pretreatment with an ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl)) was initially involved to dissolve the bagasse cellulose. Subsequently, the homogeneous solution was passed through a high pressure homogenizer without any clogging. The nanocellulose was obtained at 80 MPa for 30 cycles with recovery of 90% under the optimum refining condition. Nanocellulose had been characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that nanocellulose was 10-20 nm in diameter, and presented lower thermal stability and crystallinity than the original cellulose. The developed nanocellulose would be a very versatile renewable material.

  17. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2014-05-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  18. Boundary Control of Linear Uncertain 1-D Parabolic PDE Using Approximate Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Talaei, Behzad; Jagannathan, Sarangapani; Singler, John

    2017-03-02

    This paper develops a near optimal boundary control method for distributed parameter systems governed by uncertain linear 1-D parabolic partial differential equations (PDE) by using approximate dynamic programming. A quadratic surface integral is proposed to express the optimal cost functional for the infinite-dimensional state space. Accordingly, the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is formulated in the infinite-dimensional domain without using any model reduction. Subsequently, a neural network identifier is developed to estimate the unknown spatially varying coefficient in PDE dynamics. Novel tuning law is proposed to guarantee the boundedness of identifier approximation error in the PDE domain. A radial basis network (RBN) is subsequently proposed to generate an approximate solution for the optimal surface kernel function online. The tuning law for near optimal RBN weights is created, such that the HJB equation error is minimized while the dynamics are identified and closed-loop system remains stable. Ultimate boundedness (UB) of the closed-loop system is verified by using the Lyapunov theory. The performance of the proposed controller is successfully confirmed by simulation on an unstable diffusion-reaction process.

  19. Tctex1d2 Is a Negative Regulator of GLUT4 Translocation and Glucose Uptake.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoko; Okada, Shuichi; Yamada, Eijiro; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    Tctex1d2 (Tctex1 domain containing 2) is an open reading frame that encodes for a functionally unknown protein that contains a Tctex1 domain found in dynein light chain family members. Examination of gene expression during adipogenesis demonstrated a marked increase in Tctex1d2 protein expression that was essentially undetectable in preadipocytes and markedly induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Tctex1d2 overexpression significantly inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. In contrast, Tctex1d2 knockdown significantly increased insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. However, acute insulin stimulation (up to 30 min) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes with overexpression or knockdown of Tctex1d2 had no effect on Akt phosphorylation, a critical signal transduction target required for GLUT4 translocation. Although overexpression of Tctex1d2 had no significant effect on GLUT4 internalization, Tctex1d2 was found to associate with syntaxin 4 in an insulin-dependent manner and inhibit Doc2b binding to syntaxin 4. In addition, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide rescued the Tctex1d2 inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation by suppressing the Tctex1d2-syntaxin 4 interaction and increasing Doc2b-Synatxin4 interactions. Taking these results together, we hypothesized that Tctex1d2 is a novel syntaxin 4 binding protein that functions as a negative regulator of GLUT4 plasma membrane translocation through inhibition of the Doc2b-syntaxin 4 interaction.

  20. TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul; Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy; Heavens, Alan; Clarkson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

  1. Tits Satake projections of homogeneous special geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fré, Pietro; Gargiulo, Floriana; Rosseel, Jan; Rulik, Ksenya; Trigiante, Mario; Van Proeyen, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    We organize the homogeneous special geometries, describing as well the couplings of D = 6, 5, 4 and 3 supergravities with eight supercharges, in a small number of universality classes. This relates manifolds on which similar types of dynamical solutions can exist. The mathematical ingredient is the Tits Satake projection of real simple Lie algebras, which we extend to all solvable Lie algebras occurring in these homogeneous special geometries. Apart from some exotic cases all the other, 'very special', homogeneous manifolds can be grouped into seven universality classes. The organization of these classes, which capture the essential features of their basic dynamics, commutes with the r- and c-map. Different members are distinguished by different choices of the paint group, a notion discovered in the context of cosmic billiard dynamics of non-maximally supersymmetric supergravities. We comment on the usefulness of this organization in universality class both in relation with cosmic billiard dynamics and with configurations of branes and orbifolds defining special geometry backgrounds.

  2. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    PubMed Central

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  3. Topological defect formation in 1D and 2D spin chains realized by network of optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Inaba, Kensuke; Inagaki, Takahiro; Takesue, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A network of optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) is used to simulate classical Ising and XY spin chains. The collective nonlinear dynamics of this network, driven by quantum noise rather than thermal fluctuations, seeks out the Ising/XY ground state as the system transitions from below to above the lasing threshold. We study the behavior of this “Ising machine” for three canonical problems: a 1D ferromagnetic spin chain, a 2D square lattice and problems where next-nearest-neighbor couplings give rise to frustration. If the pump turn-on time is finite, topological defects form (domain walls for the Ising model, winding number and vortices for XY) and their density can be predicted from a numerical model involving a linear “growth stage” and a nonlinear “saturation stage”. These predictions are compared against recent data for a 10,000-spin 1D Ising machine.

  4. Polarization-driven self-organization of silver nanoparticles in 1D and 2D subwavelength gratings for plasmonic photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraldi, G.; Bakhti, S.; Liu, Z.; Reynaud, S.; Lefkir, Y.; Vocanson, F.; Destouches, N.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges in plasmonics is to conceive large-scale, low-cost techniques suitable for the fabrication of metal nanoparticle patterns showing precise spatial organization. Here, we introduce a simple method based on continuous-wave laser illumination to induce the self-organization of silver nanoparticles within high-index thin films. We show that highly regular and homogeneous nanoparticle gratings can be produced on large areas using laser-controlled self-organization processes. This very versatile technique can provide 1D and 2D patterns at a subwavelength scale with tunable features. It does not need any stabilization or expensive devices, such as those required by optical or electron lithography, and is rapid to implement. Accurate in-plane and in-depth characterizations provide valuable information to explain the mechanisms that lead to pattern formation and especially how 2D self-organization can fall into place with successive laser scans. The regular and homogeneous 2D self-organization of metallic NPs with a single laser scan is also reported for the first time in this article. As the reported nanostructures are embedded in porous TiO2, we also theoretically explore the interesting potential of organization on the photocatalytic activity of Ag-NP-containing TiO2 porous films, which is one of the most promising materials for self-cleaning or remediation applications. Realistic electromagnetic simulations demonstrate that the periodic organization of silver nanoparticles can increase the light intensity within the film more than ten times that produced with randomly distributed nanoparticles, leading as expected to enhanced photocatalytic efficiency.

  5. A comparative study of Casson fluid with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Ijaz; Waqas, Muhammad; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-03-09

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stagnation point flow of Casson fluid towards a stretching sheet is addressed. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions together with homogeneous heat effect subject to a resistive force of electromagnetic origin is discussed. It is assumed that the homogeneous process in the ambient fluid is governed by first order kinetics and the heterogeneous process on the wall surface is given by isothermal cubic autocatalator kinetics. Ordinary differential systems have been considered. Solutions of the problems are presented via a numerical technique namely built in shooting method. Graphical behaviors of velocity, temperature and concentration are analyzed comprehensively. Velocity is noticed a decreasing function of Hartman number.

