Science.gov

Sample records for 1-d numerical simulations

  1. 1d Numerical Simulation of A Swiss Debris Flow: Comparison of Flow Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdell, B. W.; Graf, Ch.; Naef, D.; Rickenmann, D.

    Efforts to numerically model debris flows have been limited by a lack of appropriate numerical tools. Here we report on our efforts to systematically evaluate different flow laws using a numerical tool under development at our institute. The model, DFEM, is a finite element solution of the shallow water equations in one or two dimensions and is based on the FEMTOOL libraries from Rutschmann (1993). Debris flow constitu- tive relations or flow laws include turbulent (e.g. Manning, Chézy, Voellmy), laminar (Bingham, Newtonian laminar), and inertial formulations (dilatant/grain shearing) as well as combinations of flow laws when appropriate. The model is applied to a recent debris flow event from the Schipfenbach torrent, Switzerland (Hürlimann, submitted), where we maintain an automated debris flow observation station. Observations include flow depth measurements from ultrasonic depth measurement devices, reach-averaged velocities estimated from the travel time between ultrasonic gages and geophones, velocity and flow behavior from video cam- eras situated near the flow retention basin on the fan, and post-event field surveys. Preliminary results suggest that the flow of debris in the steep reaches of the torrent channel can be reasonably described by a simple turbulent flow law (e.g. Manning- Strickler or Chézy) with a large overall flow resistance, and that both the flow in the channel and the deposition on the fan can be satisfactorily simulated using the Voellmy fluid approach. The results using the Voellmy fluid approach are in agree- ment with results calculated from the AVAL-1D snow avalanche simulation code and input parameters for debris instead of snow, corroborating the implementation in the DFEM model. The AVAL-1D code is commercially available, providing another tool that may be used by workers in the natural hazards field for debris flow routing in torrent channels and on alluvial fans. References: Hürlimann, M., Rickenmann, D. and Graf, Ch., Field

  2. A numerical method of reduced complexity for simulating vascular hemodynamics using coupled 0D lumped and 1D wave propagation models.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Wilco; Huberts, Wouter; Bosboom, Marielle; van de Vosse, Frans

    2012-01-01

    A computational method of reduced complexity is developed for simulating vascular hemodynamics by combination of one-dimensional (1D) wave propagation models for the blood vessels with zero-dimensional (0D) lumped models for the microcirculation. Despite the reduced dimension, current algorithms used to solve the model equations and simulate pressure and flow are rather complex, thereby limiting acceptance in the medical field. This complexity mainly arises from the methods used to combine the 1D and the 0D model equations. In this paper a numerical method is presented that no longer requires additional coupling methods and enables random combinations of 1D and 0D models using pressure as only state variable. The method is applied to a vascular tree consisting of 60 major arteries in the body and the head. Simulated results are realistic. The numerical method is stable and shows good convergence.

  3. A 1D-ecosystem model for pelagic waters in the southern Baltic Sea. Numerical simulations (future decades)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierzbicka-Glowacka, L.; Maciejewska, A.; Osiński, R.; Jakacki, J.; Jędrasik, J.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional Ecosystem Model. Mathematically, the pelagic variables in the model are described by a second-order partial differential equation of the diffusion type with biogeochemical sources and sinks. The temporal changes in the phytoplankton biomass are caused by primary production, respiration, mortality, grazing by zooplankton and sinking. The zooplankton biomass is affected by ingestion, excretion, respiration, fecal production, mortality, and carnivorous grazing. The changes in the pelagic detritus concentration are determined by input of: dead phytoplankton and zooplankton, natural mortality of predators, fecal pellets, and sinks: sedimentation, zooplankton grazing and decomposition. The nutrient concentration is caused by nutrient release, zooplankton excretion, predator excretion, detritus decomposition and benthic regeneration as sources and by nutrient uptake by phytoplankton as sinks. However, the benthic detritus is described by phytoplankton sedimentation, detritus sedimentation and remineralisation. The particulate organic carbon concentration is determined as the sum of phytoplankton, zooplankton and dead organic matter (detritus) concentrations. The 1D ecosystem model was used to simulate the seasonal dynamics of pelagic variables (phytoplankton, zooplankton, pelagic detritus and POC) in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep, Bornholm Deep and Gotland Deep). The calculations were made assuming: 1) increase in the water temperature in the upper layer - 0.008oC per year, 2) increase in the available light - 0.2% per year. Based on this trend, daily, monthly and seasonal and annual variability of phytoplankton, zooplankton, pelagic detritus and particulate organic carbon in different areas of the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep, Borrnholm Deep and Gotland Deep) in the euphotic layer was calculated for the years: 2000, 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040 and 2050.

  4. Comparison between 1D and 1 1/2D Eulerian Vlasov codes for the numerical simulation of stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghizzo, A.; Bertrand, P.; Lebas, J.; Shoucri, M.; Johnston, T.; Fijalkow, E.; Feix, M. R.

    1992-10-01

    The present 1 1/2D relativistic Euler-Vlasov code has been used to check the validity of a hydrodynamic description used in a 1D version of the Vlasov code. By these means, detailed numerical results can be compared; good agreement furnishes full support for the 1D electromagnetic Vlasov code, which runs faster than the 1 1/2D code. The results obtained assume a nonrelativistic v(y) velocity.

  5. Development of a Numerical Method for Patient-Specific Cerebral Circulation Using 1D-0D Simulation of the Entire Cardiovascular System with SPECT Data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Fujiwara, Naoya; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Yamada, Shigeki; Liang, Fuyou; Takagi, Shu; Oshima, Marie

    2016-08-01

    The detailed flow information in the circle of Willis (CoW) can facilitate a better understanding of disease progression, and provide useful references for disease treatment. We have been developing a one-dimensional-zero-dimensional (1D-0D) simulation method for the entire cardiovascular system to obtain hemodynamics information in the CoW. This paper presents a new method for applying 1D-0D simulation to an individual patient using patient-specific data. The key issue is how to adjust the deviation of physiological parameters, such as peripheral resistance, from literature data when patient-specific geometry is used. In order to overcome this problem, we utilized flow information from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. A numerical method was developed to optimize physiological parameters by adjusting peripheral cerebral resistance to minimize the difference between the resulting flow rate and the SPECT data in the efferent arteries of the CoW. The method was applied to three cases using different sets of patient-specific data in order to investigate the hemodynamics of the CoW. The resulting flow rates in the afferent arteries were compared to those of the phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC-MRA) data. Utilization of the SPECT data combined with the PC-MRA data showed a good agreement in flow rates in the afferent arteries of the CoW with those of PC-MRA data for all three cases. The results also demonstrated that application of SPECT data alone could provide the information on the ratios of flow distributions among arteries in the CoW.

  6. 1-D Numerical Analysis of ABCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ABCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engine into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Except for the heat source, the basic operation of the ABCC is similar to the basic operation of the RBCC engine. The ABCC is intended to have a higher specific impulse than the RBCC for single stage Earth to orbit vehicle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in ABCC propulsion system. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model using conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy equations that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic ABCC engine following a flight path. At specific points during the development of the 1-D numerical model a myriad of tests were performed to prove the program produced consistent, realistic numbers that follow compressible flow theory for various inlet conditions.

  7. Verification and comparison of four numerical schemes for a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Fullana, Jose-Maria; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    A reliable and fast numerical scheme is crucial for the 1D simulation of blood flow in compliant vessels. In this paper, a 1D blood flow model is incorporated with a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic arterial wall. This leads to a nonlinear hyperbolic-parabolic system, which is then solved with four numerical schemes, namely: MacCormack, Taylor-Galerkin, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation law and local discontinuous Galerkin. The numerical schemes are tested on a single vessel, a simple bifurcation and a network with 55 arteries. The numerical solutions are checked favorably against analytical, semi-analytical solutions or clinical observations. Among the numerical schemes, comparisons are made in four important aspects: accuracy, ability to capture shock-like phenomena, computational speed and implementation complexity. The suitable conditions for the application of each scheme are discussed.

  8. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  9. Requirements definition by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, James J.; Kostas, Chris; Tsang, Kang T.

    1994-10-01

    We are investigating the issues involved in requirements definition for narcotics interdiction: how much of a particular signature is possible, how does this amount change for different conditions, and what is the temporal relationship in various scenarios. Our approach has been to simulate numerically the conditions that arise during vapor or particulate transport. The advantages of this approach are that (1) a broad range of scenarios can be rapidly and inexpensively analyzed by simulation, and (2) simulations can display quantities that are difficult or impossible to measure. The drawback of this approach is that simulations cannot include all of the phenomena present in a real measurement, and therefore the fidelity of the simulation results is always an issue. To address this limitation, we will ultimately combine the results of numerical simulations with measurements of physical parameters for inclusion in the simulation. In this paper, we discuss these issues and how they apply to the current problems in narcotics interdictions, especially cargo containers. We also show the results of 1D and 3D numerical simulations, and compare these results with analytical solutions. The results indicate that this approach is viable. We also present data from 3D simulations of vapor transport in a loaded cargo container and some of the issues present in this ongoing work.

  10. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  11. Rocket engine numerical simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: a rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS) definition; objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusion.

  12. Partical Simulation of Bounded 1D Plasma Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, William S.

    1989-02-01

    The physical and numerical problems of kinetic simulation of a bounded electrostatic plasma system in one planar dimension are examined, and solutions to them are presented. These problems include particle absorption, reflection and emission at boundaries, the solution of Poisson's equation under non-periodic boundary conditions, and the treatment of an external circuit connecting the boundaries. The methods which are described here are immlemented in a code named PDW1, which is available from Professor C. K. Birdsall, Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Cory Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

  13. 1D and 2D simulations of seismic wave propagation in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Fractures and cracks have a significant influence on the propagation of seismic waves. Their presence causes reflections and scattering and makes the medium effectively anisotropic. We present a numerical approach to simulation of seismic waves in fractured media that does not require direct modelling of the fracture itself, but uses the concept of linear slip interfaces developed by Schoenberg (1980). This condition states that at an interface between two imperfectly bonded elastic media, stress is continuous across the interface while displacement is discontinuous. It is assumed that the jump of displacement is proportional to stress which implies a jump in particle velocity at the interface. We use this condition as a boundary condition to the elastic wave equation and solve this equation in the framework of a Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin scheme using a velocity-stress formulation. We use meshes with tetrahedral elements to discretise the medium. Each individual element face may be declared as a slip interface. Numerical fluxes have been derived by solving the 1D Riemann problem for slip interfaces with elastic and viscoelastic rheology. Viscoelasticity is realised either by a Kelvin-Voigt body or a Standard Linear Solid. These fluxes are not limited to 1D and can - with little modification - be used for simulations in higher dimensions as well. The Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin code "neXd" developed by Lambrecht (2013) is used as a basis for the numerical implementation of this concept. We present examples of simulations in 1D and 2D that illustrate the influence of fractures on the seismic wavefield. We demonstrate the accuracy of the simulation through comparison to an analytical solution in 1D.

  14. 1D quantum simulation using a solid state platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkendall, Megan; Irvin, Patrick; Huang, Mengchen; Levy, Jeremy; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom

    Understanding the properties of large quantum systems can be challenging both theoretically and numerically. One experimental approach-quantum simulation-involves mapping a quantum system of interest onto a physical system that is programmable and experimentally accessible. A tremendous amount of work has been performed with quantum simulators formed from optical lattices; by contrast, solid-state platforms have had only limited success. Our experimental approach to quantum simulation takes advantage of nanoscale control of a metal-insulator transition at the interface between two insulating complex oxide materials. This system naturally exhibits a wide variety of ground states (e.g., ferromagnetic, superconducting) and can be configured into a variety of complex geometries. We will describe initial experiments that explore the magnetotransport properties of one-dimensional superlattices with spatial periods as small as 4 nm, comparable to the Fermi wavelength. The results demonstrate the potential of this solid-state quantum simulation approach, and also provide empirical constraints for physical models that describe the underlying oxide material properties. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from AFOSR (FA9550-12-1- 0057 (JL), FA9550-10-1-0524 (JL) and FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR N00014-15-1-2847 (JL), and NSF DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  15. Parametric Simulations of Slanted 1D Photonic Crystal Sensors.

    PubMed

    Breuer-Weil, Aaron; Almasoud, Naif Nasser; Abbasi, Badaruddin; Yetisen, Ali K; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2016-12-01

    Photonic crystals and band gap materials act as manipulators of light and have a plethora of applications. They are made up of stacks of alternating dielectric constants. This article shows the simulations of an inclined, one dimensional and tuneble photonic crystal, using numerical finite element methods. The photonic crystal was made up of silver nanoparticles embedded in a hydrogel matrix and it has the ability to change and recover its periodicity. A series of factors concerning the geometry of the lattice were tested in order to analyze the efficiency, performance and optimize the properties of the optical sensor. These factors range from the size of the nanoparticles and their density within the stacks, to observing the effect of diffraction angle in readouts.

  16. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  17. 1D numerical model of muddy subaqueous and subaerial debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imran, J.; Parker, G.; Locat, J.; Lee, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 1D numerical model of the downslope flow and deposition of muddy subaerial and subaqueous debris flows is presented. The model incorporates the Herschel-Bulkley and bilinear rheologies of viscoplastic fluid. The more familiar Bingham model is integrated into the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model. The conservation equations of mass and momentum of single-phase laminar debris flow are layer-integrated using the slender flow approximation. They are then expressed in a Lagrangian framework and solved numerically using an explicit finite difference scheme. Starting from a given initial shape, a debris flow is allowed to collapse and propagate over a specified topography. Comparison between the model predictions and laboratory experiments shows reasonable agreement. The model is used to study the effect of the ambient fluid density, initial shape of the failed mass, and rheological model on the simulated propagation of the front and runout characteristics of muddy debris flows. It is found that initial failure shape influence the front velocity but has little bearing on the final deposit shape. In the Bingham model, the excess of shear stress above the yield strength is proportional to the strain rate to the first power. This exponent is free to vary in the Herschel-Bulkley model. When it is set at a value lower than unity, the resulting final deposits are thicker and shorter than in the case of the Bingham rheology. The final deposit resulting from the bilinear model is longer and thinner than that from the Bingham model due to the fact that the debris flow is allowed to act as a Newtonian fluid at low shear rate in the bilinear model.

  18. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  19. Numerical simulation of dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1995-09-01

    The numerical simulation of physical processes in dusty plasmas is reviewed, with emphasis on recent results and unresolved issues. Three areas of research are discussed: grain charging, weak dust-plasma interactions, and strong dust-plasma interactions. For each area, we review the basic concepts that are tested by simulations, present some appropriate examples, and examine numerical issues associated with extending present work.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Nix's Rotation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a numerical simulation of the orientation of Nix as seen from the center of the Pluto system. It has been sped up so that one orbit of Nix around Pluto takes 2 seconds instead of 25 days. L...

  1. Numerical simulation of Bootstrap Current

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; White, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    The neoclassical theory of Bootstrap Current in toroidal systems is calculated in magnetic flux coordinates and confirmed by numerical simulation. The effects of magnetic ripple, loop voltage, and magnetic and electrostatic perturbations on bootstrap current for the cases of zero and finite plasma pressure are studied. The numerical results are in reasonable agreement with analytical estimates.

  2. Nanoelectronic Modeling (NEMO): Moving from commercial grade 1-D simulation to prototype 3-D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2001-03-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of commercially pursued heterostructure devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared photodetectors, and quantum well lasers are enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The creation of these heterostructure devices is realized in a vast design space of material compositions, layer thicknesses and doping profiles. The full experimental exploration of this design space is unfeasible and a reliable design tool is needed. The Nanoelectronic Modeling tool (NEMO) is one of the first commercial grade attempts for such a modeling tool. NEMO was developed as a general-purpose quantum mechanics-based 1-D device design and analysis tool from 1993-97 by the Central Research Laboratory of Texas Instruments (later Raytheon Systems). NEMO enables(R. Lake, G. Klimeck, R. C. Bowen, and D. Jovanovic, J. Appl. Phys. 81), 7845 (1997). the fundamentally sound inclusion of the required(G. Klimeck et al.), in the 1997 55th Annual Device Research Conference Digest, (IEEE, NJ, 1997), p. 92^,(R. C. Bowen et al.), J. Appl. Phys 81, 3207 (1997). physics: bandstructure, scattering, and charge self-consistency based on the non-equilibrium Green function approach. A new class of devices which require full 3-D quantum mechanics based models is starting to emerge: quantum dots, or in general semiconductor based deca-nano devices. We are currently building a 3-D modeling tool based on NEMO to include the important physics to understand electronic stated in such superscaled structures. This presentation will overview various facets of the NEMO 1-D tool such electron transport physics in RTDs, numerical technology, software engineering and graphical user interface. The lessons learned from that work are now entering the NEMO 3-D development and first results using the NEMO 3-D prototype will be shown. More information about

  3. Numerical simulation of gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeld, P.H.; Schroeder, D.E. Jr. )

    1992-08-01

    To obtain maximum productivity from unconsolidated formations where sand control is required, it is important to understand the mechanics of gravel packing. This paper describes a finite-element, numerical simulator that can predict gravel placement in the perforations and annulus of a wellbore. The equations for the simulator include mass and momentum conservation. Wellbore geometry, physical properties, and fluid and gravel-pack properties are simulator input. Experiments in a 100-ft full-scale wellbore model for three gravel-packing configurations have been successfully simulated. These configurations are a circulating pack with a washpipe, a squeeze pack, and a circulating/squeeze pack with a washpipe and a lower telltale screen. The low cost, speed, and extrapolation capabilities of the numerical simulator will greatly enhance our ability to predict gravel placement in a wellbore.

  4. Efficient numerical schemes for viscoplastic avalanches. Part 1: The 1D case

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Nieto, Enrique D.

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the numerical resolution of a shallow water viscoplastic flow model. Viscoplastic materials are characterized by the existence of a yield stress: below a certain critical threshold in the imposed stress, there is no deformation and the material behaves like a rigid solid, but when that yield value is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. In the context of avalanches, it means that after going down a slope, the material can stop and its free surface has a non-trivial shape, as opposed to the case of water (Newtonian fluid). The model involves variational inequalities associated with the yield threshold: finite-volume schemes are used together with duality methods (namely Augmented Lagrangian and Bermúdez–Moreno) to discretize the problem. To be able to accurately simulate the stopping behavior of the avalanche, new schemes need to be designed, involving the classical notion of well-balancing. In the present context, it needs to be extended to take into account the viscoplastic nature of the material as well as general bottoms with wet/dry fronts which are encountered in geophysical geometries. We derived such schemes and numerical experiments are presented to show their performances.

  5. Numerical simulation of Ulysses nutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marirrodriga, C. Garcia; Zeischka, J.; Boslooper, E. C.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical simulation has been performed on the in-orbit instability of the Ulysses Spacecraft. The thermal excitation from the solar flux, the flexible axial boom and its deployment mechanism have been modeled and analyzed. The simulation shows that the nutation build-up has been originated by the solar input on the axial boom coupled with the system nutation frequency of the spacecraft. The results agree with the observed behavior.

  6. Numerical approaches for multidimensional simulations of stellar explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann S.

    2013-11-01

    We introduce numerical algorithms for initializing multidimensional simulations of stellar explosions with 1D stellar evolution models. The initial mapping from 1D profiles onto multidimensional grids can generate severe numerical artifacts, one of the most severe of which is the violation of conservation laws for physical quantities. We introduce a numerical scheme for mapping 1D spherically-symmetric data onto multidimensional meshes so that these physical quantities are conserved. We verify our scheme by porting a realistic 1D Lagrangian stellar profile to the new multidimensional Eulerian hydro code CASTRO. Our results show that all important features in the profiles are reproduced on the new grid and that conservation laws are enforced at all resolutions after mapping. We also introduce a numerical scheme for initializing multidimensional supernova simulations with realistic perturbations predicted by 1D stellar evolution models. Instead of seeding 3D stellar profiles with random perturbations, we imprint them with velocity perturbations that reproduce the Kolmogorov energy spectrum expected for highly turbulent convective regions in stars. Our models return Kolmogorov energy spectra and vortex structures like those in turbulent flows before the modes become nonlinear. Finally, we describe approaches to determining the resolution for simulations required to capture fluid instabilities and nuclear burning. Our algorithms are applicable to multidimensional simulations besides stellar explosions that range from astrophysics to cosmology.

  7. Build up An Operational Flood Simulation from Existing 1D Channel Flow Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Che-Hao; Hsu, Chih-Tsung; Wu, Shiang-Jen; Lien, Ho-Cheng; Shen, Jhih-Cyuan; Chung, Ming-Ko

    2016-04-01

    Several 2D flood simulations will be developed for urban area in recent years in Taiwan. Original ideas focus on the static flood maps produced by the 2D flood simulation with respect to design events, which could be useful no matter for planning or disaster awareness. However, an extra bonus is expected to see if we can reuse the 2D flood simulation framework for operational use or not. Such a project goal inspire us to setup a standard operation procedure before any progress from existing 1D channel flow works. 3 key issues are taken into account in the SOP: 1. High Resolution Terrain: A 1m resolution digital terrain model (DTM) is considered as a reference. The Channels and structures should be setup in 1D channel flow works if we can identify under such high resolution. One should examine the existing 1D channel flow works consistent with the DTM or not. 2. Meteo Stations Referenced: Real time precipitation would be send to referenced location in RR models during an operational forecast. Existing 1D channels flow works are usually specifically for design events which are not necessarily equipped with such references. 3. Time Consuming: A full scale 2D flood simulation needs a lot of computation resources. A solution should be derived within practical time limits. Under the above consideration, some impacts and procedures will be analyzed and developed to setup the SOP for further model modification.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of human phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, Shakti; Bodony, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation study of the generation and propagation of the human voice in a full-body domain is conducted. A fully compressible fluid flow model, anatomically representative vocal tract geometry, finite deformation model for vocal fold (VF) motion and a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model are employed. The dynamics of the multi-layered VF tissue with varying stiffness are solved using a quadratic finite element code. The fluid-solid domains are coupled through a boundary-fitted interface and utilize a Poisson equation-based mesh deformation method. A new inflow boundary condition, based upon a quasi-1D formulation with constant sub-glottal volume velocity, linked to the VF movement, has been adopted. Simulations for both child and adult phonation were performed. Acoustic characteristics obtained from these simulation are consistent with expected values. A sensitivity analysis based on VF stiffness variation is undertaken and sound pressure level/fundamental frequency trends are established. An evaluation of the data against the commonly-used quasi-1D equations suggest that the latter are not sufficient to model phonation. Phonation threshold pressures are measured for several VF stiffness variations and comparisons to clinical data are carried out. Supported by the National Science Foundation (CAREER Award Number 1150439).

  9. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections.

  10. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections. PMID:25888513

  11. Numerical Simulation of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teukolsky, Saul

    2003-04-01

    Einstein's equations of general relativity are prime candidates for numerical solution on supercomputers. There is some urgency in being able to carry out such simulations: Large-scale gravitational wave detectors are now coming on line, and the most important expected signals cannot be predicted except numerically. Problems involving black holes are perhaps the most interesting, yet also particularly challenging computationally. One difficulty is that inside a black hole there is a physical singularity that cannot be part of the computational domain. A second difficulty is the disparity in length scales between the size of the black hole and the wavelength of the gravitational radiation emitted. A third difficulty is that all existing methods of evolving black holes in three spatial dimensions are plagued by instabilities that prohibit long-term evolution. I will describe the ideas that are being introduced in numerical relativity to deal with these problems, and discuss the results of recent calculations of black hole collisions.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Protoplanetary Vortices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Center for Turbulence Research 81 Annual Research Briefs 2003 Numerical simulation of protoplanetary vortices By H. Lin, J.A. Barranco t AND P.S...planetesimals and planets. In earlier works ( Barranco & Marcus 2000; Barranco et al. 2000; Lin et al. 2000) we have briefly described the possible physical...transport. In particular, Barranco et al. (2000) provided a general mathe- matical framework that is suitable for the asymptotic regime of the disk

  13. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

  14. Pool Formation in Boulder-Bed Streams: Implications From 1-D and 2-D Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L. R.; Keller, E. A.

    2003-12-01

    In mountain rivers of Southern California, boulder-large roughness elements strongly influence flow hydraulics and pool formation and maintenance. In these systems, boulders appear to control the stream morphology by converging flow and producing deep pools during channel forming discharges. Our research goal is to develop quantitative relationships between boulder roughness elements, temporal patterns of scour and fill, and geomorphic processes that are important in producing pool habitat. The longitudinal distribution of shear stress, unit stream power and velocity were estimated along a 48 m reach on Rattlesnake Creek, using the HEC-RAS v 3.0 and River 2-D numerical models. The reach has an average slope of 0.02 and consists of a pool-riffle sequence with a large boulder constriction directly above the pool. Model runs were performed for a range of stream discharges to test if scour and fill thresholds for pool and riffle environments could be identified. Results from the HEC-RAS simulations identified that thresholds in shear stress, unit stream power and mean velocity occur above a discharge of 5.0 cms. Results from the one-dimensional analysis suggest that the reversal in competency is likely due to changes in cross-sectional width at varying flows. River 2-D predictions indicated that strong transverse velocity gradients were present through the pool at higher modeled discharges. At a flow of 0.5 cms (roughly 1/10th bankfull discharge), velocities are estimated at 0.6 m/s and 1.3 m/s for the pool and riffle, respectively. During discharges of 5.15 cms (approximate bankfull discharge), the maximum velocity in the pool center increased to nearly 3.0 m/s, while the maximum velocity over the riffle is estimated at approximately 2.5 cms. These results are consistent with those predicted by HEC-RAS, though the reversal appears to be limited to a narrow jet that occurs through the pool head and pool center. Model predictions suggest that the velocity reversal is

  15. Quantum simulation of 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Li, Chuan-Feng; Xu, Jin-Shi; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2015-07-06

    Orbital angular momentum of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom characterized by unlimited number of available angular momentum states. Although this unique property has proved invaluable in diverse recent studies ranging from optical communication to quantum information, it has not been considered useful or even relevant for simulating nontrivial physics problems such as topological phenomena. Contrary to this misconception, we demonstrate the incredible value of orbital angular momentum of light for quantum simulation by showing theoretically how it allows to study a variety of important 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities. This application for orbital angular momentum of light not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation, and thus makes it possible to investigate important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition in a small simulator ready for immediate experimental exploration.

  16. Numerical simulation of aneurysm hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVicar, Stephen; Huynh, Sophia; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysms is the leading cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage, with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Numerical simulations of flow in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional saccular aneurysm geometries were performed to evaluate possible sites and mechanisms for aneurysm growth and rupture. The governing equations were solved in their finite volume formulation for both steady and pulsatile flows. Recirculation zones and secondary flows were observed in aneurysms and arteries. Regions of elevated and oscillating shear stress were observed, often at the aneurysm's distal shoulder. The influence of several geometric factors, including vessel curvature, branching angle, and aneurysm shape, on flow patterns and fluid mechanical forces was studied, with the goal of assessing the risks posed by given aneurysm geometry.

  17. Optimizing physical parameters in 1-D particle-in-cell simulations with Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John P.; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation tool, OOPD1, is wrapped in the Python programming language, enabling automated algorithmic optimization of physical and numerical parameters. The Python-based environment exposes internal variables, enabling modification of simulation parameters, as well as run-time generation of new diagnostics based on calculations with internal data. For problems requiring an iterative optimization approach, this enables a programmable interactive feedback loop style simulation model, where the input to one simulation is a programmable function of the output of the previous one. This approach is applied to field-emission of electrons in a diode, in order to explore space charge effects in bipolar flow. We find an analytical solution for maximizing the space-charge limited current through a diode with an upstream ion current, and confirm the result with simulations, demonstrating the efficacy of the feedback scheme. We also demonstrate and analyze a modeling approach for scaling the ion mass, which can shorten simulation time without changing the ultimate result. The methods presented can be generalized to handle other applications where it is desirable to evolve simulation parameters based on algorithmic results from the simulation, including models in which physical or numerical parameter tuning is used to converge or optimize a system in one or more variables.

  18. Simulating reionization in numerical cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokasian, Aaron

    2003-11-01

    The incorporation of radiative transfer effects into cosmological hydrodynamical simulations is essential for understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) makes the transition from a neutral medium to one that is almost fully ionized. I present an approximate numerical method designed to study in a statistical sense how a cosmological density field is ionized by various sets of sources. The method requires relatively few time steps and can be employed with simulations of high resolution. First, I explore the reionization history of Helium II by z < 6 quasars. Comparisons between HeII opacities measured observationally and inferred from our analysis reveal that the uncertainties in the empirical luminosity function provide enough leeway to provide a satisfactory match. A property common to all the calculations is that the epoch of Helium II reionization must have occurred between 3≲z≲4 . I extend my analysis to study the constraints that can be placed on the nature of the cosmic ultraviolet (UV) background in the redshift interval 2.5≲z≲5 . I find that in order to simultaneously match observational estimates of the HI and HeII opacities, galaxies and quasars must contribute about equally to the ionizing background in HI at z ≃ 3. Moreover, my analysis requires the stellar component to rise for z > 3 to compensate for the declining contribution from bright quasars at higher redshift. To investigate how stellar source may have reionized the universe at z > 6, I have combined our 3D radiative transfer code with high resolution hydrodynamical simulations to study how population II and III type stars affected the reionization process. The resulting complex reionization histories are presented and comparisons made with observational constraints on the neutral fraction of hydrogen at z ˜ 6 derived from the z = 6.28 SDSS quasar of Becker and coworkers and the recent WMAP measurements of the electron scattering optical depth analysis of Kogut

  19. 1D GAS-DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF SHOCK-WAVE PROCESSES VIA INTERNET

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Levashov, P. R.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Zakharenkov, A. S.

    2009-12-28

    We present a Web-interface for 1D simulation of different shock-wave experiments. The choosing of initial parameters, the modeling itself and output data treatment can be made directly via the Internet. The interface is based upon the expert system on shock-wave data and equations of state and contains both the Eulerian and Lagrangian Godunov hydrocodes. The availability of equations of state for a broad set of substances makes this system a useful tool for planning and interpretation of shock-wave experiments. As an example of simulation with the system, results of modeling of multistep shock loading of potassium between polytetrafluoroethylene and stainless steel plates are presented in comparison with experimental data from Shakhray et al.(2005).

  20. Understanding the Rayleigh-Taylor instability through 1D and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaeil, Mark; Denissen, Nicholas; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    A series of Rayleigh-Taylor instability numerical simulations were completed using the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode FLAG developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One-dimensional simulations employed a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach with turbulence closure models selected from the Besnard-Harlow-Rauenzahn family of models. Growth rate parameters and turbulence statistics are derived from these simulations and compared between closure models. Variations from experimental results are explored and used to validate the models. The effect of density ratio on the bubble-spike growth rate asymmetry is also investigated. High resolution three-dimensional large eddy simulations (LES) are also completed and presented. LES were initialized using a multi-modal perturbation prescribed from experimental data collected at the Georgia Institute of Technology multi-layer Gas Tunnel facility. Turbulence statistics are gathered by averaging many simulations started with different initial conditions. Late time development is compared to Gas Tunnel experimental results and previous LES.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Protoplanetary Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H.; Barranco, J. A.; Marcus, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    The fluid dynamics within a protoplanetary disk has been attracting the attention of many researchers for a few decades. Previous works include, to list only a few among many others, the well-known prescription of Shakura & Sunyaev, the convective and instability study of Stone & Balbus and Hawley et al., the Rossby wave approach of Lovelace et al., as well as a recent work by Klahr & Bodenheimer, which attempted to identify turbulent flow within the disk. The disk is commonly understood to be a thin gas disk rotating around a central star with differential rotation (the Keplerian velocity), and the central quest remains as how the flow behavior deviates (albeit by a small amount) from a strong balance established between gravitational and centrifugal forces, transfers mass and momentum inward, and eventually forms planetesimals and planets. In earlier works we have briefly described the possible physical processes involved in the disk; we have proposed the existence of long-lasting, coherent vortices as an efficient agent for mass and momentum transport. In particular, Barranco et al. provided a general mathematical framework that is suitable for the asymptotic regime of the disk; Barranco & Marcus (2000) addressed a proposed vortex-dust interaction mechanism which might lead to planetesimal formation; and Lin et al. (2002), as inspired by general geophysical vortex dynamics, proposed basic mechanisms by which vortices can transport mass and angular momentum. The current work follows up on our previous effort. We shall focus on the detailed numerical implementation of our problem. We have developed a parallel, pseudo-spectral code to simulate the full three-dimensional vortex dynamics in a stably-stratified, differentially rotating frame, which represents the environment of the disk. Our simulation is validated with full diagnostics and comparisons, and we present our results on a family of three-dimensional, coherent equilibrium vortices.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Thermobaric Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04

    A Model of the energy evolution in thermobaric explosions is presented. It is based on the two-phase formulation: conservation laws for the gas and particle phases along with inter-phase interaction terms. It incorporates a Combustion Model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields. The Model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the fuel (Al or TNT detonation products) with air. Numerical simulations were performed for 1.5-g thermobaric explosions in five different chambers (volumes ranging from 6.6 to 40 liters and length-to-diameter ratios from 1 to 12.5). Computed pressure waveforms were very similar to measured waveforms in all cases - thereby proving that the Model correctly predicts the energy evolution in such explosions. The computed global fuel consumption {mu}(t) behaved as an exponential life function. Its derivative {dot {mu}}(t) represents the global rate of fuel consumption. It depends on the rate of turbulent mixing which controls the rate of energy release in thermobaric explosions.

  3. Numerical simulation of interplanetary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun

    This dissertation discusses investigations into the physics of the propagation of solar generated disturbances in the interplanetary medium. The motivation to initiate this study was two-fold: (1) understanding the fundamental physics of the nonlinear interactions of solar generated MHD shocks and non-homogeneous interplanetary medium, and (2) understanding the physics of solar generated disturbance effects on the Earth's environment, (i.e. the solar connection to the geomagnetic storm). In order to achieve these goals, the authors employed two numerical models to encompass these studies. In the first part, a one-dimensional MHD code with adaptive grids is used to study the evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS), the interaction of a forward slow shock with a reverse slow shock, and the interaction of a fast shock with a slow shock. Results show that the slow shocks can be generated by a decreasing density, velocity or temperature perturbation or by a pressure pulse by following a forward fast shock and that slow shocks can propagate over 1 AU; results also show that the ISS never evolves into fast shocks. Interestingly, it is also found that an ISS could be 'eaten up' by an interplanetary fast shock (IFS) catching up from behind. This could be a reason that the slow shock has been difficult to observe near 1 AU. In addition, a forward slow shock could be dissipated by following a strong forward fast shock (Mach number greater than 1.7). In the second part, a fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, MHD interplanetary global model (3D IGM) is used to study the relationship between different forms of solar activity and transient variations of the north-south component, Bx, of the interplanetary magnetic field, IMF, at 1 AU. One form of solar activity, the flare, is simulated by using a pressure pulse at different locations near the solar surface and observing the simulated IMF evolution of Btheta (= -Bx) at 1 AU. Results show that, for a given pressure

  4. Numerical Simulations of Granular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Michel, Patrick; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Yu, Yang; Matsumura, Soko

    2014-11-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a completely different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Understanding and modeling these motions can aid in the interpretation of imaged surface features that may exhibit signatures of constituent material properties. Also, upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the parallelized N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). Ongoing and recently completed projects include: impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes [5]; possible tidal resurfacing of asteroid Apophis during its 2029 encounter [6]; the Brazil-nut effect in low gravity [7]; and avalanche modeling.Acknowledgements: DCR acknowledges NASA (grants NNX08AM39G, NNX10AQ01G, NNX12AG29G) and NSF (AST1009579). PM acknowledges the French agency CNES. SRS works on the NEOShield Project funded under the European Commission’s FP7 program agreement No. 282703. SM acknowledges support from the Center for Theory and Computation at U Maryland and the Dundee Fellowship at U Dundee. Most simulations were performed using the YORP cluster in the Dept. of Astronomy at U Maryland and on the Deepthought High-Performance Computing Cluster at U Maryland.References: [1] Richardson, D.C. et al. 2000, Icarus 143, 45; [2] Stadel, J. 2001, Ph.D. Thesis, U Washington; [3] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2012, Gran

  5. Generation of Multiband Chorus in the Earth's Magnetosphere: 1-D PIC Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinliang; Ke, Yangguang; Lu, Quanming; Chen, Lunjin; Wang, Shui

    2017-01-01

    Multiband chorus waves, where the frequency of upper band chorus is about twice that of lower band chorus, have recently been reported based on THEMIS observations. The generation of multiband chorus waves is attributed to the mechanism of lower band cascade, where upper band chorus is excited via the nonlinear coupling process between lower band chorus and the associated density mode with the frequency equal to that of lower band chorus. In this letter, with a one-dimensional (1-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model, we have successfully reproduced multiband chorus waves. During the simulation, the significant density fluctuation is driven by the fluctuating electric field along the wave vector of the pump wave (lower band chorus), which can be directly observed in this self-consistent plasma system. Then, the second harmonic of the pump whistler-mode wave (upper band chorus) is generated. After quantitatively analyzing resonant conditions among wave numbers, we can confirm that the generation is caused due to the coupling between the pump wave and the density fluctuation along its wave vector. The third harmonic can also be excited through lower band cascade if the pump whistler-mode wave has a sufficiently large amplitude. Our simulation results not only provide a theoretical support to the mechanism of lower band cascade to generate multiband chorus but also propose a new pattern of evolution for whistler-mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  6. Resolution requirements for numerical simulations of transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Krist, Steven E.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    The resolution requirements for direct numerical simulations of transition to turbulence are investigated. A reliable resolution criterion is determined from the results of several detailed simulations of channel and boundary-layer transition.

  7. 1-D transient numerical model of a regenerator in a novel sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Miller, Franklin K.

    2016-03-01

    A sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) is being developed at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. This AMRR consists of two circulators, two regenerators, one superleak, one cold heat exchanger, and two warm heat exchangers. The circulators are novel non-moving part pumps that reciprocate a superfluid mixture of 4He-3He in the system. Heat from the mixture is removed within the two regenerators of this tandem system. An accurate model of the regenerators in this AMRR is necessary in order to predict the performance of these components, which in turn helps predicting the overall performance of the AMRR system. This work presents modeling methodology along with results from a 1-D transient numerical model of the regenerators of an AMRR capable of removing 2.5 mW at 850 mK at cyclic steady state.

  8. Numerical simulation package for speckle metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornis, Janos; Bokor, Nandor; Nemeth, Attila

    1998-09-01

    A computer program package for numerical simulation of speckle phenomena has been developed. It is suitable for simulating both objective and subjective speckle effects in various optical setups. Several simulation results are presented in this paper. The simulations was made in UNIX and Windows NT environment.

  9. Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.

    1997-01-01

    Work is being done at three universities to help today's NASA engineers use the knowledge and experience of their Apolloera predecessors in designing liquid rocket engines. Ground-breaking work is being done in important subject areas to create a prototype of the most important functions for the Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS). The goal of RENS is to develop an interactive, realtime application that engineers can utilize for comprehensive preliminary propulsion system design functions. RENS will employ computer science and artificial intelligence research in knowledge acquisition, computer code parallelization and objectification, expert system architecture design, and object-oriented programming. In 1995, a 3year grant from the NASA Lewis Research Center was awarded to Dr. Douglas Moreman and Dr. John Dyer of Southern University at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to begin acquiring knowledge in liquid rocket propulsion systems. Resources of the University of West Florida in Pensacola were enlisted to begin the process of enlisting knowledge from senior NASA engineers who are recognized experts in liquid rocket engine propulsion systems. Dr. John Coffey of the University of West Florida is utilizing his expertise in interviewing and concept mapping techniques to encode, classify, and integrate information obtained through personal interviews. The expertise extracted from the NASA engineers has been put into concept maps with supporting textual, audio, graphic, and video material. A fundamental concept map was delivered by the end of the first year of work and the development of maps containing increasing amounts of information is continuing. Find out more information about this work at the Southern University/University of West Florida. In 1996, the Southern University/University of West Florida team conducted a 4day group interview with a panel of five experts to discuss failures of the RL10 rocket engine in conjunction with the Centaur launch vehicle. The

  10. Specifications of ZnO growth for heterostructure solar cell and PC1D based simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Babar; Ebong, Abasifreke

    2015-01-01

    This data article is related to our recently published article (Hussain et al., in press [1]) where we have proposed a new solar cell model based on n-ZnO as front layer and p-Si as rear region. The ZnO layer will act as an active n-layer as well as antireflection (AR) coating saving considerable processing cost. There are several reports presenting use of ZnO as window/antireflection coating in solar cells (Mansoor et al., 2015; Haq et al., 2014; Hussain et al., 2014; Matsui et al., 2014; Ding et al., 2014 [2], [3], [4], [5], [6]) but, here, we provide data specifically related to simultaneous use of ZnO as n-layer and AR coating. Apart from the information we already published, we provide additional data related to growth of ZnO (with and without Ga incorporation) layers using MOCVD. The data related to PC1D based simulation of internal and external quantum efficiencies with and without antireflection effects of ZnO as well as the effects of doping level in p-Si on current–voltage characteristics have been provided. PMID:26587557

  11. Specifications of ZnO growth for heterostructure solar cell and PC1D based simulations.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Babar; Ebong, Abasifreke

    2015-12-01

    This data article is related to our recently published article (Hussain et al., in press [1]) where we have proposed a new solar cell model based on n-ZnO as front layer and p-Si as rear region. The ZnO layer will act as an active n-layer as well as antireflection (AR) coating saving considerable processing cost. There are several reports presenting use of ZnO as window/antireflection coating in solar cells (Mansoor et al., 2015; Haq et al., 2014; Hussain et al., 2014; Matsui et al., 2014; Ding et al., 2014 [2], [3], [4], [5], [6]) but, here, we provide data specifically related to simultaneous use of ZnO as n-layer and AR coating. Apart from the information we already published, we provide additional data related to growth of ZnO (with and without Ga incorporation) layers using MOCVD. The data related to PC1D based simulation of internal and external quantum efficiencies with and without antireflection effects of ZnO as well as the effects of doping level in p-Si on current-voltage characteristics have been provided.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical simulation of turbulent flows is discussed. Computational requirements for the direct simulaton of turbulence, simulation of arbitrary homogeneous flows, an expansion technique for wall bounded flows with application to pipe flow, and possibilities of flow representations or modeling techniques that allow the simulation of high Reynolds number flows with a relatively small number of dependent variables are included.

  13. Numerical simulation of heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate and detailed knowledge of the fluid flow field and thermal distribution inside a heat exchanger becomes invaluable as a large, efficient, and reliable unit is sought. This information is needed to provide proper evaluation of the thermal and structural performance characteristics of a heat exchanger. It is to be noted that an analytical prediction method, when properly validated, will greatly reduce the need for model testing, facilitate interpolating and extrapolating test data, aid in optimizing heat-exchanger design and performance, and provide scaling capability. Thus tremendous savings of cost and time are realized. With the advent of large digital computers and advances in the development of computational fluid mechanics, it has become possible to predict analytically, through numerical solution, the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for both the shellside and tubeside fluids. The numerical modeling technique will be a valuable, cost-effective design tool for development of advanced heat exchangers.

  14. Numerical simulation of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially from the well established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element and spectral methods, in both concept and methodology. The key features of the current scheme include: (1) direct discretization of the integral forms of conservation laws, (2) treating space and time on the same footing, (3) flux conservation in space and time, and (4) unified treatment of the convection and diffusion fluxes. The model equation considered in the initial study is the standard one dimensional unsteady constant-coefficient convection-diffusion equation. In a stability study, it is shown that the principal and spurious amplification factors of the current scheme, respectively, are structurally similar to those of the leapfrog/DuFort-Frankel scheme. As a result, the current scheme has no numerical diffusion in the special case of pure convection and is unconditionally stable in the special case of pure diffusion. Assuming smooth initial data, it will be shown theoretically and numerically that, by using an easily determined optimal time step, the accuracy of the current scheme may reach a level which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the MacCormack scheme, with virtually identical operation count.

  15. Numerical tools for atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.; Gullett, Philip Michael; Slepoy, Alexander; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Baskes, Michael I.; Wagner, Gregory John; Li, Mo

    2004-01-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled 'Parallel Atomistic Computing for Failure Analysis of Micromachines' is presented. In this project, atomistic algorithms for parallel computers were developed to assist in quantification of microstructure-property relations related to weapon micro-components. With these and other serial computing tools, we are performing atomistic simulations of various sizes, geometries, materials, and boundary conditions. These tools provide the capability to handle the different size-scale effects required to predict failure. Nonlocal continuum models have been proposed to address this problem; however, they are phenomenological in nature and are difficult to validate for micro-scale components. Our goal is to separately quantify damage nucleation, growth, and coalescence mechanisms to provide a basis for macro-scale continuum models that will be used for micromachine design. Because micro-component experiments are difficult, a systematic computational study that employs Monte Carlo methods, molecular statics, and molecular dynamics (EAM and MEAM) simulations to compute continuum quantities will provide mechanism-property relations associated with the following parameters: specimen size, number of grains, crystal orientation, strain rates, temperature, defect nearest neighbor distance, void/crack size, chemical state, and stress state. This study will quantify sizescale effects from nanometers to microns in terms of damage progression and thus potentially allow for optimized micro-machine designs that are more reliable and have higher fidelity in terms of strength. In order to accomplish this task, several atomistic methods needed to be developed and evaluated to cover the range of defects, strain rates, temperatures, and sizes that a material may see in micro-machines. Therefore we are providing a complete set of tools for large scale atomistic simulations that include pre-processing of

  16. A 1D plug flow reactor as validation tool for reactive transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaïa, G.; Garcia, D.

    2012-04-01

    Predictions in CO2 geological sequestration involve a broad range of earth sciences linked in complex models. Amongst the processes commonly described, fluid-rock interactions are both a central issue and a source of discomfort for modelers since it has to deal with 1) kinetics data obtained through experimental procedures that dramatically differ from natural systems and 2) reactive surface model that are very diverse and often empirical. This study presents a new type of plug flow reactor developed to provide an experimental validation of reactive transport simulations. This is a 1D pressurized packed-bed plug-flow reactor containing a granular mixture as a porous medium. This mixture is composed of a reactive solids and unreactive quartz used to set an adequate ratio between fluid and reactive mineral to control the front velocity. A seven sampling valve unit allows concentration profiles of the reacting fluid to be captured at any time. One the one side, a low reaction rate (diopside, HNO3, pH 2) produces linear profile resulting from a constant dissolution rate along the reactor length. But on the other side, when performing the reaction of CO2 saturated solutions (5 bar) at 40°C with dolomite it gives rise to dissolution fronts migrating downstream. A proper projection of experimental data reveals a dynamic steady state of front shape is reached. Texture of the mineral recovered at the end of the experiment is quantified by Hg-porosimetry and these results are linked to SEM observations. Altogether, this provides a robust way for the parameterization of a reactive surface area model.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Thermographic Responses in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliot; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of thermographic responses in composite materials have been a useful for evaluating and optimizing thermographic analysis techniques. Numerical solutions are particularly beneficial for thermographic techniques, since the fabrication of specimens with realistic flaws is difficult. Simulations are presented with different ply layups that incorporated the anisotropic thermal properties that exist in each ply. The results are compared to analytical series solutions and thermal measurements on composites with flat bottom holes and delaminations.

  18. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey, Jordi; Khir, Ashraf W.; Matthys, Koen S.; Segers, Patrick; Sherwin, Spencer J.; Verdonck, Pascal R.; Parker, Kim H.; Peiró, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of the nonlinear one-dimensional (1-D) equations of pressure and flow wave propagation in Voigt-type visco-elastic arteries was tested against measurements in a well-defined experimental 1:1 replica of the 37 largest conduit arteries in the human systemic circulation. The parameters required by the numerical algorithm were directly measured in the in vitro setup and no data fitting was involved. The inclusion of wall visco-elasticity in the numerical model reduced the underdamped high-frequency oscillations obtained using a purely elastic tube law, especially in peripheral vessels, which was previously reported in this paper [Matthys et al., 2007. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D numerical simulations against in vitro measurements. J. Biomech. 40, 3476–3486]. In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate. In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10−6) for the flow rate. These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost. PMID:21724188

  19. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    A consistent "2D/1D" neutron transport method is derived from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. This paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. Several applications have been performed on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  20. Numerical simulations of pendant droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Carlos; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2015-11-01

    We simulate the evolution of a three-dimensional pendant droplet through pinch-off using a new parallel two-phase flow solver called BLUE. The parallelization of the code is based on the technique of algebraic domain decomposition where the velocity field is solved by a parallel GMRes method for the viscous terms and the pressure by a parallel multigrid/GMRes method. Communication is handled by MPI message passing procedures. The method for the treatment of the fluid interfaces uses a hybrid Front Tracking/Level Set technique which defines the interface both by a discontinuous density field as well as by a local triangular Lagrangian mesh. This structure allows the interface to undergo large deformations including the rupture and coalescence of fluid interfaces. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SPICULE ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Guerreiro, N.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V. E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2013-04-01

    Observations in the H{alpha} line of hydrogen and the H and K lines of singly ionized calcium on the solar limb reveal the existence of structures with jet-like behavior, usually designated as spicules. The driving mechanism for such structures remains poorly understood. Sterling et al. shed some light on the problem mimicking reconnection events in the chromosphere with a one-dimensional code by injecting energy with different spatial and temporal distributions and tracing the thermodynamic evolution of the upper chromospheric plasma. They found three different classes of jets resulting from these injections. We follow their approach but improve the physical description by including non-LTE cooling in strong spectral lines and non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization. Increased cooling and conversion of injected energy into hydrogen ionization energy instead of thermal energy both lead to weaker jets and smaller final extent of the spicules compared with Sterling et al. In our simulations we find different behavior depending on the timescale for hydrogen ionization/recombination. Radiation-driven ionization fronts also form.

  3. GIS-based channel flow and sediment transport simulation using CCHE1D coupled with AnnAGNPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CCHE1D (Center for Computational Hydroscience and Engineering 1-Dimensional model) simulates unsteady free-surface flows with nonequilibrium, nonuniform sediment transport in dendritic channel networks. Since early 1990’s, the model and its software packages have been developed and continuously main...

  4. Numerical simulation of gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Yakov

    Gravitational lens is a massive body or system of bodies with gravitational field that bends directions of light rays propagating nearby. This may cause an observer to see multiple images of a light source, e.g. a star, if there is a gravitational lens between the star and the observer. Light rays that form each individual image may have different distances to travel, which creates time delays between them. In complex gravitational fields generated by the system of stars, analytical calculation of trajectories and light intensities is virtually impossible. Gravitational lens of two massive bodies, one behind another, are able to create four images of a light source. Furthermore, the interaction between the four light beams can form a complicated interference pattern. This article provides a brief theory of light behavior in a gravitational field and describes the algorithm for constructing the trajectories of light rays in a gravitational field, calculating wave fronts and interference pattern of light. If you set gravitational field by any number of transparent and non- transparent objects (stars) and set emitters of radio wave beams, it is possible to calculate the interference pattern in any region of space. The proposed method of calculation can be applied even in the case of the lack of continuity between the position of the emitting stars and position of the resulting image. In this paper we propose methods of optimization, as well as solutions for some problems arising in modeling of gravitational lenses. The simulation of light rays in the sun's gravitational field is taken as an example. Also caustic is constructed for objects with uniform mass distribution.

  5. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  6. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-15

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  7. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  8. Boundary acquisition for setup of numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.

    1997-12-31

    The author presents a work flow diagram that includes a path that begins with taking experimental measurements, and ends with obtaining insight from results produced by numerical simulation. Two examples illustrate this path: (1) Three-dimensional imaging measurement at micron scale, using X-ray tomography, provides information on the boundaries of irregularly-shaped alumina oxide particles held in an epoxy matrix. A subsequent numerical simulation predicts the electrical field concentrations that would occur in the observed particle configurations. (2) Three-dimensional imaging measurement at meter scale, again using X-ray tomography, provides information on the boundaries fossilized bone fragments in a Parasaurolophus crest recently discovered in New Mexico. A subsequent numerical simulation predicts acoustic response of the elaborate internal structure of nasal passageways defined by the fossil record. The author must both add value, and must change the format of the three-dimensional imaging measurements before the define the geometric boundary initial conditions for the automatic mesh generation, and subsequent numerical simulation. The author applies a variety of filters and statistical classification algorithms to estimate the extents of the structures relevant to the subsequent numerical simulation, and capture these extents as faceted geometries. The author will describe the particular combination of manual and automatic methods used in the above two examples.

