Science.gov

Sample records for 1-d velocity profiles

  1. Intricate heterogeneous structures of the top 300 km of the Earth's inner core inferred from global array data: I. Regional 1D attenuation and velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iritani, R.; Takeuchi, N.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2014-05-01

    We apply a waveform inversion method based on simulated annealing to complex core phase data observed by globally deployed seismic arrays, and present regional variation of depth profiles of attenuation and velocity for the top half of the inner core. Whereas measured attenuation parameters exhibit consistent trends for data sampling the eastern hemisphere of the inner core, for the western hemisphere, there is a remarkable difference between data sampling the inner core beneath Africa (W1) and beneath north America (W2). Obtained attenuation profiles suggest that intricate heterogeneities appear to be confined in the top 300 km. The profile for the eastern hemisphere has a high attenuation zone in the top 150 km that gradually diminishes with depth. Conversely, for the western hemisphere, the profile for W1 shows constant low attenuation and that for W2 represents a gradual increase from the inner core boundary to a peak at around 200 km depth. Velocity profiles, obtained from differential traveltimes between PKP(DF) and PKP(CD, BC) phases, for the eastern and western hemispheres are respectively about 0.8% faster and 0.6% slower than the reference model at the top of the inner core, and the difference nearly disappears at about 200 km depth. Our result suggests the presence of intricate quasi-hemispherical structures in the top ˜200-300 km of the inner core.

  2. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  3. Effective-range signatures in quasi-1D matter waves: sound velocity and solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgarlata, F.; Mazzarella, G.; Salasnich, L.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate ultracold and dilute bosonic atoms under strong transverse harmonic confinement using a 1D modified Gross-Pitaevskii equation (1D MGPE), which accounts for the energy dependence of the two-body scattering amplitude within an effective-range expansion. We study sound waves and solitons of the quasi-1D system, comparing the 1D MGPE results with the 1D GPE ones. We find that when the finite-size nature of the interaction is taken into account, the speed of sound and the density profiles of both dark and bright solitons show relevant quantitative changes with respect to predictions given by the standard 1D GPE.

  4. Rayleigh Wave Dispersion and A 1d S-velocity Model of The Fennoscandian Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, S.; Friederich, W.; Sstwg, The

    We derive a Rayleigh wave dispersion curve from surface wave data recorded at the SVEKALAPKO tomographic array deployed in Southern Finland from September 1998 to March 1999. After a suite of processing steps, complex spectral amplitudes of the Rayleigh wave train are determined for each available seismogram. The process- ing includes low-pass filtering, instrument correction, deconvolution using a standard earth model to compress the Rayleigh wave train, computation of Gabor matrices (sonograms) to pick group travel times, and finally estimation of complex spectral amplitudes in a Gaussian time window of frequency-dependent width centered on the group travel time. Spectral amplitude values are only accepted if the signal-to-noise ratio in the considered frequency interval is above a pre-chosen threshold and if the picked group travel time does not deviate too strongly from that predicted by a stan- dard earth model. The final dataset contains spectral amplitude values at 34 selected periods from 52 earthquakes observed at on average 25 stations. For each selected frequency, we determine a phase velocity by fitting plane waves propagating across the array with this velocity to the complex spectral amplitudes of all earthquakes and stations. Errors are estimated with a bootstrap method. We obtain reliable phase velocities in the frequency band from 8 mHz to 50 mHz. Phase veloci- ties for lower frequencies exhibit large errors due to the lack of big earthquakes during the time of deployment. The phase velocities are substantially higher than predicted by standard earth model ak135 below 20 mHz and slightly lower above 25 mHz. We have inverted the dispersion curve for a 1D shear wave velocity model down to about 400 km depth and obtain a 50 km thick crust and a fast upper mantle with a sub- Moho velocity of 4.7 km/s. Our data do not require a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle. Indeed, the dispersion curve can be explained by a nearly straight velocity profile from

  5. Investigation of 1-D crustal velocity structure beneath Izmir Gulf and surroundings by using local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Orhan; Özer, Ćaglar

    2016-04-01

    In this study; we examined one dimensional crustal velocity structure of Izmir gulf and surroundings. We used nearly one thousand high quality (A and B class) earthquake data which recorded by Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD) [1], Bogazici University (BU-KOERI) [2] and National Observatory of Athens (NOA) [3,4]. We tried several synthetic tests to understand power of new velocity structure, and examined phase residuals, RMS values and shifting tests. After evaluating these tests; we decided one dimensional velocity structure and minimum 1-D P wave velocities, hypocentral parameter and earthquake locations from VELEST algorithm. Distribution of earthquakes was visibly improved by using new minimum velocity structure.

  6. Minimum 1D P- and S- Velocity Models for Montenegro and Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucic, Ljiljana; Kissling, Edi; Spakman, Wim; Glavatovic, Branislav

    2015-04-01

    The territory of Montenegro and its vicinity are characterized by high-seismicity rate and very complex tectonics. Namely, southern Adria microplate subducts beneath Eurasia, forming the Dinarides fold-and-thrust belt which spreads through whole Montenegro and the western Balkans. Present-day lithosphere structure of the Adria-Dinarides collision zone in general is not constrained very well and, consequently, there is a lack of three-dimensional (3D) velocity models in this region. For these reasons, high resolution 3D tomography modeling of this area is considered to be of great importance. As part of preparatory phase for conducting a 3D local earthquake tomography study, a substantial amount of waveform data was collected, from all surroundings national seismic networks including 130 seismic stations from 11 countries. The data set comprises waveforms from 1452 earthquakes in the region recorded during time period 1990 - 2014. The collected data were obtained in different formats and the data base was harmonized by converting and integrating all data to miniseed format. The potential resolution of collected data for seismic tomography purpose was analyzed by ray density testing, using specially developed software for this specific purpose. The result is expressed as the number of rays between selected group of earthquake hypocenters and seismic stations, penetrating through the 3D model of the Earth crust and it documents the great potential of the data set for 3D seismic tomography. As a prerequisite to 3D tomography and for consistent high-precision earthquake locations, a minimum 1D velocity model has been calculated. The data set of around 400 earthquakes was selected from the main database and consistent wave onsets picking was performed, including seismic phase interpretation and its quality assessment. This highly consistent travel time data set is used for calculation of 1D velocity models for the region under study. The minimum 1D models were derived

  7. Velocity profiles in laminar diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Margle, Janice M.

    1986-01-01

    Velocity profiles in vertical laminar diffusion flames were measured by using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Four fuels were used: n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, and ethyl alcohol. The velocity profiles were similar for all the fuels, although there were some differences in the peak velocities. The data compared favorably with the theoretical velocity predictions. The differences could be attributed to errors in experimental positioning and in the prediction of temperature profiles. Error in the predicted temperature profiles are probably due to the difficulty in predicting the radiative heat losses from the flame.

  8. Data Analysis of cGPS stations in central Greece: station velocities and 1-D strain estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, Athanassios; Chousianitis, Konstantinos; Gianniou, Michalis

    2013-04-01

    We processed 30-s GPS data from permanent GNSS stations in central Greece, available at NOA since 2006. We obtained position time series along with horizontal and vertical velocities using the Kalman filtering approach and accounting for time-correlated noise content. The station distribution allowed us to draw velocity profiles and to calculate rates of baseline length change (1-D strain). In central Greece, the coherent picture of the velocity pattern for Attica and north-eastern Peloponnese (Corinth) stations (effectively a velocity "plateau" at 30 mm/yr) indicates that these areas belong to the same crustal block, although some internal strain is present within Attica's crust as well as across the Saronic Gulf. Our 1-D strain estimates are in general agreement with geological data (fault slip rates) in central Greece, implying accommodation of this crustal extension along E-W striking active normal faults. Some NE-SW directed shortening is mapped in the wider area to the west of the termination of the North Anatolian Fault (Sporades islands).

  9. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    SciTech Connect

    Sabtaji, Agung E-mail: agung.sabtaji@bmkg.go.id; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  10. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van; Enthoven, Daniel; Verburg, Wesley

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. The phase spectrum is used to invert for a wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. An EMAT sensor design has been made to measure at the 12 o'clock position of a pipe. The concept is evaluated on measured data, showing good sizing capabilities on a variety simple defect profiles.

  11. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  12. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van

    2014-02-18

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  13. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; Hsu, Mick; Boogert, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Guided waves are propagated around the circumference of a pipe. In case of wall loss, the phase of the signal changes which is used to estimate the local wall thickness profile. A special EMAT sensor has been developed, which works in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. In order to improve the sensitivity, an inversion in performed on multiple orders of circumferential passes. Experimental results are presented on different pipes containing artificial and real defects.

  14. Estimating Shear Velocity and Roughness Length From Velocity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Normand E.; Abrahams, Athol D.

    1992-08-01

    In turbulent boundary layer flows, shear velocity u*, and roughness length z0 are commonly derived from semilogarithmic flow velocity profiles by fitting a straight line by ordinary least squares regression to the profile and calculating estimates of u*, and z0 from the slope and intercept of the computed regression equation. However, it is not clear from the literature whether the appropriate regression is of flow velocity u on the logarithm of height above the bed In z or of ln z on u. In order to calculate estimates of u* and z0, the true or structural relation between u and In z must be established. Because u is generally observed with much greater error than is In z, the structural relation may be estimated by regressing u on ln z; regressing ln z on u is incorrect. An analysis of 24 stream channel flow velocity profiles indicates that even in situations where the correlation between u and ln z exceeds 0.9, performing the incorrect regression can result in the considerable overestimation of u* and z0.

  15. Periodic solutions for a 1D-model with nonlocal velocity via mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Lucas C. F.; Valencia-Guevara, Julio C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns periodic solutions for a 1D-model with nonlocal velocity given by the periodic Hilbert transform. There is a rich literature showing, via numerics and rigorous analysis, that this model presents singular behavior of solutions. For instance, they can blow up by forming mass-concentration. We develop a global well-posedness theory for periodic measure initial data that allows, in particular, to analyze how the model evolves from those singularities. Our results are based on periodic mass transport theory and the abstract gradient flow theory in metric spaces developed by Ambrosio et al. (2005). A viscous version of the model is also analyzed and inviscid limit properties are obtained.

  16. Calibration of a 1D Crustal Velocity and Q Model for Ground Motion Simulations in Central and Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    I have performed low frequency (f < 1 Hz) ground motion simulations for the 2008 Mw 5.23 Mt. Carmel, Illinois and 2011 Mw 5.74 Mineral, Virginia earthquakes to calibrate a rock-site 1D crustal velocity and Q structure model for central and eastern US (CEUS). For each earthquake, the observed ground motions were simulated at sites extending out to about 900 km from the epicenter. Sites within the Mississippi embayment are not included in the modeling. The initial 1D velocity model was developed by averaging profiles extracted from the CUS V1.3 3D velocity model (Ramirez-Guzman et al, 2012) at each of the recording sites, with the surface shear wave velocity set at 2200 m/s. The Mt. Carmel earthquake is represented as a point double couple (strike=25, dip=90, rake=-175) at a depth of 14 km and a slip-rate function having a Brune corner frequency of 0.89 Hz (Hartzell and Mendoza, 2011). The Mineral earthquake is represented as a point double couple (strike=26, dip=55, rake=108) at a depth of 6 km and a slip-rate function having a corner frequency of 0.50 Hz. Full waveform Green's functions were computed using the FK method of Zhu and Rivera (2002). The initial model does well at reproducing the median level of observed response spectral acceleration (Sa) for most sites out to 300 km at periods of 2 to 5 sec, including the observed flattening in distance attenuation between 70 and 150 km. However, this model under predicts the motions beyond about 400 km distance. Increasing Q in the mid- and lower crust from the original value of 700 to 5000 removes this under prediction of the larger distance motions. Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) estimates have been computed from the simulations using the ground motion-intensity conversion equations of Atkinson and Kaka (2007; AK2007) and Dangkua and Cramer (2011; DC2011-ENA) for comparison against the observed "Did You Feel It" intensity estimates. Given the bandwidth limitations of the simulations, I use the conversion

  17. Ion velocity distribution at the termination shock: 1-D PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Quanming; Yang Zhongwei; Lembege, Bertrand

    2012-11-20

    The Voyager 2 (V2) plasma observations of the proton temperature downstream of the quasi-perpendicular heliospheric termination shock (TS) showed that upstream thermal solar wind ions played little role in the shock dissipation mechanism and their downstream temperature is an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by MHD Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. While pickup ions (PUI) are generally expected to play an important role in energy dissipation at the shock, the details remain unclear. Here, one-dimensional (1-D) Particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to examine kinetic properties and downstream velocity distribution functions of pickup ions (the hot supra-thermal component) and solar wind protons (SWs, the cold component) at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock. The code treats the pickup ions self-consistently as a third component. Present results show that: (1) both of the incident SWs and PUIs can be separated into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions, the energy gain of the R ions at the shock front is much larger than that of the DT ions; (2) the fraction of reflected SWs and their downstream temperature decrease with the relative percentage PUI%; (3) no matter how large the PUI% is, the downstream ion velocity distribution function always can be separated into three parts: 1. a high energy tail (i.e. the wings) dominated by the reflected PUIs, 2. a low energy core mainly contributed by the directly transmitted SWs, and 3. a middle energy part which is a complicated superposition of reflected SWs and directly transmitted PUIs. The significance of the presence of pickup ions on shock front micro-structure and nonstationarity is also discussed.

  18. An improved 1-D seismic velocity model for seismological studies in the Campania-Lucania region (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrullo, Emanuela; De Matteis, Raffaella; Satriano, Claudio; Amoroso, Ortensia; Zollo, Aldo

    2013-10-01

    We present a 1-D velocity model of the Earth's crust in Campania-Lucania region obtained by solving the coupled hypocentre-velocity inverse problem for 1312 local earthquakes recorded at a dense regional network. The model is constructed using the VELEST program, which calculates 1-D `minimum' velocity model from body wave traveltimes, together with station corrections, which account for deviations from the simple 1-D structure. The spatial distribution of station corrections correlates with the P-wave velocity variations of a preliminary 3-D crustal velocity model that has been obtained from the tomographic inversion of the same data set of P traveltimes. We found that station corrections reflect not only inhomogeneous near-surface structures, but also larger-scale geological features associated to the transition between carbonate platform outcrops at Southwest and Miocene sedimentary basins at Northeast. We observe a significant trade-off between epicentral locations and station corrections, related to the existence of a thick low-velocity layer to the NE. This effect is taken into account and minimized by re-computing station corrections, fixing the position of a subset of well-determined hypocentres, located in the 3-D tomographic model.

  19. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D'Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  20. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D’Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  1. Influence of the inlet velocity profiles on the prediction of velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Shah M.E.; Deev, A.V.; Subaschandar, N.; Rasul, M.G.; Khan, M.M.K.

    2009-01-15

    The influence of the velocity profile at the inlet boundary on the simulation of air velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator is presented in this study. Measurements and simulations were performed in a duct and an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). A four-hole cobra probe was used for the measurement of velocity distribution. The flow simulation was performed by using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Numerical calculations for the air flow were carried out by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the realizable k-{epsilon} turbulence model equations. Simulations were performed with two different velocity profiles at the inlet boundary - one with a uniform (ideal) velocity profile and the other with a non-uniform (real) velocity profile to demonstrate the effect of velocity inlet boundary condition on the flow simulation results inside an ESP. The real velocity profile was obtained from the velocity measured at different points of the inlet boundary whereas the ideal velocity profile was obtained by calculating the mean value of the measured data. Simulation with the real velocity profile at the inlet boundary was found to predict better the velocity distribution inside the ESP suggesting that an experimentally measured velocity profile could be used as velocity inlet boundary condition for an accurate numerical simulation of the ESP. (author)

  2. Forward waveform modelling procedure for 1-D crustal velocity structure and its application to the southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongryong; Rhie, Junkee; Kim, Geunyoung

    2011-04-01

    We propose a full-grid search procedure for broad-band waveform modelling to determine a 1-D crustal velocity model. The velocity model can be more constrained because of the use of broad-band waveforms instead of traveltimes for the crustal phases, although only a small number of event-station pairs were employed. Despite the time-consuming nature of the full-grid search method to search the whole model parameter space, the use of an empirical relationship between the P- and S-wave velocities can significantly reduce computation time. The proposed method was applied to a case in the southern Korean Peninsula. Broad-band waveforms obtained from two inland earthquakes that occurred on 2007 January 20 (Mw 4.6) and 2004 April 26 (Mw 3.6) were used to test the method. The three-layers over half-space crustal velocity model of the P- and S-wave velocities was estimated. Comparisons of waveform fitness between the final model and previously published models demonstrate advancements in the average value of waveform fitness for the inland earthquakes. In addition, 1-D velocity models were determined for three distinct tectonic regions, namely, the Gyonggi Massif, the Okcheon Belt and the Gyeongsang Basin, which are all located inside the study area. A comparison between the three models demonstrates that the crustal thickness of the southern Korean Peninsula increases from NW to SE and that the lower crustal composition of the Okcheon belt differs from that of the other tectonic regions.

  3. Prediction of the expansion velocity of ultracold 1D quantum gases for integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhongtao; Vidmar, Lev; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian; Bolech, Carlos

    In the theory of Bethe-ansatz integrable quantum systems, rapidities play an important role as they are used to specify many-body states. The physical interpretation of rapidities going back to Sutherland is that they are the asymptotic momenta after letting a quantum gas expand into a larger volume rendering it dilute and noninteracting. We exploit this picture to calculate the expansion velocity of a one-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model by using the distribution of rapidities defined by the initial state. Our results are consistent with the ones from time-dependent density-matrix renormalization. We show in addition that an approximate Bethe-ansatz solution works well also for the Bose-Hubbard model. Our results are of interests for future sudden-expansion experiments with ultracold quantum gases.

  4. Velocity profile development for a poultry facility acid scrubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of the air velocity profile for 12 experimental configurations (ECs) of an acid scrubber was carried out using an equal area traverse method with a vane axial anemometer. Four velocity profile plots were created for each configuration to determine the four optimal ECs. ECs were selecte...

  5. Computing 1-D atomic densities in macromolecular simulations: The density profile tool for VMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgino, Toni

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have a prominent role in biophysics and drug discovery due to the atomistic information they provide on the structure, energetics and dynamics of biomolecules. Specialized software packages are required to analyze simulated trajectories, either interactively or via scripts, to derive quantities of interest and provide insight for further experiments. This paper presents the Density Profile Tool, a package that enhances the Visual Molecular Dynamics environment with the ability to interactively compute and visualize 1-D projections of various density functions of molecular models. We describe how the plugin is used to perform computations both via a graphical interface and programmatically. Results are presented for realistic examples, all-atom bilayer models, showing how mass and electron densities readily provide measurements such as membrane thickness, location of structural elements, and how they compare to X-ray diffraction experiments.

  6. A 1-D radiative conductive model to study the SOIR/VEx thermal profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieux, Arnaud; Erwin, Justin T.; Chamberlain, Sarah; Robert, Séverine; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Wilquet, Valérie; Thomas, Ian; Yelle, Roger V.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2015-04-01

    SOIR is an infrared spectrometer on board Venus Express that probes the Venus terminator region since 2006. The measurements are taken on the morning and evening sides of the terminator, covering all latitudes from the North Pole to the South Pole. Its wavelength range - 2.2 to 4.3 μm - allows a detailed chemical inventory of the Venus atmosphere [1-5], such as CO2, CO, H2O, HCl, HF, SO2 and aerosols. CO2 is detected from 70 km up to 165 km, CO from 70 km to 140 km, and the minor species typically below 110 km down to 70 km. Number density profiles of these species are computed from the measured spectra. Temperature profiles are obtained while computing the spectral inversion of the CO2 spectra combined with the hydrostatic law [6]. These temperature measurements show a striking permanent temperature minimum (at 125 km) and a weaker temperature maximum (over 100-115 km). The time variability of the CO2 density profiles spans over two orders of magnitude, and a clear trend is seen with latitude. The temperature variations are also important, of the order of 35 K for a given pressure level, but the latitude variation are small. Miss-RT, a 1D radiative transfer model has been developed to reproduce the SOIR terminator profiles, derived from the Mars thermosphere code presented in [7]. This model has been expanded to better account for the CO2, CO, and O non-LTE radiative heating and cooling processes which have to be considered in the dense atmosphere of Venus. Radiative cooling by minor species detected by SOIR (e.g. HCl, SO2, and H2O) are found to be small in comparison to the 15 μm CO2 cooling. Aerosol cooling in the 60-90km altitude range may be important to the thermal balance. There is a good agreement between the 1D model temperature profile and the mean SOIR temperature profile. Further we can suggest parameters that can be adjusted to improve the agreement between the model and measurements. The remaining differences can be attributed to the atmosphere

  7. Radar Wind Profiler Radial Velocity: A Comparison with Doppler Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Stephen A.; Goodrich, R. Kent

    2002-12-01

    The accuracy of the radial wind velocity measured with a radar wind profiler will depend on turbulent variability and instrumental noise. Radial velocity estimates of a boundary layer wind profiler are compared with those estimated by a Doppler lidar over 2.3 h. The lidar resolution volume was much narrower than the profiler volume, but the samples were well matched in range and time. The wind profiler radial velocity was computed using two common algorithms [profiler online program (POP) and National Center for Atmospheric Research improved moments algorithm (NIMA)]. The squared correlation between radial velocities measured with the two instruments was R2 = 0.99, and the standard deviation of the difference was about r = 0.20-0.23 m s1 for radial velocities of greater than 1 m s1 and r = 0.16-0.35 m s1 for radial velocities of less than 1 m s1. Small radial velocities may be treated differently in radar wind profiler processing because of ground-clutter mitigation strategies. A standard deviation of r = 0.23 m s1 implies an error in horizontal winds from turbulence and noise of less than 1 m s1 for a single cycle through the profiler beam directions and of less than 0.11-0.27 m s1 for a 30-min average measurement, depending on the beam pointing sequence. The accuracy of a wind profiler horizontal wind measurement will also depend on assumptions of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere, which are not considered in this comparison. The wind profiler radial velocities from the POP and NIMA are in good agreement. However, the analysis does show the need for improvements in wind profiler processing when radial velocity is close to zero.

  8. An approach to jointly invert hypocenters and 1D velocity structure and its application to the Lushan earthquake series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hui; Mechie, James; Li, Haibing; Xue, Guangqi; Su, Heping; Cui, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Earthquake location is essential when defining fault systems and other geological structures. Many methods have been developed to locate hypocenters within a 1D velocity model. In this study, a new approach, named MatLoc, has been developed which can simultaneously invert for the locations and origin times of the hypocenters and the velocity structure, from the arrival times of local earthquakes. Moreover, it can invert for layer boundary depths, such as Moho depths, which can be well constrained by the Pm and Pn phases. For this purpose, the package was developed to take into account reflected phases, e.g., the Pm phase. The speed of the inversion is acceptable due to the use of optimized matrix calculations. The package has been used to re-locate the Lushan earthquake series which occurred in Sichuan, China, from April 20 to April 22, 2013. The results obtained with the package show that the Lushan earthquake series defines the dip of the Guankou fault, on which most of the series occurred, to be 39° toward the NW. Further, the surface projection of the Lushan earthquake series is consistent with the regional tectonic strike which is about N45° E.

  9. Exponential velocity profile of granular flows down a confined heap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, E.; González-Lezcano, A.; Batista-Leyva, A. J.; Altshuler, E.

    2016-06-01

    Thick granular flows are essential to many natural and industrial phenomena. Experimentally, it has been well established that the grain velocity profile is linear from the free surface to a certain depth, after which it decreases exponentially in the so-called "creep region". In this paper we obtain an exponential velocity profile based on the force balance of a grain near a wall, where the Janssen effect and the non-locality of interactions between grains are considered. When experimental parameters such as flow angles and friction coefficients are introduced in our model, it is able to reproduce experimental creep velocity profiles previously reported in the literature.

  10. Logarithmic velocity profile of quantum turbulence of superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Tsubota, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    The logarithmic velocity profile is the most important statistical law of classical turbulence affected by channel walls. This paper demonstrates numerically that the logarithmic velocity profile of a superfluid flow appears in quantum turbulence under pure normal flow in a channel. We investigated the configuration and dynamics of an inhomogeneous vortex tangle affected by the walls, and found the characteristic behavior of the log-law.

  11. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  12. Measuring discharge with ADCPs: Inferences from synthetic velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmann, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.; Oberg, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic velocity profiles are used to determine guidelines for sampling discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The analysis allows the effects of instrument characteristics, sampling parameters, and properties of the flow to be studied systematically. For mid-section measurements, the averaging time required for a single profile measurement always exceeded the 40 s usually recommended for velocity measurements, and it increased with increasing sample interval and increasing time scale of the large eddies. Similarly, simulations of transect measurements show that discharge error decreases as the number of large eddies sampled increases. The simulations allow sampling criteria that account for the physics of the flow to be developed. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  13. Compressive and Shear Wave Velocity Profiles using Seismic Refraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziman, M.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Haimi, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic refraction measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine soil profile. Meanwhile, the borehole technique is an established way to identify the changes of soil layer based on number of blows penetrating the soil. Both techniques are commonly adopted for subsurface investigation. The seismic refraction test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment compared to borehole technique. The soil velocities of compressive wave and shear wave derived from the seismic refraction measurements can be directly utilised to calculate soil parameters such as soil modulus and Poisson’s ratio. This study investigates the seismic refraction techniques to obtain compressive and shear wave velocity profile. Using the vertical and horizontal geophones as well as vertical and horizontal strike directions of the transient seismic source, the propagation of compressive wave and shear wave can be examined, respectively. The study was conducted at Sejagung Sri Medan. The seismic velocity profile was obtained at a depth of 20 m. The velocity of the shear wave is about half of the velocity of the compression wave. The soil profiles of compressive and shear wave velocities were verified using the borehole data and showed good agreement with the borehole data.

  14. Velocity profiles between two baffles in a horizontal circular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Hae-Soo; Oh, Keon-Je; Doh, Doeg Hee; Lee, Chang-Hoan

    2014-12-01

    The shell and tube heat exchanger is an essential part of a power plant for recovering heat transfer between the feed water of a boiler and the wasted heat. The baffles are also an important element inside the heat exchanger. Internal materials influence the flow pattern in the bed. The influence of baffles in the velocity profiles was observed using a three-dimensional particle image velocimetry around baffles in a horizontal circular tube. The velocity of the particles was measured before the baffle and between them in the test tube. Results show that the flows near the front baffle flow were parallel to the vertical wall, and then concentrate on the upper opening of the front baffle. The flows circulate in the front and rear baffles. These flow profiles are related to the Reynolds number (Re) or the flow intensity. The velocity profiles at lower Re number showed a complicated mixing, concentrating on the lower opening of the rear baffle as front wall. Swirling flow was employed in this study, which was produced using tangential velocities at the inlet. At the entrance of the front baffle, the velocity vector profiles with swirl were much different from that without swirl. However, velocities between two baffles are not much different from those without swirl.

  15. Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Robert; Jenkins, Thomas

    1998-11-01

    Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow. Robert L. Powell, Thomas P. Jenkins Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science University of California, Davis, CA 95616 Using laser Doppler velocimetry, we have measured the axial velocity profiles for steady, pressure driven, laminar flow of water in a circular tube. The flow was established in a one inch diameter seamless glass tube. The entry length prior to the measuring section was over one hundred diameters. Reynolds numbers in the range 500-2000 were used. Under conditions where the temperature difference between the fluid and the surroundings differed by as little as 0.2C, we found significant asymmetries in the velocity profiles. This asymmetry was most pronounced in the vertical plane. Varying the temperature difference moved the velocity maximum either above or below the centerline depending upon whether the fluid was warmer or cooler than the room. These results compare well to existing calculations. Using the available theory and our experiments it is possible to identify parameter ranges where non-ideal conditions(not parabolic velocity profiles) will be found. Supported by the EMSP Program of DOE.

  16. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 3; Inverted Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    The instability wave noise generation model is used to study the instability waves in the two shear layers of an inverted velocity profile, supersonic, coaxial jet and the noise radiated from the dominant wave. The inverted velocity profile jet has a high speed outer stream surrounding a low speed inner stream and the outer shear layer is always larger than the inner shear layer. The jet mean flows are calculated numerically. The operating conditions are chosen to exemplify the effect of the coaxial jet outer shear layer initial spreading rates. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. Results for inverted velocity profile jets indicate that relative maximum instability wave amplitudes and far field peak noise levels can be reduced from that of the reference jet by having higher spreading rates for the outer shear layer, low velocity ratios, and outer streams hotter than the inner stream.

  17. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

  18. Enhanced ODR range using exponentially graded refractive index profile of 1D binary photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Kumar, Rajendra; Singh, Kh. S.; Jain, Deepti; Kumar, Arun

    2016-05-01

    A simple design of broadband one dimensional dielectric/semiconductor multilayer structure having refractive index profile of exponentially graded material has been proposed. The theoretical analysis shows that the proposed structure works as a perfect mirror within a certain wavelength range (1550 nm). In order to calculate the reflection properties a transfer matrix method (TMM) has been used. This property shows that binary graded photonic crystal structures have widened omnidirectional reflector (ODR) bandgap. Hence a exponentially graded photonic crystal structure can be used as a broadband optical reflector and the range of reflection can be tuned to any wavelength region by varying the refractive index profile of exponentially graded photonic crystal structure.

  19. Turbulent velocity profiles in a tilted heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salort, J.; Riedinger, X.; Rusaouen, E.; Tisserand, J.-C.; Seychelles, F.; Castaing, B.; Chillà, F.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we analyze the mean velocity profile and the Reynolds shear stress in a turbulent, inclined, heat pipe. We show that the simplest version of a mixing length model is unable to reproduce the evolution of the velocity profile shape with the inclination angle ψ. An improvement of this model, taking into account some buoyancy effects, gives nice qualitative agreement with the observations. The agreement implies a low value for the gradient Richardson number Ric above which the flow is laminar. While such a low value (Ric ≃ 0.05) is surprising, we found it in agreement with published experimental data, when the information given allowed to calculate the gradient Richardson number Ri.

  20. Measuring velocity and temperature profile sectional pipeline behind confuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Lenhard, Richard; Novomestský, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the measuring of temperature and velocity profile in area behind confuser in real made scale model of bypass. For proper operation of the equipment it is necessary to know the actual flow in the pipe. Bypasses have wide application and can be also associated with devices for heat recovery, heat exchangers different designs in which may be used in certain circumstances. In the present case, the heat that would otherwise has not been used is used for heating of insulators, and heating the air in the spray-dryer. The measuring principle was verify how the above-mentioned temperature and velocity profile decomposition above confuser on real made scale model.

  1. A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles is described. This technique utilizes an arc-discharge-electron-beam system to produce a luminous disturbance in the flow. The time of flight of this disturbance was measured. Experimental tests were conducted in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. The measured velocities were of the order of 6000 m/sec over a free-stream density range from 0.000196 to 0.00186 kg/cu m. The fractional error in the velocity measurements was less than 5 percent. Long arc discharge columns (0.356 m) were generated under hypersonic flow conditions in the expansion-tube modified to operate as an expansion tunnel.

  2. Observations and analysis of O(1D) and NH2 line profiles for the coma of comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Combi, Michael R.; Roesler, Fred L.; Scherb, Frank

    1995-01-01

    A set of high-resolution Fabry-Perot measurements of the coma of comet P/Halley was acquired in the (O I) 6300 A and NH2 6298.62 A emission lines. These high-resolution measurements provide the first optical observations capable of studying directly the photochemical kinetics and dynamic outflow of the coma. The observations were analyzed by a Monte Carlo Particle Trajectory Model. The agreement of the model and observed line profiles was excellent and verified the underlying dynamics, exothermic photodissociative chemistry, and collisional thermalization in the coma. The somewhat wider intrinsic line profile width for the O(1D) emission in 1986 January compared to 1986 May, is, for example, produced by the larger outflow speeds and gas temperatures nearer perihelion in January. The January O(1D) profile, which is wider than the January NH2 profile, is indicative of the photochemical kinetics in the dissociation of the parent molecules H2O and OH in the coma. The absolute calibration of the observations in 1986 January allowed the production rates for H2O and the NH2-parent molecules to be determined. The average daily water production rates derived from the O(1D) emission data for January 16 and 17 are presented. These very large water production rates are consistent with the extrapolated (and 7.6 day time variable) water production rates determined from the analysis of lower spectral resolution observations for O(1D) and H-alpha emissions that covered the time period up to January 13. The large production rates on January 16 and 17 establish that the maximum water production rate for comet Halley accurred pre-perihelion in January. Implications drawn from comparison with 18 cm radio emission data in January suggest that the peak water production rate was even larger. The average production rate for NH3 determined from the NH2 emission data for January 17 was (1.48 +/- 0.10) x 10(exp 28) molecules/s, yielding an NH3/H2O production rate ratio of 0.55%.

  3. Halo velocity profiles in screened modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronke, M.; Llinares, C.; Mota, D. F.; Winther, H. A.

    2015-05-01

    Screened modified gravity predicts potentially large signatures in the peculiar velocity field that makes it an interesting probe to test gravity on cosmological scales. We investigate the signatures induced by the Symmetron and a Chameleon f(R) model in the peculiar velocity field using N-body simulations. By studying fifth force and halo velocity profiles, we identify three general categories of effects found in screened modified gravity models: a fully screened regime where we recover Λ cold dark matter to high precision, an unscreened regime where the fifth force is in full operation, and, a partially screened regime where screening occurs in the inner part of a halo, but the fifth force is active at larger radii. These three regimes can be pointed out very clearly by analysing the deviation in the maximum cluster velocity. Observationally, the partially screened regime is of particular interest since an uniform increase of the gravitational force - as present in the unscreened regime - is degenerate with the (dynamical) halo mass estimate, and, thus, hard to detect.

  4. Dolphin: a tool for automatic targeted metabolite profiling using 1D and 2D (1)H-NMR data.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Josep; Brezmes, Jesús; Mallol, Roger; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Vinaixa, Maria; Salek, Reza M; Correig, Xavier; Cañellas, Nicolau

    2014-12-01

    One of the main challenges in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics is to obtain valuable metabolic information from large datasets of raw NMR spectra in a high throughput, automatic, and reproducible way. To date, established software packages used to match and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra remain mostly manually operated, leading to low resolution results and subject to inconsistencies not attributable to the NMR technique itself. Here, we introduce a new software package, called Dolphin, able to automatically quantify a set of target metabolites in multiple sample measurements using an approach based on 1D and 2D NMR techniques to overcome the inherent limitations of 1D (1)H-NMR spectra in metabolomics. Dolphin takes advantage of the 2D J-resolved NMR spectroscopy signal dispersion to avoid inconsistencies in signal position detection, enhancing the reliability and confidence in metabolite matching. Furthermore, in order to improve accuracy in quantification, Dolphin uses 2D NMR spectra to obtain additional information on all neighboring signals surrounding the target metabolite. We have compared the targeted profiling results of Dolphin, recorded from standard biological mixtures, with those of two well established approaches in NMR metabolomics. Overall, Dolphin produced more accurate results with the added advantage of being a fully automated and high throughput processing package. PMID:25370160

  5. Spectral Theory of the Turbulent Mean-Velocity Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioia, Gustavo; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2010-10-01

    It has long been surmised that the mean-velocity profile (MVP) of pipe flows is closely related to the spectrum of turbulent energy. Here we perform a spectral analysis to identify the eddies that dominate the production of shear stress via momentum transfer. This analysis allows us to express the MVP as a functional of the spectrum. Each part of the MVP relates to a specific spectral range: the buffer layer to the dissipative range, the log layer to the inertial range, and the wake to the energetic range. The parameters of the spectrum set the thickness of the viscous layer, the amplitude of the buffer layer, and the amplitude of the wake.

  6. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  7. What is the velocity profile of debris flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Fabian; McArdell, Brian

    2015-04-01

    cross-correlation scheme after calculating the signal envelope and low pass filtering it. In this sense, we do not target individual particle impacts. Rather, we measure debris flow velocities by tracking activity bursts across sensor triplets sharing the same height. Our method is therefore ideally applied to debris flows, whose geophone records show long-term modulations of signal amplitudes. For certain debris flow records our procedure provides vertical flow velocity profiles. We compare these with independent measurements of debris flow front speeds and flow depths. Furthermore, we discuss important limitations of the shear wall set up. Specifically, the channel bed below the instruments is erodible and thus varying with time. Moreover, debris deposits near the channel wall may locally perturb the debris flow and thus divert it from the direction parallel to the channel centerline. Nevertheless, we believe that our vertical flow profile results are the first of their kind and shed light on the interior of a debris flow, which is usually shielded from direct observations.

  8. Relocation of the Waldkirch seismic event, December 5, 2004, with regional 1D- and 3D-velocity models in the presence of upper mantle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, Thomas; Koch, Manfred; Schlittenhard, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    On December 5, 2004 a strong earthquake occurred near the city of Waldkirch, about 30 km's north of Freiburg, with a local magnitude of ML = 5.4. This seismic event was one of the strongest observed since the ML = 5.7 'Schwäbische Alb' event of September 3, 1978, 30 years before. In the aftermath of the event several institutions (Bens, BGR, LGBR, LED, SED and NEIC) have attempted to relocate this earthquake that came up with a hypocentral depth range of 9 - 12 km which. In fact, as the exact hypocentral location of the Waldkirch - and other events in the area - namely, the seismic depths, are of utmost importance for the further understanding of the seismotectonics as well as of the seismic hazard in the upper Rhinegraben area, one cannot over stress the necessity for a hypocenter relocation as best as possible. This requires a careful analysis of all factors that may impede an unbiased relocation of such an event. In the present talk we put forward the question whether the Waldkirch seismic event can be relocated with sufficient accuracy by a regional network when, additionally, improved regional 1D- and 3D seismic velocity models for the crust and upper mantle that take into consideration Pn-anisotropy of the upper mantle beneath Germany are employed in the hypocentral determination process. The seismological work starts with a comprehensive analysis of the dataset available for the relocation of the event. By means of traveltime curves a reevaluation of the observed phases is done and it is shown that some of the big observed traveltime residuals are most likely the consequence of wrongly associated phases as well as of the neglect of the anisotropic Pn traveltime correction for the region. Then hypcocenter relocations are done for 1D vertically inhomogeneous and 3D laterally inhomogeneous seismic velocity models, without and with the anisotropic Pn-traveltime correction included. The effects of the - often not well-known - Moho depth and of the VP

  9. Impact of boundaries on velocity profiles in bubble rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhong; Krishan, Kapilanjan; Dennin, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Under conditions of sufficiently slow flow, foams, colloids, granular matter, and various pastes have been observed to exhibit shear localization, i.e., regions of flow coexisting with regions of solidlike behavior. The details of such shear localization can vary depending on the system being studied. A number of the systems of interest are confined so as to be quasi two-dimensional, and an important issue in these systems is the role of the confining boundaries. For foams, three basic systems have been studied with very different boundary conditions: Hele-Shaw cells (bubbles confined between two solid plates); bubble rafts (a single layer of bubbles freely floating on a surface of water); and confined bubble rafts (bubbles confined between the surface of water below and a glass plate on top). Often, it is assumed that the impact of the boundaries is not significant in the “quasistatic limit,” i.e., when externally imposed rates of strain are sufficiently smaller than internal kinematic relaxation times. In this paper, we directly test this assumption for rates of strain ranging from 10-3to10-2s-1 . This corresponds to the quoted rate of strain that had been used in a number of previous experiments. It is found that the top plate dramatically alters both the velocity profile and the distribution of nonlinear rearrangements, even at these slow rates of strain. When a top is present, the flow is localized to a narrow band near the wall, and without a top, there is flow throughout the system.