  6. Light-directing chiral liquid crystal nanostructures: from 1D to 3D.

    PubMed

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2014-10-21

    Endowing external, remote, and dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired functionalities is a principal driving force in the bottom-up nanofabrication of molecular devices. Light-driven chiral molecular switches or motors in liquid crystal (LC) media capable of self-organizing into optically tunable one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) superstructures represent such an elegant system. As a consequence, photoresponsive cholesteric LCs (CLCs), i.e., self-organized 1D helical superstructures, and LC blue phases (BPs), i.e., self-organized 3D periodic cubic lattices, are emerging as a new generation of multifunctional supramolecular 1D and 3D photonic materials in their own right because of their fundamental academic interest and technological significance. These smart stimuli-responsive materials can be facilely fabricated from achiral LC hosts by the addition of a small amount of a light-driven chiral molecular switch or motor. The photoresponsiveness of these materials is a result of both molecular interaction and geometry changes in the chiral molecular switch upon light irradiation. The doped photoresponsive CLCs undergo light-driven pitch modulation and/or helix inversion, which has many applications in color filters, polarizers, all-optical displays, optical lasers, sensors, energy-saving smart devices, and so on. Recently, we have conceptualized and rationally synthesized different light-driven chiral molecular switches that have very high helical twisting powers (HTPs) and exhibit large changes in HTP in different states, thereby enabling wide phototunability of the systems by the addition of very small amounts of the molecular switches into commercially available achiral LCs. The light-driven chiral molecular switches are based on well-recognized azobenzene, dithienylcyclopentene, and spirooxazine derivatives. We have demonstrated high-resolution and lightweight photoaddressable displays without patterned electronics on

  7. The FC-1D: The profitable alternative Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meza, Victor J.; Alvarez, Jaime; Harrington, Brook; Lujan, Michael A.; Mitlyng, David; Saroughian, Andy; Silva, Alex; Teale, Tim

    1994-01-01

    The FC-1D was designed as an advanced solution for a low cost commercial transport meeting or exceeding all of the 1993/1994 AIAA/Lockheed request for proposal requirements. The driving philosophy behind the design of the FC-1D was the reduction of airline direct operating costs. Every effort was made during the design process to have the customer in mind. The Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group targeted reductions in drag, fuel consumption, manufacturing costs, and maintenance costs. Flying Circus emphasized cost reduction throughout the entire design program. Drag reduction was achieved by implementation of the aft nacelle wing configuration to reduce cruise drag and increase cruise speeds. To reduce induced drag, rather than increasing the wing span of the FC-1D, spiroids were included in the efficient wing design. Profile and friction drag are reduced by using riblets in place of paint around the fuselage and empennage of the FC-1D. Choosing a single aisle configuration enabled the Flying Circus to optimize the fuselage diameter. Thus, reducing fuselage drag while gaining high structural efficiency. To further reduce fuel consumption a weight reduction program was conducted through the use of composite materials. An additional quality of the FC-1D is its design for low cost manufacturing and assembly. As a result of this design attribute, the FC-1D will have fewer parts which reduces weight as well as maintenance and assembly costs. The FC-1D is affordable and effective, the apex of commercial transport design.

  8. Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1)

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzo, L.; Drury, J; Christianson, D; Penning, T

    2009-01-01

    Human steroid 5{beta}-reductase (aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1D1) catalyzes reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-ene double bonds in steroid hormones and bile acid precursors. We have reported the structures of an AKR1D1-NADP{sup +} binary complex, and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-cortisone, AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-progesterone and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-testosterone ternary complexes at high resolutions. Recently, structures of AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone complexes showed that the product is bound unproductively. Two quite different mechanisms of steroid double bond reduction have since been proposed. However, site-directed mutagenesis supports only one mechanism. In this mechanism, the 4-pro-R hydride is transferred from the re-face of the nicotinamide ring to C5 of the steroid substrate. E120, a unique substitution in the AKR catalytic tetrad, permits a deeper penetration of the steroid substrate into the active site to promote optimal reactant positioning. It participates with Y58 to create a 'superacidic' oxyanion hole for polarization of the C3 ketone. A role for K87 in the proton relay proposed using the AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone structure is not supported.

  9. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids with a homogeneous cobalt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Elsevier, Cornelis J; de Bruin, Bas

    2015-10-16

    The reduction of esters and carboxylic acids to alcohols is a highly relevant conversion for the pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industries and for biomass conversion. It is commonly performed using stoichiometric reagents, and the catalytic hydrogenation of the acids previously required precious metals. Here we report the homogeneously catalyzed hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to alcohols using earth-abundant cobalt. This system, which pairs Co(BF4)2·6H2O with a tridentate phosphine ligand, can reduce a wide range of esters and carboxylic acids under relatively mild conditions (100°C, 80 bar H2) and reaches turnover numbers of up to 8000.

  10. Controlling And Operating Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (Hcci) Engines

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, Daniel L.

    2005-08-02

    A Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine system includes an engine that produces exhaust gas. A vaporization means vaporizes fuel for the engine an air induction means provides air for the engine. An exhaust gas recirculation means recirculates the exhaust gas. A blending means blends the vaporized fuel, the exhaust gas, and the air. An induction means inducts the blended vaporized fuel, exhaust gas, and air into the engine. A control means controls the blending of the vaporized fuel, the exhaust gas, and the air and for controls the inducting the blended vaporized fuel, exhaust gas, and air into the engine.

  11. Time Evolution of Modeled Reynolds Stresses in Planar Homogeneous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongen, T.; Gatski, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    The analytic expression of the time evolution of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor in all planar homogeneous flows is obtained by exact integration of the modeled differential Reynolds stress equations. The procedure is based on results of tensor representation theory, is applicable for general pressure-strain correlation tensors, and can account for any additional turbulence anisotropy effects included in the closure. An explicit solution of the resulting system of scalar ordinary differential equations is obtained for the case of a linear pressure-strain correlation tensor. The properties of this solution are discussed, and the dynamic behavior of the Reynolds stresses is studied, including limit cycles and sensitivity to initial anisotropies.

  12. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Free Piston Linear Alternator

    SciTech Connect

    Janson Wu; Nicholas Paradiso; Peter Van Blarigan; Scott Goldsborough

    1998-11-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) free piston powered linear alternator has been conducted to determine if improvements can be made in the thermal and conversion efficiencies of modern electrical generator systems. Performance of a free piston engine was investigated using a rapid compression expansion machine and a full cycle thermodynamic model. Linear alternator performance was investigated with a computer model. In addition linear alternator testing and permanent magnet characterization hardware were developed. The development of the two-stroke cycle scavenging process has begun.

  13. Uniform boundary regularity in almost-periodic homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuge, Jinping

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, we generalize the theory of quantitative homogenization for second-order elliptic systems with rapidly oscillating coefficients in APW2 (Rd), which is the space of almost-periodic functions in the sense of H. Weyl. We obtain the large scale uniform boundary Lipschitz estimate, for both Dirichlet and Neumann problems in C 1 , α domains. We also obtain large scale uniform boundary Hölder estimates in C 1 , α domains and L2 Rellich estimates in Lipschitz domains.

  14. Interpolatory fixed-point algorithm for an efficient computation of TE and TM modes in arbitrary 1D structures at oblique incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Molina, Manuel; Francés Monllor, Jorge; Álvarez López, Mariela; Neipp López, Cristian; Carretero López, Luis

    2010-05-01

    We develop the Interpolatory Fixed-Point Algorithm (IFPA) to compute efficiently the TE and TM reflectance and transmittance coefficients for arbitrary 1D structures at oblique incidence. For this purpose, we demonstrate that the semi-analytical solutions of the Helmholtz equation provided by the fixed-point method have a polynomial dependence on variables that are related to the essential electromagnetic parameters -incidence angle and wavelength-, which allows a drastic simplification of the required calculations taking the advantage of interpolation for a few parameter values. The first step to develop the IFPA consists of stating the Helmholtz equation and boundary conditions for TE and TM plane incident waves on a 1D finite slab with an arbitrary permittivity profile surrounded by two homogeneous media. The Helmholtz equation and boundary conditions are then transformed into a second-order initial value problem which is written in terms of transfer matrices. By applying the fixed-point method, the coefficients of such transfer matrices are obtained as polynomials on several variables that can be characterized by a reduced set of interpolating parameters. We apply the IFPA to specific examples of 1D diffraction gratings, optical rugate filters and quasi-periodic structures, for which precise solutions for the TE and TM modes are efficiently obtained by computing less than 20 interpolating parameters.