  9. H/V ratio: a tool for site effects evaluation. Results from 1-D noise simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy-Claudet, Sylvette; Cornou, Cécile; Bard, Pierre-Yves; Cotton, Fabrice; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Fäh, Donat

    2006-11-01

    Ambient vibration techniques such as the H/V method may have the potential to significantly contribute to site effect evaluation, particularly in urban areas. Previous studies interpret the so-called Nakamura's technique in relation to the ellipticity ratio of Rayleigh waves, which, for a high enough impedance contrast, exhibits a pronounced peak close to the fundamental S-wave resonance frequency. Within the European SESAME project (Site EffectS assessment using AMbient Excitations) this interpretation has been tested through noise numerical simulation under well-controlled conditions in terms of source type and distribution and propagation structure. We will present simulations for a simple realistic site (one sedimentary layer over bedrock) characterized by a rather high impedance contrast and low quality factor. Careful H/V and array analysis on these noise synthetics allow an in-depth investigation of the link between H/V ratio peaks and the noise wavefield composition for the soil model considered here: (1) when sources are near (4 to 50 times the layer thickness) and surficial, H/V curves exhibit one single peak, while the array analysis shows that the wavefield is dominated by Rayleigh waves; (2) when sources are distant (more than 50 times the layer thickness) and located inside the sedimentary layer, two peaks show up on the H/V curve, while the array analysis indicates both Rayleigh waves and strong S head waves; the first peak is due to both fundamental Rayleigh waves and resonance of head S waves, the second is only due to the resonance of head S waves; (3) when sources are deep (located inside the bedrock), whatever their distance, H/V ratio exhibit peaks at the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies, while array analyses indicate only non-dispersive body waves; the H/V is thus simply due to multiple reflections of S waves within the layer. Therefore, considering that experimental H/V ratio (i.e. derived from actual noise measured in the field

  10. Study of Cardiac Defibrillation Through Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, J.; Marin, S.; Cherry, E. M.; Fenton, F. H.

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the defibrillation problem are presented. In particular, in this study we use the rabbit ventricular geometry as a realistic model system for evaluating the efficacy of defibrillatory shocks. Statistical data obtained from the simulations were analyzed in term of a dose-response curve. Good quantitative agreement between our numerical results and clinically relevant values is obtained. An electric field strength of about 6.6 V/cm indicates a fifty percent probability of successful defibrillation for a 12-ms monophasic shock. Our validated model will be useful for optimizing defibrillation protocols.

  11. Numerical simulations of cryogenic cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Hyeongjun; Min, Daeho; Kim, Chongam

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with a numerical method for cryogenic cavitating flows. Recently, we have developed an accurate and efficient baseline numerical scheme for all-speed water-gas two-phase flows. By extending such progress, we modify the numerical dissipations to be properly scaled so that it does not show any deficiencies in low Mach number regions. For dealing with cryogenic two-phase flows, previous EOS-dependent shock discontinuity sensing term is replaced with a newly designed EOS-free one. To validate the proposed numerical method, cryogenic cavitating flows around hydrofoil are computed and the pressure and temperature depression effect in cryogenic cavitation are demonstrated. Compared with Hord's experimental data, computed results are turned out to be satisfactory. Afterwards, numerical simulations of flow around KARI turbopump inducer in liquid rocket are carried out under various flow conditions with water and cryogenic fluids, and the difference in inducer flow physics depending on the working fluids are examined.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations of Plunging Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-07

    Schmidt and E Turkel, Numerical Solutions of the Euler Equations by Finite Volume Methods Using Runge-Kutta Time-Stepping Schemes, AIAA paper 81-1259...Ω ( p ∂vj ∂xj − σij ∂v i ∂xj ) dV (4) Definition 1 A numerical scheme to solve the viscous Navier-Stokes equations is said to be Kinetic Energy...Direct Numerical Simulations of Plunging Airfoils Yves Allaneau∗ and Antony Jameson† Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305, USA This paper

  13. Numerically simulating the sandwich plate system structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Qing; Li, Gang; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Niu, Huai-Lei; Li, Chen-Feng

    2010-09-01

    Sandwich plate systems (SPS) are advanced materials that have begun to receive extensive attention in naval architecture and ocean engineering. At present, according to the rules of classification societies, a mixture of shell and solid elements are required to simulate an SPS. Based on the principle of stiffness decomposition, a new numerical simulation method for shell elements was proposed. In accordance with the principle of stiffness decomposition, the total stiffness can be decomposed into the bending stiffness and shear stiffness. Displacement and stress response related to bending stiffness was calculated with the laminated shell element. Displacement and stress response due to shear was calculated by use of a computational code write by FORTRAN language. Then the total displacement and stress response for the SPS was obtained by adding together these two parts of total displacement and stress. Finally, a rectangular SPS plate and a double-bottom structure were used for a simulation. The results show that the deflection simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is larger than the same simulated by solid elements and the analytical solution according to Hoff theory and approximate to the same simulated by the mixture of shell-solid elements, and the stress simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is approximate to the other simulating methods. So compared with calculations based on a mixture of shell and solid elements, the numerical simulation method given in the paper is more efficient and easier to do.

  14. Reliability of Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes some of the procedure to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Heliospheric Transients Approaching Geospace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    12/15/08 – 12/14/09 Numerical Simulation of Heliospheric Transients Approaching Geospace Report by Dusan Odstrcil, University of Colorado...simulations of heliospheric transients approaching geospace . The project was supervised by Dr. Dusan Odstrcil at the University of Colorado (CU...plays a key role in the prediction accuracy of heliospheric transients approaching geospace . This report presents main results achieved within the

  16. Numerical propulsion system simulation: An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  17. Numerical propulsion system simulation - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  18. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; ...

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-classmore » computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.« less

  19. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  20. Simulations of Edge Effect in 1D Spin Crossover Compounds by Atom-Phonon Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, J.; Chiruta, D.; Jureschi, C. M.; Alayli, Y.; Turcu, C. O.; Dahoo, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    We used the atom-phonon coupling model to explain and illustrate the behaviour of a linear nano-chain of molecules. The analysis of the system's behaviour was performed using Free Energy method, and by applying Monte Carlo Metropolis (MCM) method which take into account the phonon contribution. In particular we tested both the MCM algorithm and the dynamic-matrix method and we expose how the thermal behaviour of a 1D spin crossover system varies as a function of different factors. Furthermore we blocked the edge atoms of the chain in its high spin state to study the effect on the system's behaviour.

  1. Simulation and optimization of 1-D periodic dielectric nanostructures for light-trapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Menon, Rajesh

    2012-01-16

    Light-trapping is essential to improve the performance of thin-film solar cells. In this paper, we perform a parametric optimization of 1-D square and sinusoidal grating structures that act as nanophotonic scatterers to increase light absorption in ultra-thin (10nm) solar cells. Our optimization reveals that the short-circuit current density in a device of active-layer thickness 10nm can be improved by a factor of ~5 in the presence of the scattering structure. More complex geometries allow for increased degrees of design freedom and potentially high enhancement of light absorption.

  2. NASA One-Dimensional Combustor Simulation--User Manual for S1D_ML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is to promote research leading to a closed-loop control system to actively suppress thermo-acoustic instabilities. To serve as a model for such a closed-loop control system, a one-dimensional combustor simulation composed using MATLAB software tools has been written. This MATLAB based process is similar to a precursor one-dimensional combustor simulation that was formatted as FORTRAN 77 source code. The previous simulation process requires modification to the FORTRAN 77 source code, compiling, and linking when creating a new combustor simulation executable file. The MATLAB based simulation does not require making changes to the source code, recompiling, or linking. Furthermore, the MATLAB based simulation can be run from script files within the MATLAB environment or with a compiled copy of the executable file running in the Command Prompt window without requiring a licensed copy of MATLAB. This report presents a general simulation overview. Details regarding how to setup and initiate a simulation are also presented. Finally, the post-processing section describes the two types of files created while running the simulation and it also includes simulation results for a default simulation included with the source code.

  3. IRIS Spectrum Line Plot - Numeric Simulation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video is similar to the IRIS Spectrum Line Plot video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4V_vF3qMSI, but now as derived from a numerical simulation of the Sun by the University of Oslo. Credit...

  4. Numerical simulation of hemorrhage in human injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kwitae; Jiang, Chenfanfu; Santhanam, Anand; Benharash, Peyman; Teran, Joseph; Eldredge, Jeff

    2015-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is adapted to simulate hemorrhage in the injured human body. As a Lagrangian fluid simulation, SPH uses fluid particles as computational elements and thus mass conservation is trivially satisfied. In order to ensure anatomical fidelity, a three-dimensional reconstruction of a portion of the human body -here, demonstrated on the lower leg- is sampled as skin, bone and internal tissue particles from the CT scan image of an actual patient. The injured geometry is then generated by simulation of ballistic projectiles passing through the anatomical model with the Material Point Method (MPM) and injured vessel segments are identified. From each such injured segment, SPH is used to simulate bleeding, with inflow boundary condition obtained from a coupled 1-d vascular tree model. Blood particles interact with impermeable bone and skin particles through the Navier-Stokes equations and with permeable internal tissue particles through the Brinkman equations. The SPH results are rendered in post-processing for improved visual fidelity. The overall simulation strategy is demonstrated on several injury scenarios in the lower leg.

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The numerical results show severe turbulence of similar scale and intensity to that encountered during the test flight. This turbulence is associated with buoyant plumes that penetrate the upper-level thunderstorm outflow. The simulated radar reflectivity compares well with that obtained from the aircraft's onboard radar. Resolved scales of motion as small as 50 m are needed in order to accurately diagnose aircraft normal load accelerations. Given this requirement, realistic turbulence fields may be created by merging subgrid-scales of turbulence to a convective-cloud simulation. A hazard algorithm for use with model data sets is demonstrated. The algorithm diagnoses the RMS normal loads from second moments of the vertical velocity field and is independent of aircraft motion.

  6. Comparison of 1D stagnation solutions to 3D wire-array Z pinch simulations in absence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Velikovich, Alexander; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    In the idealized picture of a Z pinch, a cylindrically symmetric plasma shell implodes towards axis. In this 1D (radial) picture, the resulting stagnation is very efficient: all the kinetic energy of the shell converts to internal energy, as for instance in the Noh shock solution or the homogeneous stagnation flow. If we generalize the problem to 2D by deforming the shell from perfectly circular to oblate, the resulting stagnation will not be as efficient. As in the Hiemenz flow, in which a jet of fluid strikes a rigid flat boundary and squirts out to the sides, the more complicated flows allowed in 2D allow flow kinetic energy to redirect rather than stagnate. With this picture in mind, we might expect the stagnation of a wire-array Z pinch, which in actuality forms a highly distorted 3D imploding plasma, to dissipate its kinetic energy inefficiently due to the lack of symmetry, and be indescribable by means of the idealized 1D stagnation solutions. On the other hand, one might expect that if the imploding plasma is sufficiently messy, the non-uniformities might ``wash out,'' allowing a quasi-1D description of the averaged quantities of plasma. In this work we explore this idea, comparing predictions of 1D stagnation solutions with 3D simulation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC0 4-94AL85000.

  7. Linking Paleomagnetic Observations to Numerical Dynamo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.

    2006-05-01

    Over the past decade a number of numerical dynamo simulations have successfully mimicked properties considered important for the geomagnetic field. These include predominantly dipolar surface field structures and the ability to reverse polarity, along with some sensitivities to the presence and size of a conductive inner core and to spatial variations in core-mantle boundary conditions. The surface manifestations of geomagnetic excursions and reversals in these models are spatially and temporally variable as in paleomagnetic data. Detailed comparisons with paleosecular variation models lead to less satisfying comparisons in many cases. A huge advantage in studying the geodynamo from a numerical perspective is the detailed knowledge available about physical processes going on throughout the simulated core, instead of non-unique interpretations of inexact and incomplete actual surface observations. The well-known disadvantage to such simulations is that the parameter regime in which they operate is still far from that of Earth (resulting in viscous boundary layers that are too thick) despite concerted efforts to approach the appropriate numerical regime. The importance of these limitations in reproducing Earth-like geomagnetic field variations remains in doubt, but an optimistic view is that although the dynamics at short time scales may not be realistic, one can hope for viable comparisons on sufficiently long time scales, with the definition of sufficiently long dependent on the parameter regime. Both paleomagnetic and numerical studies appear to support the idea that the same kind of processes contribute to very long term secular variations, geomagnetic excursions, and reversals. This work attempts to link the statistical descriptions of long term paleomagnetic observations with physical descriptions from numerical simulations, and identify conditions associated with geomagnetic reversals and excursions.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Aircraft Trailing Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Switzer, George F.

    2000-01-01

    The increase in air traffic is currently outpacing the development of new airport runways. This is leading to greater air traffic congestion, resulting in costly delays and cancellations. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under its Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program is investigating new technologies that will allow increased airport capacity while maintaining the present standards for safety. As an element of this program, the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) is being demonstrated in July 2000, at Dallas Ft-Worth Airport. This system allows reduced aircraft separations, thus increasing the arrival and departure rates, while insuring that wake vortices from a leading aircraft do not endanger trailing aircraft. The system uses predictions or wake vortex position and strength based on input from the current weather state. This prediction is accomplished by a semi-empirical model developed from theory, field observations, and relationships derived from numerical wake vortex simulations. Numerical experiments with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are being conducted in order to provide guidance for the enhancement of these prediction algorithms. The LES Simulations of wake vortices are carried out with NASA's Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS). Previous wake vortex investigations with TASS are described. The primary objective of these numerical studies has been to quantify vortex transport and decay in relation to atmospheric variables. This paper summarizes many of the previous investigations with the TASS model and presents some new results regarding the onset of wake vortex decay.

  9. SLOWMOVE - A numerical model for the propagation of slow-moving landslides: a 1D approach and its application to the analysis of the Valoria landslide (Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daehne, A.; van Asch, Th. W. J.; Corsini, A.; Spickerman, A.; Bégueria-Portuguès, S.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of landslides often starts with a numerical simulation that accurately accounts for observed physical processes. This research proposes a method for the implementation of the dynamic SLOWMOVE model to a high-mobility, moderate velocity earth flow located in the northern Apennines. The Valoria landslide is 3.5 km long earth slide- earth flow that resumed activity in 2001. Landslide materials comprised of disaggregated Flysch, Marl and Claystones are mainly transported as earth slides in the upper slope, and as earth flows in the main track. Repeated acceleration events lasting several weeks occur seasonally since 2001 reactivation. During events it can reach velocities of about 10 m per hour with a cumulative displacement of hundreds of meters. Through this intermittent activity, more than ten million cubic meters have been transferred down-slope since 2001, changing significantly and several times the morphology of the slope. The SLOWMOVE model postulates that landslide materials can be represented as a homogeneous material with rheological properties and constant density. The approach is based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Under the assumptions that the inertia of the moving mass can be neglected, the behavior of the landslide depends solely on the balance between driving forces and resisting forces which contain a Coulomb-viscous component. Excess pore pressure due to undrained loading and lateral force form the main parameters that control the acceleration. The effects of lateral force and excess pore pressure allow a numerical simulation of landslide reactivation by coupling of two landslide bodies. A numerical scheme based on a finite difference solution (2D Eulerian space with Cartesian coordinates) was implemented in Microsoft Excel and used to compute propagation of the mass in 1D. The model allows coupling between mass movements having different geotechnical characteristic. In practice, it allows simulating the reactivation of

  10. Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical simulation model for the horizontal centrifugal pipe casting process was developed with the commercial simulation package Flow3D. It considers - additionally to mass, energy and momentum conservation equations and free surface tracking - the fast radial and slower horizontal movement of the mold. The iron inflow is not steady state but time dependent. Of special importance is the friction between the liquid and the mold in connection with the viscosity and turbulence of the iron. Experiments with the mold at controlled revolution speeds were carried out using a high-speed camera. From these experiments friction coefficients for the description of the interaction between mold and melt were obtained. With the simulation model, the influence of typical process parameters (e.g. melts inflow, mold movement, melt temperature, cooling media) on the wall thickness of the pipes can be studied. The comparison to results of pipes from production shows a good agreement between simulation and reality.

  11. Numerical Simulation of a Tornado Generating Supercell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of tornadoes from a tornado generating supercell is investigated with a large eddy simulation weather model. Numerical simulations are initialized with a sounding representing the environment of a tornado producing supercell that affected North Carolina and Virginia during the Spring of 2011. The structure of the simulated storm was very similar to that of a classic supercell, and compared favorably to the storm that affected the vicinity of Raleigh, North Carolina. The presence of mid-level moisture was found to be important in determining whether a supercell would generate tornadoes. The simulations generated multiple tornadoes, including cyclonic-anticyclonic pairs. The structure and the evolution of these tornadoes are examined during their lifecycle.

  12. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  13. Numerical Simulation in a Supercirtical CFB Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Gaol, Xiang; Luo, Zhongyang; Jiang, Xiaoguo

    The dimension of the hot circulation loop of the supercritical CFB boiler is large, and there are many unknowns and challenges that should be identified and resolved during the development. In order to realize a reasonable and reliable design of the hot circulation loop, numerical simulation of gas-solid flow in a supercritical CFB boiler was conducted by using FLUENT software. The working condition of hot circulation loop flow field, gas-solid flow affected by three unsymmetrical cyclones, air distribution and pressure drop in furnace were analyzed. The simulation results showed that the general arrangement of the 600MWe supercritical CFB boiler is reasonable.

  14. Numerical simulations of catastrophic disruption: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.; Ryan, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to study high velocity two-body impacts. In this paper, a two-dimensional Largrangian finite difference hydro-code and a three-dimensional smooth particle hydro-code (SPH) are described and initial results reported. These codes can be, and have been, used to make specific predictions about particular objects in our solar system. But more significantly, they allow us to explore a broad range of collisional events. Certain parameters (size, time) can be studied only over a very restricted range within the laboratory; other parameters (initial spin, low gravity, exotic structure or composition) are difficult to study at all experimentally. The outcomes of numerical simulations lead to a more general and accurate understanding of impacts in their many forms.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Confined Multiple Transverse Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-25

    equations. The solutions of three commercial RANS solvers, Fluent, STAR - CCM +, and CFD++, are compared to experimental data and large-eddy simulation...Objective: o Validate commercial CFD codes—Fluent, CFD++, and Star - ccm ++ against experimental data and an LES results o Provide numerical data for...Pairs Diluent Flow X = 2d: X = 5d: X = 10d: Fluent STAR - CCM + CFD++ Axial locations (d = inj. dia.) Experiment LES (ONERA) Distribution A: Approved

  16. Numerical simulation and nasal air-conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Tilman; Lindemann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Heating and humidification of the respiratory air are the main functions of the nasal airways in addition to cleansing and olfaction. Optimal nasal air conditioning is mandatory for an ideal pulmonary gas exchange in order to avoid desiccation and adhesion of the alveolar capillary bed. The complex three-dimensional anatomical structure of the nose makes it impossible to perform detailed in vivo studies on intranasal heating and humidification within the entire nasal airways applying various technical set-ups. The main problem of in vivo temperature and humidity measurements is a poor spatial and time resolution. Therefore, in vivo measurements are feasible only to a restricted extent, solely providing single temperature values as the complete nose is not entirely accessible. Therefore, data on the overall performance of the nose are only based on one single measurement within each nasal segment. In vivo measurements within the entire nose are not feasible. These serious technical issues concerning in vivo measurements led to a large number of numerical simulation projects in the last few years providing novel information about the complex functions of the nasal airways. In general, numerical simulations merely calculate predictions in a computational model, e.g. a realistic nose model, depending on the setting of the boundary conditions. Therefore, numerical simulations achieve only approximations of a possible real situation. The aim of this review is the synopsis of the technical expertise on the field of in vivo nasal air conditioning, the novel information of numerical simulations and the current state of knowledge on the influence of nasal and sinus surgery on nasal air conditioning. PMID:22073112

  17. Numerical simulation of swept-wing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.

    1991-01-01

    The transition process characteristics of flows over swept wings were computationally modelled. The crossflow instability and crossflow/T-S wave interaction are analyzed through the numerical solution of the full three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations including unsteadiness, curvature, and sweep. The leading-edge region of a swept wing is considered in a three-dimensional spatial simulation with random disturbances as the initial conditions.

  18. Numerical simulation of magma energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hickox, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Magma Energy Program is a speculative endeavor regarding practical utility of electrical power production from the thermal energy which reside in magma. The systematic investigation has identified an number of research areas which have application to the utilization of magma energy and to the field of geothermal energy. Eight topics were identified which involve thermal processes and which are areas for the application of the techniques of numerical simulation. These areas are: (1) two-phase flow of the working fluid in the wellbore, (2) thermodynamic cycles for the production of electrical power, (3) optimization of the entire system, (4) solidification and fracturing of the magma caused by the energy extraction process, (5) heat transfer and fluid flow within an open, direct-contact, heat-exchanger, (6) thermal convection in the overlying geothermal region, (7) thermal convection within the magma body, and (8) induced natural convection near the thermal energy extraction device. Modeling issues have been identified which will require systematic investigation in order to develop the most appropriate strategies for numerical simulation. It appears that numerical simulations will be of ever increasing importance to the study of geothermal processes as the size and complexity of the systems of interest increase. It is anticipated that, in the future, greater emphasis will be placed on the numerical simulation of large-scale, three-dimensional, transient, mixed convection in viscous flows and porous media. Increased computational capabilities, e.g.; massively parallel computers, will allow for the detailed study of specific processes in fractured media, non-Darcy effects in porous media, and non-Newtonian effects. 23 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  19. On numerical simulation of viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghia, K. N.; Ghia, U.

    Numerical simulation methods for viscous incompressible laminar flows are reviewed, with a focus on finite-difference schemes. The approaches to high/moderate-Reynolds-number flows (strong-viscous-interaction model or single sets of equations) and the factors affecting the versatility, reliability, and accuracy of the analysis algorithms are considered; approximate-factorization implicit solution techniques for low-Reynolds-number flows are discussed; and the procedures used in a number of specific problems are indicated.

  20. Modeling Large Water Infiltration Events in Small Plots Using the 1-D Finite Water-content Method and Numerical Solutions to the Richards' Equation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of soil to infiltrate large volumes of water is fundamental to managed aquifer recharge (MAR) when using infiltration basins or agricultural fields. In order to investigate the feasibility of using agricultural fields for MAR we conducted a field experiment designed to not only assess the resilience of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) to large (300 mm), short duration (1.5 hour), repeated irrigation events during the winter but also how crop resilience was influenced by soil water movement. We hypothesized that large irrigation amounts designed for groundwater recharge could cause prolonged saturated conditions in the root-zone and yield loss. Tensiometers were installed at two depths (60 and 150 cm) in a loam soil to monitor the changes in soil matric potential within and below the root-zone following irrigation events in each of five experimental plots (8 x 16 m2). To simulate the individual infiltration events we employed the HYDRUS-1D computational module (Simunek et al., 2005) and compared the finite-water content vadose zone flow method (Ogden et al. 2015) with numerical solutions to the Richards' equation. For both models we assumed a homogenous and isotropic root zone that is initially unsaturated with no water flow. Here we assess the ability of these two models to account for the control volume applied to the plots and to capture sharp changes in matric potential that were observed in the early time after an irrigation pulse. The goodness-of-fit of the models was evaluated using the root mean square error (RMSE) for observed and predicted values of cumulative infiltration over time, wetting front depth over time and water content at observation nodes. For the finite-water content method, the RMSE values and output for observation nodes were similar to that from the HYDRUS-1D solution. This indicates that the finite-water content method may be useful for predicting the fate of large volumes of water applied for MAR. Moreover, both models suggest a

  1. 2001 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Gregory; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2002-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA's Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 2000 effort and the actions taken over the past year to

  2. 2000 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2001-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective. high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA'S Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 1999 effort and the actions taken over the past year to

  3. Ion velocity distribution at the termination shock: 1-D PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Quanming; Yang Zhongwei; Lembege, Bertrand

    2012-11-20

    The Voyager 2 (V2) plasma observations of the proton temperature downstream of the quasi-perpendicular heliospheric termination shock (TS) showed that upstream thermal solar wind ions played little role in the shock dissipation mechanism and their downstream temperature is an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by MHD Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. While pickup ions (PUI) are generally expected to play an important role in energy dissipation at the shock, the details remain unclear. Here, one-dimensional (1-D) Particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to examine kinetic properties and downstream velocity distribution functions of pickup ions (the hot supra-thermal component) and solar wind protons (SWs, the cold component) at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock. The code treats the pickup ions self-consistently as a third component. Present results show that: (1) both of the incident SWs and PUIs can be separated into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions, the energy gain of the R ions at the shock front is much larger than that of the DT ions; (2) the fraction of reflected SWs and their downstream temperature decrease with the relative percentage PUI%; (3) no matter how large the PUI% is, the downstream ion velocity distribution function always can be separated into three parts: 1. a high energy tail (i.e. the wings) dominated by the reflected PUIs, 2. a low energy core mainly contributed by the directly transmitted SWs, and 3. a middle energy part which is a complicated superposition of reflected SWs and directly transmitted PUIs. The significance of the presence of pickup ions on shock front micro-structure and nonstationarity is also discussed.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Power Law Heating Functions for Quiescent Loops: Stability and Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.; Winter, H. D.; Munetsi-Mugomba, K.

    2007-12-01

    We present the numerical simulations of quiescent coronal loops with heating functions that are power law functions of pressure and temperature. These simulations are made using a time-dependent, 1D hydrodynamics code with heating functions that are treated as dynamic variables which are constantly re- evaluated during the loops' lifetimes. These numerical simulations provide a stability test for the analytical solutions formulated by Martens (2007, submitted) for the same heating functions. TRACE and XRT datasets are simulated to determine if present observables can provide adequate information to discriminate between power law heating functions.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Leidenfrost Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguy, Sebastien; Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Fluid Mechanics Institute of Toulouse Team

    2015-11-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase changes, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. For instance it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate which temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Usual numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accurate validations against experimental results on Leidenfrost Droplets to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  6. (3+1)D hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2010-07-15

    We present music, an implementation of the Kurganov-Tadmor algorithm for relativistic 3+1 dimensional fluid dynamics in heavy-ion collision scenarios. This Riemann-solver-free, second-order, high-resolution scheme is characterized by a very small numerical viscosity and its ability to treat shocks and discontinuities very well. We also incorporate a sophisticated algorithm for the determination of the freeze-out surface using a three dimensional triangulation of the hypersurface. Implementing a recent lattice based equation of state, we compute p{sub T}-spectra and pseudorapidity distributions for Au+Au collisions at sq root(s)=200 GeV and present results for the anisotropic flow coefficients v{sub 2} and v{sub 4} as a function of both p{sub T} and pseudorapidity eta. We were able to determine v{sub 4} with high numerical precision, finding that it does not strongly depend on the choice of initial condition or equation of state.

  7. Dynamic Simulation of 1D Cellular Automata in the Active aTAM.

    PubMed

    Jonoska, Nataša; Karpenko, Daria; Seki, Shinnosuke

    2015-07-01

    The Active aTAM is a tile based model for self-assembly where tiles are able to transfer signals and change identities according to the signals received. We extend Active aTAM to include deactivation signals and thereby allow detachment of tiles. We show that the model allows a dynamic simulation of cellular automata with assemblies that do not record the entire computational history but only the current updates of the states, and thus provide a way for (a) algorithmic dynamical structural changes in the assembly and (b) reusable space in self-assembly. The simulation is such that at a given location the sequence of tiles that attach and detach corresponds precisely to the sequence of states the synchronous cellular automaton generates at that location.

  8. Dynamic Simulation of 1D Cellular Automata in the Active aTAM

    PubMed Central

    Jonoska, Nataša; Karpenko, Daria; Seki, Shinnosuke

    2016-01-01

    The Active aTAM is a tile based model for self-assembly where tiles are able to transfer signals and change identities according to the signals received. We extend Active aTAM to include deactivation signals and thereby allow detachment of tiles. We show that the model allows a dynamic simulation of cellular automata with assemblies that do not record the entire computational history but only the current updates of the states, and thus provide a way for (a) algorithmic dynamical structural changes in the assembly and (b) reusable space in self-assembly. The simulation is such that at a given location the sequence of tiles that attach and detach corresponds precisely to the sequence of states the synchronous cellular automaton generates at that location. PMID:27789918

  9. Impact of sea spray on upper ocean temperature during typhoon passage: simulation with a 1-D turbulent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianxin; Zhang, Xuefeng; Han, Guijun; Wu, Xinrong; Cui, Xiaojian; Shao, Caixia; Sun, Chunjian; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Xidong; Fu, Hongli

    2015-09-01

    At the interface between the lower atmosphere and sea surface, sea spray might significantly influence air-sea heat fluxes and subsequently, modulate upper ocean temperature during a typhoon passage. The effects of sea spray were introduced into the parameterization of sea surface roughness in a 1-D turbulent model, to investigate the effects of sea spray on upper ocean temperature in the Kuroshio Extension area, for the cases of two real typhoons from 2006, Yagi and Soulik. Model output was compared with data from the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO), and Reynolds and AMSRE satellite remote sensing sea surface temperatures. The results indicate drag coefficients that include the spray effect are closer to observations than those without, and that sea spray can enhance the heat fluxes (especially latent heat flux) considerably during a typhoon passage. Consequently, the model results with heat fluxes enhanced by sea spray simulate better the cooling process of the SST and upper-layer temperature profiles. Additionally, results from the simulation of the passage of typhoon Soulik (that passed KEO quickly), which included the sea spray effect, were better than for the simulated passage of typhoon Yagi (that crossed KEO slowly). These promising 1-D results could provide insight into the application of sea spray in general circulation models for typhoon studies.

  10. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  11. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 1D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Romero, Lucia; Ferrero, Jose M.; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a final common pathway or descriptor for various cardiac pathologies. It is associated with sudden cardiac death, which is frequently caused by ventricular arrhythmias. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling, fibrosis and autonomic imbalance have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure etiology and progression. Objective In this study we investigate in silico the role of electrophysiological and structural heart failure remodeling on the modulation of key elements of the arrhythmogenic substrate, i.e., electrophysiological gradients and abnormal impulse propagation. Methods Two different mathematical models of the human ventricular action potential were used to formulate models of the failing ventricular myocyte. This provided the basis for simulations of the electrical activity within a transmural ventricular strand. Our main goal was to elucidate the roles of electrophysiological and structural remodeling in setting the stage for malignant life-threatening arrhythmias. Results Simulation results illustrate how the presence of M cells and heterogeneous electrophysiological remodeling in the human failing ventricle modulate the dispersion of action potential duration and repolarization time. Specifically, selective heterogeneous remodeling of expression levels for the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and SERCA pump decrease these heterogeneities. In contrast, fibroblast proliferation and cellular uncoupling both strongly increase repolarization heterogeneities. Conduction velocity and the safety factor for conduction are also reduced by the progressive structural remodeling during heart failure. Conclusion An extensive literature now establishes that in human ventricle, as heart failure progresses, gradients for repolarization are changed significantly by protein specific electrophysiological remodeling (either homogeneous or heterogeneous). Our simulations illustrate and provide new insights into this

  12. Colliding Two Shocks: 1-D full Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Hada, T.; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Mazelle, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Shock-shock interactions occur on various places in space and the interaction can produce high energy particles. A coronal mass ejection driven shock can collide with the Earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011]. This study reported that ions are accelerated by the first Fermi acceleration between the two shocks before the collision. An electron acceleration through an interplanetary shock-Earth's bow shock interaction was also reported [Terasawa et al., 1997]. Shock-shock interactions can occur in astrophysical phenomena as well as in the heliosphere. For example, a young supernova shock can collide with the wind termination shock of a massive star if they are close to each other [Bykov et al., 2013]. Although hybrid simulations (ions and electrons treated as super-particles and mass-less fluid, respectively) were carried out to understand the kinetic nature of a shock-shock interaction [Cargill et al., 1986], hybrid simulations cannot resolve electron dynamics and non-thermal electrons. We, therefore, use one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate a shock-shock interaction in which two shocks collide head-on. In a case of quasi-perpendicular shocks, electrons are accelerated by the mirror reflection between the two shocks before the collision (Fermi acceleration). On the other hand, because ions cannot go back upstream, the electron acceleration mechanism does not occur for ions. In a case of quasi-parallel shocks, ions can go back upstream and are accelerated at the shocks. The accelerated ions have great effect on the shock structure.

  13. 1D PIC-DSMC simulations of breakdown in microscale gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Chris H.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Crozier, Paul S.; Boerner, Jeremiah J.; Musson, Lawrence C.; Hooper, Russell W.; Bettencourt, Matthew T.

    2012-11-01

    An explicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) code with complex boundary conditions and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle collisions is utilized to investigate one dimensional direct current breakdown between two electrodes separated by air at STP. The simulation model includes Auger neutralization and cold field electron emission from the cathode as well as electron-neutral elastic, ionization, and excitation interactions. The simulated breakdown voltages at various electrode gap sizes are compared to experimental data and the Paschen curve. It is found that cold field electron emission can explain the breakdown voltage deviation from the Paschen curve measured for small gaps. Breakdown in large gaps proceeds over multiple ion transit timescales as electrons created via Auger neutralization of ions at the cathode quickly stream across the gap, creating new ions which accelerate towards the cathode and release another "pulse" of electrons. If the resultant pulse of electrons is larger than the initial pulse, then this process can build up a significant quasi-neutral plasma in the gap and the voltage drop across the gap will occur primarily across the (thin) sheath. Breakdown is accelerated if the electric field at the cathode surface is large enough for significant cold field emission flux, which increases the plasma density and decreases the Debye length and thus the sheath size, further increasing the electric field and cold field emission flux from the cathode surface. Breakdown in air pressure gaps was found to be sensitive to the differential scattering cross section for electron-neutral interactions. Isotropic scattering of elastic collisions results in lower breakdown voltages at moderate gaps (several mean free paths) and higher breakdown voltages for large gap sizes compared to when more accurate forward-biased scattering distributions are used. The dependence of breakdown voltage on the scattering distribution is due to a competition

  14. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Mud Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, N. A.; Testik, F. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid mud bottom gravity currents are simulated numerically using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, ANSYS-Fluent. In this study, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-fluid method is selected since this method treats all phases in a multiphase system as interpenetrated continua. There are three different phases in the computational model constructed for this study: water, fluid mud, and air. Water and fluid mud are defined as two miscible fluids and the mass and momentum transfers between these two phases are taken into account. Fluid mud, which is a dense suspension of clay particles and water, is defined as a single-phase non-Newtonian fluid via user-defined-functions. These functions define the physical characteristics (density, viscosity, etc.) of the fluid mud and these characteristics vary with changing suspension concentration due to mass transfer between the fluid mud and the water phase. Results of this two-dimensional numerical model are verified with data obtained from experiments conducted in a laboratory flume with a lock-release set-up. Numerical simulations are currently being conducted to elucidate turbulent entrainment of ambient water into fluid mud gravity currents. This study is motivated by coastal dredge disposal operations.

  16. A Numerical Simulation of the Density Oscilator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Zapata, Sergio; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo

    2016-11-01

    In this work we carry out a numerical simulation for the dynamics that originates when a fluid (salty water) is located on top of another less dense fluid (pure water) in the presence of gravity. This is an unstable situation that leads to the development of intercalating lines of descending salty water and ascending pure water. Another situation is studied where the fluids are in two containers joined by a small hole. In this case a time pattern of alternating flows develops leading to an oscillator. The study of the velocity field around the hole shows than in a certain interval of time it develops intercalating lines like in the former situation. An interesting result is the fact that when a given fluid is flowing in one direction a vorticity pattern develops in the other fluid. The Navier-Stokes, continuity and salt diffusion equations, are solved numerically in cylindrical coordinates, using a finite difference scheme in the axial and radial directions and a Fourier spectral method for the angular coordinate. On the other hand, the second order Adams-Bashfort method is used for the time evolution. The results are compared to a numerical simulation of a pedestrian oscillator we developed based on the Hebling and Molnar social force model. The authors want to acknowledge support by DGAPA-UNAM (Project PAPIIT IN-115315 "Ondas y estructuras coherentes en dinámica de fluidos".

  17. Direct numerical simulation of hot jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Marc C.

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate motivation of this work is to investigate the stability of two dimensional heated jets and its implications for aerodynamic sound generation from data obtained with direct numerical simulations (DNS). As pointed out in our last report, these flows undergo two types of instabilities, convective or absolute, depending on their temperature. We also described the limits of earlier experimental and theoretical studies and explained why a numerical investigation could give us new insight into the physics of these instabilities. The aeroacoustical interest of these flows was also underlined. In order to reach this goal, we first need to succeed in the DNS of heated jets. Our past efforts have been focused on this issue which encountered several difficulties. Our numerical difficulties are directly related to the physical problem we want to investigate since these absolutely or almost absolutely unstable flows are by definition very sensitive to the smallest disturbances and are very likely to reach nonlinear saturation through a numerical feedback mechanism. As a result, it is very difficult to compute a steady laminar solution using a spatial DNS. A steady state was reached only for strongly co-flowed jets, but these flows are almost equivalent to two independent mixing layers. Thus they are far from absolute instability and have much lower growth rates.

  18. Numerical simulation of real-world flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining real flow information is important in various fields, but is a difficult issue because measurement data are usually limited in time and space, and computational results usually do not represent the exact state of real flows. Problems inherent in the realization of numerical simulation of real-world flows include the difficulty in representing exact initial and boundary conditions and the difficulty in representing unstable flow characteristics. This article reviews studies dealing with these problems. First, an overview of basic flow measurement methodologies and measurement data interpolation/approximation techniques is presented. Then, studies on methods of integrating numerical simulation and measurement, namely, four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var), Kalman filters (KFs), state observers, etc are discussed. The first problem is properly solved by these integration methodologies. The second problem can be partially solved with 4D-Var in which only initial and boundary conditions are control parameters. If an appropriate control parameter capable of modifying the dynamical structure of the model is included in the formulation of 4D-Var, unstable modes are properly suppressed and the second problem is solved. The state observer and KFs also solve the second problem by modifying mathematical models to stabilize the unstable modes of the original dynamical system by applying feedback signals. These integration methodologies are now applied in simulation of real-world flows in a wide variety of research fields. Examples are presented for basic fluid dynamics and applications in meteorology, aerospace, medicine, etc.

  19. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Toshio; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    In this paper, we present two results of direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting flows. One is direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting two-dimensional mixing layer and the other is direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting compressible isotropic turbulence. As for the mixing layer, a low Mach number approximation was used to take into account the variable density effects on the flow fields and to clarify the effects of heat release and density difference of a mean flow. In the case of density difference, expansion and baroclinic torque has a negative contribution to the local vorticity transport in the high density side and a positive contribution in the low density side which results in an asymmetric vortical structure structure. Thes density difference suppresses the growth of mixing layer and causes the overshoot of mean velocity only in the high density side which coincides with an experimental result. Coupling effects of heat release and desnity difference are also investigated. As for the homogeneous turbulence, fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved to clarify the interaction between turbulence and chemical reaction in turbulent diffusion flame. The chemical reaction is suppressed by the increase of heat release because of the decrease of density and local Reynolds number. However, the decay of enstrophy with heat release is slower than that without heat release because of strong baroclinic torque which is generated near the reaction zone. Also, large amount of heat release causes increase in turbulent energy through the pressure dilatation term. The pressure dilatation term shows the periodic fluctuation which has an acoustic time scale. The fluctuation is enhanced by the heat release and travels in the turbulent field as pressure and dilatation waves.

  1. Impact of Variations on 1-D Flow in Gas Turbine Engines via Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Khiem Viet; Tumer, Irem

    2004-01-01

    The unsteady compressible inviscid flow is characterized by the conservations of mass, momentum, and energy; or simply the Euler equations. In this paper, a study of the subsonic one-dimensional Euler equations with local preconditioning is presented using a modal analysis approach. Specifically, this study investigates the behavior of airflow in a gas turbine engine using the specified conditions at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine, to determine the impact of variations in pressure, velocity, temperature, and density at low Mach numbers. Two main questions motivate this research: 1) Is there any aerodynamic problem with the existing gas turbine engines that could impact aircraft performance? 2) If yes, what aspect of a gas turbine engine could be improved via design to alleviate that impact and to optimize aircraft performance? This paper presents an initial attempt to model the flow behavior in terms of their eigenfrequencies subject to the assumption of the uncertainty or variation (perturbation). The flow behavior is explored using simulation outputs from a customer-deck model obtained from Pratt & Whitney. Variations of the main variables (i.e., pressure, temperature, velocity, density) about their mean states at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine are modeled. Flow behavior is analyzed for the high-pressure compressor and combustion chamber utilizing the conditions on their left and right boundaries. In the same fashion, similar analyses are carried out for the high-pressure and low-pressure turbines. In each case, the eigenfrequencies that are obtained for different boundary conditions are examined closely based on their probabilistic distributions, a result of a Monte Carlo 10,000 sample simulation. Furthermore, the characteristic waves and wave response are analyzed and contrasted among different cases, with and without preconditioners. The results reveal

  2. Numerical Flow Simulation for Complete Vehicle Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. •uNOING NUMBERS Numerical Field Simulation around complete configuration F49620-90-C- 6. AUTHOR(S) 0027PO006 Bharat K. Soni...2_3 d 71 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING CRGANIZATION NSF/Engineering Research Center f•r . 5 j 5 ( F i REPORT NUMBER P...AVAILABLE. THE COPY FURNISHED TO DTIC CONTAINED A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLY. TABLE OF CONTENTS A bstract

  3. Numerical aspects of compressible turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honein, Albert Edward

    Nonlinear instabilities present a long standing hurdle for compact, high order, non dissipative, finite difference computation of compressible turbulence. The spectral-like accuracy of these schemes, while attractive, results in significant aliasing errors that corrupt the solution. As a result, successful simulations have been limited to moderate Reynolds numbers ( Re) and low-order or upwind schemes with inherent numerical dissipation. However, resorting to dissipative schemes in discretizing the nonlinear terms was shown to have a detrimental effect on turbulence. A recent LES approach is to abandon the subgrid model altogether and rely on the scheme dissipation to mimic the effect of small scales. A dissipative monotone integrated LES (MILES) algorithm based on a multidimensional flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm has been developed and tested for decaying compressible isotropic turbulence. Agreement with the benchmark experiments of Comte-Bellot and Corrsin is very sensitive to the parameters involved in the FCT algorithm, while the evolution of thermodynamic fluctuations do not compare well with direct numerical simulations. An under-resolved simulation of inviscid, compressible, isotropic turbulence at low Mach number is chosen as a severe benchmark to investigate the nonlinear stability properties of nondissipative schemes. The behavior of this benchmark is predicted by performing a fully de-aliased spectral simulation on a 32 3 grid with turbulent Mach number of Mto = 0.07. The kinetic energy and thermodynamic fluctuations are found to decay for finite Re, and remain constant at infinite Re for a long time before the occurrence of numerical shocks. Extending the proof of Kraichnan (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 27(3), 1955), this inviscid statistical equilibrium is demonstrated to be a consequence of the discrete equivalent of the Liouville theorem of classical statistical mechanics. Several existing non-dissipative methods are

  4. Numerical simulation for fan broadband noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Takaaki; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Ooishi, Tsutomu

    2011-03-01

    In order to elucidate the broadband noise of fan, the numerical simulation of fan operating at two different rotational speeds is carried out using the three-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The computed results are compared to experiment to estimate its accuracy and are found to show good agreement with experiment. A method is proposed to evaluate the turbulent kinetic energy in the framework of the Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence model. From the calculation results, the turbulent kinetic energy is visualized as the turbulence of the flow which leads to generate the broadband noise, and its noise sources are identified.

  5. Numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    A vibrated drop constitutes a very rich physical system, blending both interfacial and volume phenomena. A remarkable experimental study was performed by M. Costalonga highlighting sessile drop motion subject to horizontal, vertical and oblique vibration. Several intriguing phenomena are observed such as drop walking and rapid droplet ejection. We perform three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drops where the phenomena described above are computed using the massively parallel multiphase code BLUE. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  6. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing.

    PubMed

    Statsenko, V P; Yanilkin, Yu V; Zhmaylo, V A

    2013-11-28

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flows obtained by various authors are reviewed. The paper considers the turbulent mixing (TM) process caused by the development of the main types of instabilities: those due to gravitation (with either a fixed or an alternating-sign acceleration), shift and shock waves. The problem of a buoyant jet is described as an example of the mixed-type problem. Comparison is made with experimental data on the TM zone width, profiles of density, velocity and turbulent energy and degree of homogeneity.

  7. Linking 1D evolutionary to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.

    2016-03-01

    Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The ‘stiffness’ of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ({{Ri}}{{B}}), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A ‘stiff’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ {10}4) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a ‘soft’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ 10) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are ‘stiffer’ than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett (2007 Astrophys. J. 667 448-75). This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in super-asymptotic giant branch stars and also the onset of novae.

  8. 1D simulation of runaway electrons generation in pulsed high-pressure gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, V. Yu.; Kozyrev, A. V.; Semeniuk, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The results of theoretical modelling of runaway electron generation in the high-pressure nanosecond pulsed gas discharge are presented. A novel hybrid model of gas discharge has been successfully built. Hydrodynamic and kinetic approaches are used simultaneously to describe the dynamics of different components of low-temperature discharge plasma. To consider motion of ions and low-energy (plasma) electrons the corresponding equations of continuity with drift-diffusion approximation are used. To describe high-energy (runaway) electrons the Boltzmann kinetic equation is included. As a result of the simulation we obtained spatial and temporal distributions of charged particles and electric field in a pulsed discharge. Furthermore, the energy spectra calculated runaway electrons in different cross-sections, particularly, the discharge gap in the anode plane. It is shown that the average energy of fast electrons (in eV) in the anode plane is usually slightly higher than the instantaneous value of the applied voltage to the gap (in V).

  9. Numerical simulation of large fabric filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Jan; Kovařík, Petr

    2012-04-01

    Fabric filters are used in the wide range of industrial technologies for cleaning of incoming or exhaust gases. To achieve maximal efficiency of the discrete phase separation and long lifetime of the filter hoses, it is necessary to ensure uniform load on filter surface and to avoid impacts of heavy particles with high velocities to the filter hoses. The paper deals with numerical simulation of two phase flow field in a large fabric filter. The filter is composed of six chambers with approx. 1600 filter hoses in total. The model was simplified to one half of the filter, the filter hoses walls were substituted by porous zones. The model settings were based on experimental data, especially on the filter pressure drop. Unsteady simulations with different turbulence models were done. Flow field together with particles trajectories were analyzed. The results were compared with experimental observations.

  10. Numerical simulation of space UV spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkin, Maksim; Fatkhullin, Timur; Panchuk, Vladimir; Sachkov, Mikhail; Kanev, Evgeny

    2016-07-01

    Based on the ray tracing method, we developed algorithms for constructing numerical model of spectroscopic instrumentation. The Software is realized in C ++ using nVidia CUDA technology. The software package consists of three separate modules: the ray tracing module, a module for calculating energy efficiency and module of CCD image simulation. The main objective of this work was to obtain images of the spectra for the cross-dispersed spectrographs as well as segmented aperture Long Slit Spectrograph. The software can be potentially used by WSO-UV project. To test our algorithms and the software package we have performed simulations of the ground cross-dispersed Nasmyth Echelle Spectrometer (NES) installed on the platform of the Nasmyth focus of the Russian 6-meter BTA telescope. The comparison of model images of stellar spectra with observations on this device confirms that the software works well. The high degree of agreement between the theoretical and real spectra is shown.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Flares in GRB Afterglow Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Z.; Vlasis, A.; Keppens, R.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate numerically the various evolutionary phases in the interaction of relativistic shells with its surrounding cold interstellar medium (ISM) and shell-shell interaction. We do this for 1D. This is relevant for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the observed flares, and we demonstrate that, thanks to the AMR strategy, we resolve the internal structure of the shocked shell and ISM matter and shell-shell matter, which will leave its imprint on the GRB afterglow. Also, we perform high resolution numerical simulations of late collisions between two ultra-relativistic shells in order to explore the flares in the afterglow phase of GRB. We examine the case where a cold uniform shell collides with a self-similar Blandford and McKee shell in a constant density environment and consider cases with different Lorentz factor and energy for the uniform shell. We produce the corresponding on-axis light curves and emission images for the afterglow phase and examine the occurrence of optical and radio flares assuming a spherical explosion and a hard-edged jet scenario. For our simulations we use the Adaptive Mesh Refinement version of the Versatile Advection Code (AMRVAC) coupled to a linear radiative transfer code to calculate synchrotron emission. We find steeply rising flare like behavior for small jet opening angles and more gradual rebrightenings for large opening angles. Synchrotron self-absorption is found to strongly influence the onset and shape of the radio flare.

  12. Numerical study and topology optimization of 1D periodic bimaterial phononic crystal plates for bandgaps of low order Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    The optimum topology of bimaterial phononic crystal (PhCr) plates with one-dimensional (1D) periodicity to attain maximum relative bandgap width of low order Lamb waves is computationally investigated. The evolution of optimized topology with respect to filling fraction of constituents, alternatively stiff scattering inclusion, is explored. The underlying idea is to develop PhCr plate structures with high specific bandgap efficiency at particular filling fraction, or further with multiscale functionality through gradient of optimized PhCr unitcell all over the lattice array. Multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is employed in this research in conjunction with finite element method (FEM) for topology optimization of silicon-tungsten PhCr plate unitcells. A specialized FEM model is developed and verified for dispersion analysis of plate waves and calculation of modal response. Modal band structure of regular PhCr plate unitcells with centric scattering layer is studied as a function of aspect ratio and filling fraction. Topology optimization is then carried out for a few aspect ratios, with and without prescribed symmetry, over various filling fractions. The efficiency of obtained solutions is verified as compared to corresponding regular centric PhCr plate unitcells. Moreover, being inspired by the obtained optimum topologies, definite and easy to produce topologies are proposed with enhanced bandgap efficiency as compared to centric unitcells. Finally a few cases are introduced to evaluate the frequency response of finite PhCr plate structures produced by achieved topologies and also to confirm the reliability of calculated modal band structures. Cases made by consecutive unitcells of different filling fraction are examined in order to attest the bandgap efficiency and multiscale functionality of such graded PhCr plate structures.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulations of Transient Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M.; Valdes-Parada, F.; Wood, B.

    2008-12-01

    Transient dispersion is important in many engineering applications, including transport in porous media. A common theoretical approach involves upscaling the micro-scale mass balance equations for convection- diffusion to macro-scale equations that contain effective medium quantities. However, there are a number of assumptions implicit in the various upscaling methods. For example, results obtained from volume averaging are often dependent on a given set of length and time scale constraints. Additionally, a number of the classical models for dispersion do not fully capture the early-time dispersive behavior of the solute for a general set of initial conditions. In this work, we present direct numerical simulations of micro-scale transient mass balance equations for convection-diffusion in both capillary tubes and porous media. Special attention is paid to analysis of the influence of a new time- decaying coefficient that filters the effects of the initial conditions. The direct numerical simulations were compared to results obtained from solving the closure problem associated with volume averaging. These comparisons provide a quantitative measure of the significance of (1) the assumptions implicit in the volume averaging method and (2) the importance of the early-time dispersive behavior of the solute due to various initial conditions.