  10. Profiles of 5-HT 1B/1D agonists in acute migraine with special reference to second generation agents.

    PubMed

    Deleu, D; Hanssens, Y

    1999-06-01

    The efficacy of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D (5-HT 1B/1D) agonists is related to their inhibitory effects on neurogenic inflammation, mediated through serotoninergic control mechanisms. Recently, a series of oral second generation 5-HT 1B/1D agonists (eletriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan and zolmitriptan) have been developed and are reviewed in this paper. Their in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties, clinical efficacy, drug interactions, and adverse effects are evaluated and compared to the gold standard in the treatment of acute migraine, sumatriptan. PMID:10427351

  11. Applying velocity profiling technology to flow measurement at the Orinda water treatment plant

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, M.A.; Kachur, S.; Lackenbauer, S.

    1998-07-01

    A new type of flow measurement technology, velocity profiling, was tested in the South Channel of the Orinda Water Treatment Plant. This new technology allowed installation in the difficult hydraulic conditions of the South Channel, without interrupting plant operation. The advanced technology of velocity profiling enables flow measurements to be obtained in sites normally unusable by more traditional methods of flow rate measurement.

  12. Velocity profile variations in granular flows with changing boundary conditions: insights from experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Marius; Bugnion, Louis

    2013-06-01

    We present results of detailed velocity profile measurements in a large series of granular flow experiments in a dam-break setup. The inclination angle, bead size, and roughness of the running surface were varied. In all experiments, the downstream velocity profiles changed continuously from the head to the tail of the avalanches. On rough running surfaces, an inflection point developed in the velocity profiles. These velocity profiles cannot be modeled by the large class of constitutive laws which relate the shear stress to a power law of the strain rate. The velocity profile shape factor increased from the head to the tail of the avalanches. Its maximum value grew with increasing roughness of the running surface. We conclude that flow features such as velocity profiles are strongly influenced by the boundary condition at the running surface, which depends on the ratio of bead size to the typical roughness length of the surface. Furthermore, we show that varying velocity profile shape factors inside gravitationally driven finite-mass flows give rise to an additional term in the depth-averaged momentum equation, which is normally solved in the simulation software of hazardous geophysical flows. We therefore encourage time dependent velocity profile measurements inside hazardous geophysical flows, to learn about the importance of this "new" term in the mathematical modeling of these flows.

  13. Measurement of sound velocity profiles in fluids for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Kühnicke, E.; Lenz, M.; Bock, M.

    2012-12-01

    In ultrasonic measurements, the time of flight to the object interface is often the only information that is analysed. Conventionally it is only possible to determine distances or sound velocities if the other value is known. The current paper deals with a novel method to measure the sound propagation path length and the sound velocity in media with moving scattering particles simultaneously. Since the focal position also depends on sound velocity, it can be used as a second parameter. Via calibration curves it is possible to determine the focal position and sound velocity from the measured time of flight to the focus, which is correlated to the maximum of averaged echo signal amplitude. To move focal position along the acoustic axis, an annular array is used. This allows measuring sound velocity locally resolved without any previous knowledge of the acoustic media and without a reference reflector. In previous publications the functional efficiency of this method was shown for media with constant velocities. In this work the accuracy of these measurements is improved. Furthermore first measurements and simulations are introduced for non-homogeneous media. Therefore an experimental set-up was created to generate a linear temperature gradient, which also causes a gradient of sound velocity.

  14. Inverting GPR Dispersion Curves to Resolve Water Content Profiles of Precipitation Induced Low-Velocity Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements have significant potential for monitoring dynamic hydrologic processes at multiple scales in time and space. At early times during infiltration into a soil, the zone behind the wetting front may act as a low-velocity waveguide that causes dispersion of GPR waves, thereby making interpretation of the data using standard methods difficult. In this work, we show that the dispersion is dependent upon the distribution of water within the waveguide, which is controlled by soil hydrologic properties. Simulations of infiltration were performed by varying the n-parameter of the Mualem-van Genuchten equation using HYDRUS-1D; the associated GPR data were simulated to evaluate the influence of dispersion. We observed a notable decrease in the "shingling" effect in the GPR data associated with wave dispersion as the sharpness of the wetting front profile decreased. Given the sensitivity of the dispersion effect to the wetting front profile, we also evaluated whether the water content distribution can be determined through inversion of the dispersive GPR data. We found that a global grid search combined with the simplex algorithm was able to estimate the average water content when the wetted zone is divided into 1-2 effective layers. This approach was incapable, however, of representing the gradational nature of the water content distribution behind the wetting front. In contrast, the shuffled complex evolution algorithm was able to constrain a piece-wise linear function to closely match the shallow gradational water content profile. In both the layered and piece-wise linear case, the sensitivity of the dispersive data dropped sharply below the wetting front, which in this case was around 20 cm for a 1000MHz GPR survey. This study demonstrates that dispersive GPR data has significant potential for capturing the early-time dynamics of infiltration that cannot be obtained with standard GPR analysis approaches.

  15. An Excel™-VBA programme for the analysis of current velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, J. P.; Brodalka, M.

    2004-10-01

    VPA is an Excel spreadsheet to facilitate the analysis of current velocity profiles and its application to sediment transport studies in steady, uniform, open-channel flows. The program requires input values such as the water temperature (from which the density and dynamic viscosity are calculated), the channel depth and slope, current velocities as measured at different heights above the bed, bedform length and height, as well as the sediment density and median size. The latter can be provided as sieve diameters, fall diameters or as phi values. The velocity profiles are plotted on two graphs, one being a traditional plot of velocity versus height or distance from the bed and the other comparing the observed profile with theoretical profiles for smooth, transitional and rough boundary conditions. VBA macros are provided to clear the spreadsheet before new profiles are analysed, update the formulas, straighten out the velocity profiles, calculate the shear velocity, and save the data on a separate sheet for further analysis. The programme is applied to a new and more accurate method to determine the shear velocity, which can be used to predict the bedload discharge over plane beds and is also incorporated into a dimensionally correct suspended load transport equation combining the parameters most important in sediment transport. A dimensionally correct bedload discharge equation based upon the mean excess flow velocity is also proposed for plane beds, ripples and dunes.

  16. One-dimensional velocity profiles in open-channel flow with intense transport of coarse sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrostlík, Štěpán; Bareš, Vojtěch; Krupička, Jan; Picek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Václav

    2015-05-01

    The paper deals with laboratory experiments in open-channel flows with intense transport of model sediment (coarse plastic particles) in our new tilting flume. The major objectives of the paper are: 1. to discuss applied measuring methods, 2. to analyze measured velocity profiles. Ad 1. A profile of the longitudinal component of local velocity was measured across the vertical axis of symmetry of a flume cross section using three independent measuring methods (Prandtl tube, Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler, Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler). Due to strong stratification of the flow in the flume, parts of the profile are measured in regions of very different local concentrations of sediment (from virtually zero concentration to the maximum concentration of bed packing). This makes measurements complicated, particularly for ultrasonic measuring techniques. Profiles measured using the different techniques are evaluated and mutually compared. Ad 2. The layered character of the flow causes that shapes of velocity profiles tend to be different in the transport layer (rich on transported particles) above the bed and in the solids-free region between the top of the transport layer and the water surface. Shapes of the profiles are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the logarithmic profile in the solids-free region of the flow cross section. The profile can be handled using the law of the hydraulically-rough wall. In the law, the eroded top of the bed with the transport layer is supposed to be the rough boundary and appropriate values are sought for its variables.

  17. Reconstruction of velocity profiles in axisymmetric and asymmetric flows using an electromagnetic flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, László E.; Lucas, Gary P.; Meng, Yiqing

    2015-05-01

    An analytical method that was developed formerly for the reconstruction of velocity profiles in asymmetric flows is improved to be applicable for both axisymmetric and asymmetric flows. The method is implemented in Matlab, and predicts the velocity profile from measured electrical potential distributions obtained around the boundary of a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM). Potential distributions are measured in uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields, and the velocity is assumed as a sum of axisymmetric and polynomial components. The procedure requires three steps. First, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a uniform magnetic field. Since the direction of polynomial components of order greater than two in the plane of the pipe cross section is not unique multiple solutions exist, therefore all possible polynomial velocity profiles are determined. Then, the DFT is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a specific non-uniform magnetic field, and used to calculate the exponent in a power-law representation of the axisymmetric component. Finally, the potential distribution in the non-uniform magnetic field is calculated for all of the possible velocity profile solutions using weight values, and the velocity profile with the calculated potential distribution which is closest to the measured one provides the optimum solution. The method is validated by reconstructing two quartic velocity profiles, one of which includes an axisymmetric component. The potential distributions are obtained from simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics where a model of the EMFM is constructed. The reconstructed velocity profiles show satisfactory agreement with the input velocity profiles. The main benefits of the method described in this paper are that it provides a velocity distribution in the circular cross section of a pipe as an analytical function of the spatial coordinates which is suitable for both

  18. Prediction of inverted velocity profile for gas flow in nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. T.; Ren, Y. R.

    2014-11-01

    Velocity inversion is an interesting phenomenon of nanoscale which means that the velocity near the wall is greater than that of center. To solve this problem, fluid flow in nanochannel attracts more attention in recent years. The physical model of gas flow in two-dimensional nanochannel was established here. To describe the process with conventional control equations, Navier-Stokes equations combined with high-order accurate slip boundary conditions was used as mathematical model. With the introduction of new dimensionless variables, the problem was reduced to an ordinary differential equation. Then it was analytically solved and investigated using homotopy analysis method (HAM). The results were verified by comparing with other available experiment data. Result shows that the proposed method could predict velocity phenomenon.

  19. On the Positive Bias of Peak Horizontal Velocity from an Idealized Doppler Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2004-01-01

    In the presence of 3-D turbulence, peak horizontal velocity estimates from an idealized Doppler profiler are found to be positively biased due to an incomplete specification of the vertical velocity field. The magnitude of the bias was estimated by assuming that the vertical and horizontal velocities can be separated into average and perturbation values and that the vertical and horizontal velocity perturbations are normally distributed. Under these assumptions, properties of the Type-I Extreme Value Distribution for maxima, known as the Gumbel distribution, can be used to obtain an analytical solution of the bias. The bias depends on geometric properties of the profiler configuration, the variance in the horizontal velocity, and the unresolved variance in the vertical velocity. When these variances are normalized by the average horizontal velocity, the bias can be mapped as a simple function of the normalized variances.

  20. Velocity and temperature profiles in near-critical nitrogen flowing past a horizontal flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Boundary layer velocity and temperature profiles were measured for nitrogen near its thermodynamic critical point flowing past a horizontal flat plate. The results were compared measurements made for vertically upward flow. The boundary layer temperatures ranged from below to above the thermodynamic critical temperature. For wall temperatures below the thermodynamic critical temperature there was little variation between the velocity and temperature profiles in three orientations. In all three orientations the point of crossing into the critical temperature region is marked by a significant flattening of the velocity and temperature profiles and also a decrease in heat transfer coefficient.

  1. Changes in velocity profile according to blood viscosity in a microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Eunseop; Kang, Yang Jun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are important to dictate hemorheological properties of blood. The shear-thinning effect of blood is mainly attributed to the characteristics of the RBCs. Variations in hemorheological properties alter flow resistance and wall shear stress in blood vessels. Therefore, detailed understanding of the relationship between the hemorheological and hemodynamic properties is of great importance. In this study, blood viscosity and blood flow were simultaneously measured in the same microfluidic device by monitoring the flow-switching phenomenon. To investigate blood flows according to hemorheological variations, the flow rate of blood samples (RBCs suspended in autologous plasma, dextran-treated plasma, and in phosphate buffered saline solution) was precisely controlled with a syringe pump. Velocity profiles of blood flows were measured by using a micro-particle image velocimetry technique. The shape of velocity profiles was quantified by using a curve-fitting equation. It is found that the shape of the velocity profiles is highly correlated with blood viscosity. To demonstrate the relationship under ex vivo conditions, biophysical properties and velocity profiles were measured in an extracorporeal rat bypass loop. Experimental results show that increased blood viscosity seems to induce blunt velocity profile with high velocity component at the wall of the microchannel. Simultaneous measurement of blood viscosity and velocity profile would be useful for understanding the effects of hemorheological features on the hemodynamic characteristics in capillary blood vessels. PMID:25377092

  2. Shear wave velocity profile estimation by integrated analysis of active and passive seismic data from small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontsi, A. M.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present an integrated approach for deriving the 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) information at few tens to hundreds of meters down to the first strong impedance contrast in typical sedimentary environments. We use multiple small aperture seismic arrays in 1D and 2D configuration to record active and passive seismic surface wave data at two selected geotechnical sites in Germany (Horstwalde & Löbnitz). Standard methods for data processing include the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method that exploits the high frequency content in the active data and the sliding window frequency-wavenumber (f-k) as well as the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods that exploit the low frequency content in passive seismic data. Applied individually, each of the passive methods might be influenced by any source directivity in the noise wavefield. The advantages of active shot data (known source location) and passive microtremor (low frequency content) recording may be combined using a correlation based approach applied to the passive data in the so called Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW). In this study, we apply those methods to jointly determine and interpret the dispersion characteristics of surface waves recorded at Horstwalde and Löbnitz. The reliability of the dispersion curves is controlled by applying strict limits on the interpretable range of wavelengths in the analysis and further avoiding potentially biased phase velocity estimates from the passive f-k method by comparing to those derived from the SPatial AutoCorrelation method (SPAC). From our investigation at these two sites, the joint analysis as proposed allows mode extraction in a wide frequency range (~ 0.6-35 Hz at Horstwalde and ~ 1.5-25 Hz at Löbnitz) and consequently improves the Vs profile inversion. To obtain the shear wave velocity profiles, we make use of a global inversion approach based on the neighborhood algorithm to invert the interpreted branches of the

  3. Velocity profiles of high-excitation molecular hydrogen lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Profiles of three lines of molecular hydrogen near 2.2 microns, originating from widely spaced energy levels, have been measured at a resolution of 32 km/s at Peak 1 in the Orion molecular outflow. The three lines, 1 - 0 S(1), 2 - 1 S(1), and 3 - 2 S(3), are found to have identical profiles. This result rules out any significant contribution to the population of the higher energy levels of molecular hydrogen at Peak 1 by fluorescence, and is generally consistent with emission from multiple J-type shocks.

  4. Proposed method for reconstructing velocity profiles using a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, László E.; Lucas, Gary P.; Zhang, Zhichao

    2014-07-01

    An analytical method is developed for the reconstruction of velocity profiles using measured potential distributions obtained around the boundary of a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM). The method is based on the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), and is implemented in Matlab. The method assumes the velocity profile in a section of a pipe as a superposition of polynomials up to sixth order. Each polynomial component is defined along a specific direction in the plane of the pipe section. For a potential distribution obtained in a uniform magnetic field, this direction is not unique for quadratic and higher-order components; thus, multiple possible solutions exist for the reconstructed velocity profile. A procedure for choosing the optimum velocity profile is proposed. It is applicable for single-phase or two-phase flows, and requires measurement of the potential distribution in a non-uniform magnetic field. The potential distribution in this non-uniform magnetic field is also calculated for the possible solutions using weight values. Then, the velocity profile with the calculated potential distribution which is closest to the measured one provides the optimum solution. The reliability of the method is first demonstrated by reconstructing an artificial velocity profile defined by polynomial functions. Next, velocity profiles in different two-phase flows, based on results from the literature, are used to define the input velocity fields. In all cases, COMSOL Multiphysics is used to model the physical specifications of the EMFM and to simulate the measurements; thus, COMSOL simulations produce the potential distributions on the internal circumference of the flow pipe. These potential distributions serve as inputs for the analytical method. The reconstructed velocity profiles show satisfactory agreement with the input velocity profiles. The method described in this paper is most suitable for stratified flows and is not applicable to axisymmetric flows in

  5. The cavitation induced by a rapid change of velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olšiak, Róbert; Csuka, Zoltán; Fuszko, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the theory of cavitation flow near the high-speed rotary surface. For this purpose, a spatial model of two cylindrical surfaces imposed concentrically was designed. In the narrow gap between two cylindrical surfaces the temperature, density and viscosity of liquid are constant. Shear stress is induced by the high-speed rotary motion of the inner cylinder. In this case: velocity and pressure fields are changed. Due to the pressure drop between the cylinders there is a precondition to the formation of cavitation zones at the point of the lowest static pressure. This phenomenon is simulated via CFD methods.

  6. Derivation of the anisotropy profile, constraints on the local velocity dispersion, and implications for direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    We study the implications of a pseudo-phase-space density power-law for the anisotropy profile of a Milky Way-like dark matter halo. Requiring that the anisotropy parameter does not take non-physical values within the virial radius places a maximum value on the local radial velocity dispersion. For a plausible range of halo parameters, it is possible to take a local total velocity dispersion of up to about 300 km/s. Making this choice uniquely specifies the anisotropy and dispersion profiles. We introduce a way to model the local velocity distribution that incorporates this anisotropy and study the impact on direct detection.

  7. Turbulent boundary-layer velocity profiles on a nonadiabatic at Mach number 6.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Hopkins, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Velocity profiles were obtained from pitot-pressure and total-temperature measurements within a turbulent boundary layer on a large sharp-edged flat plate. Momentum-thickness Reynolds number ranged from 2590 to 8860 and wall-to-adiabatic-wall temperature ratios ranged from 0.3 to 0.5. Measurements were made both with and without boundary layer trips. Five methods are evaluated for correlating the measured velocity profiles with the incompressible law-of-the-wall and the velocity defect law. The mixing-length generalization of Van Driest gives the best correlation.

  8. The velocity dispersion profiles of clusters of galaxies: a cosmological test and the sampling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Y. P.; Borner, G.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the velocity dispersion profiles of clusters of galaxies for seven cosmological models. One model is the SCDM model, and the others are six low-density models with the density parameter {OMEGA} = 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3 and with or without a cosmological constant {LAMBDA} = 1 - {OMEGA}. we find that the velocity dispersion profiles depend both on {OMEGA} and on {LAMBDA}. For {LAMBDA} = 0, the profiles are steeper in a lower-{OMEGA} model than in a higher-{OMEGA} one. The cosmological constant significantly weakens the dependence on {OMEGA}: the difference in the profile distributions between two flat models is much smaller than that between the two corresponding open models with the same {OMEGA}. These results in principle can be used to constrain the cosmological parameters when a large sample of velocity dispersion profiles is available. Motivated by the practical situation that a sample of ~100 clusters with ~100 measured redshifts per cluster is still the best sample available for the foreseeable future, we examine carefully to what degree the cosmological parameters can be constrained by the velocity dispersion profiles of such a sample of clusters. The limited sampling around clusters and the limited number of clusters seriously degrade the discriminative power of the velocity dispersion profiles among cosmological models. we find that the five models with {OMEGA} >= 0.2 cannot be distinguished by this type of observation. Owing to the limited sampling, one should be very cautious in extracting information about the density profile and/or the dynamics around single clusters from the diluted velocity dispersion profiles.

  9. Jet Velocity Profile Effects on Spray Characteristics of Impinging Jets at High Reynolds and Weber Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.; Kulkarni, Varun; Sojka, Paul E.

    2014-11-01

    While like-on-like doublet impinging jet atomization has been extensively studied in the literature, there is poor agreement between experimentally observed spray characteristics and theoretical predictions (Ryan et al. 1995, Anderson et al. 2006). Recent works (Bremond and Villermaux 2006, Choo and Kang 2007) have introduced a non-uniform jet velocity profile, which lead to a deviation from the standard assumptions for the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter. These works have assumed a parabolic profile to serve as another limit to the traditional uniform jet velocity profile assumption. Incorporating a non-uniform jet velocity profile results in the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter depending on the sheet azimuthal angle. In this work, the 1/7th power-law turbulent velocity profile is assumed to provide a closer match to the flow behavior of jets at high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which correspond to the impact wave regime. Predictions for the maximum wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop diameter are compared with experimental observations. The results demonstrate better agreement between experimentally measured values and predictions, compared to previous models. U.S. Army Research Office under the Multi-University Research Initiative Grant Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  10. Vertical seismic profile at Pike's Peak, Saskatchewan, Canada: turning rays and velocity anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newrick, Rachel T.; Lawton, Don C.

    2003-12-01

    First-arrival traveltimes from a multi-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) were used to estimate velocity anisotropy in the presence of a vertical velocity gradient. A numerical model consisting of two layers with vertical velocity gradients of 3.1 and 1.2 s-1, respectively, and global anisotropy parameters of ε=0.12±0.02 and δ=0.30±0.06 yielded first-arrival traveltimes that matched the observed traveltimes well. Shallow receivers were found to be crucial for constraining the vertical velocity field and for determining the parameters of anisotropy at depth.

  11. The Compressible Flow Past Various Plane Profiles Near Sonic Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goethert, B.; Kawalki, K. H.

    1949-01-01

    In an earlier report UM No.1117 by Gothert,the single-source method was applied to the compressible flow around circles, ellipses, lunes, and around an elongated body of revolution at different Mach numbers and the results compared as far as possible with the calculations by Lamla ad Busemann. Essentially, it was found that with favorable source arrangement the single-source method is in good agreement with the calculations of the same degree of approximation by.Lamla and Busemann. Near sonic velocity the number of steps must be increased considerably in order to sufficiently approximate the adiabatic curve. After exceeding a certain Mach number where local supersonic fields occur already, it was no longer possible, in spite of the substantially increased number of steps, to obtain a systematic solution because the calculation diverged. This result,was interpreted to mean that above this point of divergence the symmetrical type of flow ceases to exist and changes into the unsymmetrical type characterized by compressibility shocks.

  12. Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Problems with Linear Velocity Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hendon, Raymond C.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-08-22

    As an extension of the works of Coggeshall and Ramsey, a class of analytic solutions to the radiation hydrodynamics equations is derived for code verification purposes. These solutions are valid under assumptions including diffusive radiation transport, a polytropic gas equation of state, constant conductivity, separable flow velocity proportional to the curvilinear radial coordinate, and divergence-free heat flux. In accordance with these assumptions, the derived solution class is mathematically invariant with respect to the presence of radiative heat conduction, and thus represents a solution to the compressible flow (Euler) equations with or without conduction terms included. With this solution class, a quantitative code verification study (using spatial convergence rates) is performed for the cell-centered, finite volume, Eulerian compressible flow code xRAGE developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Simulation results show near second order spatial convergence in all physical variables when using the hydrodynamics solver only, consistent with that solver's underlying order of accuracy. However, contrary to the mathematical properties of the solution class, when heat conduction algorithms are enabled the calculation does not converge to the analytic solution.

  13. [The resolution of a 2-dimensional ultrasonic velocity profile of human tooth sections].

    PubMed

    John, C; Irion, K M; Nüssle, W; Löst, C

    1994-01-01

    In a previous study (Löst et al. 1992, Löst et al. 1994) two-dimensional ultrasound velocity profiles of human dentin were introduced, and their possible significance and the underlying measuring system were discussed. Profiles of ultrasound velocity enable us to differentiate the structure and the elasticity of dental hard tissues. The quality of these color-coded profiles enhances with improved lateral resolution of the used ultrasound measuring system. Establishing an optimal window for displaying longitudinal sound velocities increases topological statements. Under given conditions of the measuring system an optimal lateral distance between points of measurement could be found. The differentiation of values within the profiles of ultrasound velocity is most meaningful applying a standardized window within the range of ultrasound velocity. For the used 20 MHz-ultrasound transducer a 0.2 mm lateral distance of measuring points was found to be optimal and a chosen window of ultrasound velocity in dentin from at least 2800 to 4300 m/s, respectively. PMID:8108688

  14. Variation of velocity profile according to blood viscosity in a microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Eunseop; Kang, Yang Jun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-11-01

    The shear-thinning effect of blood flows is known to change blood viscosity. Since blood viscosity and motion of red blood cells (RBCs) are closely related, hemorheological variations have a strong influence on hemodynamic characteristics. Therefore, understanding on the relationship between the hemorheological and hemodynamic properties is importance for getting more detailed information on blood circulation in microvessels. In this study, the blood viscosity and velocity profiles in a microfluidic channel were systematically investigated. Rat blood was delivered in the microfluidic device which can measure blood viscosity by monitoring the flow-switching phenomenon. Velocity profiles of blood flows in the microchannel were measured by using a micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Shape of velocity profiles measured at different flow rates was quantified by using a curve-fitting equation. It was observed that the shape of velocity profiles is highly correlated with blood viscosity. The study on the relation between blood viscosity and velocity profile would be helpful to understand the roles of hemorheological and hemodynamic properties in cardiovascular diseases. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea Government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  15. Interpreting Power-Force-Velocity Profiles for Individualized and Specific Training.

    PubMed

    Morin, Jean-Benoît; Samozino, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have brought new insights into the evaluation of power-force-velocity profiles in both ballistic push-offs (eg, jumps) and sprint movements. These are major physical components of performance in many sports, and the methods the authors developed and validated are based on data that are now rather simple to obtain in field conditions (eg, body mass, jump height, sprint times, or velocity). The promising aspect of these approaches is that they allow for more individualized and accurate evaluation, monitoring, and training practices, the success of which is highly dependent on the correct collection, generation, and interpretation of athletes' mechanical outputs. The authors therefore wanted to provide a practical vade mecum to sports practitioners interested in implementing these power-force-velocity-profiling approaches. After providing a summary of theoretical and practical definitions for the main variables, the authors first detail how vertical profiling can be used to manage ballistic push-off performance, with emphasis on the concept of optimal force-velocity profile and the associated force-velocity imbalance. Furthermore, they discuss these same concepts with regard to horizontal profiling in the management of sprinting performance. These sections are illustrated by typical examples from the authors' practice. Finally, they provide a practical and operational synthesis and outline future challenges that will help further develop these approaches. PMID:26694658

  16. A lumped model for blood flow and pressure in the systemic arteries based on an approximate velocity profile function.

    PubMed

    Huberts, Wouter; Bosboom, E Marielle H; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2009-01-01

    Previously, by assuming a viscous dominated flow in the boundary layer and an inertia dominated flow in the vessel core, a velocity profile function for a 1D-wave propagation model was derived. Because the time dependent shape of the velocity profile in this boundary layer model depends on the size of the inviscid core and the boundary layer, and thus on the Womersley number, it differs along the arterial tree. In this study we evaluated a lumped model for a vessel segment in which the element configuration is based on physical phenomena described by the boundary layer model and for which all parameters have a physically based quantitative value dependent on the Womersley numbers. The proposed electrical analog consists of a Womersley number dependent resistor and an inductor arranged in parallel, representing the flow impedence in respectively the vessel core and the boundary layer, in series with a second resistor. After incorporating a capacitor representing the vessel compliance in this rigid tube model, the element configuration resembles the configuration of the four-element windkessel model. For arbitrary Womersley numbers the relative impedence of Womersley theory is approximated with high accuracy. In the limits for small and large Womersley numbers the relative impedences of the proposed lumped model correspond exactly to Womersley theory. PMID:19292506

  17. Evaluation of an Extended Autocorrelation Phase Estimator for Ultrasonic Velocity Profiles Using Nondestructive Testing Systems.

    PubMed

    Ofuchi, César Yutaka; Coutinho, Fabio Rizental; Neves, Flávio; de Arruda, Lucia Valéria Ramos; Morales, Rigoberto Eleazar Melgarejo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the extended autocorrelation velocity estimator is evaluated and compared using a nondestructive ultrasonic device. For this purpose, three velocity estimators are evaluated and compared. The autocorrelation method (ACM) is the most used and well established in current ultrasonic velocity profiler technology, however, the technique suffers with phase aliasing (also known as the Nyquist limit) at higher velocities. The cross-correlation method (CCM) is also well known and does not suffer with phase aliasing as it relies on time shift measurements between emissions. The problem of this method is the large computational burden due to several required mathematical operations. Recently, an extended autocorrelation method (EAM) which combines both ACM and CCM was developed. The technique is not well known within the fluid engineering community, but it can measure velocities beyond the Nyquist limit without the ACM phase aliasing issues and with a lower computational cost than CCM. In this work, all three velocity estimation methods are used to measure a uniform flow of the liquid inside a controlled rotating cylinder. The root-mean-square deviation variation coefficient (CVRMSD) of the velocity estimate and the reference cylinder velocity was used to evaluate the three different methods. Results show that EAM correctly measures velocities below the Nyquist limit with less than 2% CVRMSD. Velocities beyond the Nyquist limit are only measured well by EAM and CCM, with the advantage of the former of being computationally 15 times faster. Furthermore, the maximum value of measurable velocity is also investigated considering the number of times the velocity surpasses the Nyquist limit. The combination of number of pulses and number of samples, which highly affects the results, are also studied in this work. Velocities up to six times the Nyquist limit could be measurable with CCM and EAM using a set of parameters as suggested in this work. The results validate

  18. Skin friction and velocity profile family for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Bradshaw, P.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a general approach to constructing mean velocity profiles for compressible turbulent boundary layers with isothermal or adiabatic walls. The theory is based on a density-weighted transformation that allows the extension of the incompressible similarity laws of the wall to the compressible regions. The velocity profile family is compared to a range of experimental data, and excellent agreement is obtained. A self-consistent skin friction law, which satisfies the proposed velocity profile family, is derived and compared with the well-known Van Driest II theory for boundary layers in zero pressure gradient. The results are found to be at least as good as those obtained by using the Van Driest II transformation.

  19. Ultrasonic velocity profiling rheometry based on a widened circular Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratori, Takahisa; Tasaka, Yuji; Oishi, Yoshihiko; Murai, Yuichi

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new rheometry for characterizing the rheological properties of fluids. The technique produces flow curves, which represent the relationship between the fluid shear rate and shear stress. Flow curves are obtained by measuring the circumferential velocity distribution of tested fluids in a circular Couette system, using an ultrasonic velocity profiling technique. By adopting a widened gap of concentric cylinders, a designed range of the shear rate is obtained so that velocity profile measurement along a single line directly acquires flow curves. To reduce the effect of ultrasonic noise on resultant flow curves, several fitting functions and variable transforms are examined to best approximate the velocity profile without introducing a priori rheological models. Silicone oil, polyacrylamide solution, and yogurt were used to evaluate the applicability of this technique. These substances are purposely targeted as examples of Newtonian fluids, shear thinning fluids, and opaque fluids with unknown rheological properties, respectively. We find that fourth-order Chebyshev polynomials provide the most accurate representation of flow curves in the context of model-free rheometry enabled by ultrasonic velocity profiling.

  20. Velocity and density profiles of granular flow in channels using a lattice gas automaton

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, G.; Ohta, T.

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional lattice-gas-automaton simulations of granular flow between two parallel planes. We find that the velocity profiles have nonparabolic distributions, while simultaneously the density profiles are nonuniform. Under nonslip boundary conditions, deviation of velocity profiles from the parabolic form of Newtonian fluids is found to be characterized solely by ratio of maximal velocity at the center to the average velocity, though the ratio depends on the model parameters in a complex manner. We also find that the maximal velocity (u{sub max}) at the center is a linear function of the driving force (g) as u{sub max}={alpha}g{minus}{delta} with nonzero {delta} in contrast with Newtonian fluids. Regarding density profiles, we observe that densities near the boundaries are higher than those in the center. The width of higher densities (above the average density) relative to the channel width is a decreasing function of a variable which scales with the driving force (g), energy dissipation parameter ({epsilon}), and the width of the system (L) as g{sup {mu}}L{sup {nu}}/{epsilon} with exponents {mu}=1.4{plus_minus}0.1 and {nu}=0.5{plus_minus}0.1. A phenomenological theory based on a scaling argument is presented to interpret these findings. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Method of LSD profile asymmetry for estimating the center of mass velocities of pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N.; Pancino, E.; Tsymbal, V.; Romano, D.; Cacciari, C.; Clementini, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present radial velocity analysis for 20 solar neighborhood RR Lyrae and 3 Population II Cepheids. High-resolution spectra were observed with either TNG/SARG or VLT/UVES over varying phases. To estimate the center of mass (barycentric) velocities of the program stars, we utilized two independent methods. First, the 'classic' method was employed, which is based on RR Lyrae radial velocity curve templates. Second, we provide the new method that used absorption line profile asymmetry to determine both the pulsation and the barycentric velocities even with a low number of high-resolution spectra and in cases where the phase of the observations is uncertain. This new method is based on a least squares deconvolution (LSD) of the line profiles in order to an- alyze line asymmetry that occurs in the spectra of pulsating stars. By applying this method to our sample stars we attain accurate measurements (+- 2 kms^-1) of the pulsation component of the radial velocity. This results in determination of the barycentric velocity to within 5 kms^-1 even with a low number of high- resolution spectra. A detailed investigation of LSD profile asymmetry shows the variable nature of the project factor at different pulsation phases, which should be taken into account in the detailed spectroscopic analysis of pulsating stars.

  2. Method of LSD profile asymmetry for estimating the center of mass velocities of pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, Nikolay; Pancino, Elena; Romano, Donatella; Tsymbal, Vadim

    2015-08-01

    We present radial velocity analysis for 20 solar neighborhood RR Lyrae and 3 Population II Cepheids. High-resolution spectra were observed with either TNG/SARG or VLT/UVES over varying phases. To estimate the center of mass (barycentric) velocities of the program stars, we utilized two independent methods. First, the 'classic' method was employed, which is based on RR Lyrae radial velocity curve templates. Second, we provide the new method that used absorption line profile asymmetry to determine both the pulsation and the barycentric velocities even with a low number of high-resolution spectra and in cases where the phase of the observations is uncertain. This new method is based on a Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD) of the line profiles in order to analyze line asymmetry that occurs in the spectra of pulsating stars. By applying this method to our sample stars we attain accurate measurements (± 1 km/s) of the pulsation component of the radial velocity. This results in determination of the barycentric velocity to within 5 km/s even with a low number of high-resolution spectra. A detailed investigation of LSD profile asymmetry shows the variable nature of the project factor at different pulsation phases, which should be taken into account in the detailed spectroscopic analysis of pulsating stars.

  3. Control of exit velocity profile of an asymmetric annular diffuser using wall suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    An asymmetric annular diffuser equipped with wall bleed (suction) capability was tested for controllability of exit velocity profile. The diffuser area ratio was 3.2, and the length to inlet height ratio was 1.6. Results show that the diffuser radial exit velocity profile could be controlled from a hub peaked to a tip peaked form by selective use of bleed on the outer wall or on both diffuser walls. Based on these results, application of the diffuser bleed technique to gas turbine combustors may be possible. Diffuser bleed could be used to tailor the airflow distribution for optimizing combustor performance at a variety of operating conditions.

  4. The influence of velocity variability on the determination of wind profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1986-01-01

    High sensitivity radars allow the determination of velocity estimates at time resolutions down to one minute or better. Because of the variability introduced to the mean wind due to turbulence and waves, the high resolution profiles may not be too useful for forecasting applications, although they yield the most realistic estimate of the instantaneous wind profile. Profiles of wind speed and direction, vertical velocity and echo power, which were deduced in real-time on 23 August 1981 with the spaced antenna drift mode of the SOUSY-VHF-Radar are shown. Whereas these profiles were measured within 1 minute, the operating routine allowed the selection of variable (longer) measuring periods, and one has to search for the optimum duration of the data averaging period. A high time resolution wind vector diagram is given which gives an idea of the temporal variability. The data were obtained with the spaced antenna technique, which allows a good estimate of the horizontal wind without having to correct for the vertical velocity component. The wind vectors specifically indicate a quasi-periodic variation in direction. This is assumed to be due to gravity waves since the vertical velocity also shows periodical variations with the same period. The consistency of these spaced-antenna VHF radar results along with the radiosonde data convinced researchers that the method is quite suitable for wind profiling applications.

  5. Combined vertical-velocity observations with Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, J.; Leinweber, R.; Görsdorf, U.; Radenz, M.; Ansmann, A.; Lehmann, V.

    2015-08-01

    Case studies of combined vertical-velocity measurements of Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler are presented. The measurements were taken at the Meteorological Observatory, Lindenberg, Germany. Synergistic products are presented that are derived from the vertical-velocity measurements of the three instruments: a comprehensive classification mask of vertically moving atmospheric targets and the terminal fall velocity of water droplets and ice crystals corrected for vertical air motion. It is shown that this combination of instruments can up-value the measurement values of each single instrument and may allow the simultaneous sensing of atmospheric targets and the motion of clear air.

  6. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  7. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  8. ASTER based velocity profile of glaciers in the Nanga Parbat region, western Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, A. T.; Haritashya, U. K.

    2011-12-01

    Glaciers, in general, are highly sensitive to climate fluctuations making them important indicators of climate change. Overall, lack of data on this region is troubling for the amount of hydrological importance and climatic forecasts these glaciers hold. Therefore, this study aims to measure glacier velocity on selected glaciers using cross-correlation techniques. One of the main problems with determining the amount of loss or perhaps gain in glacier mass is determining their velocity. The Himalayan glaciers are inaccessible in most areas and field measurements can be impossible, which creates a problem when determining the velocity of glaciers. Consequently, we generated velocity profiles of glaciers in the Nanga Parbat region of the western Himalaya using 2009 and 2010 ASTER satellite data. Our glacier fluctuation study have shown oscillating behavior of these glaciers; however, our preliminary velocity result indicates high velocity on most of these glaciers. These results are the first ever velocity profile generated for this region and would be able to help understand glacier dynamics in a much more comprehensive manner.