  15. GaAs solar cell photoresponse modeling using PC-1D V2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, D. A.; Olsen, L. C.; Dunham, G.; Addis, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Photoresponse data of high efficiency GaAs solar cells were analyzed using PC-1D V2.1. The approach required to use PC-1D for photoresponse data analysis, and the physical insights gained from performing the analysis are discussed. In particular, the effect of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As heteroface quality was modeled. Photoresponse or spectral quantum efficiency is an important tool in characterizing material quality and predicting cell performance. The strength of the photoresponse measurement lies in the ability to precisely fit the experimental data with a physical model. PC-1D provides a flexible platform for calculations based on these physical models.

  16. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  17. 2D Biotope Mapping Using Combined LIDAR, Topographic Survey And Segmented 1D Flow Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entwistle, N. S.; Heritage, G. L.; Milan, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Reach averaged habitat availability models such as PHABSIM are limited due principally to their failure to adequately map hydraulic habitat distribution at a representative scale. A lack of morphologic data, represented in the form of sparse geometric cross-sections fails to generate the necessary detail. Advances in data collection, improved spatial modelling algorithms and the advent of cross-section based segmentation routines in 1D hydraulic models provides the opportunity to revisit the issue of hydraulic habitat mapping and modelling. This paper presents a combined technique for habitat characterisation at the sub-bar scale is presented for the River Rede, Northumberland, UK. Terrestrial LIDAR data of floodplain, banks and exposed bar surfaces at an average 0.05 m spacing are combined with sparser total station survey data of submerged morphologic features. These data are interpolated to create a uniform DEM grid at 0.2 m spacing (adequate to detect the smallest variation in hydraulic habitat in this system). The data grid were then imported into the HECRAS 1D hydraulic model to generate a 2 m spaced series of cross-sections along a 220 m sinuous single thread reach exhibiting pool - riffle point-bar morphology. The hydraulic segmentation routine then generated estimates of depth averaged flow velocity, flow depth and sub unit discharge for 40 sub-divisions of the flow width for a series of flows from 0.5 m3s-1 up to bankfull flow of approximately 9 m3s-1. The resultant hydraulic data were exported in the project coordinate system and plotted to reveal the 2D pattern of hydraulic biotopes present across the range of flows modelled. The results reveal broadly realistic patterns consistent with previous empirical studies and compare well with LIDAR based biotope maps. Analysis of the temporal pattern of biotope change indicates that biotope diversity and complexity is at a maximum at lower flows and across shallower area (riffles) and that these dominate the

  18. Biopreservation and Homogeneity of Sugar/Water Matrices: A Comparative Study by Molecular Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affouard, F.; Lerbret, A.; Bordat, P.; Descamps, M.

    2006-05-01

    Structural properties of trehalose, maltose and sucrose disaccharides in water have been investigated by Molecular Dynamics computer simulations at different concentrations and temperatures. Water-sugar and both intra and inter sugar-sugar properties and their relationships have been probed in order to measure the homogeneity of the different mixtures. The results reported here show that maltose/water systems are less homogeneous owing the tendency of maltose molecules to form clusters and thus reducing their possibility to destructure the water HB network. For sucrose/water solutions, the higher probability of sucrose molecules to form intra-molecular HBs strongly reduces their interaction with both water or other sugar molecules. Unlikely to maltose or sucrose, trehalose molecules possess similar capabilities to interact with both sugar and water molecules which make trehalose/water a more homogeneous system. This homogeneity of the disaccharide/water matrices due to the reciprocal interactions between sugar and water molecules may rule their biopreservative efficiency.

  19. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  20. The Chemical Homogeneity of Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Determining the level of chemical homogeneity in open clusters is of fundamental importance in the study of the evolution of star-forming clouds and that of the Galactic disk. Yet limiting the initial abundance spread in clusters has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining consistent spectroscopic abundances for different stellar types. Without reference to any specific model of stellar photospheres, a model for a homogeneous cluster is that it forms a one-dimensional sequence, with any differences between members due to variations in stellar mass and observational uncertainties. I present a novel method for investigating the abundance spread in open clusters that tests this one-dimensional hypothesis at the level of observed stellar spectra, rather than constraining homogeneity using derived abundances as is traditionally done. Using high-resolution APOGEE spectra for 49 giants in M67, NGC 6819, and NGC 2420 I demonstrate that these spectra form one-dimensional sequences for each cluster. With detailed forward modeling of the spectra and Approximate Bayesian Computation, I derive strong limits on the initial abundance spread of 15 elements: <0.01 (0.02) {dex} for C and Fe, ≲0.015 (0.03) {dex} for N, O, Mg, Si, and Ni, ≲0.02 (0.03) {dex} for Al, Ca, and Mn, and ≲0.03 (0.05) {dex} for Na, S, K, Ti, and V (at 68% and 95% confidence, respectively). The strong limits on C and O imply that no pollution by massive core-collapse supernovae occurred during star formation in open clusters, which, thus, need to form within ≲6 {Myr}. Further development of this and related techniques will bring the power of differential abundances to stars other than solar twins in large spectroscopic surveys and will help unravel the history of star formation and chemical enrichment in the Milky Way through chemical tagging.

  1. Contrasting Patterns of rDNA Homogenization within the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chand Dakal, Tikam; Giudici, Paolo; Solieri, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are generally expected to evolve as a coherent family, where repeats within such a family are more similar to each other than to orthologs in related species. The continuous homogenization of repeats within individual genomes is a recombination process termed concerted evolution. Here, we investigated the extent and the direction of concerted evolution in 43 yeast strains of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii species complex (Z. rouxii, Z. sapae, Z. mellis), by analyzing two portions of the 35S rDNA cistron, namely the D1/D2 domains at the 5’ end of the 26S rRNA gene and the segment including the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 (ITS regions). We demonstrate that intra-genomic rDNA sequence variation is unusually frequent in this clade and that rDNA arrays in single genomes consist of an intermixing of Z. rouxii, Z. sapae and Z. mellis-like sequences, putatively evolved by reticulate evolutionary events that involved repeated hybridization between lineages. The levels and distribution of sequence polymorphisms vary across rDNA repeats in different individuals, reflecting four patterns of rDNA evolution: I) rDNA repeats that are homogeneous within a genome but are chimeras derived from two parental lineages via recombination: Z. rouxii in the ITS region and Z. sapae in the D1/D2 region; II) intra-genomic rDNA repeats that retain polymorphisms only in ITS regions; III) rDNA repeats that vary only in their D1/D2 domains; IV) heterogeneous rDNA arrays that have both polymorphic ITS and D1/D2 regions. We argue that an ongoing process of homogenization following allodiplodization or incomplete lineage sorting gave rise to divergent evolutionary trajectories in different strains, depending upon temporal, structural and functional constraints. We discuss the consequences of these findings for Zygosaccharomyces species delineation and, more in general, for yeast barcoding. PMID:27501051

  2. Isotropic homogeneous universe with viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N.O.; Dias, R.S.; Banerjee, A.

    1985-04-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the isotropic homogeneous cosmological model with viscous fluid. The fluid has only bulk viscosity and the viscosity coefficient is taken to be a power function of the mass density. The equation of state assumed obeys a linear relation between mass density and pressure. The models satisfying Hawking's energy conditions are discussed. Murphy's model is only a special case of this general set of solutions and it is shown that Murphy's conclusion that the introduciton of bulk viscosity can avoid the occurrence of space-time singularity at finite past is not, in general, valid.