  14. Numerical Simulations of 1990 Saturn's Giant Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Melendo, E.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present here a study of the Saturn's 1990 equatorial major storm based on numerical simulations. Six planetary scale storms, nicknamed as Great White Spots (GWS) have been observed since the nineteenth century, three of them at the equatorial region in 1876 (~ +8º), 1933 (~ +2º), and 1990 (+12º), on the broad prograde equatorial jet where equatorial dynamics dominated producing a storm nucleus, with rapid expansion to the east and west to become a planetary-scale disturbance (Sánchez-Lavega, CHAOS 4, 341-353, 1994). We have detailed information, ground-based CCD imaging and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, for the 1990 event. Numerical experiments on the 1990 storm indicate that the onset of the storm can only be reproduced if the Voyager era background zonal flow is used, which suggests that it dominated the circulation dynamics at the storm's outbreak region at that time. We review the possible impact of the 1990 storm on the equatorial jet, storm dynamics, and how it relates to the observed storm morphology and zonal wind measurements derived from HST observations (Barnet et al., Icarus 100, 499-511, 1992). Observations also describe the formation of equatorial planetary waves and instabilities during the disturbance. We discuss the impact of major energy and mass injection by a planetary-scale convective event on the equatorial dynamics following our simulation results.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of incompressible axisymmetric flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loulou, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    In the present work, we propose to conduct direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible turbulent axisymmetric jets and wakes. The objectives of the study are to understand the fundamental behavior of axisymmetric jets and wakes, which are perhaps the most technologically relevant free shear flows (e.g. combuster injectors, propulsion jet). Among the data to be generated are various statistical quantities of importance in turbulence modeling, like the mean velocity, turbulent stresses, and all the terms in the Reynolds-stress balance equations. In addition, we will be interested in the evolution of large-scale structures that are common in free shear flow. The axisymmetric jet or wake is also a good problem in which to try the newly developed b-spline numerical method. Using b-splines as interpolating functions in the non-periodic direction offers many advantages. B-splines have local support, which leads to sparse matrices that can be efficiently stored and solved. Also, they offer spectral-like accuracy that are C(exp O-1) continuous, where O is the order of the spline used; this means that derivatives of the velocity such as the vorticity are smoothly and accurately represented. For purposes of validation against existing results, the present code will also be able to simulate internal flows (ones that require a no-slip boundary condition). Implementation of no-slip boundary condition is trivial in the context of the b-splines.

  16. Understanding the colloidal dispersion stability of 1D and 2D materials: Perspectives from molecular simulations and theoretical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shangchao; Shih, Chih-Jen; Sresht, Vishnu; Govind Rajan, Ananth; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2016-08-03

    The colloidal dispersion stability of 1D and 2D materials in the liquid phase is critical for scalable nano-manufacturing, chemical modification, composites production, and deployment as conductive inks or nanofluids. Here, we review recent computational and theoretical studies carried out by our group to model the dispersion stability of 1D and 2D materials, including single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide in aqueous surfactant solutions or organic solvents. All-atomistic (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can probe the molecular level details of the adsorption morphology of surfactants and solvents around these materials, as well as quantify the interaction energy between the nanomaterials mediated by surfactants or solvents. Utilizing concepts from reaction kinetics and diffusion, one can directly predict the rate constants for the aggregation kinetics and dispersion life times using MD outputs. Furthermore, the use of coarse-grained (CG) MD simulations allows quantitative prediction of surfactant adsorption isotherms. Combined with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Langmuir isotherm, and the DLVO theory, one can directly use CGMD outputs to: (i) predict electrostatic potentials around the nanomaterial, (ii) correlate surfactant surface coverages with surfactant concentrations in the bulk dispersion medium, and (iii) determine energy barriers against coagulation. Finally, we discuss challenges associated with studying emerging 2D materials, such as, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), including molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). An outlook is provided to address these challenges with plans to develop force-field parameters for MD simulations to enable predictive modeling of emerging 2D materials in the liquid phase.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  18. Numerical Simulations of High Enthalpy Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric flows within shock tubes and expansion tubes are simulated including the effects of finite rate chemistry and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of computational fluid dynamics for characterizing the flows in high enthalpy pulse facilities. The modeling and numerical requirements necessary to simulate these flows accurately are also discussed. Although there is a large body of analysis which explains and quantifies the boundary layer growth between the shock and the interface in a shock tube, there is a need for more detailed solutions. Phenomena such as thermochemical nonequilibrium. or turbulent transition behind the shock are excluded in the assumptions of Mirels' analysis. Additionally there is inadequate capability to predict the influence of the boundary layer on the expanded gas behind the interface. Quantifying the gas in this region is particularly important in expansion tubes because it is the location of the test gas. Unsteady simulations of the viscous flow in shock tubes are computationally expensive because they must follow features such as a shock wave over the length of the facility and simultaneously resolve the small length scales within the boundary layer. As a result, efficient numerical algorithms are required. The numerical approach of the present work is to solve the axisymmetric gas dynamic equations using an finite-volume formulation where the inviscid fluxes are computed with a upwind TVD scheme. Multiple species equations are included in the formulation so that finite-rate chemistry can be modeled. The simulations cluster grid points at the shock and interface and translate this clustered grid with these features to minimize numerical errors. The solutions are advanced at a CFL number of less than one based on the inviscid gas dynamics. To avoid limitations on the time step due to the viscous terms, these terms are treated implicitly. This requires a block tri

  19. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in computational technology and in physics-based modeling are making large-scale, detailed simulations of complex systems possible within the design environment. For example, the integration of computing, communications, and aerodynamics has reduced the time required to analyze major propulsion system components from days and weeks to minutes and hours. This breakthrough has enabled the detailed simulation of major propulsion system components to become a routine part of designing systems, providing the designer with critical information about the components early in the design process. This paper describes the development of the numerical propulsion system simulation (NPSS), a modular and extensible framework for the integration of multicomponent and multidisciplinary analysis tools using geographically distributed resources such as computing platforms, data bases, and people. The analysis is currently focused on large-scale modeling of complete aircraft engines. This will provide the product developer with a "virtual wind tunnel" that will reduce the number of hardware builds and tests required during the development of advanced aerospace propulsion systems.

  20. Numerical simulation of pump-intake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Pavel; Klas, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Pump pre-swirl or uneven flow distribution in front of the pump can induce pump-intake vortices. These phenomena result in blockage of the impeller suction space, deterioration of efficiency, drop of head curve and earlier onset of cavitation. Real problematic case, where head curve drop was documented, is simulated using commercial CFD software. Computational simulation was carried out for three flow rates, which correspond to three operating regimes of the vertical pump. The domain consists of the pump sump, pump itself excluding the impeller and the delivery pipe. One-phase approach is applied, because the vortex cores were not filled with air during observation of the real pump operation. Numerical simulation identified two surface vortices and one bottom vortex. Their position and strength depend on the pump flow rate. Paper presents detail analysis of the flow field on the pump intake, discusses influence of the vortices on pump operation and suggests possible actions that should be taken to suppress the intake vortices.

  1. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame.

  2. 3D Numerical simulations of oblique subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, C.; Gerya, T.; Scambelluri, M.; Crispini, L.; Federico, L.; Capponi, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the past 2D numerical studies (e.g. Gerya et al., 2002; Gorczyk et al., 2007; Malatesta et al., 2012) provided evidence that during intraoceanic subduction a serpentinite channel forms above the downgoing plate. This channel forms as a result of hydration of the mantle wedge by uprising slab-fluids. Rocks buried at high depths are finally exhumed within this buoyant low-viscosity medium. Convergence rate in these 2D models was described by a trench-normal component of velocity. Several present and past subduction zones worldwide are however driven by oblique convergence between the plates, where trench-normal motion of the subducting slab is coupled with trench-parallel displacement of the plates. Can the exhumation mechanism and the exhumation rates of high-pressure rocks be affected by the shear component of subduction? And how uprise of these rocks can vary along the plate margin? We tried to address these questions performing 3D numerical models that simulate an intraoceanic oblique subduction. The models are based on thermo-mechanical equations that are solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010). In most of the models a narrow oceanic basin (500 km-wide) surrounded by continental margins is depicted. The basin is floored by either layered or heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere with gabbro as discrete bodies in serpentinized peridotite and a basaltic layer on the top. A weak zone in the mantle is prescribed to control the location of subduction initiation and therefore the plate margins geometry. Finally, addition of a third dimension in the simulations allowed us to test the role of different plate margin geometries on oblique subduction dynamics. In particular in each model we modified the dip angle of the weak zone and its "lateral" geometry (e.g. continuous, segmented). We consider "continuous" weak zones either parallel or increasingly moving away from the continental margins

  3. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  4. Numerical simulations of black-hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tony

    This thesis covers various aspects of the numerical simulation of black-hole spacetimes according to Einstein's general theory of relativity, using the Spectral Einstein Code developed by the Caltech-Cornell-CITA collaboration. The first topic is improvement of binary-black-hole initial data. One such issue is the construction of binary-black-hole initial data with nearly extremal spins that remain nearly constant during the initial relaxation in an evolution. Another concern is the inclusion of physically realistic tidal deformations of the black holes to reduce the high-frequency components of the spurious gravitational radiation content, and represents a first step in incorporating post-Newtonian results in constraint-satisfying initial data. The next topic is the evolution of black-hole binaries and the gravitational waves they emit. The first spectral simulation of two inspiralling black holes through merger and ringdown is presented, in which the black holes are nonspinning and have equal masses. This work is extended to perform the first spectral simulations of two inspiralling black holes with moderate spins and equal masses, including the merger and ringdown. Two configurations are considered, in which both spins are either anti-aligned or aligned with the orbital angular momentum. Highly accurate gravitational waveforms are computed for all these cases, and are used to calibrate waveforms in the effective-one-body model. The final topic is the behavior of quasilocal black-hole horizons in highly dynamical situations. Simulations of a rotating black hole that is distort ed by a pulse of ingoing gravitational radiation are performed. Multiple marginally outer trapped surfaces are seen to appear and annihilate with each other during the evolution, and the world tubes th ey trace out are all dynamical horizons. The dynamical horizon and angular momentum flux laws are evaluated in this context, and the dynamical horizons are contrasted with the event horizon

  5. History of the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) program has reached a milestone with the completion of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network. This achievement is the first major milestone in the continuing effort to provide a state-of-the-art supercomputer facility for the national aerospace community and to serve as a pathfinder for the development and use of future supercomputer systems. The underlying factors that motivated the initiation of the program are first identified and then discussed. These include the emergence and evolution of computational aerodynamics as a powerful new capability in aerodynamics research and development, the computer power required for advances in the discipline, the complementary nature of computation and wind tunnel testing, and the need for the government to play a pathfinding role in the development and use of large-scale scientific computing systems. Finally, the history of the NAS program is traced from its inception in 1975 to the present time.

  6. Direct numerical simulations of vortex ring collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla Monico, Rodolfo; Pumir, Alain; Brenner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We numerically simulate the ring vortex collision experiment of Lim and Nickels in an attempt to understand the rapid formation of very fine scale turbulence (or 'smoke') from relatively smooth initial conditions. Reynolds numbers of up to Re = Γ / ν = 7500 , where Γ is the vortex ring circulation and ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid are reached, which coincide with the highest Reynolds number case of the experiments. Different perturbations to the ring vortex are added, and their effect on the generation and amplification of turbulence is quantified. The underlying dynamics of the vortex core is analyzed, and compared to the dynamics arising from a simple Biot-Savart filament model for the core.

  7. Numerical simulation of excited jet mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. N.; Hankey, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of unsteady flow in jet mixing layers, both with and without external excitation, has been performed by solving the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Computations were performed on a CRAY X-MP computer using MacCormick's explicit finite difference algorithm. Different excitation methods were investigated and were shown to be very effective in controlling the well organized periodic production, shedding and pairing of large scale vortex structures. It is found that pressure excitation was generally more effective than temperature excitation, and that grid refinement results in substantial improvement in the resolution of unsteady features. The location and orientation, in addition to the frequency, of the excitation source are shown to have a significant influence on the production and interaction of large scale vortex structures in the jet mixing layer.

  8. Numerical simulation of transonic flows in diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M.-S.; Coakley, T. J.; Bergmann, M. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical simulations were made of two-dimensional transonic flows in diffusers, including flow separation induced by a shock or adverse pressure gradient. The mass-averaged, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations, simplified by the thin-layer approximation, were solved using MacCormack's hybrid method. The eddy-viscosity formulation was described by the Wilcox-Rubesin's two-equation, k-omega model. Detailed comparison of the computed results with measurements showed good agreement in all cases, including one with massive separation induced by a strong shock. The computation correctly predicted the details of a distinct lambda shock pattern, closely duplicating the configuration observed experimentally in spark-schlieren photographs.

  9. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    There were three major issues examined in the feasibility study. First, the ability of the proposed system architecture to support the anticipated workload was evaluated. Second, the throughput of the computational engine (the flow model processor) was studied using real application programs. Third, the availability reliability, and maintainability of the system were modeled. The evaluations were based on the baseline systems. The results show that the implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, in the form considered, would indeed be a feasible project with an acceptable level of risk. The technology required (both hardware and software) either already exists or, in the case of a few parts, is expected to be announced this year. Facets of the work described include the hardware configuration, software, user language, and fault tolerance.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Acoustically Driven, Burning Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This computational study focuses on understanding and quantifying the effects of external acoustical perturbations on droplet combustion. A one-dimensional, axisymmetric representation of the essential diffusion and reaction processes occurring in the vicinity of the droplet stagnation point is used here in order to isolate the effects of the imposed acoustic disturbance. The simulation is performed using a third order accurate, essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) numerical scheme with a full methanol-air reaction mechanism. Consistent with recent microgravity and normal gravity combustion experiments, focus is placed on conditions where the droplet is situated at a velocity antinode in order for the droplet to experience the greatest effects of fluid mechanical straining of flame structures. The effects of imposed sound pressure level and frequency are explored here, and conditions leading to maximum burning rates are identified.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of Automobile Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurbatskii, Konstantin; Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Navier Stokes equation is solved computationally by the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme for the flow and acoustic fields associated with a laminar boundary layer flow over an automobile door cavity. In this work, the flow Reynolds number is restricted to R(sub delta*) < 3400; the range of Reynolds number for which laminar flow may be maintained. This investigation focuses on two aspects of the problem, namely, the effect of boundary layer thickness on the cavity tone frequency and intensity and the effect of the size of the computation domain on the accuracy of the numerical simulation. It is found that the tone frequency decreases with an increase in boundary layer thickness. When the boundary layer is thicker than a certain critical value, depending on the flow speed, no tone is emitted by the cavity. Computationally, solutions of aeroacoustics problems are known to be sensitive to the size of the computation domain. Numerical experiments indicate that the use of a small domain could result in normal mode type acoustic oscillations in the entire computation domain leading to an increase in tone frequency and intensity. When the computation domain is expanded so that the boundaries are at least one wavelength away from the noise source, the computed tone frequency and intensity are found to be computation domain size independent.

  12. Numerical simulation of turbulent slurry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghgoo, Mohammad Reza; Spiteri, Reymond J.; Bergstrom, Donlad J.

    2016-11-01

    Slurry flows, i.e., the flow of an agglomeration of liquid and particles, are widely employed in many industrial applications, such as hydro-transport systems, pharmaceutical batch crystallizers, and wastewater disposal. Although there are numerous studies available in the literature on turbulent gas-particle flows, the hydrodynamics of turbulent liquid-particle flows has received much less attention. In particular, the fluid-phase turbulence modulation due to the particle fluctuating motion is not yet well understood and remains challenging to model. This study reports the results of a numerical simulation of a vertically oriented slurry pipe flow using a two-fluid model based on the kinetic theory of granular flows. The particle stress model also includes the effects of frictional contact. Different turbulence modulation models are considered, and their capability to capture the characteristic features of the turbulent flow is assessed. The model predictions are validated against published experimental data and demonstrate the significant effect of the particles on the fluid-phase turbulence.

  13. Numerical relativity simulations of binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierfelder, Marcus; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd

    2011-08-01

    We present a new numerical relativity code designed for simulations of compact binaries involving matter. The code is an upgrade of the BAM code to include general relativistic hydrodynamics and implements state-of-the-art high-resolution-shock-capturing schemes on a hierarchy of mesh refined Cartesian grids with moving boxes. We test and validate the code in a series of standard experiments involving single neutron star spacetimes. We present test evolutions of quasiequilibrium equal-mass irrotational binary neutron star configurations in quasicircular orbits which describe the late inspiral to merger phases. Neutron star matter is modeled as a zero-temperature fluid; thermal effects can be included by means of a simple ideal gas prescription. We analyze the impact that the use of different values of damping parameter in the Gamma-driver shift condition has on the dynamics of the system. The use of different reconstruction schemes and their impact in the post-merger dynamics is investigated. We compute and characterize the gravitational radiation emitted by the system. Self-convergence of the waves is tested, and we consistently estimate error bars on the numerically generated waveforms in the inspiral phase.

  14. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Travish, G.A.

    1989-11-01

    Beam Break-Up (BBU) is a severe constraint in accelerator design, limiting beam current and quality. The control of BBU has become the focus of much research in the design of the next generation collider, recirculating and linear induction accelerators and advanced accelerators. Determining the effect on BBU of modifications to cavities, the focusing elements or the beam is frequently beyond the ability of current analytic models. A computer code was written to address this problem. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator (BBUNS) was designed to numerically solve for beam break-up (BBU) due to an arbitrary transverse wakefield. BBUNS was developed to be as user friendly as possible on the Cray computer series. The user is able to control all aspects of input and output by using a single command file. In addition, the wakefield is specified by the user and read in as a table. The program can model energy variations along and within the beam, focusing magnetic field profiles can be specified, and the graphical output can be tailored. In this note we discuss BBUNS, its structure and application. Included are detailed instructions, examples and a sample session of BBUNS. This program is available for distribution. 50 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Numerical simulation of solar coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Many aspects of solar activity are believed to be due to the stressing of the coronal magnetic field by footpoint motions at the photosphere. The results are presented of a fully spectral numerical simulation which is the first 3-D time dependent simulation of footpoint stressing in a geometry appropriate for the corona. An arcade is considered that is initially current-free and impose a smooth footpoint motion that produces a twist in the field of approx 2 pi. The footprints were fixed and the evolution was followed until the field relaxes to another current-free state. No evidence was seen for any instability, either ideal or resistive and no evidence for current sheet formation. The most striking feature of the evolution is that in response to photospheric motions, the field expands rapidly upward to minimize the stress. The expansion has two important effects. First, it suppresses the development of dips in the field that could support dense, cool material. For the motions assumed, the magnetic field does not develop a geometry suitable for prominence formation. Second, the expansion inhibits ideal instabilities such as kinking. The results indicate that simple stearing of a single arcade is unlikely to lead to solar activity such as flares or prominences. Effects are discussed that might possibly lead to such activity.

  16. Hybrid Numerical Simulations Of Planetesimal Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, Francesco; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    2006-09-01

    The multi-zone simulation code modelling the accretion of planetesimals into planets (Spaute et al. 1991, Icarus 92, 147; Weidenschilling et al. 1997, ICARUS 128, 429) includes a statistical continuum of small bodies in logarithmic mass bins, while large bodies are discrete objects with individual masses and orbits. Formerly, gravitational interactions between large planetary embryos were treated by statistical scattering. The code has now been updated to properly handle the orbits of protoplanets in a deterministic way. The trajectories of the larger bodies are numerically computed with the symplectic integrator SyYMBA. The additional forces acting on the protoplanets due to collisions with smaller planetesimals and their gravitational perturbations, including dynamical friction, as well as gas drag and tidal interaction with the solar nebula, are incorporated in the N-body algorithm by applying a further step in the leap-frog structure of the SyMBA integrator. The changes in the orbital elements of the large bodies, computed in the stochastic part of the code with a Monte Carlo approach, are applied for half a timestep before and after the N-body Hamiltonian propagation as suggested in Lee & Peale (ApJ 567, 596, 2002). With this code we intend to study the effect of dynamical friction on terrestrial planet formation and the accretion of planetary cores in the outer solar system. We will present preliminary results of simulations performed with the updated code.

  17. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2013-12-01

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  18. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  19. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  20. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marc S.; Bell, John B.; Almgren, Ann S.; Beckner, Vincent E.; Lijewski, Michael J.; Cheng, Robert; Shepherd, Ian; Johnson, Matthew

    2003-06-14

    With adaptive-grid computational methodologies and judicious use of compressible and low Mach number combustion models, we are carrying out three-dimensional, time-dependent direct numerical simulations of a laboratory-scale turbulent premixed methane burner. In the laboratory experiment, turbulence is generated by a grid located in the throat of a 50mm diameter circular nozzle; swirl is be introduced by four tangential air jets spaced uniformly around the circumference of the nozzle just above the turbulence grid. A premixed methane flame is stabilized above the nozzle in the central core region where a velocity deficit is induced7the swirling flow. The time-dependent flow field inside the nozzle, from the turbulence grid and the high-speed jets, to the nozzle exit plane is simulated using an adaptive-grid embedded-boundary compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The compressible calculation then provides time-dependent boundary conditions for an adaptive low Mach number model of the swirl-stabilized premixed flame. The low Mach model incorporates detailed chemical kinetics and species transport using 20 species and 84 reactions. Laboratory diagnostics available for comparisons include characterizations of the flow field just down stream of the nozzle exit plane, and flame surface statistics, such as mean location, wrinkling and crossing frequencies.

  1. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Disk-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Gennaro

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this thesis is the study the dynamical interactions occurring between a forming planet and its surrounding protostellar environment. This task is accomplished by means of both 2D and 3D numerical simulations. The first part of this work concerned global simulations in 3D. These were intended to investigate large-scale effects caused by a Jupiter-size body still in the process of accreting matter from its surroundings. Simulations show that, despite a density gap forms along the orbital path, Jupiter-mass protoplanets still accrete at a rate on the order of 0.01 Earth's masses per year when they are embedded in a minimum-mass Solar nebula. In the same conditions, the migration time scale due to gravitational torques by the disk is around 100000 years. The second part of the work was dedicated to perform 2D calculations, by employing a nested-grid technique. This method allows to carry out global simulations of planets orbiting in disks and, at the same time, to resolve in great detail the dynamics of the flow inside the Roche lobe of both massive and low-mass planets. Regardless of the planet mass, the high resolution supplied by the nested-grid technique permits an evaluation of the torques, resulting from short and very short range gravitational interactions, more reliable than the one previously estimated with the aid of numerical methods. Likewise, the mass flow onto the planet is computed in a more accurate fashion. Resulting migration time scales are in the range from 20000 years, for intermediate-mass planets, to 1000000 years, for very low-mass as well as high-mass planets. Circumplanetary disks form inside of the Roche lobe of Jupiter-size secondaries. In order to evaluate the consequences of the flat geometry on the local flow structure around planets, 3D nested-grid simulations were carried out to investigate a range of planetary masses spanning from 1.5 Earth's masses to one Jupiter's mass. Outcomes show that migration rates are relatively

  3. A numerical simulation of the Catalina Eddy

    SciTech Connect

    Ueyoshi, Kyozo; Roads, J.O.; Alpert, J.

    1991-12-31

    A shallow cyclonic eddy termed the Catalina Eddy has occasionally been observed during summer in the bight of southern California. The Catalina Eddy occurs within {approximately}100 km from the coastal mountains with a depth typically extending up to the marine inversion level of several hundred meters above sea level and a diameter on the order of 100--200 km. The Catalina Eddy is produced by the interaction between the synoptic-scale northerly flow and the formidable topography along the southern California coast. A favorable synoptic situation that enhances the increased low-level climatological northerly flow along the central California coastline is the presence of the prominent east-west pressure gradient between the subtropical East Pacific high and the inland thermal low over California. Increased northerlies impinging on the San Rafael mountains north of Santa Barbara result in enhanced mesoscale lee troughing in the bight and establishment of a narrow ridge alongshore, leading to establishment of cyclonic vorticity in the bight. This paper describes numerical simulations and predictions of a Catalina Eddy event with a high-resolution multi-level limited area model. The model is initialized and forced at the lateral boundaries by the National Meteorological Center`s (NMC) 2.5{degree} {times} 2.5{degree} global objective analysis and also by NMC`s medium range forecast model (MRF) 1--10 day forecasts. In the authors previous effort to simulate mesoscale disturbances such as the Catalina Eddy the integrations were performed up to 1 model-day utilizing the NMC analysis as fixed lateral boundary conditions. In this paper they describe the results of continuous 5- to 7-day simulations of the Catalina Eddy event of 26--30 June 1988 by utilizing time-dependent lateral boundary conditions obtained from NMC`s global objective analysis as well as NMC`s MRF forecasts.

  4. Satellite-derived light extinction coefficient and its impact on thermal structure simulations in a 1-D lake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, Kiana; Duguay, Claude R.; Kheyrollah Pour, Homa

    2017-01-01

    A global constant value of the extinction coefficient (Kd) is usually specified in lake models to parameterize water clarity. This study aimed to improve the performance of the 1-D freshwater lake (FLake) model using satellite-derived Kd for Lake Erie. The CoastColour algorithm was applied to MERIS satellite imagery to estimate Kd. The constant (0.2 m-1) and satellite-derived Kd values as well as radiation fluxes and meteorological station observations were then used to run FLake for a meteorological station on Lake Erie. Results improved compared to using the constant Kd value (0.2 m-1). No significant improvement was found in FLake-simulated lake surface water temperature (LSWT) when Kd variations in time were considered using a monthly average. Therefore, results suggest that a time-independent, lake-specific, and constant satellite-derived Kd value can reproduce LSWT with sufficient accuracy for the Lake Erie station. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to assess the impact of various Kd values on the simulation outputs. Results show that FLake is sensitive to variations in Kd to estimate the thermal structure of Lake Erie. Dark waters result in warmer spring and colder fall temperatures compared to clear waters. Dark waters always produce colder mean water column temperature (MWCT) and lake bottom water temperature (LBWT), shallower mixed layer depth (MLD), longer ice cover duration, and thicker ice. The sensitivity of FLake to Kd variations was more pronounced in the simulation of MWCT, LBWT, and MLD. The model was particularly sensitive to Kd values below 0.5 m-1. This is the first study to assess the value of integrating Kd from the satellite-based CoastColour algorithm into the FLake model. Satellite-derived Kd is found to be a useful input parameter for simulations with FLake and possibly other lake models, and it has potential for applicability to other lakes where Kd is not commonly measured.

  5. Numerical simulations of interacting disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noguchi, Masafumi

    1990-01-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions have long attracted many extragalactic astronomers in various aspects. A number of computer simulations performed in the 1970s have successfully reproduced the peculiar morphologies observed in interacting disk galaxies and clarified that tidal deformation explains most of the observed global peculiarities. However, most of these simulations have used test particles in modelling the disk component. Tidal response of a self-gravitating disk remains to be further clarified. Another topic which is intensely discussed at present is the relation between galaxy-galaxy interactions and activity. Many observations suggest that interactions trigger strong starbursts and possibly active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, the detailed mechanism of triggering is not yet clear. It is vital here to understand the dynamics of interstellar gas. In order to understand various phenomena related to galaxy-galaxy interactions (mainly for disk galaxies), the author performed a series of numerical simulations on close galaxy encounters which includes both interstellar gas and self-gravitating disk components. In these simulations, the galaxy model to be perturbed (target galaxy) consists of a halo and a disk. The halo was treated as a rigid spherical gravitational field which is assumed to remain fixed during the interaction. The disk is composed of stars and gas. The stellar disk was constructed by 20000 collisionless particles of the same mass. Those particles move in the halo gravitational field, interacting with each other and with the perturber. Therefore, the self-graviy of the disk is properly taken into account. Stellar particles were initially given circular velocities with small random motions required to stabilize the disk against local axisymmetric disturbances. The gravitational field of the stellar disk was calculated by the particle-mesh scheme (e.g. Hockney and Eastwood 1981). The gaseous component was modelled by the cloud-particle scheme (e

  6. Numerical simulation of "an American haboob"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, A.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Andric, J.; Kumjian, M. R.; Djurdjevic, V.; Dacic, M.; Prasad, A. K.; El-Askary, H. M.; Paris, B. C.; Petkovic, S.; Nickovic, S.; Sprigg, W. A.

    2014-04-01

    A dust storm of fearful proportions hit Phoenix in the early evening hours of 5 July 2011. This storm, an American haboob, was predicted hours in advance because numerical, land-atmosphere modeling, computing power and remote sensing of dust events have improved greatly over the past decade. High-resolution numerical models are required for accurate simulation of the small scales of the haboob process, with high velocity surface winds produced by strong convection and severe downbursts. Dust productive areas in this region consist mainly of agricultural fields, with soil surfaces disturbed by plowing and tracks of land in the high Sonoran Desert laid barren by ongoing draught. Model simulation of the 5 July 2011 dust storm uses the coupled atmospheric-dust model NMME-DREAM (Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model on E grid, Janjic et al., 2001; Dust REgional Atmospheric Model, Nickovic et al., 2001; Pérez et al., 2006) with 4 km horizontal resolution. A mask of the potentially dust productive regions is obtained from the land cover and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The scope of this paper is validation of the dust model performance, and not use of the model as a tool to investigate mechanisms related to the storm. Results demonstrate the potential technical capacity and availability of the relevant data to build an operational system for dust storm forecasting as a part of a warning system. Model results are compared with radar and other satellite-based images and surface meteorological and PM10 observations. The atmospheric model successfully hindcasted the position of the front in space and time, with about 1 h late arrival in Phoenix. The dust model predicted the rapid uptake of dust and high values of dust concentration in the ensuing storm. South of Phoenix, over the closest source regions (~25 km), the model PM10 surface dust concentration reached ~2500 μg m-3, but

  7. Numerical simulation of "An American Haboob"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, A.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Andric, J.; Kumjian, M. R.; Djurdjevic, V.; Dacic, M.; Prasad, A. K.; El-Askary, H. M.; Paris, B. C.; Petkovic, S.; Nickovic, S.; Sprigg, W. A.

    2013-10-01

    A dust storm of fearful proportions hit Phoenix in the early evening hours of 5 July 2011. This storm, an American haboob, was predicted hours in advance because numerical, land-atmosphere modeling, computing power and remote sensing of dust events have improved greatly over the past decade. High resolution numerical models are required for accurate simulation of the small-scales of the haboob process, with high velocity surface winds produced by strong convection and severe downbursts. Dust productive areas in this region consist mainly of agricultural fields, with soil surfaces disturbed by plowing and tracks of land in the high Sonoran desert laid barren by ongoing draught. Model simulation of the 5 July 2011 dust storm uses the coupled atmospheric-dust model NMME-DREAM with 3.5 km horizontal resolution. A mask of the potentially dust productive regions is obtained from the land cover and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Model results are compared with radar and other satellite-based images and surface meteorological and PM10 observations. The atmospheric model successfully hindcasted the position of the front in space and time, with about 1 h late arrival in Phoenix. The dust model predicted the rapid uptake of dust and high values of dust concentration in the ensuing storm. South of Phoenix, over the closest source regions (~ 25 km), the model PM10 surface dust concentration reached ~ 2500 μg m-3, but underestimated the values measured by the PM10stations within the city. Model results are also validated by the MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD), employing deep blue (DB) algorithms for aerosol loadings. Model validation included Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), equipped with the lidar instrument, to disclose the vertical structure of dust aerosols as well as aerosol subtypes. Promising results encourage further research and

  8. The coupling of WEPP and 3ST1D numerical models for improved estimation of runoff and sediment yield at watershed scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the major problems in watershed hydrology is to accurately simulate the transport of water and sediment from their sources to the watershed outlet. Current numerical models have been extensively used to determine upland erosion, but their application is primarily limited to the field/hillslop...

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Rui; He, Ping

    2010-11-01

    Structural cell printing, i.e., printing three dimensional (3D) structures of cells held in a tissue matrix, is gaining significant attention in the biomedical community. The key idea is to use desktop printer or similar devices to print cells into 3D patterns with a resolution comparable to the size of mammalian cells, similar to that in living organs. Achieving such a resolution in vitro can lead to breakthroughs in areas such as organ transplantation and understanding of cell-cell interactions in truly 3D spaces. Although the feasibility of cell printing has been demonstrated in the recent years, the printing resolution and cell viability remain to be improved. In this work, we investigate one of the unit operations in cell printing, namely, the impact of a cell-laden droplet into a pool of highly viscous liquids using direct numerical simulations. The dynamics of droplet impact (e.g., crater formation and droplet spreading and penetration) and the evolution of cell shape and internal stress are quantified in details.

  10. The numerical simulation of subsonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.; Mitchum, Maria V.; Mook, Dean T.

    1987-01-01

    The present paper describes a numerical simulation of unsteady, subsonic aeroelastic responses. The technique accounts for aerodynamic nonlinearities associated with angles of attack, vortex-dominated flow, static deformations, and unsteady behavior. The fluid and the wing together are treated as a single dynamic system, and the equations of motion for the structure and flowfield are integrated simultaneously and interactively in the time domain. The method employs an iterative scheme based on a predictor-corrector technique. The aerodynamic loads are computed by the general unsteady vortex-lattice method and are determined simultaneously with the motion of the wing. Two models are used to demonstrate the technique: a rigid wing on an elastic support experiencing plunge and pitch about the elastic axis, and a continuous wing rigidly supported at the root chord experiencing spanwise bending and twisting. The time domain solution coupled with the unsteady vortex-lattice method provides the capability of graphically depicting wing and wake motion. Several graphs that illustrate the time domain behavior of the wing and wake are presented.

  11. Cloud interactions and merging - Numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.

    1984-01-01

    A total of 48 numerical experiments have been performed to study cloud interactions adn merging by means of a two-dimensional multi-cell model. Two soundings of deep convection during GATE and two different magnitudes of large-scale lifting have been used as the initial conditions and as the main forcing on the model. Over two hundred groups of cloud systems with a life history of over sixty minutes have been generated under the influence of different combinations of the stratification and large-scale lifting. The results demonstrate the increase in convective activity and in amount of precipitation with increased intensity of large-scale lifting. The results also show increased occurrence of cloud merger with increased intensity of large-scale lifting. The most unfavorable environmental conditions for cloud merging are (1) less unstable stratification of the atmosphere and (2) weaker large-scale lifting. A total of fourteen cloud systems qualify as mergers. Two selected cases will be described dynamically and thermodynamically in this paper. Although these cloud mergers have been simulated under the influence of different synoptic-scale conditions, the major physical mechanism related to the cloud merging process is the same as that proposed by Simpson. Cumulus downdrafts and associated cold outflows play a dominant role in the merging process in all cases studied.

  12. Numerical simulations of drainage flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, Thomas R.; Howard, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    Data collected by Viking Landers have shown that the meteorology of the near surface Martian environment is analogous to desertlike terrestrial conditions. Geological evidence such as dunes and frost streaks indicate that the surface wind is a potentially important factor in scouring of the martian landscape. In particular, the north polar basin shows erosional features that suggest katabatic wind convergence into broad valleys near the margin of the polar cap. The pattern of katabatic wind drainage off the north polar cap is similar to that observed on Earth over Antarctica or Greenland. The sensitivity is explored of Martian drainage flows to variations in terrain slope and diurnal heating using a numerical modeling approach. The model used is a 2-D sigma coordinate primitive equation system that has been used for simulations of Antarctic drainage flows. Prognostic equations include the flux forms of the horizontal scalar momentum equations, temperature, and continuity. Parameterization of both longwave (terrestrial) and shortwave (solar) radiation is included. Turbulent transfer of heat and momentum in the Martian atmosphere remains uncertain since relevant measurements are essentially nonexistent.

  13. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems.

  14. Numerical simulations of superluminous supernovae of type IIn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Audit, Edouard; Hillier, D. John

    2015-06-01

    We present numerical simulations that include 1D Eulerian multigroup radiation-hydrodynamics, 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer, and 2D polarized radiative transfer for superluminous interacting supernovae (SNe). Our reference model is a ˜10 M⊙ inner shell with 1051 erg ramming into an ˜3 M⊙ cold outer shell (the circumstellar medium, or CSM) that extends from 1015 to 2 × 1016 cm and moves at 100 km s-1. We discuss the light-curve evolution, which cannot be captured adequately with a grey approach. In this type of interactions, the shock-crossing time through the optically thick CSM is much longer than the photon diffusion time. Radiation is thus continuously leaking from the shock through the CSM. This configuration is distinct from the shell-shocked model. Our spectra redden with time, with a peak distribution in the near-UV during the first month gradually shifting to the optical range over the following year. Initially, Balmer lines exhibit a narrow line core and the broad line wings that are characteristic of electron scattering in the SNe IIn atmospheres (CSM). At later times, they also exhibit a broad blue-shifted component which arises from the cold dense shell. Our model results are broadly consistent with the bolometric light curve and spectral evolution observed for SN 2010jl. Invoking a prolate pole-to-equator density ratio in the CSM, we can also reproduce the ˜2 per cent continuum polarization, and line depolarization, observed in SN 2010jl. By varying the inner shell kinetic energy and the mass and extent of the outer shell, a large range of peak luminosities and durations, broadly compatible with superluminous SNe IIn like 2010jl or 2006gy, can be produced.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Merging Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettiger, Kurt; Loken, Chris; Burns, Jack O.

    1997-04-01

    We present results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of head-on mergers between two clusters of galaxies using a hybrid hydro/N-body code. In these simulations, the gaseous intracluster medium (ICM) is evolved as a massless fluid within a changing gravitational potential defined by the collisionless dark matter component. The ICM is represented by the equations of hydrodynamics which are solved by an Eulerian, finite-difference method. The cluster dark matter component is represented by the N-body particle distribution. A series of simulations have been conducted in which we have systematically varied the cluster-subcluster mass ratio between 8:1 and 1:1. We find that cluster-subcluster mergers result in an elongation of both the cluster dark matter and gas distributions. The dark matter distribution is elongated parallel to the merger axis and accompanied by anisotropy in the dark matter velocity dispersion. Both the elongation and corresponding velocity anisotropy are sustained for more than 5 Gyr after the merger. The elongation of the gas distribution is also generally along the merger axis, although shocks and adiabatic compressions produce elongations perpendicular to the merger axis at various times during the merger. We also find a significant offset between dark matter and gas centroids in the period following core passage. The gasdynamics is also severely affected by the cluster-subcluster merger. In these simulations, the subcluster enters the primary at supersonic speeds initiating bulk flows that can exceed 2000 km s-1. The width of the bulk flows are seen to range between several hundred kiloparsecs to nearly 1 Mpc. We believe the bulk flows can produce the bending of wide-angle tailed (WAT) radio sources. The most significant gasdynamics is seen to subside on timescales of 2 Gyr, although still significant dynamics is seen even after 5 Gyr. The merger-induced gasdynamics may also play a role in the formation of radio halo sources, and

  16. Numerical Simulation of Complex Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernobrovkin, A. A.; Lakshiminarayana, B.

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady, multiblock, Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes solver based on Runge-Kutta scheme and Pseudo-time step for turbo-machinery applications was developed. The code was validated and assessed against analytical and experimental data. It was used to study a variety of physical mechanisms of unsteady, three-dimensional, turbulent, transitional, and cooling flows in compressors and turbines. Flow over a cylinder has been used to study effects of numerical aspects on accuracy of prediction of wake decay and transition, and to modify K-epsilon models. The following simulations have been performed: (a) Unsteady flow in a compressor cascade: Three low Reynolds number turbulence models have been assessed and data compared with Euler/boundary layer predictions. Major flow features associated with wake induced transition were predicted and studied; (b) Nozzle wake-rotor interaction in a turbine: Results compared to LDV data in design and off-design conditions, and cause and effect of unsteady flow in turbine rotors were analyzed; (c) Flow in the low-pressure turbine: Assessed capability of the code to predict transitional, attached and separated flows at a wide range of low Reynolds numbers and inlet freestream turbulence intensity. Several turbulence and transition models have been employed and comparisons made to experiments; (d) leading edge film cooling at compound angle: Comparisons were made with experiments, and the flow physics of the associated vortical structures were studied; and (e) Tip leakage flow in a turbine. The physics of the secondary flow in a rotor was studied and sources of loss identified.

  17. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, W; Artinger, R; Kim, J I; Bryan, N D; Griffin, D

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parmeters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  18. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne Americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüßler, W.; Artinger, R.; Kim, J. I.; Bryan, N. D.; Griffin, D.

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parameters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  19. Geometry and Grid Modeling for Numerical Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    three dimensional spatial region (a mesh) is a prerequisite of most computer aided engineering ( CAE ) software, including computational structural...Parasolid Parasolid [13] is a commercial solid-modeling kernel. It serves as the basis for Unigraphics and several other CAD/CAM/ CAE packages. It is...As mentioned earlier, 1D and 2D arrays of standard data types are the most complex data type permitted. This method has the advantage of

  20. NUMERICAL NOISE PM SIMULATION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have found that numerical noise in the latest release of CMAQ using the yamo advection scheme when compiled on Linux cluster with pgf90 (5.0 or 6.0). We recommend to use -C option to eliminate the numerical noise.

  1. Numerical simulation of seasonal groundwater pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, Elena; Baldenkov, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    Increasing scarcity and contamination of water recourses require innovative water management strategies such as combined water system. The combined water system is a complex technology comprising two separate wells, major catchment-zone well and compensation pumping well, located inside a single stream basin. The major well is supplied by the well's catchment zone or surface flow, thus depleting the stream flow. The pumping rate of a major well is determined by the difference between the current stream flow and the minimum permissible stream flow. The deficiency of the stream flow in dry seasons can be compensated for by the short-term pumping of groundwater. The compensation pumping rate is determined by the difference between water demand and the permissible water withdrawal of the major well. The source for the compensation well is the aquifer storage. The estimation of streamflow depletion caused by compensation pumping is major question to evaluate the efficiency of the combined water system. Short-term groundwater pumping can use aquifer storage instead of catchment-zone water until the drawdown reaches the edge of the stream. Traditionally pumping simulation calculates in two-step procedure. Natural conditions, an aquifer system is in an approximate dynamic equilibrium, describe by steady-state model. A steady-state solution provides an initial heads, a set of flows through boundaries, and used as initial state for transient solutions, when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions estimates the capture and the streamflow depletion. Numerical modeling of cyclical compensation pumping has special features: the periodic solution, the seasonal changes through the boundaries and the importance even small drawdown of stream level. When seasonality is a modeling feature, traditional approach leads to mistaken values of

  2. Development of Pelton turbine using numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, K.; Patel, B.; Yadav, M.; Foggia, T.

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes recent research and development activities in the field of Pelton turbine design. Flow inside Pelton turbine is most complex due to multiphase (mixture of air and water) and free surface in nature. Numerical calculation is useful to understand flow physics as well as effect of geometry on flow. The optimized design is obtained using in-house special optimization loop. Either single phase or two phase unsteady numerical calculation could be performed. Numerical results are used to visualize the flow pattern in the water passage and to predict performance of Pelton turbine at full load as well as at part load. Model tests are conducted to determine performance of turbine and it shows good agreement with numerically predicted performance.

  3. Numerical Simulation Of Cutting Of Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Huston, Ronald L.; Mavriplis, Dimitrios

    1994-01-01

    Shapes of gear teeth produced by gear cutters of specified shape simulated computationally, according to approach based on principles of differential geometry. Results of computer simulation displayed as computer graphics and/or used in analyses of design, manufacturing, and performance of gears. Applicable to both standard and non-standard gear-tooth forms. Accelerates and facilitates analysis of alternative designs of gears and cutters. Simulation extended to study generation of surfaces other than gears. Applied to cams, bearings, and surfaces of arbitrary rolling elements as well as to gears. Possible to develop analogous procedures for simulating manufacture of skin surfaces like automobile fenders, airfoils, and ship hulls.

  4. The Analysis, Numerical Simulation, and Diagnosis of Extratropical Weather Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    respectively, and iv ) the numerical simulation and observational validation of high-spatial resolution (~10 km) numerical predictions. APPROACH My approach...satellite and targeted dropwindsonde observations; in collaboration with Xiaolie Zou (Fla. State Univ.), Chris Velden (Univ. Wisc ./CIMMS), and Arlin...Univ. Wisc .), and Arlin Krueger (NASA/GSFC). Analysis and numerical simulation of the fine-scale structure of upper-level jet streams from high- spatial

  5. Numerical Simulation of Two Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2001-01-01

    Two phase flows can be found in broad situations in nature, biology, and industry devices and can involve diverse and complex mechanisms. While the physical models may be specific for certain situations, the mathematical formulation and numerical treatment for solving the governing equations can be general. Hence, we will require information concerning each individual phase as needed in a single phase. but also the interactions between them. These interaction terms, however, pose additional numerical challenges because they are beyond the basis that we use to construct modern numerical schemes, namely the hyperbolicity of equations. Moreover, due to disparate differences in time scales, fluid compressibility and nonlinearity become acute, further complicating the numerical procedures. In this paper, we will show the ideas and procedure how the AUSM-family schemes are extended for solving two phase flows problems. Specifically, both phases are assumed in thermodynamic equilibrium, namely, the time scales involved in phase interactions are extremely short in comparison with those in fluid speeds and pressure fluctuations. Details of the numerical formulation and issues involved are discussed and the effectiveness of the method are demonstrated for several industrial examples.

  6. Numerical simulation of turbulent combustion: Scientific challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, ZhuYin; Lu, Zhen; Hou, LingYun; Lu, LiuYan

    2014-08-01

    Predictive simulation of engine combustion is key to understanding the underlying complicated physicochemical processes, improving engine performance, and reducing pollutant emissions. Critical issues as turbulence modeling, turbulence-chemistry interaction, and accommodation of detailed chemical kinetics in complex flows remain challenging and essential for high-fidelity combustion simulation. This paper reviews the current status of the state-of-the-art large eddy simulation (LES)/prob-ability density function (PDF)/detailed chemistry approach that can address the three challenging modelling issues. PDF as a subgrid model for LES is formulated and the hybrid mesh-particle method for LES/PDF simulations is described. Then the development need in micro-mixing models for the PDF simulations of turbulent premixed combustion is identified. Finally the different acceleration methods for detailed chemistry are reviewed and a combined strategy is proposed for further development.

  7. Numerical simulation of unsteady flow in a hypersonic shock tunnel facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Tokarcik, Susan; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the computational work performed on the simulation of a 16-in shock-tunnel facility. The numerical problems encountered during the computation of these flows are discussed along with the validity of some approximations used, notably concerning the reduction of the problem into problems of smaller dimensionality. Quasi-1D simulations can be used to help design experiments, or to better understanding the characteristics of the facility. An application to the design of a nonintrusive diagnostic is shown. The multidimensional flow transients computed include the shock reflection at the end of the driven tube, the shock propagation down the nozzle, and the breaking of the main diaphragm.

  8. Relationships between Th1 or Th2 iNKT Cell Activity and Structures of CD1d-Antigen Complexes: Meta-analysis of CD1d-Glycolipids Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Xavier; Renault, Nicolas; Farce, Amaury; Chavatte, Philippe; Hénon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A number of potentially bioactive molecules can be found in nature. In particular, marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds. The activity of an α-galactosylceramide was first discovered in 1993 via screening of a Japanese marine sponge (Agelas mauritanius). Very rapidly, a synthetic glycololipid analogue of this natural molecule was discovered, called KRN7000. Associated with the CD1d protein, this α-galactosylceramide 1 (KRN7000) interacts with the T-cell antigen receptor to form a ternary complex that yields T helper (Th) 1 and Th2 responses with opposing effects. In our work, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations (11.5 µs in total) involving eight different ligands (conducted in triplicate) in an effort to find out correlation at the molecular level, if any, between chemical modulation of 1 and the orientation of the known biological response, Th1 or Th2. Comparative investigations of human versus mouse and Th1 versus Th2 data have been carried out. A large set of analysis tools was employed including free energy landscapes. One major result is the identification of a specific conformational state of the sugar polar head, which could be correlated, in the present study, to the biological Th2 biased response. These theoretical tools provide a structural basis for predicting the very different dynamical behaviors of α-glycosphingolipids in CD1d and might aid in the future design of new analogues of 1. PMID:25376021

  9. Numerical simulation of in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1998-12-31

    Models that couple subsurface flow and transport with microbial processes are an important tool for assessing the effectiveness of bioremediation in field applications. A numerical algorithm is described that differs from previous in situ bioremediation models in that it includes: both vadose and groundwater zones, unsteady air and water flow, limited nutrients and airborne nutrients, toxicity, cometabolic kinetics, kinetic sorption, subgridscale averaging, pore clogging and protozoan grazing.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-03

    interest to the Air Force. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Numerical methods, Diffusion Flames, Adaptive Gridding, Velocity-Vorticity, Compact Methods 16...robust unst tions, and s ’ unstructur acobian, as g in 2012, th ploy a full convergenc ory-efficien potentially grid adapts , he computat...the multiple-scale discretizations are precomputed (each time the grid adapts ) to save CPU time later during residual formation, and that additional

  11. Numerical characteristics of quantum computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavskiy, A.; Khamitov, K.; Teplov, A.; Voevodin, V.; Voevodin, Vl.

    2016-12-01

    The simulation of quantum circuits is significantly important for the implementation of quantum information technologies. The main difficulty of such modeling is the exponential growth of dimensionality, thus the usage of modern high-performance parallel computations is relevant. As it is well known, arbitrary quantum computation in circuit model can be done by only single- and two-qubit gates, and we analyze the computational structure and properties of the simulation of such gates. We investigate the fact that the unique properties of quantum nature lead to the computational properties of the considered algorithms: the quantum parallelism make the simulation of quantum gates highly parallel, and on the other hand, quantum entanglement leads to the problem of computational locality during simulation. We use the methodology of the AlgoWiki project (algowiki-project.org) to analyze the algorithm. This methodology consists of theoretical (sequential and parallel complexity, macro structure, and visual informational graph) and experimental (locality and memory access, scalability and more specific dynamic characteristics) parts. Experimental part was made by using the petascale Lomonosov supercomputer (Moscow State University, Russia). We show that the simulation of quantum gates is a good base for the research and testing of the development methods for data intense parallel software, and considered methodology of the analysis can be successfully used for the improvement of the algorithms in quantum information science.

  12. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. A numerical simulation of auroral ionospheric electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation of auroral ionospheric electrodynamics in the altitude range 80 to 250 km has been developed. The routine will either simulate typical electron precipitation profiles or accept observed data. Using a model background ionosphere, ion production rates are calculated from which equilibrium electron densities and the Hall and Pedersen conductivities may be determined. With the specification of suitable boundary conditions, the entire three-dimensional current system and electric field may be calculated within the simulation region. The results of the application of the routine to a typical inverted-V precipitation profile are demonstrated. The routine is used to explore the observed anticorrelation between electric field magnitude and peak energy in the precipitating electron spectrum of an auroral arc.

  14. A Computing Cluster for Numerical Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-23

    34Contact and Friction for Cloth Animation", SIGGRAPH 2002, ACM TOG 21, 594-603 (2002). "* [BHTF] Bao, Z., Hong, J.-M., Teran , J. and Fedkiw, R...Simulation of Large Bodies of Water by Coupling Two and Three Dimensional Techniques", SIGGRAPH 2006, ACM TOG 25, 805-811 (2006). "* [ITF] Irving, G., Teran ...O’Brien (2006) "* [TSBNLF] Teran , J., Sifakis, E., Blemker, S., Ng Thow Hing, V., Lau, C. and Fedkiw, R., "Creating and Simulating Skeletal Muscle from the

  15. Numerical simulation of cross field amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.

    1990-01-01

    Cross field amplifiers (CFA) have been used in many applications where high power, high frequency microwaves are needed. Although these tubes have been manufactured for decades, theoretical analysis of their properties is not as highly developed as for other microwave devices such as klystrons. One feature distinguishing cross field amplifiers is that the operating current is produced by secondary emission from a cold cathode. This removes the need for a heater and enables the device to act as a switch tube, drawing no power until the rf drive is applied. However, this method of generating the current does complicate the simulation. We are developing a simulation model of cross field amplifiers using the PIC code CONDOR. We simulate an interaction region, one traveling wavelength long, with periodic boundary conditions. An electric field with the appropriate phase velocity is imposed on the upper boundary of the problem. Evaluation of the integral of E{center dot}J gives the power interchanged between the wave and the beam. Given the impedance of the structure, we then calculate the change in the traveling wave field. Thus we simulate the growth of the wave through the device. The main advance of our model over previous CFA simulations is the realistic tracking of absorption and secondary emission. The code uses experimental curves to calculate secondary production as a function of absorbed energy, with a theoretical expression for the angular dependence. We have used this code to model the 100 MW X-band CFA under construction at SLAC, as designed by Joseph Feinstein and Terry Lee. We are examining several questions of practical interest, such as the power and spectrum of absorbed electrons, the minimum traveling wave field needed to initiate spoke formation, and the variation of output power with dc voltage, anode-cathode gap, and magnetic field. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  17. A reduced-order model based on the coupled 1D-3D finite element simulations for an efficient analysis of hemodynamics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudah, Eduardo; Rossi, Riccardo; Idelsohn, Sergio; Oñate, Eugenio

    2014-10-01

    A reduced-order model for an efficient analysis of cardiovascular hemodynamics problems using multiscale approach is presented in this work. Starting from a patient-specific computational mesh obtained by medical imaging techniques, an analysis methodology based on a two-step automatic procedure is proposed. First a coupled 1D-3D Finite Element Simulation is performed and the results are used to adjust a reduced-order model of the 3D patient-specific area of interest. Then, this reduced-order model is coupled with the 1D model. In this way, three-dimensional effects are accounted for in the 1D model in a cost effective manner, allowing fast computation under different scenarios. The methodology proposed is validated using a patient-specific aortic coarctation model under rest and non-rest conditions.