  9. Re-evaluation of the central velocity-dispersion profile in NGC 6388

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lützgendorf, Nora; Gebhardt, Karl; Baumgardt, Holger; Noyola, Eva; Neumayer, Nadine; Kissler-Patig, Markus; de Zeeuw, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Context. The globular cluster NGC 6388 is one of the most massive clusters in our Milky Way and has been the subject of many studies. Recently, two independent groups found very different results when measuring its central velocity-dispersion profile with different methods. While we found a rising profile and a high central velocity dispersion (23.3 km s-1), measurements obtained by Lanzoni et al. (2013, ApJ, 769, 107) showed a value lower by 40%. The value of the central velocity dispersion has a serious effect on the mass and possible presence of an intermediate-mass black hole at the center of NGC 6388. Aims: The goal of this paper is to quantify the biases arising from measuring velocity dispersions from individual extracted stellar velocities versus the line broadening measurements of the integrated light using new tools to simulate realistic observations made with integral field units (IFU). Methods: We used a photometric catalog of NGC 6388 to extract the positions and magnitudes from the brightest stars in the central three arcseconds of NGC 6388 and created a simulated SINFONI and ARGUS dataset. The IFU data cube was constructed with different observing conditions (i.e., Strehl ratios and seeing) reproducing the conditions reported for the original observations as closely as possible. In addition, we produced an N-body realization of a ~106 M⊙ stellar cluster with the same photometric properties as NGC 6388 to account for unresolved stars. Results: We find that the individual radial velocities, that is, the measurements from the simulated SINFONI data, are systematically biased towards lower velocity dispersions. The reason is that the velocities become biased toward the mean cluster velocity as a result of the wings in the point spread function of adaptive optics (AO) corrected data sets. This study shows that even with AO supported observations, individual radial velocities in crowded fields do not reproduce the true velocity distribution. The ARGUS

  10. Monochromatic heterodyne fiber-optic profile sensor for spatially resolved velocity measurements with frequency division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, Thorsten; Buettner, Lars; Shirai, Katsuaki; Czarske, Juergen

    2005-05-01

    Investigating shear flows is important in technical applications as well as in fundamental research. Velocity measurements with high spatial resolution are necessary. Laser Doppler anemometry allows nonintrusive precise measurements, but the spatial resolution is limited by the size of the measurement volume to {approx}50 {mu}m. A new laser Doppler profile sensor is proposed, enabling determination of the velocity profile inside the measurement volume. Two fringe systems with contrary fringe spacing gradients are generated to determine the position as well as the velocity of passing tracer particles. Physically discriminating between the two measuring channels is done by a frequency-division-multiplexing technique with acousto-optic modulators. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and a fiber-optic measuring head were employed, resulting in a portable and flexible sensor. In the center of the measurement volume of {approx}1-mm length, a spatial resolution of {approx}5 {mu}m was obtained. Spatially resolved measurements of the Blasius velocity profile are presented. Small velocities as low as 3 cm/s are measured. The sensor is applied in a wind tunnel to determine the wall shear stress of a boundary layer flow. All measurement results show good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  11. Measurement of Plasma Ion Temperature and Flow Velocity from Chord-Averaged Emission Line Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xu

    2011-06-01

    The distinction between Doppler broadening and Doppler shift has been analysed, the differences between Gaussian fitting and the distribution of chord-integral line shape have also been discussed. Local ion temperature and flow velocity have been derived from the chord-averaged emission line profile by a chosen-point Gaussian fitting technique.

  12. Estimation of seabed shear-wave velocity profiles using shear-wave source data.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hefeng; Nguyen, Thanh-Duong; Duffaut, Kenneth

    2013-07-01

    This paper estimates seabed shear-wave velocity profiles and their uncertainties using interface-wave dispersion curves extracted from data generated by a shear-wave source. The shear-wave source generated a seismic signature over a frequency range between 2 and 60 Hz and was polarized in both in-line and cross-line orientations. Low-frequency Scholte- and Love-waves were recorded. Dispersion curves of the Scholte- and Love-waves for the fundamental mode and higher-order modes are extracted by three time-frequency analysis methods. Both the vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles in the sediment are estimated by the Scholte- and Love-wave dispersion curves, respectively. A Bayesian approach is utilized for the inversion. Differential evolution, a global search algorithm is applied to estimate the most-probable shear-velocity models. Marginal posterior probability profiles are computed by Metropolis-Hastings sampling. The estimated vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles fit well with the core and in situ measurements. PMID:23862796

  13. Seasonal variations and profile measurements of photolysis frequencies j(O1D) and j(NO2) at the ECHO forest field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, B.; Koppmann, R.; Rohrer, F.

    2006-06-01

    The Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (ECHO) project investigated formation, transport, and photochemistry of biogenic organic compounds in a deciduous forest. Within the project, filterradiometers were used to measure photolysis frequencies j(O1D) (O3 + hv → O2+ O(1D)) and j(NO2) (NO2 + hv → NO + O(3P)) at different levels of a tower set up in a small clearing in a forest at Jülich, Germany. The tower served as a measurement platform for instruments in two photochemistry field campaigns during the summer seasons of 2002 and 2003. Filterradiometer measurements were made throughout a complete vegetation cycle to give an extended characterization of the field site UV radiation conditions. At fully developed foliage, 3-7% of above-forest values of j(O1D) and j(NO2) were obtained close to ground at the tower clearing, dependent on external conditions. In the course of the vegetation period, these ratios remained fairly constant. After fall of leaves, photolysis frequencies increased to about 33% of above-forest values. Profile measurements in undisturbed forest showed a strong decrease of j(NO2) by about 90% within 5 m below canopy top (≈33 m) and a slowed decrease to typically 2% at ground level. At the tower clearing the decrease was more gradual reaching 50% of above-canopy values approximately 10 m below canopy top under overcast conditions. With regard to photochemical conversion of biogenic compounds we estimated that degradation of the major reactive compound isoprene within the forest by OH and O3 was insignificant (<10%) if residence times were less than about 1 hour.

  14. Experimental investigation of an axisymmetric free jet with an initially uniform velocity profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.; Symons, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the flow characteristics of a circular free helium jet having an initially uniform velocity profile. Complete velocity profiles are presented at Reynolds numbers of 1027 and 4571 at 0, 3, 6, 10, 15, and 20 nozzle diameters (where possible) from the nozzle exit. Centerline velocity decay and potential core length were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 155 to 5349 at distances up to and including 25 nozzle diameters from the nozzle exit. The angles of spread associated with the diffusion of the jet downstream of the nozzle are also given. Axial jet momentum flux and entrained mass flux, at various distances downstream of the nozzle, are presented as a function of the jet Reynolds number.

  15. Velocity Profile inside Piezoacoustic Inkjet Droplets in Flight: Comparison between Experiment and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bos, Arjan; van der Meulen, Mark-Jan; Driessen, Theo; van den Berg, Marc; Reinten, Hans; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-02-01

    Inkjet printing deposits droplets with a well-controlled narrow size distribution. This paper aims at improving experimental and numerical methods for the optimization of drop formation. We introduce a method to extract the one-dimensional velocity profile inside a single droplet during drop formation. We use a novel experimental approach to capture two detailed images of the very same droplet with a small time delay. The one-dimensional velocity within the droplet is resolved by accurately determining the volume distribution of the droplet. We compare the obtained velocity profiles to a numerical simulation based on the slender jet approximation of the Navier-Stokes equation and we find very good agreement.

  16. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Shear wave velocity profiling and evaluation of liquefaction potential in northeast Arkansas using simplified equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, A.; Haran, S.

    2010-03-01

    Soil liquefaction in Northeast Arkansas (NEA) is expected to result in substantial damage during seismic events. Insitu shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of the subsurface, to a depth of at least 30-meters (according to the International Building Code or IBC), is necessary for determining the "Site Class", which is subsequently used in the structural analysis of buildings, and can be used as a screening tool to evaluate the depth and thickness of potentially liquefiable soil layers. Shear wave velocity profiles at 3 sites in Craighead County, AR were determined utilizing simplified equipment by means of a non-invasive technique. The results indicated good agreement with previous work performed by other researchers. These profiles were used to evaluate the liquefaction resistance at these sites using the simplified procedure by Seed and Idriss (Vs approach). The liquefaction resistance was also evaluated using the Standard Penetration Test (SPT approach) results from the geotechnical investigations that were conducted by others. The equipment and procedure should allow governmental agencies and engineering professional to determine the shear wave velocity profiles of the upper soil zones at relatively low cost. These profiles can aid different agencies in mapping areas of interest and assessing seismic hazard potential during planning future development or evaluating current facilities.

  18. Inversion of surface wave data for subsurface shear wave velocity profiles characterized by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterized by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (traveltime average sear wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterized by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  19. The assignment of velocity profiles in finite element simulations of pulsatile flow in arteries.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, A; Boschetti, F; Inzoli, F

    1997-05-01

    In this paper we present a new method for the assignment of pulsatile velocity profiles as input boundary conditions in finite element models of arteries. The method is based on the implementation of the analytical solution for developed pulsatile flow in a rigid straight tube. The analytical solution provides the fluid dynamics of the region upstream from the fluid domain to be investigated by means of the finite element approach. In standard fluid dynamics finite element applications, the inlet developed velocity profiles are achieved assuming velocity boundary conditions to be easily implementable-such as flat or parabolic velocity profiles-applied to a straight tube of appropriate length. The tube is attached to the inflow section of the original fluid domain so that the flow can develop fully. The comparison between the analytical solution and the traditional numerical approach indicates that the analytical solution has some advantages over the numerical one. Moreover, the results suggest that subroutine employment allows a consistent reduction in solving time especially for complex fluid dynamic model, and significantly decreases the storage and memory requirements for computations. PMID:9215485

  20. Role of ionization and electron drift velocity profile to Rayleigh instability in a Hall thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sukhmander; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2012-07-01

    Role of ionization to Rayleigh instability is clarified in a Hall thruster plasma under the variety of profiles of electron drift velocity, namely, step-like profile (SLP) and two different super-Gaussian profiles (SGP1 and SGP2). For this, a relevant Rayleigh equation is derived and solved numerically using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Interestingly, an upper cutoff frequency of oscillations {omega}{sub max} is realized for the occurrence of the instability that shows dependence on the ionization rate {alpha}, electron drift velocity u{sub 0}, electron cyclotron frequency {Omega}, azimuthal wave number k{sub y}, plasma density n{sub 0}, density gradient {partial_derivative}n{sub 0}/{partial_derivative}x, ion (electron) thermal speed V{sub thI}(V{sub thE}), and ion (electron) plasma frequency {omega}{sub pi}({omega}{sub pe}). The frequency {omega}{sub max} follows the trend {omega}{sub max} (for SGP2) >{omega}{sub max} (for SLP) >{omega}{sub max} (for SGP1) and shows a similar behaviour with ionization for all types of the velocity profiles. The instability is found to grow faster for the higher {alpha} and the ion temperature but it acquires lower rate under the effect of the higher electron temperature; the perturbed potential also varies in accordance with the growth rate. The electron temperature influences the growth rate and cutoff frequency less significantly in comparison with the ion temperature.

  1. Effect of simulated forward speed on the jet noise of inverted velocity profile coannular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packman, A. B.; Ng, K. W.; Chen, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted of inverted velocity profile coannular nozzles and a conical nozzle in an acoustic wind tunnel facility to simulate flight effects on jet noise generation. Coannular model nozzles were tested at fan to core nozzle exit area ratios of .75 and 1.2. Fan stream jet velocity ranged up to 2000 fps at a variety of fan exhaust pressure ratios and temperatures for a core stream of 1000 fps. The wind tunnel airflow was varied from static to 425 fps. The acoustic results indicated that the noise level differences seen previously under static conditions are retained in the flight environment.

  2. Variation in Velocity Profile with Change in Surface Roughness of Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, W

    1940-01-01

    The present report deals with the variation of a turbulent velocity profile in flow from rough to smooth wall and vice versa. Expressions obtained for the shear-stress distribution with respect to the distance from the point of junction of the different roughnesses and from the wall distance, are utilized to ascertain the developing velocity distributions. Under simplified assumptions, the use of these formulas renders possible the integration of the motion equations for the shear stress. This calculation is carried out and compared with the experiments.

  3. Extracting Short Rise-Time Velocity Profiles with Digital Down-Shift Analysis of Optically Up-Converted PDV Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abel Diaz, Nathan Riley, Cenobio Gallegos, Matthew Teel, Michael Berninger, Thomas W. Tunnell

    2010-09-08

    This work describes the digital down-shift (DDS) technique, a new method of extracting short rise-time velocity profiles in the analysis of optically up-converted PDV data. The DDS technique manipulates the PDV data by subtracting a constant velocity (i.e., the DDS velocity νDDS) from the velocity profile. DDS exploits the simple fact that the optically up-converted data ride on top of a base velocity (ν0, the apparent velocity at no motion) with a rapid rise to a high velocity (νf) of a few km/s or more. Consequently, the frequency content of the signal must describe a velocity profile that increases from ν0 to ν0 + νf. The DDS technique produces velocity reversals in the processed data before shock breakout when ν0 < νDDS < ν0 + νf. The DDS analysis process strategically selects specific DDS velocities (velocity at which the user down shifts the data) that produce anomalous reversals (maxima and/or minima), which are predictable and easy to identify in the mid-range of the data. Additional analysis determines when these maxima and minima occur. By successive application of the DDS technique and iterative analysis, velocity profiles are extracted as time as a function of velocity rather than as a function of time as it would be in a conventional velocity profile. Presented results include a description of DDS, velocity profiles extracted from laser-driven shock data with rise times of 200 ps or less, and a comparison with other techniques.

  4. Retrieval of Hydrometeor Drop Size Distributions from TRMM Field Campaign Profiler Doppler Velocity Spectra Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Christopher R.; Gage, Kenneth S.

    2003-01-01

    Consistent with the original proposal and work plan, this project focused on estimating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) retrieved from vertically pointing Doppler radar profilers and analyzing the relationship of the retrieved DSDs with the dynamics of the precipitation processes. The first phase of this project focused on developing the model to retrieve the DSD from the observed Doppler velocity spectra. The second phase used this model to perform DSD retrievals from the profiler observations made during the TRMM Ground Validation Field Campaigns of TEFLUN-B, TRMM-LBA, and KWAJEX. The third phase of this project established collaborations with scientists involved with each field campaign in order to validate the profiler DSD estimates and to enable the profiler retrievals to be used in their research. Through these collaborations, the retrieved DSDs were placed into context with the dynamical processes of the observed precipitating cloud systems.

  5. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-01

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  6. Three dimensional potential and current distributions in a Hall generator with assumed velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankiewicz, N.; Palmer, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three-dimensional potential and current distributions in a Faraday segmented MHD generator operating in the Hall mode are computed. Constant conductivity and a Hall parameter of 1.0 is assumed. The electric fields and currents are assumed to be coperiodic with the electrode structure. The flow is assumed to be fully developed and a family of power-law velocity profiles, ranging from parabolic to turbulent, is used to show the effect of the fullness of the velocity profile. Calculation of the square of the current density shows that nonequilibrium heating is not likely to occur along the boundaries. This seems to discount the idea that the generator insulating walls are regions of high conductivity and are therefore responsible for boundary-layer shorting, unless the shorting is a surface phenomenon on the insulating material.

  7. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-15

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  8. Effect of Inlet Velocity Profiles on Patient-Specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of the Carotid Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian C.; Ries, Jared; Dhawan, Saurabh S.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Taylor, W. Robert; Oshinski, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for researching the role of blood flow in disease processes. Modern clinical imaging technology such as MRI and CT can provide high resolution information about vessel geometry, but in many situations, patient-specific inlet velocity information is not available. In these situations, a simplified velocity profile must be selected. Method of approach We studied how idealized inlet velocity profiles (blunt, parabolic, and Womersley flow) affect patient-specific CFD results when compared to simulations employing a “reference standard” of the patient’s own measured velocity profile in the carotid bifurcation. To place the magnitude of these effects in context, we also investigated the effect of geometry and the use of subject-specific flow waveform on CFD results. We quantified these differences by examining the pointwise percent error of mean wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) and by computing the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) between axial profiles of mean WSS and OSI in the internal carotid artery bulb. Results The parabolic inlet velocity profile produced the most similar mean WSS and OSI to simulations employing the real patient-specific inlet velocity profile. However, anatomic variation in vessel geometry and use of non-patient-specific flow waveform both affected WSS and OSI results more than did choice of inlet velocity profile. Conclusions Although careful selection of boundary conditions is essential for all CFD analysis, accurate patient-specific geometry reconstruction and measurement of vessel flow rate waveform are more important than choice of velocity profile. A parabolic velocity profile provided results most similar to the patient-specific velocity profile. PMID:22757489

  9. [Characterization of the dentin by a 2-dimensional ultrasonic velocity profile].

    PubMed

    Löst, C; John, C; Irion, K M; Nüssle, W

    1994-01-01

    The velocity of sound is material-specific and therefore offers the opportunity for indirect physical characterization of materials. Preliminary ultrasound velocity profiles gained from ground tooth sections suggested that in the dentin core of the tooth areas of different sound velocity and thus different physical properties can be differentiated. As a base for this type of non-destructive characterization of materials an optimized and automated measurement system is presented, and its possibilities are critically discussed with regard to hardness tests. Normally, the LSV in the dentin core was found to be decreasing from the coronal to the apical regions, as well as from the outer to the inner parts near the pulp. PMID:8108687

  10. Profiling river surface velocities and volume flow estimation with bistatic UHF RiverSonde radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.; Gartner, J.

    2003-01-01

    From the velocity profiles across the river, estimates of total volume flow for the four methods were calculated based on a knowledge of the bottom depth vs position across the river. It was found that the flow comparisons for the American River were much closer, within 2% of each other among all of the methods. Sources of positional biases and anomalies in the RiverSonde measurement patterns along the river were identified and discussed.

  11. Complete characterization of the constrained geometry bimolecular reaction O({sup 1}D)+N{sub 2}O{yields}NO+NO by three-dimensional velocity map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goedecke, Niels; Maul, Christof; Kauczok, Sebastian; Gericke, Karl-Heinz; Chichinin, Alexey I.

    2009-08-07

    The bimolecular reaction O({sup 1}D)+N{sub 2}O{yields}NO+NO was photoinitiated in the (N{sub 2}O){sub 2} dimer at a wavelength of 193 nm and was investigated by three-dimensional (3D) velocity map imaging. State selective 3D momentum vector distributions were monitored and analyzed. For the first time, kinetic energy resolution and stereodynamic information about the reaction under constrained geometry conditions is available. Directly observable NO products exhibit moderate vibrational excitation and are rotationally and translationally cold. Speed and spatial distributions suggest a pronounced backward scattering of the observed products with respect to the direction of motion of the O({sup 1}D) atom. Forward scattered partner products, which are not directly detectable are also translationally cold, but carry very large internal energy as vibration or rotation. The results confirm and extend previous studies on the complex initiated reaction system. The restricted geometry of the van der Waals complex seems to favor an abstraction reaction of the terminal nitrogen atom by the O({sup 1}D) atom, which is in striking contrast to the behavior observed for the unrestricted gas phase reaction under bulk conditions.

  12. Shipboard acoustic Doppler profiler velocity observations near Point Conception: Spring 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.; Brink, K. H.

    1987-04-01

    During April 1983, shipboard Doppler acoustic log current profiles were collected in an effort to characterize the flow field near points Conception and Arguello, California. Subsurface velocity maps derived from these profiles have been used to describe spatial flow structures both on and off the shelf and to investigate flow variability as a function of time and of wind stress. Persistent westward flow out of the northern half of the Santa Barbara Channel and eastward flow into its southern half were observed regardless of the direction of the local wind stress. During one well-documented upwelling-favorable wind event, currents responded in the form of an energetic (maximum 21-m speeds of >60 cm s-1) offshore squirt of cold water. During weak or downwelling-favorable winds, currents continuous with the Santa Barbara Channel outflow were observed flowing to the northwest following the local isobaths before turning offshore west of Point Arguello. Evidence for wind forcing of current fluctuations nearshore between the points and north of Point Arguello was found. Lack of a thermal wind balance between directly measured velocity shear and horizontal density gradient was explained by the presence of large accelerations in the momentum equations. Lack of a consistent relation between velocity and temperature gradient illustrates the difficulty in estimating velocity from temperature information alone in this area.

  13. Measurements of the bulk and interfacial velocity profiles in oscillating Newtonian and Maxwellian fluids.

    PubMed

    Torralba, M; Castrejón-Pita, J R; Castrejón-Pita, A A; Huelsz, G; del Río, J A; Ortín, J

    2005-07-01

    We present the dynamic velocity profiles of a Newtonian fluid (glycerol) and a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid (CPyCl-NaSal in water) driven by an oscillating pressure gradient in a vertical cylindrical pipe. The frequency range explored has been chosen to include the first three resonance peaks of the dynamic permeability of the viscoelastic-fluid--pipe system. Three different optical measurement techniques have been employed. Laser Doppler anemometry has been used to measure the magnitude of the velocity at the center of the liquid column. Particle image velocimetry and optical deflectometry are used to determine the velocity profiles at the bulk of the liquid column and at the liquid-air interface respectively. The velocity measurements in the bulk are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of a linear theory. The results, however, show dramatic differences in the dynamic behavior of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids, and demonstrate the importance of resonance phenomena in viscoelastic fluid flows, biofluids in particular, in confined geometries. PMID:16090087

  14. Bayesian Assessment of Mean Velocity Profile Models in Wall-Bounded Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Robert; Oliver, Todd

    2010-11-01

    The form of the mean velocity profile in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded turbulent shear flows has been the subject of renewed interest in recent years. A number of questions have been raised regarding the universality of the von Karman constant, the dependence of the over-lap layer on Reynolds number and even the appropriateness of a logarithmic description of the overlap layer. The questions have been difficult to resolve because the models predict subtle differences in the mean velocity profiles at finite Reynolds number. However, these subtle differences are important for scaling to very high Reynolds number and for inferring wall shear stress when direct measurements are not available. In this work, Bayesian inference is used to infer parameters (e.g. the Karman constant) and their uncertainty in a variety of turbulent mean velocity representations using experimental data over a wide range of Reynolds number. Moreover, an information theory-based multi-model formalism is used to rank competing models (e.g., the standard log and power laws and finite Reynolds number refinements of these profiles) by a metric that naturally balances data fit versus model complexity. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  15. Electrical Conductivity of H2O-CO2 rich-Melt at mantle conditions: interpretation of the LAB using petrology-based 1D conductivity profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifre, D.; Gaillard, F.; Hashim, L.; Massuyeau, M.; Gardés, E.; Hier-Majumder, S.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic data images mantle regions more conductive than that of dry olivine. There is no doubt that melt is thermodynamically stable and present in the LAB, but how they can impact on mantle electrical conductivity remains debated. In addition, gravitational segregation and fast melt upwelling, being expected if melt fraction exceeds 2 vol. %, is thought to seriously restrict the role of partial melting at the level of the LAB. Petrological studies realized some 30 years ago have shown that peridotites exposed at the P-T-fO2 conditions of the LAB produced H2O and CO2 rich-melts. The segregation of such melts is not expected since they constitute only about 0.5 vol. % of the peridotite, but electrical conductivities of these melts are poorly known. Therefore, electrical conductivity experiments have been performed in piston cylinder on H2O-CO2 rich melts. Different melt compositions have been explored, from carbonated melts to basalts. The effects of chemical compositions and volatiles on these melts have been determined. The electrical conductivity measurements have shown that hydrous carbonated melts are very conductive, and the incorporation of basalt decreases the conductivity. With these new data, a semi-empirical law predicting the conductivity as a function of H2O and CO2 contents has been produced. Based on this law and the electrical conductivity of olivine, 1D conductivity profiles were constructed. With these profiles, the effect of volatiles content (partitioned between the melt and in the solids), melt fractions (mixing law and interconnection of the melt) and different temperature regimes on conductivity are discussed. These calculations are conducted on oceanic and continental settings with different ages. The electrical conductivities of the mantle is thus a powerful tool to track the fundamental process of mantle incipient melting, which is in turn narrowly associated to the cycling of H2O and CO2 in the upper mantle.

  16. Velocity profiles of electric-field-induced backflows in liquid crystals confined between parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Tomohiro; Chono, Shigeomi; Matsumi, Takanori

    2015-02-01

    For the purpose of developing liquid crystalline microactuators, we visualize backflows induced between two parallel plates for various parameters such as the twist angle, cell gap, applied voltage, and molecular configuration mode. We use 4-cyano-4'-pentyl biphenyl, a typical low-molar-mass nematic liquid crystal. By increasing the twist angle from 0° to 180°, the velocity component parallel to the anchoring direction of the lower plate changes from an S-shaped profile to a distorted S-shaped profile before finally becoming unidirectional. In contrast, the velocity component perpendicular to the anchoring direction evolves from a flat profile at 0° into an S-shaped profile at 180°. Because both an increase in the applied voltage and a decrease in the cell gap increase the electric field intensity, the backflow becomes large. The hybrid molecular configuration mode induces a larger backflow than that for the planar aligned mode. The backflow develops in two stages: an early stage with a microsecond time scale and a later stage with a millisecond time scale. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with the measurements, but not quantitative agreement because our computation ignores the plate edge effect of surface tension.

  17. Crustal velocities near Coalinga, California, modeled from a combined earthquake/explosion refraction profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macgregor-Scott, N.; Walter, A.

    1988-01-01

    Crustal velocity structure for the region near Coalinga, California, has been derived from both earthquake and explosion seismic phase data recorded along a NW-SE seismic-refraction profile on the western flank of the Great Valley east of the Diablo Range. Comparison of the two data sets reveals P-wave phases in common which can be correlated with changes in the velocity structure below the earthquake hypocenters. In addition, the earthquake records reveal secondary phases at station ranges of less than 20 km that could be the result of S- to P-wave conversions at velocity interfaces above the earthquake hypocenters. Two-dimensional ray-trace modeling of the P-wave travel times resulted in a P-wave velocity model for the western flank of the Great Valley comprised of: 1) a 7- to 9-km thick section of sedimentary strata with velocities similar to those found elsewhere in the Great Valley (1.6 to 5.2 km s-1); 2) a middle crust extending to about 14 km depth with velocities comparable to those reported for the Franciscan assemblage in the Diablo Range (5.6 to 5.9 km s-1); and 3) a 13- to 14-km thick lower crust with velocities similar to those reported beneath the Diablo Range and the Great Valley (6.5 to 7.30 km s-1). This lower crust may have been derived from subducted oceanic crust that was thickened by accretionary underplating or crustal shortening. -Authors

  18. Multi-method determination of continuous 2D velocity profiles from the surface to 1 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterie, S.; Miller, R. D.; Ivanov, J.; Schwenk, J.; Bailey, B. L.; Schwarzer, J.; Markiewicz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Compressional and shear reflection data provide critical measurements of velocity and attenuation that are necessary for numerical simulations of site response from earthquake energy and seismic investigations to lithologic and pore characterizations. Imperative for accurate site response models is a seismic velocity model extending from the surface to the depth of interest that is representative of the true subsurface. In general, no seismic method can be used to characterize the shallowest (< 30 m) and deepest (30 m to 1 km) portions of the subsurface in a single pass with a consistent set of equipment and acquisition parameters. With four unique seismic surveys targeting different portions of the subsurface and different components of the seismic wavefield, we were able to build a comprehensive dataset that facilitated continuous 2D velocity profiles. The upper kilometer underlying our study site consists of Lake Bonneville lucustrine sediments and post-Bonneville alluvium and colluvium from the nearby Wasatch Front in north central Utah (Eardley, 1938; Hintze, 2005). Four unique seismic surveys were acquired along each of two 1.5 km lines located approximately 3 km apart. Data for tomography and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) were acquired with a bungee accelerated weight drop and 4.5 Hz compressional geophones. P-wave and S-wave reflection data were acquired with an IVI minivib 1 and 28 Hz compressional and 14 Hz SH geophones, respectively. P-wave and S-wave velocities from the surface to 30 m were determined using tomography and MASW, respectively. Stacking velocities of reflections on common midpoint gathers from the vibroseis data were used to determine Vp and Vs from approximately 30 m to nearly 1 km below ground surface. Each Vp and Vs dataset were merged to generate continuous interval and average velocity profiles. The sutured velocity cross-sections were produced for both P- and S-waves in a fashion not previously described in the

  19. Collision-free motion planning for fiber positioner robots: discretization of velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarem, Laleh; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Gillet, Denis; Bleuler, Hannes; Bouri, Mohamed; Hörler, Philippe; Jenni, Laurent; Prada, Francisco; Sánchez, Justo

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of large-scale spectroscopic survey experiments such as DESI, will use thousands of fiber positioner robots packed on a focal plate. In order to maximize the observing time with this robotic system we need to move in parallel the fiber-ends of all positioners from the previous to the next target coordinates. Direct trajectories are not feasible due to collision risks that could undeniably damage the robots and impact the survey operation and performance. We have previously developed a motion planning method based on a novel decentralized navigation function for collision-free coordination of fiber positioners. The navigation function takes into account the configuration of positioners as well as their envelope constraints. The motion planning scheme has linear complexity and short motion duration (2.5 seconds with the maximum speed of 30 rpm for the positioner), which is independent of the number of positioners. These two key advantages of the decentralization designate the method as a promising solution for the collision-free motion-planning problem in the next-generation of fiber-fed spectrographs. In a framework where a centralized computer communicates with the positioner robots, communication overhead can be reduced significantly by using velocity profiles consisting of a few bits only. We present here the discretization of velocity profiles to ensure the feasibility of a real-time coordination for a large number of positioners. The modified motion planning method that generates piecewise linearized position profiles guarantees collision-free trajectories for all the robots. The velocity profiles fit few bits at the expense of higher computational costs.

  20. Experimental Studies of Low-Pressure Turbine Flows and Flow Control. Streamwise Pressure Profiles and Velocity Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    faculties. The geometry corresponded to "Pak B" LPT airfoil. The test section simulated LPT flow in a passage. Three experimental studies were performed: (a) Boundary layer measurements for ten baseline cases under high and low freestream turbulence conditions at five Reynolds numbers of 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000, and 300,000, based on passage exit velocity and suction surface wetted length; (b) Passive flow control studies with three thicknesses of two-dimensional bars, and two heights of three-dimensional circular cylinders with different spanwise separations, at same flow conditions as the 10 baseline cases; (c) Active flow control with oscillating synthetic (zero net mass flow) vortex generator jets, for one case with low freestream turbulence and a low Reynolds number of 25,000. The Passive flow control was successful at controlling the separation problem at low Reynolds numbers, with varying degrees of success from case to case and varying levels of impact at higher Reynolds numbers. The active flow control successfully eliminated the large separation problem for the low Reynolds number case. Very detailed data was acquired using hot-wire anemometry, including single and two velocity components, integral boundary layer quantities, turbulence statistics and spectra, turbulent shear stresses and their spectra, and intermittency, documenting transition, separation and reattachment. Models were constructed to correlate the results. The report includes a summary of the work performed and reprints of the publications describing the various studies. The folders in this supplement contain processed data in ASCII format. Streamwise pressure profiles and velocity profiles are included. The velocity profiles were acquired using single sensor and cross sensor hot-wire probes which were traversed from the wall to the freestream at various streamwise locations. In some of the flow control cases (3D Trips and Jets) profiles were acquired at multiple spanwise locations.

  1. The Dynamics of M15: Observations of the Velocity Dispersion Profile and Fokker-Planck Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dull, J. D.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Murphy, B. W.; Seitzer, P. O.; Callanan, P. J.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Charles, P. A.

    1997-05-01

    We report a new measurement of the velocity dispersion profile within 1' (3 pc) of the center of the globular cluster M15 (NGC 7078), using long-slit spectra from the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at La Palma Observatory. We obtained spatially resolved spectra for a total of 23 slit positions during two observing runs. During each run, a set of parallel slit positions was used to map out the central region of the cluster; the position angle used during the second run was orthogonal to that used for the first. The spectra are centered in wavelength near the Ca II infrared triplet at 8650 Å, with a spectral range of about 450 Å. We determined radial velocities by cross-correlation techniques for 131 cluster members. A total of 32 stars were observed more than once. Internal and external comparisons indicate a velocity accuracy of about 4 km s-1. The velocity dispersion profile rises from about σ = 7.2 +/- 1.4 km s-1 near 1' from the center of the cluster to σ = 13.9 +/- 1.8 km s-1 at 20". Inside of 20", the dispersion remains approximately constant at about 10.2 +/- 1.4 km s-1 with no evidence for a sharp rise near the center. This last result stands in contrast with that of Peterson, Seitzer, & Cudworth who found a central velocity dispersion of 25 +/- 7 km s-1, based on a line-broadening measurement. Our velocity dispersion profile is in good agreement with those determined in the recent studies of Gebhardt et al. and Dubath & Meylan. We have developed a new set of Fokker-Planck models and have fitted these to the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of M15. We also use the two measured millisecond pulsar accelerations as constraints. The best-fitting model has a mass function slope of x = 0.9 (where 1.35 is the slope of the Salpeter mass function) and a total mass of 4.9 × 105 M⊙. This model contains approximately 104 neutron stars (3% of the total mass), the majority of which lie within 6" (0.2 pc) of the cluster center. Since the

  2. Transient flow of highly concentrated suspensions investigated using the ultrasound velocity profiler pressure difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriev (Ur'ev), Boris; Windhab, Erich

    2003-11-01

    In the present work, the transient pressure driven shear flow of highly concentrated suspensions was investigated. The authors applied a novel Doppler-based ultrasound velocity profiler (Met-Flow SA)-pressure difference (UVP-PD) methodology (Ouriev B 2000 PhD Thesis Zurich ISBN: 3-905609-11-8, Ouriev B and Windhab E 2002 J. Exp. Fluids 32 204-11), for the investigation of concentrated suspensions in steady and transient flows. Model suspensions with two different solid phase concentrations and fluid matrixes were analysed in shear steady flow at different volumetric flow rates. Transient flow was initiated by abrupt flow interruption. Simultaneous recording of the pressure gradient (Windhab E 1986 Thesis VDI) and real time flow velocity profiles enables analyses of transient rheological flow properties. Both velocity and rheological information were simultaneously measured on-line and evaluated off-line. The rheological characteristics of the suspensions in transient flow are compared with those in steady flow and conclusions are drawn.

  3. An experimental study of a plasma actuator in absence of free airflow: Ionic wind velocity profile

    SciTech Connect

    Mestiri, R.; Hadaji, R.; Ben Nasrallah, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we are interested in the direct current electrical corona discharge created between two wire electrodes. The experimental results are related to some electroaerodynamic actuators based on the direct current corona discharge at the surface of a dielectric material. Several geometrical forms are selected for the dielectric surface, such as a plate, a cylinder, and a NACA 0015 aircraft wing. The current density-electric field characteristics are presented for different cases in order to determine the discharge regimes. The corona discharge produces nonthermal plasma, so it is called plasma discharge. Plasma discharge creates a tangential ionic wind above the surface at the vicinity of the wall. The ionic wind induced by the corona discharge is measured in absence of free external airflow. The ionic wind velocity profiles and the maximum induced tangential force are given for different surface forms, so it is possible to compare the actuators effect based on the span of the ionic wind velocity and thrust values. The higher ionic wind velocity is obtained with the NACA profile, which shows the effectiveness of this actuator for the airflow control.

  4. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows Using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey,Christopher b.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD (charge-coupled device) camera was used to obtain two sequential images of the NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm horizontal, 0.7-mm vertical). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. A numerical study of measured velocity error due to a uniform and linearly-varying collisional rate distribution was performed. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and the influence of collision rate on temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired profiles. This velocity measurement technique has been demonstrated for two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel.

  5. Time-resolved wave-profile measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-06-01

    Development of well-controlled hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step to understand material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not available using conventional gun technology. In this paper, techniques used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light-gas gun to 10 km/s and their use to determine material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock loading and release characteristics of materials impacted by titanium and aluminum fliers launched by the only developed three-stage light-gas gun at 10 km/s. In particular, the Sandia three stage light gas gun, also referred to as the hypervelocity launcher, HVL, which is capable of launching 0.5 mm to 1.0 mm thick by 6 mm to 19 mm diameter plates to velocities approaching 16 km/s has been used to obtain the necessary impact velocities. The VISAR, interferometric particle-velocity techniques has been used to determine shock loading and release profiles in aluminum and titanium at impact velocities of 10 km/s.

  6. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Abdusalam M.; Jawan, Hosen A.; Almabsout, Fthi A.

    2014-03-01

    In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig) and computational (employing CFD software) investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  7. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  8. Effects of inflow velocity profile on two-dimensional hemodynamic analysis by ordinary and ultrasonic-measurement-integrated simulations.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takaumi; Sone, Shusaku; Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Kadowaki, Hiroko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (2D-UMI) simulation correctly reproduces hemodynamics even with an inexact inflow velocity distribution. This study aimed to investigate which is superior, a two-dimensional ordinary (2D-O) simulation with an accurate inflow velocity distribution or a 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate one. 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations were performed for blood flow in a carotid artery with four upstream velocity boundary conditions: a velocity profile with backprojected measured Doppler velocities (condition A), and velocity profiles with a measured Doppler velocity distribution, a parabolic one, and a uniform one, magnitude being obtained by inflow velocity estimation (conditions B, C, and D, respectively). The error of Doppler velocity against the measurement data was sensitive to the inflow velocity distribution in the 2D-O simulation, but not in the 2D-UMI simulation with the inflow velocity estimation. Among the results in conditions B, C, and D, the error in the worst 2D-UMI simulation with condition D was 31 % of that in the best 2D-O simulation with condition B, implying the superiority of the 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate inflow velocity distribution over the 2D-O simulation with an exact one. Condition A resulted in a larger error than the other conditions in both the 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations. PMID:26307203

  9. Flow-driven transition and associated velocity profiles in a nematic liquid-crystal cell.

    PubMed

    Jewell, S A; Cornford, S L; Yang, F; Cann, P S; Sambles, J R

    2009-10-01

    The alignment properties and distribution of flow speed during Poiseuille flow through a microchannel of a nematic liquid crystal in a cell with homeotropic surface alignment has been measured using a combination of conoscopy, fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, and time-lapse imaging. Two topologically distinct director profiles, with associated fluid velocity fields, are found to exist with the preferred state dictated by the volumetric flow rate of the liquid crystal. The results show excellent agreement with model data produced using the Ericksen-Leslie nematodynamics theory. PMID:19905324

  10. Trapezoidal Wing Experimental Repeatability and Velocity Profiles in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Judith A.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Watson, Ralph D.

    2012-01-01

    The AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee sponsored a High Lift Prediction Workshop held in June 2010. For this first workshop, data from the Trapezoidal Wing experiments were used for comparison to CFD. This paper presents long-term and short-term force and moment repeatability analyses for the Trapezoidal Wing model tested in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This configuration was chosen for its simplified high-lift geometry, publicly available set of test data, and previous CFD experience with this configuration. The Trapezoidal Wing is a three-element semi-span swept wing attached to a body pod. These analyses focus on configuration 1 tested in 1998 (Test 478), 2002 (Test 506), and 2003 (Test 513). This paper also presents model velocity profiles obtained on the main element and on the flap during the 1998 test. These velocity profiles are primarily at an angle of attack of 28 degrees and semi-span station of 83% and show confluent boundary layers and wakes.