  3. Homogenization and Numerical Methods for Hyperbolic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation studies three aspects of analysis and numerical methods for partial differential equations with oscillatory solutions. 1. Homogenization theory for certain linear hyperbolic equations is developed. We derive the homogenized convection equations for linear convection problems with rapidly varying velocity in space and time. We find that the oscillatory solutions are very sensitive to the arithmetic properties of certain parameters, such as the corresponding rotation number and the ratio between the components of the mean velocity field in linear convection. We also show that the oscillatory velocity field in two dimensional incompressible flow behaves like shear flows. 2. The homogenization of scalar nonlinear conservation laws in several space variables with oscillatory initial data is also discussed. We prove that the initial oscillations will be eliminated for any positive time when the equations are non-degenerate. This is also true for degenerate equations if there is enough mixing among the initial oscillations in the degenerate direction. Otherwise, the initial oscillation, for which the homogenized equation is obtained, will survive and be propagated. The large-time behavior of conservation laws with several space variables is studied. We show that, under a new nondegenerate condition (the second derivatives of the flux functions are linearly independent in any interval), a piecewise smooth periodic solution with converge strongly to the mean value of initial data. This generalizes Glimm and Lax's result for the one dimensional problem (3). 3. Numerical simulations of the oscillatory solutions are also carried out. We give some error estimate for varepsilon-h resonance ( varepsilon: oscillation wave length, h: numerical step) and prove essential convergence (24) of order alpha < 1 for some numerical schemes. These include upwind schemes and particle methods for linear hyperbolic equations with oscillatory coefficients. A stochastic analysis

  4. Homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Koch, E

    2002-11-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry have been derived by studying the characteristic Wyckoff positions P -1 1a and P -1 2i of the two triclinic lattice complexes. These sphere packings belong to 30 different types. Only one type exists that has exclusively triclinic sphere packings and no higher-symmetry ones. The inherent symmetry of part of the sphere packings is triclinic for 18 types. Sphere packings of all but six of the 30 types may be realized as stackings of parallel planar nets.

  5. Heterogeneity versus homogeneity of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Martinez, Nicholas E; Omura, Seiichi; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The 10th International Congress of Neuroimmunology, including the 10th European School of Neuroimmunology Course, was held by the International Society of Neuroimmunology in Sitges (Barcelona, Spain) on 26–30 October 2010. The conference covered a wide spectrum of issues and challenges in both basic science and clinical aspects of neuroimmunology. Data and ideas were shared through a variety of programs, including review talks and poster sessions. One of the topics of the congress was whether multiple sclerosis is a homogenous or heterogenous disease, clinically and pathologically, throughout its course. PMID:21426254

  6. Compressible homogeneous shear: Simulation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Compressibility effects were studied on turbulence by direct numerical simulation of homogeneous shear flow. A primary observation is that the growth of the turbulent kinetic energy decreases with increasing turbulent Mach number. The sinks provided by compressible dissipation and the pressure dilatation, along with reduced Reynolds shear stress, are shown to contribute to the reduced growth of kinetic energy. Models are proposed for these dilatational terms and verified by direct comparison with the simulations. The differences between the incompressible and compressible fields are brought out by the examination of spectra, statistical moments, and structure of the rate of strain tensor.

  7. Study of local in-homogeneity in ion beam mixing using SIMS ion imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ch. Kishan; Ilango, S.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-05

    The local in-homogeneity in ion beam mixing of Mo/Si system subjected to 110keV Ar{sup +} ion implantation is studied using secondary ion imaging. Sequences of images are recorded across the interface and depth profiles are constructed from different regions of the image planes. Our results show a significant variation in decay length indicative of in-homogeneity in mixing.

  8. Involvement of Dopamine D1/D5 and D2 Receptors in Context-Dependent Extinction Learning and Memory Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    André, Marion Agnès Emma; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine contributes to the regulation of higher order information processing and executive control. It is important for memory consolidation processes, and for the adaptation of learned responses based on experience. In line with this, under aversive learning conditions, application of dopamine receptor antagonists prior to extinction result in enhanced memory reinstatement. Here, we investigated the contribution of the dopaminergic system to extinction and memory reinstatement (renewal) of an appetitive spatial learning task in rodents. Rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze (context “A”) to associate a goal arm with a food reward, despite low reward probability (acquisition phase). On day 4, extinction learning (unrewarded) occurred, that was reinforced by a context change (“B”). On day 5, re-exposure to the (unrewarded) “A” context took place (renewal of context “A”, followed by extinction of context “A”). In control animals, significant extinction occurred on day 4, that was followed by an initial memory reinstatement (renewal) on day 5, that was, in turn, succeeded by extinction of renewal. Intracerebral treatment with a D1/D5-receptor antagonist prior to the extinction trials, elicited a potent enhancement of extinction in context “B”. By contrast, a D1/D5-agonist impaired renewal in context “A”. Extinction in the “A” context on day 5 was unaffected by the D1/D5-ligands. Treatment with a D2-receptor antagonist prior to extinction had no overall effect on extinction in context “B” or renewal in context “A”, although extinction of the renewal effect was impaired on day 5, compared to controls. Taken together, these data suggest that dopamine acting on the D1/D5-receptor modulates both acquisition and consolidation of context-dependent extinction. By contrast, the D2-receptor may contribute to context-independent aspects of this kind of extinction learning. PMID:26834599

  9. Determination of the absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol by neutron and x-ray diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H.S.H.; Stevens, R.C.; Bau, R. ); Mosher, H.S. ); Koetzle, T.F. )

    1994-12-20

    The absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol, prepared by the reduction of 2,2-dimethylpropanol-1-d by actively fermenting yeast, has been determined to be S by neutron diffraction. The neutron study was carried out on the phthalate half ester of neopentyl-1-d alcohol, crystallized as its strychnine salt. The absolute configuration of the (-)-strychninium cation was first determined by an x-ray anomalous dispersion study of its iodide salt. The chiral skeleton of strychnine then served as a reference from which the absolute configuration of the -O-CHD-C(CH[sub 3])[sub 3] group of neopentyl phthalate was determined. Difference Fourier maps calculated from the neutron data showed unambiguously that the -O-CHD-C(CH[sub 3])[sub 3] groups of both independent molecules in the unit cell had the S configuration. This work proves conclusively that the yeast system reduces aldehydes by delivering hydrogen to the re face of the carbonyl group. Crystallographic details: (-)-strychninium (+)-neopentyl-1-d phthalate, space group P2[sub 1] (monoclinic), a = 18.564(6) [angstrom], b = 7.713(2) [angstrom], c = 23.361(8) [angstrom], [beta] = 94.18(4)[degrees], V = 3336.0(5) [angstrom][sup 3], Z = 2 (T = 100 K). Final agreement factors are R(F) = 0.073 for 2768 reflections collected at room temperature (x-ray analysis) and R(F) = 0.144 for 960 reflections collected at 100 K (neutron analysis). 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Ubiquitination and degradation of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 is regulated by protein palmitoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Chen; Lange, Jeffrey J.; Samovski, Dmitri; Su, Xiong; Liu, Jialiu; Sundaresan, Sinju; Stahl, Philip D.

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Hominoid-specific oncogene TBC1D3 is targeted to plasma membrane by palmitoylation. •TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. •TBC1D3 palmitoylation governs growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. •Post-translational modifications may regulate oncogenic properties of TBC1D3. -- Abstract: Expression of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 promotes enhanced cell growth and proliferation by increased activation of signal transduction through several growth factors. Recently we documented the role of CUL7 E3 ligase in growth factors-induced ubiquitination and degradation of TBC1D3. Here we expanded our study to discover additional molecular mechanisms that control TBC1D3 protein turnover. We report that TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. The expression of double palmitoylation mutant TBC1D3:C318/325S resulted in protein mislocalization and enhanced growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. Moreover, ubiquitination of TBC1D3 via CUL7 E3 ligase complex was increased by mutating the palmitoylation sites, suggesting that depalmitoylation of TBC1D3 makes the protein more available for ubiquitination and degradation. The results reported here provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern TBC1D3 protein degradation. Dysregulation of these mechanisms in vivo could potentially result in aberrant TBC1D3 expression and promote oncogenesis.