  18. High order hybrid numerical simulations of two dimensional detonation waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In order to study multi-dimensional unstable detonation waves, a high order numerical scheme suitable for calculating the detailed transverse wave structures of multidimensional detonation waves was developed. The numerical algorithm uses a multi-domain approach so different numerical techniques can be applied for different components of detonation waves. The detonation waves are assumed to undergo an irreversible, unimolecular reaction A yields B. Several cases of unstable two dimensional detonation waves are simulated and detailed transverse wave interactions are documented. The numerical results show the importance of resolving the detonation front without excessive numerical viscosity in order to obtain the correct cellular patterns.

  19. Numerical simulation of vortex-wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ho; Lee, Duck-Joo

    1994-06-01

    Interactions between vortical flows and a solid surface cause one of the primary sources of noise and unsteady loading. The mechanism of the interaction is studied numerically for a single Rankine vortex impinging upon a wedge. An Euler-Lagrangian method is employed to calculate the unsteady, viscous, incompressible flows in two dimensions. A random vortex method is used to describe the vorticity dominant field. A fast vortex method is used to reduce the computational time in the calculation of the convection velocity of each vortex particle. A Schwarz-Christoffel transformation is used to map the numerical domain onto the physical domain. Vortex partical plots, velocity vectors, and streamlines are presented at selected times for both inviscid and viscous interactions. It is observed that the incident rankine vortex distorts and is split by the wedge as it nears and passes the wedge, and the vortices generated from the leading edge toward the underside of the wedge form into a single vortex. The vorticity orientation of the shed vortex is opposite to that of the incident vortex. It is found that the convection velocity of the shed vortex is changed wheen it comes off the leading edge of the wedge, and the strength of the shed vortex varies with the time during the vortex-wedge interaction. This strength variation is presumed to influence the shed vortex convection velocity. The overall features for the interaction agree well with the experimental results of Ziada and Rockwell.

  20. Representation of wells in numerical reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Renard, G.; Weill, L.

    1995-12-31

    In reservoir simulation, linear approximations are generally used for well modeling. However, this type of approximations can be inaccurate for fluid flow calculation in the vicinity of wells leading to incorrect well performance predictions. To overcome such problems, a new well representation has been proposed that uses a ``logarithmic`` type of approximation for vertical wells. In this paper, it is shown how the new well model can be easily implemented in existing simulator through the conventional PI. The relationship between wellbore pressure, wellblock pressure and flow rate is discussed in more detail, especially for the definition of wellblock pressure. Extension of the new approach to off-center wells and to flexible grids are both presented. Through this extension, the equivalence of various gridding techniques for the well model is emphasized. The key element is the accurate calculation of flow components in the vicinity of wells.

  1. Studying Spacecraft Charging via Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G. L.; Moulton, D.; Meierbachtol, C.; Svyatskiy, D.; Vernon, L.

    2015-12-01

    The electrical charging of spacecraft due to bombarding charged particles can affect their performance and operation. We study this charging using CPIC; a particle-in-cell code specifically designed for studying plasma-material interactions [1]. CPIC is based on multi-block curvilinear meshes, resulting in near-optimal computational performance while maintaining geometric accuracy. Relevant plasma parameters are imported from the SHIELDS framework (currently under development at LANL), which simulates geomagnetic storms and substorms in the Earth's magnetosphere. Simulated spacecraft charging results of representative Van Allen Probe geometries using these plasma parameters will be presented, along with an overview of the code. [1] G.L. Delzanno, E. Camporeale, J.D. Moulton, J.E. Borovsky, E.A. MacDonald, and M.F. Thomsen, "CPIC: A Curvilinear Particle-In-Cell Code for Plasma-Material Interaction Studies," IEEE Trans. Plas. Sci., 41 (12), 3577 (2013).

  2. Numerical Simulation of Ion Thruster Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K. (Technical Monitor); Farnell, Cody C.; Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional simulation code (ffx) designed to analyze ion thruster optics is described. It is an extension of an earlier code and includes special features like the ability to model a wide range of grid geometries, cusp details, and mis-aligned aperture pairs to name a few. However, the principle reason for advancing the code was in the study of ion optics erosion. Ground based testing of ion thruster optics, essential to the understanding of the processes of grid erosion, can be time consuming and costly. Simulation codes that can accurately predict grid lifetimes and the physical mechanisms of grid erosion can be of great utility in the development of future ion thruster optics designed for more ambitious applications. Results of simulations are presented that describe wear profiles for several standard and nonstandard aperture geometries, such as those grid sets with square- or slotted-hole layout patterns. The goal of this paper will be to introduce the methods employed in the ffx code and to briefly demonstrate their use.

  3. Classical MHD shocks: theory and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.

    2005-08-01

    Recent results are surveyed in the investigation of the behavior of shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and corresponding structures in dissipative/resistive plasma flows. In contrast to evolutionary shocks, a solution of the problem of the nonevolutionary shock interaction with small perturbations is either nonunique or does not exist. The peculiarity of non-ideal MHD is in that some nonevolutionary shocks have dissipative structures. Since this structure is always non-plane, it can reveal itself in problems where transverse perturbations do not exist due to symmetries restrictions. We discuss the numerical behavior of nonevolutionary shocks and argue that they necessarily disappear once the problem is solved in a genuinely three-dimensional statement.

  4. Vector Potential Generation for Numerical Relativity Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberman, Zachary; Faber, Joshua; Adams, Thomas; Etienne, Zachariah; Ruchlin, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Many different numerical codes are employed in studies of highly relativistic magnetized accretion flows around black holes. Based on the formalisms each uses, some codes evolve the magnetic field vector B, while others evolve the magnetic vector potential A, the two being related by the curl: B=curl(A). Here, we discuss how to generate vector potentials corresponding to specified magnetic fields on staggered grids, a surprisingly difficult task on finite cubic domains. The code we have developed solves this problem in two ways: a brute-force method, whose scaling is nearly linear in the number of grid cells, and a direct linear algebra approach. We discuss the success both algorithms have in generating smooth vector potential configurations and how both may be extended to more complicated cases involving multiple mesh-refinement levels. NSF ACI-1550436

  5. Numerical simulation of electrophoresis separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganjoo, D. K.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    A new Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation has been proposed for transient convection-diffusion problems. Most Petrov-Galerkin formulations take into account the spatial discretization, and the weighting functions so developed give satisfactory solutions for steady state problems. Though these schemes can be used for transient problems, there is scope for improvement. The schemes proposed here, which consider temporal as well as spatial discretization, provide improved solutions. Electrophoresis, which involves the motion of charged entities under the influence of an applied electric field, is governed by equations similiar to those encountered in fluid flow problems, i.e., transient convection-diffusion equations. Test problems are solved in electrophoresis and fluid flow. The results obtained are satisfactory. It is also expected that these schemes, suitably adapted, will improve the numerical solutions of the compressible Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations.

  6. Numerical simulation of ac plasma arc thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequnecy range of 10-10(exp 2) Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  7. Numerical Simulation of AC Plasma Arc Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequency range of 10-102 Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Transition in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    T∗∞=103.6K, flat plate. . . . . . . . . 139 6.1 Boundary layer edge Reynolds number as a function of downstream posi- tion for the computed baseflow...200 7.1 Computational domain used for Temporal Direct Numerical Simulations. 205 7.2 Comparison of base flow profiles at downstream location...the computational methods used for all direct numerical simulations (DNS) discussed in this report are presented. The results for a flat plate (Chapter

  9. Floret Test, Numerical Simulations of the Dent, Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Cutting, J.; Gagliardi, F.; Tarver, C.; Tran, T.

    2006-02-14

    The Floret test has been developed as a screening test to study the performance of a small amount of HE. Numerical simulations have been performed recently using CTH. The objective of this study is to perform numerical simulations in order to better understand the shock waves interactions, involved in the dent formation. Different 3D wedge configurations have been tested using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the HE receptor with Ls-Dyna.

  10. Numerical simulation of turbulent flows around airfoil and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, Yves P.

    1990-01-01

    During the last years the simulation of compressible viscous flows has received much attention. While the numerical methods were improved drastically, a satisfactory modeling of the Reynolds stresses is still missing. In this paper, after a short description of the numerical procedure used for solving the Reynolds equations, experiments with a promising simple turbulence model are discussed.

  11. The numerical simulation of multistage turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Beach, T. A.; Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; To, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The need to account for momentum and energy transport by the unsteady deterministic flow field in modeling the time-averaged flow state within a blade row passage embedded in a multistage compressor is assessed. It was found that, within the endwall regions, large-scale three-dimensional unsteady structures existed which caused significant transport of momentum and energy across the time-averaged stream surface of a stator flow field. These experiments confirmed that the tranport process is dominated by turbulent diffusion in the midspan region. A model was then proposed for simulating this transport process, and a limited study was undertaken to assess its validity.

  12. Numerical simulation of the SOFIA flowfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotz, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a concise summary of the contribution of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project at NASA Ames and presents results obtained from closed- and open-cavity SOFIA simulations. The aircraft platform is a Boeing 747SP and these are the first SOFIA simulations run with the aircraft empennage included in the geometry database. In the open-cavity run the telescope is mounted behind the wings. Results suggest that the cavity markedly influences the mean pressure distribution on empennage surfaces and that 110-140 decibel (db) sound pressure levels are typical in the cavity and on the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. A strong source of sound was found to exist on the rim of the open telescope cavity. The presence of this source suggests that additional design work needs to be performed in order to minimize the sound emanating from that location. A fluid dynamic analysis of the engine plumes is also contained in this report. The analysis was part of an effort to quantify the degradation of telescope performance resulting from the proximity of the port engine exhaust plumes to the open telescope bay.

  13. Numerical simulation of the SOFIA flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotz, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a concise summary of the contribution of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project at NASA Ames and presents results obtained from closed- and open-cavity SOFIA simulations. The aircraft platform is a Boeing 747SP and these are the first SOFIA simulations run with the aircraft empennage included in the geometry database. In the open-cavity runs the telescope is mounted behind the wings. Results suggest that the cavity markedly influences the mean pressure distribution on empennage surfaces and that 110-140 decibel (db) sound pressure levels are typical in the cavity and on the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. A strong source of sound was found to exist on the rim of the open telescope cavity. The presence of this source suggests that additional design work needs to be performed in order to minimize the sound emanating from that location. A fluid dynamic analysis of the engine plumes is also contained in this report. The analysis was part of an effort to quantify the degradation of telescope performance resulting from the proximity of the port engine exhaust plumes to the open telescope bay.

  14. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J.; Mann, I.

    2013-10-15

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  15. Numerical Simulations of the Mechanics of Vitrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ethan; Eldredge, Jeff; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Vitreous is the clear, gel-like substance that fills the cavity between the lens and retina in the eye. Treating certain eye abnormalities requires removing this substance using a minimally-invasive device called a vitreous cutter. Understanding the behavior of this viscoelastic biofluid during surgeries is essential to improving the effectiveness of the procedure. In this study, three-dimensional computational models of vitreous cutters are investigated using an immersed boundary method paired with a viscoelastic constitutive model. The solver uses a fractional-step method to satisfy continuity and traction boundary conditions to simulate the applied suction. The current work extends previous efforts to accurately model the rheological parameters measured by Sharif-Kashani et al. using the Giesekus constitutive equation [Retina, 2013]. The simulations were used to quantify both the average and time-varying flow rate through the device. Values for flow rate are compared with experimental results from Hubschman et al. [Retina, 2009]. Flow features associated with the cutting dynamics are of particular interest, as is the geometry of the cutter itself. These operational and design changes are a target for improving cutter efficacy while minimizing potential tissue damage.

  16. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2015-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic energy is being accumulated. However, still many questions are outstanding on the detailed mechanism of the ejection and observations continuously provide new data to interpret and put in the context. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. However, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities, thus, we need to compare equivalent quantities to test and improve our models. In our work, we intend to bridge the gap between models and observations with our model of flux rope ejection where we consistently describe the full life span of a flux rope from its formation to ejection. This is done by coupling the global non-linear force-free model (GNLFFF) built to describe the slow low- β formation phase, with a full MHD simulation run with the software MPI-AMRVAC, suitable to describe the fast MHD evolution of the flux rope ejection that happens in a heterogeneous β regime. We also explore the parameter space to identify the conditions upon which the ejection is favoured (gravity stratification and magnetic field intensity) and we produce synthesised AIA observations (171 Å and 211 Å). To carry this out, we run 3D MHD simulation in spherical coordinates where we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Our model of

  17. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Gap Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  18. Numerical simulation of synthesis gas incineration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, A. V.; Khaustov, S. A.; Tabakaev, R. B.; Belousova, Y. A.

    2016-04-01

    The authors have analysed the expediency of the suggested low-grade fuels application method. Thermal processing of solid raw materials in the gaseous fuel, called synthesis gas, is investigated. The technical challenges concerning the applicability of the existing gas equipment developed and extensively tested exclusively for natural gas were considered. For this purpose computer simulation of three-dimensional syngas-incinerating flame dynamics was performed by means of the ANSYS Multiphysics engineering software. The subjects of studying were: a three-dimensional aerodynamic flame structure, heat-release and temperature fields, a set of combustion properties: a flare range and the concentration distribution of burnout reagents. The obtained results were presented in the form of a time-averaged pathlines with color indexing. The obtained results can be used for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of complex multicomponent gas incineration singularities.

  19. Numerical simulation of the world ocean circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, K.; Mintz, Y.; Han, Y. J.

    1973-01-01

    A multi-level model, based on the primitive equations, is developed for simulating the temperature and velocity fields produced in the world ocean by differential heating and surface wind stress. The model ocean has constant depth, free slip at the lower boundary, and neglects momentum advection; so that there is no energy exchange between the barotropic and baroclinic components of the motion, although the former influences the latter through temperature advection. The ocean model was designed to be coupled to the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, for the study of the dynamics of climate and climate changes. But here, the model is tested by prescribing the observed seasonally varying surface wind stress and the incident solar radiation, the surface air temperature and humidity, cloudiness and the surface wind speed, which, together with the predicted ocean surface temperature, determine the surface flux of radiant energy, sensible heat and latent heat.

  20. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Preliminary study extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The production of an optimized design of key elements of the candidate facility was the primary objective of this report. This was accomplished by effort in the following tasks: (1) to further develop, optimize and describe the function description of the custom hardware; (2) to delineate trade off areas between performance, reliability, availability, serviceability, and programmability; (3) to develop metrics and models for validation of the candidate systems performance; (4) to conduct a functional simulation of the system design; (5) to perform a reliability analysis of the system design; and (6) to develop the software specifications to include a user level high level programming language, a correspondence between the programming language and instruction set and outline the operation system requirements.

  1. Numerical simulation of tides in Ontario Lacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, David; Karatekin, Ozgür

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbons liquid filled lakes has been recently detected on Titan's surface. Most of these lakes are located in the northern latitudes but there is a substantial lake in the southern latitudes: Ontario Lacus. This lake gets our attention because of possible shoreline changes suggested by Cassini flybys over Ontario Lacus between September 2005 (T7) et January 2010 (T65). The shoreline changes could be due to evaporation-precipitation processes but could also be a consequence of tides. Previous studies showed that the maximal tidal amplitudes of Ontario Lacus would be about 0.2m (for an uniform bathymetry of 20m). In this study we simulate tidal amplitude and currents with SLIM (Second-generation Louvain-la-Neuve Ice-ocean Model, http://sites.uclouvain.be/slim/ ) which resolves 2D shallow water equation on an unstructured mesh. Unstructured mesh prevents problems like mesh discontinuities at poles and allows higher accuracy at some place like coast or straits without drastically increasing computing costs. The tide generating force modeled in this work is the gradient of tidal potential due to titan's obliquity and titan's orbital eccentricity around Saturn (other contribution such as sun tide generating force are unheeded). The uncertain input parameters such as the wind direction and amplitude, bottom friction and thermo-physical properties of hydrocarbons liquids are varied within their expected ranges. SAR data analysis can result in different bathymetry according to the method. We proceed simulations for different bathymetries: tidal amplitudes doesn't change but this is not the case for tidal currents. Using a recent bathymetry deduced from most recent RADAR/SAR observations and a finer mesh, the peak-to peak tidal amplitudes are calculated to be up to 0.6 m. which is more than a factor two larger than the previous results. The maximal offshore tidal currents magnitude is about 0.06 m/s.

  2. Numerical simulation of pulsation processes in hydraulic turbine based on 3D model of cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, L. V.; Chirkov, D. V.; Cherny, S. G.; Pylev, I. M.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach was proposed for simulation of unsteady cavitating flow in the flow passage of a hydraulic power plant. 1D hydro-acoustics equations are solved in the penstock domain. 3D equations of turbulent flow of isothermal compressible liquid-vapor mixture are solved in the turbine domain. Cavitation is described by a transfer equation for liquid phase with a source term which is responsible for evaporation and condensation. The developed method was applied for simulation of pulsations in pressure, discharge, and total energy propagating along the flow conduit of the hydraulic power plant. Simulation results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment. The influence of key physical and numerical parameters like discharge, cavitation number, penstock length, time step, and vapor density on simulation results was studied.

  3. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit.

  4. Numerical simulation of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's crust, stress can be subdivided into tectonic background stress, overburden pressure, and pore-fluid pressure. The superposition of the first two and the variation of the third part are key factors in controlling movement along faults. Furthermore, stresses due to sedimentation and erosion contribute to the total stress field. In deglaciated regions, an additional stress must be considered: the rebound stress, which is related to rebounding of the crust and mantle after deglaciation. During the growth of a continental ice sheet, the lithosphere under the iceload is deformed and the removal of the ice load during deglaciation initiates a rebound process. The uplift is well known in formerly glaciated areas, e.g.North America and Scandinavia, and in currently deglaciating areas, e.g.Alaska, Antarctica, and Greenland. The whole process of subsiding and uplifting during the growth and melting of an iceload and all related phenomena is known as glacial isostatic adjustment. During the process of glaciation, the surface of the lithosphere is depressed underneath the ice load and compressional flexural stresses are induced in the upper lithosphere, whereas the bottom of the lithosphere experiences extensional flexural stresses; an additional vertical stress due to the ice load is present and it decreases to zero during deglaciation. During rebound, flexural stresses relax slowly. These stresses are able to change the original stress directions and regime.In this work we aim to study the effect of the GIA process in the context of petroleum engineering. The main aspect we will focus on is the mathematical and numerical modeling of the GIA including thermal effects. We plan also to include a preliminary study of the effect of the glacial erosion. All these phenomena are of paramount importance in petroleum engineering: for example some reservoir have been depleted due to tilting caused by both GIA, erosion and thermal effects.

  5. Numerical simulation of baroclinic Jovian vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achterberg, Richard K.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the evolution of baroclinic vortices in a time-dependent, nonlinear numerical model of a Jovian atmosphere. The model uses a normal-mode expansion in the vertical, using the barotropic and first two baroclinic modes. Results for the stability of baroclinic vortices on an f plane in the absence of a mean zonal flow are similar to results of Earth vortex models, although the presence of a fluid interior on the Jovian planets shifts the stability boundaries to smaller length scales. The presence of a barotropic mean zonal flow in the interior stabilizes vortices against instability and significantly modifies the finite amplitude form of baroclinic instabilities. The effect of a zonal flow on a form of barotropic instability produces periodic oscillations in the latitude and longitude of the vortex as observed at the level of the cloud tops. This instability may explain some, but not all, observations of longitudinal oscillations of vortices on the outer planets. Oscillations in aspect ratio and orientation of stable vortices in a zonal shear flow are observed in this baroclinic model, as in simpler two-dimensional models. Such oscillations are also observed in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Neptune. The meridional propagation and decay of vortices on a beta plane is inhibited by the presence of a mean zonal flow. The direction of propagation of a vortex relative to the mean zonal flow depends upon the sign of the meridional potential vorticity gradient; combined with observations of vortex drift rates, this may provide a constraint on model assumption for the flow in the deep interior of the Jovian planets.

  6. Numerical simulations of altocumulus with a cloud resolving model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Krueger, S.K.

    1996-04-01

    Altocumulus and altostratus clouds together cover approximately 22% of the earth`s surface. They play an important role in the earth`s energy budget through their effect on solar and infrared radiation. However, there has been little altocumulus cloud investigation by either modelers or observational programs. Starr and Cox (SC) (1985a,b) simulated an altostratus case as part of the same study in which they modeled a thin layer of cirrus. Although this calculation was originally described as representing altostratus, it probably better represents altocumulus stratiformis. In this paper, we simulate altocumulus cloud with a cloud resolving model (CRM). We simply describe the CRM first. We calculate the same middle-level cloud case as SC to compare our results with theirs. We will look at the role of cloud-scale processes in response to large-scale forcing. We will also discuss radiative effects by simulating diurnal and nocturnal cases. Finally, we discuss the utility of a 1D model by comparing 1D simulations and 2D simulations.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Asymmetric Mixing in Planar Shear Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    unsteady shear flows with periodic boundary conditions (Riley & Metcalfe 1980), or in previous simulations of the splitter-plate geometry using either...Soloukhin, AIMA. Riley, 3.3. & Metcalfe , R.W. 1980, Direct Numerical simulation or a Perturbed, Turbulent Mixing Layer, AIAA paper 80-02741, Pasadena

  8. Numerical simulation of aluminum extrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, T. J.; Muller, A.

    1995-04-01

    This presentation describes a research program directed towards the development of automated design procedures for aluminum extrusion technology. The objective is to eliminate costly trial and error by being able to simultaneously design the product, die, billet, and process (e.g.. extrusion temperatures and speeds, uniformizing metal flow, etc.), within constraints of feasibility, and satisfying objectives including, but not limited to, optimizing shape, surface finish, and properties of the product, processing costs, time to market, and full utilization of capabilities. The approach is based on the development of efficient and effective analysis of the whole processing system employing newly developed finite element solution technologies for complex, multi region, multiphysical behavior. Generalizations of these methodologies to include Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) mesh descriptions for nonlinear, elastic viscoplastic mechanical constitution equations will allow the faithful modeling of the metal flow within the die system and the accurate attainment of final shape upon exit. Automatic meshing and adaptive remeshing will insure efficient and accurate simulation of the entire forming process. New element technologies facilitating the use of general meshing procedures for difficult metal-forming processes involving a variety of kinematical constraints, such as incompressibility, contact, etc., are utilized. Feature based design methodologies, parametric modeling, and knowledge-based engineering techniques will constitute the fundamental methodologies for representing designs, managing the hierarchy of analysis models, performing model reduction and feature removal, and effectively utilizing design knowledge.

  9. Numerical simulation of the edge tone phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Liu, B. L.; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Time accurate Navier-Stokes computations were performed to study a class 2 (acoustic) whistle, the edge tone, and to gain knowledge of the vortex-acoustic coupling mechanisms driving production of these tones. Results were obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible air flow of a two dimensional jet issuing from a slit interacting with a wedge. Cases considered were determined by varying the distance from the slit to the wedge. Flow speed was kept constant at 1,750 cm/s as was the slit thickness of 0.1 cm, corresponding to conditions in the experiments of Brown. The analytical computations revealed edge tones to be present in four harmonic stages of jet flow instability over the wedge as the jet length was varied from 0.3 to 1.6 cm. Excellent agreement was obtained in all four edge tone stage cases between the present computational results and the experimentally obtained frequencies and flow visualization results of Brown. Specific edge tone generation phenomena and further confirmation of certain theories and empirical formulas concerning these phenomena were brought to light in this analytical simulation of edge tones.

  10. Numerical simulation of photoexcited polaron states in water

    SciTech Connect

    Zemlyanaya, E. V. Volokhova, A. V.; Amirkhanov, I. V.; Puzynin, I. V.; Puzynina, T. P.; Rikhvitskiy, V. S.; Lakhno, V. D.; Atanasova, P. Kh.

    2015-10-28

    We consider the dynamic polaron model of the hydrated electron state on the basis of a system of three nonlinear partial differential equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. A parallel numerical algorithm for the numerical solution of this system has been developed. Its effectiveness has been tested on a few multi-processor systems. A numerical simulation of the polaron states formation in water under the action of the ultraviolet range laser irradiation has been performed. The numerical results are shown to be in a reasonable agreement with experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  11. Numerical simulation of vortex pyrolysis reactors for condensable tar production from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical study is performed in order to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of vortex pyrolysis reactors used for condensable tar production from biomass. A detailed mathematical model of porous biomass particle pyrolysis is coupled with a compressible Reynolds stress transport model for the turbulent reactor swirling flow. An initial evaluation of particle dimensionality effects is made through comparisons of single- (1D) and multi-dimensional particle simulations and reveals that the 1D particle model results in conservative estimates for total pyrolysis conversion times and tar collection. The observed deviations are due predominantly to geometry effects while directional effects from thermal conductivity and permeability variations are relatively small. Rapid ablative particle heating rates are attributed to a mechanical fragmentation of the biomass particles that is modeled using a critical porosity for matrix breakup. Optimal thermal conditions for tar production are observed for 900 K. Effects of biomass identity, particle size distribution, and reactor geometry and scale are discussed.

  12. Sensitivity testing of a 1-D calving criterion numerical model constrained by observations of post-LIA fluctuations of Kangiata Nunaata Sermia, SW Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, J. M.; Mair, D.; Nick, F. M.; Rea, B. R.; Schofield, E.; Nienow, P. W.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to successfully model the behaviour of Greenlandic tidewater glaciers is pivotal for the prediction of future behaviour and potential impact on global sea level. However, to have confidence in the results of numerical models, they must be capable of replicating the full range of observed glacier behaviour (i.e. both advance and retreat) when realistic forcings are applied. Due to the paucity of observational records recording this behaviour, it is therefore necessary to verify calving models against reconstructions of glacier dynamics. The dynamics of Kangiata Nunaata Sermia (KNS) can be reconstructed with a high degree of detail using a combination of sedimentological and geomorphological evidence, photographs, historical sources and satellite imagery. Since the LIA-maximum KNS has retreated a total of 21 km with multiple phases of rapid retreat evident between topographic pinning points. A readvance attaining a position 9 km from the current terminus associated with the '1920 stade' is also identified. KNS therefore represents an ideal test location for calving models since it has both advanced and retreated over known timescales, while the scale of fluctuations implies KNS is sensitive to parameter(s) controlling terminus stability. Using the known stable positions for verification, we present the results of an array of sensitivity tests conducted on KNS using the 1-D flowband calving model of Nick et al (2009). The model is initially tuned to an historically stable position where the glacier configuration is accurately known (in this case 1985), and forced by varying surface mass balance, crevasse water depth, submarine melt rate at the calving front, in addition to the strength and pervasiveness of sikussak in the fjord. Successive series of experiments were run using each parameter to test model sensitivity to the initial conditions of each variable. Results indicate that the model is capable of stabilising at locations that are in agreement with

  13. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, N. R.; Bergman, R. O.; Bonstrom, D. B.; Brinkman, T. W.; Chiu, S. H. J.; Green, S. S.; Hansen, S. D.; Klein, D. L.; Krohn, H. E.; Prow, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) was designed for the simulation of fluid flow around three-dimensional bodies, both in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The application of numerical simulation to this field of endeavor promised to yield economies in aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. A model for a NASF/FMP (Flow Model Processor) ensemble using a possible approach to meeting NASF goals is presented. The computer hardware and software are presented, along with the entire design and performance analysis and evaluation.

  14. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation to Mud Turbine for LWD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaojiang; Dong, Jingxin; Shang, Jie; Zhang, Guanqi

    Hydraulic performance analysis was discussed for a type of turbine on generator used for LWD. The simulation models were built by CFD analysis software FINE/Turbo, and full three-dimensional numerical simulation was carried out for impeller group. The hydraulic parameter such as power, speed and pressure drop, were calculated in two kinds of medium water and mud. Experiment was built in water environment. The error of numerical simulation was less than 6%, verified by experiment. Based on this rationalization proposals would be given to choice appropriate impellers, and the rationalization of methods would be explored.

  15. Numerical simulation of porosity-free titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this research was to analyse, predict and control the porosity in titanium dental castings by the use of numerical simulation. A commercial software package (MAGMASOFT) was used. In the first part of the study, a model casting (two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar) was simulated to analyse shrinkage porosity. Secondly, gas pores were numerically examined by means of a ball specimen with a "snake" sprue. The numerical simulation results were compared with the experimental casting results, which were made on a centrifugal casting machine. The predicted shrinkage levels coincided well with the experimentally determined levels. Based on the above numerical analyses, an optimised running and gating system design for the crown model was proposed. The numerical filling and solidification results of the ball specimen showed that this simulation model could be helpful for the explanation of the experimentally indicated gas pores. It was concluded that shrinkage porosity in titanium dental casting was predictable, and it could be minimised by improving the running and gating system design. Entrapped gas pores can be explained from the simulation results of the mould filling and solidification.

  16. Numerical Simulation of SNCR Technology with Simplified Chemical Kinetics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blejchař, T.; Dolníčková, D.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with numerical simulation of SNCR method. For numerical modelling was used CFD code Ansys/CFX. SNCR method was described by dominant chemical reaction, which were look up NIST Chemical database. The reactions including reduction of NOx and concentration change of pollutants, like N2O and CO in flue gas too. Proposed chemical kinetics and CFD model was applied to two boilers. Both simulations were compared with experimental measurements. First simulation was used to validation of chemical mechanism. Second simulation was based on first simulation and it was used to verification of compiled SNCR chemical mechanism. Next the new variant of the reagent penetration lance was proposed and compared with the original variants.

  17. Numerical simulation of wave propagation in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Padilla, F; Bossy, E; Haiat, G; Jenson, F; Laugier, P

    2006-12-22

    Numerical simulation of wave propagation is performed through 31 3D volumes of trabecular bone. These volumes were reconstructed from high synchrotron microtomography experiments and are used as the input geometry in a simulation software developed in our laboratory. The simulation algorithm accounts for propagation into both the saturating fluid and bone but absorption is not taken into account. We show that 3D simulation predicts phenomena observed experimentally in trabecular bones : linear frequency dependence of attenuation, increase of attenuation and speed of sound with the bone volume fraction, negative phase velocity dispersion in most of the specimens, propagation of fast and slow wave depending on the orientation of the trabecular network compared to the direction of propagation of the ultrasound. Moreover, the predicted attenuation is in very close agreement with the experimental one measured on the same specimens. Coupling numerical simulation with real bone architecture therefore provides a powerful tool to investigate the physics of ultrasound propagation in trabecular structures.

  18. Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

  19. Compressible Turbulent Flow Numerical Simulations of Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatami, F.; van der Weide, E.; Hoeijmakers, H.

    2015-12-01

    For an elliptic Arndt's hydrofoil numerical simulations of vortex cavitation are presented. An equilibrium cavitation model is employed. This single-fluid model assumes local thermodynamic and mechanical equilibrium in the mixture region of the flow, is employed. Furthermore, for characterizing the thermodynamic state of the system, precomputed multiphase thermodynamic tables containing data for the appropriate equations of state for each of the phases are used and a fast, accurate, and efficient look-up approach is employed for interpolating the data. The numerical simulations are carried out using the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations for compressible flow. The URANS equations of motion are discretized using an finite volume method for unstructured grids. The numerical simulations clearly show the formation of the tip vortex cavitation in the flow about the elliptic hydrofoil.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flames using Vortex Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-05

    layer," Phys. Fluids , 30, pp. 706-721, 1987. (11) Ghoniem, A.F., and Knio, O.M., "Numerical Simulation of Flame Propagation in Constant Volume Chambers...1985. 4. "Numerical solution of a confined shear layer using vortex methods," The International Symposium on Computational Fluid Dynamics, Tokyo...Symposium on Computational Fluid Dynamics, Tokyo, Japan, September 1985. 8. "Application of Computational Methods in Turbulent Reacting Flow

  1. Study on the numerical schemes for hypersonic flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagdewe, S. P.; Shevare, G. R.; Kim, Heuy-Dong

    2009-10-01

    Hypersonic flow is full of complex physical and chemical processes, hence its investigation needs careful analysis of existing schemes and choosing a suitable scheme or designing a brand new scheme. The present study deals with two numerical schemes Harten, Lax, and van Leer with Contact (HLLC) and advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) to effectively simulate hypersonic flow fields, and accurately predict shock waves with minimal diffusion. In present computations, hypersonic flows have been modeled as a system of hyperbolic equations with one additional equation for non-equilibrium energy and relaxing source terms. Real gas effects, which appear typically in hypersonic flows, have been simulated through energy relaxation method. HLLC and AUSM methods are modified to incorporate the conservation laws for non-equilibrium energy. Numerical implementation have shown that non-equilibrium energy convect with mass, and hence has no bearing on the basic numerical scheme. The numerical simulation carried out shows good comparison with experimental data available in literature. Both numerical schemes have shown identical results at equilibrium. Present study has demonstrated that real gas effects in hypersonic flows can be modeled through energy relaxation method along with either AUSM or HLLC numerical scheme.

  2. Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-05-01

    Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure processes in solid continua using Lagrangian finite element techniques is the subject of discussion in this investigation. The specific configurations in this study include penetration of steel projectiles into aluminum blocks and concrete slabs. The failure mode in the aluminum block is excessive deformation while the concrete slab fails by hole growth, spallation, and scabbing. The transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA2D was used for the numerical analysis. The erosion capability in LS-DYNA2D was exercised to carry out the fracture and failure simulations. Calculated results were compared to the experimental data. Good correlations were obtained.

  3. Preface to advances in numerical simulation of plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott E.; Chacon, Luis

    2016-10-01

    This Journal of Computational Physics Special Issue, titled "Advances in Numerical Simulation of Plasmas," presents a snapshot of the international state of the art in the field of computational plasma physics. The articles herein are a subset of the topics presented as invited talks at the 24th International Conference on the Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (ICNSP), August 12-14, 2015 in Golden, Colorado. The choice of papers was highly selective. The ICNSP is held every other year and is the premier scientific meeting in the field of computational plasma physics.

  4. Numerical simulation of tornado wind loading on structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a tornado interacting with a building was undertaken in order to compare the pressures due to a rotational unsteady wind with that due to steady straight winds used in design of nuclear facilities. The numerical simulations were performed on a two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics code. Calculated pressure profiles for a typical building were then subjected to a tornado wind field and the results were compared with current quasisteady design calculations. The analysis indicates that current design practices are conservative.

  5. Numerical simulation of wall-bounded turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in three dimensional, time dependent numerical simulation of turbulent flows bounded by a wall are reviewed. Both direct and large eddy simulation techniques are considered within the same computational framework. The computational spatial grid requirements as dictated by the known structure of turbulent boundary layers are presented. The numerical methods currently in use are reviewed and some of the features of these algorithms, including spatial differencing and accuracy, time advancement, and data management are discussed. A selection of the results of the recent calculations of turbulent channel flow, including the effects of system rotation and transpiration on the flow are included. Previously announced in STAR as N82-28577

  6. Numerical simulation of wall-bounded turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in three dimensional, time dependent numerical simulation of turbulent flows bounded by a wall are reviewed. Both direct and large eddy simulation techniques are considered within the same computational framework. The computational spatial grid requirements as dictated by the known structure of turbulent boundary layers are presented. The numerical methods currently in use are reviewed and some of the features of these algorithms, including spatial differencing and accuracy, time advancement, and data management are discussed. A selection of the results of the recent calculations of turbulent channel flow, including the effects of system rotation and transpiration on the flow are included.

  7. Numerical simulation of transition in wall-bounded shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiser, Leonhard; Zang, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    The current status of numerical simulation techniques for the transition to turbulence in incompressible channel and boundary-layer flows is surveyed, and typical results are presented graphically. The focus is on direct numerical simulations based on the full nonlinear time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations without empirical closure assumptions for prescribed initial and boundary conditions. Topics addressed include the vibrating ribbon problem, space and time discretization, initial and boundary conditions, alternative methods based on the triple-deck approximation, two-dimensional channel and boundary-layer flows, three-dimensional boundary layers, wave packets and turbulent spots, compressible flows, transition control, and transition modeling.

  8. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  9. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations.

  10. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  11. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive finger convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Vacher, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid finite element, integrated finite difference numerical model is developed for the simulation of double-diffusive and multicomponent flow in two and three dimensions. The model is based on a multidimensional, density-dependent, saturated-unsaturated transport model (SUTRA), which uses one governing equation for fluid flow and another for solute transport. The solute-transport equation is applied sequentially to each simulated species. Density coupling of the flow and solute-transport equations is accounted for and handled using a sequential implicit Picard iterative scheme. High-resolution data from a double-diffusive Hele-Shaw experiment, initially in a density-stable configuration, is used to verify the numerical model. The temporal and spatial evolution of simulated double-diffusive convection is in good agreement with experimental results. Numerical results are very sensitive to discretization and correspond closest to experimental results when element sizes adequately define the spatial resolution of observed fingering. Numerical results also indicate that differences in the molecular diffusivity of sodium chloride and the dye used to visualize experimental sodium chloride concentrations are significant and cause inaccurate mapping of sodium chloride concentrations by the dye, especially at late times. As a result of reduced diffusion, simulated dye fingers are better defined than simulated sodium chloride fingers and exhibit more vertical mass transfer. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  13. Numerical Simulations of the Digital Microfluidic Manipulation of Single Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chuanjin; Pal, Souvik; Li, Zhen; Ma, Yanbao

    2015-09-08

    Single-cell analysis techniques have been developed as a valuable bioanalytical tool for elucidating cellular heterogeneity at genomic, proteomic, and cellular levels. Cell manipulation is an indispensable process for single-cell analysis. Digital microfluidics (DMF) is an important platform for conducting cell manipulation and single-cell analysis in a high-throughput fashion. However, the manipulation of single cells in DMF has not been quantitatively studied so far. In this article, we investigate the interaction of a single microparticle with a liquid droplet on a flat substrate using numerical simulations. The droplet is driven by capillary force generated from the wettability gradient of the substrate. Considering the Brownian motion of microparticles, we utilize many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD), an off-lattice mesoscopic simulation technique, in this numerical study. The manipulation processes (including pickup, transport, and drop-off) of a single microparticle with a liquid droplet are simulated. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects on the manipulation processes from the droplet size, wettability gradient, wetting properties of the microparticle, and particle-substrate friction coefficients. The numerical results show that the pickup, transport, and drop-off processes can be precisely controlled by these parameters. On the basis of the numerical results, a trap-free delivery of a hydrophobic microparticle to a destination on the substrate is demonstrated in the numerical simulations. The numerical results not only provide a fundamental understanding of interactions among the microparticle, the droplet, and the substrate but also demonstrate a new technique for the trap-free immobilization of single hydrophobic microparticles in the DMF design. Finally, our numerical method also provides a powerful design and optimization tool for the manipulation of microparticles in DMF systems.

  14. GPU Accelerated Numerical Simulation of Viscous Flow Down a Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gygax, Remo; Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yuri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations are an effective tool in natural risk analysis. They are useful to determine the propagation and the runout distance of gravity driven movements such as debris flows or landslides. To evaluate these processes an approach on analogue laboratory experiments and a GPU accelerated numerical simulation of the flow of a viscous liquid down an inclined slope is considered. The physical processes underlying large gravity driven flows share certain aspects with the propagation of debris mass in a rockslide and the spreading of water waves. Several studies have shown that the numerical implementation of the physical processes of viscous flow produce a good fit with the observation of experiments in laboratory in both a quantitative and a qualitative way. When considering a process that is this far explored we can concentrate on its numerical transcription and the application of the code in a GPU accelerated environment to obtain a 3D simulation. The objective of providing a numerical solution in high resolution by NVIDIA-CUDA GPU parallel processing is to increase the speed of the simulation and the accuracy on the prediction. The main goal is to write an easily adaptable and as short as possible code on the widely used platform MATLAB, which will be translated to C-CUDA to achieve higher resolution and processing speed while running on a NVIDIA graphics card cluster. The numerical model, based on the finite difference scheme, is compared to analogue laboratory experiments. This way our numerical model parameters are adjusted to reproduce the effective movements observed by high-speed camera acquisitions during the laboratory experiments.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of compressible free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lele, Sanjiva K.

    1989-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of compressible free shear layers in open domains are conducted. Compact finite-difference schemes of spectral-like accuracy are used for the simulations. Both temporally-growing and spatially-growing mixing layers are studied. The effect of intrinsic compressibility on the evolution of vortices is studied. The use of convective Mach number is validated. Details of vortex roll up and pairing are studied. Acoustic radiation from vortex roll up, pairing and shape oscillations is studied and quantified.

  16. Numerical simulation of piezoelectric effect of bone under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    The piezoelectric effect of bone under ultrasound irradiation was numerically simulated using an elastic finite-difference time-domain method with piezoelectric constitutive equations (PE-FDTD method). First, to demonstrate the validity of the PE-FDTD method, the ultrasound propagation in piezoelectric ceramics was simulated and then compared with the experimental results. The simulated and experimental waveforms propagating through the ceramics were in good agreement. Next, the piezoelectric effect of human cortical bone on the ultrasound propagation was investigated by PE-FDTD simulation. The simulated result showed that the difference between the waveforms propagating through the bone without and with piezoelectricity was negligible. Finally, the spatial distributions of the electric fields in a human femur induced by ultrasound irradiation were simulated. The electric fields were changed by a bone fracture, which depended on piezoelectric anisotropy. In conclusion, the PE-FDTD method is considered to be useful for investigating the piezoelectric effect of bone.

  17. Data of the recombination loss mechanisms analysis on Al2O3 PERC cell using PC1D and PC2D simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haibing; Lv, Jun; Bao, Yameng; Xuan, Rongwei; Sun, Shenghua; Sneck, Sami; Li, Shuo; Modanese, Chiara; Savin, Hele; Wang, Aihua; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-04-01

    This data article is related to our recently published article ('20.8% industrial PERC solar cell: ALD Al2O3 rear surface passivation, efficiency loss mechanisms analysis and roadmap to 24%', Huang et al., 2017 [1]) where we have presented a systematic evaluation of the overall cell processing and a cost-efficient industrial roadmap for PERC cells. Aside from the information already presented in Huang et al., 2017 [1], here we provide data related to Sectin 3 in Huang et al., 2017 [1] concerning the analysis of the recombination losses׳ mechanisms by PC1D V5.9 and PC2D simulations (Clugston and Basore, 1997, Basore and Cabanas-Holmen, 2011, Cabanas-Holmen and Basore, 2012 and Cabanas-Holmen and Basore, 2012.) [2], [3], [4], [5] on our current industrial Al2O3 PERC cell. The data include: i) PC2D simulations on J02, ii) the calculation of series resistance and back surface recombination velocity (BSRV) on the rear side metallization of PERC cell for the case of a point contact, and iii) the PC1D simulation on the cumulative photo-generation and recombination along the distance from the front surface. Finally, the roadmap of the solar cell efficiency for an industrial PERC technology up to 24% is presented, with the aim of providing a potential guideline for industrial researchers.

  18. Can numerical simulations accurately predict hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid films?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; Charogiannis, Alexandros; Pradas, Marc; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Markides, Christos N.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid film flows is an active field of research in fluid dynamics and non-linear science in general. Numerical simulations offer a powerful tool to study hydrodynamic instabilities in film flows and can provide deep insights into the underlying physical phenomena. However, the direct comparison of numerical results and experimental results is often hampered by several reasons. For instance, in numerical simulations the interface representation is problematic and the governing equations and boundary conditions may be oversimplified, whereas in experiments it is often difficult to extract accurate information on the fluid and its behavior, e.g. determine the fluid properties when the liquid contains particles for PIV measurements. In this contribution we present the latest results of our on-going, extensive study on hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid film flows, which includes direct numerical simulations, low-dimensional modelling as well as experiments. The major focus is on wave regimes, wave height and wave celerity as a function of Reynolds number and forcing frequency of a falling liquid film. Specific attention is paid to the differences in numerical and experimental results and the reasons for these differences. The authors are grateful to the EPSRC for their financial support (Grant EP/K008595/1).

  19. A review of numerical simulation of hydrothermal systems.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Many advances in simulating single and two-phase fluid flow and heat transport in porous media have recently been made in conjunction with geothermal energy research. These numerical models reproduce system thermal and pressure behaviour and can be used for other heat-transport problems, such as high-level radioactive waste disposal and heat-storage projects. -Authors

  20. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  1. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility preliminary study: Executive study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computing system was designed with the capability of providing an effective throughput of one billion floating point operations per second for three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes. The methodology used in defining the baseline design, and the major elements of the numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are described.

  2. Numerical simulation and experimental observations of initial friction transients

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, D.A.; Weingarten, L.I.; Dawson, D.B.

    1995-07-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the sliding frictional behavior between metals under relatively high shear and normal forces. Microstructural analyses were done to estimate local near-surface stress and strain gradients. The numerical simulation of the observed frictional behavior was based on a constitutive model that uses a state variable approach.

  3. Numerical Simulation of the Perrin-Like Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Zygmunt; Grech, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    A simple model of the random Brownian walk of a spherical mesoscopic particle in viscous liquids is proposed. The model can be solved analytically and simulated numerically. The analytic solution gives the known Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion law r[superscript 2] = 2Dt, where the diffusion constant D is expressed by the mass and geometry of a…

  4. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  5. Numerical simulation and experimental progress on plasma window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Z.; Zhu, K.; Huang, S.; Lu, Y. R.; Shi, B. L.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a numerical 2D FLUENT-based magneto-hydrodynamic simulation on 3mm plasma window using argon, taken as a windowless vacuum device, was developed. The gas inlet, arc creation and developing and plasma expansion segments are all contained in this model. In the axis-symmetry cathode structure, a set of parameters including pressure, temperature, velocity and current distribution were obtained and discussed. The fluid dynamics of plasma in cavities with different shapes was researched. Corresponding experiments was carried out and the result agrees well to the numerical simulation. The validity of sealing ability of plasma window has been verified. Relevant further research upon deuteron gas as neutron production target is to be continued, considering larger diameter plasma window experimentally and numerically.

  6. Numeric Modified Adomian Decomposition Method for Power System Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Simunovic, Srdjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of numeric Wazwaz El Sayed modified Adomian Decomposition Method (WES-ADM) for time domain simulation of power systems. WESADM is a numerical method based on a modified Adomian decomposition (ADM) technique. WES-ADM is a numerical approximation method for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The non-linear terms in the differential equations are approximated using Adomian polynomials. In this paper WES-ADM is applied to time domain simulations of multimachine power systems. WECC 3-generator, 9-bus system and IEEE 10-generator, 39-bus system have been used to test the applicability of the approach. Several fault scenarios have been tested. It has been found that the proposed approach is faster than the trapezoidal method with comparable accuracy.

  7. Effects of various types of molecular dynamics on 1D and 2D (2)H NMR studied by random walk simulations

    PubMed

    Vogel; Rossler

    2000-11-01

    By carrying out random walk simulations we systematically study the effects of various types of complex molecular dynamics on (2)H NMR experiments in solids. More precisely, we calculate one-dimensional (1D) (2)H NMR spectra and the results of two dimensional (2D) (2)H NMR experiments in time domain, taking into account isotropic as well as highly restricted motions which involve rotational jumps about different finite angles. Although the dynamical models are chosen to mimic the primary and secondary relaxation in supercooled liquids and glasses, we do not intend to describe experimental results quantitatively but rather to show general effects appearing for complex reorientations. We carefully investigate whether 2D (2)H NMR in time domain, which was originally designed to measure correlation times of ultraslow motions (tau >/= 1 ms), can be used to obtain shorter tau, too. It is demonstrated that an extension of the time window to tau >/= 10 &mgr;s is possible when dealing with exponential relaxation, but that it will fail if there is a distribution of correlation times G(lgtau). Vice versa, we show that 1D (2)H NMR spectra, usually recorded to look at dynamics with tau in the microsecond regime, are also applicable for studying ultraslow motions provided that the loss of correlation is achieved step by step. Therefore, it is useful to carry out 1D and 2D NMR experiments simultaneously in order to reveal the mechanism of complex molecular motions. In addition, we demonstrate that highly restricted dynamics can be clearly observed in 1D spectra and in 2D NMR in time domain if long solid-echo delays and large evolution times are applied, respectively. Finally, unexpected observations are described which appear in the latter experiment when considering very broad distributions G(lgtau). Because of these effects, time scale and geometry of a considered motion cannot be extracted from a straightforward analysis of experimental results. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Understanding casing flow in Pelton turbines by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentschler, M.; Neuhauser, M.; Marongiu, J. C.; Parkinson, E.

    2016-11-01

    For rehabilitation projects of Pelton turbines, the flow in the casing may have an important influence on the overall performance of the machine. Water sheets returning on the jets or on the runner significantly reduce efficiency, and run-away speed depends on the flow in the casing. CFD simulations can provide a detailed insight into this type of flow, but these simulations are computationally intensive. As in general the volume of water in a Pelton turbine is small compared to the complete volume of the turbine housing, a single phase simulation greatly reduces the complexity of the simulation. In the present work a numerical tool based on the SPH-ALE meshless method is used to simulate the casing flow in a Pelton turbine. Using improved order schemes reduces the numerical viscosity. This is necessary to resolve the flow in the jet and on the casing wall, where the velocity differs by two orders of magnitude. The results are compared to flow visualizations and measurement in a hydraulic laboratory. Several rehabilitation projects proved the added value of understanding the flow in the Pelton casing. The flow simulation helps designing casing insert, not only to see their influence on the flow, but also to calculate the stress in the inserts. In some projects, the casing simulation leads to the understanding of unexpected behavior of the flow. One such example is presented where the backsplash of a deflector hit the runner, creating a reversed rotation of the runner.

  9. Numerical simulation of premixed H2-air cellular tubular flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Carl Alan; Wendell Pitz, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The detailed flame structure of laminar premixed cellular flames in the tubular domain is simulated in 2D using a fully-implicit primitive variable finite difference formulation that includes multicomponent transport and detailed chemical kinetics. Numerical results for H2/air flames are presented and compared against spatially resolved experimental measurements of temperature and chemical species including atomic H and OH. The experimental results compare well for flame structure and cell number, despite the numerical model under-predicting the peak temperature by 200 K. Numerical experiments were performed to assess the ability for cellular tubular flames to impact experimental and numerical investigations of practical flames. The cellular flame structure is found to provide a highly sensitive geometry that is useful for validating diffusive transport modelling approximations. This capability is exemplified through the development of a simple and accurate approximation for thermal diffusion (i.e. the Soret effect) that is suitable for practical combustion codes.

  10. Collapse of a Liquid Column: Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruchaga, Marcela A.; Celentano, Diego J.; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2007-03-01

    This paper is focused on the numerical and experimental analyses of the collapse of a liquid column. The measurements of the interface position in a set of experiments carried out with shampoo and water for two different initial column aspect ratios are presented together with the corresponding numerical predictions. The experimental procedure was found to provide acceptable recurrence in the observation of the interface evolution. Basic models describing some of the relevant physical aspects, e.g. wall friction and turbulence, are included in the simulations. Numerical experiments are conducted to evaluate the influence of the parameters involved in the modeling by comparing the results with the data from the measurements. The numerical predictions reasonably describe the physical trends.

  11. Visualization of a Numerical Simulation of GW 150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Nicole; Healy, James; Lousto, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of a simulation displaying apparent horizon curvature and radiation emitted from a binary black hole system modeling GW-150914 during merger. The simulation follows the system from seven orbits prior to merger to the resultant Kerr black hole. Horizon curvature was calculated using a mean curvature flow algorithm. Radiation data was visualized via the Ψ4 component of the Weyl scalars, which were determined using a numerical quasi-Kinnersley method. We also present a comparative study of the differences in quasi-Kinnersley and PsiKadelia tetrads to construct Ψ4. The analysis is displayed on a movie generated from these numerical results, and was done using VisIt software from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This simulation and analysis gives more insight into the merger of the system GW 150914.

  12. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations.