  11. Velocity profiles and rheology of a granular bed sheared by a fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Benjamin; Kudrolli, Arshad

    We discuss an experimental investigation of motion of a granular bed driven by a laminar fluid flow as a function of applied shear rate. This is a model system to investigate a variety of examples where such a situation arises including wind blowing over sand, sediment transport in rivers, slurries, and turbidity currents. We have developed an experimental apparatus which allows examination of the fluid as well as the grain dynamics both at the surface as well as deep into the bed under steady state conditions with refractive index matching technique. This allows us to obtain both the applied local shear stress by the fluid as well as the local strain rate inside the bed. We find that that the granular flux as a function of depth decays exponentially into the bed. Further, the velocity profile is observed to exhibit a crossover from a regime where particles are fully suspended to where there is bed load transport. We will discuss the observed velocity and density profiles in light of various models of granular suspensions. Supported by NSF CBET - 1335928.

  12. A rare saccade velocity profile in Stiff-Person Syndrome with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Siman-Tov, Tali; Gadoth, Natan; Gordon, Carlos R

    2006-06-01

    Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS) is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system characterized by muscle rigidity, episodic muscle spasms, and high titers of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The presence of cerebellar ataxia in SPS is extremely rare, but occurs. Clinical observations of ocular motor abnormalities have been noted in a few SPS patients. The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed quantitative documentation of ocular motor abnormalities in a patient with SPS and progressive cerebellar signs. Detailed clinical assessment of a woman with SPS and precise eye movement recordings using the magnetic search coil technique was performed. In addition to other ocular motor abnormalities that included longer latencies for saccades, downbeat nystagmus, and loss of downward smooth pursuit, a rare saccade velocity profile consisting of multi-component saccades was observed. We postulate that these ocular motor findings are related to impairment of GABAergic neurotransmission because antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both SPS and some cases of cerebellar ataxia. In addition, this unusual saccadic velocity profile may have important implications for modeling the saccadic system and furthering a complete understanding of saccade generation. PMID:16725126

  13. Buoyancy effects on the integral lengthscales and mean velocity profile in atmospheric surface layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Scott T.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2013-10-01

    Within the diabatic atmospheric surface layer (ASL) under quasi-stationary and horizontal homogeneous conditions, the mean velocity profile deviates from its conventional logarithmic shape by a height-dependent universal stability correction function ϕm(ζ) that varies with the stability parameter ζ. The ζ parameter measures the relative importance of mechanical to buoyant production or destruction of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) within the ASL. A link between ϕm(ζ) and the spectrum of turbulence in the ASL was recently proposed by Katul et al. ["Mean velocity profile in a sheared and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 268502 (2011)]. By accounting for the stability-dependence of TKE production, Katul et al. were able to recover scalings for ϕm with the anticipated power-law exponents for free convective, slightly unstable, and stable conditions. To obtain coefficients for the ϕm(ζ) curve in good agreement with empirical formulas, they introduced a correction for the variation of the integral lengthscale of vertical velocity with ζ estimated from the Kansas experiment. In the current work, the link between the coefficients in empirical curves for ϕm(ζ) and stability-dependent properties of turbulence in the ASL, including the variation with ζ of the integral lengthscale and the anisotropy of momentum transporting eddies is investigated using data from the Advection Horizontal Array Turbulence Study. The theoretical framework presented by Katul et al. is revised to account explicitly for these effects. It is found that the coefficients in the ϕm(ζ) curve for unstable and near-neutral conditions can be explained by accounting for the stability-dependence of the integral lengthscale and anisotropy of momentum-transporting eddies; however, an explanation for the observed ϕm(ζ) curve for stable conditions remains elusive. The effect of buoyancy on the horizontal and vertical integral lengthscales is also analyzed in

  14. Testing the limits of the dune phase-stability diagram: the influence of velocity profile shape on dune morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsworth, C. A.; Parsons, D. R.; Reesink, A. J. H.; McLelland, S.

    2014-12-01

    The past 100 years of research on fluvial dunes and their deposits has produced bedform scaling laws based on flow depth, grain size and flow velocity. Such flow-form-deposit scaling is used ubiquitously for a wide range of paleo-environmental interpretations and in predictions of river bed roughness in floods. Recent research from marine environments, density currents, and fluvial flows with strong secondary circulation shows that these laws are often extrapolated beyond the limits of the original research. In submarine density currents, for example, paleo-hydraulic reconstructions commonly predict dune forming flow conditions, but preserved dune cross strata are rarely found. One particular difference between these geophysical flows is the velocity profile shape and bed shear stress that results. In a series of novel laboratory experiments the shape of the mean downstream velocity profile was systematically altered so the velocity maximum was lowered toward the bed through the addition of roughness elements at the water surface; whilst maintaining flow depth and depth-averaged velocities. This produced velocity profile shapes closer to those in density currents, and open-channel flows with strong secondary circulation. The initial lowering of the velocity maximum position increased dune height and length by 250%. The lowest velocity maximum position produced a stable upper-stage plane bed, whilst predictions based on flow depth and mean velocity remained within the dune regime phase-space. The results therefore demonstrate that the vertical position of the downstream velocity maximum can be a better predictor of equilibrium bedform geometries than flow depth or depth averaged velocity and also highlight that paleo-hydraulic reconstructions need to account for the possible variation in profile shape between geophysical flows. This research improves fundamental understanding of fluvial bedform stability and flow-form-deposit scaling laws for extrapolation into in a

  15. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  16. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  17. The identification of vertical velocity profiles using an inertial sensor to investigate pre-impact detection of falls.

    PubMed

    Bourke, A K; O'Donovan, K J; Olaighin, G

    2008-09-01

    This study investigates distinguishing falls from normal Activities of Daily Living (ADL) by thresholding of the vertical velocity of the trunk. Also presented is the design and evaluation of a wearable inertial sensor, capable of accurately measuring these vertical velocity profiles, thus providing an alternative to optical motion capture systems. Five young healthy subjects performed a number of simulated falls and normal ADL and their trunk vertical velocities were measured by both the optical motion capture system and the inertial sensor. Through vertical velocity thresholding (VVT) of the trunk, obtained from the optical motion capture system, at -1.3 m/s, falls can be distinguished from normal ADL, with 100% accuracy and with an average of 323 ms prior to trunk impact and 140 ms prior to knee impact, in this subject group. The vertical velocity profiles obtained using the inertial sensor, were then compared to those obtained using the optical motion capture system. The signals from the inertial sensor were combined to produce vertical velocity profiles using rotational mathematics and integration. Results show high mean correlation (0.941: Coefficient of Multiple Correlations) and low mean percentage error (6.74%) between the signals generated from the inertial sensor to those from the optical motion capture system. The proposed system enables vertical velocity profiles to be measured from elderly subjects in a home environment where as this has previously been impractical. PMID:18243034

  18. Measurement of the differential cross section of the photoinitiated reactive collision of O(1D)+D2 using only one molecular beam: A study by three dimensional velocity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauczok, S.; Maul, C.; Chichinin, A. I.; Gericke, K.-H.

    2010-06-01

    velocities. Using the benchmark system O(D1)+D2 with N2O as the precursor, we demonstrate that the technique is also applicable in a very general sense (i.e., also with a large spread in reactant velocities, products much faster than reactants) and therefore can be used also if such unfortunate conditions cannot be avoided. Since the resulting distribution of velocities in the laboratory frame is not cylindrically symmetric, three dimensional velocity mapping is the method of choice for the detection of the ionized products. For the reconstruction, the distance between the two laser beams is an important parameter. We have measured this distance using the photodissociation of HBr at 193 nm, detecting the H atoms near 243 nm. The collision energy resulting from the 193 nm photodissociation of N2O is 5.2±1.9 kcal/mol. Our results show a preference for backward scattered D atoms with the OH partner fragment in the high vibrational states (v =4-6), in accord with previously published results claiming the growing importance of a linear abstraction mechanism for collision energies higher than 2.4 kcal/mol.

  19. Molecular dynamic simulation of Ar-Kr mixture across a rough walled nanochannel: Velocity and temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pooja, Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of mixture of argon and krypton in the Poiseuille flow across a rough walled nanochannel. The roughness effect on liquid nanoflows has recently drawn attention The computational software used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations is LAMMPS. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal rough walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Leenard-Jones (LJ) potential with a cut off distance of 5.0. To derive the flow a constant force is applied whose value is varied from 0.1 to 0.3 and velocity profiles and temperature profiles are noted for these values of forces. The velocity profile and temperature profiles are also looked at different channel widths of nanochannel and at different densities of mixture. The velocity profile and temperature profile of rough walled nanochannel are compared with that of smooth walled nanochannel and it is concluded that mean velocity increases with increase in channel width, force applied and decrease in density also with introduction of roughness in the walls of nanochannel mean velocity again increases and results also agree with the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow.

  20. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  1. Comparison of phase velocities from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and results calculated from borehole shear-wave velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Boore, David M.; Joyner, William B.; Oppenheimer, David H.; Warrick, Richard E.; Zhang, Wenbo; Hamilton, John C.; Brown, Leo T.

    2000-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities (VS) are widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. VS data are now largely obtained using borehole methods. Drilling holes, however, is expensive. Nonintrusive surface methods are inexpensive for obtaining VS information, but not many comparisons with direct borehole measurements have been published. Because different assumptions are used in data interpretation of each surface method and public safety is involved in site characterization for engineering structures, it is important to validate the surface methods by additional comparisons with borehole measurements. We compare results obtained from a particular surface method (array measurement of surface waves associated with microtremor) with results obtained from borehole methods. Using a 10-element nested-triangular array of 100-m aperture, we measured surface-wave phase velocities at two California sites, Garner Valley near Hemet and Hollister Municipal Airport. The Garner Valley site is located at an ancient lake bed where water-saturated sediment overlies decomposed granite on top of granite bedrock. Our array was deployed at a location where seismic velocities had been determined to a depth of 500 m by borehole methods. At Hollister, where the near-surface sediment consists of clay, sand, and gravel, we determined phase velocities using an array located close to a 60-m deep borehole where downhole velocity logs already exist. Because we want to assess the measurements uncomplicated by uncertainties introduced by the inversion process, we compare our phase-velocity results with the borehole VS depth profile by calculating fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from an earth model constructed from the borehole data. For wavelengths less than ~2 times of the array aperture at Garner Valley, phase-velocity results from array measurements agree with the calculated Rayleigh-wave velocities to better than 11%. Measurement errors become larger for wavelengths 2

  2. Velocity profiles between two baffles in a shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Chang-Hoan; Lee, Hae-Soo; Lee, Kwon-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Heat exchangers are extensively utilized for waste heat recovery, oil refining, chemical processing, and steam generation. In this study, velocity profiles are measured using a 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) system betweentwo baffles in a shell and tube heat exchanger for parallel and counter flows. The PIV and computational fluid dynamics results show the occurrence of some strong vectors near the bottom. These vectors are assumed due to the clearance between the inner tubes and the front baffle. Therefore, the major parts of the vectors are moved out through the bottom opening of the rear baffle, and other vectors produce a large circle between the two baffles. Numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the effects of the baffle on the heat exchanger using the Fluent software. The k-ɛ turbulence model is employed to calculate the flows along the heat exchanger

  3. Stability effects on the profiles of vertical velocity and its variance in katabatic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.; Martin, T.J.

    1994-10-01

    The atmospheric katabatic flow in the foothills of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains has been monitored by a network of towers and sodars for several years as part of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. The dependence of the vertical component of motion, its variance, and the mean component of the wind perpendicular to the surface at the mouth of Coal Creek Canyon on surface cooling and channeling by winds above the canyon has been explored by using almost three years of data from the network. The magnitude of the near-surface temperature differences was found to decrease with increasing surface cooling in light winds, apparently because of increasing turbulence resulting when increasing winds interact with surface topography. The variance of vertical velocity exhibits three types of vertical profiles, corresponding to different cooling rates and external wind speeds. The mean variance was found to depend strongly on a locally derived Richardson number.

  4. Transport in a three-zone wetland: Flow velocity profile and environmental dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Chen, G. Q.; Jiang, C. B.; Alsaedi, A.; Wu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2015-01-01

    To achieve better understanding of transport process in real waterways interacted with adjacent aquatic vegetation and riparian buffers, a three-zone model featuring the bank-effect is presented to character the water flow and environmental dispersion. Based on basic formulation in context of porous media flow, the velocity profile of a fully developed flow through the wetland is derived, with that for single zone and two-zone wetland flows recovered as special cases. The environmental dispersivity is determined by the approach of multi-scale analysis, with the effects of dimensionless parameters well illustrated. Application examples are provided to illustrate associated hierarchical structure for the critical length and duration of the contaminant cloud, and a comparison is made between the three-zone wetland and a corresponding three-layer wetland.

  5. Burner tilting angle effect on velocity profile in 700 MW Utility Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munisamy, K. M.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Thangaraju, S. K.; Hassan, H.; Ahmad, A.

    2015-09-01

    700 MW of utility boiler is investigated with manipulation of inlet burner angle. Manipulation of burner titling angle is an operational methodology in controlling rear pass temperature in utility boilers. The rear pass temperature unbalance between right and left side is a problem caused by fouling and slagging of the ash from the coal fired boilers. This paper presents the CFD investigation on the 0° and -30° of the burner angle of the utility boiler. The results focusing on the velocity profile. The design condition of 0° burner firing angle is compared with the off-design burner angle -30° which would be the burner angle to reduce the rear pass temperature un-balance by boiler operators. It can be concluded that the -30° burner angle reduce the turbulence is fire ball mixing inside the furnace. It also shift the fire ball position in the furnace to reduce the rear pass temperature.

  6. Least squares inversion of Stokes profiles in the presence of velocity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumanich, A.; Rees, D. E.; Lites, B. W.

    1985-05-01

    The Auer, Heasley and House Stokes inversion procedure in use at High Altitude Observatory is based on the analytic solution of the equation of transfer for polarized light where the representation of the thermodynamic and magnetic structure of the atmosphere is assumed to have a high degree of invariance, namely, a Milne-Eddington (ME) structure with a constant magnetic field. In the presence of invariance breaking gradients the resultant Stokes profiles are represented only approximately, if at all, by analytic forms. The accuracy of the inversion parameters and their significance as measures of actual structure are explored for the ME and the Landman-Finn sunspot models under the effects of velocity gradients. The resulting field parameters are good to a few percent and prove to be insensitive to the errors committed by the use of a ME-representation, but the resulting ME parameters yield a less precise measure of thermal structure.

  7. Least squares inversion of Stokes profiles in the presence of velocity gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skumanich, A.; Rees, D. E.; Lites, B. W.

    1985-01-01

    The Auer, Heasley and House Stokes inversion procedure in use at High Altitude Observatory is based on the analytic solution of the equation of transfer for polarized light where the representation of the thermodynamic and magnetic structure of the atmosphere is assumed to have a high degree of invariance, namely, a Milne-Eddington (ME) structure with a constant magnetic field. In the presence of invariance breaking gradients the resultant Stokes profiles are represented only approximately, if at all, by analytic forms. The accuracy of the inversion parameters and their significance as measures of actual structure are explored for the ME and the Landman-Finn sunspot models under the effects of velocity gradients. The resulting field parameters are good to a few percent and prove to be insensitive to the errors committed by the use of a ME-representation, but the resulting ME parameters yield a less precise measure of thermal structure.

  8. Biviscous blood flow and a new method for velocity profile adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Carlos; Reyes, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we describe our proposal of a new numerical procedure for the adjusting of the velocity profile of body fluids with two viscosities. We have focused on the relevant case of the human blood and we have selected a particular model, the biviscous blood model, with the purpose of proving the convenience of our method. We start by describing the convenience of the biviscous stress equation as a model for the blood constitutive equation, then we solve it in the particular case of a stationary flow and use this solutions as the basis of our numerical procedure, which is described afterwards. Then, we present its implementation for analyzing in vivo measurements and exhibit its pertinence. Finally, we explain the design of a programmatic code of an automatic routine which is capable of applying our method and therefore could be used as the basis of an automatic implementation in new diagnosis software within a measurement device.

  9. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R.L.; Brutsaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, w_pm???2, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with w_pm???2 was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on w_pm???2 and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of w_pm???2 versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  10. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers.

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R. L.; Brutsaert, W.; Environmental Research; Cornell Univ.

    2003-11-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, {omega}'{sup 2}, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with {omega}'{sup 2} was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on {omega}'{sup 2} and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of {omega}'{sup 2} versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  11. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inmian, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial undelayed and delayed NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm x 0.7-mm). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and influence of collision rate on fluorescence to temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the analysis technique and signal-to-noise of the acquired profiles. This investigation focused on two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-inch Mach 10 wind tunnel.

  12. Shock associated noise reduction from inverted-velocity-profile coannular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanna, H. K.; Tam, C. K. W.; Brown, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Acoustic measurements show that the shock noise from the outer stream is virtually eliminated when the inner stream is operated at a Mach number just above unity, regardless of all the other jet operating conditions. At this optimum condition, the coannular jet provides the maximum noise reduction relative to the equivalent single jet. The shock noise reduction can be achieved at inverted-as well as normal-velocity-profile conditions, provided the coannular jet is operated with the inner stream just slightly supersonic. Analytical models for the shock structure and shock noise are developed indicate that a drastic change in the outer stream shock cell structure occurs when the inner stream increases its velocity from subsonic to supersonic. At this point, the almost periodic shock cell structure of the outer stream nearly completely disappears the noise radiated is minimum. Theoretically derive formulae for the peak frequencies and intensity scaling of shock associated noise are compared with the measured results, and good agreement is found for both subsonic and supersonic inner jet flows.

  13. Measurement of flow velocity profiles in tank structures using the prototype device OCM Pro LR.

    PubMed

    Klepiszewski, K; Teufel, M; Seiffert, S; Henry, E

    2011-01-01

    Generally, studies investigating the treatment efficiency of tank structures for storm water or waste water treatment observe pollutant flows in connection with conditions of hydraulic loading. Further investigations evaluate internal processes in tank structures using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling or lab scale tests. As flow paths inside of tank structures have a considerable influence on the treatment efficiency, flow velocity profile (FVP) measurements can provide a possibility to calibrate CFD models and contribute to a better understanding of pollutant transport processes in these structures. This study focuses on tests carried out with the prototype FVP measurement device OCM Pro LR by NIVUS in a sedimentation tank with combined sewer overflow (CSO) situated in Petange, Luxembourg. The OCM Pro LR measurement system analyses the echo of ultrasonic signals of different flow depths to get a detailed FVP. A comparison of flow velocity measured by OCM Pro LR with a vane measurement showed good conformity. The FVPs measured by OCM Pro LR point out shortcut flows within the tank structure during CSO events, which could cause a reduction of the cleaning efficiency of the structure. The results prove the applicability of FVP measurements in large-scale structures. PMID:22053484

  14. Velocity profile of water vapor inside a cavity with two axial inlets and two outlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadarrama-Cetina, José; Ruiz Chavarría, Gerardo

    2014-03-01

    To study the dynamics of Breath Figure phenomenon, a control of both the rate of flow and temperature of water vapor is required. The experimental setup widely used is a non hermetically closed chamber with cylindrical geometry and axial inlets and outlets. In this work we present measurements in a cylindrical chamber with diameter 10 cm and 1.5 cm height, keeping a constant temperature (10 °C). We are focused in the velocity field when a gradient of the temperatures is produced between the base plate and the vapor. With a flux of water vapor of 250 mil/min at room temperature (21 °C), the Reynolds number measured in one inlet is 755. Otherwise, the temperatures of water vapor varies from 21 to 40 °C. The velocity profile is obtained by hot wire anemometry. We identify the stagnations and the possibly instabilities regions for an empty plate and with a well defined shape obstacle as a fashion sample. Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM.

  15. The Surface Density Profile of the Galactic Disk from the Terminal Velocity Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.

    2016-01-01

    The mass distribution of the Galactic disk is constructed from the terminal velocity curve and the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation. Mass models numerically quantifying the detailed surface density profiles are tabulated. For R0 = 8 kpc, the models have stellar mass 5 < M* < 6 × 1010 {M}⊙ , scale length 2.0 ≤ Rd ≤ 2.9 kpc, LSR circular velocity 222 ≤ Θ0 ≤ 233 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and solar circle stellar surface density 34 ≤ Σd(R0) ≤ 61 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2. The present interarm location of the solar neighborhood may have a somewhat lower stellar surface density than average for the solar circle. The Milky Way appears to be a normal spiral galaxy that obeys scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-mass relation, and the disk maximality-surface brightness relation. The stellar disk is maximal, and the spiral arms are massive. The bumps and wiggles in the terminal velocity curve correspond to known spiral features (e.g., the Centaurus arm is a ˜50% overdensity). The rotation curve switches between positive and negative over scales of hundreds of parsecs. The rms amplitude {< {| {dV}/{dR}| }2> }1/2≈ 14 {km} {{{s}}}-1 {{kpc}}-1, implying that commonly neglected terms in the Jeans equations may be nonnegligible. The spherically averaged local dark matter density is ρ0,DM ≈ 0.009 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-3 (0.34 {GeV} {{cm}}-3). Adiabatic compression of the dark matter halo may help reconcile the Milky Way with the c-V200 relation expected in ΛCDM while also helping to mitigate the too-big-to-fail problem, but it remains difficult to reconcile the inner bulge/bar-dominated region with a cuspy halo. We note that NGC 3521 is a near twin to the Milky Way, having a similar luminosity, scale length, and rotation curve.

  16. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Survey of Flow Velocities in Detroit River, a Connecting Channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  17. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  18. Air-Induced Drag Reduction at High Reynolds Numbers: Velocity and Void Fraction Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbing, Brian; Mäkiharju, Simo; Wiggins, Andrew; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2010-11-01

    The injection of air into a turbulent boundary layer forming over a flat plate can reduce the skin friction. With sufficient volumetric fluxes an air layer can separate the solid surface from the flowing liquid, which can produce drag reduction in excess of 80%. Several large scale experiments have been conducted at the US Navy's Large Cavitation Channel on a 12.9 m long flat plate model investigating bubble drag reduction (BDR), air layer drag reduction (ALDR) and the transition between BDR and ALDR. The most recent experiment acquired phase velocities and void fraction profiles at three downstream locations (3.6, 5.9 and 10.6 m downstream from the model leading edge) for a single flow speed (˜6.4 m/s). The profiles were acquired with a combination of electrode point probes, time-of-flight sensors, Pitot tubes and an LDV system. Additional diagnostics included skin-friction sensors and flow-field image visualization. During this experiment the inlet flow was perturbed with vortex generators immediately upstream of the injection location to assess the robustness of the air layer. From these, and prior measurements, computational models can be refined to help assess the viability of ALDR for full-scale ship applications.

  19. The ultrasonic velocity profile measurement of flow structure in the near field of a square free jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Y.; Yamashita, S.; Kondo, K.

    Coherent structures in the near field of a three-dimensional jet have been investigated. Experiments were carried out for a free jet issuing from a square nozzle using a water channel. Instantaneous velocity profiles were obtained in the axial and radial directions by using an ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) monitor. Axial variations of dominant time-scales of vortex structures were examined from one-dimensional wavelet spectra. Wavenumber-frequency spectra were calculated by two-dimensional Fourier transform along the axial direction in a mixing layer, and it was found that a convective velocity of flow structures was nearly constant independently of their scales in space and time. Coherent structures in the axial direction were investigated in terms of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Eigenfunctions are similar to a sinusoidal wave, and reconstructed velocity fields by the lower-order and higher-order POD modes demonstrate large-scale and smaller-scale coherent structures, respectively.

  20. Comparison of measured and calculated velocity profiles of a laminar incompressible free jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison of the measured and calculated velocity profiles of a laminar, incompressible, low Reynolds number jet is presented. The experimental jet was produced by a nozzle which consists of a porous metal plate covering the end of a pipe. This nozzle produces a uniform exit velocity profile at Reynolds numbers well below those at which conventional contoured nozzles are completely filled by the boundary layer. A jet mixing analysis based on the boundary-layer equations accurately predicted the velocity field for each test condition. The Reynolds number based on nozzle diameter ranged from 50 to 1000 with jet exit velocity either 30 or 61 m/s (100 or 200 ft/sec).

  1. The radial velocity dispersion profile of the Galactic halo: constraining the density profile of the dark halo of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Helmi, Amina; Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Olszewski, Edward W.; Mateo, Mario; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Norris, John; Shectman, Stephen A.

    2005-12-01

    We have compiled a new sample of 240 halo objects with accurate distance and radial velocity measurements, including globular clusters, satellite galaxies, field blue horizontal branch (FHB) stars and red giant stars from the Spaghetti survey. The new data lead to a significant increase in the number of known objects for Galactocentric radii beyond 50 kpc, which allows a reliable determination of the radial velocity dispersion profile out to very large distances. The radial velocity dispersion shows an almost constant value of 120 km s-1 out to 30 kpc and then continuously declines down to 50 km s-1 at about 120 kpc. This fall-off puts important constraints on the density profile and total mass of the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. For a constant velocity anisotropy, the isothermal profile is ruled out, while both a dark halo following a truncated flat (TF) model of mass 1.2+1.8-0.5× 1012Msolar and a Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) profile of mass 0.8+1.2-0.2× 1012Msolar and c= 18 are consistent with the data. The significant increase in the number of tracers combined with the large extent of the region probed by these has allowed a more precise determination of the Milky Way mass in comparison to previous works. We also show how different assumptions for the velocity anisotropy affect the performance of the mass models.

  2. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  3. Estimation of volume flow in curved tubes based on analytical and computational analysis of axial velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkaik, A. C.; Beulen, B. W. A. M. M.; Bogaerds, A. C. B.; Rutten, M. C. M.; van de Vosse, F. N.

    2009-02-01

    To monitor biomechanical parameters related to cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to perform correct volume flow estimations of blood flow in arteries based on local blood velocity measurements. In clinical practice, estimates of flow are currently made using a straight-tube assumption, which may lead to inaccuracies since most arteries are curved. Therefore, this study will focus on the effect of curvature on the axial velocity profile for flow in a curved tube in order to find a new volume flow estimation method. The study is restricted to steady flow, enabling the use of analytical methods. First, analytical approximation methods for steady flow in curved tubes at low Dean numbers (Dn) and low curvature ratios (δ) are investigated. From the results a novel volume flow estimation method, the cos θ-method, is derived. Simulations for curved tube flow in the physiological range (1≤Dn≤1000 and 0.01≤δ≤0.16) are performed with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The asymmetric axial velocity profiles of the analytical approximation methods are compared with the velocity profiles of the CFD model. Next, the cos θ-method is validated and compared with the currently used Poiseuille method by using the CFD results as input. Comparison of the axial velocity profiles of the CFD model with the approximations derived by Topakoglu [J. Math. Mech. 16, 1321 (1967)] and Siggers and Waters [Phys. Fluids 17, 077102 (2005)] shows that the derived velocity profiles agree very well for Dn≤50 and are fair for 50100), no analytical approximation method exists. In the position of the maximum axial velocity, a shift toward the inside of the curve is observed for low Dean numbers, while for high Dean numbers, the position of the maximum velocity is located at the outer curve. When the position of

  4. Non-uniform velocity profile mechanism for flame stabilization in a porous radiant burner

    SciTech Connect

    Catapan, R.C.; Costa, M.; Oliveira, A.A.M.

    2011-01-15

    Industrial processes where the heating of large surfaces is required lead to the possibility of using large surface porous radiant burners. This causes additional temperature uniformity problems, since it is increasingly difficult to evenly distribute the reactant mixture over a large burner surface while retaining its stability and keeping low pollutant emissions. In order to allow for larger surface area burners, a non-uniform velocity profile mechanism for flame stabilization in a porous radiant burner using a single large injection hole is proposed and analyzed for a double-layered burner operating in open and closed hot (laboratory-scale furnace, with temperature-controlled, isothermal walls) environments. In both environments, local mean temperatures within the porous medium have been measured. For lower reactant flow rate and ambient temperature the flame shape is conical and anchored at the rim of the injection hole. As the volumetric flow rate or furnace temperature is raised, the flame undergoes a transition to a plane flame stabilized near the external burner surface. However, the stability range envelope remains the same in both regimes. (author)

  5. Kelvin Modes with Nonlinear Critical Layers on a Vortex with a Continuous Velocity Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowe, Sherwin

    2005-11-01

    The short wave cooperative instability mechanism is of interest both scientifically and because of its pertinence to the aircraft trailing vortex problem. In the first quantitative investigation of this mechanism [Tsai & Widnall (1976)], the discontinuous Rankine vortex was employed. Recently, Sipp & Jacquin [Phys. Fluids (2003)] have shown, however, that for a continuous velocity profile the modes required for the ``Widnall instabilities'' would be damped. The damping is a consequence of viscosity being used to deal with the singular critical point that occurs in the linear, inviscid theory. An alternative approach that is, in fact, more appropriate at high Reynolds numbers is to restore nonlinear terms in a thin critical layer centered on the singular point. With such a nonlinear critical layer, we show that neutral modes exist that would be damped in the linear viscous theory. These modes are non-axisymmetric and the theory is similar mathematically to that for stratified shear flows, where it has been shown that nonlinear modes, not permitted in linear theory, can occur at Richardson numbers larger than 1/4.

  6. Nonlocal stochastic mixing-length theory and the velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-02-01

    Turbulence mixing by finite size eddies will be treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic closure hypothesis, which implies a well defined recipe for the calculation of sampling and transition rates. The connection with the general theory of stochastic processes will be established. The relation with other nonlocal turbulence models (e.g. transilience and spectral diffusivity theory) is also discussed. Using an analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) the theory is applied to the boundary layer (using a scaling hypothesis), which maps boundary layer turbulence mixing of scalar densities onto a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The resulting transpport equation for longitudinal momentum P x ≡ ϱ U is solved for a unified description of both the inertial and the viscous sublayer including the crossover. With a scaling exponent ε ≈ 0.58 (while local turbulence would amount to ε → ∞) the velocity profile U+ = ƒ(y +) is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Inter alia (i) the significance of ε as a turbulence Cantor set dimension, (ii) the value of the integration constant in the logarithmic region (i.e. if y+ → ∞), (iii) linear timescaling, and (iv) finite Reynolds number effects will be investigated. The (analytical) predictions of the theory for near-wall behaviour (i.e. if y+ → 0) of fluctuating quantities also perfectly agree with recent direct numerical simulations.

  7. Azimuthal velocity profiles in Rayleigh-stable Taylor-Couette flow and implied axial angular momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordsiek, Freja; Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-07-01

    We present azimuthal velocity profiles measured in a Taylor-Couette apparatus, which has been used as a model of stellar and planetary accretion disks. The apparatus has a cylinder radius ratio of $\\eta = 0.716$, an aspect-ratio of $\\Gamma = 11.74$, and the plates closing the cylinders in the axial direction are attached to the outer cylinder. We investigate angular momentum transport and Ekman pumping in the Rayleigh-stable regime. The regime is linearly stable and is characterized by radially increasing specific angular momentum. We present several Rayleigh-stable profiles for shear Reynolds numbers $Re_S \\sim O(10^5) \\,$, both for $\\Omega_i > \\Omega_o > 0$ (quasi-Keplerian regime) and $\\Omega_o > \\Omega_i > 0$ (sub-rotating regime) where $\\Omega_{i,o}$ is the inner/outer cylinder rotation rate. None of the velocity profiles matches the non-vortical laminar Taylor-Couette profile. The deviation from that profile increased as solid-body rotation is approached at fixed $Re_S$. Flow super-rotation, an angular velocity greater than that of both cylinders, is observed in the sub-rotating regime. The velocity profiles give lower bounds for the torques required to rotate the inner cylinder that were larger than the torques for the case of laminar Taylor-Couette flow. The quasi-Keplerian profiles are composed of a well mixed inner region, having approximately constant angular momentum, connected to an outer region in solid-body rotation with the outer cylinder and attached axial boundaries. These regions suggest that the angular momentum is transported axially to the axial boundaries. Therefore, Taylor-Couette flow with closing plates attached to the outer cylinder is an imperfect model for accretion disk flows, especially with regard to their stability.

  8. MOND implications for spectral line profiles of shell galaxies: shell formation history and mass-velocity scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bílek, M.; Jungwiert, B.; Ebrová, I.; Bartošková, K.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Many ellipticals are surrounded by round stellar shells probably stemming from minor mergers. A new method for constraining gravitational potential in elliptical galaxies has recently been suggested. It uses the spectral line profiles of these shells to measure the circular velocity at the edge of the shell and the expansion velocity of the shell itself. MOND is an alternative to the dark matter framework aiming to solve the missing mass problem. Aims: We study how the circular and expansion velocities behave in MOND for large shells. Methods: The asymptotic behavior for infinitely large shells is derived analytically. The applicability of the asymptotic results for finitely sized shells is studied numerically on a grid of galaxies modeled with Sérsic spheres. Results: Circular velocity settles asymptotically at a value determined by the baryonic mass of the galaxy forming the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation known for disk galaxies. Shell expansion velocity also becomes asymptotically constant. The expansion velocities of large shells form a multibranched analogy to the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, together with the galactic baryonic masses. For many - but not all - shell galaxies, the asymptotic values of these two types of velocities are reached under the effective radius. If MOND is assumed to work in ellipticals, then the shell spectra allow many details of the history to be revealed about the formation of the shell system, including its age. The results pertaining to circular velocities apply to all elliptical galaxies, not only those with shells.

  9. Velocity profiles and plug zones in a free surface viscoplastic flow : experimental study and comparison to shallow flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freydier, Perrine; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Rheological studies concerning natural muddy debris flows have shown that these materials can be modelled as non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluids. These complex flows are generally represented using models based on a depth-integrated approach (Shallow Water) that take into account closure terms depending on the shape of the velocity profile. But to date, there is poor knowledge about the shape of velocity profiles and the position of the interface between sheared and unsheared regions (plug) in these flows, especially in the vicinity of the front. In this research, the internal dynamics of a free-surface viscoplastic flow down an inclined channel is investigated and compared to the predictions of a Shallow Water model based on the lubrication approximation. Experiments are conducted in an inclined channel whose bottom is constituted by an upward-moving conveyor belt with controlled velocity, which allows generating and observing gravity-driven stationary surges in the laboratory frame. Carbopol microgel has been used as a homogeneous and transparent viscoplastic fluid. High-resolution measurements of velocity field is performed through optical velocimetry techniques both in the uniform zone and within the front zone where flow thickness is variable and where recirculation takes place. Specific analyses have been developed to determine the position of the plug within the surge. Flow height is accessible through image processing and ultrasonic sensors. Sufficiently far from the front, experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions regarding the velocity profiles and the flow height evolution. In the vicinity of the front, however, analysis of measured velocity profiles shows an evolution of the plug different from that predicted by lubrication approximation. Accordingly, the free surface shape also deviates from the predictions of the classical Shallow Water model. These results highlight the necessity to take into account higher

  10. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto, Waluyo

    2015-04-01

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone's spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  11. Computational study of velocity profile obtained in microfluidic channel bearing a fluidic transistor: toward highly resolved electrophoretic separation.

    PubMed

    Charhrouchni, Issam; Pallandre, Antoine; Le Potier, Isabelle; Deslouis, Claude; Haghiri-Gosnet, Anne-Marie

    2013-03-01

    The present work is a computational study of velocity profiles in microfluidic channels bearing field flow effect transistors (FFET). In particular, this work investigates perturbations and distortions of the sample band during electrophoretic transport in a rectangular separation channel. The EOF heterogeneity and its induced pressure render the predictions of the analytical performances rather complex. In this context, we propose a systematic numerical inquiry that focuses on the distribution of the velocities for several geometries and EOF modulations. We compare the calculated parabolic velocity profiles to the bare glass microchips. Here, the reported parabolic velocity profiles are coherent with recent experimental results that have been published elsewhere. From the presented equations, in such active hybrid microfluidic chip that integrates a FFET gate layer, separation can be optimized by playing on the gate coverage ratio. The flow fields obtained from analytical models allow further investigations about the efficiency and resolution during electrophoresis. The resulting induced pressure gradient and the associated band broadening underline the need to optimize the resolution in the detriment of the efficiency in such active microfluidic chips. PMID:23254905

  12. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto; Waluyo

    2015-04-24

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone’s spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  13. A robust post-processing method to determine skin friction in turbulent boundary layers from the velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes a method to extrapolate the mean wall shear stress, , and the accurate relative position of a velocity probe with respect to the wall, , from an experimentally measured mean velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer. Validation is made between experimental and direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer flows with independent measurement of the shear stress. The set of parameters which minimize the residual error with respect to the canonical description of the boundary layer profile is taken as the solution. Several methods are compared, testing different descriptions of the canonical mean velocity profile (with and without overshoot over the logarithmic law) and different definitions of the residual function of the optimization. The von Kármán constant is used as a parameter of the fitting process in order to avoid any hypothesis regarding its value that may be affected by different initial or boundary conditions of the flow. Results show that the best method provides an accuracy of for the estimation of the friction velocity and for the position of the wall. The robustness of the method is tested including unconverged near-wall measurements, pressure gradient, and reduced number of points; the importance of the location of the first point is also tested, and it is shown that the method presents a high robustness even in highly distorted flows, keeping the aforementioned accuracies if one acquires at least one data point in . The wake component and the thickness of the boundary layer are also simultaneously extrapolated from the mean velocity profile. This results in the first study, to the knowledge of the authors, where a five-parameter fitting is carried out without any assumption on the von Kármán constant and the limits of the logarithmic layer further from its existence.

  14. Outstanding Phenotypic Differences in the Profile of Amyloid-β between Tg2576 and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Allué, José Antonio; Sarasa, Leticia; Izco, María; Pérez-Grijalba, Virginia; Fandos, Noelia; Pascual-Lucas, María; Ogueta, Samuel; Pesini, Pedro; Sarasa, Manuel

    2016-05-30

    APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg2576 are very common transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), used in many laboratories as tools to research the mechanistic process leading to the disease. In order to augment our knowledge about the amyloid-β (Aβ) isoforms present in both transgenic mouse models, we have developed two chromatographic methods, one acidic and the other basic, for the characterization of the Aβ species produced in the brains of the two transgenic mouse models. After immunoprecipitation and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, 10 species of Aβ, surprisingly all of human origin, were detected in the brain of Tg2576 mouse, whereas 39 species, of both murine and human origin, were detected in the brain of the APP/PS1 mouse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the identification of such a high number of Aβ species in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse, whereas, in contrast, a much lower number of Aβ species were identified in the Tg2576 mouse. Therefore, this study brings to light a relevant phenotypic difference between these two popular mice models of AD. PMID:27258422

  15. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Han; Huang, Yunsong; Guo, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green's function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  16. Velocity-density models of the Earth's crust and upper mantle from the quartz, Craton, and Kimberlite superlong seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorova, T. P.; Pavlenkova, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    The unique deep seismic studies carried out in Russia with the use of nuclear explosions provided the possibility to identify the detailed structure of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, and transition zone to the lower mantle to a depth of 700 km in a huge territory of North Eurasia. It is shown that seismic velocities in the upper mantle mainly reflect its temperature regime. The gravity modeling along these profiles showed the absence of a direct relationship between seismic velocity and density. The Siberian Craton, which is marked with a low heat flow and high-velocity mantle, has lower density. The upper mantle of the East European Platform, with almost the same heat flow, is characterized by the highest densities and seismic velocities. Within the West Siberian Plate, high heat flow, lower seismic velocities, and increased density in the upper mantle are revealed. This combination of seismic velocities and densities suggests different composition of the upper mantle beneath the studied structures with the depleted upper mantle beneath the Siberian Craton.