  11. Isolation and characterization of the Prochlorococcus carboxysome reveal the presence of the novel shell protein CsoS1D.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Evan W; Cai, Fei; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Cannon, Gordon C; Heinhorst, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    Cyanobacteria, including members of the genus Prochlorococcus, contain icosahedral protein microcompartments known as carboxysomes that encapsulate multiple copies of the CO(2)-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) in a thin protein shell that enhances the catalytic performance of the enzyme in part through the action of a shell-associated carbonic anhydrase. However, the exact mechanism by which compartmentation provides a catalytic advantage to the enzyme is not known. Complicating the study of cyanobacterial carboxysomes has been the inability to obtain homogeneous carboxysome preparations. This study describes the first successful purification and characterization of carboxysomes from the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus MED4. Because the isolated P. marinus MED4 carboxysomes were free from contaminating membrane proteins, their protein complement could be assessed. In addition to the expected shell proteins, the CsoS1D protein that is not encoded by the canonical cso gene clusters of α-cyanobacteria was found to be a low-abundance shell component. This finding and supporting comparative genomic evidence have important implications for carboxysome composition, structure, and function. Our study indicates that carboxysome composition is probably more complex than was previously assumed based on the gene complements of the classical cso gene clusters.

  12. Quantum and semi-classical transport in RTDs using NEMO 1-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, G.; Stout, P.; Bowen, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    NEMO 1-D has been developed primarily for the simulation of resonant tunneling diodes, and quantitative and predictive agreements with experimental high performance, high current density devices have been achieved in the past.

  13. Vorticity and Λ polarization in event-by-event (3+1)D viscous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Fang, Ren-Hong; Petersen, Hannah; Wang, Qun; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2017-01-01

    We visualized the vortical fluid in fluctuating QGP using (3+1)D viscous hydrodynamics, computed the spin distribution and correlation of hyperons and estimated the polarization splitting between Λ and .

  14. Quasi-one dimensional (Q1D) nanostructures: Synthesis, integration and device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chung-Jen

    Quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanowires have been widely regarded as the potential building blocks for nanoscale electronic, optoelectronic and sensing devices. In this work, the content can be divided into three categories: Nano-material synthesis and characterizations, alignment and integration, physical properties and application. The dissertation consists of seven chapters as following. Chapter 1 will give an introduction to low dimensional nano-materials. Chapter 2 explains the mechanism how Q1D nanostructure grows. Chapter 3 describes the methods how we horizontally and vertically align the Q1D nanostructure. Chapter 4 and 5 are the electrical and optical device characterization respectively. Chapter 6 demonstrates the integration of Q1D nanostructures and the device application. The last chapter will discuss the future work and conclusion of the thesis.

  15. Ruthenium and osmium complexes of hemilabile chiral monophosphinite ligands derived from 1D-pinitol or 1D-chiro-inositol as catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Slade, Angela T; Lensink, Cornelis; Falshaw, Andrew; Clark, George R; Wright, L James

    2014-12-07

    The monophosphinite ligands, 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-cyclopentylidene-3-O-methyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P1), 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-3-O-methyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P2), 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-cyclohexylidene-3-O-methyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P3), and 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-cyclopentylidene-3-O-ethyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P4), can be conveniently prepared from the chiral natural products 1D-pinitol or 1D-chiro-inositol. On treatment of toluene solutions of RuCl2(PPh3)3 with two mole equivalents of the ligands D-PY (Y = 1-4) the complexes RuCl2(D-P1)2 (1), RuCl2(D-P2)2 (4), RuCl2(D-P3)2 (5), or RuCl2(D-P4)2 (6), respectively, are formed. Similarly, treatment of OsCl2(PPh3)3 with D-P1 gives OsCl2(D-P1)2 (7). The single crystal X-ray structure determination of 1 reveals that each D-P1 ligand coordinates to ruthenium through phosphorus and the oxygen atom of the methoxyl group. Treatment of 1 with excess LiBr or LiI results in metathesis of the chloride ligands and RuBr2(D-P1)2 (2) or RuI2(D-P1)2 (3), respectively, are formed. Exposure of a solution of 1 to carbon monoxide results in the very rapid formation of RuCl2(CO)2(D-P1)2 (8), thereby demonstrating the ease with which the oxygen donors are displaced from the metal and hence the hemilabile nature of the two bidentate D-P1 ligands in 1. Preliminary studies indicate that 1-7 act as catalysts for the asymmetric hydrogenation reactions of acetophenone and 3-quinuclidinone to give the corresponding alcohols in generally high conversions but low enantiomeric excesses.

  16. Design, synthesis, and functional activity of labeled CD1d glycolipid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Peter J; Polzella, Paolo; Wojno, Justyna; Jukes, John-Paul; Ghadbane, Hemza; Garcia Diaz, Yoel R; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Cox, Liam R

    2013-04-17

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are restricted by CD1d molecules and activated upon CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipids to T cell receptors (TCRs) located on the surface of the cell. Because the cytokine response profile is governed by the structure of the glycolipid, we sought a method for labeling various glycolipids to study their in vivo behavior. The prototypical CD1d agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) 1, instigates a powerful immune response and the generation of a wide range of cytokines when it is presented to iNKT cell TCRs by CD1d molecules. Analysis of crystal structures of the TCR-α-GalCer-CD1d ternary complex identified the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid side chain, and more specifically the pro-S hydrogen at this position, as a site for incorporating a label. We postulated that modifying the glycolipid in this way would exert a minimal impact on the TCR-glycolipid-CD1d ternary complex, allowing the labeled molecule to function as a good mimic for the CD1d agonist under investigation. To test this hypothesis, the synthesis of a biotinylated version of the CD1d agonist threitol ceramide (ThrCer) was targeted. Both diastereoisomers, epimeric at the label tethering site, were prepared, and functional experiments confirmed the importance of substituting the pro-S, and not the pro-R, hydrogen with the label for optimal activity. Significantly, functional experiments revealed that biotinylated ThrCer (S)-10 displayed behavior comparable to that of ThrCer 5 itself and also confirmed that the biotin residue is available for streptavidin and antibiotin antibody recognition. A second CD1d agonist, namely α-GalCer C20:2 4, was modified in a similar way, this time with a fluorescent label. The labeled α-GalCer C20:2 analogue (11) again displayed functional behavior comparable to that of its unlabeled substrate, supporting the notion that the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid amide chain should be a suitable site for attaching

  17. Design, Synthesis, and Functional Activity of Labeled CD1d Glycolipid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are restricted by CD1d molecules and activated upon CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipids to T cell receptors (TCRs) located on the surface of the cell. Because the cytokine response profile is governed by the structure of the glycolipid, we sought a method for labeling various glycolipids to study their in vivo behavior. The prototypical CD1d agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) 1, instigates a powerful immune response and the generation of a wide range of cytokines when it is presented to iNKT cell TCRs by CD1d molecules. Analysis of crystal structures of the TCR−α-GalCer–CD1d ternary complex identified the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid side chain, and more specifically the pro-S hydrogen at this position, as a site for incorporating a label. We postulated that modifying the glycolipid in this way would exert a minimal impact on the TCR–glycolipid–CD1d ternary complex, allowing the labeled molecule to function as a good mimic for the CD1d agonist under investigation. To test this hypothesis, the synthesis of a biotinylated version of the CD1d agonist threitol ceramide (ThrCer) was targeted. Both diastereoisomers, epimeric at the label tethering site, were prepared, and functional experiments confirmed the importance of substituting the pro-S, and not the pro-R, hydrogen with the label for optimal activity. Significantly, functional experiments revealed that biotinylated ThrCer (S)-10 displayed behavior comparable to that of ThrCer 5 itself and also confirmed that the biotin residue is available for streptavidin and antibiotin antibody recognition. A second CD1d agonist, namely α-GalCer C20:2 4, was modified in a similar way, this time with a fluorescent label. The labeled α-GalCer C20:2 analogue (11) again displayed functional behavior comparable to that of its unlabeled substrate, supporting the notion that the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid amide chain should be a suitable site for

  18. Actinometric measurement of j(O3-O(1D)) using a luminol detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bairai, Solomon T.; Stedman, Donald H.