  13. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) 1999 Industry Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Evans, Austin

    2000-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners in the development effort and the actions taken over the past year to respond to that feedback. The NPSS development was supported in FY99 by the High Performance Computing and Communications Program.

  14. Non-robust numerical simulations of analogue extension experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naliboff, John; Buiter, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Numerical and analogue models of lithospheric deformation provide significant insight into the tectonic processes that lead to specific structural and geophysical observations. As these two types of models contain distinct assumptions and tradeoffs, investigations drawing conclusions from both can reveal robust links between first-order processes and observations. Recent studies have focused on detailed comparisons between numerical and analogue experiments in both compressional and extensional tectonics, sometimes involving multiple lithospheric deformation codes and analogue setups. While such comparisons often show good agreement on first-order deformation styles, results frequently diverge on second-order structures, such as shear zone dip angles or spacing, and in certain cases even on first-order structures. Here, we present finite-element experiments that are designed to directly reproduce analogue "sandbox" extension experiments at the cm-scale. We use material properties and boundary conditions that are directly taken from analogue experiments and use a Drucker-Prager failure model to simulate shear zone formation in sand. We find that our numerical experiments are highly sensitive to numerous numerical parameters. For example, changes to the numerical resolution, velocity convergence parameters and elemental viscosity averaging commonly produce significant changes in first- and second-order structures accommodating deformation. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations to small parameter changes likely reflects a number of factors, including, but not limited to, high angles of internal friction assigned to sand, complex, unknown interactions between the brittle sand (used as an upper crust equivalent) and viscous silicone (lower crust), highly non-linear strain weakening processes and poor constraints on the cohesion of sand. Our numerical-analogue comparison is hampered by (a) an incomplete knowledge of the fine details of sand failure and sand

  15. Image based numerical simulation of hemodynamics in a intracranial aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Kallmes, David; Cloft, Harry; Lewis, Debra; Dai, Daying; Ding, Yonghong; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2007-11-01

    Image-based numerical simulations of hemodynamics in a intracranial aneurysm are carried out. The numerical solver based on CURVIB (curvilinear grid/immersed boundary method) approach developed in Ge and Sotiropoulos, JCP 2007 is used to simulate the blood flow. A curvilinear grid system that gradually follows the curved geometry of artery wall and consists of approximately 5M grid nodes is constructed as the background grid system and the boundaries of the investigated artery and aneurysm are treated as immersed boundaries. The surface geometry of aneurysm wall is reconstructed from an angiography study of an aneurysm formed on the common carotid artery (CCA) of a rabbit and discretized with triangular meshes. At the inlet a physiological flow waveform is specified and direct numerical simulations are used to simulate the blood flow. Very rich vortical dynamics is observed within the aneurysm area, with a ring like vortex sheds from the proximal side of aneurysm, develops and impinge onto the distal side of the aneurysm as flow develops, and destructs into smaller vortices during later cardiac cycle. This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  16. Graphics interfaces and numerical simulations: Mexican Virtual Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, L.; González, A.; Salas, G.; Santillán, A.

    2007-08-01

    Preliminary results associated to the computational development and creation of the Mexican Virtual Solar Observatory (MVSO) are presented. Basically, the MVSO prototype consists of two parts: the first, related to observations that have been made during the past ten years at the Solar Observation Station (EOS) and at the Carl Sagan Observatory (OCS) of the Universidad de Sonora in Mexico. The second part is associated to the creation and manipulation of a database produced by numerical simulations related to solar phenomena, we are using the MHD ZEUS-3D code. The development of this prototype was made using mysql, apache, java and VSO 1.2. based GNU and `open source philosophy'. A graphic user interface (GUI) was created in order to make web-based, remote numerical simulations. For this purpose, Mono was used, because it is provides the necessary software to develop and run .NET client and server applications on Linux. Although this project is still under development, we hope to have access, by means of this portal, to other virtual solar observatories and to be able to count on a database created through numerical simulations or, given the case, perform simulations associated to solar phenomena.

  17. MADNESS: A Multiresolution, Adaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Robert J.; Beylkin, Gregory; Bischoff, Florian A.; Calvin, Justus A.; Fann, George I.; Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Galindo, Diego; Hammond, Jeff R.; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca; Hill, Judith C.; Jia, Jun; Kottmann, Jakob S.; Yvonne Ou, M-J.; Pei, Junchen; Ratcliff, Laura E.; Reuter, Matthew G.; Richie-Halford, Adam C.; Romero, Nichols A.; Sekino, Hideo; Shelton, William A.; Sundahl, Bryan E.; Thornton, W. Scott; Valeev, Edward F.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Vence, Nicholas; Yanai, Takeshi; Yokoi, Yukina

    2016-01-01

    MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation) is a high-level software environment for solving integral and differential equations in many dimensions that uses adaptive and fast harmonic analysis methods with guaranteed precision based on multiresolution analysis and separated representations. Underpinning the numerical capabilities is a powerful petascale parallel programming environment that aims to increase both programmer productivity and code scalability. This paper describes the features and capabilities of MADNESS and briefly discusses some current applications in chemistry and several areas of physics.

  18. MADNESS: A Multiresolution, Adaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Robert J.; Beylkin, Gregory; Bischoff, Florian A.; Calvin, Justus A.; Fann, George I.; Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Galindo, Diego; Hammond, Jeff R.; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca; Hill, Judith C.; Jia, Jun; Kottmann, Jakob S.; Yvonne Ou, M-J.; Pei, Junchen; Ratcliff, Laura E.; Reuter, Matthew G.; Richie-Halford, Adam C.; Romero, Nichols A.; Sekino, Hideo; Shelton, William A.; Sundahl, Bryan E.; Thornton, W. Scott; Valeev, Edward F.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Vence, Nicholas; Yanai, Takeshi; Yokoi, Yukina

    2016-01-01

    We present MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation) that is a high-level software environment for solving integral and differential equations in many dimensions that uses adaptive and fast harmonic analysis methods with guaranteed precision that are based on multiresolution analysis and separated representations. Underpinning the numerical capabilities is a powerful petascale parallel programming environment that aims to increase both programmer productivity and code scalability. This paper describes the features and capabilities of MADNESS and briefly discusses some current applications in chemistry and several areas of physics.

  19. Numerical simulation of multi-fluid shock-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yifeng; Jaberi, Farhad; Livescu, Daniel; Li, Zhaorui

    2017-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of multi-fluid Shock-Turbulence Interaction (STI) is conducted by a hybrid monotonicity preserving-compact finite difference scheme for a detailed study of STI in variable density flows. Theoretical and numerical assessments of data confirm that all turbulence scales as well as the STI are well captured by the computational method. Comparison of multi-fluid and single-fluid data indicates that the turbulent kinetic energy is amplified more and the scalar mixing is enhanced more by the shock in flows involving two different fluids/densities when compared with those observed in single-fluid flows.

  20. Numerical Simulations of One-dimensional Microstructure Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berezovski, M.; Berezovski, A.; Engelbrecht, J.

    2010-05-21

    Results of numerical simulations of one-dimensional wave propagation in microstructured solids are presented and compared with the corresponding results of wave propagation in given layered media. A linear microstructure model based on Mindlin theory is adopted and represented in the framework of the internal variable theory. Fully coupled systems of equations for macro-motion and microstructure evolution are rewritten in the form of conservation laws. A modification of wave propagation algorithm is used for numerical calculations. It is shown how the initial microstructure model can be improved in order to match the results obtained by both approaches.

  1. Simulation of guided wave propagation near numerical Brillouin zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Packo, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Attractive properties of guided waves provides very unique potential for characterization of incipient damage, particularly in plate-like structures. Among other properties, guided waves can propagate over long distances and can be used to monitor hidden structural features and components. On the other hand, guided propagation brings substantial challenges for data analysis. Signal processing techniques are frequently supported by numerical simulations in order to facilitate problem solution. When employing numerical models additional sources of errors are introduced. These can play significant role for design and development of a wave-based monitoring strategy. Hence, the paper presents an investigation of numerical models for guided waves generation, propagation and sensing. Numerical dispersion analysis, for guided waves in plates, based on the LISA approach is presented and discussed in the paper. Both dispersion and modal amplitudes characteristics are analysed. It is shown that wave propagation in a numerical model resembles propagation in a periodic medium. Consequently, Lamb wave propagation close to numerical Brillouin zone is investigated and characterized.

  2. Numerical simulations of internal wave generation by convection in water.

    PubMed

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Le Bars, Michael; Burns, Keaton J; Vasil, Geoffrey M; Brown, Benjamin P; Quataert, Eliot; Oishi, Jeffrey S

    2015-06-01

    Water's density maximum at 4°C makes it well suited to study internal gravity wave excitation by convection: an increasing temperature profile is unstable to convection below 4°C, but stably stratified above 4°C. We present numerical simulations of a waterlike fluid near its density maximum in a two-dimensional domain. We successfully model the damping of waves in the simulations using linear theory, provided we do not take the weak damping limit typically used in the literature. To isolate the physical mechanism exciting internal waves, we use the spectral code dedalus to run several simplified model simulations of our more detailed simulation. We use data from the full simulation as source terms in two simplified models of internal-wave excitation by convection: bulk excitation by convective Reynolds stresses, and interface forcing via the mechanical oscillator effect. We find excellent agreement between the waves generated in the full simulation and the simplified simulation implementing the bulk excitation mechanism. The interface forcing simulations overexcite high-frequency waves because they assume the excitation is by the "impulsive" penetration of plumes, which spreads energy to high frequencies. However, we find that the real excitation is instead by the "sweeping" motion of plumes parallel to the interface. Our results imply that the bulk excitation mechanism is a very accurate heuristic for internal-wave generation by convection.

  3. Numerical simulation of pulsatile flow in rough pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Cheng; Monty, Jason; Ooi, Andrew; Illingworth, Simon; Marusic, Ivan; Skvortsov, Alex

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of pulsatile turbulent pipe flow is carried out over three-dimensional sinusoidal surfaces mimicking surface roughness. The simulations are performed at a mean Reynolds number of Reτ 540 (based on friction velocity, uτ, and pipe radii, δ) and at various roughness profiles following the study of Chan et al., where the size of the roughness (roughness semi-amplitude height h+ and wavelength λ+) is increased geometrically while maintaining the height-to-wavelength ratio of the sinusoidal roughness element. Results from the pulsatile simulations are compared with non-pulsatile simulations to investigate the effects of pulsation on the Hama roughness function, ΔU+ . Other turbulence statistics including mean turbulence intensities, Reynolds stresses and energy spectra are analysed. In addition, instantaneous phase (eg. at maximum and minimum flow velocities) and phase-averaged flow structures are presented and discussed.

  4. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of acoustic wave phase conjugation in magnetostrictive elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinovich, Peter; Merlen, Alain

    2005-12-01

    The effect of parametric wave phase conjugation (WPC) in application to ultrasound or acoustic waves in magnetostrictive solids has been addressed numerically by Ben Khelil et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 75-83 (2001)] using 1-D unsteady formulation. Here the numerical method presented by Voinovich et al. [Shock waves 13(3), 221-230 (2003)] extends the analysis to the 2-D effects. The employed model describes universally elastic solids and liquids. A source term similar to Ben Khelil et al.'s accounts for the coupling between deformation and magnetostriction due to external periodic magnetic field. The compatibility between the isotropic constitutive law of the medium and the model of magnetostriction has been considered. Supplementary to the 1-D simulations, the present model involves longitudinal/transversal mode conversion at the sample boundaries and separate magnetic field coupling with dilatation and shear stress. The influence of those factors in a 2-D geometry on the potential output of a magneto-elastic wave phase conjugator is analyzed in this paper. The process under study includes propagation of a wave burst of a given frequency from a point source in a liquid into the active solid, amplification of the waves due to parametric resonance, and formation of time-reversed waves, their radiation into liquid, and focusing. The considered subject is particularly important for ultrasonic applications in acoustic imaging, nondestructive testing, or medical diagnostics and therapy.

  5. A numerical method based on the Fourier-Fourier transform approach for modeling 1-D electron plasma evolution. [in earth bow shock region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for studying one-dimensional electron plasma evolution under typical interplanetary conditions. The method applies the Fourier-Fourier transform approach to a plasma model that is a generalization of the electrostatic Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. Conservation laws that are modified to include the plasma model generalization and also the boundary effects of nonperiodic solutions are given. A new conservation law for entropy in the transformed space is then introduced. These conservation laws are used to verify the numerical solutions. A discretization error analysis is presented. Two numerical instabilities and the methods used for their suppression are treated. It is shown that in interplanetary plasma conditions, the bump-on-tail instability produces significant excitation of plasma oscillations at the Bohm-Gross frequency and its second harmonic. An explanation of the second harmonic excitation is given in terms of wave-wave coupling during the growth phase of the instability.

  6. Numerical Simulation of nZVI at the Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, A. I.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) has been used at a number of contaminated sites over the last decade. At most of these sites, significant decreases in contaminant concentrations have resulted from the application of nZVI. However, limited work has been completed investigating nZVI mobility at the field-scale. In this study a three dimensional, three phase, finite difference numerical simulator (CompSim) was used to simulate nZVI and polymer transport in a variably saturated site. The model was able to accurately predict the field observed head data without parameter fitting. In addition, the numerical simulator estimated the amount of nZVI delivered to the saturated and unsaturated zones as well as the phase of nZVI (i.e., attached or aqueous phase). The simulation results showed that the injected slurry migrated radially outward from the injection well, and therefore nZVI transport was governed by injection velocity as well as viscosity of the injected solution. A suite of sensitivity analyses was performed to investigate the impact of different injection scenarios (e.g. different volume and injection rate) on nZVI migration. Simulation results showed that injection of a higher volume of nZVI delivered more iron particles at a given distance; however, not necessarily to a greater distance proportionate to the increase in volume. This study suggests that on-site synthesized nZVI particles are mobile in the subsurface and the numerical simulator can be a valuable tool for optimum design of nZVI applications.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Urea Hydrolysis and Calcite Precipitation in Porous Media Using STOMP

    SciTech Connect

    Luanjing Guo; Hai Huang; Bill X. Hu

    2010-11-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising in situ immobilization approach of these contaminants is engineered mineral (co)precipitation of calcite driven by urea hydrolysis that is catalyzed by enzyme urease. The tight nonlinear coupling among flow, transport, reaction and reaction-induced property changes of media of this approach was studied by reactive transport simulations with systematically increasing level of complexities of reaction network and physical/chemical heterogeneities using a numerical simulator named STOMP. Sensitivity studies on the reaction rates of both urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation are performed via controlling urease enzyme concentration and precipitation rate constant according to the rate models employed. We have found that the rate of ureolysis is a dominating factor in the amount of precipitated mineral; however, the spatial distribution of the precipitates depends on both rates of ureolysis and calcite precipitation. A maximum 5% reduction in the porosity was observed within the simulation time period of 6 pore volumes in our 1-dimensional (1D) column simulations. When a low permeability inclusion is considered in the 2D simulations, the altered flow fields redistribute mineral forming constituents, leading to a distorted precipitation reaction front. The simulations also indicate that mineral precipitation occurs along the boundary of the low permeability zone, which implies that contaminants in the low permeability zone could be encapsulated and isolated from the flow paths.

  8. Direct Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Flows with Unstable Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Eugenio; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Antepara, Oscar; Oliva, Assensi

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical model that intends to simulate efficiently the surface instability that arise in multiphase flows, typically liquid-gas, both for laminar or turbulent regimes. The model is developed on the in-house computing platform TermoFluids, and operates the finite-volume, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of multiphase flows by means of a conservative level-set method for the interface-capturing. The mesh size is optimized by means of an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) strategy, that allows the dynamic re-concentration of the mesh in the vicinity of the interfaces between fluids, in order to correctly represent the diverse structures (as ligaments and droplets) that may rise from unstable phenomena. In addition, special attention is given to the discretization of the various terms of the momentum equations, to ensure stability of the flow and correct representation of turbulent vortices. As shown, the method is capable of truthfully simulate the interface phenomena as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Plateau-Rayleigh instability, both in the case of 2-D and 3-D configurations. Therefore it is suitable for the simulation of complex phenomena such as simulation of air-blast atomization, with several important application in the field of automotive and aerospace engines. A prove is given by our preliminary study of the 3-D coaxial liquid-gas jet.

  9. Numerical simulation of electrothermal de-icing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Witt, K. J.; Keith, T. G.; Chao, D. F.; Masiulaniec, K. C.

    1983-01-01

    Transient simulations of de-icing of composite aircraft components by electrothermal heating have been computed for both one and two-dimensional rectangular geometries. The implicit Crank-Nicolson formulation is used to insure stability of the finite-differenced heat conduction equations and the phase change in the ice layer is simulated using the Enthalpy method. Numerical solutions illustrating de-icer performance for various composite aircraft blades and environmental conditions are presented. Comparisons are made with previous studies and with available experimental data. Initial results using a coordinate mapping technique to describe the actual blade geometry are discussed.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Impact Effects on Multilayer Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric

    2007-06-01

    High strength fabrics provide lightweight impact protection and are employed in a wide range of applications. Examples include body armor for law enforcement and military personnel and orbital debris shielding for the International Space Station. Numerical simulation of impact effects on fabric protection systems is difficult, due to the complex woven structure of the fabric layers and the typical application of fabrics in a multilayer configuration. Recent research has developed new particle-element methods for the simulation of impact effects on multilayer fabrics, applicable over a wide range of impact velocities, for use in body armor and orbital debris shielding applications.

  11. Numerical simulations of an oblique detonation wave engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, Henry; Menees, Gene P.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the numerical methods employed in a code for the simulation of supersonic combustion, which is then applied to the simulation of attached detonations and flames associated with the oblique-detonation wave supersonic combustor concept. The addition of heat by a detonation wave results in a shorter combustor than can be obtained in more conventional scramjet designs. Pure oblique detonations have been produced in a stoichiometric, uniformly mixed hydrogen/air stream; the wave rotates upstream with energy release, according to simple analytical arguments. Flow visualization maps for Mach number and temperature are presented.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Impact Effects on Multilayer Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric; Rabb, Robert; Bohannan, April

    2007-12-01

    High strength fabrics provide lightweight impact protection and are employed in a wide range of applications. Examples include body armor for law enforcement and military personnel and orbital debris shielding for the International Space Station. Numerical simulation of impact effects on fabric protection systems is difficult, due to the complex woven structure of the fabric layers and the typical application of fabrics in a multilayer configuration. Recent research has applied a new particle-element method to the simulation of impact effects on multilayer fabrics, applicable over a wide range of impact velocities, for use in body armor and orbital debris shielding design applications.

  13. Numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Tachimori, M.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells is presented. The model consists of equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, for thermodynamic state of water, for friction losses, for slip velocity relations, and of the criteria for various flow regimes. A new set of correlations and criteria is presented for two-phase flow to improve the accuracy of predictions; bubbly flow - Griffith and Wallis correlation, slug flow - Nicklin et al. one, annular-mist flow - Inoue and Aoki and modified by the author. The simulation method was verified by data from actual wells.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Gleeble Torsion Testing of HSLA-65 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Simulation of Friction Stir Weld Mictrstructures of a High Strength, Low Alloy Steel (HSLA-65),” Proceedings of the TWI 7th International FSW ...of HSLA-65 Steel by David R. Forrest and Matthew F. Sinfield N SW C C D -6 1- TR –2 00 8/ 02 N um er ic al S im ul at io n of G le eb le T or...Numerical Simulation of Gleeble Torsion Testing of HSLA-65 Steel by David R. Forrest and Matthew F. Sinfield i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form

  15. Modified Numerical Simulation Model of Blood Flow in Bend

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Zhou, X; Hao, X; Sang, X

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The numerical simulation model of blood flow in bend is studied in this paper. The curvature modification is conducted for the blood flow model in bend to obtain the modified blood flow model in bend. The modified model is verified by U tube. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained by measuring the flow data in U tube, it was found that the modified blood flow model in bend can effectively improve the prediction accuracy of blood flow data affected by the curvature effect. PMID:27398727

  16. Numerical Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Erlebacher, G.

    2002-01-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of a spatially evolving, supersonic, flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow, with free-stream Mach number of 2.25 are presented. The simulated flow field extends from a transition region, initiated by wall suction and blowing near the inflow boundary, into the fully turbulent regime. Distributions of mean and turbulent flow quantities are obtained and an analysis of these quantities is performed at a downstream station corresponding to Re(sub x)= 5.548 x10(exp 6) based on distance from the leading edge.

  17. GPU accelerated numerical simulations of viscoelastic phase separation model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keda; Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2012-07-05

    We introduce a complete implementation of viscoelastic model for numerical simulations of the phase separation kinetics in dynamic asymmetry systems such as polymer blends and polymer solutions on a graphics processing unit (GPU) by CUDA language and discuss algorithms and optimizations in details. From studies of a polymer solution, we show that the GPU-based implementation can predict correctly the accepted results and provide about 190 times speedup over a single central processing unit (CPU). Further accuracy analysis demonstrates that both the single and the double precision calculations on the GPU are sufficient to produce high-quality results in numerical simulations of viscoelastic model. Therefore, the GPU-based viscoelastic model is very promising for studying many phase separation processes of experimental and theoretical interests that often take place on the large length and time scales and are not easily addressed by a conventional implementation running on a single CPU.

  18. Numerical simulation of electrified jets: An application to electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzacchiello, D.; Vermiglio, S.; Chinesta, F.; Nabat, S.; Lafdi, K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns the numerical simulation of electrified jets with application to the electrospinning process for the fabrication of fibers with controllable size, diameter, and cross section shape. Most numerical models used to simulate electrospinning rely on the Upper Convected Maxwell model (UCM) which is fit to model polymer melts. However, in most electrospinning processes the fluid is a polymer solution with a Newtonian solvent that evaporates after the fiber is deposited on the collector. In this work we propose to describe the fluid rheology using Giesekus model, which predicts the properties of polymer solutions more accurately, and show the impact of the rheological model on the prediction of the fiber radius and size.

  19. Numerical aerodynamic simulation program long haul communications prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cmaylo, Bohden K.; Foo, Lee

    1987-01-01

    This document is a report of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Long Haul Communications Prototype (LHCP). It describes the accomplishments of the LHCP group, presents the results from all LHCP experiments and testing activities, makes recommendations for present and future LHCP activities, and evaluates the remote workstation accesses from Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Colorado State University to Ames Research Center. The report is the final effort of the Long Haul (Wideband) Communications Prototype Plan (PT-1133-02-N00), 3 October 1985, which defined the requirements for the development, test, and operation of the LHCP network and was the plan used to evaluate the remote user bandwidth requirements for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Processing System Network.

  20. Numerical Relativity Simulations for Black Hole Merger Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Massive black hole mergers are perhaps the most energetic astronomical events, establishing their importance as gravitational wave sources for LISA, and also possibly leading to observable influences on their local environments. Advances in numerical relativity over the last five years have fueled the development of a rich physical understanding of general relativity's predictions for these events. Z will overview the understanding of these event emerging from numerical simulation studies. These simulations elucidate the pre-merger dynamics of the black hole binaries, the consequent gravitational waveform signatures ' and the resulting state, including its kick velocity, for the final black hole produced by the merger. Scenarios are now being considered for observing each of these aspects of the merger, involving both gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy.

  1. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, V; London, R A; Papademetriou, S

    1999-02-23

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the simulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to- patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  2. Numerical model for learning concepts of streamflow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, L.L.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Numerical models are useful for demonstrating principles of open-channel flow. Such models can allow experimentation with cause-and-effect relations, testing concepts of physics and numerical techniques. Four PT is a numerical model written primarily as a teaching supplement for a course in one-dimensional stream-flow modeling. Four PT options particularly useful in training include selection of governing equations, boundary-value perturbation, and user-programmable constraint equations. The model can simulate non-trivial concepts such as flow in complex interconnected channel networks, meandering channels with variable effective flow lengths, hydraulic structures defined by unique three-parameter relations, and density-driven flow.The model is coded in FORTRAN 77, and data encapsulation is used extensively to simplify maintenance and modification and to enhance the use of Four PT modules by other programs and programmers.

  3. A numerical simulation of flows around a deformable gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Minoru; Ishii, Ryuji; Morioka, Shigeki

    1991-12-01

    A numerical simulation of flows around a (deformable) gas bubble rising through an incompressible viscous fluid was carried out on a supercomputer Fujitsu VP2600 at Data Processing Center of Kyoto University. The solution algorithm is a modified Marker And Cell (MAC) method. For the grid generation, an orthogonal mapping proposed by Ryskin and Leal was applied. it is assumed that the shape of the bubble and the flow field are axisymmetric.

  4. Numerical Simulations of the Metallicity Distribution in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-12-12

    Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf galaxies in order to verify whether this result can be reproduced with ''standard'' assumptions. The answer is likely to be negative, unless some selection bias against very low metallicity stars is present in the observations.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Shocked Helium Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    2002-02-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of a shock tube experiment in which a cylindrical laminar jet of helium doped with biacetyl is injected into air and subjected to a weak shock wave. Computed species distributions in a planar cross section of the jet are compared to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images produced by the experiment. The calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental images. We find that differential diffusion of species is an important feature of this experiment.

  6. Numerical simulations of a pulsed detonation wave augmentation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, Henry; Menees, Gene P.

    1993-01-01

    We present here the concept of a hybrid engine for Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) air-breathing hypersonic vehicle. This concept relies on the use of pulsed detonation waves, both for thrust generation and mixing/combustion augmentation. We describe the principles behind the engine concept, which we call the Pulsed Detonation Wave Augmentor (PDWA). We demonstrate the principles of operation for two possible configurations through numerical simulations. We also attempt a first approximation to engine design, and propose various applications.

  7. Numerical simulation of high-gradient magnetic filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, B. A.; Semenov, V. G.; Panchuk, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We have reported on the results of a numerical simulation of high-gradient magnetic filtration of ultradisperse corrosion products from water coolants. These results have made it possible to establish optimal technical characteristics of high-gradient magnetic filters. The results have been used to develop test samples of high-gradient magnetic filters (HGMFs) with different magnetic systems to purify technological water media of atomic power plants from activated corrosion products.

  8. Numerical simulation of flow in the wet scrubber for desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosád, Jan; Vít, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    This article deals with numerical simulation of flow and chemical reactions in absorber for desulfurization of flue-gas. The objective of the work is the investigation of effect of different nozzles types and their placement in spray layers. These nozzles distribute lime suspension into flue gas stream. The research includes two types of nozzles and four different arrangements of nozzles and spray layers. Conclusion describes the effect of nozzle types and their arrangements on the suspension concentration in absorber.

  9. Numerical simulation of the BRAMS interferometer in Humain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Picar, A.; Marqué, C.; Verbeeck, C.; Calders, S.; Ranvier, S.; Gamby, E.; Anciaux, M.; Tetard, C.; Lamy, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BISA) operates a network for radio meteor studies based in Belgium. One of the receiving stations is located in the Humain Radio-Astronomy Station (HuRAS) and consists of an array of five 3-element Yagi antennas. In this paper the results of detailed numerical simulations are presented in order to obtain a first approach for the direction finding capability of this interferometer.

  10. Numerical Simulation of the Radiation Symmetry in Tetrahedral Hohlraums.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, J. J.; Magelssen, G.; Delamater, N.; Wallace, J.; Murphy, T.; Klare, K.

    1997-11-01

    The successful implosion of a capsule in indirect-drive ICF experiments requires the ability to diagnose and control the radiation symmetry at its surface. Recently, there has been increased interest in studying whether ``tetrahedral'' hohlraums can produce a radiation field on the capsule which is more symmetric than cylindrical hohlraums. Asymmetries in the 3-D radiation field are influenced by: the size and shape of the hohlraum, the wall albedo, the capsule radius, the LEH and diagnostic holes, and the laser beam pointing and power/energy imbalances. Time-dependent asymmetries are caused by the laser pulse history, changing wall albedos, and wall motion. We have recently developed a 3-D view factor code to investigate the time-dependent radiation asymmetry in indirect-drive ICF experiments. This code includes algorithms for the accurate solution of configuration factors, as well as laser ray-trace algorithms for modeling OMEGA, NOVA, and NIF laser/target chamber geometries. Time-dependent albedos are based on 1-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations using UTA opacities for the high-Z wall. We will present results from simulations of OMEGA tetrahedral hohlraum experiments, as well as simulations showing how asymmetries scale with capsule/hohlraum configuration.

  11. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott J.; Livescu, Daniel; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) requires efficient numerical methods, advanced boundary conditions, and consistent initialization in order to capture the wide range of scales and vortex dynamics present in the system, while reducing the computational impact associated with acoustic wave generation and the subsequent interaction with the flow. An advanced computational framework is presented that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of RTI systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification dependent vorticity production. The foundation of the numerical methodology described here is the wavelet-based grid adaptivity of the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM) that maintains symmetry in single-mode RTI systems to extreme late-times. PAWCM is combined with a consistent initialization, which reduces the generation of acoustic disturbances, and effective boundary treatments, which prevent acoustic reflections. A dynamic time integration scheme that can handle highly nonlinear and potentially stiff systems, such as compressible RTI, completes the computational framework. The numerical methodology is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  12. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A.

    1997-08-01

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of A Shaped Hole Film Cooling Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The combustor exit temperatures in modern gas turbine engines are generally higher than the melting temperature of the turbine blade material. Film cooling, where cool air is fed through holes in the turbine blades, is one strategy which is used extensively in such engines to reduce heat transfer to the blades and thus reduce their temperature. While these flows have been investigated both numerically and experimentally, many features are not yet well understood. For example, the geometry of the hole is known to have a large impact on downstream cooling performance. However, the details of the flow in the hole, particularly for geometries similar to those used in practice, are generally know well-understood, both because it is difficult to experimentally observe the flow inside the hole and because much of the numerical literature has focused on round hole simulations. In this work, we show preliminary direct numerical simulation results for a film cooling flow passing through a shaped hole into a the boundary layer developing on a flat plate. The case has density ratio 1.6, blowing ratio 2.0, and the Reynolds number (based on momentum thickness) of incoming boundary layer is approximately 600. We compare the new simulations against both previous experiments and LES.

  14. The numerical simulation based on CFD of hydraulic turbine pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, X. H.; Kong, F. Y.; Liu, Y. Y.; Zhao, R. J.; Hu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    As the functions of hydraulic turbine pump including self-adjusting and compensation with each other, it is far-reaching to analyze its internal flow by the numerical simulation based on CFD, mainly including the pressure field and the velocity field in hydraulic turbine and pump.The three-dimensional models of hydraulic turbine pump are made by Pro/Engineer software;the internal flow fields in hydraulic turbine and pump are simulated numerically by CFX ANSYS software. According to the results of the numerical simulation in design condition, the pressure field and the velocity field in hydraulic turbine and pump are analyzed respectively .The findings show that the static pressure decreases systematically and the pressure gradient is obvious in flow area of hydraulic turbine; the static pressure increases gradually in pump. The flow trace is regular in suction chamber and flume without spiral trace. However, there are irregular traces in the turbine runner channels which contrary to that in flow area of impeller. Most of traces in the flow area of draft tube are spiral.

  15. Numerical prediction of microstructure and hardness in multicycle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oddy, A.S.; McDill, J.M.J.

    1996-06-01

    Thermal-microstructural predictions are made and compared to physical simulations of heat-affected zones in multipass and weaved welds. The microstructural prediction algorithm includes reaustenitization kinetics, grain growth, austenite decomposition kinetics, hardness, and tempering. Microstructural simulation of weaved welds requires that the algorithm include transient reaustenitization, austenite decomposition for arbitrary thermal cycles including during reheating, and tempering. Material properties for each of these phenomena are taken from the best available literature. The numerical predictions are compared with the results of physical simulations made at the Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, on a Gleeble 1500 simulator. Thermal histories used in the physical simulations included single-pass welds, isothermal tempering, two-cycle, and three-cycle welds. The two- and three-cycle welds include temper-bead and weaved-weld simulations. A recurring theme in the analysis is the significant variation found in the material properties for the same grade of steel. This affected all the material properties used including those governing reaustenitization, austenite grain growth, austenite decomposition, and hardness. Hardness measurements taken from the literature show a variation of {+-}5 to 30 HV on the same sample. Alloy differences within the allowable range also led to hardness variations of {+-}30 HV for the heat-affected zone of multipass welds. The predicted hardnesses agree extremely well with those taken from the physical simulations.

  16. Efficient numerical simulation of heat storage in subsurface georeservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boockmeyer, A.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The transition of the German energy market towards renewable energy sources, e.g. wind or solar power, requires energy storage technologies to compensate for their fluctuating production. Large amounts of energy could be stored in georeservoirs such as porous formations in the subsurface. One possibility here is to store heat with high temperatures of up to 90°C through borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) since more than 80 % of the total energy consumption in German households are used for heating and hot water supply. Within the ANGUS+ project potential environmental impacts of such heat storages are assessed and quantified. Numerical simulations are performed to predict storage capacities, storage cycle times, and induced effects. For simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites, detailed high-resolution models are required. We set up a model that accounts for all components of the BHE and verified it using experimental data. The model ensures accurate simulation results but also leads to large numerical meshes and thus high simulation times. In this work, we therefore present a numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly for use in larger scale simulations. The numerical model includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with an accuracy of less than 2% deviation from the fully discretized model. By changing the BHE geometry and using equivalent parameters, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. Results of a sensitivity study that quantify the effects of different design and storage formation parameters on temperature distribution and storage efficiency for heat storage using multiple BHEs are then shown. It is found that storage efficiency strongly depends on the number of BHEs composing the storage site, their distance and

  17. Towards an Automated Full-Turbofan Engine Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Turner, Mark G.; Norris, Andrew; Veres, Joseph P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the high-fidelity numerical simulation of a modern high-bypass turbofan engine. The simulation utilizes the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) thermodynamic cycle modeling system coupled to a high-fidelity full-engine model represented by a set of coupled three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) component models. Boundary conditions from the balanced, steady-state cycle model are used to define component boundary conditions in the full-engine model. Operating characteristics of the three-dimensional component models are integrated into the cycle model via partial performance maps generated automatically from the CFD flow solutions using one-dimensional meanline turbomachinery programs. This paper reports on the progress made towards the full-engine simulation of the GE90-94B engine, highlighting the generation of the high-pressure compressor partial performance map. The ongoing work will provide a system to evaluate the steady and unsteady aerodynamic and mechanical interactions between engine components at design and off-design operating conditions.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Ferrofluid Flow for Subsurface Environmental Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Moridis, George J.

    1997-05-05

    Ferrofluids are suspensions of magnetic particles of diameter approximately 10 nm stabilized by surfactants in carrier liquids. The large magnetic susceptibility of ferrofluids allows the mobilization of ferrofluid through permeable rock and soil by the application of strong external magnetic fields. We have developed simulation capabilities for both miscible and immiscible conceptualizations of ferrofluid flow through porous media in response to magnetic forces arising from the magnetic field of a rectangular permanent magnet. The flow of ferrofluid is caused by the magnetization of the particles and their attraction toward a magnet, regardless of the orientation of the magnet. The steps involved in calculating the flow of ferrofluid are (1) calculation of the external magnetic field, (2) calculation of the gradient of the external magnetic field, (3) calculation of the magnetization of the ferrofluid, and (4) assembly of the magnetic body force term and addition of this term to the standard pressure gradient and gravity force terms. We compare numerical simulations to laboratory measurements of the magnetic field, fluid pressures, and the two-dimensional flow of ferrofluid to demonstrate the applicability of the methods coded in the numerical simulators. We present an example of the use of the simulator for a field-scale application of ferrofluids for barrier verification.

  19. Interrogation of numerical simulation for modeling of flow induced microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, D.D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent efforts using direct numerical simulations to determine microstructural properties of fluidized suspensions of a few particles. The authors have been studying the motions of a few particles in a viscous fluid by direct numerical simulation at moderate values of the Reynolds number in the 100`s. From these simulations, they find the mechanisms which give rise to lateral migration of particles and turn the broad side of long bodies perpendicular to the stream. They find that a viscous ``stagnation`` point is a point on the body where the shear stress vanishes and the pressure is nearly a maximum. They show how the migration is controlled by stagnation and separation points and go further than before in the discussion of Segre-Silberberg effects of cross-streamline migration in two dimensions. They have analyzed the lift off and steady flight of solid capsules in Poiseuille flows. They do a three-dimensional simulation of steady flow at slow speeds and show that the extensional stresses in a viscoelastic flow change the sign of the normal stress which would exist at points of stagnation in a Newtonian fluid, causing the long side of the body to line up with the stream.

  20. Insight into the physics of foam densification via numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenhagen, S. G.; Brydon, A. D.; Guilkey, J. E.

    2005-03-01

    Foamed materials are increasingly finding application in engineering systems on account of their unique properties. The basic mechanics which gives rise to these properties is well established, they are the result of collapsing the foam microstructure. Despite a basic understanding, the relationship between the details of foam microstructure and foam bulk response is generally unknown. With continued advances in computational power, many researchers have turned to numerical simulation to gain insight into the relationship between foam microstructure and bulk properties. However, numerical simulation of foam microscale deformation is a very challenging computational task and, to date, simulations over the full range of bulk deformations in which these materials operate have not been reported. Here a particle technique is demonstrated to be well-suited for this computational challenge, permitting simulation of the compression of foam microstructures to full densification. Computations on idealized foam microstructures are in agreement with engineering guidelines and various experimental results. Dependencies on degree of microstructure regularity and material properties are demonstrated. A surprising amount of porosity is found in fully-densified foams. The presence of residual porosity can strongly influence dynamic material response and hence needs to be accounted for in bulk (average) constitutive models of these materials.

  1. Unsteady numerical simulation of a round jet with impinging microjets for noise suppression.

    PubMed

    Lew, Phoi-Tack; Najafi-Yazdi, Alireza; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of a lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM)-Large Eddy Simulation methodology for the prediction of sound radiation from a round jet-microjet combination. The distinct advantage of LBM over traditional computational fluid dynamics methods is its ease of handling problems with complex geometries. Numerical simulations of an isothermal Mach 0.5, Re(D) = 1 × 10(5) circular jet (D(j) = 0.0508 m) with and without the presence of 18 microjets (D(mj) = 1 mm) were performed. The presence of microjets resulted in a decrease in the axial turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy. The associated decrease in radiated sound pressure level was around 1 dB. The far-field sound was computed using the porous Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings surface integral acoustic method. The trend obtained is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. The results of this study support the accuracy of LBM based numerical simulations for predictions of the effects of noise suppression devices on the radiated sound power.

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Effect of 3D Needle Movement on Cavitation and Spray Formation in a Diesel Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandumpala Devassy, B.; Edelbauer, W.; Greif, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation and its effect on spray formation and its dispersion play a crucial role in proper engine combustion and controlled emission. This study focuses on these effects in a typical common rail 6-hole diesel injector accounting for 3D needle movement and flow compressibility effects. Coupled numerical simulations using 1D and 3D CFD codes are used for this investigation. Previous studies in this direction have already presented a detailed structure of the adopted methodology. Compared to the previous analysis, the present study investigates the effect of 3D needle movement and cavitation on the spray formation for pilot and main injection events for a typical diesel engine operating point. The present setup performs a 3D compressible multiphase simulation coupled with a standalone 1D high pressure flow simulation. The simulation proceeds by the mutual communication between 1D and 3D solvers. In this work a typical common rail injector with a mini-sac nozzle is studied. The lateral and radial movement of the needle and its effect on the cavitation generation and the subsequent spray penetration are analyzed. The result indicates the effect of compressibility of the liquid on damping the needle forces, and also the difference in the spray penetration levels due to the asymmetrical flow field. Therefore, this work intends to provide an efficient and user-friendly engineering tool for simulating a complete fuel injector including spray propagation.

  3. Numerical simulation of plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Chan, C. B.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating in a diverging flux tube are investigated with numerical simulation. The heating is found to drive a host of plasma processes, in addition to the well-known phenomenon of ion conics. The downward electric field near the reverse shock generates a doublestreaming situation consisting of two upflowing ion populations with different average flow velocities. The electric field in the reverse shock region is modulated by the ion-ion instability driven by the multistreaming ions. The oscillating fields in this region have the possibility of heating electrons. These results from the simulations are compared with results from a previous study based on a hydrodynamical model. Effects of spatial resolutions provided by simulations on the evolution of the plasma are discussed.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Nitrogen Chilldown of a Vertical Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darr, Samuel; Hu, Hong; Schaeffer, Reid; Chung, Jacob; Hartwig, Jason; Majumdar, Alok

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a one-dimensional numerical simulation of the transient chilldown of a vertical stainless steel tube with liquid nitrogen. The direction of flow is downward (with gravity) through the tube. Heat transfer correlations for film, transition, and nucleate boiling, as well as critical heat flux, rewetting temperature, and the temperature at the onset of nucleate boiling were used to model the convection to the tube wall. Chilldown curves from the simulations were compared with data from 55 recent liquid nitrogen chilldown experiments. With these new correlations the simulation is able to predict the time to rewetting temperature and time to onset of nucleate boiling to within 25% for mass fluxes ranging from 61.2 to 1150 kg/(sq m s), inlet pressures from 175 to 817 kPa, and subcooled inlet temperatures from 0 to 14 K below the saturation temperature.

  5. Studying Barred Galaxies by Means of Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    We describe two morphological structures of barred galaxies with the help of numerical simulations. The first one is a feature seen in face-on barred galaxies, the ansae, probably very important dynamically speaking. The second one are the Boxy/Peanut bulges in disc galaxies. They have been associated to stellar bars, and are a result of the secular evolution of barred galaxies. We analyze their properties in a large sample of N-body simulations, using different methods to measure their strength, shape and possible asymmetry, and then inter-compare the results. Some of these methods can be applied to both simulations and observations. In particular, we seek correlations between bar and peanut properties, which, when applied to real galaxies, will give information on bars in edge-on galaxies, and on peanuts in face-on galaxies.

  6. Numerical simulation of radiative heat loss in an experimental burner

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.; Brookshaw, L.

    1993-09-01

    We describe the numerical algorithm used in the COYOTE two-dimensional, transient, Eulerian hydrodynamics program to allow for radiative heat losses in simulations of reactive flows. The model is intended primarily for simulations of industrial burners, but it is not confined to that application. It assumes that the fluid is optically thin and that photons created by the fluid immediately escape to free space or to the surrounding walls, depending upon the application. The use of the model is illustrated by simulations of a laboratory-scale experimental burner. We find that the radiative heat losses reduce the local temperature of the combustion products by a modest amount, typically on the order of 50 K. However, they have a significant impact on NO{sub x} production.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Delamination Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, P. P.; Davila, C. G.; Ambur, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    The use of decohesion elements for the simulation of delamination in composite materials is reviewed. The test methods available to measure the interfacial fracture toughness used in the formulation of decohesion elements are described initially. After a brief presentation of the virtual crack closure technique, the technique most widely used to simulate delamination growth, the formulation of interfacial decohesion elements is described. Problems related with decohesion element constitutive equations, mixed-mode crack growth, element numerical integration and solution procedures are discussed. Based on these investigations, it is concluded that the use of interfacial decohesion elements is a promising technique that avoids the need for a pre-existing crack and pre-defined crack paths, and that these elements can be used to simulate both delamination onset and growth.

  8. Numerical simulation and modeling of combustion in scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Ryan James

    In the last fifteen years the development of a viable scramjet has quickly approached the following long term goals: responsive sub-orbital space access; long-range, prompt global strike; and high-speed transportation. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges that need to be resolved. These challenges include high skin friction drag and high heat transfer rates, inherent to vehicles in sustained, hypersonic flight. Another challenge is sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation and modeling was performed to provide insight into reducing skin friction drag and sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation was used to investigate boundary layer combustion, which has been shown to reduce skin friction drag. The objective of the numerical simulations was to quantify the effect of fuel injection parameters on boundary layer combustion and ultimately on the change in the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. A qualitative analysis of the results suggest that the reduction in the skin friction coefficient depends on multiple parameters and potentially an interaction between parameters. Sustained combustion can be achieved through a stabilized detonation wave. Additionally, stabilizing a detonation wave will yield rapid combustion. This will allow for a shorter and lighter-weight engine system, resulting in less required combustor cooling. A stabilized detonation wave was numerically modeled for various inlet and geometric cases. The effect of fuel concentration, inlet Mach number, and geometric configuration on the stability of a detonation wave was quantified. Correlations were established between fuel concentration, inlet speed, geometric configuration and parameters characterizing the detonation wave. A linear relationship was quantified between the fuel concentration and the parameters characterizing the detonation wave.

  9. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-07-01

    In this work, numerical simulations of flow separation control are performed. The separation control technique studied is called "synthetic jet actuation". The developed code employs a cell centered finite volume scheme which handles viscous, steady and unsteady compressible turbulent flows. The pulsating zero mass jet flow is simulated by imposing a harmonically varying transpiration boundary condition on the airfoil's surface. Turbulence is modeled with the algebraic model of Baldwin and Lomax. The application of synthetic jet actuators is based in their ability to energize the boundary layer, thereby providing significant increase in the lift coefficient. This has been corroborated experimentally and it is corroborated numerically in this research. The performed numerical simulation investigates the flow over a NACA0015 airfoil. For this flow Re = 9 x 105 and the reduced frequency and momentum coefficient are F + = 1.1 and Cmu = 0.04 respectively. The oscillatory injection takes place at 12.27% chord from the leading edge. A maximum increase in the mean lift coefficient of 93% is predicted by the code. A discrepancy of approximately 10% is observed with corresponding experimental data from the literature. The general trend is, however, well captured. The discrepancy is attributed to the modeling of the injection boundary condition and to the turbulence model. A sensitivity analysis of the lift coefficient to different values of the oscillation parameters is performed. It is concluded that tangential injection, F+ ≈ O(1) and the utilized grid resolution around the site of injection are optimal. Streamline fields obtained for different angles of injection are analyzed. Flow separation and attachment as functions of the injection angle and of the velocity of injection can be observed. It is finally concluded that a reliable numerical tool has been developed which can be utilized as a support tool in the optimization of the synthetic jet operation and in the

  10. Numerical simulation of space debris impacts on the Whipple shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, M.; Toda, S.; Kibe, S.

    1997-06-01

    The authors carried out three series of experimental tests of the first bumper perforation and main wall cratering processes directly caused by three types of projectiles with about 2, 4 and 7 km s -1 impact velocities but comparable initial kinetic energies, by using three different accelerators (one-stage powder gun, two-stage light-gas gun and rail gun), for the purpose of investigating space debris hypervelocity impacts onto single-walled Whipple bumper shields [1]. In the present study, after reviewing the numerical simulation method of hydrocode for both Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions, a number of parametric numerical simulation analyses using multiple material Eulerian methods were performed in order to optimize the material properties of bumper and main wall materials through comparison with experimental results of single target impacts by the projectiles. In particular, the material data on the dynamic fracture phenomena are discussed in detail in the first part. Then a couple of numerical calculations using the interactive Lagrangian rezoning method to simulate the overall impact process against the single walled Whipple shield were performed and compared with the corresponding experimental results. Both results indicated fairly good agreement with each other. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the present method is helpful and efficient in understanding the impact phenomena and fracture mechanism in the space debris hypervelocity impact problem. Finally the multiple material Eulerian method was applied to the same problems modeled by the interactive Lagrangian rezoning method used previously, because the former is much easier to use for almost all users, although it is more diffusive and unclear of material boundaries than the latter. Those two kinds of numerical results also indicated fairly good agreements with each other.

  11. Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees using renormalized numerical simulation: Alternate formulations and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Jason; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-12-01

    Simulating turbulent flows over objects characterized by hierarchies of length-scales poses special challenges associated with the cost of resolving small-scale elements. If these are treated as subgrid-scale elements, their effects on the resolved scales must be captured realistically. Most importantly, the associated drag forces must be parameterized. Prior work [S. Chester, C. Meneveau, and M. B. Parlange, "Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees with renormalized numerical simulation," J. Comput. Phys. 225, 427-448 (2007), 10.1016/j.jcp.2006.12.009] proposed a technique called renormalized numerical simulation (RNS), which is applicable to objects that display scale-invariant geometric (fractal) properties. The idea of RNS is similar to that of the dynamic model used in large eddy simulation to determine model parameters for the subgrid-stress tensor model in the bulk of the flow. In RNS, drag forces from the resolved elements that are obtained during the simulation are re-scaled appropriately by determining drag coefficients that are then applied to specify the drag forces associated with the subgrid-scale elements. The technique has already been applied to model turbulent flow over a canopy of fractal trees [S. Chester, C. Meneveau, and M. B. Parlange, "Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees with renormalized numerical simulation," J. Comput. Phys. 225, 427-448 (2007), 10.1016/j.jcp.2006.12.009], using a particular set of assumptions in evaluating the drag coefficient. In the current work we introduce a generalized framework for describing and implementing the RNS methodology. Furthermore, we describe various other possible practical implementations of RNS that differ on important, technical aspects related to (1) time averaging, (2) spatial localization, and (3) numerical representation of the drag forces. As part of this study, several RNS formulations are presented and compared. The various models are first implemented and compared in simulations of

  12. Numerical Simulation of Shock Propagation in Dilute Monodisperse Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartmell, J. J.; Nadim, A.; Barbone, P. E.

    1997-11-01

    The MacCormack finite-difference method is used to simulate the propagation and evolution of shock waves in a bubbly liquid. The bubbly liquid is modeled as a continuum which is described by the continuity and Euler equations, but with a non-equilibrium equation of state (EOS) which relates the mixture pressure to the mixture density and its first two material time derivatives. This nonlinear EOS can be derived by assuming the liquid phase to be incompressible and the gas bubbles to be identical and non-interacting. The bubbles are further assumed to translate with the mixture velocity, and their spherical oscillations are taken to be described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. In 1-D, the evolution of an initial step function in pressure is followed in time. This produces a shock which propagates towards the low pressure side and a rarefaction front which moves in the opposite direction. The shock forms a steady traveling wave with the oscillatory tail characteristic of bubbly liquids. In 2-D, the focusing of an initially small amplitude wave into a strong shock is simulated.

  13. Direct and Continuous Numerical Simulations of Bubbly Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tianshi; Samulyak, Roman; Glimm, James

    2003-11-01

    We have studied numerically the propagation of linear and nonlinear waves in bubbly flows using direct and continuous approaches. The direct method represents a mixture of gas bubbles in a liquid as a system of one phase domains separated by free interfaces. FronTier, a front tracking hydro code was used for numerical simulations. It is capable of tracking simultaneously a large number of interfaces and resolving their topological changes (the breakup and merger of bubbles) in two- and three-dimensional spaces. The continuous method describes a bubbly fluid as a homogeneous system or pseudofluid that obeys an equation of state of single-component flow. Homogeneous equation of state models based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation have been developed for the FronTier code. We have compared results of our numerical simulations with theoretical predictions and experimental data on the propagation of shocks and linear sound waves in bubbly fluids. The two methods can be applied to estimate the efficiency of gas bubble mitigation in reducing the cavitation erosion of the container of the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Thin Film Breakup on Nonwettable Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzzi, N.; Croce, G.

    2017-01-01

    When a continuous film flows on a nonwettable substrate surface, it may break up, with the consequent formation of a dry-patch. The actual shape of the resulting water layer is of great interest in several engineering applications, from in-flight icing simulation to finned dehumidifier behavior modeling. Here, a 2D numerical solver for the prediction of film flow behavior is presented. The effect of the contact line is introduced via the disjoining pressure terms, and both gravity and shear are included in the formulation. The code is validated with literature experimental data for the case of a stationary dry-patch on an inclined plane. Detailed numerical results are compared with literature simplified model prediction. Numerical simulation are then performed in order to predict the threshold value of the film thickness allowing for film breakup and to analyze the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on film velocity and position along the contact line. Those informations will be useful in order to efficiently predict more complex configuration involving multiple breakups on arbitrarily curved substrate surfaces (as those involved in in-flight icing phenomena on aircraft).