  17. Descriptions of the neutral gas outflow in Comets P/Halley and Wilson (1987 VII) from analyses of velocity-resolved H2O line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.; Hu, Hong-Yao; Hsieh, K. C.; Weaver, Harold A.; Mumma, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution and expansion velocity of the Comets Wilson (1987 VII) and pre- and postperihelion P/Halley are derived on the bases of velocity-resolved H2O spectral line profiles, using a kinematic model which synthesizes line profiles for comparison with observed line shapes. The results thus obtained demonstrate that the spherically symmetric outflow at constant velocity is a poor characterization of cometary neutral-gas outflow. While the radial dependence of the H2O expansion velocity is noted to be consistent with theoretically envisioned trends, the high H2O outflow velocity observed in Comet Wilson resists reconciliation with any existing kinematic model.

  18. A simple method of calculating power-law velocity profile exponents from experimental data. [for boundary layer shape factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the effects of compressibility and heat transfer on laminar and turbulent shape factors H have been developed. Solving the turbulent equation for the power law velocity profile exponent N has resulted in a simple technique by which the N values of experimental turbulent profiles can be calculated directly from the integral parameters. Thus the data plotting, curve fitting, and slope measuring, which is the normal technique of obtaining experimental N values, is eliminated. The N values obtained by this method should be within the accuracy with which they could be measured.

  19. Seasonal enhancement of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD)-derived nitrate loading into the Ria Formosa coastal lagoon assessed by 1-D modeling of benthic NO3- profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Leote, Catarina; Rocha, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    The role of benthic sandy ecosystems in mitigating NO3- loads carried by Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) to coastal marine ecosystems is uncertain. Benthic biogeochemical mediation of NO3--rich submarine groundwater discharge was studied at the seepage face of a barrier island site in the Ria Formosa coastal lagoon (Southern Portugal). Preliminary analysis of NO3- porewater distributions at the seepage face during discharge indicated that benthic biogeochemical processes could significantly affect the fluxes of groundwater-borne NO3- into the lagoon. In order to discriminate between the relative contribution of transport and reaction processes to shape and concentration range evidenced by in-situ porewater NO3- gradients, an advection-dispersion-reaction (ADR) model of NO3- diagenesis was applied to describe NO3- porewater profiles obtained in March, June, September and December 2006. Good agreement between modeled and measured profiles was obtained. Model-derived apparent benthic nitrification and NO3- reduction rates ranged from 0.01 to 5.2 mmol m-2 h-1, sufficient to explain gross observed changes in NO3- fluxes arriving at the seepage face (up to 70% within the surficial 20 cm depth layer). Results of the analysis indicated that the upper limit of the seepage face promoted mitigation of NO3- fluxes to the lagoon throughout the year. In contrast, the lower limit of the seepage area promoted net amplification of the NO3- fluxes into the lagoon in June and September. These results will help constrain further work aiming to clarify the role of permeable sediments in mitigating nitrogen loading of coastal ecosystems.

  20. Effect of catheter placement on 3-D velocity profiles in curved tubes resembling the human coronary system.

    PubMed

    Krams, R; Wentzel, J J; Cespedes, I; Vinke, R; Carlier, S; van der Steen, A F; Lancee, C T; Slager, C J

    1999-06-01

    Novel measurement techniques based on intravenous ultrasound (IVUS) technology ('IVUS-Flowmetry') require the location of a catheter inside the coronary bed. The present study quantifies disturbances in the 3-D velocity profile induced by catheter placement inside a tube, applying computational fluid dynamics. Two curved, circular meshes (radius K = 0.025 m and K = 0.035 m) with and without a catheter inside the lumen were applied. The catheter was located at the inner curve, the outer curve and at the top position. Boundary conditions were: no slip on the wall, zero stress at the outlet, uniform inflow with entrance velocities of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 m/s. Curvature-associated centrifugal forces shifted the maximal velocity to the outer curve and introduced two symmetrical vortices. Additional catheter placement redistributed the 3-D axial velocity field away from the catheter, which was accompanied by the appearance of multiple low-strength vortices. In addition, peak axial velocity increased, peak secondary velocities decreased, axial pressure drop increased and shear stress increased. Flow calculations simulated to resemble IVUS-based flowmetry changed by only 1% after considering secondary velocity. In conclusion, placement of a catheter inside a curved tube resembling the human coronary system changes the velocity field and reduces secondary patterns. The present study supports the usefulness of catheter-based flowmetry during resting flow conditions. During hyperemic flow conditions, flow measurements might be accompanied by large axial pressure drops because the catheter, itself, might act as a significant stenosis. PMID:10414897

  1. Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 2: Laser Doppler dust devil velocity profile measurement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howle, R. E.; Krause, M. C.; Craven, C. E.; Gorzynski, E. J.; Edwards, B. B.

    1976-01-01

    The first detailed velocity profile data on thermally induced dust vortices are presented. These dust devils will be analyzed and studied to determine their flow fields and origin in an effort to correlate this phenomena with the generation and characteristics of tornadoes. A continuing effort to increase mankind's knowledge of vortex and other meteorological phenomena will hopefully allow the prediction of tornado occurrence, their path, and perhaps eventually even lead to some technique for their destruction.

  2. Inversion of surface wave data for shear wave velocity profiles: Case studies of thick buried low-velocity layers in Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2015-04-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four layer sequence of limestones and clays, with the Lower Coralline Limestone being the oldest exposed layer. The hard Globigerina Limestone (GL) overlies this layer and is found outcropping in the eastern part of Malta and western part of Gozo. The rest of the islands are characterised by Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. Thus the BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, and makes the Vs30 parameter not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may still produce amplification effects, however would not contribute to the numerical mean of Vs in the upper 30m. Moreover, buildings are being increasingly constructed on this type of geological foundation. Obtaining the shear wave (Vs) profiles of the different layers around the islands is the first step needed for a detailed study of local seismic site response. A survey of Vs in each type of lithology and around the islands has never been undertaken. Array measurements of ambient noise using vertical geophones were carried out at six sites in Malta and one in Gozo, characterised by the buried low-velocity layer. The array was set up in an L-shaped configuration and the Extended Spatial Autocorrelation (ESAC) technique was used to extract Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The effective dispersion curve obtained at all the sites exhibited a 'normal' dispersive trend (i.e. velocity decreases with increasing frequency) at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at high frequencies. Such a shape can be tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are generally present when a stiff layer overlies a softer layer. Additionally a series of three-component ambient noise measurements were taken at each of the sites and H/V curves obtained. The

  3. Range and velocity independent classification of humans and animals using a profiling sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chari, Srikant; Smith, Forrest; Halford, Carl; Jacobs, Eddie; Brooks, Jason

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents object profile classification results using range and speed independent features from an infrared profiling sensor. The passive infrared profiling sensor was simulated using a LWIR camera. Field data collected near the US-Mexico border to yield profiles of humans and animals is reported. Range and speed independent features based on height and width of the objects were extracted from profiles. The profile features were then used to train and test three classification algorithms to classify objects as humans or animals. The performance of Naïve Bayesian (NB), K-Nearest Neighbors (K-NN), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are compared based on their classification accuracy. Results indicate that for our data set all three algorithms achieve classification rates of over 98%. The field data is also used to validate our prior data collections from more controlled environments.

  4. Inversion of surface-wave data for subsurface shear-wave velocity profiles characterised by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-05-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (travel-time average shear-wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterised by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation (ESAC) technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  5. Comparison between an in-house 1D profile correction method and a 2D correction provided in Varian's PDPC Package for improving the accuracy of portal dosimetry images.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Maritza A; Davis, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    While commissioning Varian's Portal Dose Image Prediction (PDIP) algorithm for portal dosimetry, an asymmetric radial response in the portal imager due to backscatter from the support arm was observed. This asymmetric response led to differences on the order of 2%-3% for simple square fields (< 20 × 20 cm2) when comparing the measured to predicted portal fluences. A separate problem was that discrepancies of up to 10% were seen in measured to predicted portal fluences at increasing off-axis distance (> 10 cm). We have modified suggested methods from the literature to provide a 1D correction for the off-axis response problem which adjusts the diagonal profile used in the portal imager calibration. This inherently cannot fix the 2D problem since the PDIP algorithm assumes a radially symmetric response and will lead to some uncertainty in portal dosimetry results. Varian has recently released generic "2D correction" files with their Portal Dosimetry Pre-configuration (PDPC) package, but no independent testing has been published. We present the comparison between QA results using the Varian correction method to results using our 1D profile correction method using the gamma passing rates with a 3%, 3 mm criterion. The average, minimum, and maximum gamma pass rates for nine fixed-field IMRT fields at gantry 0° using our profile correction method were 98.1%, 93.7%, and 99.8%, respectively, while the results using the PDPC correction method were 98.4%, 93.1%, and 99.8%. For four RapidArc fields, the average, minimum, and maximum gamma pass rates using our correction method were 99.6%, 99.4%, and 99.9%, respectively, while the results using the PDPC correction method were 99.8%, 99.5%, and 99.9%. The average gamma pass rates for both correction methods are quite similar, but both show improvement over the uncorrected results. PMID:26103173

  6. Comparisons of Crosswind Velocity Profile Estimates Used in Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruis, Mathew J.; Delisi, Donald P.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Five methods for estimating crosswind profiles used in fast-time wake vortex prediction models are compared in this study. Previous investigations have shown that temporal and spatial variations in the crosswind vertical profile have a large impact on the transport and time evolution of the trailing vortex pair. The most important crosswind parameters are the magnitude of the crosswind and the gradient in the crosswind shear. It is known that pulsed and continuous wave lidar measurements can provide good estimates of the wind profile in the vicinity of airports. In this study comparisons are made between estimates of the crosswind profiles from a priori information on the trajectory of the vortex pair as well as crosswind profiles derived from different sensors and a regional numerical weather prediction model.

  7. Effects of radial and circumferential inlet velocity profile distortions on performance of a short-length double-annular ram induction combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.; Perkins, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Inlet air velocity profile tests were conducted on a full-scale short-length 102-centimeter-diameter annual combustor designed for advanced gas turbine engine applications. The inlet profiles studied include radial distortions that were center peaked, and tip peaked, as well as a circumferential distortion which was center peaked for one-third of the circumference and flat for the other two-thirds. An increase in combustor pressure loss was the most significant effect of the radial air velocity distortions. With the circumferential distortion, exit temperature pattern factor doubled when compared to a flat velocity profile.

  8. Wall-wake velocity profile for compressible non-adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. C.; Childs, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    A form of the wall-wake profile, which is applicable to flows with heat transfer, and for which a variation in y = O at y = delta, was suggested. The modified profile, which takes into account the effect of turbulent Prandtl number, was found to provide a good representation of experimental data for a wide range numbers and heat transfer. The Cf values which are determined by a least squares fit of the profile to the data agree well with values which were measured by the floating element technique. In addition, the values of delta determined by the fit correspond more closely to the outer edge of the viscous flow region than those obtained with earlier versions of the wall-wake profile.

  9. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimating fracture parameters from p-wave velocity profiles about a geothermal well

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkinson, J.T.; Henyey, T.L.; Sammis, C.G.; Leary, P.C.; McRaney, J.K.

    1981-12-01

    The feasibility of locating fracture zones and estimating their crack parameters was examined using an areal well shoot method centered on Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1, Beaver County, Utah. High-resolution travel time measurements were made between a borehole sensor and an array of shot stations distributed radially and azimuthally about the well. Directional velocity behavior in the vicinity of the well was investigated by comparing velocity logs derived from the travel time data. Three fracture zones were identified form the velocity data, corroborating fracture indicators seen in other geophysical logs conducted in Well 9-1. Crack densities and average crack aspect ratios for these fracture zones were estimated using a self-consistent velocity theory (O'Connell and Budiansy 1974). Probable trends of these fracture zones were established from a combination of the data from the more distant shot stations and the results of a gravity survey. The results of this study indicate that the areal well shoot is a potentially powerful tool for the reconnaisance of fracture-controlled fluid and gas reservoirs. Improvements in methodology and hardware could transform it into an operationally viable survey method.

  11. Unimpeded air velocity profiles of air-assisted five-port sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that relies on tree structure information to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Unimpeded air jet velocities from an air assisted, five-port sprayer in an open field were measured at four height...

  12. Displaced logarithmic profile of the velocity distribution in the boundary layer of a turbulent flow over an unbounded flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talpos, Simona; Apostol, Marian

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that the Reynolds equations for a turbulent flow over an unbounded flat surface in the presence of a constant pressure-gradient lead to a displaced logarithmic profile of the velocity distribution; the displaced logarithmic profile is obtained by assuming a constant production rate of turbulence energy. The displacement height measured on the (vertical) axis perpendicular to the surface is either positive or negative. For a positive displacement height the boundary layer exhibits an inversion, while for a negative displacement height the boundary layer is a direct one. In an inversion boundary layer the logarithmic velocity profile is disrupted into two distinct branches separated by a logarithmic singularity. The viscosity transforms this logarithmic singularity into a sharp edge, governed by a generalized Reynolds number. The associated temperature distribution is calculated, and the results are discussed in relation to meteorological boundary-layer jets and stratified layers. The effects of gravitation and atmospheric thermal or fluid-mixture concentration gradients ("external forcings") are also considered; it is shown that such circumstances may lead to various modifications of the boundary layers. A brief presentation of a similar situation is described for a circular pipe.

  13. The velocity and energy profiles of elite cross-country skiers executing downhill turns with different radii.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, Oyvind; Bucher Sandbakk, Silvana; Supej, Matej; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the influence of turn radius on velocity and energy profiles when skidding and step turning during more and less effective downhill turns while cross-country skiing. Thirteen elite female cross-country skiers performed single turns with a 9- or 12-m radius using the skidding technique and a 12- or 15-m radius with step turning. Mechanical parameters were monitored using a real-time kinematic Global Navigation Satellite System and video analysis. Step turning was more effective during all phases of a turn, leading to higher velocities than skidding (P < .05). With both techniques, a greater radius was associated with higher velocity (P < .05), but the quality of turning, as assessed on the basis of energy characteristics, was the same. More effective skidding turns involved more pronounced deceleration early in the turn and maintenance of higher velocity thereafter, while more effective step turning involved lower energy dissipation during the latter half of the turn. In conclusion, the single-turn analysis employed here reveals differences in the various techniques chosen by elite cross-country skiers when executing downhill turns of varying radii and can be used to assess the quality of such turns. PMID:24408350

  14. Effects of velocity profile and inclination on dual-jet-induced pressures on a flat plate in a crosswind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakubowski, A. L.; Schetz, J. A.; Moore, C. L.; Joag, R.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine surface pressure distributions on a flat plate with dual subsonic, circular jets exhausting from the surface into a crossflow. The jets were arranged in both side-by-side and tandem configurations and were injected at 90 deg and 60 deg angles to the plate, with jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 2.2 and 4. The major objective of the study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform (vs uniform) jet velocity profile, simulating the exhaust of a turbo-fan engine. Nonuniform jets with a high-velocity outer annulus and a low-velocity core induced stronger negative pressure fields than uniform jets with the same mass flow rate. However, nondimensional lift losses (lift loss/jet thrust lift) due to such nonuniform jets were lower than lift losses due to uniform jets. Changing the injection angle from 90 deg to 60 deg resulted in moderate (for tandem jets) to significant (for side-by-side jets) increases in the induced negative pressures, even though the surface area influenced by the jets tended to reduce as the angle decreased. Jets arranged in the side-by-side configuration led to significant jet-induced lift losses exceeding, in some cases, lift losses reported for single jets.

  15. Linear relation between H I circular velocity and stellar velocity dispersion in early-type galaxies, and slope of the density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Oosterloo, Tom; Cappellari, Michele; den Heijer, Milan; Józsa, Gyula I. G.

    2016-04-01

    We report a tight linear relation between the H I circular velocity measured at 6 Re and the stellar velocity dispersion measured within 1 Re for a sample of 16 early-type galaxies with stellar mass between 1010 and 1011 M⊙. The key difference from previous studies is that we only use spatially resolved vcirc(H I) measurements obtained at large radius for a sizeable sample of objects. We can therefore link a kinematical tracer of the gravitational potential in the dark-matter dominated outer regions of galaxies with one in the inner regions, where baryons control the distribution of mass. We find that vcirc(H I) = 1.33 σe with an observed scatter of just 12 percent. This indicates a strong coupling between luminous and dark matter from the inner- to the outer regions of early-type galaxies, analogous to the situation in spirals and dwarf irregulars. The vcirc(H I)-σe relation is shallower than those based on vcirc measurements obtained from stellar kinematics and modelling at smaller radius, implying that vcirc declines with radius - as in bulge-dominated spirals. Indeed, the value of vcirc(H I) is typically 25 percent lower than the maximum vcirc derived at ˜0.2 Re from dynamical models. Under the assumption of power-law total density profiles ρ∝r-γ, our data imply an average logarithmic slope <γ> = 2.18 ± 0.03 across the sample, with a scatter of 0.11 around this value. The average slope and scatter agree with recent results obtained from stellar kinematics alone for a different sample of early-type galaxies.

  16. Linear relation between H I circular velocity and stellar velocity dispersion in early-type galaxies, and slope of the density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Oosterloo, Tom; Cappellari, Michele; den Heijer, Milan; Józsa, Gyula I. G.

    2016-08-01

    We report a tight linear relation between the H I circular velocity measured at 6 Re and the stellar velocity dispersion measured within 1 Re for a sample of 16 early-type galaxies with stellar mass between 1010 and 1011 M⊙. The key difference from previous studies is that we only use spatially resolved vcirc(H I) measurements obtained at large radius for a sizeable sample of objects. We can therefore link a kinematical tracer of the gravitational potential in the dark-matter dominated outer regions of galaxies with one in the inner regions, where baryons control the distribution of mass. We find that vcirc(H I)= 1.33 σe with an observed scatter of just 12 per cent. This indicates a strong coupling between luminous and dark matter from the inner- to the outer regions of early-type galaxies, analogous to the situation in spirals and dwarf irregulars. The vcirc(H I)-σe relation is shallower than those based on vcirc measurements obtained from stellar kinematics and modelling at smaller radius, implying that vcirc declines with radius - as in bulge-dominated spirals. Indeed, the value of vcirc(H I) is typically 25 per cent lower than the maximum vcirc derived at ˜0.2 Re from dynamical models. Under the assumption of power-law total density profiles ρ ∝ r-γ, our data imply an average logarithmic slope <γ> = 2.18 ± 0.03 across the sample, with a scatter of 0.11 around this value. The average slope and scatter agree with recent results obtained from stellar kinematics alone for a different sample of early-type galaxies.

  17. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  18. Improving the uniqueness of shear wave velocity profiles derived from the inversion of multiple-mode surface wave dispersion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supranata, Yosep Erwin

    One of the factors, which contributes to errors in shear wave velocity profile obtained from the inversion of surface wave dispersion data is non-uniqueness due to the limited number of field dispersion data. In this research, a new procedure is developed to improve the uniqueness of the shear wave velocity profile resulting from the inversion. A new forward modeling algorithm using the smallest absolute eigenvalue as the screening parameter to generate Rayleigh wave modes from a theoretical model is developed. The theoretical model adopted in this research is the Dynamic Stiffness Matrix. The results indicate that the new technique is more reliable than the traditional method using the determinant as the screening parameter. The performance of the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno and Levenberg-Marquardt methods are evaluated in this research to determine the most suitable gradient method for surface wave inversion. Comparison of the performance of the two methods shows that the Levenberg-Marquardt method produces more accurate results than the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method. An updated inversion technique which divides the inversion process into a number of stages, with each successive stage utilizing the shear wave velocities obtained from the previous stage as its initial model, is introduced. The number of stages is the same as the highest Rayleigh wave mode number, and the kth stage of the inversion utilizes the dispersion data from the 1st through kth modes. Shear wave velocities obtained from the updated inversion technique are more accurate than those obtained from the inversion procedure using an initial model constructed from fundamental mode dispersion data.

  19. Field monitoring of sprinting power-force-velocity profile before, during and after hamstring injury: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, J; Edouard, P; Samozino, P; Brughelli, M; Cross, M; Ross, A; Gill, N; Morin, J B

    2016-01-01

    Very little is currently known about the effects of acute hamstring injury on over-ground sprinting mechanics. The aim of this research was to describe changes in power-force-velocity properties of sprinting in two injury case studies related to hamstring strain management: Case 1: during a repeated sprint task (10 sprints of 40 m) when an injury occurred (5th sprint) in a professional rugby player; and Case 2: prior to (8 days) and after (33 days) an acute hamstring injury in a professional soccer player. A sports radar system was used to measure instantaneous velocity-time data, from which individual mechanical profiles were derived using a recently validated method based on a macroscopic biomechanical model. Variables of interest included: maximum theoretical velocity (V0) and horizontal force (F(H0)), slope of the force-velocity (F-v) relationship, maximal power, and split times over 5 and 20 m. For Case 1, during the injury sprint (sprint 5), there was a clear change in the F-v profile with a 14% greater value of F(H0) (7.6-8.7 N/kg) and a 6% decrease in V0 (10.1 to 9.5 m/s). For Case 2, at return to sport, the F-v profile clearly changed with a 20.5% lower value of F(H0) (8.3 vs. 6.6 N/kg) and no change in V0. The results suggest that the capability to produce horizontal force at low speed (F(H0)) (i.e. first metres of the acceleration phase) is altered both before and after return to sport from a hamstring injury in these two elite athletes with little or no change of maximal velocity capabilities (V0), as evidenced in on-field conditions. Practitioners should consider regularly monitoring horizontal force production during sprint running both from a performance and injury prevention perspective. PMID:26648237

  20. A method for predicting the noise levels of coannular jets with inverted velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A coannular jet was equated with a single stream equivalent jet with the same mass flow, energy, and thrust. The acoustic characteristics of the coannular jet were then related to the acoustic characteristics of the single jet. Forward flight effects were included by incorporating a forward exponent, a Doppler amplification factor, and a Strouhal frequency shift. Model test data, including 48 static cases and 22 wind tunnel cases, were used to evaluate the prediction method. For the static cases and the low forward velocity wind tunnel cases, the spectral mean square pressure correlation coefficients were generally greater than 90 percent, and the spectral sound pressure level standard deviation were generally less than 3 decibels. The correlation coefficient and the standard deviation were not affected by changes in equivalent jet velocity. Limitations of the prediction method are also presented.

  1. Work performed on velocity profiles in a hot jet by simplified RELIEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Richard B.; Lempert, Walter R.

    1991-01-01

    The Raman Excitation + Laser Induced Electronic Fluorescence (RELIEF) velocity measurement method is based on vibrationally tagging oxygen molecules and observing their displacement after a short period of time. Two papers that discuss the use and implementation of the RELIEF technique are presented in this final report. Additionally, the end of the report contains a listing of the personnel involved and the reference documents used in the production of this final report.

  2. Inverted velocity profile semi-annular nozzle jet exhaust noise experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental noise data are shown for a conical nozzle with a semi-annular secondary flow passage having secondary to primary velocity ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.4. Spectral data are presented at different directivity angles in the flyover plane with the semi-annular flow passage located either on the same side or opposite side relative to an observer. A 10.0 cm diameter primary conical nozzle was used with a 2.59 cm and 5.07 cm wide annular gap secondary nozzle. Similar trends were observed for both nozzle configurations. In general, near the peak noise location and at velocity ratios greater than 1.0, noise levels were larger on the side where the secondary passage was closest to an observer. At velocity ratios near 1.0 the opposite was true. When compared to predicted noise levels for a conical nozzle alone operating at the same ideal thrust, the semi-annular configuration showed no benefit in terms of noise attenuation.

  3. 3D Simulation of Velocity Profile of Turbulent Flow in Open Channel with Complex Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Benoumessad; Ilhem, Kriba; Ali, Fourar; Abdelbaki, Djebaili

    Simulation of open channel flow or river flow presents unique challenge to numerical simulators, which is widely used in the applications of computational fluid dynamics. The prediction is extremely difficult because the flow in open channel is usually transient and turbulent, the geometry is irregular and curved, and the free-surface elevation is varying with time. The results from a 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model are presented to investigate the flow structure, the velocity distribution and mass transport process in a meandering compound open channel and a straight open channel. The 3D numerical model for calculating flow is set up in cylinder coordinates in order to calculate the complex boundary channel. The finite volume method is used to disperse the governing equations and the SIMPLE algorithm is applied to acquire the coupling of velocity and pressure. The non-linear k- ɛ turbulent model has good useful value because of taking into account the anisotropy and not increasing the computational time. The main contributions of this study are developing a numerical method that can be applied to predict the flow in river bends with various bend curvatures and different width-depth ratios. This study demonstrates that the 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model can be used for analyzing flow structures, the velocity distribution and pollutant transport in the complex boundary open channel, this model is applicable for real river and wetland problem.

  4. Temperature, velocity and Species Profile Measurements for Reburning in a Pulverized, Entrained Flow, Coal Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.

    1997-10-01

    Measurements of effluent NO{sub x}, CO, and O{sub 2} have been obtained for various reburning locations in the controlled profile reactor. the location of the reburning zone and tertiary air zone have been varied to find an optimal location for detailed reburning profile measurements. No{sub x} reduction of greater than 70% has been seen with natural gas injection in and just below the primary combustion zone. Strategic injection of the natural gas for reburning reduces the total No{sub x} reduction capability of reburning. Modeling efforts continue in trying to match the modeling solution to the detailed baseline data taken in previous measurement. The use of more accurate measured boundary conditions did not appear to improve the model predictions greatly but the use of more detailed turbulence models was found to improve the predictions, the predictions are still far from matching the combustion measurements.

  5. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  6. Spectral line profiles of nickel and argon in supernova 1987A - Expansion velocity and electron scattering effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, F. C.; Bregman, J. D.; Wooden, D. H.; Pinto, P. A.; Rank, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra of SN 1987A showing the Ni II 6.634-micron and Ar II 6.983-micron fine-structure lines were obtained from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in April 1988. The signal-to-noise ratio of 100 near the peaks and resolving power of 200 are sufficient to show the average velocity of expansion from the core of about 1400 km/s and to indicate the range of velocities. An asymmetry in the profiles of both lines and a redshift of the line centroids of about 440 km/s above the 280-km/s recessional velocity of the LMC can be explained in terms of scattering of the photons by electrons in the expanding hydrogen envelope of the supernova. A mass of 0.0030 solar masses of Ni II can be deduced from the line strength of the Ni II line and a mass of 0.0009 solar masses of Ar II from the Ar II line strength.

  7. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  8. Temperature, velocity and species profile measurements for reburning in a pulverized, entrained flow, coal combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrogen oxide emissions from pulverized coal combustion have been and will continue to be a regulated pollutant for electric utility boilers burning pulverized coal. Full scale combustion models can help in the design of new boilers and boiler retrofits which meet emissions standards, but these models require validation before they can be used with confidence. The objective of this work was to obtain detailed combustion measurements of pulverized coal flames which implement two NO reduction strategies, namely reburning and advanced reburning, to provide data for model validation. The data were also compared to an existing comprehensive pulverized coal combustion model with a reduced mechanism for NO reduction under reburning and advanced reburning conditions. The data were obtained in a 0.2 MW, cylindrical, down-fired, variable swirl, pulverized coal reactor. The reactor had a diameter of 0.76 m and a length of 2.4 m with access ports along the axial length. A Wyodak, sub-bituminous coal was used in all of the measurements. The burner had a centrally located primary fuel and air tube surrounded by heated and variably swirled secondary air. Species of NO, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were measured continuously. Aqueous sampling was used to measure HCN and NH{sub 3} at specific reactor locations. Samples were drawn from the reactor using water quenched suction probes. Velocity measurements were obtained using two component laser doppler anemometry in back-scatter mode. Temperature measurements were obtained using a shielded suction pyrometer. A series of six or more radial measurements at six or more axial locations within the reactor provided a map of species, temperature, and velocity measurements. In total, seven reactor maps were obtained. Three maps were obtained at baseline conditions of 0, 0.5 and 1.5 swirl and 10% excess air. Two maps were obtained under reburning conditions of 0.78 stoichiometric ratio and 1.5 swirl and 0.9 stoichiometric ratio and

  9. Mean-velocity profile of smooth channel flow explained by a cospectral budget model with wall-blockage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Gentine, Pierre; Entekhabi, Dara

    2016-03-01

    A series of recent studies has shown that a model of the turbulent vertical velocity variance spectrum (Fvv) combined with a simplified cospectral budget can reproduce many macroscopic flow properties of turbulent wall-bounded flows, including various features of the mean-velocity profile (MVP), i.e., the "law of the wall". While the approach reasonably models the MVP's logarithmic layer, the buffer layer displays insufficient curvature compared to measurements. The assumptions are re-examined here using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) dataset at moderate Reynolds number that includes all the requisite spectral and co-spectral information. Starting with several hypotheses for the cause of the "missing" curvature in the buffer layer, it is shown that the curvature deficit is mainly due to mismatches between (i) the modelled and DNS-observed pressure-strain terms in the cospectral budget and (ii) the DNS-observed Fvv and the idealized form used in previous models. By replacing the current parameterization for the pressure-strain term with an expansive version that directly accounts for wall-blocking effects, the modelled and DNS reported pressure-strain profiles match each other in the buffer and logarithmic layers. Forcing the new model with DNS-reported Fvv rather than the idealized form previously used reproduces the missing buffer layer curvature to high fidelity thereby confirming the "spectral link" between Fvv and the MVP across the full profile. A broad implication of this work is that much of the macroscopic properties of the flow (such as the MVP) may be derived from the energy distribution in turbulent eddies (i.e., Fvv) representing the microstate of the flow, provided the link between them accounts for wall-blocking.

  10. The expansion velocities of laser-produced plasmas determined from extreme ultraviolet spectral line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Behring, W. E.; Cohen, L.

    1977-01-01

    The expansion of laser-produced plasma is determined from the shapes of spectral lines of highly ionized iron emitted in the extreme ultraviolet. The plasmas were produced by focusing the pulse from a Nd:glass laser onto solid planar targets, and spectra were recorded with a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrograph. From the Doppler broadening of lines of Fe XX and Fe XXI, expansion velocities of about 830 km/s were determined. The relative time-averaged ion abundances of Fe XVIII, Fe XIX, Fe XX, and Fe XXI are estimated for three different spectra. The abundances do not differ by more than a factor of 4 for any of the spectra.

  11. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  12. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  13. Linking motor-related brain potentials and velocity profiles in multi-joint arm reaching movements.

    PubMed

    Amengual, Julià L; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Grau, Carles; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    The study of the movement related brain potentials (MRPBs) needs accurate technical approaches to disentangle the specific patterns of bran activity during the preparation and execution of movements. During the last forty years, synchronizing the electromyographic activation (EMG) of the muscle with electrophysiological recordings (EEG) has been commonly ussed for these purposes. However, new clinical approaches in the study of motor diseases and rehabilitation suggest the demand of new paradigms that might go further into the study of the brain activity associated with the kinematics of movements. As a response to this call, we have used a 3-D hand-tracking system with the aim to record continuously the position of an ultrasonic sender attached to the hand during the performance of multi-joint self-paced movements. We synchronized time-series of position and velocity of the sender with the EEG recordings, obtaining specific patterns of brain activity as a function of the fluctuations of the kinematics during natural movement performance. Additionally, the distribution of the brain activity during the preparation and execution phases of movements was similar that reported previously using the EMG, suggesting the validity of our technique. We claim that this paradigm could be usable in patients because of its simplicity and the potential knowledge that can be extracted from clinical protocols. PMID:24808853

  14. Analysis of membrane-protein complexes of the marine sulfate reducer Desulfobacula toluolica Tol2 by 1D blue native-PAGE complexome profiling and 2D blue native-/SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Ruppersberg, Hanna S; Feenders, Christoph; Blasius, Bernd; Braun, Hans-Peter; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) obtain energy from cytoplasmic reduction of sulfate to sulfide involving APS-reductase (AprAB) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). These enzymes are predicted to obtain electrons from membrane redox complexes, i.e. the quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase (QmoABC) and DsrMKJOP complexes. In addition to these conserved complexes, the genomes of SRB encode a large number of other (predicted) membrane redox complexes, the function and actual formation of which is unknown. This study reports the establishment of 1D Blue Native-PAGE complexome profiling and 2D BN-/SDS-PAGE for analysis of the membrane protein complexome of the marine sulfate reducer Desulfobacula toluolica Tol2. Analysis of normalized score profiles of >800 proteins in combination with hierarchical clustering and identification of 2D BN-/SDS-PAGE separated spots demonstrated separation of membrane complexes in their native form, e.g. ATP synthase. In addition to the QmoABC and DsrMKJOP complexes, other complexes were detected that constitute the basic membrane complexome of D. toluolica Tol2, e.g. transport proteins (e.g. sodium/sulfate symporters) or redox complexes involved in Na(+) -based bioenergetics (RnfABCDEG). Notably, size estimation indicates dimer and quadruple formation of the DsrMKJOP complex in vivo. Furthermore, cluster analysis suggests interaction of this complex with a rhodanese-like protein (Tol2_C05230) possibly representing a periplasmic electron transfer partner for DsrMKJOP. PMID:26792001

  15. High-resolution Vertical Profiling of Ocean Velocity and Water Properties Under Hurricane Frances in September 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. B.; D'Asarp, E. A.; Girton, J. B.; Price, J. F.; Webb, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    In ONR's CBLAST Hurricane research program observations were made of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Frances. Three EM-APEX floats (velocity sensing versions of Webb Research APEX floats) and two Lagrangian floats were deployed north of Hispaniola from a C-130 aircraft ahead of Hurricane Frances in September 2004. The EM-APEX floats measured T, S and V over the upper 500 m starting about a day before the storm's arrival. The Lagrangian floats measured temperature and salinity while following the three- dimensional boundary layer turbulence in the upper 40 m. One EM-APEX float was directly under the track of the storm's eye, another EM-APEX and two Lagrangian floats went in about 50 km to the right of the track (where the surface winds are strongest) and the third float was about 100 km to the right. The EM-APEX floats profiled for 10 hours from the surface to 200 m, then continued profiling between 35 and 200 m with excursions to 500 m every half inertial period. After 5 days, the EM-APEX floats surfaced and transmitted the accumulated processed observations, then the floats profiled to 500 m every half inertial period until recovered early in October aided by GPS and Iridium. The float array sampled in unprecedented detail the upper-ocean turbulence, momentum, and salt and heat changes in response to the hurricane. The buildup of surface gravity waves in advance of the storm was also observed in the velocity profiles, with significant wave heights of up to 11 m. Rapid acceleration of inertial currents in the surface mixing layer (SML) to over 1 m/s stimulated vertical mixing by shear instability at the SML base, as indicated by low Richardson numbers and SML deepening from about 40 m to 120 m under the strongest wind forcing. Surface cooling of about 2.5 C was primarily due to the SML deepening and entrainment of colder water, with a small contribution from surface heat flux. Intense inertial pumping was observed under the eye, with vertical excursions of

  16. TEMPERATURE, VELOCITY AND SPECIES PROFILE MEASUREMENTS FOR REBURNING IN A PULVERIZED, ENTRAINED FLOW, COAL COMBUSTOR

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    An experimental program has been completed to make detailed measurements of a pulverized coal flame with reburning and advanced reburning. Maps of species (CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} , NO, HCN, and NH{sub 3}), temperature and velocity have been obtained which consist of approximately 60 measurements across a cross sectional plane of the reactor. A total of six of these maps have been obtained. Three operating conditions for the baseline flame have been mapped, two operating conditions with reburning, and one operating condition of advanced reburning. In addition to the mapping data, effluent measurements of gaseous products were obtained for various operating conditions. This report focuses on the advanced reburning data. Advanced reburning was achieved in the reactor by injecting natural gas downstream of the primary combustion zone to form a reburning zone followed by a second injection of ammonia downstream of reburning to form an advanced reburning zone. Finally, downstream of the ammonia injection, air was injected to form a burnout or tertiary air zone. The amount of natural gas injected was characterized by the reburning zone stoichiometric ratio. The amount of ammonia injected was characterized by the ammonia to nitrogen stoichiometric ratio or NSR and by the amount of carrier gas used to transport and mix the ammonia. A matrix of operating conditions where injector position, reburning zone stoichiometric ratio, NSR, and carrier gas flow rate were varied and NO reduction was measured was completed in addition to a map of data at one operating condition. The data showed advanced reburning was more effective than either reburning or NH{sub 3} injection alone. At one advanced reburning condition over 95% NO reduction was obtained. Ammonia injection was most beneficial when following a reburning zone which was slightly lean, S.R. = 1.05, but was not very effective when following a slightly rich reburning zone, S.R. of 0.95. In the cases where advanced reburning

  17. Mapping refuse profile in Singapore old dumping ground through electrical resistivity, S-wave velocity and geotechnical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ke; Tong, Huan Huan; Noh, Omar; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Giannis, Apostolos

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to track the refuse profile in Lorong Halus Dumping Ground, the largest landfill in Singapore, by electrical resistivity and surface wave velocity after 25 years of closure. Data were analyzed using an orthogonal set of plots by spreading 24 lines in two perpendicular geophone-orientation directions. Both geophysical techniques determined that refuse boundary depth was 13 ± 2 m. The refuse boundary revealed a certain degree of variance, mainly ascribed to the different principle of measurements, as well as the high heterogeneity of the subsurface. Discrepancy was higher in spots with greater heterogeneity. 3D analysis was further conducted detecting refuse pockets, leachate mounding and gas channels. Geotechnical monitoring (borehole) confirmed geophysical outcomes tracing different layers such as soil capping, decomposed refuse materials and inorganic wastes. Combining the geophysical methods with borehole monitoring, a comprehensive layout of the dumping site was presented showing the hot spots of interests. PMID:25427774

  18. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  19. A NOVEL X-RAY IMAGING CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR DOPPLER MEASUREMENTS OF ION TEMPERATURE AND PLASMA ROTATION VELOCITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2008-06-06

    A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on Alcator CMod for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity profiles. The instrument consists of two spherically bent (102)-quartz crystals with radii of curvature of 1444 and 1385 mm and four 'PILATUS II' detector modules. It records spectra of He-like argon from the entire, 72 cm high, elongated plasma cross-section and spectra of H-like argon from a 20 cm high, central region of the plasma, with a spatial resolution of 1.3 cm and a time resolution of less than 20 ms. The new spectrometer concept is also of interest for the diagnosis of burning plasmas on future machines. This paper presents recent experimental results from Aclator C-Mod and discusses challenges in X-ray spectroscopy for the diagnosis of fusion plasmas on future machines.