    1992-01-01

    The photolysis frequency of ozone to singlet D oxygen atoms has been measured by means of a chemical actinometer using a luminol based detector. The instrument measures j(O3-O(1D)) with a precision of 10 percent. The data collected in winter and spring of 1991 is in agreement with model predictions and previously measured values. Data from a global solar radiometer can be used to estimate the effects of local cloudiness on j(O3-O(1D)).

  19. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  20. Energy dependent 3-body loss in out-of-equilibrium 1D Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zundel, Laura; Xia, Lin; Wilson, Joshua; Riou, Jean-Felix; Weiss, David

    2015-05-01

    We measure the three-body loss of out-of-equilibrium one-dimensional (1D) Bose gases and find that it depends strongly on the average energy of the distribution. The theory of three-body loss in 1D gas experiments is incomplete due to the challenge of calculating how correlations evolve. We present an empirical model based on energy dependent correlations and show that it reproduces the data.

  1. On shearing fluids with homogeneous densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, D. C.; Srivastava, V. C.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study shearing spherically symmetric homogeneous density fluids in comoving coordinates. It is found that the expansion of the four-velocity of a perfect fluid is homogeneous, whereas its shear is generated by an arbitrary function of time M( t), related to the mass function of the distribution. This function is found to bear a functional relationship with density. The field equations are reduced to two coupled first order ordinary differential equations for the metric coefficients g_{11} and g_{22}. We have explored a class of solutions assuming that M is a linear function of the density. This class embodies, as a subcase, the complete class of shear-free solutions. We have discussed the off quoted work of Kustaanheimo (Comment Phys Math XIII:12, 1, 1947) and have noted that it deals with shear-free fluids having anisotropic pressure. It is shown that the anisotropy of the fluid is characterized by an arbitrary function of time. We have discussed some issues of historical priorities and credentials related to shear-free solutions. Recent controversial claims by Mitra (Astrophys Space Sci 333:351, 2011 and Gravit Cosmol 18:17, 2012) have also been addressed. We found that the singularity and the shearing motion of the fluid are closely related. Hence, there is a need for fresh look to the solutions obtained earlier in comoving coordinates.

  2. Modified Homogeneous Data Set of Coronal Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorotovič, I.; Minarovjech, M.; Lorenc, M.; Rybanský, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences has published the intensities, recalibrated with respect to a common intensity scale, of the 530.3 nm (Fe xiv) green coronal line observed at ground-based stations up to the year 2008. The name of this publication is Homogeneous Data Set (HDS). We have developed a method that allows one to successfully substitute the ground-based observations by satellite observations and, thus, continue with the publication of the HDS. For this purpose, the observations of the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite, were exploited. Among other data the EIT instrument provides almost daily 28.4 nm (Fe xv) emission-line snapshots of the corona. The Fe xiv and Fe xv data (4051 observation days) taken in the period 1996 - 2008 have been compared and good agreement was found. The method to obtain the individual data for the HDS follows from the correlation analysis described in this article. The resulting data, now under the name of Modified Homogeneous Data Set (MHDS), are identical up to 1996 to those in the HDS. The MHDS can be used further for studies of the coronal solar activity and its cycle. These data are available at http://www.suh.sk.

  3. Microstructure and homogeneity of dental porcelain frits.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Matsuo, K; Mizutani, N; Iwase, H; Kani, T; Hasegawa, J

    1998-12-01

    The microstructure and homogeneity of three commercial dentin and incisal unfired porcelain frits (one conventional and two ultra-low fusing types, fused-to metal were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microspectroscopy, and wavelength- and energy dispersive X-ray microspectroscopy. The average contents of tetragonal and cubic leucite for the conventional and one of the ultra-low fusing type frits were 20.1-22.6 wt% and 0-2.6 wt%, respectively, whereas those of another of the ultra-low fusing type frits were about 11.5-11.6 wt% and 2.9-4.6 wt%, respectively. The conventional type frits seemed to be admixtures of three kinds of glass frits. One of the ultra-low fusing type frits seemed to be an admixture of four kinds of glass frits. Another ultra-low fusing frits seemed to be only one kind of glass frit dispersed with small size, less than 1 micron, leucite crystals. There were no remarkable differences in microstructure and homogeneity between dentin and incisal porcelain frits in each brand.

  4. Planar factors of proper homogeneous Lorentz transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fahnline, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    This article discusses two constructions factoring proper homogeneous Lorentz transformations H into the product of two planar transformations. A planar transformation is a proper homogeneous Lorentz transformation changing vectors in a two-flat through the origin, called the transformation two-flat, into new vectors in the same two-flat and which leaves unchanged vectors in the orthogonal two-flat, called the pointwise invariant two-flat. The first construction provides two planar factors such that a given timelike vector lies in the transformation two-flat of one and in the pointwise invariant two-flat of the other; it leads to several basic conditions on the trace of H and to necessary and sufficient conditions for H to be planar. The second construction yields explicit formulas for the orthogonal factors of H when they exist and are unique, where two planar transformations are orthogonal if the transformation two-flat of one is the pointwise invariant two-flat of the other.

  5. Primary Healthcare Solo Practices: Homogeneous or Heterogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Boivin, Antoine; Prud'homme, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Solo practices have generally been viewed as forming a homogeneous group. However, they may differ on many characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify different forms of solo practice and to determine the extent to which they are associated with patient experience of care. Methods. Two surveys were carried out in two regions of Quebec in 2010: a telephone survey of 9180 respondents from the general population and a postal survey of 606 primary healthcare (PHC) practices. Data from the two surveys were linked through the respondent's usual source of care. A taxonomy of solo practices was constructed (n = 213), using cluster analysis techniques. Bivariate and multilevel analyses were used to determine the relationship of the taxonomy with patient experience of care. Results. Four models were derived from the taxonomy. Practices in the “resourceful networked” model contrast with those of the “resourceless isolated” model to the extent that the experience of care reported by their patients is more favorable. Conclusion. Solo practice is not a homogeneous group. The four models identified have different organizational features and their patients' experience of care also differs. Some models seem to offer a better organizational potential in the context of current reforms. PMID:24523964

  6. Population dynamics in non-homogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alards, Kim M. J.; Tesser, Francesca; Toschi, Federico

    2014-11-01

    For organisms living in aquatic ecosystems the presence of fluid transport can have a strong influence on the dynamics of populations and on evolution of species. In particular, displacements due to self-propulsion, summed up with turbulent dispersion at larger scales, strongly influence the local densities and thus population and genetic dynamics. Real marine environments are furthermore characterized by a high degree of non-homogeneities. In the case of population fronts propagating in ``fast'' turbulence, with respect to the population duplication time, the flow effect can be studied by replacing the microscopic diffusivity with an effective turbulent diffusivity. In the opposite case of ``slow'' turbulence the advection by the flow has to be considered locally. Here we employ numerical simulations to study the influence of non-homogeneities in the diffusion coefficient of reacting individuals of different species expanding in a 2 dimensional space. Moreover, to explore the influence of advection, we consider a population expanding in the presence of simple velocity fields like cellular flows. The output is analyzed in terms of front roughness, front shape, propagation speed and, concerning the genetics, by means of heterozygosity and local and global extinction probabilities.