  15. Numerical simulation of evaporating liquid jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soteriou, Marios; Li, Xiaoyi

    2014-11-01

    Atomization of liquid fuel jets by cross-flowing air is critical to combustor performance. Ability to experimentally probe the fundamentals of this multiscale two phase flows has been hampered by limitations in experimental techniques and the challenges posed by operating conditions. Direct numerical simulation has recently emerged as a promising alternative due to advances in computer hardware and numerical methods. Using this approach, we recently demonstrated the ability to reproduce the physics of atomization of a liquid jet in cross-flow (LJIC) under ambient conditions. In this work we consider this flow in a high temperature environment. The inclusion of evaporation is the major new element. The numerical approach employs the CLSVOF method to capture the liquid-gas interface. Interface evaporation is solved directly with proper treatment of interface conditions and reproduces the relevant species/temperature fields there. A Lagrangian droplet tracking approach is used for the small droplets which are transferred from the Eulerian phase and evaporate using a traditional d2 law model. Other key algorithms of the massively parallelized solver include a ghost fluid method, a multi-grid preconditioned conjugate gradient approach and an adaptive mesh refinement technique. The overall method is verified using canonical problems. Simulations of evaporating LJIC point to the significant effect that evaporation has on the evolution of this flow and elucidate the downstream fuel species patterns.

  16. Towards direct numerical simulation of freely swimming fish.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curet, Oscar; Patankar, Neelesh; Maciver, Malcolm

    2006-11-01

    Swimming mechanisms employed by fish are currently inspiring unique underwater vehicles and robotic devices as well as basic science research into the neural control of movement. Key engineering issues include propulsion efficiency, precise motion control and maneuverability. A numerical scheme that simulates the motion of freely swimming fish will be a valuable design and research tool. We are working towards this goal. In particular we are interested in simulating the motion of a gymnotiform fish that swims by producing undulations of a ventral ribbon fin while keeping its body rigid. We model the fish as a rigid body with an attached undulating membrane. In our numerical scheme the key idea is to assume that the entire fluid-fish domain is a fluid. Then we impose two constraints: the first requires that the fluid in the region occupied by the fish body moves rigidly (a fictitious domain approach), and the second requires that the fluid at the location of the fin has the traveling wave velocity of the fin (an immersed boundary approach). Given the traveling wave form of the fin, the objective is for the numerical scheme to give the swimming velocity of the fish by solving the coupled fluid-fish problem. We will present results for the forces generated by a fin attached to a fixed body and preliminary results for freely swimming fish.

  17. A simplified model for TIG-dressing numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, P.; Berto, F.; James, M. N.

    2017-04-01

    Irrespective of the mechanical properties of the alloy to be welded, the fatigue strength of welded joints is primarily controlled by the stress concentration associated with the weld toe or weld root. In order to reduce the effects of such notch defects in welds, which are influenced by tensile properties of the alloy, post-weld improvement techniques have been developed. The two most commonly used techniques are weld toe grinding and TIG dressing, which are intended to both remove toe defects such as non-metallic intrusions and to re-profile the weld toe region to give a lower stress concentration. In the case of TIG dressing the weld toe is re-melted to provide a smoother transition between the plate and the weld crown and to beneficially modify the residual stress redistribution. Assessing the changes to weld stress state arising from TIG-dressing is most easily accomplished through a complex numerical simulation that requires coupled thermo-fluid dynamics and solid mechanics. However, this can be expensive in terms of computational cost and time needed to reach a solution. The present paper therefore proposes a simplified numerical model that overcomes such drawbacks and which simulates the remelted toe region by means of the activation and deactivation of elements in the numerical model.

  18. Water and heat fluxes in desert soils: 2. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Milly, P. C. D.

    1994-03-01

    Transient one-dimensional fluxes of soil water (liquid and vapor) and heat in response to 1 year of atmospheric forcing were simulated numerically for a site in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas. The model was initialized and evaluated using the monitoring data presented in a companion paper (Scanlon, this issue). Soil hydraulic and thermal properties were estimated a priori from a combination of laboratory measurements, models, and other published information. In the first simulation, the main drying curves were used to describe soil water retention, and hysteresis was ignored. Remarkable consistency was found between computed and measured water potentials and temperatures. Attenuation and phase shift of the seasonal cycle of water potentials below the shallow subsurface active zone (0.0- to 0.3-m depth) were similar to those of temperatures, suggesting that water potential fluctuations were driven primarily by temperature changes. Water fluxes in the upper 0.3 m of soil were dominated by downward and upward liquid fluxes that resulted from infiltration of rain and subsequent evaporation from the surface. Upward flux was vapor dominated only in the top several millimeters of the soil during periods of evaporation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, water fluxes varied slowly and were dominated by downward thermal vapor flux that decreased with depth, causing a net accumulation of water. In a second simulation, nonhysteretic water retention was instead described by the estimated main wetting curves; the resulting differences in fluxes were attributed to lower initial water contents (given fixed initial water potential) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities that were lower than they were in the first simulation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, the thermal vapor fluxes dominated and were similar to those in the first simulation. Two other simulations were performed, differing from the first only in the prescription of different (wetter) initial water potentials. These three simulations

  19. Numerical modeling of 1D heterogeneous combustion in porous media under free convection taking into account dependence of permeability on porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical experiment the one-dimensional unsteady process of heterogeneous combustion in porous object under free convection is considered when the dependence of permeability on porosity is taken into account. The combustion is due to exothermic reaction between the fuel in the solid porous medium and oxidizer contained in the gas flowing through the porous object. In the present work the process is considered under natural convection, i.e. when the flow rate and velocity of the gas at the inlet to the porous objects are unknown, but the gas pressure at object boundaries is known. The influence of changing of permeability due to the changing of porosity on the solution is investigated using original numerical method, which is based on a combination of explicit and implicit finite-difference schemes. It was shown that taking into account the dependence of permeability on porosity, which is described by some known equations, can significantly change the solution in one-dimensional case. The changing of permeability due to the changing of porosity leads to the speed increasing of both cocurrent and the countercurrent combustion waves, and to the temperature increasing in the combustion zone of countercurrent combustion wave.

  20. Prediction of cavitating flow noise by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung H.; Moon, Young J.; Shin, Byeong Rog

    2008-06-01

    In this study, a direct numerical simulation procedure for the cavitating flow noise is presented. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are written for the two-phase fluid, employing a density-based homogeneous equilibrium model with a linearly-combined equation of state. To resolve the linear and non-linear waves in the cavitating flow, a sixth-order compact central scheme is utilized with the selective spatial filtering technique. The present cavitation model and numerical methods are validated for two benchmark problems: linear wave convection and acoustic saturation in a bubbly flow. The cavitating flow noise is then computed for a 2D circular cylinder flow at Reynolds number based on a cylinder diameter, 200 and cavitation numbers, σ=0.7-2. It is observed that, at cavitation numbers σ=1 and 0.7, the cavitating flow and noise characteristics are significantly changed by the shock waves due to the coherent collapse of the cloud cavitation in the wake. To verify the present direct simulation and further analyze the sources of cavitation noise, an acoustic analogy based on a classical theory of Fitzpatrik and Strasberg is derived. The far-field noise predicted by direct simulation is well compared with that of acoustic analogy, and it also confirms the f-2 decaying rate in the spectrum, as predicted by the model of Fitzpatrik and Strasberg with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation.

  1. Numerical aerodynamic simulation of the space shuttle ascent environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotnick, Jeff P.; Martin, F. W., Jr.; Buning, P. G.; Chiu, Ing-Tsau; Meakin, R. L.; Obayashi, Shigeru; Rizk, Yehia M.; Ben-Shmuel, S.; Steger, Joseph L.; Yarrow, M.

    1989-01-01

    After the STS 51-L accident, an extensive review of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's ascent aerodynamic loads uncovered several questionable areas that required further analysis. The insight gained by comparing the Shuttle ascent CFD numerical simulations, obtained by the NASA Ames Space Shuttle Flow Simulation Group, to the current IVBC-3 aerodynamic loads database was instrumental in resolving uncertainties on the Orbiter payload bay doors and fuselage. Initial confidence in the numerical simulations was gained by comparing them with the limited flight data that had been obtained during the Orbiter Flight Test (OFT) program. Current CFD results exist for Mach numbers 0.6, 0.9, 1.05, 1.55, 2.0, and 2.5. Since the pre STS-1 wind tunnel test program (IA-105) often yields considerable differences when compared to STS-5 flight data, the M(sub infinity) = 1.05 transonic case is the most investigated. The IA308 mated-vehicle hot gas plume wind tunnel test, recently completed at AEDC 16T (transonic) and Lewis (hypersonic), is also used to compare with the computation where applicable.

  2. Numerical simulation of microlayer formation in nucleate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guion, Alexandre; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Afkhami, Shahriar; Zaleski, Stephane

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulations of boiling resolve the macroscopic liquid-vapor interface of the bubble, but resort to subgrid models to account for microscale effects, such as the evaporation of the liquid microlayer underneath the bubble. Realistic time-dependent microlayer evaporation models necessitate initialization of the microlayer profile. In the recent simulations published in the literature, missing input data on initial microlayer geometry is replaced by estimated values from separate experimental measurements at similar pressure. Yet, the geometry of the initial microlayer not only depends on pressure for a given set of fluids, but also on bubble growth rate and that dependence is not known a priori. In this work, the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method, implemented in the open-source code Gerris (gfs.sf.net), is used to simulate, with unprecedented accuracy, the dynamics of microlayer formation underneath a growing bubble. A large numerical database is generated, yielding the microlayer thickness during the inertia controlled phase of bubble growth as a function of radial distance from the bubble root, time, contact angle, and capillary number associated with bubble growth. No significant dependence on density or viscosity ratios were found.

  3. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azaiez, Jalel; Homsy, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    This work is a continuing effort to advance our understanding of the effects of polymer additives on the structures of the mixing layer. In anticipation of full nonlinear simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer, we examined in a first stage the linear stability of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. The results of this study show that, for a fluid described by the Oldroyd-B model, viscoelasticity reduces the instability of the inviscid mixing layer in a special limit where the ratio (We/Re) is of order 1 where We is the Weissenberg number, a measure of the elasticity of the flow, and Re is the Reynolds number. In the present study, we pursue this project with numerical simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. Our primary objective is to determine the effects of viscoelasticity on the roll-up structure. We also examine the origin of the numerical instabilities usually encountered in the simulations of non-Newtonian fluids.

  4. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  5. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-01

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  6. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL HEATING THROUGH FOOTPOINT BRAIDING

    SciTech Connect

    Hansteen, V.; Pontieu, B. De; Carlsson, M.; Guerreiro, N. E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com

    2015-10-01

    Advanced three-dimensional (3D) radiative MHD simulations now reproduce many properties of the outer solar atmosphere. When including a domain from the convection zone into the corona, a hot chromosphere and corona are self-consistently maintained. Here we study two realistic models, with different simulated areas, magnetic field strength and topology, and numerical resolution. These are compared in order to characterize the heating in the 3D-MHD simulations which self-consistently maintains the structure of the atmosphere. We analyze the heating at both large and small scales and find that heating is episodic and highly structured in space, but occurs along loop-shaped structures, and moves along with the magnetic field. On large scales we find that the heating per particle is maximal near the transition region and that widely distributed opposite-polarity field in the photosphere leads to a greater heating scale height in the corona. On smaller scales, heating is concentrated in current sheets, the thicknesses of which are set by the numerical resolution. Some current sheets fragment in time, this process occurring more readily in the higher-resolution model leading to spatially highly intermittent heating. The large-scale heating structures are found to fade in less than about five minutes, while the smaller, local, heating shows timescales of the order of two minutes in one model and one minutes in the other, higher-resolution, model.

  7. Using Numerical Modeling to Simulate Space Capsule Ground Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Ernie; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental work is being conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) to investigate ground landing capabilities of the Orion crew exploration vehicle (CEV). The Orion capsule is NASA s replacement for the Space Shuttle. The Orion capsule will service the International Space Station and be used for future space missions to the Moon and to Mars. To evaluate the feasibility of Orion ground landings, a series of capsule impact tests are being performed at the NASA Langley Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR). The experimental results derived at LandIR provide means to validate and calibrate nonlinear dynamic finite element models, which are also being developed during this study. Because of the high cost and time involvement intrinsic to full-scale testing, numerical simulations are favored over experimental work. Subsequent to a numerical model validated by actual test responses, impact simulations will be conducted to study multiple impact scenarios not practical to test. Twenty-one swing tests using the LandIR gantry were conducted during the June 07 through October 07 time period to evaluate the Orion s impact response. Results for two capsule initial pitch angles, 0deg and -15deg , along with their computer simulations using LS-DYNA are presented in this article. A soil-vehicle friction coefficient of 0.45 was determined by comparing the test stopping distance with computer simulations. In addition, soil modeling accuracy is presented by comparing vertical penetrometer impact tests with computer simulations for the soil model used during the swing tests.

  8. An Object Model for a Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, D.; Bhalla, P. N.; Pratap, V.; Reddy, P.

    1998-01-01

    Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS) is a packet of software which numerically simulates the behavior of a rocket engine. Different parameters of the components of an engine is the input to these programs. Depending on these given parameters the programs output the behaviors of those components. These behavioral values are then used to guide the design of or to diagnose a model of a rocket engine "built" by a composition of these programs simulating different components of the engine system. In order to use this software package effectively one needs to have a flexible model of a rocket engine. These programs simulating different components then should be plugged into this modular representation. Our project is to develop an object based model of such an engine system. We are following an iterative and incremental approach in developing the model, as is the standard practice in the area of object oriented design and analysis of softwares. This process involves three stages: object modeling to represent the components and sub-components of a rocket engine, dynamic modeling to capture the temporal and behavioral aspects of the system, and functional modeling to represent the transformational aspects. This article reports on the first phase of our activity under a grant (RENS) from the NASA Lewis Research center. We have utilized Rambaugh's object modeling technique and the tool UML for this purpose. The classes of a rocket engine propulsion system are developed and some of them are presented in this report. The next step, developing a dynamic model for RENS, is also touched upon here. In this paper we will also discuss the advantages of using object-based modeling for developing this type of an integrated simulator over other tools like an expert systems shell or a procedural language, e.g., FORTRAN. Attempts have been made in the past to use such techniques.

  9. Efficient numerical simulation of electron states in quantum wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerkhoven, Thomas; Galick, Albert T.; Ravaioli, Umberto; Arends, John H.; Saad, Youcef

    1990-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for the numerical simulation of electrons in a quantum wire as described by a two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for Schroedinger's equation coupled with Poisson's equation. Initially, the algorithm employs an underrelaxed fixed point iteration to generate an approximation which is reasonably close to the solution. Subsequently, this approximate solution is employed as an initial guess for a Jacobian-free implementation of an approximate Newton method. In this manner the nonlinearity in the model is dealt with effectively. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in a set of numerical experiments which study the electron states on the cross section of a quantum wire structure based on III-V semiconductors at 4.2 and 77 K.

  10. Numerical simulation of MHD shock waves in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Dryer, M.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the interplanetary magnetic field on the propagation speed of shock waves through an ambient solar wind are examined by numerical solutions of the time-dependent nonlinear equations of motion. The magnetic field always increases the velocity of strong shocks. Although the field may temporarily slow down weak shocks inside 1 AU, it eventually also causes weak shocks to travel faster than they would without the magnetic field at larger distances. Consistent with the increase in the shock velocity, the gas pressure ratio across a shock is reduced considerably in the presence of the magnetic field. The numerical method is used to simulate (starting at 0.3 AU) the large deceleration of a shock observed in the lower corona by ground-based radio instrumentation and the more gradual deceleration of the shock in the solar wind observed by the Pioneer 9 and Pioneer 10 spacecraft.

  11. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, Richard A.; Esch, Victor C.; Papademetriou, Stephanos

    1999-06-01

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the stimulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to-patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  12. Mechanical characterisation of Dacron graft: Experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-01-04

    Experimental and numerical analyses focused on the mechanical characterisation of a woven Dacron vascular graft are presented. To that end, uniaxial tensile tests under different orientations have been performed to study the anisotropic behaviour of the material. These tests have been used to adjust the parameters of a hyperelastic anisotropic constitutive model which is applied to predict through numerical simulation the mechanical response of this material in the ring tensile test. The obtained results show that the model used is capable of representing adequately the nonlinear elastic region and, in particular, it captures the progressive increase of the rigidity and the anisotropy due to the stretching of the Dacron. The importance of this research lies in the possibility of predicting the graft׳s mechanical response under generalized loading such as those that occur under physiological conditions after surgical procedures.

  13. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-08-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  14. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent boundary layer with constant thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yichen; Xu, Chunxiao; Huang, Weixi

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation is performed to turbulent boundary layer (TBL) with constant thickness at Reθ = 1420 . Periodic boundary condition is applied in the streamwise direction, and a mean body force equivalent to the convection term in the mean momentum equation is imposed in this direction. The body force is calculated using the published TBL data of Schlatter and Orlu (2010) at Reθ = 1420 . The presently simulated TBL is compared with the conventional TBL and turbulent channel flow at the prescribed Reynolds number. The turbulent statistics agrees well with that of Schlatter and Orlu (2010). The pre-multiplied energy spectra in current simulation also present high similarity with the conventional TBL, while differ obviously with those in turbulent channel. The successful replication of turbulent boundary in the current simulation provides an alternative method for boundary layer simulation with much less computational cost. Meanwhile, in aspect of both turbulent statistics and flow structures, the current results indicate that the differences between turbulent channel and boundary layer flow mainly caused by the discrepancy in driving force distribution rather than the periodic boundary restriction. National Natural Science Foundation of China (Project No. 11490551, 11472154, 11322221, 11132005).

  16. Numerical simulations of drop impact on superhydrophobic structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, Davide; Larentis, Stefano; Pugno, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    During the last decade drop impact dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces has been intensively investigated because of the incredible properties of water repellency exhibited by this kind of surfaces, mostly inspired by biological examples such as Lotus leave. Thanks to the recent progress in micro-fabrication technology is possible to tailor surfaces wettability defining specific pillar-like structured surfaces. In this work, the behavior of impinging drops on these pillar-like surfaces is simulated, characterizing temporal evolution of droplets contact radius and drop maximal deformation dependence on Weber number. Numerical simulations results are compared with theoretical and experimental results guaranteeing simulation reliability. Fingering patterns obtained from drop impact has been studied obtaining a correlation between number of fingers and Weber number. Drop fragmentation pattern obtained from simulations supports the proposed correlation. Different drop impact outcomes (e.g. rebound, fragmentation) on structured superhydrophobic surfaces are simulated, focusing on the influence of micro-structured surface geometrical pattern. This investigation is relevant in order to define design rules for possible reliable non wettable surfaces. Financial support by Alta Scuola Politecnica.

  17. Numerical simulation of pressure pulsations in Francis turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoli, M. V.; Schilling, R.

    2012-11-01

    In the last decades, hydraulic turbines have experienced the increase of their power density and the extension of their operating range, leading the fluid and mechanical dynamic effects to become significantly more pronounced. The understanding of the transient fluid flow and of the associated unsteady effects is essential for the reduction of the pressure pulsation level and improvement of the machine dynamic behaviour. In this study, the instationary fluid flow through the complete turbine was numerically calculated for an existing Francis machine with high specific speed. The hybrid turbulence models DES (detached eddy simulation) and SAS (scale adaptive simulation) allowed the accurate simulation of complex dynamic flow effects, such as the rotor-stator-interaction and the draft tube instabilities. Different operating conditions, as full load, part load, higher part load and deep part load, were successfully simulated and showed very tight agreement with the experimental results from the model tests. The transient pressure field history, obtained from the CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulation and stored for each time step, was used as input for the full instationary FEA (finite element analysis) of turbine components. The assessment of the machine dynamic motion also offered the possibility to contribute to the understanding of the pressure pulsation effects and to further increase the turbine stability. This research project was developed at the Institute of Fluid Mechanics of the TU München.

  18. Numerical simulations for plasma-based dry reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeckx, Ramses; Aerts, Robby; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2012-10-01

    The conversion of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) to more valuable chemicals is one of the challenges of the 21st century. The aim of this study is to describe the plasma chemistry occurring in a DBD for the dry reforming of CO2/CH4 mixtures, via numerical simulations. For this purpose we apply the 0D simulation code ``Global/kin,'' developed by Kushner, in order to simulate the reaction chemistry and the actual reaction conditions for a DBD, including the occurrence of streamers. For the chemistry part, we include a chemistry set consisting of 62 species taking part in 530 reactions. First we describe the reaction chemistry during one streamer, by simulating one discharge pulse and its afterglow, to obtain a better understanding of the reaction kinetics. Subsequently, we expand these results to real time scale simulations, i.e., 1 to 10 seconds, where we analyze the effects of the multiple discharges (streamers) and input energy on the conversion and the selectivity of the reaction products, as well as on the energy efficiency of the process. The model is validated based on experimental data from literature.

  19. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  20. Numerical Simulation of Tangling in Jet Engine Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendón, David A.; Erice, Borja; Gálvez, Francisco; Sánchez-Gálvez, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    The numerical analysis of certain safety related problems presents serious difficulties, since the large number of components present leads to huge finite element models that can only be solved by using large and expensive computers or by making rough approaches to the problem. Tangling, or clashing, in the turbine of a jet engine airplane is an example of such problems. This is caused by the crash and friction between rotor and stator blades in the turbine after an eventual shaft failure. When facing the study of an event through numerical modelling, the accurate simulation of this problem would require the engineer to model all the rotor and stator blades existing in the turbine stage, using a small element size in all pieces. Given that the number of stator and rotor blades is usually around 200, such simulations would require millions of elements. This work presents a new numerical methodology, specifically developed for the accurate modelling of the tangling problem that, depending on the turbine configuration, is able to reduce the number of nodes up to an order of magnitude without losing accuracy. The methodology, which benefits from the cyclic configuration of turbines, is successfully applied to the numerical analysis of a hypothetical tangling event in a turbine, providing valuable data such as the rotating velocity decrease of the turbine, the braking torque and the damage suffered by the blades. The methodology is somewhat general and can be applied to any problem in which damage caused by the interaction between a rotating and static piece is to be analysed.

  1. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  2. Computer-based numerical simulations of adsorption in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashimova, Diana

    2014-08-01

    Zeolites are crystalline oxides with uniform, molecular-pore diameters of 3-14Å. Significant developments since 1950 made production of synthetic zeolites with high purity and controlled chemical composition possible. In powder-form, zeolites are major role-players in high-tech, industrial catalysis, adsorption, and ion exchange applications. Understanding properties of thin-film zeolites has been a focus of recent research. The ability to fine-tune desired macroscopic properties by controlled alteration at the molecular level is paramount. The relationships between macroscopic and molecular-level properties are established by experimental research. Because generating macroscopic, experimental data in a controlled laboratory can be prohibitively costly and time-consuming, reliable numerical simulations, which remove such difficulties, are an attractive alternative. Using a Configurational Biased Monte Carlo (CBMC) approach in grand canonical ensemble, numerical models for pure component and multicomponent adsorption processes were developed. Theoretical models such as ideal (IAST) and real adsorbed solution theory (RAST) to predict mixture adsorption in nanopores were used for comparison. Activity coefficients used in RAST calculations were determined from the Wilson, spreading pressure and COSMO-RS models. Investigative testing of the method on known materials, represented by all-silica zeolites such as MFI (channel type) and DDR (cage type), proved successful in replicating experimental data on adsorption of light hydrocarbons - alkanes, such as methane, ethane, propane and butane. Additionally, adsorption of binary and ternary mixtures was simulated. The given numerical approach developed can be a powerful, cost and time saving tool to predict process characteristics for different molecular-structure configurations. The approach used here for simulating adsorption properties of nanopore materials including process characteristics, may have great potential for

  3. Numerical prediction of microstructure and hardness in multicycle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddy, A. S.; McDill, J. M. J.

    1996-06-01

    Thermal-microstructural predictions are made and compared to physical simulations of heat-affected zones in multipass and weaved welds. The microstructural prediction algorithm includes reaustenitization kinetics, grain growth, austenite decomposition kinetics, hardness, and tempering. Microstructural simulation of weaved welds requires that the algorithm include transient reaustenitization, austenite decomposition for arbitrary thermal cycles including during reheating, and tempering. Material properties for each of these phenomena are taken from the best available literature. The numerical predictions are compared with the results of physical simulations made at the Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, on a Gleeble 1500 simulator. Thermal histories used in the physical simulations included single-pass welds, isothermal tempering, two-cycle, and three-cycle welds. The two-and three-cycle welds include temper-bead and weaved-weld simulations. A recurring theme in the analysis is the significant variation found in the material properties for the same grade of steel. This affected all the material properties used including those governing reaustenitization, austenite grain growth, austenite decomposition, and hardness. Hardness measurements taken from the literature show a variation of ±5 to 30 HV on the same sample. Alloy differences within the allowable range also led to hardness variations of ±30 HV for the heat-affected zone of multipass welds. The predicted hardnesses agree extremely well with those taken from the physical simulations. Some differences due to problems with the austenite decomposition properties were noted in that bainite formation was predicted to occur somewhat more rapidly than was found experimentally. Reaustenitization values predicted during the rapid excursions to intercritical temperatures were also in good qualitative agreement with those measured experimentally.

  4. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility preliminary study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A technology forecast was established for the 1980-1985 time frame and the appropriateness of various logic and memory technologies for the design of the numerical aerodynamic simulation facility was assessed. Flow models and their characteristics were analyzed and matched against candidate processor architecture. Metrics were established for the total facility, and housing and support requirements of the facility were identified. An overview of the system is presented, with emphasis on the hardware of the Navier-Stokes solver, which is the key element of the system. Software elements of the system are also discussed.

  5. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  6. Accurate numerical simulation of short fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Marhic, M E; Rieznik, A A; Kalogerakis, G; Braimiotis, C; Fragnito, H L; Kazovsky, L G

    2008-03-17

    We improve the accuracy of numerical simulations for short fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs). Instead of using the usual coarse-step method, we adopt a model for birefringence and dispersion which uses fine-step variations of the parameters. We also improve the split-step Fourier method by exactly treating the nonlinear ellipse rotation terms. We find that results obtained this way for two-pump OPAs can be significantly different from those obtained by using the usual coarse-step fiber model, and/or neglecting ellipse rotation terms.

  7. Numerical simulation of low Prandtl number turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, C.; Rogers, M.; Chasnov, J.; Petresky, J.

    1990-12-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent mixing of strongly diffusive scalar fields were carried out with and without subgrid-scale modeling of the small-scale strain field. For low Reynolds number flows, when the rate of strain field (determined primarily by the small scales) is fully resolved, the scalar microstructure was found to collapse under Batchelor rate-of-strain scaling even for small Prandtl numbers, in agreement with Kerr. For high Reynolds number flows, when small-scale straining is modeled with a subgrid-scale model, the scalar microstructure follows the Batchelor, Howells, and Townsend predictions that the small-scale rate-of-strain is irrelevant.

  8. Numerical simulation of lava flows: Applications to the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, James R.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Kousoum, Juliana; Lampkin, Derrick J.

    1993-01-01

    Lava flows are the visible expression of the extrusion of volcanic materials on a variety of planetary surfaces. A computer program described by Ishihara et al. appears to be well suited for application to different environments, and we have undertaken tests to evaluate their approach. Our results are somewhat mixed; the program does reproduce reasonable lava flow behavior in many situations, but we have encountered some conditions common to planetary environments for which the current program is inadequate. Here we present our initial efforts to identify the 'parameter space' for reasonable numerical simulations of lava flows.

  9. Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M.

    2012-07-01

    Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

  10. Numerical simulation of fluid flow around a scramaccelerator projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.; Sobota, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the fluid motion and temperature distribution around a 'scramaccelerator' projectile are obtained for Mach numbers in the 5-10 range. A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for inviscid and viscous two-dimensional or axisymmetric compressible flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly, using bilinear isoparametric quadrilateral elements, mass lumping, and a shock-capturing Petrov-Galerkin formulation. Computed results indicate that maintaining on-design performance for controlling and stabilizing oblique detonation waves is critically dependent on projectile shape and Mach number.

  11. Numerical Simulation of a High Mach Number Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1993-01-01

    The recent efforts to develop accurate numerical schemes for transition and turbulent flows are motivated, among other factors, by the need for accurate prediction of flow noise. The success of developing high speed civil transport plane (HSCT) is contingent upon our understanding and suppression of the jet exhaust noise. The radiated sound can be directly obtained by solving the full (time-dependent) compressible Navier-Stokes equations. However, this requires computational storage that is beyond currently available machines. This difficulty can be overcome by limiting the solution domain to the near field where the jet is nonlinear and then use acoustic analogy (e.g., Lighthill) to relate the far-field noise to the near-field sources. The later requires obtaining the time-dependent flow field. The other difficulty in aeroacoustics computations is that at high Reynolds numbers the turbulent flow has a large range of scales. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) cannot obtain all the scales of motion at high Reynolds number of technological interest. However, it is believed that the large scale structure is more efficient than the small-scale structure in radiating noise. Thus, one can model the small scales and calculate the acoustically active scales. The large scale structure in the noise-producing initial region of the jet can be viewed as a wavelike nature, the net radiated sound is the net cancellation after integration over space. As such, aeroacoustics computations are highly sensitive to errors in computing the sound sources. It is therefore essential to use a high-order numerical scheme to predict the flow field. The present paper presents the first step in a ongoing effort to predict jet noise. The emphasis here is in accurate prediction of the unsteady flow field. We solve the full time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations by a high order finite difference method. Time accurate spatial simulations of both plane and axisymmetric jet are presented. Jet Mach

  12. Numerical simulation of compact intracloud discharge and generated electromagnetic pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2015-06-01

    Using the concept of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche, numerical simulation of compact intracloud discharge as a generator of powerful natural electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) in the HF-UHF range was conducted. We evaluated the numbers of electrons initiating the avalanche, with which the calculated EMP characteristics are consistent with measured ones. The discharge capable of generating EMPs produces runaway electrons in numbers close to those in the source of terrestrial γ-flashes (TGF) registered in the nearest space, which may be an argument for a joint EMP and TGF source.

  13. Numerical simulations of volume holographic imaging system resolution characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yajun; Jiang, Zhuqing; Liu, Shaojie; Tao, Shiquan

    2009-05-01

    Because of the Bragg selectivity of volume holographic gratings, it helps VHI system to optically segment the object space. In this paper, properties of point-source diffraction imaging in terms of the point-spread function (PSF) are investigated, and characteristics of depth and lateral resolutions in a VHI system is numerically simulated. The results show that the observed diffracted field obviously changes with the displacement in the z direction, and is nearly unchanged with displacement in the x and y directions. The dependence of the diffracted imaging field on the z-displacement provides a way to possess 3-D image by VHI.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Static Tested Ramjet Dump Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    The flow field of a Liquid Fuel Ram Jet engine side dump combustor with kerosene fuel is numerically simulated using commercial CFD code CFX-11. Reynolds Averaged 3-D Navier-Stokes equations are solved alongwith SST turbulence model. Single step infinitely fast reaction is assumed for kerosene combustion. The combustion efficiency is evaluated in terms of the unburnt kerosene vapour leaving the combustor. The comparison of measured pressures with computed values show that the computation underpredicts (~5 %) pressures for non reacting cases but overpredicts (9-7 %) for reacting cases.

  15. Numerical simulation in alternating current field measurement inducer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhixiong; Zheng, Wenpei

    2017-02-01

    The present work develops a numerical simulation model to evaluate the magnetic field perturbation of a twin coil alternating current field measurement (ACFM) inducer passing above a surface-breaking crack for the purpose of enhanced crack detection. Model predictions show good agreement with experimental data, verifying the accuracy of the model. The model includes the influence of various parameters, such as core dimensions and core positions on the perturbed magnetic field above a crack. Optimized design parameters for a twin coil inducer are given according to the analysis results, which provide for a greatly improved detection effect.

  16. Numerical and laboratory simulation of fault motion and earthquake occurrence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Simple linear rheologies were used with elastic forces driving the main events and viscoelastic forces being important for aftershock and creep occurrence. Friction and its dependence on velocity, stress, and displacement also plays a key role in determining how, when, and where fault motion occurs. The discussion of the qualitative behavior of the simulators focuses on the manner in which energy was stored in the system and released by the unstable and stable sliding processes. The numerical results emphasize the statistics of earthquake occurrence and the correlations among source parameters.

  17. Efficient Parallel Algorithm For Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Stuti; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1997-01-01

    A distributed algorithm for a high-order-accurate finite-difference approach to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of transition and turbulence in compressible flows is described. This work has two major objectives. The first objective is to demonstrate that parallel and distributed-memory machines can be successfully and efficiently used to solve computationally intensive and input/output intensive algorithms of the DNS class. The second objective is to show that the computational complexity involved in solving the tridiagonal systems inherent in the DNS algorithm can be reduced by algorithm innovations that obviate the need to use a parallelized tridiagonal solver.

  18. Time-Accurate Numerical Simulations of Synthetic Jet Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupesh, K-A. B.; Ravi, B. R.; Mittal, R.; Raju, R.; Gallas, Q.; Cattafesta, L.

    2007-01-01

    The unsteady evolution of three-dimensional synthetic jet into quiescent air is studied by time-accurate numerical simulations using a second-order accurate mixed explicit-implicit fractional step scheme on Cartesian grids. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations of synthetic jet are carried out at a Reynolds number (based on average velocity during the discharge phase of the cycle V(sub j), and jet width d) of 750 and Stokes number of 17.02. The results obtained are assessed against PIV and hotwire measurements provided for the NASA LaRC workshop on CFD validation of synthetic jets.

  19. Directly comparing gravitational wave data to numerical relativity simulations: systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Jacob; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Healy, James; Lousto, Carlos; Zlochower, Yosef; Shoemaker, Deirdre; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Pankow, Christopher; Brady, Patrick; Scheel, Mark; Pfeiffer, Harald; Ossokine, Serguei

    2017-01-01

    We compare synthetic data directly to complete numerical relativity simulations of binary black holes. In doing so, we circumvent ad-hoc approximations introduced in semi-analytical models previously used in gravitational wave parameter estimation and compare the data against the most accurate waveforms including higher modes. In this talk, we focus on the synthetic studies that test potential sources of systematic errors. We also run ``end-to-end'' studies of intrinsically different synthetic sources to show we can recover parameters for different systems.

  20. Numerical simulations of type-III solar radio bursts.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Robinson, P A; Cairns, I H

    2006-04-14

    The first numerical simulations are presented for type-III solar radio bursts in the inhomogeneous solar corona and interplanetary space, that include microscale quasilinear and nonlinear processes, intermediate-scale driven ambient density fluctuations, and large scale evolution of electron beams, Langmuir and ion sound waves, and fundamental and harmonic electromagnetic emission. Bidirectional coronal emission is asymmetric between the upward and downward directions, and harmonic emission dominates fundamental emission. In interplanetary space, fundamental and/or harmonic emission can be important. Langmuir and ion sound waves are bursty and the statistics of Langmuir wave energy agree well with the predictions of stochastic growth theory.

  1. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Reckinger, Scott James; Livescu, Daniel; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-09-02

    A comprehensive numerical methodology has been developed that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification-dependent vorticity production. The computational framework is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  2. A 1-D simulation analysis of the development and maintenance of the 2001 red tide of the ichthyotoxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis on the West Florida shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenes, J. M.; Darrow, B. P.; Walsh, J. J.; Jolliff, J. K.; Chen, F. R.; Weisberg, R. H.; Zheng, L.

    2012-06-01

    A one-dimensional (1-D) ecological model, HABSIM, examined the initiation and maintenance of the 2001 red tide on the West Florida shelf (WFS). Phytoplankton competition among toxic dinoflagellates (Karenia brevis), nitrogen fixing cyanophytes (Trichodesmium erythraeum), large siliceous phytoplankton (diatoms), and small non-siliceous phytoplankton (microflagellates) explored the sequence of events required to support the observed red tide from August to December 2001. The ecological model contained 24 state variables within five submodels: circulation, atmospheric (iron deposition), bio-optics, pelagic (phytoplankton, nutrients, bacteria, zooplankton, and fish), and benthic (nutrient regeneration). The 2001 model results reaffirmed that diazotrophs are the basis for initiation of red tides of K. brevis on the WFS. A combination of selective grazing pressure, iron fertilization, low molar nitrogen to phosphorus ratios, and eventual silica limitation of fast-growing diatoms set the stage for dominance of nitrogen fixers. "New" nitrogen was made available for subsequent blooms of K. brevis through the release of ammonium and urea during nitrogen fixation, as well as during cell lysis, by the Trichodesmium population. Once K. brevis biomass reached ichthyotoxic levels, rapid decay of subsequent fish kills supplied additional organic nutrients for utilization by these opportunistic toxic algae. Both nutrient vectors represented organic non-siliceous sources of nitrogen and phosphorus, further exacerbating silica limitation of the diatom population. The model reproduced this spring transition from a simple estuarine-driven, diatom-based food chain to a complex summer-fall system of Trichodesmium and toxic dinoflagellates. While the model was able to replicate the initiation and maintenance of the 2001 red tide, bloom termination was not captured by this 1-D form on the WFS. Here, horizontal advection and perhaps cell lysis loss terms might play a significant role, to be

  3. The CFS-PML in numerical simulation of ATEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuejiao; Ji, Yanju; Qiu, Shuo; Guan, Shanshan; Wu, Yanqi

    2017-01-01

    In the simulation of airborne transient electromagnetic method (ATEM) in time-domain, the truncated boundary reflection can bring a big error to the results. The complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (CFS-PML) absorbing boundary condition has been proved to have a better absorption of low frequency incident wave and can reduce the late reflection greatly. In this paper, we apply the CFS-PML to three-dimensional numerical simulation of ATEM in time-domain to achieve a high precision .The expression of divergence equation in CFS-PML is confirmed and its explicit iteration format based on the finite difference method and the recursive convolution technique is deduced. Finally, we use the uniformity half space model and the anomalous model to test the validity of this method. Results show that the CFS-PML can reduce the average relative error to 2.87% and increase the accuracy of the anomaly recognition.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Sound-Orifice-Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Bodony, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    We report on a series of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the interaction of a monochromatic incident acoustic field with a cavity-backed circular orifice in the presence of laminar and turbulent boundary layers of freestream Mach number 0.5 and momentum thickness Reynolds number 2,300, with application to acoustic liners. The simulations show that the addition of the orifice increases the drag and can induce laminar-to-turbulent transition at sufficiently high acoustic levels. Furthermore, the sound-orifice-boundary layer system support three distinct timescales whose spatial distributions change with the phase of the incident sound. Details of the near-orifice interaction are studied to create a model of the orifice discharge coefficient that is part of a time-domain, nonlinear reduced-order model (ROM) for the liner impedance. Comparisons between the ROM-predicted and DNS-measured near-orifice flow and acoustic impedance are given.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Plasma Based Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Jacob, J. D.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators. The effects of the plasma actuators on the external flow are incorporated into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector. In order to compute this body force vector, the model solves two additional equations: one for the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and the other for the charge density representing the ionized air. The model is calibrated against an experiment having plasma-driven flow in a quiescent environment and is then applied to simulate a low pressure turbine flow with large flow separation. The effects of the plasma actuator on control of flow separation are demonstrated numerically.

  6. Reliability of numerical wind tunnels for VAWT simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raciti Castelli, M.; Masi, M.; Battisti, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.; Dossena, V.; Persico, G.

    2016-09-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based on the Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations have long been widely used to study vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs). Following a comprehensive experimental survey on the wakes downwind of a troposkien-shaped rotor, a campaign of bi-dimensional simulations is presented here, with the aim of assessing its reliability in reproducing the main features of the flow, also identifying areas needing additional research. Starting from both a well consolidated turbulence model (k-ω SST) and an unstructured grid typology, the main simulation settings are here manipulated in a convenient form to tackle rotating grids reproducing a VAWT operating in an open jet wind tunnel. The dependence of the numerical predictions from the selected grid spacing is investigated, thus establishing the less refined grid size that is still capable of capturing some relevant flow features such as integral quantities (rotor torque) and local ones (wake velocities).

  7. [Numerical flow simulation : A new method for assessing nasal breathing].

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T; Osman, J; Goubergrits, L

    2016-08-01

    The current options for objective assessment of nasal breathing are limited. The maximum they can determine is the total nasal resistance. Possibilities to analyze the endonasal airstream are lacking. In contrast, numerical flow simulation is able to provide detailed information of the flow field within the nasal cavity. Thus, it has the potential to analyze the nasal airstream of an individual patient in a comprehensive manner and only a computed tomography (CT) scan of the paranasal sinuses is required. The clinical application is still limited due to the necessary technical and personnel resources. In particular, a statistically based referential characterization of normal nasal breathing does not yet exist in order to be able to compare and classify the simulation results.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Conductivity Gradient-Induced Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Stephen; Meinhart, Carl

    2006-03-01

    This research is focused on the electrokinetic flow instabilities observed in long, thin microchannels with conductivity gradients orthogonal to the streamwise direction and applied potential. This situation often occurs in field amplified sample stacking (FASS) and isoelectric focusing, where control of the instabilities is imperative. Alternatively, the inherently chaotic flow patterns can be leveraged to fabricate an efficient micromixer under specific conditions. These instabilities arise from fluid body forces generated by the action of applied electric fields on electrolyte concentration-based conductivity gradients. A model is developed to describe the phenomena in general and applied specifically to thin microchannels with the conductivity gradient perpendicular to the applied field (both DC and AC). A higher-order, depth averaged correlation is proposed to account for the out of plane effects. Numerical simulations performed using COMSOL 3.2 are compared to 2-D and 3-D simulations as well as experimental data for multiple geometries with good agreement.

  9. Convective Self-Aggregation in Numerical Simulations: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Allison A.; Emanuel, Kerry; Holloway, Christopher E.; Muller, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    Organized convection in the tropics occurs across a range of spatial and temporal scales and strongly influences cloud cover and humidity. One mode of organization found is "self-aggregation," in which moist convection spontaneously organizes into one or several isolated clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing. Self-aggregation is driven by interactions between clouds, moisture, radiation, surface fluxes, and circulation, and occurs in a wide variety of idealized simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium. Here we provide a review of convective self-aggregation in numerical simulations, including its character, causes, and effects. We describe the evolution of self-aggregation including its time and length scales and the physical mechanisms leading to its triggering and maintenance, and we also discuss possible links to climate and climate change.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flow in Hot Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leslie

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant expansion in our ability to model systems that involve the interaction of fluid flow, mass transport, heat transfer, and geochemical reaction in porous media. Such scenarios arise in studies of both fundamental science, such as the effects of thermohaline flow and heat transfer in rift basins, and in the solution of applied problems, such as the response of a geothermal reservoir to the re-injection of cool water. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flow in Hot Aquifers presents the simulation tools that were developed by a team of researchers based in Germany. This group has a long history in analyzing geothermal systems, but the methods presented can be applied far beyond the study of geothermal reservoirs. The heart of the book is a description of the model SHEMAT. The executable code and a graphical user interface are included with the book.

  11. Numerical simulation of transitional flows with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kožíšek, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Fürst, Jiří; Straka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with simulation of internal flows with the laminar/turbulent transition and heat transfer. The numerical modeling of incompressible flow on a heated flat plate was carried out partly by the k-kL-ω model of Walters and Cokljat [1] and partly by the algebraic transition model of Straka and Příhoda [2] connected with the EARSM turbulence model of Hellsten [3]. Transition models were tested by means of the skin friction and the Stanton number distribution. Used models of turbulent heat transfer were compared with the simplest model based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number. The k-kL-ω model is applied for the simulation of compressible flow through the VKI turbine blade cascade with heat transfer.

  12. Numerical simulation of frontogenesis in a moist atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsie, E.-Y.; Anthes, R. A.; Keyser, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of condensation and evaporation on mesoscale frontal circulations in a two-dimensional numerical model. Utilizing an explicit scheme for the prediction of water vapor, cloud water and rainwater, the model is used to investigate the interactions between convection and the larger-scale environment. The model results are qualitatively compared with results of theoretical and observational studies, including those from the recent Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment-Atmospheric Variability Experiment (SESAME-AVE). Three major differences are observed in a comparison of the moist and dry simulations: (1) The speed of the upper- and lower-level jets was significantly higher in the moist case, (2) The intensity of the ageostrophic circulations in the moist simulation was much stronger, (3) The vertical velocity field in the moist case was characterized by a banded structure not present in the dry case.

  13. Numerical solutions of atmospheric flow over semielliptical simulated hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, C. F.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric motion over obstacles on plane surfaces to compute simulated wind fields over terrain features was studied. Semielliptical, two dimensional geometry and numerical simulation of flow over rectangular geometries is also discussed. The partial differential equations for the vorticity, stream function, turbulence kinetic energy, and turbulence length scale were solved by a finite difference technique. The mechanism of flow separation induced by a semiellipse is the same as flow over a gradually sloping surface for which the flow separation is caused by the interaction between the viscous force, the pressure force, and the turbulence level. For flow over bluff bodies, a downstream recirculation bubble is created which increases the aspect ratio and/or the turbulence level results in flow reattachment close behind the obstacle.

  14. Numerical simulations of binary black holes with nearly extremal spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2010-02-01

    There is a significant possibility that astrophysically realistic black holes may have nearly extremal spins (i.e., spins close to 1 in dimensionless units). The prospect of observing the gravitational waves from a binary-black-hole merger with nearly extremal spins motivates the goal of simulating these systems numerically. These simulations must begin with initial data that satisfy the Einstein constraint equations; however, the commonly used methods of generating constraint-satisfying initial data cannot yield data with nearly extremal spins. In this talk, I will describe evolutions of conformally curved binary-black-hole initial data with nearly extremal spins using the Caltech-Cornell-CITA Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC). )

  15. Three dimensional direct numerical simulation of complex jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Kahouadji, Lyes; Juric, Damir; Chergui, Jalel; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations of two types of very challenging jet flow configurations. The first consists of a liquid jet surrounded by a faster coaxial air flow and the second consists of a global rotational motion. These computations require a high spatial resolution and are performed with a newly developed high performance parallel code, called BLUE, for the simulation of two-phase, multi-physics and multi-scale incompressible flows, tested on up to 131072 threads with excellent scalability performance. The method for the treatment of the fluid interfaces uses a hybrid Front Tracking/Level Set technique that defines the interface both by a discontinuous density field as well as by a local triangular Lagrangian mesh. Coriolis forces are taken into account and solved via an exact time-integration method that ensures numerical accuracy and stability. EPSRC UK Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  16. Numerical simulations of energy transfer in counter-streaming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. P.; Capdessus, R.; d'Humières, E.; Jequier, S.; Andriyash, I.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-03-01

    Collisionless shock formation is investigated with large scale fully electromagnetic two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell numerical simulations. Two plasmas are colliding in the center of mass reference frame at sub-relativistic velocities. Their interaction leads to collisionless stochastic electron heating, ion slowing down and formation of a shock front. We focus here on the initial stage of evolution where electron heating is due to the Weibel-like micro-instability driven by the high-speed ion flow. A two stage process is described in the detailed analysis of our simulation results. Filament generation, followed by turbulent mixing, constitute the dominant mechanism for energy repartition. The global properties are illustrated by examination of single filament evolution in terms of energy/particle density and fields.

  17. Numerical simulation of transient hypervelocity flow in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Several numerical simulations of the transient flow of helium in an expansion tube are presented. The aim of the exercise is to provide further information on the operational problems of the NASA Langley expansion tube. The calculations were performed with an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code based on a finite-volume formulation and upwinding techniques. Although laminar flow and ideal bursting of the diaphragms was assumed, the simulations showed some of the important features seen in the experiments. In particular, the discontinuity in the tube diameter at the primary diaphragm station introduced a transverse perturbation to the expanding driver gas, and this perturbation was seen to propagate into the test gas under some flow conditions. The disturbances seen in the test flow can be characterized as either 'small-amplitude' noise possibly introduced during shock compression or 'large-amplitude' noise associated with the passage of the reflected head of the unsteady expansion.

  18. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  19. Material flow data for numerical simulation of powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretek, I.; Holzer, C.

    2017-01-01

    The powder injection molding (PIM) process is a cost efficient and important net-shape manufacturing process that is not completely understood. For the application of simulation programs for the powder injection molding process, apart from suitable physical models, exact material data and in particular knowledge of the flow behavior are essential in order to get precise numerical results. The flow processes of highly filled polymers are complex. Occurring effects are very hard to separate, like shear flow with yield stress, wall slip, elastic effects, etc. Furthermore, the occurrence of phase separation due to the multi-phase composition of compounds is quite probable. In this work, the flow behavior of a 316L stainless steel feedstock for powder injection molding was investigated. Additionally, the influence of pre-shearing on the flow behavior of PIM-feedstocks under practical conditions was examined and evaluated by a special PIM injection molding machine rheometer. In order to have a better understanding of key factors of PIM during the injection step, 3D non-isothermal numerical simulations were conducted with a commercial injection molding simulation software using experimental feedstock properties. The simulation results were compared with the experimental results. The mold filling studies amply illustrate the effect of mold temperature on the filling behavior during the mold filling stage. Moreover, the rheological measurements showed that at low shear rates no zero shear viscosity was observed, but instead the viscosity further increased strongly. This flow behavior could be described with the Cross-WLF approach with Herschel-Bulkley extension very well.

  20. WATSFAR: numerical simulation of soil WATer and Solute fluxes using a FAst and Robust method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevoisier, David; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    To simulate the evolution of hydro- and agro-systems, numerous spatialised models are based on a multi-local approach and improvement of simulation accuracy by data-assimilation techniques are now used in many application field. The latest acquisition techniques provide a large amount of experimental data, which increase the efficiency of parameters estimation and inverse modelling approaches. In turn simulations are often run on large temporal and spatial domains which requires a large number of model runs. Eventually, despite the regular increase in computing capacities, the development of fast and robust methods describing the evolution of saturated-unsaturated soil water and solute fluxes is still a challenge. Ross (2003, Agron J; 95:1352-1361) proposed a method, solving 1D Richards' and convection-diffusion equation, that fulfil these characteristics. The method is based on a non iterative approach which reduces the numerical divergence risks and allows the use of coarser spatial and temporal discretisations, while assuring a satisfying accuracy of the results. Crevoisier et al. (2009, Adv Wat Res; 32:936-947) proposed some technical improvements and validated this method on a wider range of agro- pedo- climatic situations. In this poster, we present the simulation code WATSFAR which generalises the Ross method to other mathematical representations of soil water retention curve (i.e. standard and modified van Genuchten model) and includes a dual permeability context (preferential fluxes) for both water and solute transfers. The situations tested are those known to be the less favourable when using standard numerical methods: fine textured and extremely dry soils, intense rainfall and solute fluxes, soils near saturation, ... The results of WATSFAR have been compared with the standard finite element model Hydrus. The analysis of these comparisons highlights two main advantages for WATSFAR, i) robustness: even on fine textured soil or high water and solute

  1. Magnetic reconnection in numerical simulations of the Bastille day flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, A. P.; Charbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    If neither waves nor adiabatic heating due to compression are taken into account, coronal heating may be obtained in numerical simulations from current dissipation inside solar flares. To increase Joule heating locally we used a model for hyper resistivity (Klimas et al., 2004: Journal of Geophysical Research, 109, 2218-2231). Here the change in resistivity is due to small scale (less than 1Mm in our simulations) current density fluctuations. Whenever the current exceeds a cut-off value, magnetic resistivity jumps sharply to reach a maximum locally thus increasing magnetic gradients at the border of the flare. In this way, not only the current increases but also the maximum is slowly displaced and simulations of the full set of 3-D MHD equations show a progression westward as can be seen in SOHO-EIT images of the ''slinky''. In our simulations of the Bastille day flare, most of the reconnection events take place just above the transition and mostly follow the neutral line but it is Spitzer thermal diffusivity together with radiative cooling that illuminates magnetic arcades in a way similar to what can be seen in extreme ultra-violet animations of the slinky.

  2. Real-time numerical simulation of the Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkala, J.; Gall, M.; Kutner, R.; Maciejczyk, M.

    2005-09-01

    We developed a highly interactive, multi-windows Java applet which made it possible to simulate and visualize within any platform and internet the Carnot cycle (or engine) in a real-time computer experiment. We extended our previous model and algorithm (Galant et al 2003 Heat Transfer, Newton's Law of Cooling and the Law of Entropy Increase Simulated by the Real-Time Computer Experiments in Java (Lecture Notes in Computer Science vol 2657) pp 45-53, Gall and Kutner 2005 Molecular mechanisms of heat transfer: Debye relaxation versus power-law Physica A 352 347-78) to simulate not only the heat flow but also the macroscopic movement of the piston. Since in reality it is impossible to construct a reversible Carnot engine, the question arises whether it is possible to simulate it at least in a numerical experiment? The positive answer to this question which we found is related to our model and algorithm which make it possible to omit the many-body problem arising when many gas particles simultaneously interact with the mobile piston. As usual, the considerations of phenomenological thermodynamics began with a study of the basic properties of heat engines, hence our approach, besides intrinsic physical significance, is also important from the educational, technological and even environmental points of view. .