  20. Testing modified Newtonian dynamics through statistics of velocity dispersion profiles in the inner regions of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun; Gong, In-Taek

    2015-08-01

    Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) proposed by Milgrom provides a paradigm alternative to dark matter (DM) that has been successful in fitting and predicting the rich phenomenology of rotating disc galaxies. There have also been attempts to test MOND in dispersion-supported spheroidal early-type galaxies, but it remains unclear whether MOND can fit the various empirical properties of early-type galaxies for the whole ranges of mass and radius. As a way of rigorously testing MOND in elliptical galaxies we calculate the MOND-predicted velocity dispersion profiles (VDPs) in the inner regions of ˜2000 nearly round Sloan Digital Sky Survey elliptical galaxies under a variety of assumptions on velocity dispersion (VD) anisotropy, and then compare the predicted distribution of VDP slopes with the observed distribution in 11 ATLAS3D galaxies selected with essentially the same criteria. We find that the MOND model parametrized with an interpolating function that works well for rotating galaxies can also reproduce the observed distribution of VDP slopes based only on the observed stellar mass distribution without DM or any other galaxy-to-galaxy varying factor. This is remarkable in view that Newtonian dynamics with DM requires a specific amount and/or profile of DM for each galaxy in order to reproduce the observed distribution of VDP slopes. When we analyse non-round galaxy samples using the MOND-based spherical Jeans equation, we do not find any systematic difference in the mean property of the VDP slope distribution compared with the nearly round sample. However, in line with previous studies of MOND through individual analyses of elliptical galaxies, varying MOND interpolating function or VD anisotropy can lead to systematic change in the VDP slope distribution, indicating that a statistical analysis of VDPs can be used to constrain specific MOND models with an accurate measurement of VDP slopes or a prior constraint on VD anisotropy.

  1. Passive A-band Wind Sounder (PAWS) for measuring tropospheric wind velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miecznik, Grzegorz; Pierce, Robert; Huang, Pei; Slaymaker, Philip A.; Kaptchen, Paul; Roark, Shane; Johnson, Brian R.; Heath, Donald F.

    2007-09-01

    The Passive A-Band Wind Sounder (PAWS) was funded through NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to determine the feasibility of measuring tropospheric wind speed profiles from Doppler shifts in absorption O II A-band. It is being pursued as a low-cost and low-risk alternative capable of providing better wind data than is currently available. The instrument concept is adapted from the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) sensor on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The operational concept for PAWS is to view an atmospheric limb over an altitude range from the surface to 20 km with a Doppler interferometer in a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Two orthogonal views of the same sampling volume will be used to resolve horizontal winds from measured line-of-sight winds. A breadboard instrument was developed to demonstrate the measurement approach and to optimize the design parameters for the subsequent engineering unit and future flight sensor. The breadboard instrument consists of a telescope, collimator, filter assembly, and Michelson interferometer. The instrument design is guided by a retrieval model, which helps to optimize key parameters, spectral filter and optical path difference in particular.

  2. Comparison of Active and Passive Seismic Methods for Calculating Shear-wave Velocity Profiles: An Example from Hartford County, Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, S.; Lane, J. W.; Liu, L.; Thomas, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic hazard classifications have been developed for Hartford County, Connecticut based primarily on mapping of surficial materials and depositional environment using criteria specified by the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). A study using near-surface seismic techniques to measure shear-wave velocities in Connecticut was initiated in support of broader seismic hazard mapping efforts undertaken by New England State Geologists. Thirty field sites in Hartford County representative of the range of mapped seismic hazard classes were chosen based on the availability of boring logs and adequate open space for the geophysical surveys. Because it can be difficult to acquire multi-channel seismic data in urban areas due to unwanted noise and open space restrictions, we also investigated the use of passive single-station seismometer measurements as a compact supplement and potential alternative to long-offset multi-channel measurements. Here we compare the results of active-source multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic methods to determine shear-wave velocity profiles and seismic hazard classification based on Vs30 in glacial sediments throughout Hartford County, Connecticut. HVSR-derived seismic resonances were used as a constraint during inversion of the MASW dispersion curve to reduce model misfit and improve model comparison to site lithology.

  3. Understanding 1D Electrostatic Dust Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzell, C. M.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Electrostatically-dominated dust motion has been hypothesized since the Lunar Horizon Glow was observed by the Surveyor spacecraft. The hypothesized occurence of this phenomenon was naturally extended to asteroids due to their small gravities. Additionally, it has been suggested that the dust ponds observed on Eros by the NEAR mission may be created by electrostatically-dominated dust transport. Previous attempts to numerically model dust motion on the Moon and Eros have been stymied by poorly understood dust launching mechanisms. As a result, the initial velocity and charge of dust particles used in numerical simulations may or may not have any relevance to the actual conditions occurring in situ. It has been seen that properly tuned initial states (velocity and charge) result in dust particles levitating above the surface in both 1D and 2D simulations. Levitation is of interest to planetary scientists since it provides a way to quickly redistribute the surface dust particles over a body. However, there is currently no method to predict whether or not a certain initial state will result in levitation. We have developed a method to provide constraints on the initial states that result in levitation as a function of dust particle size and central body gravity. Additionally, our method can be applied to several models of the plasma sheath. Thus, we limit the guesswork involved in determining which initial conditions result in levitation. We provide a more detailed understanding of levitation phenomena couched in terms of the commonly recognized spring-mass system. This method of understanding dust motion removes the dependency on the launching mechanism, which remains fraught with controversy. Once a feasible dust launching mechanism is identified (be it micrometeoroid bombardment or electrostatic lofting), our method will allow the community to quickly ascertain if dust levitation will occur in situ or if it is simply a numerical artifact. In addition to

  4. Elliptical galaxies with rapidly decreasing velocity dispersion profiles: NMAGIC models and dark halo parameter estimates for NGC 4494

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Lucia; Gerhard, Ortwin; Coccato, Lodovico; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2013-06-01

    NGC 4494 is one of several intermediate-luminosity elliptical galaxies inferred to have an unusually diffuse dark matter halo. We use the χ2-made-to-measure particle code NMAGIC to construct axisymmetric models of NGC 4494 from photometric and various kinematic data. The extended kinematics include light spectra in multiple slitlets out to 3.5Re, and hundreds of planetary nebula velocities out to ≃7Re, thus allowing us to probe the dark matter content and orbital structure in the halo. We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate confidence boundaries for the halo parameters, given our data and modelling set-up. We find that the true potential of the dark matter halo is recovered within ΔG (merit function) ≲ 26 (Δχ2 ≲ 59) at the 70 per cent confidence level (CL), and within ΔG ≲ 32 (Δχ2 ≲ 70) at the 90 per cent CL. These numbers are much larger than the usually assumed Δχ2 = 2.3 (4.6) for the 70 per cent (90 per cent) CL for two free parameters, perhaps case dependent, but calling into question the general validity of the standard assumptions used for halo and black hole mass determinations. The best-fitting models for NGC 4494 have a dark matter fraction of about 0.6 ± 0.1 at 5Re (70 per cent CL) and are embedded in a dark matter halo with circular velocity ˜200 km s-1. The total circular velocity curve (CVC) is approximately flat at vc = 220 km s-1 outside ˜0.5Re. The orbital anisotropy of the stars is moderately radial. These results are independent of the assumed inclination of the galaxy, and edge-on models are preferred. Comparing with the haloes of NGC 3379 and NGC 4697, whose velocity dispersion profiles also decrease rapidly from the centre outwards, the outer CVCs and dark matter haloes are quite similar. NGC 4494 shows a particularly high dark matter fraction inside ˜ 3Re, and a strong concentration of baryons in the centre.

  5. Analysis of distortions in the velocity profiles of suspension flows inside a light-scattering medium upon their reconstruction from the optical coherence Doppler tomograph signal

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, A V; Kirillin, M Yu; Priezzhev, A V

    2005-11-30

    Model signals from one and two plane flows of a particle suspension are obtained for an optical coherence Doppler tomograph (OCDT) by the Monte-Carlo method. The optical properties of particles mimic the properties of non-aggregating erythrocytes. The flows are considered in a stationary scattering medium with optical properties close to those of the skin. It is shown that, as the flow position depth increases, the flow velocity determined from the OCDT signal becomes smaller than the specified velocity and the reconstructed profile extends in the direction of the distant boundary, which is accompanied by the shift of its maximum. In the case of two flows, an increase in the velocity of the near-surface flow leads to the overestimated values of velocity of the reconstructed profile of the second flow. Numerical simulations were performed by using a multiprocessor parallel-architecture computer. (laser applications in medicine)

  6. The anisotropy1 D604N Mutation in the Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase1 Catalytic Domain Reduces Cell Wall Crystallinity and the Velocity of Cellulose Synthase Complexes1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Miki; Himmelspach, Regina; Ward, Juliet; Whittington, Angela; Hasenbein, Nortrud; Liu, Christine; Truong, Thy T.; Galway, Moira E.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Hocart, Charles H.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple cellulose synthase (CesA) subunits assemble into plasma membrane complexes responsible for cellulose production. In the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) model system, we identified a novel D604N missense mutation, designated anisotropy1 (any1), in the essential primary cell wall CesA1. Most previously identified CesA1 mutants show severe constitutive or conditional phenotypes such as embryo lethality or arrest of cellulose production but any1 plants are viable and produce seeds, thus permitting the study of CesA1 function. The dwarf mutants have reduced anisotropic growth of roots, aerial organs, and trichomes. Interestingly, cellulose microfibrils were disordered only in the epidermal cells of the any1 inflorescence stem, whereas they were transverse to the growth axis in other tissues of the stem and in all elongated cell types of roots and dark-grown hypocotyls. Overall cellulose content was not altered but both cell wall crystallinity and the velocity of cellulose synthase complexes were reduced in any1. We crossed any1 with the temperature-sensitive radial swelling1-1 (rsw1-1) CesA1 mutant and observed partial complementation of the any1 phenotype in the transheterozygotes at rsw1-1’s permissive temperature (21°C) and full complementation by any1 of the conditional rsw1-1 root swelling phenotype at the restrictive temperature (29°C). In rsw1-1 homozygotes at restrictive temperature, a striking dissociation of cellulose synthase complexes from the plasma membrane was accompanied by greatly diminished motility of intracellular cellulose synthase-containing compartments. Neither phenomenon was observed in the any1 rsw1-1 transheterozygotes, suggesting that the proteins encoded by the any1 allele replace those encoded by rsw1-1 at restrictive temperature. PMID:23532584

  7. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  8. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  9. Estimating sea-ice coverage, draft, and velocity in Marguerite Bay (Antarctica) using a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Visbeck, Martin; Beardsley, Robert C.; Brechner Owens, W.

    2008-02-01

    A technique for the analysis of data from a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to determine ice coverage, draft and velocity is presented and applied to data collected in Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula shelf. This method provides sea-ice information when no dedicated upward-looking sonar (ULS) data are available. Ice detection is accomplished using windowed variances of ADCP vertical velocity, vertical error velocity, and surface horizontal speed. ADCP signal correlation and backscatter intensity were poor indicators of the presence of ice at this site. Ice draft is estimated using a combination of ADCP backscatter data, atmospheric and oceanic pressure data, and information about the thermal stratification. This estimate requires corrections to the ADCP-derived range for instrument tilt and sound speed profile. Uncertainties of ±0.20 m during midwinter and ±0.40 m when the base of the surface mixed layer is above the ADCP for ice draft are estimated based on: (a) a Monte Carlo simulation, (b) uncertainty in the sound speed correction, and (c) performance of the zero-draft estimate during times of known open water. Ice velocity is taken as the ADCP horizontal velocity in the depth bin specified by the range estimate.

  10. The velocity dispersion profile of NGC 6388 from resolved-star spectroscopy: No evidence of a central cusp and new constraints on the black hole mass

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzoni, B.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Miocchi, P.; Dalessandro, E.; Pallanca, C.; Massari, D.; Valenti, E.

    2013-06-01

    By combining high spatial resolution and wide-field spectroscopy performed, respectively, with SINFONI and FLAMES at the ESO/VLT we measured the radial velocities of more than 600 stars in the direction of NGC 6388, a Galactic globular cluster which is suspected to host an intermediate-mass black hole. Approximately 55% of the observed targets turned out to be cluster members. The cluster velocity dispersion has been derived from the radial velocity of individual stars: 52 measurements in the innermost 2'', and 276 stars located between 18'' and 600''. The velocity dispersion profile shows a central value of ∼13 km s{sup –1}, a flat behavior out to ∼60'' and a decreasing trend outward. The comparison with spherical and isotropic models shows that the observed density and velocity dispersion profiles are inconsistent with the presence of a central black hole more massive than ∼2000 M {sub ☉}. These findings are at odds with recent results obtained from integrated light spectra, showing a velocity dispersion profile with a steep central cusp of 23-25 km s{sup –1} at r < 2'' and suggesting the presence of a black hole with a mass of ∼1.7 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}. We also found some evidence of systemic rotation with amplitude A {sub rot} ∼ 8 km s{sup –1} in the innermost 2'' (0.13 pc), decreasing to A {sub rot} = 3.2 km s{sup –1} at 18'' < r < 160''.

  11. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-02-27

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and vφ on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  12. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-01-29

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1 MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and vφ on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and uclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  13. Characterisation of the 5-HT receptor binding profile of eletriptan and kinetics of [3H]eletriptan binding at human 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors.

    PubMed

    Napier, C; Stewart, M; Melrose, H; Hopkins, B; McHarg, A; Wallis, R

    1999-03-01

    The affinity of eletriptan ((R)-3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinylmethyl)-5-[2-(phenylsulphonyl )ethyl]-1H-indole) for a range of 5-HT receptors was compared to values obtained for other 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists known to be effective in the treatment of migraine. Eletriptan, like sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, naratriptan and rizatriptan had highest affinity for the human 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D and putative 5-ht1f receptor. Kinetic studies comparing the binding of [3H]eletriptan and [3H]sumatriptan to the human recombinant 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors expressed in HeLa cells revealed that both radioligands bound with high specificity (>90%) and reached equilibrium within 10-15 min. However, [3H]eletriptan had over 6-fold higher affinity than [3H]sumatriptan at the 5-HT1D receptor (K(D)): 0.92 and 6.58 nM, respectively) and over 3-fold higher affinity than [3H]sumatriptan at the 5-HT1B receptor (K(D): 3.14 and 11.07 nM, respectively). Association and dissociation rates for both radioligands could only be accurately determined at the 5-HT1D receptor and then only at 4 degrees C. At this temperature, [3H]eletriptan had a significantly (P<0.05) faster association rate (K(on) 0.249 min(-1) nM(-1)) than [3H]sumatriptan (K(on) 0.024 min(-1) nM(-1)) and a significantly (P<0.05) slower off-rate (K(off) 0.027 min(-1) compared to 0.037 min(-1) for [3H]sumatriptan). These data indicate that eletriptan is a potent ligand at the human 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, and 5-ht1f receptors and are consistent with its potent vasoconstrictor activity and use as a drug for the acute treatment of migraine headache. PMID:10193663

  14. Effect of ion orbit loss on the structure in the H-mode tokamak edge pedestal profiles of rotation velocity, radial electric field, density, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2013-09-15

    An investigation of the effect of ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current directly on the radial ion flux flowing in the plasma, and thereby indirectly on the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocity profiles, the radial electric field, density, and temperature profiles, and the interpretation of diffusive and non-diffusive transport coefficients in the plasma edge, is described. Illustrative calculations for a high-confinement H-mode DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] plasma are presented and compared with experimental results. Taking into account, ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current is found to have a significant effect on the structure of the radial profiles of these quantities in the edge plasma, indicating the necessity of taking ion orbit loss effects into account in interpreting or predicting these quantities.

  15. A HIFI view on circumstellar H2O in M-type AGB stars: radiative transfer, velocity profiles, and H2O line cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Danilovich, T.; Olofsson, H.; De Beck, E.; Justtanont, K.; Lombaert, R.; Royer, P.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We aim to constrain the temperature and velocity structures, and H2O abundances in the winds of a sample of M-type asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We further aim to determine the effect of H2O line cooling on the energy balance in the inner circumstellar envelope. Methods: We use two radiative-transfer codes to model molecular emission lines of CO and H2O towards four M-type AGB stars. We focus on spectrally resolved observations of CO and H2O from HIFI aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The observations are complemented by ground-based CO observations, and spectrally unresolved CO and H2O observations with PACS aboard Herschel. The observed line profiles constrain the velocity structure throughout the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs), while the CO intensities constrain the temperature structure in the CSEs. The H2O observations constrain the o-H2O and p-H2O abundances relative to H2. Finally, the radiative-transfer modelling allows to solve the energy balance in the CSE, in principle including also H2O line cooling. Results: The fits to the line profiles only set moderate constraints on the velocity profile, indicating shallower acceleration profiles in the winds of M-type AGB stars than predicted by dynamical models, while the CO observations effectively constrain the temperature structure. Including H2O line cooling in the energy balance was only possible for the low-mass-loss-rate objects in the sample, and required an ad hoc adjustment of the dust velocity profile in order to counteract extreme cooling in the inner CSE. H2O line cooling was therefore excluded from the models. The constraints set on the temperature profile by the CO lines nevertheless allowed us to derive H2O abundances. The derived H2O abundances confirm previous estimates and are consistent with chemical models. However, the uncertainties in the derived abundances are relatively large, in particular for p-H2O, and consequently the derived o/p-H2O ratios are not well constrained.

  16. P- and S-wave velocity model along crustal scale refraction and wide-angle reflection profile in the southern Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun-Moo; Baag, Chang-Eob; Lee, Jung Mo; Moon, Wooil M.; Jung, Heeok; Kim, Ki Young

    2013-01-01

    The onshore seismic experiment, KCRT2004, explored the crustal velocity structure of the southern Korean peninsula. We present an interpretation of seismic data along this 340 km long NNW-SSE trending profile. The crust was found to consist of three layers: the upper, middle, and lower crust with P- and S-wave velocities ranging 5.50 to 6.95 km/s and 2.82 to 3.91 km/s, respectively. The average P-wave velocity (6.26 km/s) and Pn velocity (7.82-7.88 km/s) are lower than the worldwide average of continental crust. Moho depths are 29.0-34.9 km, gradually thickening toward south. The Vp/Vs ratio of crustal material is estimated to be 1.73 (σ = 0.249) for the upper and middle crust and the ratio increases with the depth in the lower crust. The Gyeonggi massif in the north of the profile has a lower Vp/Vs ratio than other tectonic units. The average crustal Vp/Vs ratio of 1.74 (σ = 0.253) is remarkably lower than the average value 1.78 (σ = 0.27) for the bulk continental crust. The low average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is similar to that measured in eastern China. The empirical analysis using both P-wave velocity and Vp/Vs ratio shows that the upper and middle crust is dominantly felsic and the lower crust is intermediate in composition. The absence of the mafic material in the lower crust that is also found in eastern China contrasts with the generally accepted global model of the mafic lower crust.

  17. Convenient (1 + 1) probe of S(1D2) and application to photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide at 216.9 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeraratna, Chaya; Amarasinghe, Chandika; Fernando, Ravin; Tiwari, Vishwas; Suits, Arthur G.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a 1 + 1 probe of S(1D) at 216.9 nm through the (4s 3So) state, and demonstrate it in one-color experiments to examine the photodissociation of OCS using DC slice imaging. As seen in previous work, the S(1D) image shows a bimodal distribution corresponding to two dissociation pathways of the parent molecule. The slice images are rotationally resolved across the entire product velocity profile. Separate two-color experiments allow us to determine that the probe is insensitive to orbital polarization in the sulfur atom under the conditions studied.

  18. Characterizing the Velocity Profile of a Swirling Gas Experiment by Particle Imaging Velocimetry to Study Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greess, Samuel; Ji, Hantao; Merino, Enrique; Berrios, William

    2013-10-01

    The method by which angular momentum transfers between different sections of accretion disks is a matter of ongoing debate. One suggested answer is Magnetorotational instability (MRI), which would facilitate this transfer through the magnetic interactions between particles at different distances from the center of the disk. While ongoing experiments with MRI have focused on the use of liquid metals to test the effects of magnetic fields, we are developing a swirling gas experiment to study effects beyond incompressible hydrodynamics, including compressible gas dynamics and plasma effects when gas is ionized. A second-generation prototype swirling gas experiment has been built to test the principle and to establish favorable rotation profiles using a chamber of swirling fog to simulate the formation and movement of accretion disks about some gravitational center. The paths of the visible fog particles can then be analyzed with Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) techniques; these velocity measurements can then be organized by a Python program. Anticipated results include a radial profile of velocities at different times during the gas injection process, as well as further refinement of the fog chamber design to improve the accuracy in controlling the profile.

  19. Effect of spaceflight on the maximal shortening velocity, morphology, and enzyme profile of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Romatowski, J. G.; De La Cruz, L.; Widrick, J. J.; Desplanches, D.

    2000-01-01

    Weightlessness has been shown to cause limb muscle wasting and a reduced peak force and power in the antigravity soleus muscle. Despite a reduced peak power, Caiozzo et al. observed an increased maximal shortening velocity in the rat soleus muscle following a 14-day space flight. The major purpose of the present investigation was to determine if weightlessness induced an elevated velocity in the antigravity slow type I fibers of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), as well as to establish a cellular mechanism for the effect. Spaceflight or models of weightlessness have been shown to increase glucose uptake, elevate muscle glycogen content, and increase fatigability of the soleus muscle. The latter appears to be in part caused by a reduced ability of the slow oxidative fibers to oxidize fats. A second goal of this study was to establish the extent to which weightlessness altered the substrate profile and glycolytic and oxidative enzyme capacity of individual slow- and fast-twitch fibers.

  20. A Spatially Resolving X-ray Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-temperature and Rotation-velocity Profiles on the AlcatorC-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M. L.; Scott, S. D.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.; Lee, S. G.; Broennimann, C. H.; Eikenberry, E. F.

    2009-03-24

    A new spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of measuring continuous spatial profiles of high resolution spectra (λ/dλ > 6000) of He-like and H-like Ar Kα lines with good spatial (~1 cm) and temporal (~10 ms) resolutions has been installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Two spherically bent crystals image the spectra onto four two-dimensional Pilatus II pixel detectors. Tomographic inversion enables inference of local line emissivity, ion temperature (Ti), and toroidal plasma rotation velocity (vφ) from the line Doppler widths and shifts. The data analysis techniqu

  1. An Investigation of a Mathematical Model for the Internal Velocity Profile of Conical Diffusers Applied to DAWTs.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Disterfano L M; Vaz, Jerson R P; Figueiredo, Sávio W O; De Oliveira e Silva, Marcelo; Lins, Erb F; Mesquita, André L A

    2015-01-01

    The Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbines (DAWTs) have been widely studied, since the diffusers improve the power coefficient of the wind turbine, particularly of small systems. The diffuser is a device which has the function of causing an increase on the flow velocity through the wind rotor plane due to pressure drop downstream, therefore resulting in an increase of the rotor power coefficient. This technology aids the turbine to exceed the Betz limit, which states that the maximum kinetic energy extracted from the flow is 59.26%. Thus, the present study proposes a mathematical model describing the behavior of the internal velocity for three conical diffusers, taking into account the characteristics of flow around them. The proposed model is based on the Biot-Savart's Law, in which the vortex filament induces a velocity field at an arbitrary point on the axis of symmetry of the diffusers. The results are compared with experimental data obtained for the three diffusers, and present good agreement. PMID:25923169

  2. A bayesian approach for determining velocity and uncertainty estimates from seismic cone penetrometer testing or vertical seismic profiling data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pidlisecky, A.; Haines, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional processing methods for seismic cone penetrometer data present several shortcomings, most notably the absence of a robust velocity model uncertainty estimate. We propose a new seismic cone penetrometer testing (SCPT) data-processing approach that employs Bayesian methods to map measured data errors into quantitative estimates of model uncertainty. We first calculate travel-time differences for all permutations of seismic trace pairs. That is, we cross-correlate each trace at each measurement location with every trace at every other measurement location to determine travel-time differences that are not biased by the choice of any particular reference trace and to thoroughly characterize data error. We calculate a forward operator that accounts for the different ray paths for each measurement location, including refraction at layer boundaries. We then use a Bayesian inversion scheme to obtain the most likely slowness (the reciprocal of velocity) and a distribution of probable slowness values for each model layer. The result is a velocity model that is based on correct ray paths, with uncertainty bounds that are based on the data error. ?? NRC Research Press 2011.

  3. Development of a Spatially Resolving X-Ray Crystal Spectrometer (XCS) for Measurement of Ion-Temperature (Ti) and Rotation-Velocity (v) Profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Delgado-Aprico, L; Johnson, D; Feder, R; Beiersdorfer,; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Barnsley, R; O'Mullane, M; Lee, S G

    2010-05-21

    Imaging XCS arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, Fe) with ~7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a PPPL-MIT instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2d x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. Measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod will be presented.

  4. Performance of an asymmetric short annular diffuser with a nondiverging inner wall using suction. [control of radial profiles of diffuser exit velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of a short highly asymmetric annular diffuser equipped with wall bleed (suction) capability was evaluated at nominal inlet Mach numbers of 0.188, 0.264, and 0.324 with the inlet pressure and temperature at near ambient values. The diffuser had an area ratio of 2.75 and a length- to inlet-height ratio of 1.6. Results show that the radial profiles of diffuser exit velocity could be controlled from a severely hub peaked to a slightly tip biased form by selective use of bleed. At the same time, other performance parameters were also improved. These results indicate the possible application of the diffuser bleed technique to control flow profiles to gas turbine combustors.

  5. Development Of a Spatially Resolving X-ray Crystal Spectrometer For Measurement Of Ion-temperature (Ti) And Rotation-velocity (v) Profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Delgado-Aparico, L; Johnson, David; Feder, R; Beiersdorfer, P; Dunn, James; Morris, K; Wang, E; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Barnsley, R; O'Mullane, M

    2010-12-15

    Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer XCS arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, and Fe) with ~ 7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a prototype instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2D x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E / dE > 6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. The measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for the inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod are presented.

  6. A spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer for measurement of ion-temperature and rotation-velocity profiles on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M. L.; Scott, S. D.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M.-F.; Lee, S. G.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.

    2008-10-15

    A new spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of measuring continuous spatial profiles of high resolution spectra ({lambda}/d{lambda}>6000) of He-like and H-like Ar K{alpha} lines with good spatial ({approx}1 cm) and temporal ({approx}10 ms) resolutions has been installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Two spherically bent crystals image the spectra onto four two-dimensional Pilatus II pixel detectors. Tomographic inversion enables inference of local line emissivity, ion temperature (T{sub i}), and toroidal plasma rotation velocity (v{sub {phi}}) from the line Doppler widths and shifts. The data analysis techniques, T{sub i} and v{sub {phi}} profiles, analysis of fusion-neutron background, and predictions of performance on other tokamaks, including ITER, will be presented.

  7. Development of a spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer for measurement of ion-temperature (T{sub i}) and rotation-velocity (v) profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Johnson, D.; Feder, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Dunn, J.; Morris, K.; Wang, E.; Reinke, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Barnsley, R.; O'Mullane, M.; Lee, S. G.

    2010-10-15

    Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of T{sub i} and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, and Fe) with {approx}7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a prototype instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2D x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure T{sub i} and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. The measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for the inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod are presented.

  8. Development of 1D Particle-in-Cell Code and Simulation of Plasma-Wall Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Laura P.

    This thesis discusses the development of a 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) code and the analysis of plasma-wall interactions. The 1D code (Plasma and Wall Simulation -- PAWS) is a kinetic simulation of plasma done by treating both electrons and ions as particles. The goal of this thesis is to study near wall plasma interaction to better understand the mechanism that occurs in this region. The main focus of this investigation is the effects that secondary electrons have on the sheath profile. The 1D code is modeled using the PIC method. Treating both the electrons and ions as macroparticles the field is solved on each node and weighted to each macro particle. A pre-ionized plasma was loaded into the domain and the velocities of particles were sampled from the Maxwellian distribution. An important part of this code is the boundary conditions at the wall. If a particle hits the wall a secondary electron may be produced based on the incident energy. To study the sheath profile the simulations were run for various cases. Varying background neutral gas densities were run with the 2D code and compared to experimental values. Different wall materials were simulated to show their effects of SEE. In addition different SEE yields were run, including one study with very high SEE yields to show the presence of a space charge limited sheath. Wall roughness was also studied with the 1D code using random angles of incidence. In addition to the 1D code, an external 2D code was also used to investigate wall roughness without secondary electrons. The roughness profiles where created upon investigation of wall roughness inside Hall Thrusters based off of studies done on lifetime erosion of the inner and outer walls of these devices. The 2D code, Starfish[33], is a general 2D axisymmetric/Cartesian code for modeling a wide a range of plasma and rarefied gas problems. These results show that higher SEE yield produces a smaller sheath profile and that wall roughness produces a lower SEE yield

  9. Modification of the mean near-wall velocity profile of a high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer with the injection of drag-reducing polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbing, Brian R.; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2013-08-01

    The current study explores the influence of polymer drag reduction on the near-wall velocity distribution in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and its dependence on Reynolds number. Recent moderate Reynolds number direct numerical simulation and experimental studies presented in White et al. [Phys. Fluids 24, 021701 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3681862 have challenged the classical representation of the logarithmic dependence of the velocity profile for drag-reduced flows, especially at drag reduction levels above 40%. In the present study, high Reynolds number data from a drag reduced TBL is presented and compared to the observations of White et al. [Phys. Fluids 24, 021701 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3681862. Data presented here were acquired in the TBL flow on a 12.9-m-long flat plate at speeds to 20.3 m s-1, achieving momentum thickness based Reynolds number to 1.5 × 105, which is an order of magnitude greater than that available in the literature. Polyethylene oxide solutions with an average molecular weight of 3.9 × 106 g mol-1 were injected into the flow at various concentrations and volumetric fluxes to achieve a particular level of drag reduction. The resulting mean near-wall velocity profiles show distinctly different behavior depending on whether they fall in the low drag reduction (LDR) or the high drag reduction (HDR) regimes, which are nominally divided at 40% drag reduction. In the LDR regime, the classical view that the logarithmic slope remains constant at the Newtonian value and the intercept constant increases with increasing drag reduction appears to be valid. However, in the HDR regime the behavior is no longer universal. The intercept constant continues to increase linearly in proportion to the drag reduction level until a Reynolds-number-dependent threshold is achieved, at which point the intercept constant rapidly decreases to that predicted by the ultimate profile. The rapid decrease in the intercept constant is due to the corresponding increase in the

  10. Experimental method for laser-driven flyer plates for 1-D shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D. L.; Luo, S. N.; Swift, D. C.; Loomis, E.; Johnson, R.; Greenfield, S.; Peralta, P.; Koskelo, A.; Tonks, D.

    2007-12-12

    One-dimensional shocks can be generated by impacting flyer plates accelerated to terminal velocities by a confined laser-ablated plasma. Over the past few years, we have developed this capability with our facility-size laser, TRIDENT, capable of {>=}500 Joules at multi-microsecond pulse lengths to accelerate 1-D flyer plates, 8-mm diameter by 0.1-2 mm thick. Plates have been accelerated to terminal velocities of 100 to {>=}500 m/s, with full recovery of the flyer and target for post mortem metallography. By properly tailoring the laser temporal and spatial profile, the expanding confined plasma accelerates the plate away from the transparent sapphire substrate, and decouples the laser parameters from shock pressure profile resulting from the plate impact on a target. Since the flyer plate is in free flight on impact with the target, minimal collateral damage occurs to either. The experimental method to launch these plates to terminal velocity, ancillary diagnostics, and representative experimental data is presented.

  11. Outstanding Phenotypic Differences in the Profile of Amyloid-β between Tg2576 and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allué, José Antonio; Sarasa, Leticia; Izco, María; Pérez-Grijalba, Virginia; Fandos, Noelia; Pascual-Lucas, María; Ogueta, Samuel; Pesini, Pedro; Sarasa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg2576 are very common transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), used in many laboratories as tools to research the mechanistic process leading to the disease. In order to augment our knowledge about the amyloid-β (Aβ) isoforms present in both transgenic mouse models, we have developed two chromatographic methods, one acidic and the other basic, for the characterization of the Aβ species produced in the brains of the two transgenic mouse models. After immunoprecipitation and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, 10 species of Aβ, surprisingly all of human origin, were detected in the brain of Tg2576 mouse, whereas 39 species, of both murine and human origin, were detected in the brain of the APP/PS1 mouse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the identification of such a high number of Aβ species in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse, whereas, in contrast, a much lower number of Aβ species were identified in the Tg2576 mouse. Therefore, this study brings to light a relevant phenotypic difference between these two popular mice models of AD. PMID:27258422

  12. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  13. Measurement of magnetic field and velocity profiles in 3.6 kJ United Nations University/International Center For Theoretical Physics plasma focus fusion device

    SciTech Connect

    Mathuthu, M.; Zengeni, T.G.; Gholap, A.V.

    1996-12-01

    A Mather-type small plasma focus device was operated in air filling in the pressure range of 0.5 to 1.0 Torr and capacitor bank charging voltage of 13{endash}15 kV. A strong focusing action was observed in this pressure range. Magnetic probe signals at various axial positions were used to estimate velocity of current sheet and axial magnetic field distribution profiles. It was observed that under the present experimental conditions the magnetic field remains constant at 0.72 T from {ital z}=0.0 cm to {ital z}=8.0 cm but falls rapidly to 0.52 T at about {ital z}=14.5 cm at a fixed radial distance of 2.65 cm. The magnetic field and velocity measurements indicate a current shedding effect{emdash}only 68.5{percent} of the total injected current flows into the focus region. The rapid drop of the magnetic field at {ital z}=8.0 cm suggests that further (initial shedding is at the insulator) current and mass shedding in the focus tube is significant after this value of {ital z}. Experimental values of velocity of the current sheet are compared with those of the snow plough theoretical model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Tracer-pebble movement along a concave river profile: Virtual velocity in relation to grain size and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, R. I.; Wathen, S. J.

    1998-08-01

    Over 1400 tracer pebbles 16-256 mm in diameter were tracked for 2 years in six reaches of Allt Dubhaig, Scotland, a small gravel-bed river along which shear stress and bed surface grain size decrease toward a local base level. Pebble movement was size-selective both within and between reaches. Within reaches the decrease in mean travel distance with increasing grain size is strongest in the coarse tail of the size distribution. Particle shape has a minor secondary effect. A nondimensional grain velocity, averaged over the duration of competent flow, is used to compare different size classes and reaches. Over 90% of its variance is explained by relative grain size and reach Shields stress. The pattern of size selectivity is consistent with single-event tracer results elsewhere, bedload trap data from our distal reach, and the concept of partial mobility. It provides a mechanism for strong downstream fining by selective transport and deposition along rivers in which stress declines toward base level. The nondimensional prediction equation for grain velocity may be of use in other rivers but requires testing.

  15. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  16. Calculation of area-averaged vertical profiles of the horizontal wind velocity from volume-imaging lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schols, J. L.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    Area-averaged horizontal wind measurements are derived from the motion of spatial inhomogeneities in aerosol backscattering observed with a volume-imaging lidar. Spatial averaging provides high precision, reducing sample variations of wind measurements well below the level of turbulent fluctuations, even under conditions of very light mean winds and strong convection or under the difficult conditions represented by roll convection. Wind velocities are measured using the two-dimensional spatial cross correlation computed between successive horizontal plane maps of aerosol backscattering, assembled from three-dimensional lidar scans. Prior to calculation of the correlation function, three crucial steps are performed: (1) the scans are corrected for image distortion by the wind during a finite scan time; (2) a temporal high pass median filtering is applied to eliminate structures that do not move with the wind; and (3) a histogram equalization is employed to reduce biases to the brightest features.

  17. Heave-Pitch-Roll Dynamics of a Vehicle with a Variable Velocity Over a Non-Homogeneously Profiled Flexible Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, D.; Upadhyay, H. C.

    1993-06-01

    An analysis of the response characteristic evaluation of a vehicle moving over a flexible track is presented, with a heave-pitch-roll model of the vehicle. The track foundation is flexible and has distributed mass, stiffness and damping. The road roughness may be non-homogeneous in the longitudinal direction and unsymmetrical in the width direction. The vehicle velocity may be variable. An available method with a two-point input has been extended to a four-point input, and a closed form expression has been obtained for the second order statistics of the response. The use of different types of sleepers is common on railway tracks, leading to variations in the foundation properties. The dynamic behaviour is expected to be sensitive to these changes. The effects of some typical sleepers on the system response have been obtained and compared.

  18. Seismic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle along profile PANCAKE across the Carpathians between the Pannonian Basin and the East European Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Kolomiyets, K.; Czuba, W.; Środa, P.; Grad, M.; Kovács, I.; Stephenson, R.; Lysynchuk, D.; Thybo, H.; Artemieva, I. M.; Omelchenko, V.; Gintov, O.; Kutas, R.; Gryn, D.; Guterch, A.; Hegedűs, E.; Komminaho, K.; Legostaeva, O.; Tiira, T.; Tolkunov, A.

    2013-11-01

    Results are presented of a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction survey along a profile between the Pannonian Basin (PB) and the East European Craton (EEC) called PANCAKE. The P- and S-wave velocity model derived can be divided into three sectors: the PB; the Carpathians, including the Transcarpathian Depression and the Carpathian Foredeep; and the south-western part of the EEC, including the Trans European Suture Zone (TESZ). Seismic data support a robust model of the Vp velocity structure of the crust. In the PB, the 22-23 km thick crust consists of a 2-5 km thick sedimentary layer (Vp = 2.4-3.7 km/s), 17-20 km thick upper crystalline crust (5.9-6.3 km/s) and an up to 3 km thick lower crustal layer (Vp = 6.4 km/s). In the central part of the Carpathians, a 10-24 km thick uppermost part of the crust with Vp ≤ 6.0 km/s may correspond to sedimentary rocks of different ages; several high velocity bodies (Vp = 5.35, 5.95 and 6.05 km/s) within the sedimentary flysch sequences may represent volcanic sequences. The Moho depth changes from 25 km to 45 km over ca. 100 km distance beneath the Carpathians, west of TESZ. The cratonic crust has a typical three layer structure with a pronounced thickening of the lower crust towards the Ukrainian Shield, where a high velocity lower crust (Vp > 7.2 km/s) is observed. Two low-velocity lenses in the upper crust of the EEC are interpreted beneath major sedimentary troughs (Lviv and Volyn-Podolsk). Mantle reflectors are observed at depths of ~ 45 km and ~ 75 km below the PB and 10-20 km below the Moho in the EEC. Sub-Moho (Pn) velocities increase from 8.0 km/s beneath the PB to 8.1 km/s beneath the Carpathians and to ~ 8.3 km/s beneath the EEC. S-waves of acceptable quality are recorded in the EEC; their signal-to-noise ratios increase towards the Ukrainian Shield.