  7. Homogenization in micro-magneto-mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, A.; Keip, M.-A.; Miehe, C.

    2016-07-01

    Ferromagnetic materials are characterized by a heterogeneous micro-structure that can be altered by external magnetic and mechanical stimuli. The understanding and the description of the micro-structure evolution is of particular importance for the design and the analysis of smart materials with magneto-mechanical coupling. The macroscopic response of the material results from complex magneto-mechanical interactions occurring on smaller length scales, which are driven by magnetization reorientation and associated magnetic domain wall motions. The aim of this work is to directly base the description of the macroscopic magneto-mechanical material behavior on the micro-magnetic domain evolution. This will be realized by the incorporation of a ferromagnetic phase-field formulation into a macroscopic Boltzmann continuum by the use of computational homogenization. The transition conditions between the two scales are obtained via rigorous exploitation of rate-type and incremental variational principles, which incorporate an extended version of the classical Hill-Mandel macro-homogeneity condition covering the phase field on the micro-scale. An efficient two-scale computational scenario is developed based on an operator splitting scheme that includes a predictor for the magnetization on the micro-scale. Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the method. They investigate micro-magnetic domain evolution driven by macroscopic fields as well as the associated overall hysteretic response of ferromagnetic solids.

  8. Epigenetic activation of a cryptic TBC1D16 transcript enhances melanoma progression by targeting EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Ferreira, Humberto J; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Javier Carmona, F; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Girotti, Maria Romina; Villanueva, Alberto; Guil, Sonia; Moutinho, Catia; Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, August; Martinez-Iniesta, Maria; Manzano, Jose L; Fernandez-Figueras, Maria Teresa; Elez, Elena; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Berrocal, Alfonso; Pontén, Fredrik; van den Oord, Joost; Gallagher, William M; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; McDermott, Ultan; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, and, among common tumor types, melanoma is one with great potential to metastasize. Here we study the contribution of epigenetic changes to the dissemination process by analyzing the changes that occur at the DNA methylation level between primary cancer cells and metastases. We found a hypomethylation event that reactivates a cryptic transcript of the Rab GTPase activating protein TBC1D16 (TBC1D16-47 kDa; referred to hereafter as TBC1D16-47KD) to be a characteristic feature of the metastatic cascade. This short isoform of TBC1D16 exacerbates melanoma growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. By combining immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified RAB5C as a new TBC1D16 target and showed that it regulates EGFR in melanoma cells. We also found that epigenetic reactivation of TBC1D16-47KD is associated with poor clinical outcome in melanoma, while conferring greater sensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:26030178

  9. The structure of nanocomposite 1D cationic conductor crystal@SWNT.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, N A; Kumskov, A S; Zakalyukin, R M; Vasiliev, A L; Chernisheva, M V; Eliseev, A A; Krestinin, A V; Freitag, B; Hutchison, J L

    2012-06-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of one-dimensional (1D) crystals of the cationic conductors CuI, CuBr and AgBr inside single-walled carbon nanotubes, mainly (n, 0), were obtained using the capillary technique. 1D crystal structure models were proposed based on the high resolution transmission electron microscopy performed on a FEI Titan 80-300 at 80 kV with aberration correction. According to the models and image simulations there are two modifications of 1D crystal: hexagonal close-packed bromine (iodine) anion sublattice (growth direction <001>) and 1D crystal cubic structure (growth direction <112>) compressed transversely to the nanotube (D(m) ∼1.33 nm) axis. Tentatively this kind of 1D crystal can be considered as monoclinic. One modification of the anion sublattice reversibly transforms into the other inside the nanotube, probably initiated by electron beam heating. As demonstrated by micrographs, copper or silver cations can occupy octahedral positions or are statistically distributed across two tetrahedral positions. A 1DAgBr@SWNT (18, 0; 19, 0) pseudoperiodic 'lattice distortion' is revealed resulting from convolution of the nanotube wall function image with 1D cubic crystal function image.

  10. PPM1D controls nucleolar formation by up-regulating phosphorylation of nucleophosmin

    PubMed Central

    Kozakai, Yuuki; Kamada, Rui; Furuta, Junya; Kiyota, Yuhei; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    An increase of nucleolar number and size has made nucleoli essential markers for cytology and tumour development. However, the underlying basis for their structural integrity and abundance remains unclear. Protein phosphatase PPM1D was found to be up-regulated in different carcinomas including breast cancers. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation via inducing an increased phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein NPM. We show that PPM1D overexpression induces an increase in the nucleolar number regardless of p53 status. We also demonstrated that specific sequential phosphorylation of NPM is important for nucleolar formation and that PPM1D is a novel upstream regulator of this phosphorylation pathway. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern nucleoli formation by demonstrating that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation by regulating NPM phosphorylation status through a novel signalling pathway, PPM1D-CDC25C-CDK1-PLK1. PMID:27619510

  11. Generation of Multiband Chorus in the Earth's Magnetosphere: 1-D PIC Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinliang; Ke, Yangguang; Lu, Quanming; Chen, Lunjin; Wang, Shui

    2017-01-01

    Multiband chorus waves, where the frequency of upper band chorus is about twice that of lower band chorus, have recently been reported based on THEMIS observations. The generation of multiband chorus waves is attributed to the mechanism of lower band cascade, where upper band chorus is excited via the nonlinear coupling process between lower band chorus and the associated density mode with the frequency equal to that of lower band chorus. In this letter, with a one-dimensional (1-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model, we have successfully reproduced multiband chorus waves. During the simulation, the significant density fluctuation is driven by the fluctuating electric field along the wave vector of the pump wave (lower band chorus), which can be directly observed in this self-consistent plasma system. Then, the second harmonic of the pump whistler-mode wave (upper band chorus) is generated. After quantitatively analyzing resonant conditions among wave numbers, we can confirm that the generation is caused due to the coupling between the pump wave and the density fluctuation along its wave vector. The third harmonic can also be excited through lower band cascade if the pump whistler-mode wave has a sufficiently large amplitude. Our simulation results not only provide a theoretical support to the mechanism of lower band cascade to generate multiband chorus but also propose a new pattern of evolution for whistler-mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  12. O(1S → 1D,3P) branching ratio as measured in the terrestrial nightglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Cosby, P. C.; Sharpee, B. D.; Minschwaner, K. R.; Siskind, D. E.

    2006-12-01

    The branching ratio of the two optically forbidden atmospheric emission lines, O(1S - 1D) at 557.7 nm and O(1S - 3P) at 297.2 nm, is a fixed number in the upper atmosphere because the O(1S) level is common to both lines. The value for the ratio A(557.7)/A(297.2) currently recommended by NIST is 16.7, and the ratio found in the laboratory is somewhat larger. Field observations require space-based instruments, in which case calibration between the two wavelength regions is the critical issue. We circumvent this problem by using the O2(A-X) Herzberg I emission system as a bridge between the UV region below 310 nm and the ground-accessible region above that wavelength. These two spectral regions can be separately calibrated in terms of intensity, and the results of a disparate set of observations (satellite, rocket, ground-based sky spectra) lead to a quite consistent value of 9.8 ± 1.0 for A(557.7)/A(297.2). This conclusion has consequences for auroral and dayglow processes and for spectral calibration. It is particularly important to ascertain the cause of the substantial difference between this value and those from theory.

  13. The O(1S - 1D,3P) Line Intensity Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Sharpee, B. D.; Cosby, P. C.; Minschwaner, K. R.; Siskind, D. E.

    2005-05-01

    The line intensity ratio of the two optically-forbidden atmospheric emissions, O(1S-1D) at 557.7 nm and O(1S-3P) at 297.2 nm, must be a single-valued number in the upper atmosphere because the upper level is common to both lines. The calculated transition probability ratio A(557.7)/A(297.2) is 16, by several authors, and the ratio found in the laboratory is significantly larger. Field observations require space-based instruments, in which case calibration between the two wavelengths is the critical issue. We circumvent this problem by using the O2 Herzberg I emission system as a bridge between the UV region below 310 nm and the ground-accessible region above that wavelength. These two spectral regions can be separately calibrated in terms of intensity, and the results of a disparate set of observations (satellite, rocket, ground-based) lead to A(557.7)/A(297.2) ratios that are consistently much smaller than the calculated value. These results have consequences for auroral and dayglow processes, and it is particularly important to ascertain the cause of the substantial difference between theory and observation.