  3. Numerical analysis of JET discharges with the European Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupin, D.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Ferreira, J.; Coster, D.; Alves, L. L.; Aniel, Th.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Bizarro, Joãs P. S.; Coelho, R.; Czarnecka, A.; Huynh, Ph.; Figueiredo, A.; Garcia, J.; Garzotti, L.; Imbeaux, F.; Köchl, F.; Nave, M. F.; Pereverzev, G.; Sauter, O.; Scott, B. D.; Stankiewicz, R.; Strand, P.; contributors, ITM-TF; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-12-01

    The ‘European Transport Simulator’ (ETS) (Coster et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 2085-92, Kalupin et al 2011 Proc. 38th EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics (Strasbourg, France, 2011) vol 35G (ECA) P. 4.111) is the new modular package for 1D discharge evolution developed within the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) Task Force. It consists of precompiled physics modules combined into a workflow through standardized input/output data structures. Ultimately, the ETS will allow for an entire discharge simulation from the start up until the current termination phase, including controllers and sub-systems. The paper presents the current status of the ETS towards this ultimate goal. It discusses the design of the workflow, the validation and verification of its components on the example of impurity solver and demonstrates a proof-of-principles coupling of a local gyrofluid model for turbulent transport to the ETS. It also presents the first results on the application of the ETS to JET tokamak discharges with the ITER like wall. It studies the correlations of the radiation from impurity to the choice of the sources and transport coefficients.

  4. Laboratory and Numerical Simulations of the Impulsive Penetration Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, M. M.; Lemaire, J. F.

    2000-05-01

    Plasma interaction at the interface between the magnetosheath and magnetosphere has been extensively studied during recent years. As a consequence various theoretical models have emerged. The impulsive penetration mechanism initially proposed by Lemaire and Roth as an alternative approach to the steady state reconnection, is a non-stationary model describing the processes which take place when a 3-D solar wind plasma irregularity interacts with the outer regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this paper we are reviewing the main features of the impulsive penetration mechanism and the role of the electric field in driving impulsive events. An alternative point of view and the controversy it has raised are discussed. We also review the numerical codes developed to simulate the impulsive transport of plasma across the magnetopause. They have illustrated the relationship between the magnetic field distribution and the convection of solar-wind plasma inside the magnetosphere and brought into perspective non-stationary phenomena (like instabilities and waves) which were not explicitly integrated in the early models of impulsive penetration. Numerical simulations devoted to these processes cover a broad range of approximations, from ideal MHD to hybrid and kinetic codes. The results show the limitation of these theories in describing the full range of phenomena observed at the magnetopause and magnetospheric boundary layers.

  5. Whistler Observations on DEMETER Compared with FWM Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compston, A. J.; Cohen, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.; Parrot, M.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiation, which plays an important role in the Van Allen radiation belts, is injected into Earth's plasmasphere from two primary sources: man-made VLF transmitters and lightning discharges. Recent studies have called into question some of the numerical models that simulate radiation injection into the plasmasphere by VLF transmitters: specifically, said models have been shown to overestimate the electromagnetic fields by at least 10 dB when compared to satellite measurements. In this study, we compared lightning-induced whistlers on the low earth orbiting DEMETER satellite with an electromagnetic, frequency domain Full Wave Method (FWM) finite element numerical code. By correlating lightning discharge time, location, and peak current data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in the United States with burst mode electromagnetic field measurements of the whistlers on DEMETER, we were able to make an accurate estimate of the field strengths on DEMETER from the FWM simulation results for over 5000 lightning discharges over more than 10 different DEMETER passes during both the day and night. The FWM field estimates match the DEMETER measurements to less than 5 dB.

  6. Numerical Simulation for Mechanism of Airway Narrowing in Asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Ohba, Kenkichi

    A calculation model is proposed to examine the generation mechanism of the numerous lobes on the inner-wall of the airway in asthmatic patients and to clarify luminal occlusion of the airway inducing breathing difficulties. The basement membrane in the airway wall is modeled as a two-dimensional thin-walled shell having inertia force due to the mass, and the smooth muscle contraction effect is replaced by uniform transmural pressure applied to the basement membrane. A dynamic explicit finite element method is used as a numerical simulation method. To examine the validity of the present model, simulation of an asthma attack is performed. The number of lobes generated in the basement membrane increases when transmural pressure is applied in a shorter time period. When the remodeling of the basement membrane occurs characterized by thickening and hardening, it is demonstrated that the number of lobes decreases and the narrowing of the airway lumen becomes severe. Comparison of the results calculated by the present model with those measured for animal experiments of asthma will be possible.

  7. Novel discretization schemes for the numerical simulation of membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolsti, Kyle F.

    Motivated by the demands of simulating flapping wings of Micro Air Vehicles, novel numerical methods were developed and evaluated for the dynamic simulation of membranes. For linear membranes, a mixed-form time-continuous Galerkin method was employed using trilinear space-time elements. Rather than time-marching, the entire space-time domain was discretized and solved simultaneously. Second-order rates of convergence in both space and time were observed in numerical studies. Slight high-frequency noise was filtered during post-processing. For geometrically nonlinear membranes, the model incorporated two new schemes that were independently developed and evaluated. Time marching was performed using quintic Hermite polynomials uniquely determined by end-point jerk constraints. The single-step, implicit scheme was significantly more accurate than the most common Newmark schemes. For a simple harmonic oscillator, the scheme was found to be symplectic, frequency-preserving, and conditionally stable. Time step size was limited by accuracy requirements rather than stability. The spatial discretization scheme employed a staggered grid, grouping of nonlinear terms, and polygon shape functions in a strong-form point collocation formulation. The observed rate of convergence was two for both displacement and strain. Validation against existing experimental data showed the method to be accurate until hyperelastic effects dominate.

  8. Influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Gao, B.; Yang, L.; Du, W. Q.

    2016-05-01

    Computing models are always simplified to save the computing resources and time. Particularly, the clearance that between impeller and pump casing is always ignored. But the completer model is, the more precise result of numerical simulation is in theory. This paper study the influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump. We present such influence via comparing performance, flow characteristic and pressure pulsation of two cases that the one of two cases is the model pump with clearance and the other is not. And the results show that the head decreases and power increases so that efficiency decreases after computing with front and back cavities. Then no-leakage model would improve absolute velocity magnitude in order to reach the rated flow rate. Finally, more disturbance induced by front cavity flow and wear-ring flow would change the pressure pulsation of impeller and volute. The performance of clearance flow is important for the whole pump in performance, flow characteristic, pressure pulsation and other respects.

  9. Numerical grid generation in 3D Euler-flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-04-01

    The technical problems with grid generation are analyzed and an overview of proposed solutions is given. The usefulness of grid-generation techniques, for the numerical simulation of Euler (and Navier-Stokes) flows around complex three-dimensional aerodynamic configurations, is illustrated. It is shown that the core of the grid-generation problem is a topology problem. The following remarks are sketched: grid generation is a subtask in a numerical simulation of a flow in industrial and research environments; the design requirements of a grid generation concern the geometrical imput, the desired grid as output, the technical means to control grid resolution and quality and turnaround time performance; the construction of a blocked grid can be subdivided in a block-decomposition task and a grid-point distribution task. A technique for using connectivity relations to define conventions about local coordinate systems in edges, faces and blocks is presented. Experiences are reported and an example concerning a 96-blocked grid around a complex aerodynamic configuration is given. Concepts for improvements in the presented technique are discussed.

  10. Numerical simulation of premixed flame propagation in a closed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuu, Kazuto; Ishii, Katsuya; Kuwahara, Kunio

    1996-08-01

    Premixed flame propagation of methane-air mixture in a closed tube is estimated through a direct numerical simulation of the three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations coupled with chemical reaction. In order to deal with a combusting flow, an extended version of the MAC method, which can be applied to a compressible flow with strong density variation, is employed as a numerical method. The chemical reaction is assumed to be an irreversible single step reaction between methane and oxygen. The chemical species are CH 4, O 2, N 2, CO 2, and H 2O. In this simulation, we reproduce a formation of a tulip flame in a closed tube during the flame propagation. Furthermore we estimate not only a two-dimensional shape but also a three-dimensional structure of the flame and flame-induced vortices, which cannot be observed in the experiments. The agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data is satisfactory, and we compare the phenomenon near the side wall with the one in the corner of the tube.

  11. Constitutive Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Frp Confined Concrete Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitha, Gopinath; Ramachandramurthy, Avadhanam; Nagesh, Ranganatha Iyer; Shahulhameed, Eduvammal Kunhimoideen

    2014-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are generally used for the seismic retrofit of concrete members to enhance their strength and ductility. In the present work, the confining effect of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite layers has been investigated by numerical simulation. The numerical simulation has been carried out using nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) to predict the response behaviour of CFRP-wrapped concrete cylinders. The nonlinear behaviour of concrete in compression and the linear elastic behaviour of CFRP has been modeled using an appropriate constitutive relationship. A cohesive model has been developed for modeling the interface between the concrete and CFRP. The interaction and damage failure criteria between the concrete to the cohesive element and the cohesive element to the CFRP has also been accounted for in the modeling. The response behaviour of the wrapped concrete specimen has been compared with the proposed interface model and with a perfectly bonded condition. The results obtained from the present study showed good agreement with the experimental load-displacement response and the failure pattern in the literature. Further, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out to study the effect of the number of layers of CFRP on the concrete specimens. It has been observed that wrapping with two layers was found to be the optimum, beyond which the response becomes flexible but with a higher load-carrying capacity

  12. Numerical Simulation of Spray Atomization in Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiangfeng; Liu, Chen; Wu, Yizhao

    With the rapid development of the air-breathing hypersonic vehicle design, an accurate description of the combustion properties becomes more and more important, where one of the key techniques is the procedure of the liquid fuel mixing, atomizing and burning coupled with the supersonic crossflow in the combustion chamber. The movement and distribution of the liquid fuel droplets in the combustion chamber will influence greatly the combustion properties, as well as the propulsion performance of the ramjet/scramjet engine. In this paper, numerical simulation methods on unstructured hybrid meshes were carried out for liquid spray atomization in supersonic crossflows. The Kelvin-Helmholtz/Rayleigh-Taylor hybrid model was used to simulate the breakup process of the liquid spray in a supersonic crossflow with Mach number 1.94. Various spray properties, including spray penetration height, droplet size distribution, were quantitatively compared with experimental results. In addition, numerical results of the complex shock wave structure induced by the presence of liquid spray were illustrated and discussed.

  13. Numerical Simulations For the F-16XL Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled; Cavallo, Peter A.; Parlette, Edward B.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow around the F-16XL are presented as a contribution to the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International II (CAWAPI-II). The NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System (TetrUSS) is used to perform numerical simulations. This CFD suite, developed and maintained by NASA Langley Research Center, includes an unstructured grid generation program called VGRID, a postprocessor named POSTGRID, and the flow solver USM3D. The CRISP CFD package is utilized to provide error estimates and grid adaption for verification of USM3D results. A subsonic high angle-of-attack case flight condition (FC) 25 is computed and analyzed. Three turbulence models are used in the calculations: the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA), the two-equation shear stress transport (SST) and the ke turbulence models. Computational results, and surface static pressure profiles are presented and compared with flight data. Solution verification is performed using formal grid refinement studies, the solution of Error Transport Equations, and adaptive mesh refinement. The current study shows that the USM3D solver coupled with CRISP CFD can be used in an engineering environment in predicting vortex-flow physics on a complex configuration at flight Reynolds numbers.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  15. A Computational Model for the Numerical Simulation of FSW Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agelet de Saracibar, C.; Chiumenti, M.; Santiago, D.; Cervera, M.; Dialami, N.; Lombera, G.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper a computational model for the numerical simulation of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processes is presented. FSW is a new method of welding in solid state in which a shouldered tool with a profile probe is rotated and slowly plunged into the joint line between two pieces of sheet or plate material which are butted together. Once the probe has been completely inserted, it is moved with a small tilt angle in the welding direction. Here a quasi-static, thermal transient, mixed multiscale stabilized Eulerian formulation is used. Norton-Hoff and Sheppard-Wright rigid thermo-viscoplastic material models have been considered. A staggered solution algorithm is defined such that for any time step, the mechanical problem is solved at constant temperature and then the thermal problem is solved keeping constant the mechanical variables. A pressure multiscale stabilized mixed linear velocity/linear pressure finite element interpolation formulation is used to solve the mechanical problem and a convection multiscale stabilized linear temperature interpolation formulation is used to solve the thermal problem. The model has been implemented into the in-house developed FE code COMET. Results obtained in the simulation of FSW process are compared to other numerical results or experimental results, when available.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Propagation in a Lined Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biringen, S.; Reichert, R. S.; Yu, J.; Zorumski, W. E.

    1996-11-01

    An inviscid, spatial time-domain numerical simulation is employed to compute acoustic wave propagation in a duct treated with an acoustic liner. The motivation is to assess the effects on sound attenuation of bias flow passed through the liner for application to noise suppression in jet engine nacelles. Physically, the liner is composed of porous sheets with backing air cavities. The mathematical model lumps the liner presence into a continuous empirical source term which modifies the right-hand side of the momentum equations. Thus, liner effects are felt interior to the domain rather than through boundary conditions. This source term determines the time-domain effects of the frequency-domain resistance and reactance of the liner's component sheets. The source term constants are matched to frequency-domain impedance data via a one-dimensional numerical impedance tube simulation. Nonlinear behavior of the liner at high sound pressure levels is included in the form of the source term. Sound pressure levels and axially transmitted power are computed to assess the effect of various magnitudes of bias flow on attenuation.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Floodplain Heterogeneity Effects on Meanders Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoni, M.; Lanzoni, S.; Putti, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains and sinuous rivers have a close relationship with each other, mutually influencing their evolutions in time and space. The heterogeneity in erosional resistance has a crucial role on meander planform evolution. It depends on external factors, like land use and cover, but also on the composition of the floodplain, which is due to the ancient geological composition and to the processes associated to long-term river migration. In particular, banks erosion and deposition cause a variation of the superficial composition of the soil, therefore the river patterns are influenced by the previous trends. Based on some recent works, the aim of this contribution is to collect numerical information on the relations between meander migration and the heterogeneity of floodplains caused by oxbow lakes. Numerical simulations have been performed to analyze the temporal and spatial behavior of meanders with a range of values of the erosional resistance of the plain. These values are set as a function of some factors: the characteristic grain size of sediment transported by the flow, the deposition age of the sediments, the eventual presence of vegetation on the banks. The statistical analysis of characteristic geometrical quantities of meanders are able to show the dependence of the simulation results on the meander history. In particular we try to answer to the following questions: how do the rivers affect themselves during their spatial and temporal evolution, modifying the distribution of the floodplain erodibility? Do the migration history plays a main role on the meanders migration modeling?

  18. 3D EFT imaging with planar electrode array: Numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuykin, T.; Korjenevsky, A.

    2010-04-01

    Electric field tomography (EFT) is the new modality of the quasistatic electromagnetic sounding of conductive media recently investigated theoretically and realized experimentally. The demonstrated results pertain to 2D imaging with circular or linear arrays of electrodes (and the linear array provides quite poor quality of imaging). In many applications 3D imaging is essential or can increase value of the investigation significantly. In this report we present the first results of numerical simulation of the EFT imaging system with planar array of electrodes which allows 3D visualization of the subsurface conductivity distribution. The geometry of the system is similar to the geometry of our EIT breast imaging system providing 3D conductivity imaging in form of cross-sections set with different depth from the surface. The EFT principle of operation and reconstruction approach differs from the EIT system significantly. So the results of numerical simulation are important to estimate if comparable quality of imaging is possible with the new contactless method. The EFT forward problem is solved using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for the 8×8 square electrodes array. The calculated results of measurements are used then to reconstruct conductivity distributions by the filtered backprojections along electric field lines. The reconstructed images of the simple test objects are presented.

  19. Possible tsunami transmission across the Strait of Gibraltar: numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, V.; Servidio, S.; Vecchio, A.; Anzidei, M.; Guerra, I.

    2012-12-01

    The possibility that a tsunami, generated as a consequence of the large earthquake in the Atlantic or Pacific ocean, could be recorded by the tide gauge stations located in the Mediterranean has been numerically investigated. In particular, direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (SWE) have been performed in order to simulate the transmission of large scale waves trough the Strait of Gibraltar. The SWE have wide applications in ocean and hydraulic engineering: tidal flows in estuary and coastal water regions, bore wave propagation, hydraulic jump, open channel flows, and so on. Among all these examples, the application of SWE to tsunamies is indeed one of the most successful. A numerical scheme, based on a Godunov-type method for solving the SWE with source term, has been proposed in Ref. [1]. In contrast to conventional data reconstruction methods based on conservative variables, the water surface level is chosen as the basis for data reconstruction. This provides accurate values of the conservative variables at cell interfaces so that the fluxes can be accurately calculated with a Riemann solver. The surface gradient method can be incorporated into any Godunov-type method which requires data reconstruction. Here, the MUSCL-Hancock finite-volume method has been combined with a body-fitted cut cell mesh [2], which can efficiently treat irregular boundaries while retaining the simplicity of a Cartesian grid implementation. Preliminary results show that incident waves, coming from the free ocean, can enter the Mediterraneum sea, passing trough the Strait. The incoming wave, altough is strongly reduced in intensity, fragmentate because of the bed profile and the interaction with the coasts, producing low ang high frequency disturbances. In agreement with observations (See Ref. [3]), these numerical simulations suggest that large tsunamis can pass through Gibraltar, initiating anomalous fluctuations in the Mediterraneum. [1] J. G. Zhou, D

  20. Detection and thermal description of medicanes from numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picornell, M. A.; Campins, J.; Jansà, A.

    2014-05-01

    Tropical-like cyclones rarely affect the Mediterranean region but they can produce strong winds and heavy precipitations. These warm-core cyclones, called MEDICANES (MEDIterranean hurriCANES), are small in size, develop over the sea and are infrequent. For these reasons, the detection and forecast of medicanes are a difficult task and many efforts have been devoted to identify them. The goals of this work are to contribute to a proper description of these structures and to develop some criteria to identify medicanes from numerical weather prediction (NWP) model outputs. To do that, existing methodologies for detecting, characterizating and tracking cyclones have been adapted to small-scale intense cyclonic perturbations. First, a mesocyclone detection and tracking algorithm has been modified to select intense cyclones. Next, the parameters that define the Hart's cyclone phase diagram are tuned and calculated to examine their thermal structure. Four well-known medicane events have been described from numerical simulation outputs of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) model. The predicted cyclones and their evolution have been validated against available observational data and numerical analyses from the literature.

  1. Detection and thermal description of medicanes from numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picornell, M. A.; Campins, J.; Jansà, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical-like cyclones rarely affect the Mediterranean region and they can produce strong winds and heavy precipitations. These warm-core cyclones, called MEDICANES (MEDIterranean hurriCANES), are small size, develop over the sea and are infrequent. For these reasons, the detection and forecast of medicanes are a difficult task and many efforts have been devoted to identify them. The goals of this work are to contribute to a proper description of these structures and to develop some criteria to identify medicanes from numerical weather prediction (NWP) model outputs. To do that, existing methodologies for detecting, characterizating and tracking cyclones have been adapted to small-scale intense cyclonic perturbations. First, a mesocyclone detection and tracking algorithm has been modified to select intense cyclones. Next, the parameters that define the Hart's cyclone phase diagram are tuned and calculated to examine their thermal structure. Four well-known medicane events have been described from numerical simulation outputs of the ECMWF model. The predicted cyclones and their evolution have been validated against available observational data and numerical analyses from literature.

  2. Numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamical systems driven by commutative noise

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F. Biscay, R.J.; Jimenez, J.C.; Cruz, H. de la

    2007-10-01

    The local linearization (LL) approach has become an effective technique for the numerical integration of ordinary, random and stochastic differential equations. One of the reasons for this success is that the LL method achieves a convenient trade-off between numerical stability and computational cost. Besides, the LL method reproduces well the dynamics of nonlinear equations for which other classical methods fail. However, in the stochastic case, most of the reported works has been focused in Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) driven by additive noise. This limits the applicability of the LL method since there is a number of interesting dynamics observed in equations with multiplicative noise. On the other hand, recent results show that commutative noise SDEs can be transformed into a random differential equation (RDE) by means of a random diffeomorfism (conjugacy). This paper takes advantages of such conjugacy property and the LL approach for defining a LL scheme for SDEs driven by commutative noise. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by means of numerical simulations.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter; Tosh, Abhijit; Curtis, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This technology development originated from the need to assess the debris threat resulting from soil material erosion induced by landing spacecraft rocket plume impingement on extraterrestrial planetary surfaces. The impact of soil debris was observed to be highly detrimental during NASA s Apollo lunar missions and will pose a threat for any future landings on the Moon, Mars, and other exploration targets. The innovation developed under this program provides a simulation tool that combines modeling of the diverse disciplines of rocket plume impingement gas dynamics, granular soil material liberation, and soil debris particle kinetics into one unified simulation system. The Unified Flow Solver (UFS) developed by CFDRC enabled the efficient, seamless simulation of mixed continuum and rarefied rocket plume flow utilizing a novel direct numerical simulation technique of the Boltzmann gas dynamics equation. The characteristics of the soil granular material response and modeling of the erosion and liberation processes were enabled through novel first principle-based granular mechanics models developed by the University of Florida specifically for the highly irregularly shaped and cohesive lunar regolith material. These tools were integrated into a unique simulation system that accounts for all relevant physics aspects: (1) Modeling of spacecraft rocket plume impingement flow under lunar vacuum environment resulting in a mixed continuum and rarefied flow; (2) Modeling of lunar soil characteristics to capture soil-specific effects of particle size and shape composition, soil layer cohesion and granular flow physics; and (3) Accurate tracking of soil-borne debris particles beginning with aerodynamically driven motion inside the plume to purely ballistic motion in lunar far field conditions. In the earlier project phase of this innovation, the capabilities of the UFS for mixed continuum and rarefied flow situations were validated and demonstrated for lunar lander rocket

  4. Numerical simulation of groundwater flooding: An example from the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A. G.; Jackson, C. R.; Vounaki, T.; Peach, D. W.; Wheater, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flooding is increasingly necessary as the problem is gaining recognition from government bodies and climate change may bring more extreme events. However producing a suitable simulation of groundwater flooding involves many technical challenges. The timescale of the development of the flood can be short, recharge must be calculated correctly, the unsaturated zone must be considered as well as the "usual" suitable simulation of the saturated zone. The latter requires good simulation of absolute as well as relative values, since the timing and extent of the water table reaching the ground surface must be simulated well. All these factors combined with data scarcity makes simulation of groundwater flooding difficult. The Natural Environmental Research Council, in the UK, is funding a consortium to examine the problem of groundwater flooding in the Chalk, a micro-porous fractured limestone, which is an important aquifer for water supply in South-East England. This consortium, consisting of the British Geological Survey, Imperial College and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology are studying groundwater flooding in the Pang and Lambourn catchments, located 50 kilometres to the west of London. A modelling system is currently under development of simulate the groundwater flooding which occurred in winter 2000/1, winter 2002/3 and summer 2007. The project has taken an existing groundwater flow model to simulate the groundwater flooding that occurred in winter 2000/1. The groundwater flow model, originally developed for another part of the catchment, has been run with daily stress periods as opposed to monthly in the original model. This reduction in the length of the stress period has resulted in a much improved simulation of the groundwater and river baseflow hydrographs during the flooding. Analysis of the time lag between recharge and groundwater rise using the model shows that there is a spatial and a temporal distribution in time

  5. Numerical simulation of immiscible viscous fingering using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Salinas, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement of one fluid by another in porous media occurs in various settings including hydrocarbon recovery, CO2 storage and water purification. When the invading fluid is of lower viscosity than the resident fluid, the displacement front is subject to a Saffman-Taylor instability and is unstable to transverse perturbations. These instabilities can grow, leading to fingering of the invading fluid. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering is challenging. The physics is controlled by a complex interplay of viscous and diffusive forces and it is necessary to ensure physical diffusion dominates numerical diffusion to obtain converged solutions. This typically requires the use of high mesh resolution and high order numerical methods. This is computationally expensive. We demonstrate here the use of a novel control volume - finite element (CVFE) method along with dynamic unstructured mesh adaptivity to simulate viscous fingering with higher accuracy and lower computational cost than conventional methods. Our CVFE method employs a discontinuous representation for both pressure and velocity, allowing the use of smaller control volumes (CVs). This yields higher resolution of the saturation field which is represented CV-wise. Moreover, dynamic mesh adaptivity allows high mesh resolution to be employed where it is required to resolve the fingers and lower resolution elsewhere. We use our results to re-examine the existing criteria that have been proposed to govern the onset of instability.Mesh adaptivity requires the mapping of data from one mesh to another. Conventional methods such as consistent interpolation do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields and are non-conservative. We further contribute a general framework for interpolation of CV fields by Galerkin projection. The method is conservative, higher order and yields improved results, particularly with higher order or discontinuous elements where existing approaches are often excessively diffusive.

  6. Numerical simulation of drop breakup and coalescence with soluble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John; Zhou, Hua; Macosko, Chris

    2003-11-01

    In the processing of emulsions and polymer blends, the drop size distributions are determined by two coexisting processes: drop breakup and coalescence. Here we study the effects of surfactants, e.g. block copolymers, on these phenomena and on the shear and normal stress in dilute blends by direct numerical simulation. We use a newly developed 3D adaptive algorithm. A nonlinear equation of state for the surfactant is used and van der Waals forces, which are responsible for coalescence, are included in the numerical method. Surfactants are transported by convection-diffusion on the drop/matrix interface and between the interface and the bulk phases. Our accurate and robust numerical method features parallel computation and adaptive reconstruction of the finite element meshes describing the bulk phases and the interface. We find that surfactants affect strongly the breakup and coalescence mechanisms by introducing nonuniformities in surface tension. The related Marangoni (tangential) stresses at the interface greatly inhibit coalescence but in a nontrivial fashion. At small coverages of surfactant at the interface, the critical capillary number for coalescence (below which coalescence will occur) decreases. However, at larger coverages, the critical capillary number reaches a minimum and then increases again and tends to the value for clean (surfactant-free) interfaces. This behavior was first observed experimentally by Leal and coworkers. In this talk, we demonstrate that this behavior is a consequence of a nontrivial evolution of the Marangoni stresses. We also demonstrate that under certain conditions surfactants enhance coalescence by a totally different mechanism. This surfactant induced coalescence occurs when drops are separating and the surfactant-enriched highly-stretched drop tips interact. Finally, we present preliminary results of simulations that indicate that surfactants have a strong effect on the size of the fragments resulting from drop breakup

  7. Numerical simulations of a filament in a flowing soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnell, D. J. J.; David, T.; Barton, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments concerning the properties of soap films have recently been carried out and these systems have been proposed as experimental versions of theoretical two-dimensional liquids. A silk filament introduced into a flowing soap film, was seen to demonstrate various stable modes, and these were, namely, a mode in which the filament oscillates and one in which the filament is stationary and aligns with the flow of the liquid. The system could be forced from the oscillatory mode into the non- oscillatory mode by varying the length of the filament. In this article we use numerical and computational techniques in order to simulate the strongly coupled behaviour of the filament and the fluid. Preliminary results are presented for the specific case in which the filament is seen to oscillate continuously for the duration of our simulation. We also find that the filament oscillations are strongly suppressed when we reduce the effective length of the filament. We believe that these results are reminiscent of the different oscillatory and non-oscillatory modes observed in experiment. The numerical solutions show that, in contrast to experiment, vortices are created at the leading edge of the filament and are preferentially grown in the curvature of the filament and are eventually released from the trailing edge of the filament. In a similar manner to oscillating hydrofoils, it seems that the oscillating filaments are in a minimal energy state, extracting sufficient energy from the fluid to oscillate. In comparing numerical and experimental results it is possible that the soap film does have an effect on the fluid flow especially in the boundary layer where surface tension forces are large.

  8. Numerical methods for large eddy simulation of acoustic combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Clifton T.

    Acoustic combustion instabilities occur when interaction between the combustion process and acoustic modes in a combustor results in periodic oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release. If sufficiently large in amplitude, these instabilities can cause operational difficulties or the failure of combustor hardware. In many situations, the dominant instability is the result of the interaction between a low frequency acoustic mode of the combustor and the large scale hydrodynamics. Large eddy simulation (LES), therefore, is a promising tool for the prediction of these instabilities, since both the low frequency acoustic modes and the large scale hydrodynamics are well resolved in LES. Problems with the tractability of such simulations arise, however, due to the difficulty of solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations efficiently at low Mach number and due to the large number of acoustic periods that are often required for such instabilities to reach limit cycles. An implicit numerical method for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations has been developed which avoids the acoustic CFL restriction, allowing for significant efficiency gains at low Mach number, while still resolving the low frequency acoustic modes of interest. In the limit of a uniform grid the numerical method causes no artificial damping of acoustic waves. New, non-reflecting boundary conditions have also been developed for use with the characteristic-based approach of Poinsot and Lele (1992). The new boundary conditions are implemented in a manner which allows for significant reduction of the computational domain of an LES by eliminating the need to perform LES in regions where one-dimensional acoustics significantly affect the instability but details of the hydrodynamics do not. These new numerical techniques have been demonstrated in an LES of an experimental combustor. The new techniques are shown to be an efficient means of performing LES of acoustic combustion

  9. Numerical Simulation of Non-Thermal Food Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.

    2010-09-01

    Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel non-thermal food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the non-thermal techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.

  10. Entropy Splitting for High Order Numerical Simulation of Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Yee, H. C.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A stable high order numerical scheme for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of shock-free compressible turbulence is presented. The method is applicable to general geometries. It contains no upwinding, artificial dissipation, or filtering. Instead the method relies on the stabilizing mechanisms of an appropriate conditioning of the governing equations and the use of compatible spatial difference operators for the interior points (interior scheme) as well as the boundary points (boundary scheme). An entropy splitting approach splits the inviscid flux derivatives into conservative and non-conservative portions. The spatial difference operators satisfy a summation by parts condition leading to a stable scheme (combined interior and boundary schemes) for the initial boundary value problem using a generalized energy estimate. A Laplacian formulation of the viscous and heat conduction terms on the right hand side of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to ensure that any tendency to odd-even decoupling associated with central schemes can be countered by the fluid viscosity. A special formulation of the continuity equation is used, based on similar arguments. The resulting methods are able to minimize spurious high frequency oscillation producing nonlinear instability associated with pure central schemes, especially for long time integration simulation such as DNS. For validation purposes, the methods are tested in a DNS of compressible turbulent plane channel flow at a friction Mach number of 0.1 where a very accurate turbulence data base exists. It is demonstrated that the methods are robust in terms of grid resolution, and in good agreement with incompressible channel data, as expected at this Mach number. Accurate turbulence statistics can be obtained with moderate grid sizes. Stability limits on the range of the splitting parameter are determined from numerical tests.

  11. Numerical Methods and Simulations of Complex Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Peter

    Multiphase flows are an important part of many natural and technological phenomena such as ocean-air coupling (which is important for climate modeling) and the atomization of liquid fuel jets in combustion engines. The unique challenges of multiphase flow often make analytical solutions to the governing equations impossible and experimental investigations very difficult. Thus, high-fidelity numerical simulations can play a pivotal role in understanding these systems. This dissertation describes numerical methods developed for complex multiphase flows and the simulations performed using these methods. First, the issue of multiphase code verification is addressed. Code verification answers the question "Is this code solving the equations correctly?" The method of manufactured solutions (MMS) is a procedure for generating exact benchmark solutions which can test the most general capabilities of a code. The chief obstacle to applying MMS to multiphase flow lies in the discontinuous nature of the material properties at the interface. An extension of the MMS procedure to multiphase flow is presented, using an adaptive marching tetrahedron style algorithm to compute the source terms near the interface. Guidelines for the use of the MMS to help locate coding mistakes are also detailed. Three multiphase systems are then investigated: (1) the thermocapillary motion of three-dimensional and axisymmetric drops in a confined apparatus, (2) the flow of two immiscible fluids completely filling an enclosed cylinder and driven by the rotation of the bottom endwall, and (3) the atomization of a single drop subjected to a high shear turbulent flow. The systems are simulated numerically by solving the full multiphase Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the various equations of state and a level set interface tracking scheme based on the refined level set grid method. The codes have been parallelized using MPI in order to take advantage of today's very large parallel computational

  12. Numerical simulation of observations with GOLF on board SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R. A.; Roca Cortes, T.; Regulo, C.

    1998-03-01

    The main objective of the GOLF Experiment (Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies) on-board the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) space mission is the quantitative knowledge of the internal structure of the Sun by measuring the spectrum of its global oscillations in a wide frequency range (30 nHz to 6 mHz). There is special interest in detecting the low l p- and g-modes (low frequency modes) which penetrate deeply down into the solar core. The instrument chosen is an improved disk-integrated sunlight resonant scattering spectrophotometer. It obtains the line of sight velocity of the integrated visible solar surface by measuring the Doppler shift of the sodium doublet. Mainly, two innovations have been incorporated to standard earth-based similar apparatus (those from the networks IRIS and BISON). First, GOLF samples each line of the sodium doublet in principle at four points on its wings, using an extra small modulated magnetic field. This new information enables an instantaneous calibration of the measured signal and also opens the possibility to correct from the background solar velocity noise. Second, the use of an extra fixed quarter wave plate, placed at the entrance of the instrument, enables a selection of the circularly polarized solar light. Therefore, the disk averaged solar line-of-sight component of the magnetic field can also be obtained. This is considered as a secondary objective of the mission. In order to study the new information available due to these improvements in the apparatus, the necessity of fully understanding it and the need to write the appropriate software to analyze the data, a complete numerical simulation of the experiment has been built. Running the simulation has yielded two series of 12 months long each, one corresponding to a year of maximum solar activity and the other to a year of minimum solar activity. In this paper the numerical simulation of the GOLF experiment is presented, its sensitivity and instrumental

  13. Experimental and numerical simulation of dissolution andprecipitation: Implications for fracture sealing at Yucca Mountain,Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas; Apps, John A.

    2001-08-31

    Plugging of flow paths caused by mineral precipitation in fractures above the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would reduce the probability of water seeping into the repository. As part of an ongoing effort to evaluate thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) effects on flow in fractured media, we performed a laboratory experiment and numerical simulations to investigate mineral dissolution and precipitation under anticipated temperature and pressure conditions in the repository. To replicate mineral dissolution by vapor condensate in fractured tuff, water was flowed through crushed Yucca Mountain tuff at 94 C. The resulting steady-state fluid composition had a total dissolved solids content of about 140 mg/L; silica was the dominant dissolved constituent. A portion of the steady-state mineralized water was flowed into a vertically oriented planar fracture in a block of welded Topopah Spring Tuff that was maintained at 80 C at the top and 130 C at the bottom. The fracture began to seal with amorphous silica within five days. A 1-D plug-flow numerical model was used to simulate mineral dissolution, and a similar model was developed to simulate the flow of mineralized water through a planar fracture, where boiling conditions led to mineral precipitation. Predicted concentrations of the major dissolved constituents for the tuff dissolution were within a factor of 2 of the measured average steady-state compositions. The mineral precipitation simulations predicted the precipitation of amorphous silica at the base of the boiling front, leading to a greater than fifty-fold decrease in fracture permeability in 5 days, consistent with the laboratory experiment. These results help validate the use of a numerical model to simulate THC processes at Yucca Mountain. The experiment and simulations indicated that boiling and concomitant precipitation of amorphous silica could cause significant reductions in fracture porosity and permeability on a local scale. However

  14. On the potential for CO2 mineral storage in continental flood basalts - PHREEQC batch- and 1D diffusion-reaction simulations.

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Thi Hai; Aagaard, Per; Hellevang, Helge

    2012-06-14

    Continental flood basalts (CFB) are considered as potential CO2 storage sites because of their high reactivity and abundant divalent metal ions that can potentially trap carbon for geological timescales. Moreover, laterally extensive CFB are found in many place in the world within reasonable distances from major CO2 point emission sources.Based on the mineral and glass composition of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) we estimated the potential of CFB to store CO2 in secondary carbonates. We simulated the system using kinetic dependent dissolution of primary basalt-minerals (pyroxene, feldspar and glass) and the local equilibrium assumption for secondary phases (weathering products). The simulations were divided into closed-system batch simulations at a constant CO2 pressure of 100 bar with sensitivity studies of temperature and reactive surface area, an evaluation of the reactivity of H2O in scCO2, and finally 1D reactive diffusion simulations giving reactivity at CO2 pressures varying from 0 to 100 bar.Although the uncertainty in reactive surface area and corresponding reaction rates are large, we have estimated the potential for CO2 mineral storage and identified factors that control the maximum extent of carbonation. The simulations showed that formation of carbonates from basalt at 40 C may be limited to the formation of siderite and possibly FeMg carbonates. Calcium was largely consumed by zeolite and oxide instead of forming carbonates. At higher temperatures (60 - 100 C), magnesite is suggested to form together with siderite and ankerite. The maximum potential of CO2 stored as solid carbonates, if CO2 is supplied to the reactions unlimited, is shown to depend on the availability of pore space as the hydration and carbonation reactions increase the solid volume and clog the pore space. For systems such as in the scCO2 phase with limited amount of water, the total carbonation potential is limited by the amount of water present for hydration of basalt.

  15. On the potential for CO2 mineral storage in continental flood basalts – PHREEQC batch- and 1D diffusion–reaction simulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Continental flood basalts (CFB) are considered as potential CO2 storage sites because of their high reactivity and abundant divalent metal ions that can potentially trap carbon for geological timescales. Moreover, laterally extensive CFB are found in many place in the world within reasonable distances from major CO2 point emission sources. Based on the mineral and glass composition of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) we estimated the potential of CFB to store CO2 in secondary carbonates. We simulated the system using kinetic dependent dissolution of primary basalt-minerals (pyroxene, feldspar and glass) and the local equilibrium assumption for secondary phases (weathering products). The simulations were divided into closed-system batch simulations at a constant CO2 pressure of 100 bar with sensitivity studies of temperature and reactive surface area, an evaluation of the reactivity of H2O in scCO2, and finally 1D reactive diffusion simulations giving reactivity at CO2 pressures varying from 0 to 100 bar. Although the uncertainty in reactive surface area and corresponding reaction rates are large, we have estimated the potential for CO2 mineral storage and identified factors that control the maximum extent of carbonation. The simulations showed that formation of carbonates from basalt at 40 C may be limited to the formation of siderite and possibly FeMg carbonates. Calcium was largely consumed by zeolite and oxide instead of forming carbonates. At higher temperatures (60 – 100 C), magnesite is suggested to form together with siderite and ankerite. The maximum potential of CO2 stored as solid carbonates, if CO2 is supplied to the reactions unlimited, is shown to depend on the availability of pore space as the hydration and carbonation reactions increase the solid volume and clog the pore space. For systems such as in the scCO2 phase with limited amount of water, the total carbonation potential is limited by the amount of water present for hydration of basalt

  16. Direct numerical simulation of free falling sphere in creeping flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Rupesh K.; Jin, Shi; Nandakumar, K.; Minev, Peter D.; Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B.

    2010-03-01

    In the present study, direct numerical simulations (DNS) are performed on single and a swarm of particles settling under the action of gravity. The simulations have been carried out in the creeping flow range of Reynolds number from 0.01 to 1 for understanding the hindrance effect, of the other particles, on the settling velocity and drag coefficient. The DNS code is a non-Lagrange multiplier-based fictitious-domain method, which has been developed and validated by Jin et al. (2008; A parallel algorithm for the direct numerical simulation of 3D inertial particle sedimentation. In: Conference proceedings of the 16th annual conference of the CFD Society of Canada). It has been observed that the time averaged settling velocity of the particle in the presence of other particles, decreases with an increase in the number of particles surrounding it (from 9 particles to 245 particles). The effect of the particle volume fraction on the drag coefficient has also been studied and it has been observed that the computed values of drag coefficients are in good agreement with the correlations proposed by Richardson and Zaki (1954; Sedimentation and fluidization: part I. Transactions of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, 32, 35-53) and Pandit and Joshi (1998; Pressure drop in packed, expanded and fluidised beds, packed columns and static mixers - a unified approach. Reviews in Chemical Engineering, 14, 321-371). The suspension viscosity-based model of Frankel and Acrivos (1967; On the viscosity of a concentrated suspension of solid spheres. Chemical Engineering Science, 22, 847-853) shows good agreement with the DNS results.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Long-period Surface Wave in Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiqiong; Yu, Yanxiang

    2016-04-01

    Studies have shown that the western Taiwan coastal plain is influenced by long-period ground motion from the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake, and engineering structures with natural vibration long-period are damaged by strong surface wave in the western coastal plain. The thick sediments in the western coastal plain are the main cause of the propagation of strong long-period ground motion. The thick sediments similar to in the western coastal plain also exist in northern China. It is necessary to research the effects of thick sediments to long-period ground motion in northern China. The numerical simulation of ground motion based on theoretical seismology is one of important means to study the ground motion. We will carry out the numerical simulation of long-period ground motion in northern China by using the existing tomographic imaging results of northern China to build underground medium model, and adopting finite fault source model for wave input. In the process of simulation, our previous developed structure-preserving algorithm, symplectic discrete singular convolution differentiator (SDSCD), is used to deal with seismic wave field propagation. Our purpose is to reveal the formation and propagation of long-period surface wave in thick sediments and grasp the amplification effect of long-period ground motion due to the thick sediments. It will lay the foundation on providing the reference for the value of the long-period spectrum during determining the ground motion parameters in seismic design. This work has been supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.41204046, 42574051).

  18. Numerical Simulations Of Vortex-cloud Interactions On Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palotai, Csaba J.; Dowling, T. E.; Chappell, G.

    2012-10-01

    We have studied the atmospheric physics and dynamics of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and BA vortices using the Explicit Planetary hybrid-Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) model (Dowling et al., 2006. Icarus, 182, 259--273). The model employs an ammonia cycle that includes interactive vapor, cloud and precipitation phases and accounts for latent heating and cooling (Palotai and Dowling, 2008. Icarus, 194, 303--326). The pressure-based coordinate in this version of the EPIC model allows us to use high vertical resolution in our simulations. The typical model configuration uses 45--50 non-uniformly spaced layers ranging from about 10 mb down to 15 bars, with extra resolution placed in the expected ammonia cloud-forming region. The resulting horizontal and vertical cloud and temperature structures in our simulations are in good agreement with observational data. Our model reproduces the relatively cloud-free regions West and Northeast of the GRS and the elevated clouds over the vortex that was observed by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS). The thermal structure of the simulated vortices is being compared to ground-based and spacecraft observations, as well. Fletcher et al. (2010, Icarus, 208, 306--328) discovered inhomogeneities in the horizontal temperature field over the GRS and correlated it to observations of clouds. Our numerical model produces similar inhomogeneities that we overlay on the simulated cloud field for direct comparison with the observations. Data also suggests that clouds cover a larger area over the vortices than the area encircled by their high-velocity collars, the simulated collars in our model reproduce these observations. Additional comparisons with observations and results from our latest findings will be presented. The resulting EPIC model is available as open source software from NASA's PDS Atmospheres Node. This research is supported by NASA's Cassini Data Analysis and Planetary Atmospheres Programs.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Dispersion in the Combustion Integrated Rack Simulated Numerically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming-Shin; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    When discharged into an International Space Station (ISS) payload rack, a carbon dioxide (CO2) portable fire extinguisher (PFE) must extinguish a fire by decreasing the oxygen in the rack by 50 percent within 60 sec. The length of time needed for this oxygen reduction throughout the rack and the length of time that the CO2 concentration remains high enough to prevent the fire from reigniting is important when determining the effectiveness of the response and postfire procedures. Furthermore, in the absence of gravity, the local flow velocity can make the difference between a fire that spreads rapidly and one that self-extinguishes after ignition. A numerical simulation of the discharge of CO2 from PFE into the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) in microgravity was performed to obtain the local velocity and CO2 concentration. The complicated flow field around the PFE nozzle exits was modeled by sources of equivalent mass and momentum flux at a location downstream of the nozzle. The time for the concentration of CO2 to reach a level that would extinguish a fire anywhere in the rack was determined using the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), a computational fluid dynamics code developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology specifically to evaluate the development of a fire and smoke transport. The simulation shows that CO2, as well as any smoke and combustion gases produced by a fire, would be discharged into the ISS cabin through the resource utility panel at the bottom of the rack. These simulations will be validated by comparing the results with velocity and CO2 concentration measurements obtained during the fire suppression system verification tests conducted on the CIR in March 2003. Once these numerical simulations are validated, portions of the ISS labs and living areas will be modeled to determine the local flow conditions before, during, and after a fire event. These simulations can yield specific information about how long it takes for smoke and

  20. Numerical simulation of a self-propelled copepod during escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Borazjani, Iman; Malkiel, Edwin; Katz, Josef

    2008-11-01

    Obtaining the 3D flow field, forces, and power is essential for understanding the high accelerations of a copepod during the escap. We carry out numerical simulations to study a free swimming copepod using the sharp-interface immersed boundary, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach of Borazjani et al. (J Compu Phys, 2008, 227, p 7587-7620). We use our previous tethered copepod model with a realistic copepod-like body, including all the appendages with the appendages motion prescribed from high-resolution, cinematic dual digital holography. The simulations are performed in a frame of reference attached to the copepod whose velocity is calculated by considering the forces acting on the copepod. The self-propelled simulations are challenging due to the destabilizing effects of the large added mass resulting from the low copepod mass and fast acceleration during the escape. Strongly-coupled FSI with under-relaxation and the Aitken acceleration technique is used to obtain stable and robust FSI iterations. The computed results for the self-propelled model are analyzed and compared with our earlier results for the tethered model.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Within Parallel Plate Plastometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    2002-01-01

    Parallel Plate Plastometer (PPP) is a device commonly used for measuring the viscosity of high polymers at low rates of shear in the range 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) poises. This device is being validated for use in measuring the viscosity of liquid glasses at high temperatures having similar ranges for the viscosity values. PPP instrument consists of two similar parallel plates, both in the range of 1 inch in diameter with the upper plate being movable while the lower one is kept stationary. Load is applied to the upper plate by means of a beam connected to shaft attached to the upper plate. The viscosity of the fluid is deduced from measuring the variation of the plate separation, h, as a function of time when a specified fixed load is applied on the beam. Operating plate speeds measured with the PPP is usually in the range of 10.3 cm/s or lower. The flow field within the PPP can be simulated using the equations of motion of fluid flow for this configuration. With flow speeds in the range quoted above the flow field between the two plates is certainly incompressible and laminar. Such flows can be easily simulated using numerical modeling with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. We present below the mathematical model used to simulate this flow field and also the solutions obtained for the flow using a commercially available finite element CFD code.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Sickle Cell Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2001-11-01

    A numerical simulation of normal and sickle cell blood flow through the transverse arteriole-capillary microcirculation is carried out to model the dominant mechanisms involved in the onset of vascular stasis in sickle cell disease. The transverse arteriole-capillary network is described by Strahler's network branching method, and the oxygen and blood transport in the capillaries is modeled by a Krogh cylinder analysis utilizing Lighthill's lubrication theory, as developed by Berger and King. Poiseuille's law is used to represent blood flow in the arterioles. Applying this flow and transport model and utilizing volumetric flow continuity at each network bifurcation, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained, which is solved iteratively using a steepest descent algorithm coupled with a Newton solver. Ten different networks are generated and flow results are calculated for normal blood and sickle cell blood without and with precapillary oxygen loss. We find that total volumetric blood flow through the network is greater in the two sickle cell blood simulations than for normal blood owing to the anemia associated with sickle cell disease. The percentage of capillary blockage in the network increases dramatically with decreasing pressure drop across the network in the sickle cell cases while there is no blockage when normal blood flows through simulated networks. It is concluded that, in sickle cell disease, without any vasomotor dilation response to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the blood, capillary blockage will occur in the microvasculature even at average pressure drops across the transverse arteriole-capillary networks.

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Weakly Stratified Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redford, J. A.; Lund, T. S.; Coleman, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate a time-dependent turbulent wake evolving in a stably stratified background. A large initial Froude number is chosen to allow the wake to become fully turbulent and axisymmetric before stratification affects the spreading rate of the mean defect. The uncertainty introduced by the finite sample size associated with gathering statistics from a simulation of a time-dependent flow is reduced, compared to earlier simulations of this flow. The DNS reveals the buoyancy-induced changes to the turbulence structure, as well as to the mean-defect history and the terms in the mean-momentum and turbulence-kinetic-energy budgets, that characterize the various states of this flow - namely the three-dimensional (essentially unstratified), non-equilibrium (or 'wake-collapse') and quasi-two-dimensional (or 'two-component') regimes observed elsewhere for wakes embedded in both weakly and strongly stratified backgrounds. The wake-collapse regime is not accompanied by transfer (or 'reconversion') of the potential energy of the turbulence to the kinetic energy of the turbulence, implying that this is not an essential feature of stratified-wake dynamics. The dependence upon Reynolds number of the duration of the wake-collapse period is demonstrated, and the effect of the details of the initial/near-field conditions of the wake on its subsequent development is examined.

  4. A simplified DEM numerical simulation of vibroflotation without backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. J.; Liu, W. W.; He, J.; Sun, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Vibroflotation is one of the deep vibratory compaction techniques for ground reinforcement. This method densities the soil and improves its mechanical properties, thus helps to protect people's lives and property from geological disasters. The macro reinforcement mechanisms of vibroflotation method have been investigated by numerical simulations, laboratory and in-situ experiments. However, little attention has been paid on its micro - mechanism, which is essential to fully understand the principle of the ground reinforcement. Discrete element method (DEM), based on discrete mechanics, is more powerful to solve large deformation and failure problems. This paper investigated the macro-micro mechanism of vibroflotation without backfill under two conditions, i.e., whether or not the ground water was considered, by incorporating inter-particle rolling resistance model in the DEM simulations. Conclusions obtained are as follows: The DEM simulations incorporating rolling resistance well replicate the mechanical response of the soil assemblages and are in line with practical observations. The void ratio of the granular soil fluctuates up and down in the process of vibroflotation, and finally reduces to a lower value. It is more efficient to densify the ground without water compared to the ground with water.

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongibello, L.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Naso, V.

    2014-11-01

    An innovative transient numerical model is presented for the simulation of a solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system. The solar collectors have been simulated by using a zerodimensional analytical model. The temperature distributions in the heat transfer fluid and in the water inside the tank have been evaluated by one-dimensional models. The reversion elimination algorithm has been used to include the effects of natural convection among the water layers at different heights in the tank on the thermal stratification. A finite difference implicit scheme has been implemented to solve the energy conservation equation in the coil heat exchanger, and the energy conservation equation in the tank has been solved by using the finite difference Euler implicit scheme. Energy conservation equations for the solar DHW components models have been coupled by means of a home-made implicit algorithm. Results of the simulation performed using as input data the experimental values of the ambient temperature and the solar irradiance in a summer day are presented and discussed.

  6. Numerical simulation of plasma transport driven by the Io torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y. S.; Wolf, R. A.; Spiro, R. W.; Dessler, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Rice convection model (RCM) has been modified to a form suitable for Jupiter (RCM-J) to study plasma interchange motion in and near the Io plasma torus. The net result of the interchange is that flux tubes, heavily loaded with torus plasma, are transported outward, to be replaced by tubes containing little low-energy (less than 1 keV) plasma. The process is numerically simulated in terms of time evolution from an initial torus that is longitudinally asymmetric and with gradually decreasing density outward from Io's orbit. In the simulations, the nonlinear stage of the instability characteristically exhibits outreaching fingers of heavily-loaded flux tubes that lengthen at an accelerating rate. The principal finding is that the primary geometrical form of outward transport of torus plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere is through long, outward-moving fingers of plasma. In the simulations, the fingers mainly form in the active sector of the Io torus (the heavier side of the asymmetric torus), and they are spaced longitudinally roughly 20 deg apart.

  7. The 5-HT1D/1B receptor agonist sumatriptan enhances fear of simulated speaking and reduces plasma levels of prolactin.