  19. Crustal shear (S) velocity and Poisson's ratio structure along the INDEPTH IV profile in northeast Tibet as derived from wide-angle seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechie, J.; Zhao, W.; Karplus, M. S.; Wu, Z.; Meissner, R.; Shi, D.; Klemperer, S. L.; Su, H.; Kind, R.; Xue, G.; Brown, L. D.

    2012-08-01

    From the S-wave data collected along a 270-km-long profile spanning the Kunlun mountains in NE Tibet, 14595 Sg phase arrivals and 21 SmS phase arrivals were utilized to derive a whole-crustal S velocity model and, together with a previously derived P velocity model, a Poisson's ratio (σ) model beneath the profile. The final tomogram for the upper 10-15 km of the crust reveals the lower velocities associated with the predominantly Neogene-Quaternary sediments of the Qaidam basin to the north and the higher velocities associated with the predominantly Palaeozoic and Mesozoic upper crustal sequences of the Songpan-Ganzi terrane and Kunlun mountains to the south. This study finds no evidence that the Kunlun mountains are involved in large-scale northward overriding of the Qaidam basin along a shallow south-dipping thrust. The σ in the upper 10-15 km of the crust are often lower than 0.25, indicating a preponderance of quartz-rich rocks in the upper crust beneath the profile. Below 10-15 km depth, the remainder of the crust down to the Moho has an average σ of 0.24 beneath the Songpan-Ganzi terrane and Kunlun mountains and 0.25 below the Qaidam basin. These low σ are similar to other low σ found along other profiles in the northeastern part of the plateau. Assuming an isotropic situation and no significant variation in σ between 10-15 km depth and the Moho, then the lower crust between 25-30 km depth below sea level and the Moho with P velocities varying from 6.6 km s-1 at the top to around 6.9 km s-1 at the base and σ of 0.24-0.25 should comprise intermediate granulites in the upper part transitioning to granulite facies metapelites in the lower part. As the pre-Cenozoic Qaidam basin crust has probably not lost any of its lower crust during the present Himalayan orogenic cycle in the Cenozoic and only has a σ of 0.245-0.25, then it appears that the pre-Cenozoic Qaidam basin crust involved in the collision is more felsic and thus weaker and more easily

  20. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles, volume 1. [jet engine noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken to: (1) define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; (3) and to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan nozzle convergence angle, core extention length to annulus height ratio, and flow Mach number and temperatures were studied. The results are presented as normalized directivity plots.

  1. Quasi 1-D Analysis of a Circular, Compressible, Turbulent Jet Laden with Water Droplets. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Recent experimental studies indicate that presence of small amount of liquid droplets reduces the Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of a jet. Present study is aimed at numerically investigating the effect of liquid particles on the overall flow quantities of a heated, compressible round jet. The jet is assumed perfectly expanded. A quasi-1D model was developed for this purpose which uses area-averaged quantities that satisfy integral conservation equations. Special attention is given to represent the early development region since it is acoustically important. Approximate velocity and temperature profiles were assumed in this region to evaluate entrainment rate. Experimental correlations were used to obtain spreading rate of shear layer. The base flow thus obtained is then laden with water droplets at the exit of the nozzle. Mass, momentum and energy coupling between the two phases is represented using empirical relations. Droplet size and mass loading are varied to observe their effect on flow variables.

  2. A Computational Fluid Mechanical Study on the Effects of Opening and Closing of the Mitral Orifice on a Transmitral Flow Velocity Profile and an Early Diastolic Intraventricular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masanori; Wada, Shigeo; Mikami, Taisei; Kitabatake, Akira; Karino, Takeshi

    A computational fluid dynamics study of intraventricular flow during early diastole is carried out to examine the effect of a change in the size of the mitral orifice due to opening and closing of the mitral valve on the flow evolution in the left ventricle during early diastole. It is found that a velocity profile of a transmitral flow with maximum velocity locating at the center of the mitral orifice is generated by gradual opening of the mitral orifice, and it remains even after the mitral orifice has fully opened. This transmitral flow causes the development of a vortex ring extending from the anterior to the posterior side of the left ventricle. The vortex ring keeps the main inflow to stream linearly toward the ventricular apex. Such a flow pattern produces an elongated shape of an aliasing area in a color M-mode Doppler echocardiogram obtained clinically. It is, therefore, considered that although opening and closing of the mitral orifice occur with a short period, they play an important role in characterizing intraventricular flow during early diastole.

  3. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  4. CLASH-VLT: The mass, velocity-anisotropy, and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of the z = 0.44 galaxy cluster MACS J1206.2-0847

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biviano, A.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Mercurio, A.; Girardi, M.; Nonino, M.; Grillo, C.; Scodeggio, M.; Lemze, D.; Kelson, D.; Umetsu, K.; Postman, M.; Zitrin, A.; Czoske, O.; Ettori, S.; Fritz, A.; Lombardi, M.; Maier, C.; Medezinski, E.; Mei, S.; Presotto, V.; Strazzullo, V.; Tozzi, P.; Ziegler, B.; Annunziatella, M.; Bartelmann, M.; Benitez, N.; Bradley, L.; Brescia, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Coe, D.; Demarco, R.; Donahue, M.; Ford, H.; Gobat, R.; Graves, G.; Koekemoer, A.; Kuchner, U.; Melchior, P.; Meneghetti, M.; Merten, J.; Moustakas, L.; Munari, E.; Regős, E.; Sartoris, B.; Seitz, S.; Zheng, W.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We constrain the mass, velocity-anisotropy, and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of the z = 0.44 CLASH cluster MACS J1206.2-0847, using the projected phase-space distribution of cluster galaxies in combination with gravitational lensing. Methods: We use an unprecedented data-set of ≃600 redshifts for cluster members, obtained as part of a VLT/VIMOS large program, to constrain the cluster mass profile over the radial range ~0-5 Mpc (0-2.5 virial radii) using the MAMPOSSt and Caustic methods. We then add external constraints from our previous gravitational lensing analysis. We invert the Jeans equation to obtain the velocity-anisotropy profiles of cluster members. With the mass-density and velocity-anisotropy profiles we then obtain the first determination of a cluster pseudo-phase-space density profile. Results: The kinematics and lensing determinations of the cluster mass profile are in excellent agreement. This is very well fitted by a NFW model with mass M200 = (1.4 ± 0.2) × 1015 M⊙ and concentration c200 = 6 ± 1, only slightly higher than theoretical expectations. Other mass profile models also provide acceptable fits to our data, of (slightly) lower (Burkert, Hernquist, and Softened Isothermal Sphere) or comparable (Einasto) quality than NFW. The velocity anisotropy profiles of the passive and star-forming cluster members are similar, close to isotropic near the center and increasingly radial outside. Passive cluster members follow extremely well the theoretical expectations for the pseudo-phase-space density profile and the relation between the slope of the mass-density profile and the velocity anisotropy. Star-forming cluster members show marginal deviations from theoretical expectations. Conclusions: This is the most accurate determination of a cluster mass profile out to a radius of 5 Mpc, and the only determination of the velocity-anisotropy and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of both passive and star-forming galaxies for an individual

  5. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  6. LASER APPLICATIONS IN MEDICINE: Analysis of distortions in the velocity profiles of suspension flows inside a light-scattering medium upon their reconstruction from the optical coherence Doppler tomograph signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. V.; Kirillin, M. Yu; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2005-11-01

    Model signals from one and two plane flows of a particle suspension are obtained for an optical coherence Doppler tomograph (OCDT) by the Monte-Carlo method. The optical properties of particles mimic the properties of non-aggregating erythrocytes. The flows are considered in a stationary scattering medium with optical properties close to those of the skin. It is shown that, as the flow position depth increases, the flow velocity determined from the OCDT signal becomes smaller than the specified velocity and the reconstructed profile extends in the direction of the distant boundary, which is accompanied by the shift of its maximum. In the case of two flows, an increase in the velocity of the near-surface flow leads to the overestimated values of velocity of the reconstructed profile of the second flow. Numerical simulations were performed by using a multiprocessor parallel-architecture computer.

  7. Optical properties of LEDs with patterned 1D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hronec, P.; Kuzma, A.; Å kriniarová, J.; Kováč, J.; Benčurová, A.; Haščík, Å.; Nemec, P.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we focus on the application of the one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PhC) structures on the top of Al0.295Ga0.705As/GaAs multi-quantum well light emitting diode (MQW LED). 1D PhC structures with periods of 600 nm, 700 nm, 800 nm, and 900 nm were fabricated by the E-Beam Direct Write (EBDW) Lithography. Effect of 1D PhC period on the light extraction enhancement was studied. 1D PhC LED radiation profiles were obtained from Near Surface Light Emission Images (NSLEI). Measurements showed the strongest light extraction enhancement using 800 nm period of PhC. Investigation of PhC LED radiation profiles showed strong light decoupling when light reaches PhC structure. Achieved LEE was from 22.6% for 600 nm PhC LED to 47.0% for 800 nm PhC LED. LED with PhC structure at its surface was simulated by FDTD simulation method under excitation of appropriate launch field.

  8. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Vought F4U-1D Corsair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    Vought F4U-1D Corsair: In February and March of 1945 this Corsair was examined in the NACA's 30 x 60 Full Scale Tunnel at Langley Field. The F4U-1D has rockets mounted on its wings for this test. After installation and during testing, the wings would be lowered to their flight position.

  10. Near-surface characterization of a geotechnical site in north-east Missouri using shear-wave velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ismail, A.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) as a function of soil stiffness is an essential parameter in geotechnical characterization of the subsurface. In this study, multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) and downhole methods were used to map the shear-wave velocity-structure and depth to the bed-rock surface at a 125m ?? 125m geotechnical site in Missouri. The main objective was to assess the suitability of the site for constructing a large, heavy building. The acquired multichannel surface wave data were inverted to provide 1D shear-wave velocity profile corresponding to each shot gather. These 1D velocity profiles were interpolated and contoured to generate a suite of 2D shear-wave velocity sections. Integrating the shear-wave velocity data from the MASW method with the downhole velocity data and the available borehole lithologic information enabled us to map shear-wave velocity-structure to a depth on the order of 20m. The bedrock surface, which is dissected by a significant cut-and-fill valley, was imaged. The results suggest that the study site will require special consideration prior to construction. The results also demonstrate the successful use of MASW methods, when integrated with downhole velocity measurements and borehole lithologic information, in the characterization of the near surface at the geotechnical sites. ?? 2007 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  11. Community interactive webtool to retrieve Greenland glacier data for 1-D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrette, Mahé

    2015-04-01

    Marine-terminating, outlet glaciers are challenging to include in conventional Greenland-wide ice sheet models because of the large variation in scale between model grid size (typically 10 km) and outlet glacier width (typically 1-5km), making it a subgrid scale feature. A possible approach to tackle this problem is to use one-dimensional flowline models for the individual glaciers (e.g. Nick et al., 2013, Nature; Enderlin et al 2013a,b, The Cryosphere). Here we present a python- and javascript- based webtool to prepare data required to feed in or validate a flowline model. It is designed primarily to outline the glacier geometry and returns relevant data averaged over cross-sections. The tool currently allows to: visualize 2-D ice sheet data (zoom/pan), quickly switch between datasets (e.g. ice thickness, bedrock elevation, surface velocity) interpolated / transformed on a common grid. draw flowlines from user-input seeds on the map, calculated from a vector field of surface velocity, as an helpful guide for point 3 interactively draw glacier outline (side and middle lines) on top of the data mesh the outlined glacier domain in the horizontal plane extract relevant data into a 1-D longitudinal profile download the result as a netCDF file The project is hosted on github to encourage collaboration, under the open-source MIT Licence. The server-side is written in python (open-source) using the web-framework flask, and the client-side (javascript) makes use of the d3 library for interactive figures. For now it only works locally in a web browser (start server: "python runserver.py"). Data need to be downloaded separately from the original sources. See the README file in the project for information how to use it. Github projects: https://github.com/perrette/webglacier1d (main) https://github.com/perrette/dimarray (dependency)

  12. Numerical simulations of heavily polluted fine-grained sediment remobilization using 1D, 1D+, and 2D channel schematization.

    PubMed

    Kaiglová, Jana; Langhammer, Jakub; Jiřinec, Petr; Janský, Bohumír; Chalupová, Dagmar

    2015-03-01

    This article used various hydrodynamic and sediment transport models to analyze the potential and the limits of different channel schematizations. The main aim was to select and evaluate the most suitable simulation method for fine-grained sediment remobilization assessment. Three types of channel schematization were selected to study the flow potential for remobilizing fine-grained sediment in artificially modified channels. Schematization with a 1D cross-sectional horizontal plan, a 1D+ approach, splitting the riverbed into different functional zones, and full 2D mesh, adopted in MIKE by the DHI modeling suite, was applied to the study. For the case study, a 55-km stretch of the Bílina River, in the Czech Republic, Central Europe, which has been heavily polluted by the chemical and coal mining industry since the mid-twentieth century, was selected. Long-term exposure to direct emissions of toxic pollutants including heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) resulted in deposits of pollutants in fine-grained sediments in the riverbed. Simulations, based on three hydrodynamic model schematizations, proved that for events not exceeding the extent of the riverbed profile, the 1D schematization can provide comparable results to a 2D model. The 1D+ schematization can improve accuracy while keeping the benefits of high-speed simulation and low requirements of input DEM data, but the method's suitability is limited by the channel properties. PMID:25687259

  13. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  14. 1D ferrimagnetism in homometallic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, E.; Gómez-García, C. J.; Borrás-Almenar, J. J.

    1990-05-01

    The magnetic properties of the cobalt zigzag chain Co(bpy)(NCS)2 (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) are discussed on the basis of an Ising-chain model that takes into account alternating Landé factors. It is emphasized, for the first time, that a homometallic chain containing only one type of site can give rise to a 1D ferrimagneticlike behavior.

  15. DESIGN PACKAGE 1D SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    L.R. Eisler

    1995-02-02

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package 1D, Surface Facilities, (for a list of design items included in the package 1D system safety analysis see section 3). This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the structure/system/component (S/S/C) design, (2) add safety devices and capabilities to the designs that reduce risk, (3) provide devices that detect and warn personnel of hazardous conditions, and (4) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components (S/S/Cs) during normal operations excluding hazards occurring during maintenance and ''off normal'' operations.

  16. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  17. Waveform Constrained Seismic Velocity Structure in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhie, J.; Dreger, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    1-D and 2-D S-wave velocity structure from Mammoth Lakes to Yreka is determined by SH waveform modeling and receiver function analysis. Regional broadband waveforms from the 21 September 1993 Klamath Falls (Mw 6.0), the 15 May 1999 Mammoth Lakes (Mw 6.0), and the 10 August 2001 Portola (Mw 5.2) events were well recorded by 4 to 5 BDSN stations that are also located nearly on the same NNW line. This naturally aligned configuration of three local earthquakes and stations provides an excellent opportunity to determine a waveform constrained velocity model along the profile. Before performing the waveform modeling, a receiver function technique is applied to constrain Moho depth at each station. 1-D models are estimated iteratively by forward modeling of the broadband waveforms and the receiver functions. A 2-D model will be determined based on the 1-D results, and will be tested by modeling the broadband waveforms using a finite difference technique.

  18. Preparation of 1D nanostructures using biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruneanu, Stela; Olenic, Liliana; Barbu Tudoran, Lucian; Kacso, Irina; Farha Al-Said, Said A.; Hassanien, Reda; Houlton, Andrew; Horrocks, Benjamin R.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we have shown that one-dimensional (1D) particle arrays can be obtained using biomolecules, like DNA or amino-acids. Nano-arrays of silver and gold were prepared in a single-step synthesis, by exploiting the binding abilities of λ-DNA and L-Arginine. The morphology and optical properties of these nanostructures were investigated using AFM, TEM and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy.

  19. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  20. Coalescence phenomena in 1D silver nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Wing, C.; Pérez-Alvarez, M.; Mondragón-Galicia, G.; Arenas-Alatorre, J.; Gutiérrez-Wing, M. T.; Henk, M. C.; Negulescu, I. I.; Rusch, K. A.

    2009-07-01

    Different coalescence processes on 1D silver nanostructures synthesized by a PVP assisted reaction in ethylene glycol at 160 °C were studied experimentally and theoretically. Analysis by TEM and HRTEM shows different defects found on the body of these materials, suggesting that they were induced by previous coalescence processes in the synthesis stage. TEM observations showed that irradiation with the electron beam eliminates the boundaries formed near the edges of the structures, suggesting that this process can be carried out by the application of other means of energy (i.e. thermal). These results were also confirmed by theoretical calculations by Monte Carlo simulations using a Sutton-Chen potential. A theoretical study by molecular dynamics simulation of the different coalescence processes on 1D silver nanostructures is presented, showing a surface energy driven sequence followed to form the final coalesced structure. Calculations were made at 1000-1300 K, which is near the melting temperature of silver (1234 K). Based on these results, it is proposed that 1D nanostructures can grow through a secondary mechanism based on coalescence, without losing their dimensionality.

  1. A crustal seismic velocity model for the UK, Ireland and surrounding seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, A.; England, R.W.; Maguire, Peter K.H.

    2007-01-01

    A regional model of the 3-D variation in seismic P-wave velocity structure in the crust of NW Europe has been compiled from wide-angle reflection/refraction profiles. Along each 2-D profile a velocity-depth function has been digitised at 5 km intervals. These 1-D velocity functions were mapped into three dimensions using ordinary kriging with weights determined to minimise the difference between digitised and interpolated values. An analysis of variograms of the digitised data suggested a radial isotropic weighting scheme was most appropriate. Horizontal dimensions of the model cells are optimised at 40 ?? 40 km and the vertical dimension at 1 km. The resulting model provides a higher resolution image of the 3-D variation in seismic velocity structure of the UK, Ireland and surrounding areas than existing models. The construction of the model through kriging allows the uncertainty in the velocity structure to be assessed. This uncertainty indicates the high density of data required to confidently interpolate the crustal velocity structure, and shows that for this region the velocity is poorly constrained for large areas away from the input data. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  2. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    SciTech Connect

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  3. General instability criterion of laminar velocity distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollmien, W

    1936-01-01

    The present paper describes the results of a stability investigation on symmetrical velocity profiles in a channel and of boundary-layer profiles. The effect of friction was assumed to be vanishing and did not occur in the stability consideration so far as it had been resorted to for preparatory asymptotic considerations. Proceeding on very general premises as regards the form of the velocity distribution, a proof was deduced of the elementary theorem that velocity profiles with inflection points are unstable.

  4. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  5. Non-linearity in Bayesian 1-D magnetotelluric inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rongwen; Dosso, Stan E.; Liu, Jianxin; Dettmer, Jan; Tong, Xiaozhong

    2011-05-01

    This paper applies a Bayesian approach to examine non-linearity for the 1-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse problem. In a Bayesian formulation the posterior probability density (PPD), which combines data and prior information, is interpreted in terms of parameter estimates and uncertainties, which requires optimizing and integrating the PPD. Much work on 1-D MT inversion has been based on (approximate) linearized solutions, but more recently fully non-linear (numerical) approaches have been applied. This paper directly compares results of linearized and non-linear uncertainty estimation for 1-D MT inversion; to do so, advanced methods for both approaches are applied. In the non-linear formulation used here, numerical optimization is carried out using an adaptive-hybrid algorithm. Numerical integration applies Metropolis-Hastings sampling, rotated to a principal-component parameter space for efficient sampling of correlated parameters, and employing non-unity sampling temperatures to ensure global sampling. Since appropriate model parametrizations are generally not known a priori, both under- and overparametrized approaches are considered. For underparametrization, the Bayesian information criterion is applied to determine the number of layers consistent with the resolving power of the data. For overparametrization, prior information is included which favours simple structure in a manner similar to regularized inversion. The data variance and/or trade-off parameter regulating data and prior information are treated in several ways, including applying fixed optimal estimates (an empirical Bayesian approach) or including them as hyperparameters in the sampling (hierarchical Bayesian). The latter approach has the benefit of accounting for the uncertainty in the hyperparameters in estimating model parameter uncertainties. Non-linear and linearized inversion results are compared for synthetic test cases and for the measured COPROD1 MT data by considering marginal probability

  6. Spectral functions of 1D Peierls and Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Johannes

    1998-03-01

    We construct the spectral function of the Luther-Emery model which describes one-dimensional Peierls and Mott insulators with a spin resp. charge gap, using symmetries and known limits and equivalences to other models. For the Peierls insulator, we find a true singularity with interaction dependent exponents on the gapped spin dispersion and a finite maximum depending on the magnitude of the spin gap, on a charge dispersion shifted by Δ_σ, as well as strong shadow bands with the same functional form as the main bands. For 1D Mott insulators, one or two singularities with universal inverse-square-root singularities are found depending on whether the charge velocity is larger or smaller than the spin velocity. The shadow band has a single singularity on the renormalized charge dispersion. These results could apply to the description of photoemission experiments in systems like K_0.3 Mo O_3, TTF-TCNQ, or Sr Cu O_2.

  7. Measuring Spin-Charge Separation in a 1D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jacob A.; Revelle, Melissa C.; Hulet, Randall G.

    2016-05-01

    We present progress on measurement of spin-charge separation in a two-component, strongly interacting, 1D gas of fermionic lithium. A characteristic feature of interacting 1D Fermi gases is that the velocity of a charge excitation propagates faster than a spin excitation. We create an excitation by applying a dipole force at the center of the cloud using a sheet of light. Depending on the detuning of this beam, we can either excite both spin species equally (charge excitation) or preferentially (spin excitation). Once this beam is turned off, the excitations propagate to the edges of the atomic cloud at a velocity determined by coupling strength. A magnetically tuned Feshbach resonance enables us to vary this coupling and map out the velocities of spin and charge excitations. Supported by an ARO MURI Grant, NSF, and The Welch Foundation

  8. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  9. Diagnostics from a 1-D atmospheric column

    SciTech Connect

    Flatley, J.M.; Mace, G.

    1996-04-01

    Various diagnostics were computed from an array of radiosondes during an intensive field operation arranged by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. The network data was centered around the site at Lamont, Oklahoma. The apparent heat source and apparent moisture sink were computed and compared to the kinematic vertical velocity for both real data and the mesoscale analysis and prediction system. Three different case studies of various weathe regimes were examined.

  10. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  11. Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

  12. Shear wave velocities from noise correlation at local scale

    SciTech Connect

    De Nisco, G.; Nunziata, C.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    Cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recordings have been studied to infer shear seismic velocities with depth. Experiments have been done in the crowded and noisy historical centre of Napoli over inter-station distances from 50 m to about 400 m, whereas active seismic spreadings are prohibitive, even for just one receiver. Group velocity dispersion curves have been extracted with FTAN method from the noise cross correlations and then the non linear inversion of them has resulted in Vs profiles with depth. The information of near by stratigraphies and the range of Vs variability for samples of Neapolitan soils and rocks confirms the validity of results obtained with our expeditious procedure. Moreover, the good comparison of noise H/V frequency of the first main peak with 1D and 2D spectral amplifications encourages to continue experiments of noise cross-correlation. If confirmed in other geological settings, the proposed approach could reveal a low cost methodology to obtain reliable and detailed Vs velocity profiles.

  13. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  14. ON THE DOPPLER VELOCITY OF EMISSION LINE PROFILES FORMED IN THE 'CORONAL CONTRAFLOW' THAT IS THE CHROMOSPHERE-CORONA MASS CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Tian Hui; Sechler, Marybeth; De Pontieu, Bart

    2012-04-10

    This analysis begins to explore the complex chromosphere-corona mass cycle using a blend of imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics. Single Gaussian fits (SGFs) to hot emission line profiles (formed above 1 MK) at the base of coronal loop structures indicate material blueshifts of 5-10 km s{sup -1}, while cool emission line profiles (formed below 1 MK) yield redshifts of a similar magnitude-indicating, to zeroth order, that a temperature-dependent bifurcating flow exists on coronal structures. Image sequences of the same region reveal weakly emitting upward propagating disturbances in both hot and cool emission with apparent speeds of 50-150 km s{sup -1}. Spectroscopic observations indicate that these propagating disturbances produce a weak emission component in the blue wing at commensurate speed, but that they contribute only a few percent to the (ensemble) emission line profile in a single spatio-temporal resolution element. Subsequent analysis of imaging data shows material 'draining' slowly ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) out of the corona, but only in the cooler passbands. We interpret the draining as the return flow of coronal material at the end of the complex chromosphere-corona mass cycle. Further, we suggest that the efficient radiative cooling of the draining material produces a significant contribution to the red wing of cool emission lines that is ultimately responsible for their systematic redshift as derived from an SGF when compared to those formed in hotter (conductively dominated) domains. The presence of counterstreaming flows complicates the line profiles, their interpretation, and asymmetry diagnoses, but allows a different physical picture of the lower corona to develop.

  15. The FC-1D: The profitable alternative Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meza, Victor J.; Alvarez, Jaime; Harrington, Brook; Lujan, Michael A.; Mitlyng, David; Saroughian, Andy; Silva, Alex; Teale, Tim

    1994-01-01

    The FC-1D was designed as an advanced solution for a low cost commercial transport meeting or exceeding all of the 1993/1994 AIAA/Lockheed request for proposal requirements. The driving philosophy behind the design of the FC-1D was the reduction of airline direct operating costs. Every effort was made during the design process to have the customer in mind. The Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group targeted reductions in drag, fuel consumption, manufacturing costs, and maintenance costs. Flying Circus emphasized cost reduction throughout the entire design program. Drag reduction was achieved by implementation of the aft nacelle wing configuration to reduce cruise drag and increase cruise speeds. To reduce induced drag, rather than increasing the wing span of the FC-1D, spiroids were included in the efficient wing design. Profile and friction drag are reduced by using riblets in place of paint around the fuselage and empennage of the FC-1D. Choosing a single aisle configuration enabled the Flying Circus to optimize the fuselage diameter. Thus, reducing fuselage drag while gaining high structural efficiency. To further reduce fuel consumption a weight reduction program was conducted through the use of composite materials. An additional quality of the FC-1D is its design for low cost manufacturing and assembly. As a result of this design attribute, the FC-1D will have fewer parts which reduces weight as well as maintenance and assembly costs. The FC-1D is affordable and effective, the apex of commercial transport design.

  16. Temperature, velocity and species profile measurements for reburning in a pulverized, entrained flow, coal combustor. Semi-annual report, October 30, 1995--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; Eatough, C.

    1996-04-01

    Data for mean velocity and temperature have been obtained over a baseline matrix operating conditions for pulverized coal without reburning. The data show the reactor to be symmetrical about the axial centerline. Effluent NO{sub x} data have been seen to correlate with measured and modeled results of flow patterns within the reactor. At low swirl the fuel jet creates a downward flow at the centerline with some upward recirculation at the perimeter of the reactor near the walls. This recirculation pattern reverses as swirl is increased, changing the flame from a long toroidal shape to a flat annulus. The NO{sub x} data show a local minimum at a swirl number of 1.0 which may be primarily the result of the direction and magnitude of the recirculation zone. Gas species and coal char burnout data have begun but have not yet been completed. Velocity data and modeling results have been used in the process of validating the comprehensive combustion code and in designing the reburning hardware. The details concerning storing and delivering the reburning fuel (natural gas) have been completed and the fabrication of the hardware is underway.

  17. Solar influence on the O(1D) dayglow emission rate: Global-scale measurements by WINDII on UARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. P.; Shepherd, G. G.

    2004-04-01

    More than 130,000 emission rate profiles of the O(1D) dayglow (630 nm) were observed by WINDII during 1991-1995, which provide an unprecedented resource for studying the O(1D) layer, and related physics and chemistry in the thermosphere and ionosphere. This article describes the general properties of the O(1D) emission layer and an empirical model derived from WINDII measurements for the O(1D) emission rate as a function of the solar zenith angle and solar irradiance using the F10.7 cm flux as a proxy.

  18. Middle and upper crust shear-wave velocity structure of the Chinese mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mei; An, Mei-Jian

    2007-07-01

    In order to give a more reliable shallow crust model for the Chinese mainland, the present study collected many short-period surface wave data which are better sensitive to shallow earth structures. Different from traditional two-step surface wave tomography, we developed a new linearized surface wave dispersion inversion method to directly get a 3D S-wave velocity model in the second step instead of inverting for 1D S-velocity profile cell by cell. We convert all the regionalized dispersions into linear constraints for a 3D S-velocity model. Checkerboard tests show that this method can give reasonable results. The distribution of the middle-and upper-crust shear-wave velocity of the Chinese mainland in our model is strongly heterogeneous and related to different geotectonic terrains. Low-velocity anomalies delineated very well most of the major sedimentary basins of China. And the variation of velocities at different depths gives an indication of basement depth of the basins. The western Tethyan tectonic domain (on the west of the 95°E longitude) is characterized by low velocity, while the eastern Tethyan domain does not show obvious low velocity. Since petroleum resources often distribute in sedimentary basins where low-velocity anomaly appears, the low velocity anomalies in the western Tethyan domain may indicate a better petroleum prospect than in its eastern counterpart. Besides, low velocity anomaly in the western Tethyan domain and around the Xing’an orogenic belt may be partly caused by high crustal temperature. The weak low-velocity belt along ˜105°E longitude corresponds to the N-S strong seismic belt of central China.

  19. Velocity and velocity bounds in static spherically symmetric metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraut, Ivan; Batic, Davide; Nowakowski, Marek

    2011-08-01

    We find simple expressions for velocity of massless particles with dependence on the distance, r, in Schwarzschild coordinates. For massive particles these expressions give an upper bound for the velocity. Our results apply to static spherically symmetric metrics. We use these results to calculate the velocity for different cases: Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström with and without the cosmological constant. We emphasize the differences between the behavior of the velocity in the different metrics and find that in cases with naked singularity there always exists a region where the massless particle moves with a velocity greater than the velocity of light in vacuum. In the case of Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter we completely characterize the velocity and the metric in an algebraic way. We contrast the case of classical naked singularities with naked singularities emerging from metric inspired by noncommutative geometry where the radial velocity never exceeds one. Furthermore, we solve the Einstein equations for a constant and polytropic density profile and calculate the radial velocity of a photon moving in spaces with interior metric. The polytropic case of radial velocity displays an unexpected variation bounded by a local minimum and maximum.

  20. Using overlapping sonobuoy data from the Ross Sea to construct a 2D deep crustal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Stock, J. M.; Granot, R.

    2012-03-01

    Sonobuoys provide an alternative to using long streamers while conducting multi-channel seismic (MCS) studies, in order to provide deeper velocity control. We present analysis and modeling techniques for interpreting the sonobuoy data and illustrate the method with ten overlapping sonobuoys collected in the Ross Sea, offshore from Antarctica. We demonstrate the importance of using the MCS data to correct for ocean currents and changes in ship navigation, which is required before using standard methods for obtaining a 1D velocity profile from each sonobuoy. We verify our 1D velocity models using acoustic finite-difference (FD) modeling and by performing depth migration on the data, and demonstrate the usefulness of FD modeling for tying interval velocities to the shallow crust imaged using MCS data. Finally, we show how overlapping sonobuoys along an MCS line can be used to construct a 2D velocity model of the crust. The velocity model reveals a thin crust (5.5 ± 0.4 km) at the boundary between the Adare and Northern Basins, and implies that the crustal structure of the Northern Basin may be more similar to that of the oceanic crust in the Adare Basin than to the stretched continental crust further south in the Ross Sea.

  1. Velocity distribution in horizontal slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kvernvold, O.; Saasen, A.; Selmor-Olsen, S.; Sontvedt, T.; Vindoy, V.

    1984-08-01

    An experimental device for measurement of the velocity distribution in a two-phase slug is developed. Velocity profiles both in the film and the liquid slug besides velocity variation along the pipe bottom (at a distance of 1 mm) through the slug front are presented.

  2. A 1-D morphodynamic model of postglacial valley incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnicliffe, Jon F.; Church, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Chilliwack River is typical of many Cordilleran valley river systems that have undergone dramatic Holocene degradation of valley fills that built up over the course of Pleistocene glaciation. Downstream controls on base level, mainly blockage of valleys by glaciers, led to aggradation of significant glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine valley fills and fan deposits, subsequently incised by fluvial action. Models of such large-scale, long-term degradation present a number of important challenges since the evolution of model parameters, such as the rate of bedload transport and grain size characteristics, are governed by the nature of the deposit. Sediment sampling in the Chilliwack Valley reveals a complex sequence of very coarse to fine textural modes. We present a 1-D numerical morphodynamic model for the river-floodplain system tailored to conditions in the valley. The model is adapted to dynamically adjust channel width to optimize sediment transporting capacity and to integrate relict valley fill material as the channel incises through valley deposits. Sensitivity to model parameters is studied using four principal criteria: profile concavity, rate of downstream grain size fining, bed surface sand content, and the timescale to equilibrium. Model results indicate that rates of abrasion and coarsening of the grain size distributions exert the strongest controls on all of the interrelated model performance criteria. While there are a number of difficulties in satisfying all model criteria simultaneously, results indicate that 1-D models of valley bottom sedimentary systems can provide a suitable framework for integrating results from sediment budget studies and chronologies of sediment evacuation established from dating.

  3. TCTEX1D4 Interactome in Human Testis: Unraveling the Function of Dynein Light Chain in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Maria João; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Morais-Santos, Filipa; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Studies were designed to identify the TCTEX1D4 interactome in human testis, with the purpose of unraveling putative protein complexes essential to male reproduction and thus novel TCTEX1D4 functions. TCTEX1D4 is a dynein light chain that belongs to the DYNT1/TCTEX1 family. In spermatozoa, it appears to be important to sperm motility, intraflagellar transport, and acrosome reaction. To contribute to the knowledge on TCTEX1D4 function in testis and spermatozoa, a yeast two-hybrid assay was performed in testis, which allowed the identification of 40 novel TCTEX1D4 interactors. Curiously, another dynein light chain, TCTEX1D2, was identified and its existence demonstrated for the first time in human spermatozoa. Immunofluorescence studies proved that TCTEX1D2 is an intra-acrosomal protein also present in the midpiece, suggesting a role in cargo movement in human spermatozoa. Further, an in silico profile of TCTEX1D4 revealed that most TCTEX1D4 interacting proteins were not previously characterized and the ones described present a very broad nature. This reinforces TCTEX1D4 as a dynein light chain that is capable of interacting with a variety of functionally different proteins. These observations collectively contribute to a deeper molecular understanding of the human spermatozoa function. PMID:24606217

  4. 1D-1D Coulomb drag in a 6 Million Mobility Bi-layer Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, Simon; Laroche, Dominique; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Lilly, Mike; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gervais, Guillaume

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in vertically-coupled quantum wires. The wires are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer heterostructures grown from two different MBE chambers: one at Sandia National Laboratories (1.2M mobility), and the other at Princeton University (6M mobility). The previously observed positive and negative drag signals are seen in both types of devices, demonstrating the robustness of the result. However, attempts to determine the temperature dependence of the drag signal in the 1D regime proved challenging in the higher mobility heterostructure (Princeton), in part because of difficulties in aligning the wires within the same transverse subband configuration. Nevertheless, this work, performed at the Microkelvin laboratory of the University of Florida, is an important proof-of-concept for future investigations of the temperature dependence of the 1D-1D drag signal down to a few mK. Such an experiment could confirm the Luttinger charge density wave interlocking predicted to occur in the wires. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  5. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore » high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  6. Analysis of altimeter data jointly with seafloor electric data (vertically integrated velocity) and VCTD-yoyo data (detailed profiles of VCTD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarits, Pascal D.; Menvielle, M.; Provost, C.; Filloux, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    We propose simultaneous analyses of the TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry data, in situ data--mainly permanent seafloor electric recordings--and velocity, conductivity, temperature, density (VCTD)-yoyo data at several stations in areas of scientific interest. We are planning experiments in various areas of low and high energy levels. Several complementary and redundant methods will be used to characterize the ocean circulation and its short- and long-term variability. We shall emphasize long-term measurement using permanent stations. Our major initial objectives with the TOPEX/POSEIDON mission are the Confluence area in the Argentine Basin and the Circumpolar Antarctic Current. An early experiment was carried out in the Confluence zone in 1988 and 1990 (Confluence Principal Investigators, 1990) to prepare for an intensive phase later one. This intensive phase will include new types of instrumentation. Preliminary experiments will be carried out in the Mediterranean Sea (in 1991) and in the North Atlantic Ocean (in 1992, north of the Canary Islands) to test the new instrumentation.

  7. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates ({approx}1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry traces to 725 deg. C. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 10{sup 5} K/s) in high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (T{sub max}) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6{+-}0.1 m/s and 1220{+-}50 K, respectively, and that the measured T{sub max} is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (T{sub ad}). The difference between T{sub max} and T{sub ad} is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after T{sub max} and results in the release of 20%-30% of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.

  8. Measurement of surface velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique for measuring surface velocity fields is briefly described. It determines the surface velocity vector as a function of location and time by the analysis of thermal fluctuations of the surface profile in a small domain around the point of interest. The apparatus now being constructed will be used in a series of experiments involving flow fields established by temperature gradients imposed along a surface.

  9. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  10. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  11. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  12. Human serotonin 1D receptor is encoded by a subfamily of two distinct genes: 5-HT1D alpha and 5-HT1D beta.

    PubMed Central

    Weinshank, R L; Zgombick, J M; Macchi, M J; Branchek, T A; Hartig, P R

    1992-01-01

    The serotonin 1D (5-HT1D) receptor is a pharmacologically defined binding site and functional receptor site. Observed variations in the properties of 5-HT1D receptors in different tissues have led to the speculation that multiple receptor proteins with slightly different properties may exist. We report here the cloning, deduced amino acid sequences, pharmacological properties, and second-messenger coupling of a pair of human 5-HT1D receptor genes, which we have designated 5-HT1D alpha and 5-HT1D beta due to their strong similarities in sequence, pharmacological properties, and second-messenger coupling. Both genes are free of introns in their coding regions, are expressed in the human cerebral cortex, and can couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. The pharmacological binding properties of these two human receptors are very similar, and match closely the pharmacological properties of human, bovine, and guinea pig 5-HT1D sites. Both receptors exhibit high-affinity binding of sumatriptan, a new anti-migraine medication, and thus are candidates for the pharmacological site of action of this drug. Images PMID:1565658

  13. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  14. Laser flash photolysis of ozone - O/1D/ quantum yields in the fall-off region 297-325 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, J. C.; Watson, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the quantum yield for O(1D) production from ozone photolysis has been determined between 297.5 nm and 325 nm in order to resolve serious discrepancies among previous studies. The results of this investigation are compared to earlier work by calculating atmospheric production rate constants for O(1D). It is found that for the purpose of calculating this rate constant, there is now good agreement among three studies at 298 K. Furthermore, it appears that previous data on the temperature dependence of the O(1D) quantum yield fall-off is adequate for determining the vertical profile of the O(1D) production rate constant. Several experimental difficulties associated with using NO2(asterisk) chemiluminescence to monitor O(1D) have been identified.