  14. A Deconstruction Lattice Description of the D1/D5 Brane World-Volume Gauge Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Giedt, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I genermore » alize the deconstruction lattice formulation of Endres and Kaplan to two-dimensional super-QCD with eight supercharges, denoted by (4,4), and bifundamental matter. I specialize to a particularly interesting (4,4) gauge theory, with gauge group U ( N c ) × U ( N f ) , and U ( N f ) being weakly gauged. It describes the infrared limit of the D1/D5 brane system, which has been studied extensively as an example of the AdS 3 /CFT 2 correspondence. The construction here preserves two supercharges exactly and has a lattice structure quite similar to that which has previously appeared in the deconstruction approach, that is, site, link, and diagonal fields with both the Bose and Fermi statistics. I remark on possible applications of the lattice theory that would test the AdS 3 /CFT 2 correspondence, particularly one that would exploit the recent worldsheet instanton analysis of Chen and Tong.« less

  15. Kinetics of O(1D) + H2O and O(1D) + H2: absolute rate coefficients and O(3P) yields between 227 and 453 K.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Stijn; Peeters, Jozef; Carl, Shaun

    2010-08-28

    The rate coefficients for the crucial atmospheric reactions of O((1)D) with H(2)O and H(2), k(1) and k(2), were measured over a wide temperature range using O((1)D) detection based on the chemiluminescence reaction of O((1)D) with C(2)H. Analyzing the decays of the chemiluminescence intensities yielded a value for k(1)(T) of (1.70 x 10(-10)exp[36 K/T]) cm(3) s(-1). Multiplying or dividing k(1)(T) by a factor f(T) = 1.04 exp(5.59(|1 K/T- 1/287|)), gives the 95% confidence limits; our new determination, in good agreement with previous studies, further reduces the uncertainty in k(1). An extended study of k(2) yielded a temperature independent rate constant of (1.35 +/- 0.05) x 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). This precise value, based on an extended set of determinations with very low scatter, is significantly larger than the current recommendations, as were two other recent k(2) determinations. Secondly, the fractions of O((1)D) quenched to O((3)P) by H(2)O and H(2), k(1b)/k(1) and k(2b)/k(2), were precisely determined from fits to chemiluminescence decays. A temperature-independent value for k(1b)/k(1) of 0.010 +/- 0.003 was found. For the quenching fraction k(2b)/k(2) a value of 0.007 +/- 0.007 was obtained at room temperature. Both determinations are significantly smaller than values and upper limits from previous studies.

  16. Exploring the Kibble-Zurek mechanism with homogeneous Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beugnon, Jérôme; Navon, Nir

    2017-01-01

    Out-of-equilibrium phenomena are a subject of considerable interest in many fields of physics. Ultracold quantum gases, which are extremely clean, well-isolated and highly controllable systems, offer ideal platforms to investigate this topic. The recent progress in tailoring trapping potentials now allows the experimental production of homogeneous samples in custom geometries, which is a key advance for studies of the emergence of coherence in interacting quantum systems. Here we review recent experiments in which temperature quenches have been performed across the Bose-Einstein condensation phase transition in an annular geometry and in homogeneous 3D and quasi-2D gases. Combined, these experiments comprehensively explore and validate the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) scenario through complementary measurements of correlation functions and density of topological defects. They allow the measurement of KZ scaling laws, the direct confirmation of the ‘freeze-out’ hypothesis that underlies the KZ theory, and the extraction of critical exponents of the Bose-Einstein condensation transition.

  17. Critical Casimir forces between homogeneous and chemically striped surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent experiments have measured the critical Casimir force acting on a colloid immersed in a binary liquid mixture near its continuous demixing phase transition and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. Motivated by these experiments, we study the critical behavior of a system, which belongs to the Ising universality class, for the film geometry with one planar wall chemically striped, such that there is a laterally alternating adsorption preference for the two species of the binary liquid mixture, which is implemented by surface fields. For the opposite wall we employ alternatively a homogeneous adsorption preference or homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions, which within a lattice model are realized by open boundary conditions. By means of mean-field theory, Monte Carlo simulations, and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the critical Casimir force acting on the two parallel walls and its corresponding universal scaling function. We show that in the limit of stripe widths small compared with the film thickness, on the striped surface the system effectively realizes Dirichlet boundary conditions, which generically do not hold for actual fluids. Moreover, the critical Casimir force is found to be attractive or repulsive, depending on the width of the stripes of the chemically patterned surface and on the boundary condition applied to the opposing surface.

  18. Bio-inspired homogeneous multi-scale place recognition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zetao; Lowry, Stephanie; Jacobson, Adam; Hasselmo, Michael E; Milford, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Robotic mapping and localization systems typically operate at either one fixed spatial scale, or over two, combining a local metric map and a global topological map. In contrast, recent high profile discoveries in neuroscience have indicated that animals such as rodents navigate the world using multiple parallel maps, with each map encoding the world at a specific spatial scale. While a number of theoretical-only investigations have hypothesized several possible benefits of such a multi-scale mapping system, no one has comprehensively investigated the potential mapping and place recognition performance benefits for navigating robots in large real world environments, especially using more than two homogeneous map scales. In this paper we present a biologically-inspired multi-scale mapping system mimicking the rodent multi-scale map. Unlike hybrid metric-topological multi-scale robot mapping systems, this new system is homogeneous, distinguishable only by scale, like rodent neural maps. We present methods for training each network to learn and recognize places at a specific spatial scale, and techniques for combining the output from each of these parallel networks. This approach differs from traditional probabilistic robotic methods, where place recognition spatial specificity is passively driven by models of sensor uncertainty. Instead we intentionally create parallel learning systems that learn associations between sensory input and the environment at different spatial scales. We also conduct a systematic series of experiments and parameter studies that determine the effect on performance of using different neural map scaling ratios and different numbers of discrete map scales. The results demonstrate that a multi-scale approach universally improves place recognition performance and is capable of producing better than state of the art performance compared to existing robotic navigation algorithms. We analyze the results and discuss the implications with respect to

  19. A novel approach to make homogeneous protease-stable monovalent streptavidin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.; Shao, J; Xiao, J.; Deng, W.; Yu, H.

    2015-06-11

    The interaction between the tetramer streptavidin and biotin is recognized as one of the strongest non-covalent associations. Owing to the tight and specific binding, the streptavidin-biotin system has been used widely for bimolecular labeling, purification, immobilization, and even for targeted delivery of therapeutics drugs. Here, we report a novel approach to make homogeneous monovalent tetramer streptavidin. The purified monovalent protein showed both thermal stability and protease stability. Unexpectedly, we found that two proteases, Proteinase K (PK) and Subtilisin (SU), can efficiently remove the His8-tag from the wild-type subunit without affecting the tetramer architecture of monovalent streptavidin, thus making it more homogeneous. In addition, crystallization was performed to assure the homogeneity of the monovalent protein prepared. Overall, monovalent streptavidin shows increased homogeneity and will likely be valuable for many future applications in a wide range of research areas.

  20. A novel approach to make homogeneous protease-stable monovalent streptavidin

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, M.; Shao, J; Xiao, J.; ...

    2015-06-11

    The interaction between the tetramer streptavidin and biotin is recognized as one of the strongest non-covalent associations. Owing to the tight and specific binding, the streptavidin-biotin system has been used widely for bimolecular labeling, purification, immobilization, and even for targeted delivery of therapeutics drugs. Here, we report a novel approach to make homogeneous monovalent tetramer streptavidin. The purified monovalent protein showed both thermal stability and protease stability. Unexpectedly, we found that two proteases, Proteinase K (PK) and Subtilisin (SU), can efficiently remove the His8-tag from the wild-type subunit without affecting the tetramer architecture of monovalent streptavidin, thus making it moremore » homogeneous. In addition, crystallization was performed to assure the homogeneity of the monovalent protein prepared. Overall, monovalent streptavidin shows increased homogeneity and will likely be valuable for many future applications in a wide range of research areas.« less