    PubMed

    de Rezende, Marcos Gonçalves; Garcia-Leal, Cybele; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta

    2013-12-01

    This study measured the effects of the preferential 5-HT1D/1B receptor agonist sumatriptan in healthy volunteers who performed the Simulated Public Speaking Test (SPST), which recruits the neural network involved in panic disorder and social anxiety disorder. In a double-blind, randomised experiment, 36 males received placebo (12), 50 mg (12) or 100 mg (12) of sumatriptan 2 h before the SPST. Subjective, physiological and hormonal measures were taken before, during and after the test. The dose of 100 mg of sumatriptan increased speech-induced fear more than either a 50mg dose of the drug or placebo. The largest dose of sumatriptan also enhanced vigilance more than placebo, without any change in blood pressure, heart rate or electrical skin conductance. Sumatriptan decreased plasma levels of prolactin. A significant but moderate increase in plasma cortisol after SPST occurred, independent of treatment. Because sumatriptan decreases 5-HT release into the extracellular space, the potentiation of SPST-induced fear caused by the drug supports the hypothesis that 5-HT attenuates this emotional state. As acute administration of antidepressants has also been shown to enhance speaking fear and increase plasma prolactin, in contrast to sumatriptan, the 5-HT regulation of stress-hormone release is likely to be different from that of emotion.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection in Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Syuniti

    2000-03-01

    In this thesis, we perform two-dimensional (2D) resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of the magnetic reconnection in interstellar medium. Part I is introduction. The motivation of the study is to investigate the origin of hot gas in interstellar medium. A scenario for generating X-ray gas in Galaxy is proposed, and examined by performing 2D MHD simulations with simple assumptions (Part II). The magnetic reconnection triggered by a supernova (Part III) and Parker instability (Part IV) are studied in detail, by performing 2D MHD simulations. Furthermore, the magnetic reconnection is also studied by performing three-dimensional (3D) MHD numerical simulation in (Part V). % Finally, we discuss and summarize the thesis (Parts VI and VII). Part I First, we review observation of Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) and its problems. Second, we describe observation of interstellar magnetic field briefly. Third, we review magnetic reconnection, theoretical models, numerical simulations, observations and experiments, and tearing instability. Forth, Parker instability (undular mode of magnetobuoyancy instability) is mentioned. Finally, we show the purpose of this thesis. Part II We present a scenario for the origin of the hot plasma in Galaxy as a model of strong X-ray emission [sim 3-10 keV; LX(2-10 keV) sim 1038 erg s-1], called GRXE, which has been observed near to the galactic plane. GRXE is thermal emission from a hot component (sim 7 keV) and a cool component (sim 0.8 keV). Observations suggest that the hot component is diffuse, and that it is not escaping away freely. Both what heats the hot component and what confines it in Galactic ridge still remain puzzling, while the cool component is believed to be created by supernovae. We propose a new scenario: the hot component is heated by magnetic reconnection, and confined by a helical magnetic field produced by magnetic reconnection. We solved 2D MHD equations numerically to study how magnetic

  9. Comparing Numerical Spall Simulations with a Nonlinear Spall Formation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, L.; Melosh, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Spallation accelerates lightly shocked ejecta fragments to speeds that can exceed the escape velocity of the parent body. We present high-resolution simulations of nonlinear shock interactions in the near surface. Initial results show the acceleration of near-surface material to velocities up to 1.8 times greater than the peak particle velocity in the detached shock, while experiencing little to no shock pressure. These simulations suggest a possible nonlinear spallation mechanism to produce the high-velocity, low show pressure meteorites from other planets. Here we pre-sent the numerical simulations that test the production of spall through nonlinear shock interactions in the near sur-face, and compare the results with a model proposed by Kamegai (1986 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Report). We simulate near-surface shock interactions using the SALES_2 hydrocode and the Murnaghan equation of state. We model the shock interactions in two geometries: rectangular and spherical. In the rectangular case, we model a planar shock approaching the surface at a constant angle phi. In the spherical case, the shock originates at a point below the surface of the domain and radiates spherically from that point. The angle of the shock front with the surface is dependent on the radial distance of the surface point from the shock origin. We model the target as a solid with a nonlinear Murnaghan equation of state. This idealized equation of state supports nonlinear shocks but is tem-perature independent. We track the maximum pressure and maximum velocity attained in every cell in our simula-tions and compare them to the Hugoniot equations that describe the material conditions in front of and behind the shock. Our simulations demonstrate that nonlinear shock interactions in the near surface produce lightly shocked high-velocity material for both planar and cylindrical shocks. The spall is the result of the free surface boundary condi-tion, which forces a pressure gradient

  10. Understanding disordered systems through numerical simulation and algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Sean Michael

    Disordered systems arise in many physical contexts. Not all matter is uniform, and impurities or heterogeneities can be modeled by fixed random disorder. Numerous complex networks also possess fixed disorder, leading to applications in transportation systems, telecommunications, social networks, and epidemic modeling, to name a few. Due to their random nature and power law critical behavior, disordered systems are difficult to study analytically. Numerical simulation can help overcome this hurdle by allowing for the rapid computation of system states. In order to get precise statistics and extrapolate to the thermodynamic limit, large systems must be studied over many realizations. Thus, innovative algorithm development is essential in order reduce memory or running time requirements of simulations. This thesis presents a review of disordered systems, as well as a thorough study of two particular systems through numerical simulation, algorithm development and optimization, and careful statistical analysis of scaling properties. Chapter 1 provides a thorough overview of disordered systems, the history of their study in the physics community, and the development of techniques used to study them. Topics of quenched disorder, phase transitions, the renormalization group, criticality, and scale invariance are discussed. Several prominent models of disordered systems are also explained. Lastly, analysis techniques used in studying disordered systems are covered. In Chapter 2, minimal spanning trees on critical percolation clusters are studied, motivated in part by an analytic perturbation expansion by Jackson and Read that I check against numerical calculations. This system has a direct mapping to the ground state of the strongly disordered spin glass. We compute the path length fractal dimension of these trees in dimensions d = {2, 3, 4, 5} and find our results to be compatible with the analytic results suggested by Jackson and Read. In Chapter 3, the random bond Ising

  11. Numerical simulation of the radiation environment on Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.

    2015-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Martian surface is significantly different from that on earth. Existing observation and studies reveal that the radiation environment on the Martian surface is highly variable regarding to both short- and long-term time scales. For example, its dose rate presents diurnal and seasonal variations associated with atmospheric pressure changes. Moreover, dose rate is also strongly influenced by the modulation from GCR flux. Numerical simulation and theoretical explanations are required to understand the mechanisms behind these features, and to predict the time variation of radiation environment on the Martian surface if aircraft is supposed to land on it in near future. The high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) which are ubiquitous throughout the solar system are highly penetrating and extremely difficult to shield against beyond the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere. The goal of this article is to evaluate the long term radiation risk on the Martian surface. Therefore, we need to develop a realistic time-dependent GCR model, which will be integrated with Geant4 transport code subsequently to reproduce the observed variation of surface dose rate associated with the changing heliospheric conditions. In general, the propagation of cosmic rays in the interplanetary medium can be described by a Fokker-Planck equation (or Parker equation). In last decade,we witnessed a fast development of GCR transport models within the heliosphere based on accurate gas-dynamic and MHD backgrounds from global models of the heliosphere. The global MHD simulation produces a more realistic pattern of the 3-D heliospheric structure, as well as the interface between the solar system and the surrounding interstellar space. As a consequence, integrating plasma background obtained from global-dependent 3-D MHD simulation and stochastic Parker transport simulation, we expect to produce an accurate global physical-based GCR modulation model. Combined

  12. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, Craig J.

    1990-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementation of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program to extend the present capabilities of this method was initiated for the treatment of chemically reacting flows. In the DNS efforts, the focus is on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and non-equilibrium kinetics modelings in high speed reacting flows. Emphasis was on the simulations of simple flows, namely homogeneous compressible flows, and temporally developing high speed mixing layers.

  13. Numerical simulation of a battlefield Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, Markus; Sjoqvist, Lars; Uhrwing, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A numeric model has been developed to identify the critical components and parameters in improving the output beam quality of a flashlamp pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a folded Porro-prism resonator and polarization output coupling. The heating of the laser material and accompanying thermo-optical effects are calculated using the finite element partial differential equations package FEMLAB allowing arbitrary geometries and time distributions. The laser gain and the cavity are modeled with the physical optics simulation code GLAD including effects such as gain profile, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence, the Pockels cell rise-time and component aberrations. The model is intended to optimize the pumping process of an OPO providing radiation to be used for ranging, imaging or optical countermeasures.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of turbulence using GPU accelerated supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajeh-Saeed, Ali; Blair Perot, J.

    2013-02-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulence are optimized for up to 192 graphics processors. The results from two large GPU clusters are compared to the performance of corresponding CPU clusters. A number of important algorithm changes are necessary to access the full computational power of graphics processors and these adaptations are discussed. It is shown that the handling of subdomain communication becomes even more critical when using GPU based supercomputers. The potential for overlap of MPI communication with GPU computation is analyzed and then optimized. Detailed timings reveal that the internal calculations are now so efficient that the operations related to MPI communication are the primary scaling bottleneck at all but the very largest problem sizes that can fit on the hardware. This work gives a glimpse of the CFD performance issues will dominate many hardware platform in the near future.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, C. G.; Riggins, D. W.; Bittner, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a numerical investigation of a three-dimensional dual-mode scramjet isolator-combustor flow-field are presented. Specifically, the effect of wall cooling on upstream interaction and flow-structure is examined for a case assuming jet-to-jet symmetry within the combustor. Comparisons are made with available experimental wall pressures. The full half-duct for the isolator-combustor is then modeled in order to study the influence of side-walls. Large scale three-dimensionality is observed in the flow with massive separation forward on the side-walls of the duct. A brief review of convergence-acceleration techniques useful in dual-mode simulations is presented, followed by recommendations regarding the development of a reliable and unambiguous experimental data base for guiding CFD code assessments in this area.

  16. Observation and numerical simulation of a convective initiation during COHMEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, J. Aaron; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Under a synoptically undisturbed condition, a dual-peak convective lifecycle was observed with the COoperative Huntsville Meteorological EXperiment (COHMEX) observational network over a 24-hour period. The lifecycle included a multicell storm, which lasted about 6 hours, produced a peak rainrate exceeding 100 mm/hr, and initiated a downstream mesoscale convective system. The 24-hour accumulated rainfall of this event was the largest during the entire COHMEX. The downstream mesoscale convective system, unfortunately, was difficult to investigate quantitatively due to the lack of mesoscale observations. The dataset collected near the time of the multicell storm evolution, including its initiation, was one of the best datasets of COHMEX. In this study, the initiation of this multicell storm is chosen as the target of the numerical simulations.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Gas Leaking Diffusion from Storage Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongjun; Jing, Jiaqiang

    Over 80 percents of storage tank accidents are caused by gas leaking. Since traditional empirical calculation has great errors, present work aims to study the gas leaking diffusion under different wind conditions by numerical simulation method based on computational fluid dynamics theory. Then gas concentration distribution was obtained to determine the scope of the security zone. The results showed that gas diffused freely along the axis of leaking point without wind, giving rise to large range of hazardous area. However, wind plays the role of migrating and diluting the leaking gas. The larger is the wind speed, the smaller is the damage and the bigger is the security zone. Calculation method and results can provide some reference to establish and implement rescue program for accidents.

  18. Numerical simulation of high Reynolds number bubble motion

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of bubble motion. All the results are for single bubbles in unbounded fluids. The liquid phase is quiescent except for the motion created by the bubble, which is axisymmetric. The main focus of the paper is on bubbles that are of order 1 mm in diameter in water. Of particular interest is the effect of surfactant molecules on bubble motion. Results for the {open_quotes}insoluble surfactant{close_quotes} model will be presented. These results extend research by other investigators to finite Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that, by assuming complete coverage of the bubble surface, one obtains good agreement with experimental observations of bubble motion in tap water. The effect of surfactant concentration on the separation angle is discussed.

  19. Numerical simulation of duct flow with fog droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryan, Abhilash; Lee, J. K.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    Evaporative cooling is a widely used air cooling technique. In this method, evaporation of a liquid in the surrounding air cools the air in contact with it. In the current investigation, numerical simulations are carried out to visualize the evaporation and dynamics of tiny water droplets of different diameters in a long air duct. The effect of initial droplet size on the temperature and relative humidity distribution of the air stream in the duct is investigated. Three different initial conditions of air are considered to verify the influence of ambient conditions. Droplet spray patterns are also analyzed to identify the suitable locations for the spray nozzles within the duct. The results obtained are displayed in a series of plots to provide a clear understanding of the evaporative cooling process as well as the droplet dynamics within the ducts.

  20. Direct numerical simulation and analysis of shock turbulence interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sangsan; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1991-01-01

    Two kinds of linear analysis, rapid distortion theory (RDT) and linear interaction analysis (LIA), were used to investigate the effects of a shock wave on turbulence. Direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional isotropic turbulence interaction with a normal shock were also performed. The results from RDT and LIA are in good agreement for weak shock waves, where the effects of shock front curvature and shock front unsteadiness are not significant in producing vorticity. The linear analyses predict wavenumber-dependent amplification of the upstream one-dimensional energy spectrum, leading to turbulence scale length scale decrease through the interaction. Instantaneous vorticity fields show that vortical structures are enhanced while they are compressed in the shock normal direction. Entrophy amplfication through the shock wave compares favorably with the results of linear analyses.

  1. Numerical simulation of a radially injected barium cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.; Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of a radially symmetric barium injection experiment demonstrate that ions created by solar UV irradiation are electrostatically bound to the electrons which remain tied to the field lines on which they are created. Two possible instabilities are identified, but neither of them causes the barium plasma cloud to polarize in a way that would permit the plasma to keep up with the neutrals. In a second model, the velocity of the neutrals is allowed to be a function of the azimuthal angle. Here, a portion of the cloud does polarize in a way that allows a portion of the plasma to detach and move outward at the approximate speed of the neutrals. No rapid detachment is found when only the density of the neutrals is given an azimuthal asymmetry.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet Atomization Including Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.; Balasubramanyam, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes numerical implementation of a newly developed hybrid model, T-blob/T-TAB, into an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program for primary and secondary breakup simulation of liquid jet atomization. This model extend two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O'Rourke and Amsden to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. Several assessment studies are presented and the results indicate that the existing KH and TAB models tend to under-predict the product drop size and spray angle, while the current model provides superior results when compared with the measured data.

  3. Numerical simulation of vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Nripen K.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulation of vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection are addressed. The vehicle crashworthiness design objectives are to design the vehicle structure for optimum impact energy absorption, and to design the restraint system (seatbelts, airbags, bolsters, etc.) for optimum occupant protection. The following approaches are taken; a major part of the impact energy is to be absorbed by the vehicle structure; the restraint components will provide protection against the remaining crash energy; certain vehicle components are designed to deform under specific types and speeds of impact in a desired mode for sound energy management; structural components such as front side rails, rear rails, door structure and pillars undergo large amounts of deformation; and with properly designed geometry and material these components assist in mitigating the effects of impact.

  4. Fully-resolved numerical simulation of 1024 sedimenting spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2005-11-01

    The dynamics of a suspension of finite-size particles settling under gravity in a Newtonian fluid is simulated. The ``Physalis'' numerical method is used to fully resolve the flow around the spheres at finite particle Reynolds number, with an elastic-collision model. Of interest in the investigation is the self-organization of the disperse phase and its effect on the sedimenting behavior. Particle clustering and anisotropy are found to be prominent features of the system. The suspension displays preferential orientation at scales comparable to the particle dimension. Fluctuations in the mean particle settling velocity are shown to be intimately linked to the anisotropy of the microstructure. The particle Lagrangian time scale in the direction gravity is larger than in the orthogonal directions and, as a consequence, a similar difference is found between the vertical and horizontal self-diffusion coefficients.

  5. Numerical simulation on snow melting phenomena by CIP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoe, H.; Yoon, Seong Y.; Josho, M.; Yabe, T.

    2001-04-01

    A numerical scheme based on the C-CUP method to simulate melting phenomena in snow is proposed. To calculate these complex phenomena we introduce the phase change, elastic-plastic model, porous model, and verify each model by using some simple examples. This scheme is applied to a practical model, such as the snow piled on the insulator of electrical transmission line, in which snow is modeled as a compound material composed of air, water, and ice, and is calculated by elastic-plastic model. The electric field between two electrodes is solved by the Poisson equation giving the Joule heating in the energy conservation that eventually leads to snow melting. Comparison is made by changing the fraction of water in the snow to see its effect on melting process for the cases of applied voltage of 50 and 500 kV on the two electrodes.

  6. Numerical simulation of flow characteristics in micro shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-06-01

    Recently micro shock tubes have been widely used in many engineering and industrial fields, but the characteristics of unsteady flow are not well known to date in micro shock tubes. Compared to conventional shock tubes with macro scales, flows related to shock waves in micro shock tubes are highly complicated. Stronger viscous and dissipative interactions make shock wave dynamic behaviors significantly different from theoretical predictions. In the present study, a CFD work was applied to the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations which were solved using a fully implicit finite volume scheme. The diaphragm pressure ratio and shock tube diameter were varied to investigate their effects on micro shock tube flows. Different wall boundary conditions were also performed to observe shock wave and contact surface propagation with no slip and slip walls. Detailed flow characteristics at the foot of shock wave and contact surface propagation were known from the present numerical simulations.

  7. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility feasibility study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    There were three major issues examined in the feasibility study. First, the ability of the proposed system architecture to support the anticipated workload was evaluated. Second, the throughput of the computational engine (the flow model processor) was studied using real application programs. Third, the availability, reliability, and maintainability of the system were modeled. The evaluations were based on the baseline systems. The results show that the implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, in the form considered, would indeed be a feasible project with an acceptable level of risk. The technology required (both hardware and software) either already exists or, in the case of a few parts, is expected to be announced this year.

  8. Numerical simulation of the resonantly excited capillary-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Hirata, Motonori; Okino, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    Capillary gravity waves excited by an obstacle are investigated by a direct numerical simulation. In the flow without capillary effects, it is well known that large-amplitude upstream advancing solitary waves are generated periodically under the resonant condition, i.e., when the phase velocity of the long surface waves and the mean flow velocity agrees. With capillary effects, solutions of the Euler equations show the generation of very short waves further upstream of the solitary waves and also in the depression region downstream of the obstacle. The overall characteristics of these waves agree with the solutions of the forced fifth-order KdV equation, while the weakly nonlinear theory generally overestimates the wavelength of the short waves.

  9. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation of a model of morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Ana I; Tello, José Ignacio

    2011-10-01

    We consider a simple mathematical model of distribution of morphogens (signaling molecules responsible for the differentiation of cells and the creation of tissue patterns). The mathematical model is a particular case of the model proposed by Lander, Nie and Wan in 2006 and similar to the model presented in Lander, Nie, Vargas and Wan 2005. The model consists of a system of three equations: a PDE of parabolic type with dynamical boundary conditions modelling the distribution of free morphogens and two ODEs describing the evolution of bound and free receptors. Three biological processes are taken into account: diffusion, degradation and reversible binding. We study the stationary solutions and the evolution problem. Numerical simulations show the behavior of the solution depending on the values of the parameters.

  10. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Permyakov, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    This research examines the process of electron-beam welding in a keyhole mode with the use of beam oscillations. We study the impact of various beam oscillations and their parameters on the shape of the keyhole, the flow of heat and mass transfer processes and weld parameters to develop methodological recommendations. A numerical three-dimensional mathematical model of electron beam welding is presented. The model was developed on the basis of a heat conduction equation and a Navier-Stokes equation taking into account phase transitions at the interface of a solid and liquid phase and thermocapillary convection (Marangoni effect). The shape of the keyhole is determined based on experimental data on the parameters of the secondary signal by using the method of a synchronous accumulation. Calculations of thermal and hydrodynamic processes were carried out based on a computer cluster, using a simulation package COMSOL Multiphysics.

  11. Numerical simulations of runaway electron generation in pressurized gases

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of the generation of runaway electrons in pressurized nitrogen and helium gases are presented. It was shown that runaway electrons generation occurs in two stages. In the first stage, runaway electrons are composed of the electrons emitted by the cathode and produced in gas ionization in the vicinity of the cathode. This stage is terminated with the formation of the virtual cathode, which becomes the primary source of runaway electrons in the second stage. Also, it was shown that runaway electrons current is limited by both the shielding of the field emission by the space charge of the emitted electrons and the formation of a virtual cathode. In addition, the influence of the initial conditions, such as voltage rise time and amplitude, gas pressure, and the type of gas, on the processes that accompany runaway electrons generation is presented.

  12. A numerical simulation of photothermal response in laser medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan; Xiao, Songshan

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we reported a numerical solution of laser induced thermal effect in the bio-tissue. The model of photothermal effect and classical Pennes bio-heat transfer equation were introduced. Finite element method (FEM), which was realized by Matlab software, was used to calculate the temperature distribution. He-Ne laser (633 nm) was used to simulate the physical therapy in in vivo skin tissue. Under the cylinder coordinates, the three-dimension (3-D) geometry of tissue was reduced to two-dimension (2-D) computation. The results contained the radial, axial and temperature 3-D color plot. Combining the time animation display was possible. By changing the laser and tissue parameters we can get different results. This will be the initial and indispensable work of the non-destructive evaluation of the laser induced injury.

  13. Numerical simulations for a variable order fractional Schnakenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouch, Z.; Mekkaoui, T.; Belgacem, F. B. M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical solutions of a variable-order space-time fractional reaction-diffusion model. The space-time fractional derivative is considered in the sense of Riesz-Feller, the system is defined by replacing the second order space derivatives with the variable Riesz-Feller derivatives. The problem is solved by an explicit finite difference method. Finally, simulation results to this problem are presented and discussed. In the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, the name and affiliation of author F. B. M. Belgacem was missing due to a Latex compiling error. This article was updated on 29 January 2015 to correct that error.

  14. Analysis of quadratic nonlinearities in hydrodynamic transport systems employing numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicken, Gurcan

    This dissertation deals with the analysis and identification of quadratic non-linearities in hydrodynamic transport problems arising in engineering and science. As representative application areas, homogenous oscillations of electron and ion plasmas in a 1-D periodic domain and the forced voltage-current dynamics of a semiconductor device are considered. The time series data obtained from numerical solutions of the associated hydrodynamic equations are used for the spectral analysis of the quadratic nonlinearities in these respective systems. More specifically, electron plasma oscillations are analyzed using power spectra and cross-bicoherency spectra to gain insight into the quadratic interactions predicted by a simple model of the energy transfer that cascades from lower modes to higher modes within a small amplitude range of oscillations. The efficiency of the bicoherency function in detecting the quadratic wave interactions from the complex time series of the mode amplitudes is observed. The difference in the modal interactions for isentropic and isothermal plasma models are investigated based on numerical 'experiments' simulating the modal dynamics in each case. Furthermore, the concentration oscillations of cold ion plasmas in a Lagrangian frame are analyzed for different Debye lengths. The detailed effects of linear and nonlinear mechanisms in the hydrodynamic model on the power spectra of the oscillations are investigated. Second-order Volterra models are considered for approximating the dynamics of input-output systems with quadratic nonlinear terms. The linear and quadratic kernels of the Volterra model are estimated using multi- tone inputs and least-squares minimization. The implications of the non-orthogonality of the model are investigated in detail. To circumvent the negative effects of non-orthogonality on the accuracy of the kernel estimation, an 'odd-even' separation technique is utilized in the kernel estimation. This approach for estimating an

  15. Numerical simulation of equatorial plasma bubbles over Cachimbo: COPEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, A. J.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in onset of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using data from the 2002 COPEX observational campaign in Brazil and numerical modeling. The observational results show that for values of virtual height of the F layer base less than 355 km at around 18:35 LT, and for the prereversal peak enhancement of the vertical plasma drift (Vp) less than 30 m/s, the spread-F (ESF) was absent on four nights over Cachimbo (9.5°S, 54.8°W, dip latitude = -2.1°). In this work we analyze the geophysical conditions for the generation of the irregularities by comparing the nights with and without the ESF. In the comparison a numerical code is used to simulate plasma irregularity development in an extended altitude range from the bottom of the equatorial F layer. The code uses the flux corrected transport method with Boris-Book’s flux limiter for the spatial integration and a predictor-corrector method for the direct time integration of the continuity equation for O+ and the SOR (Successive-Over-Relaxation) method for electric potential equation. The code is tested with different evening eastward electric fields (or vertical drifts Vp < 30 m/s and Vp > 30 m/s) in order to study the influence of the prereversal enhancement in the zonal electric field on plasma bubble formation and development. The code also takes into account the zonal wind, the vertical electric field and the collision frequency of ions with neutrals and the amplitude of initial perturbation. The simulation shows a good agreement with the observational results of the ESF. The results of the code suggest that the instability can grow at the F layer bottomside by the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism only when the Vp > 30 m/s. In the analyzed cases we have considered the competition of other geophysical parameters in the generation of plasma structures.

  16. Airplane numerical simulation for the rapid prototyping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roysdon, Paul F.

    Airplane Numerical Simulation for the Rapid Prototyping Process is a comprehensive research investigation into the most up-to-date methods for airplane development and design. Uses of modern engineering software tools, like MatLab and Excel, are presented with examples of batch and optimization algorithms which combine the computing power of MatLab with robust aerodynamic tools like XFOIL and AVL. The resulting data is demonstrated in the development and use of a full non-linear six-degrees-of-freedom simulator. The applications for this numerical tool-box vary from un-manned aerial vehicles to first-order analysis of manned aircraft. A Blended-Wing-Body airplane is used for the analysis to demonstrate the flexibility of the code from classic wing-and-tail configurations to less common configurations like the blended-wing-body. This configuration has been shown to have superior aerodynamic performance -- in contrast to their classic wing-and-tube fuselage counterparts -- and have reduced sensitivity to aerodynamic flutter as well as potential for increased engine noise abatement. Of course without a classic tail elevator to damp the nose up pitching moment, and the vertical tail rudder to damp the yaw and possible rolling aerodynamics, the challenges in lateral roll and yaw stability, as well as pitching moment are not insignificant. This thesis work applies the tools necessary to perform the airplane development and optimization on a rapid basis, demonstrating the strength of this tool through examples and comparison of the results to similar airplane performance characteristics published in literature.

  17. Cascade processes in stratified media: experiment and direct numerical simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibgatullin, Ilias; Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves may transfer substantial part of energy in oceans and astrophysical objects, influence the background stratification, and angular momentum. Internal waves can be generated by convection in astrophysical objects, by tidal motion and interaction with orography in oceans. Internal and inertial waves obey similar system of equations. Due to very particular type of dispersive relation and the way internal waves are reflected from surfaces, in confined domains the monochromatic internal waves after sequence of reflections may form closed paths, the "wave attractors" [1]. Presently, linear theory of wave attractors is quite elaborated and a principal interest of research is focused on nonlinear regimes and unstable configurations, overturning events and mixing. We have performed direct numerical simulation of wave attractors which closely reproduces experiments [2] being carried out in Ecole Normal Superior de Lyon (ENS de Lyon). Direct numerical simulation is realized with the help of spectral element approach and code nek5000. Triadic resonance is confirmed as the first instability which appears on the most energetic ray of the attractor at sufficiently large forcing. With further increase of the forcing amplitude the daughter waves also become unstable resulting in a sophisticated cascade process which was first observed experimentally. For very high forcing amplitude interaction of focused waves with the walls results in appearance of small-scale folded structures. Their interaction with principal flow is the subject of further research. 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F.-P. A., Geometric focusing of internal waves. J. Fluid Mech, 1995,. 300, 1-41 2. Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E., Dauxois, T., 2013, Physical Review Letters, 110, 234501

  18. Direct numerical simulations of magmatic differentiation at the microscopic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, J.; Suckale, J.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2010-12-01

    A key question in the context of magmatic differentiation and fractional crystallization is the ability of crystals to decouple from the ambient fluid and sink or rise. Field data indicates a complex spectrum of behavior ranging from rapid sedimentation to continued entrainment. Theoretical and laboratory studies paint a similarly rich picture. The goal of this study is to provide a detailed numerical assessment of the competing effects of sedimentation and entrainment at the scale of individual crystals. The decision to simulate magmatic differentiation at the grain scale comes at the price of not being able to simultaneously solve for the convective velocity field at the macroscopic scale, but has the crucial advantage of enabling us to fully resolve the dynamics of the systems from first principles without requiring any simplifying assumptions. The numerical approach used in this study is a customized computational methodology developed specifically for simulations of solid-fluid coupling in geophysical systems. The algorithm relies on a two-step projection scheme: In the first step, we solve the multiple-phase Navier-Stokes or Stokes equation in both domains. In the second step, we project the velocity field in the solid domain onto a rigid-body motion by enforcing that the deformation tensor in the respective domain is zero. This procedure is also used to enforce the no-slip boundary-condition on the solid-fluid interface. We have extensively validated and benchmarked the method. Our preliminary results indicate that, not unexpectedly, the competing effects of sedimentation and entrainment depend sensitively on the size distribution of the crystals, the aspect ratio of individual crystals and the vigor of the ambient flow field. We provide a detailed scaling analysis and quantify our results in terms of the relevant non-dimensional numbers.

  19. Numerical simulations of electromagnetic scattering by Solar system objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.

    2016-11-01

    Having been profoundly stimulated by the seminal work of Viktor V. Sobolev, I have been involved in multi-decadal research in the fields of radiative transfer, electromagnetic scattering by morphologically complex particles and particulate media, and planetary remote sensing. Much of this research has been done in close collaboration with other "descendants" of Academician Sobolev. This tutorial paper gives a representative overview of the results of extensive numerical simulations (in the vast majority carried out in collaboration with Michael Mishchenko) used to analyze remote-sensing observations of Solar system objects and based on highly accurate methods of the radiative transfer theory and direct computer solvers of the Maxwell equations. Using the atmosphere of Jupiter as a proving ground and performing T-matrix and radiative-transfer calculations helps demonstrate the strong effect of aerosol-particle shapes on the accuracy of remote-sensing retrievals. I then discuss the application of the T-matrix method, a numerically exact solution of the vector radiative transfer equation, and the theory of coherent backscattering to an analysis of polarimetric radar observations of Saturn's rings. Numerical modeling performed by using the superposition T-matrix method in application to cometary dust in the form of aggregates serves to reproduce the results of polarimetric observations of the distant comet C/2010 S1. On the basis of direct computer solutions of the Maxwell equations, it is demonstrated that all backscattering effects predicted by the low-density theories of radiative transfer and coherent backscattering can also be identified for media with volume packing densities typically encountered in natural and artificial environments. This result implies that spectacular opposition effects observed for some high-albedo atmoshereless Solar system bodies can be attributed to coherent backscattering of sunlight by regolith layers composed of microscopic particles.

  20. Numerical simulation of the drying of inkjet-printed droplets.

    PubMed

    Siregar, D P; Kuerten, J G M; van der Geld, C W M

    2013-02-15

    In this paper we study the behavior of an inkjet-printed droplet of a solute dissolved in a solvent on a solid horizontal surface by numerical simulation. An extended model for drying of a droplet and the final distribution of the solute on an impermeable substrate is proposed. The model extends the work by Deegan, Fischer and Kuerten by taking into account convection, diffusion and adsorption of the solute in order to describe more accurately the surface coverage on the substrate. A spherically shaped droplet is considered such that the model can be formulated as an axially symmetric problem. The droplet dynamics is driven by the combined action of surface tension and evaporation. The fluid flow in the droplet is modeled by the Navier-Stokes equation and the continuity equation, where the lubrication approximation is applied. The rate of evaporation is determined by the distribution of vapor pressure in the air surrounding the droplet. Numerical results are compared with experimental results for droplets of various sizes.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of curved turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, R. D.; Moin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Low Reynolds number, mildly curved, turbulent channel flow has been simulated numerically without subgrid scale models. A new spectral numerical method developed for this problem was used, and the computations were performed with 2 million degrees of freedom. A variety of statistical and structural information has been extracted from the computed flow fields. These include mean velocity, turbulence stresses, velocity skewness, and flatness factors, space time correlations and spectra, all the terms in the Reynolds stress balance equations, and contour and vector plots of instantaneous velocity fields. The effects of curvature on this flow were determined by comparing the concave and convex sides of the channel. The observed effects are consistent with experimental observations for mild curvature. The most significant difference in the turbulence statistics between the concave and convex sides was in the Reynolds shear stress. This was accompanied by significant differences in the terms of the Reynolds shear stress balance equations. In addition, it was found that stationary Taylor-Gortler vortices were present and that they had a significant effect on the flow by contributing to the mean Reynolds shear stress, and by affecting the underlying turbulence.

  2. Quantifying paleosecular variation: Insights from numerical dynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuillier, F.; Gilder, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical dynamo simulations can be used to investigate paleosecular variation of Earth-like magnetic fields over several million-year timescales. Using a set of five numerical models integrated over the equivalent of 40-50 Myr, we generated synthetic data analogous to paleomagnetic data. We show that paleosecular variation among the five models is best discriminated by the relative variability in paleointensity (ɛ_F) and the precision parameter (k) of directions or poles. Whether the geodynamo operated in different regimes in its past can be best tested with these parameters in combination. Roughly one million years of time with 200 time-independent samples is required to achieve convergence of ɛ_F and k. The quantities ɛ_F and k correlate well with the average chron duration (μ_chr), which suggests that excursions and reversals are an integral part of palaeosecular variation. If applicable to the geodynamo, the linear dependence of k on μ_chr could help to predict μ_chr for the Earth during geologic times with no available reversal frequency data; it also predicts much higher average k for directions during superchrons (k ≈ 2500 for the Cretaceous normal superchron) than during actively reversing times (k ≈ 35 for the last 80 Myr). As such high k values are not observed, either this family of dynamo models is not applicable to the geodynamo, or the geodynamo regime acting during superchrons lies statistically within the same energy state as at present.

  3. Numerical simulations of the blood flow through vertebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Jozwik, Krzysztof; Obidowski, Damian

    2010-01-19

    Vertebral arteries are two arteries whose structure and location in human body result in development of special flow conditions. For some of the arteries, one can observe a significant difference between flow rates in the left and the right arteries during ultrasonography diagnosis. Usually the reason of such a difference was connected with pathology of the artery in which a smaller flow rate was detected. Simulations of the flow through the selected type of the vertebral artery geometry for twenty five cases of artery diameters have been carried out. The main aim of the presented experiment was to visualize the flow in the region of vertebral arteries junction in the origin of the basilar artery. It is extremely difficult to examine this part of human circulation system, thus numerical experiments may be helpful in understanding the phenomena occurring when two relatively large arteries join together to form one vessel. The obtained results have shown that an individual configuration and diameters of particular arteries can exert an influence on the flow in them and affect a significant difference between flow rates for vertebral arteries. It has been assumed in the investigations that modelled arteries were absolutely normal, without any pathology. In the numerical experiment, the non-Newtonian model of blood was employed.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Particle Deposition in Metal Foam Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauret, Emilie; Saha, Suvash C.; Gu, Yuantong

    2013-01-01

    Australia is a high-potential country for geothermal power with reserves currently estimated in the tens of millions of petajoules, enough to power the nation for at least 1000 years at current usage. However, these resources are mainly located in isolated arid regions where water is scarce. Therefore, wet cooling systems for geothermal plants in Australia are the least attractive solution and thus air-cooled heat exchangers are preferred. In order to increase the efficiency of such heat exchangers, metal foams have been used. One issue raised by this solution is the fouling caused by dust deposition. In this case, the heat transfer characteristics of the metal foam heat exchanger can dramatically deteriorate. Exploring the particle deposition property in the metal foam exchanger becomes crucial. This paper is a numerical investigation aimed to address this issue. Two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations of a standard one-row tube bundle wrapped with metal foam in cross-flow are performed and highlight preferential particle deposition areas.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Dynamics in Deformable Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2011-11-01

    The growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles has been implicated as a potential damage mechanism leading to the rupture of blood vessels in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). While this phenomenon has been investigated numerically, the resulting simulations have often assumed some degree of symmetry and have often failed to include a large number of influential physics, such as viscosity, compressibility, surface tension, phase change and fluid-structure interactions. We present here our efforts to explore the role that cavitation bubbles play in the rupture of blood vessels in SWL and to improve upon the current state of the numerical approach. We have developed a three-dimensional, high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, multicomponent flow algorithm that accounts for the effects of viscosity and surface tension. At this time, we omit any effects due to elasticity and instead, as a first step, model tissue as a viscous and stiffened gas. We discuss preliminary results for the Rayleigh and shock-induced collapse of a gas bubble within a blood vessel and characterize the increase in vessel deformation with increasing bubble confinement and proximity to the vessel wall. This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant No. 2PO1DK43881.

  6. Numerical simulation of the devolatilization of a moving coal particle

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, F.J.

    2009-05-15

    The devolatilization of an isolated coal particle moving relative to the surrounding gas is numerically simulated using a competing reaction model of the pyrolysis and assuming that the released volatiles burn in an infinitely thin diffusion flame around the particle or not at all. The temperature of the particle is assumed to be uniform and the effects of the heat of pyrolysis, the intraparticle mass transfer resistance, and the variation of the particle radius are neglected. The effects of the size and velocity of the particle and of the temperature and oxygen mass fraction of the gas on the particle and flame temperature histories, the devolatilization time and the yield of light and heavy volatiles are investigated. The motion of the particle may have an important effect on the shape and position of the flame of volatiles, but it has only a mild effect on the devolatilization process for the particle sizes typical of pulverized coal combustion. This effect increases for large particles or in the absence of radiation. The relative motion enhances the heat transfer between the particle and the gas, causing the devolatilization time to decrease at high gas temperatures and to increase at low gas temperatures. The numerical results are compared with a blowing-corrected Nusselt number correlation often used in heat transfer models of the process. (author)

  7. Numerical simulation of shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, Sedat; Hatay, Ferhat F.

    1993-01-01

    Most flows of aerodynamic interest are compressible and turbulent. However, our present knowledge on the structures and mechanisms of turbulence is mostly based on incompressible flows. In the present work, compressibility effects in turbulent, high-speed, boundary layer flows are systematically investigated using the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach. Three-dimensional, time-dependent, fully nonlinear, compressible Navier-Stokes equations were numerically integrated by high-order finite-difference methods; no modeling for turbulence is used during the solution because the available resolution is sufficient to capture the relevant scales. The boundary layer problem deals with fully-turbulent compressible flows over flat geometries. Apart from its practical relevance to technological flows, turbulent compressible boundary layer flow is the simplest experimentally realizable turbulent compressible flow. Still, measuring difficulties prohibit a detailed experimental description of the flow, especially in the near-wall region. DNS studies provide a viable means to probe the physics of compressible turbulence in this region. The focus of this work is to explore the paths of energy transfer through which compressible turbulence is sustained. The structural similarities and differences between the incompressible and compressible turbulence are also investigated. The energy flow patterns or energy cascades are found to be directly related to the evolution of vortical structures which are generated in the near-wall region. Near-wall structures, and mechanisms which are not readily accessible through physical experiments are analyzed and their critical role on the evolution and the behavior of the flow is documented extensively.

  8. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of three-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhizhua; Salinas, Pablo; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional three-phase flow problems, such as droplet impact on a gas-liquid interface and bubble rising through a liquid-liquid interface. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is employed here to study three-phase flow problems, which can modify and adapt unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of multiphase problems and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a `volume of fluid' type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method and second-order finite element methods, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation, minimising the spurious velocities often found in such flow simulations. The surface tension coefficient decomposition method has been employed to deal with surface tension pairing between different phases via a compositional approach. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of three-phase flows are presented to demonstrate the ability of this method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  9. Numerical simulations of inductive-heated float-zone growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Y. T.; Choi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    The present work provides an improved fluid flow and heat-transfer modeling of float-zone growth by introducing a RF heating model so that an ad hoc heating temperature profile is not necessary. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the high-temperature float-zone growth of titanium carbide single crystal. The numerical results showed that the thermocapillary convection occurring inside the molten zone tends to increase the convexity of the melt-crystal interface and decrease the maximum temperature of the molten zone, while the natural convection tends to reduce the stability of the molten zone by increasing its height. It was found that the increase of induced heating due to the increase of applied RF voltage is reduced by the decrease of zone diameter. Surface tension plays an important role in controlling the amount of induced heating. Finally, a comparison of the computed shape of the free surface with a digital image obtained during a growth run showed adequate agreement.

  10. Numerical simulation of a compressible vortex-wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, T.; De, S.; Sreevatsa, A.; Dutta, S.

    2016-05-01

    The wall interaction of isolated compressible vortices generated from a short driver section shock tube has been simulated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric form. The dynamics of shock-free (incident shock Mach number M = 1.36) and shock-embedded (M = 1.57) compressible vortices near the wall has been studied in detail. The AUSM+ scheme with a fifth-order upwind interpolation formula is used for the convective fluxes. Time integration is performed using a low dissipative and dispersive fourth-order six-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. The evolution of primary and wall vortices has been shown using the velocity field, vorticity field, and numerical schlierens. The vortex impingement, shocklets, wall vortices, and their lift-off are clearly identified from the wall pressure time history. It has been observed that the maximum vorticity of the wall vortices reaches close to 30 % of the primary vortex for M = 1.36 and it reaches up to 60 % for M = 1.57. The net pressure force on the wall due to incident shock impingement is dominant compared to the compressible vortex impingement and their evolution.

  11. Numerical Simulation on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Mass

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuguang; Wang, Yuan; Mei, Yu; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration phenomenon was confirmed and its mechanism is revealed. It is found to be the result of circular fracture which develops within surrounding rock mass under the high geostress. The fractured shape of zonal disintegration was determined, and the radii of the fractured zones were found to fulfill the relationship of geometric progression. The numerical results were in accordance with the model test findings. The mechanism of the zonal disintegration was revealed by theoretical analysis based on fracture mechanics. The fractured zones are reportedly circular and concentric to the cavern. Each fracture zone ruptured at the elastic-plastic boundary of the surrounding rocks and then coalesced into the circular form. The geometric progression ratio was found to be related to the mechanical parameters and the ground stress of the surrounding rocks. PMID:24592166

  12. Numerical simulation on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock mass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuguang; Wang, Yuan; Mei, Yu; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration phenomenon was confirmed and its mechanism is revealed. It is found to be the result of circular fracture which develops within surrounding rock mass under the high geostress. The fractured shape of zonal disintegration was determined, and the radii of the fractured zones were found to fulfill the relationship of geometric progression. The numerical results were in accordance with the model test findings. The mechanism of the zonal disintegration was revealed by theoretical analysis based on fracture mechanics. The fractured zones are reportedly circular and concentric to the cavern. Each fracture zone ruptured at the elastic-plastic boundary of the surrounding rocks and then coalesced into the circular form. The geometric progression ratio was found to be related to the mechanical parameters and the ground stress of the surrounding rocks.

  13. Numerical Simulation of a Mist Singlet Oxygen Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Muto, Shigeki; Fujioka, Tomoo; Nanri, Kenzo

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation code for a mist singlet oxygen generator (SOG) is developed. Unlike previous SOGs, a mist SOG utilizes fine droplets of basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) to achieve a stoichiometric reaction with chlorine gas in a single pass through a reaction zone. The numerical model presented in the present paper deals with the depletion of superficial HO2- density and the diffusive redistribution of each droplet, water evaporation, temperature variation of the droplet due to chemical reaction and evaporation, and heat exchange between the gas and liquid phases. Under identical initial conditions, the calculated results are consistent with the results from previous experiments. The heterogeneous quenching probability of O2(1Δ) to the BHP surface (γ) was determined by a comparison between the experimental and calculated results, and was found to be 2× 10-3. The process conditions were then varied to establish the theoretical limit of BHP utilization. For a very small (15 μm) droplet diameter, it was shown that 50% BHP could be utilized with an output of 64% O2(1Δ) yield and 88% Cl2 utilization.

  14. Numerical Simulations on Origin of Galilean Moons' Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, LiQuo; Kuang, WeiJia; Ma, ShiZhuang

    2011-01-01

    Galileo mission detected the magnetic anomalies originated from Galilean moons. These anomalies are likely generated in the moons interiors, under the influence of a strong ambient Jovian field. Among various possible generation mechanisms of the anomalies, we focus on magneto-convection and dynamos in the interiors via numerical simulation. To mimic the electromagnetic environment of the moons, we introduce in our numerical model an external uniform magnetic field B(sub 0) with a fixed orientation but varying field strength. Our results show that a finite B(sub 0) can substantially alter the dynamo processes inside the core. When the ambient field strength B(sub 0) increases to approximately 40% of the field generated by the pure dynamo action, the convective state in the core changes significantly: the convective flow decreases by 80% in magnitude, but the differential rotation becomes stronger in much of the fluid layer, leading to a stronger field generated in the core. The field morphologies inside the core tend to align with the ambient field, while the flow patterns show the symmetry-breaking effect under the influence of B(sub 0). Furthermore, the generated field tends to be temporally more stable.

  15. 3D Numerical Simulation on the Rockslide Generated Tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, M.; Wu, T.; Wang, C.; Chu, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rockslide generated tsunami is one of the most devastating nature hazards. However, the involvement of the moving obstacle and dynamic free-surface movement makes the numerical simulation a difficult task. To describe both the fluid motion and solid movement at the same time, we newly developed a two-way fully-coupled moving solid algorithm with 3D LES turbulent model. The free-surface movement is tracked by volume of fluid (VOF) method. The two-step projection method is adopted to solve the Navier-Stokes type government equations. In the new moving solid algorithm, a fictitious body force is implicitly prescribed in MAC correction step to make the cell-center velocity satisfied with the obstacle velocity. We called this method the implicit velocity method (IVM). Because no extra terms are added to the pressure Poission correction, the pressure field of the fluid part is stable, which is the key of the two-way fluid-solid coupling. Because no real solid material is presented in the IVM, the time marching step is not restricted to the smallest effective grid size. Also, because the fictitious force is implicitly added to the correction step, the resulting velocity is accurate and fully coupled with the resulting pressure field. We validated the IVM by simulating a floating box moving up and down on the free-surface. We presented the time-history obstacle trajectory and compared it with the experimental data. Very accurate result can be seen in terms of the oscillating amplitude and the period (Fig. 1). We also presented the free-surface comparison with the high-speed snapshots. At the end, the IVM was used to study the rock-slide generated tsunamis (Liu et al., 2005). Good validations on the slide trajectory and the free-surface movement will be presented in the full paper. From the simulation results (Fig. 2), we observed that the rockslide generated waves are manly caused by the rebounding waves from two sides of the sliding rock after the water is dragging

  16. Finite-difference numerical simulations of underground explosion cavity decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Preston, L. A.; Jensen, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Earth models containing a significant portion of ideal fluid (e.g., air and/or water) are of increasing interest in seismic wave propagation simulations. Examples include a marine model with a thick water layer, and a land model with air overlying a rugged topographic surface. The atmospheric infrasound community is currently interested in coupled seismic-acoustic propagation of low-frequency signals over long ranges (~tens to ~hundreds of kilometers). Also, accurate and efficient numerical treatment of models containing underground air-filled voids (caves, caverns, tunnels, subterranean man-made facilities) is essential. In support of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation in mixed solid/fluid media. Solution methodology involves explicit, time-domain, finite-differencing of the elastodynamic velocity-stress partial differential system on a three-dimensional staggered spatial grid. Conditional logic is used to avoid shear stress updating within the fluid zones; this approach leads to computational efficiency gains for models containing a significant proportion of ideal fluid. Numerical stability and accuracy are maintained at air/rock interfaces (where the contrast in mass density is on the order of 1 to 2000) via a finite-difference operator "order switching" formalism. The fourth-order spatial FD operator used throughout the bulk of the earth model is reduced to second-order in the immediate vicinity of a high-contrast interface. Current modeling efforts are oriented toward quantifying the amount of atmospheric infrasound energy generated by various underground seismic sources (explosions and earthquakes). Source depth and orientation, and surface topography play obvious roles. The cavity decoupling problem, where an explosion is detonated within an air-filled void, is of special interest. A point explosion

  17. Parametric Optimization Through Numerical Simulation of VCR Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, Prabhakara Rao; Mahmood, Al-Qarttani Abdulrahman Shakir; Kandula, Aasrith; Raju, Vysyaraju Rajesh Khana; Rao, Surapaneni Srinivasa

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) engine was analyzed numerically using CONVERGE™ Computational Fluid Dynamics code in order to optimize the design/operating parameters such as Compression Ratio (CR), Start of Injection (SOI) and Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR). VCR engine was run for 100 % load to test its performance and it was validated for standard configuration. Simulations were performed by varying the design/operating parameters such as CR (18-14), SOI (17°-26° bTDC) and EGR (0-15 %) at constant fuel injection pressure of 230 bar and speed of 1500 rpm. The effect of each of these parameters on pressure, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and soot are presented. Finally, regression equations were developed for pressure, NOx and soot by using the simulation results. The regression equations were solved for multi objective criteria in order to reduce the NOx and soot while maintaining the baseline performance. The optimized configuration was tested for validation and found satisfactory.

  18. 3D Numerical Simulations of the Breakout Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Lee, J.; Lynch, B. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2005-05-01

    We present the continuing progress of the numerical simulations of the breakout model for coronal mass ejection initiation. To validate the 3D spherical ARMS code we have run the 2.5D breakout problem and compare the eruption to the published 2D results. The ARMS 2.5D CME also forms a large magnetic island ahead of the erupting plasmoid due to the code's excellent maintenance of equatorial symmetry. Progress on the fully 3D breakout problem is also discussed. To build up enough magnetic free energy for an eruption the active region field must be strong with a steep gradient near the polarity inversion line and the shear must be highly concentrated there. This requires adaptive griding techniques. In the current simulation, the active region to background field ratio is 20-to-1 and the neutral line is long compared to the active region width. We present the evolution of this topology under Br-conserving shearing flow and discuss implications for a 3D eruption. This work is supported by NASA and ONR. BJL is supported by NASA GSRP grant NGT5-50453.

  19. Numerical simulation of linear fiction welding (LFW) processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fratini, L.; La Spisa, D.

    2011-05-04

    Solid state welding processes are becoming increasingly important due to a large number of advantages related to joining ''unweldable'' materials and in particular light weight alloys. Linear friction welding (LFW) has been used successfully to bond non-axisymmetric components of a range of materials including titanium alloys, steels, aluminum alloys, nickel, copper, and also dissimilar material combinations. The technique is useful in the research of quality of the joints and in reducing costs of components and parts of the aeronautic and automotive industries.LFW involves parts to be welded through the relative reciprocating motion of two components under an axial force. In such process the heat source is given by the frictional forces work decaying into heat determining a local softening of the material and proper bonding conditions due to both the temperature increase and the local pressure of the two edges to be welded. This paper is a comparative test between the numerical model in two dimensions, i.e. in plane strain conditions, and in three dimensions of a LFW process of AISI1045 steel specimens. It must be observed that the 3D model assures a faithful simulation of the actual threedimensional material flow, even if the two-dimensional simulation computational times are very short, a few hours instead of several ones as the 3D model. The obtained results were compared with experimental values found out in the scientific literature.

  20. Numerical simulation of ground-based telescope enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Nian; Ma, Wenli; Huang, Jinlong

    2014-11-01

    In order to choose enclosure for the next generation telescopes, numerical simulation method was used. Firstly, the telescope, two general kinds of enclosures structure and the external flow field model were established, Then CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) technology was used to analyze the wind speed, static pressure, turbulence kinetic energy distribution and eddy around the telescope, when the telescope at two different pointing gestures and the external wind speed at 10m/s. The simulation results showed that when the telescope adapt the retractable enclosure, the wind speed of the main optical path between 6.1 m/s and 9.3 m/s, and the average static pressure (gauge pressure) on the primary mirror between 42.9268 Pa and 37.5579 Pa, however when telescope adapt the hemispherical enclosure, the wind speed of the main optical path between 3.4 m/s and 6.8 m/s, the average static pressure (gauge pressure) on the primary mirror between 12.1387 Pa and 11.105 Pa. Although the wind resistance of the retractable enclosure was lower than the hemispherical enclosure, no eddy generated near the main optical path, it provided the telescope a uniform flow field and ensured the quality of the image of a star. So the retractable enclosure would have better performance than the hemispherical enclosure.