  15. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  16. 3D/1D Analysis of ICRF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, Riccardo; Lancellotti, Vito; Vecchi, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    An innovative tool has been realized for the 3D/1D simulation of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF), i.e. accounting for antennas in a realistic 3D geometry and with an accurate 1D plasma model. The approach to the problem is based on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. The environment has been subdivided in two coupled region: the plasma region and the vacuum region. The two problems are linked by means of a magnetic current (electric field) distribution on the aperture between the two regions. In the vacuum region all the calculations are executed in the spatial domain while in the plasma region an extraction in the spectral domain of some integrals is employed that permits to significantly reduce the integration support and to obtain a high numerical efficiency leading to the practical possibility of using a large number of sub-domain (rectangular or triangular) basis functions on each solid conductor of the system. The plasma enters the formalism of the plasma region via a surface impedance matrix; for this reason any plasma model can be used; at present the FELICE code has been adopted, that affords density and temperature profiles, and FLR effects. The source term directly models the TEM mode of the coax feeding the antenna and the current in the coax is determined self-consistently, giving the input impedance/admittance of the antenna itself. Calculation of field distributions (both magnetic and electric), useful for sheath considerations, is included. This tool has been implemented in a suite, called TOPICA, that is modular and applicable to ICRF antenna structures of arbitrary shape. This new simulation tool can assist during the detailed design phase and for this reason can be considered a "Virtual Prototyping Laboratory" (VPL). The TOPICA suite has been tested against assessed codes and against measurements and data of mock-ups and existing antennas. The VPL is being used in

  17. Statistical investigation and thermal properties for a 1-D impact system with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz I., Gabriel; Livorati, André L. P.; Leonel, Edson D.

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of the average velocity, its deviation and average squared velocity are characterized using three techniques for a 1-D dissipative impact system. The system - a particle, or an ensemble of non-interacting particles, moving in a constant gravitation field and colliding with a varying platform - is described by a nonlinear mapping. The average squared velocity allows to describe the temperature for an ensemble of particles as a function of the parameters using: (i) straightforward numerical simulations; (ii) analytically from the dynamical equations; (iii) using the probability distribution function. Comparing analytical and numerical results for the three techniques, one can check the robustness of the developed formalism, where we are able to estimate numerical values for the statistical variables, without doing extensive numerical simulations. Also, extension to other dynamical systems is immediate, including time dependent billiards.

  18. The reaction of N/2D/ with O2 as a source of O/1D/ atoms in aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Sharp, W. E.; Gerard, J.-C.

    1978-01-01

    The source of O(1D) atoms in the auroral ionosphere is investigated using sounding rocket data. Previously, it has been shown that the conventional sources of O(1D) atoms in the aurora, dissociative recombination of O2(plus) and electron impact excitation of atomic oxygen, fail to explain the measured 6300 A volume emission rate profile. It is suggested that the atom-atom interchange reaction of N(2D) with O2 can be the major source of auroral 6300 A emission if O(1D) is created with high efficiency.

  19. A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Steinke, Robert C.; Zhu, Jianting; Talbot, Cary A.; Wilson, John L.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed an alternative to the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE) attributed to Richards (1931) that describes unsaturated porous media flow in homogeneous soil layers. Our solution is a set of three ordinary differential equations (ODEs) derived from unsaturated flux and mass conservation principles. We used a hodograph transformation, the Method of Lines, and a finite water-content discretization to produce ODEs that accurately simulate infiltration, falling slugs, and groundwater table dynamic effects on vadose zone fluxes. This formulation, which we refer to as "finite water-content", simulates sharp fronts and is guaranteed to conserve mass using a finite-volume solution. Our ODE solution method is explicitly integrable, does not require iterations and therefore has no convergence limits and is computationally efficient. The method accepts boundary fluxes including arbitrary precipitation, bare soil evaporation, and evapotranspiration. The method can simulate heterogeneous soils using layers. Results are presented in terms of fluxes and water content profiles. Comparing our method against analytical solutions, laboratory data, and the Hydrus-1D solver, we find that predictive performance of our finite water-content ODE method is comparable to or in some cases exceeds that of the solution of Richards' equation, with or without a shallow water table. The presented ODE method is transformative in that it offers accuracy comparable to the Richards (1931) PDE numerical solution, without the numerical complexity, in a form that is robust, continuous, and suitable for use in large watershed and land-atmosphere simulation models, including regional-scale models of coupled climate and hydrology.

  20. The quest for TPa Hugoniot data: using the DEMG in high velocity pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jeff H; Rousculp, Christopher L; Holtkamp, David B; Oro, David M; Griego, Jeffrey R; Atchison, Walter L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2010-12-20

    ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive >60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. The 1-D model of the DEMG has been refined from a given current profile to a time-varying inductance. Various techniques are used to model the FOS (Foil Opening Switch) on the DEMG and a refined DEMG model is then used to drive a liner into various targets to determine the optimum design for the experiment and analyze the possible conditions and complications.

  1. Self-consistent one dimension in space and three dimension in velocity kinetic trajectory simulation model of magnetized plasma-wall transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chalise, Roshan Khanal, Raju

    2015-11-15

    We have developed a self-consistent 1d3v (one dimension in space and three dimension in velocity) Kinetic Trajectory Simulation (KTS) model, which can be used for modeling various situations of interest and yields results of high accuracy. Exact ion trajectories are followed, to calculate along them the ion distribution function, assuming an arbitrary injection ion distribution. The electrons, on the other hand, are assumed to have a cut-off Maxwellian velocity distribution at injection and their density distribution is obtained analytically. Starting from an initial guess, the potential profile is iterated towards the final time-independent self-consistent state. We have used it to study plasma sheath region formed in presence of an oblique magnetic field. Our results agree well with previous works from other models, and hence, we expect our 1d3v KTS model to provide a basis for the studying of all types of magnetized plasmas, yielding more accurate results.

  2. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  3. Phosphorylation and desensitization of alpha1d-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Vázquez-Cuevas, F G; Romero-Avila, M T

    2001-01-01

    In rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing rat alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors, noradrenaline and PMA markedly decreased alpha(1d)-adrenoceptor function (noradrenaline-elicited increases in calcium in whole cells and [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate binding in membranes), suggesting homologous and heterologous desensitizations. Photoaffinity labelling, Western blotting and immunoprecipitation identified alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors as a broad band of 70-80 kDa. alpha(1d)-Adrenoceptors were phosphorylated in the basal state and noradrenaline and PMA increased it. The effect of noradrenaline was concentration-dependent (EC(50) 75 nM), rapid (maximum at 1 min) and transient. Phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation was concentration-dependent (EC(50) 25 nM), slightly slower (maximum at 5 min) and stable for at least 60 min. Inhibitors of protein kinase C decreased the effect of phorbol esters but not that of noradrenaline. Evidence of cross-talk of alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors with receptors endogenously expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts was given by the ability of endothelin, lysophosphatidic acid and bradykinin to induce alpha(1d)-adrenoceptor phosphorylation. In summary, it is shown for the first time here that alpha(1d)-adrenoceptors are phosphoproteins and that receptor phosphorylation is increased by the natural ligand, noradrenaline, by direct activation of protein kinase C and via cross-talk with other receptors endogenously expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts. Receptor phosphorylation has functional repercussions. PMID:11171057

  4. 1D and 2D simulations of seismic wave propagation in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Fractures and cracks have a significant influence on the propagation of seismic waves. Their presence causes reflections and scattering and makes the medium effectively anisotropic. We present a numerical approach to simulation of seismic waves in fractured media that does not require direct modelling of the fracture itself, but uses the concept of linear slip interfaces developed by Schoenberg (1980). This condition states that at an interface between two imperfectly bonded elastic media, stress is continuous across the interface while displacement is discontinuous. It is assumed that the jump of displacement is proportional to stress which implies a jump in particle velocity at the interface. We use this condition as a boundary condition to the elastic wave equation and solve this equation in the framework of a Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin scheme using a velocity-stress formulation. We use meshes with tetrahedral elements to discretise the medium. Each individual element face may be declared as a slip interface. Numerical fluxes have been derived by solving the 1D Riemann problem for slip interfaces with elastic and viscoelastic rheology. Viscoelasticity is realised either by a Kelvin-Voigt body or a Standard Linear Solid. These fluxes are not limited to 1D and can - with little modification - be used for simulations in higher dimensions as well. The Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin code "neXd" developed by Lambrecht (2013) is used as a basis for the numerical implementation of this concept. We present examples of simulations in 1D and 2D that illustrate the influence of fractures on the seismic wavefield. We demonstrate the accuracy of the simulation through comparison to an analytical solution in 1D.

  5. The generalization of upper atmospheric wind and temperature based on the Voigt line shape profile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunmin; He, Jian

    2006-12-25

    The principle of probing the upper atmospheric wind field, which is the Voigt profile spectral line shape, is presented for the first time. By the Fourier Transform of Voigt profile, with the Imaging Spectroscope and the Doppler effect of electromagnetic wave, the distribution and calculation formulae of the velocity field, temperature field, and pressure field of the upper atmosphere wind field are given. The probed source is the two major aurora emission lines originated from the metastable O(1S) and O(1D) at 557.7nm and 630.0nm. From computer simulation and error analysis, the Voigt profile, which is the correlation of the Gaussian profile and Lorentzian profile, is closest to the actual airglow emission lines. PMID:19532147

  6. S-wave velocity and Poisson's ratio model in Southern Chile along a transect at 38°15'S from active and passive TIPTEQ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Catalina; Mechie, James

    2015-04-01

    Using active and passive seismology data from project TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to mega-Thrust EarthQuake processes) we derive a shear (S) wave velocity and a Poisson's ratio (σ) model across the Chilean convergent margin along 38°15'S, where the Mw 9.5 Valdivia earthquake is believed to have occurred. The obtained S-wave velocity model consists of three different tomographic images that were merged together. In the upper part (0 - 5 km depth), controlled source data from explosions were used to obtain a S-wave travel-time tomography. In the middle part (5 - 20 km depth) a dispersion analysis and then a noise tomography were carried out in two different ways: one used the dispersion curves to obtain a 3D S-wave velocity model in one step and the other used the dispersion curves to obtain surface-wave velocity tomographic images for different periods and then used the surface-wave velocity values every 10 km along the profile to obtain 1D S-wave velocity profiles every 10 km that were then interpolated to obtain a 2D S-wave tomography. Both methods produce similar S-wave travel-times. In the lower part (20 - 75 km depth, depending on the longitude) an already existent S-wave velocity model from local earthquake tomography was merged with the other two sections. The final S-wave velocity model and already existent compressional (P) wave velocity models along the same transect allowed us to obtain a Poisson's ratio model. The results show that the velocities and Poisson's ratios in this part of the Chilean convergent margin can all be explained in terms of normal rock types. There is no requirement to call on the existence of significant amounts of present-day fluids in the continental lithosphere above the plate interface in this part of the Chilean convergent margin, to explain the derived velocities and Poisson's ratios.

  7. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  8. Localized self-heating in large arrays of 1D nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Monereo, O; Illera, S; Varea, A; Schmidt, M; Sauerwald, T; Schütze, A; Cirera, A; Prades, J D

    2016-03-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal efficiency was attributed to the small dimensions of the objects). Infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy were used to map the temperature profiles of films based on random arrangements of carbon nanofibers during self-heating. Both the techniques demonstrate consistently that heating concentrates in small regions, the here-called "hot-spots". On correlating dynamic temperature mapping with electrical measurements, we also observed that these minute hot-spots rule the resistance values observed macroscopically. A physical model of a random network of 1D resistors helped us to explain this observation. The model shows that, for a given random arrangement of 1D nanowires, current spreading through the network ends up defining a set of spots that dominate both the electrical resistance and power dissipation. Such highly localized heating explains the high power savings observed in larger nanostructured systems. This understanding opens a path to design highly efficient self-heating systems, based on random or pseudo-random distributions of 1D nanostructures. PMID:26868599

  9. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry; Genestier, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  10. Time-evolution of ion-temperature radial profiles for high performance FRC (HPF) plasma in C-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deepak; Granstedt, E.; Gupta, S.; Magee, R.; Osin, D.; Tuszewski, M.; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of ion temperature profile and its time evolution is important for the understanding of FRC confinement and transport properties. Recently, in C-2 plasma device, FRCs with significantly improved confinement and transport properties are observed (HPF14) using higher formation DC field and Lithium wall conditioning. Time evolutions of ion-temperature profiles in these FRCs are measured using upgraded impurity ions passive Doppler spectroscopy system. Measured line integration profiles are inverted to get the local ion-temperature profiles, by taking in to consideration the local emissivity and directed ion-velocity. These profiles are measured under different C-2 operation conditions; for example, Neutral Beam power, plasma gun and magnetic field configurations. Radial profiles of ion temperature and its time evolution will be presented. Comparison of ion-temperature time-evolution with neutron measurements, deuterium-ion temperature measurements, and 1-d transport modeling will also be presented.

  11. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Glut1D on Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Heussinger, Nicole; Lausch, Ekkehart; Bosch, Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are the only treatment available for Glut1 deficiency (Glut1D). Here, we describe an 8-year-old girl with classical Glut1D responsive to a 3:1 ketogenic diet and ethosuximide. After 3 years on the diet a gradual increase of blood lipids was followed by rapid, severe asymptomatic hypertriglyceridemia (1,910 mg/dL). Serum lipid apheresis was required to determine liver, renal, and pancreatic function. A combination of medium chain triglyceride-oil and a reduction of the ketogenic diet to 1:1 ratio normalized triglyceride levels within days but triggered severe myoclonic seizures requiring comedication with sultiam. Severe hypertriglyceridemia in children with Glut1D on ketogenic diets may be underdiagnosed and harmful. In contrast to congenital hypertriglyceridemias, children with Glut1D may be treated effectively by dietary adjustments alone. PMID:26902182

  12. 1D Nanostructures: Controlled Fabrication and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2013-01-01

    Jian Wei, Xuchun Song, Chunli Yang, and Michael Z. Hu, 1D Nanostructures: Controlled Fabrication and Energy Applications, Journal of Nanomaterials, published special issue (http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/si/197254/) (2013).

  13. 60. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, D LOOP STEAM GENERATOR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, D LOOP STEAM GENERATOR AND MAIN COOLANT PUMP LOOKING NORTHEAST (LOCATION OOO) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  14. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1).

    PubMed

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. PMID:25088042

  15. TBC1D24 genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Simona; Milh, Mathieu; Castiglioni, Claudia; Lüthy, Kevin; Finelli, Mattea J.; Verstreken, Patrik; Cardon, Aaron; Stražišar, Barbara Gnidovec; Holder, J. Lloyd; Lesca, Gaetan; Mancardi, Maria M.; Poulat, Anne L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Banka, Siddharth; Bilo, Leonilda; Birkeland, Laura E.; Bosch, Friedrich; Brockmann, Knut; Cross, J. Helen; Doummar, Diane; Félix, Temis M.; Giuliano, Fabienne; Hori, Mutsuki; Hüning, Irina; Kayserili, Hulia; Kini, Usha; Lees, Melissa M.; Meenakshi, Girish; Mewasingh, Leena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Peluso, Silvio; Mey, Antje; Rice, Gregory M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Troester, Matthew M.; Stanley, Christine M.; Ville, Dorothee; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Falace, Antonio; Fassio, Anna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Biskup, Saskia; Tardif, Jessica; Ajeawung, Norbert F.; Tolun, Aslihan; Corbett, Mark; Gecz, Jozef; Afawi, Zaid; Howell, Katherine B.; Oliver, Karen L.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; de Falco, Fabrizio A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in TBC1D24. Methods: We acquired new clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 11 previously unreported and 37 published patients. TBC1D24 mutations, identified through various sequencing methods, can be found online (http://lovd.nl/TBC1D24). Results: Forty-eight patients were included (28 men, 20 women, average age 21 years) from 30 independent families. Eighteen patients (38%) had myoclonic epilepsies. The other patients carried diagnoses of focal (25%), multifocal (2%), generalized (4%), and unclassified epilepsy (6%), and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (25%). Most patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. We detail EEG, neuroimaging, developmental, and cognitive features, treatment responsiveness, and physical examination. In silico evaluation revealed 7 different highly conserved motifs, with the most common pathogenic mutation located in the first. Neuronal outgrowth assays showed that some TBC1D24 mutations, associated with the most severe TBC1D24-associated disorders, are not necessarily the most disruptive to this gene function. Conclusions: TBC1D24-related epilepsy syndromes show marked phenotypic pleiotropy, with multisystem involvement and severity spectrum ranging from isolated deafness (not studied here), benign myoclonic epilepsy restricted to childhood with complete seizure control and normal intellect, to early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe developmental delay and early death. There is no distinct correlation with mutation type or location yet, but patterns are emerging. Given the phenotypic breadth observed, TBC1D24 mutation screening is indicated in a wide variety of epilepsies. A TBC1D24 consortium was formed to develop further research on this gene and its associated phenotypes. PMID:27281533

  16. Group and phase velocities from deterministic and ambient sources measured during the AlpArray-EASI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolínský, Petr; Zigone, Dimitri; Fuchs, Florian; Bianchi, Irene; Qorbani, Ehsan; Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray-EASI Working Group

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern Alpine Seismic Investigation (EASI) was a complementary experiment to the AlpArray project. EASI was composed of 55 broadband seismic stations deployed in a winding swath of 540 km length along longitude 13.350 E from the Czech-German border to the Adriatic Sea. Average north-south inter-station distance was 10 km, the distance of each station to either side of the central line was 6 km. Such a dense linear network allows for surface wave dispersion measurements by both deterministic and ambient noise sources along the same paths. During the experiment (July 2014 - August 2015), three earthquakes ML = 2.6, 2.9 and 4.2 occurred in Austria and Northern Italy only several kilometers off the swath. We measure Rayleigh and Love wave group velocities between the source and a single station for the recorded earthquakes, as well as phase velocities between selected pairs of stations using the standard two-station method. We also calculate cross-correlations of ambient noise between selected pairs of stations and we determine the corresponding group velocity dispersion curves. We propose a comparison of phase velocities between two stations measured from earthquakes with group velocities obtained from cross-correlations for the same station pairs. We also compare group velocities measured at single station using earthquakes, which occurred along the swath, with group velocities measured from cross-correlations. That way we analyze velocities of both deterministic and ambient noise reconstructed surface waves propagating along the same path. We invert the resulting dispersion curves for 1D shear wave velocity profiles with depth and we compile a quasi-2D velocity model along the EASI swath.

  17. 1D crustal structure from quality seismological data for the Cyprus subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perk, Şükran; Deǧer, Ali; Özbakır, Karabulut, Hayrullah

    2013-04-01

    The eastern Mediterranean is a tectonically complex region, where long-term subduction and accretion processes have shaped the overall evolution. Recently, many seismic tomography studies have shown subducted slabs of the Neo-Tethyan lithosphere, continuing its subduction in the Hellenic trench, stalled in the Cyprus trench and being torn near the intersection between them. Antalya bay is a key region located on the western flank of the Cyprus Subduction Zone (CSZ), close to the junction between the Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs. Here deep earthquakes are nucleated, which otherwise cannot be seen anywhere else along the CSZ. For this reason, we focus our attention specifically to the Antalya Bay area but also the remaining parts of the CSZ. Several regional studies have been carried out to define the velocity structure beneath the region but none have been able to locate the CSZ. One of the main reasons for this was the lack of incorporation of a wide seismic network in those regional studies. We compile a large catalog of seismicity and relocate earthquakes to infer 1D local crustal structure using the clusters of seismicity. We used seismic data between 2005 - 2011 which are recorded at more than 335 seismic stations operated by several agencies and portable deployments. The data-set is composed of over 10,000 events and earthquakes can be grouped in several distinct clusters. We defined five of these clusters, where the total number of events is more than 4500, among which we selected over 2000 events with the highest data quality. 1-D local P-wave velocity models are developed using this high quality data-set and the earthquakes are relocated using the local velocity models. The compiled and reanalyzed data will contribute to perform local earthquake tomography. Moreover, obtained local velocity models represent a fundamental step towards an improved seismic tomography studies in a very crucial region in the eastern Mediterranean.

  18. HMI Measured Doppler Velocity Contamination from the SDO Orbit Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Philip H.; SDO HMI Team

    2016-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) measures sets of filtergrams which are converted into velocity and magnetic field maps each 45-seconds with its front camera and each 12 minutes with its side camera. In addition to solar phototspheric motions the velocity measurements include a direct component from the line-of-sight component of the SDO orbit. Since the magnetic field is computed as the difference between the velocity measured in left and right circular polarization the orbit velocity is canceled only if the celocity is properly calibrated. When the orbit component of the velocity is subtracted for each pixel the remaining "solar" velocity shows a residual signal which is equal to about 2% of the c. +- 3000 m/s orbit velocity in a nearly linear relationship. This implies an error in our knowledge of some of the details of as-built filter components. The model instrument transmission profile is required for calibration of all HMI level 1.5 “observable” quantities. This systematic error is very likely the source of 12- and 24-hour variations in most HMI data products. Over the years since launch a substantial effort has been dedicated to understanding the origin of this problem. While the instrument as presently calibrated (Couvidat et al. 2012 and 2016) meets all of the “Level-1” mission requirements it fails to meet the stated goal of 10 m/s accuracy for velocity data products and some not stated but generally assumed goals for other products. For the velocity measurements this has not been a significant problem since the prime HMI goals of obtaining data for helioseismology are not affected by this systematic error. However the orbit signal leaking into the magnetograms and vector magnetograms degrades the ability to accomplish some of the mission science goals at the expected levels of accuracy. This poster presents the current state of understanding of the source of this systematic error and

  19. Measuring the Speed of Sound in a 1D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jacob; Revelle, Melissa; Hulet, Randall

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the speed of sound in a two-spin component, 1D gas of fermionic lithium. The 1D system is an array of one-dimensional tubes created by a 2D optical lattice. By increasing the lattice depth, the tunneling between tubes is sufficiently small to make each an independent 1D system. To measure the speed of sound, we create a density notch at the center of the atom cloud using a sheet of light tuned far from resonance. The dipole force felt by both spin states will be equivalent, so this notch can be thought of as a charge excitation. Once this beam is turned off, the notch propagates to the edge of the atomic cloud with a velocity that depends on the strength of interatomic interactions. We control interactions using a magnetically tuned Feshbach resonance, allowing us to measure the speed of sound over a wide range of interaction. This method may be used to extract the Luttinger parameter vs. interaction strength. Supported by an ARO MURI Grant, NSF, and The Welch Foundation.

  20. Polar discontinuities and 1D interfaces in monolayered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Gordillo, Rafael; Pruneda, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Interfaces are the birthplace of a multitude of fascinating discoveries in fundamental science, and have enabled modern electronic devices, from transistors, to lasers, capacitors or solar cells. These interfaces between bulk materials are always bi-dimensional (2D) 'surfaces'. However the advent of graphene and other 2D crystals opened up a world of possibilities, as in this case the interfaces become one-dimensional (1D) lines. Although the properties of 1D nanoribbons have been extensively discussed in the last few years, 1D interfaces within infinite 2D systems had remained mostly unexplored until very recently. These include grain boundaries in polycrystalline samples, or interfaces in hybrid 2D sheets composed by segregated domains of different materials (as for example graphene/BN hybrids, or chemically different transition metal dichalcogenides). As for their 2D counterparts, some of these 1D interfaces exhibit polar characteristics, and can give rise to fascinating new physical properties. Here, recent experimental discoveries and theoretical predictions on the polar discontinuities that arise at these 1D interfaces will be reviewed, and the perspectives of this new research topic, discussed.

  1. Probing 1D super-strongly correlated dipolar quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, R.; de Palo, S.; Orignac, E.; Pedri, P.; Chiofalo, M.-L.

    2009-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) dipolar quantum gases are characterized by a very special condition where super-strong correlations occur to significantly affect the static and dynamical low-energy behavior. This behavior is accurately described by the Luttinger Liquid theory with parameter K < 1. Dipolar Bose gases are routinely studied in laboratory with Chromium atoms. On the other hand, 1D realizations with molecular quantum gases can be at reach of current experimental expertises, allowing to explore such extreme quantum degenerate conditions which are the bottom line for designing technological devices. Aim of the present contribution is to focus on the possible probes expected to signal the reach of Luttinger-Liquid behavior in 1D dipolar gases.

  2. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. The GIRAFFE Archive: 1D and 3D Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, F.; Jégouzo, I.; Tajahmady, F.; Normand, J.; Chilingarian, I.

    2013-10-01

    The GIRAFFE Archive (http://giraffe-archive.obspm.fr) contains the reduced spectra observed with the intermediate and high resolution multi-fiber spectrograph installed at VLT/UT2 (ESO). In its multi-object configuration and the different integral field unit configurations, GIRAFFE produces 1D spectra and 3D spectra. We present here the status of the archive and the different functionalities to select and download both 1D and 3D data products, as well as the present content. The two collections are available in the VO: the 1D spectra (summed in the case of integral field observations) and the 3D field observations. These latter products can be explored using the VO Paris Euro3D Client (http://voplus.obspm.fr/ chil/Euro3D).

  4. Nanodamage and Nanofailure of 1d Zno Nanomaterials and Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peifeng; Yang, Ya; Huang, Yunhua; Zhang, Yue

    2012-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanomaterials include nanowires, nanobelts, and nanorods etc. The extensive applied fields and excellent properties of 1D ZnO nanomaterials can meet the requests of the electronic and electromechanical devices for "smaller, faster and colder", and would be applied in new energy convention, environmental protection, information science and technology, biomedical, security and defense fields. While micro porous, etching pits nanodamage and brittle fracture, dissolving, functional failure nanofailure phenomena of 1D ZnO nanomaterials and nanodevices are observed in some practical working environments like illumination, currents or electric fields, external forces, and some chemical gases or solvents. The more important thing is to discuss the mechanism and reduce or prohibit their generation.

  5. Resonant indirect exchange in 1D semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhansky, I. V.; Krainov, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Lähderanta, E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider resonant indirect exchange interaction between magnetic centers in 1D nanostructures. The magnetic centers are assumed to be coupled to the 1D conducting channel by the quantum tunneling which can be of resonant character. The indirect exchange between the centers is mediated by the free carriers of the channel. The two cases of quadratic and linear energy dispersion of the 1D free carriers are considered. The former case is attributed to conventional semiconductor (InGaAs based to be concrete) nanowires or nanowhiskers, while the latter case is associated with carbon nanotubes with magnetic adatoms. We demonstrate that whenever the energy of a bound state at the magnetic center lies within the continuum energy spectra of the delocalized carriers in the channel the indirect exchange is strongly enhanced due to effective tunnel hybridization of the bound states with the continuum.

  6. Universal low-energy physics in 1D strongly repulsive multi-component Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuzhu; He, Peng; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown (Yang and You 2011 Chin. Phys. Lett. 28 020503) that at zero temperature the ground state of the one-dimensional (1D) w-component Fermi gas coincides with that of the spinless Bose gas in the limit ω \\to ∞ . This behavior was experimentally evidenced through quasi-1D tightly trapping ultracold 173Yb atoms in a recent paper (Pagano et al 2014 Nat. Phys. 10 198). However, understanding of low-temperature behavior of Fermi gases with a repulsive interaction requires spin-charge separated conformal field theories of an effective Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid and an antiferromagnetic SU(w) Heisenberg spin chain. Here we analytically derive universal thermodynamics of 1D strongly repulsive fermionic gases with SU(w) symmetry via the Yang-Yang thermodynamic Bethe ansatz method. The analytical free energy and magnetic properties of the systems at low temperature in a weak magnetic field are obtained through the Wiener-Hopf method. In particular, the free energy essentially manifests the spin-charge separated conformal field theories for high-symmetry systems with arbitrary repulsive interaction strength. We also find that the sound velocity of the Fermi gases in the large w limit coincides with that for the spinless Bose gas, whereas the spin velocity vanishes quickly as w becomes large. This indicates strong suppression of the Fermi exclusion statistics by the commutativity feature among the w-component fermions with different spin states in the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid phase. Moreover, the equations of state and critical behavior of physical quantities at finite temperature are analytically derived in terms of the polylogarithm functions in the quantum critical region.

  7. A Practical Deconvolution Computation Algorithm to Extract 1D Spectra from 2D Images of Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangwei, Li; Haotong, Zhang; Zhongrui, Bai

    2015-06-01

    Bolton & Schlegel presented a promising deconvolution method to extract one-dimensional (1D) spectra from a two-dimensional (2D) optical fiber spectral CCD (charge-coupled device) image. The method could eliminate the PSF (point-spread function) difference between fibers, extract spectra to the photo noise level, as well as improve the resolution. But the method is limited by its huge computation requirement and thus can not be implemented in actual data reduction. In this article, we develop a practical computation method to solve the computation problem. The new computation method can deconvolve a 2D fiber spectral image of any size with actual PSFs, which may vary with positions. Our method does not require large amounts of memory and can extract a 4 k × 4 k noise-free CCD image with 250 fibers in 2 hr. To make our method more practical, we further consider the influence of noise, which is thought to be an intrinsic ill-posed problem in deconvolution algorithms. We modify our method with a Tikhonov regularization item to depress the method induced noise. We do a series of simulations to test how our method performs under more real situations with Poisson noise and extreme cross talk. Compared with the results of traditional extraction methods, i.e., the Aperture Extraction Method and the Profile Fitting Method, our method has the least residual and influence by cross talk. For the noise-added image, the computation speed does not depend very much on fiber distance, the signal-to-noise ratio converges in 2-4 iterations, and the computation times are about 3.5 hr for the extreme fiber distance and about 2 hr for nonextreme cases. A better balance between the computation time and result precision could be achieved by setting the precision threshold similar to the noise level. Finally, we apply our method to real LAMOST (Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope; a.k.a. Guo Shou Jing Telescope) data. We find that the 1D spectrum extracted by our

  8. One-dimensional variational (1D-Var) retrieval of middle to upper tropospheric humidity using AIRS radiance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Kozo; Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori

    2014-06-01

    A one-dimensional variational analysis (1D-Var retrieval) of tropospheric humidity was conducted using hyper-spectral radiance data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). For the vertical range of the atmosphere between 200 and 600 hPa, the same high-resolution retrieval of humidity profiles as for clear-sky conditions was possible over low clouds if the cloud height was lower than 800 hPa. Global analyses from a global data assimilation system were used for initial profiles, and clear conditions over 800 hPa height were determined from AIRS radiance data. Results of analyses for 50 days of global radiosonde matchup data from 21 December 2008 to 8 February 2009 revealed that our 1D-Var calculations derived humidity profiles were closer to the sonde profiles than those of a global analysis at a height over 600 hPa. Furthermore, the results of 1D-Var retrieval often represented high and supersaturated relative humidity around the supposed ice clouds. The altitudes of the high humidity region agreed with the height of ice clouds that had been detected by CloudSat/CALIPSO. As well as possibly improving the humidity profiles in a numerical model by data assimilation, it is expected that these humidity analyses using AIRS radiance data will provide additional information for the study of ice clouds in the middle to upper troposphere.

  9. High-resolution mapping of 1D and 2D dose distributions using X-band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kolbun, N; Adolfsson, E; Gustafsson, H; Lund, E

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) was performed to visualise 2D dose distributions of homogenously irradiated potassium dithionate tablets and to demonstrate determination of 1D dose profiles along the height of the tablets. Mathematical correction was applied for each relative dose profile in order to take into account the inhomogeneous response of the resonator using X-band EPRI. The dose profiles are presented with the spatial resolution of 0.6 mm from the acquired 2D images; this value is limited by pixel size, and 1D dose profiles from 1D imaging with spatial resolution of 0.3 mm limited by the intrinsic line-width of potassium dithionate. In this paper, dose profiles from 2D reconstructed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) images using the Xepr software package by Bruker are focussed. The conclusion is that using potassium dithionate, the resolution 0.3 mm is sufficient for mapping steep dose gradients if the dosemeters are covering only ±2 mm around the centre of the resonator. PMID:24748487

  10. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  11. Pore Velocity Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devary, J. L.; Doctor, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    Geostatistical data analysis techniques were used to stochastically model the spatial variability of groundwater pore velocity in a potential waste repository site. Kriging algorithms were applied to Hanford Reservation data to estimate hydraulic conductivities, hydraulic head gradients, and pore velocities. A first-order Taylor series expansion for pore velocity was used to statistically combine hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head gradient, and effective porosity surfaces and uncertainties to characterize the pore velocity uncertainty. Use of these techniques permits the estimation of pore velocity uncertainties when pore velocity measurements do not exist. Large pore velocity estimation uncertainties were found to be located in the region where the hydraulic head gradient relative uncertainty was maximal.

  12. ESTIMATION OF S-WAVE VELOCITY STRUCTURE OF FUKUI PLAIN BASED ON MICROTREMOR ARRAY OBSERVATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Keisuke; Moto, Koudai

    The precise evaluations of Quaternary structure of the region are indispensable in order to accurately predict the seismic damage. However, deep borehole, PS-logging and elastic wave exploration have been executed only on limited points around the Fukui Plain. The problem analyzed in this study is statistical estimation of the 3D S-wave velocity structure down to the Tertiary bedrock of the Fukui Plain based on the data from 75 microtremor array observation sites. The Rayleigh wave phase velocities at each array site were calculated by the spatial autocorrelation method. The phase velocities at each site were inverted to a 1D S-wave profile using a genetic inversion. The 3-components single-site microtremor observations were carried out to compensate the array observations. The 3D S-wave velocity structure around the Fukui plain have been interpolated by using Kriging and Co-Kriging techniques. In the Co-Kriging procedure, the correlations between the estimated depths of Quaternary and the observed predominant periods of the sites were taken into account. The validity of the estimated structure from the microtremor observation was confirmed by comparing with the density structure and with the existing PS-logging data.

  13. Measurement of pre-sheath flow velocities by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. L.; Stansfield, B. L.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Boucher, C.; Matte, J. P.; Johnston, T. W.; Marchand, R.

    1990-12-01

    For the first time, the pre-sheath ion flow velocity has been measured using the Doppler shift of laser-induced fluorescence in singly-ionized argon ions. The velocity shows a monotonic increase, from a value of about 0.15 of the sound speed VS far from the target to 0.5 of Vs at a distance of 5 mm from the surface. The temperature, the floating potential and the density are calculated from cylindrical probe measurements taken in the same region under identical conditions. These experimental results are compared with those from a 1D isothermal single-ion fluid model of the pre-sheath and a kinetic electron/fluid ion model. Both models agree well with the density profile, but underestimate the potential change and overestimate the velocity. In addition, the bulk flow velocity has been independently determined from "Mach probe" measurements, using various candidate theories to relate the Mach number to the ratio of the upstream to downstream saturation currents. Comparison with the optical measurements indicate that the probe models which include viscosity provide reasonable agreement with our Mach probe data.

  14. NEW FEATURES OF HYDRUS-1D, VERSION 3.0

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper briefly summarizes new features in version 3.0 of HYDRUS-1D, released in May 2005, as compared to version 2.1. The new features are a) new approaches to simulate preferential and nonequilibrium water flow and solute transport, b) a new hysteresis module that avoids the effects of pumpin...

  15. A 1D wavelet filtering for ultrasound images despeckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Dubois, Mathieu; Frenoux, Emmanuelle; Osorio, Angel

    2010-03-01

    Ultrasound images appearance is characterized by speckle, shadows, signal dropout and low contrast which make them really difficult to process and leads to a very poor signal to noise ratio. Therefore, for main imaging applications, a denoising step is necessary to apply successfully medical imaging algorithms on such images. However, due to speckle statistics, denoising and enhancing edges on these images without inducing additional blurring is a real challenging problem on which usual filters often fail. To deal with such problems, a large number of papers are working on B-mode images considering that the noise is purely multiplicative. Making such an assertion could be misleading, because of internal pre-processing such as log compression which are done in the ultrasound device. To address those questions, we designed a novel filtering method based on 1D Radiofrequency signal. Indeed, since B-mode images are initially composed of 1D signals and since the log compression made by ultrasound devices modifies noise statistics, we decided to filter directly the 1D Radiofrequency signal envelope before log compression and image reconstitution, in order to conserve as much information as possible. A bi-orthogonal wavelet transform is applied to the log transform of each signal and an adaptive 1D split and merge like algorithm is used to denoise wavelet coefficients. Experiments were carried out on synthetic data sets simulated with Field II simulator and results show that our filter outperforms classical speckle filtering methods like Lee, non-linear means or SRAD filters.

  16. Non-cooperative Brownian donkeys: A solvable 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez de Cisneros, B.; Reimann, P.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A paradigmatic 1D model for Brownian motion in a spatially symmetric, periodic system is tackled analytically. Upon application of an external static force F the system's response is an average current which is positive for F < 0 and negative for F > 0 (absolute negative mobility). Under suitable conditions, the system approaches 100% efficiency when working against the external force F.

  17. Assessing the habitability of planets with Earth-like atmospheres with 1D and 3D climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godolt, M.; Grenfell, J. L.; Kitzmann, D.; Kunze, M.; Langematz, U.; Patzer, A. B. C.; Rauer, H.; Stracke, B.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The habitable zone (HZ) describes the range of orbital distances around a star where the existence of liquid water on the surface of an Earth-like planet is in principle possible. The applicability of one-dimensional (1D) climate models for the estimation of the HZ boundaries has been questioned by recent three-dimensional (3D) climate studies. While 3D studies can calculate the water vapor, ice albedo, and cloud feedback self-consistently and therefore allow for a deeper understanding and the identification of relevant climate processes, 1D model studies rely on fewer model assumptions and can be more easily applied to the large parameter space possible for extrasolar planets. Aims: We evaluate the applicability of 1D climate models to estimate the potential habitability of Earth-like extrasolar planets by comparing our 1D model results to those of 3D climate studies in the literature. We vary the two important planetary properties, surface albedo and relative humidity, in the 1D model. These depend on climate feedbacks that are not treated self-consistently in most 1D models. Methods: We applied a cloud-free 1D radiative-convective climate model to calculate the climate of Earth-like planets around different types of main-sequence stars with varying surface albedo and relative humidity profile. We compared the results to those of 3D model calculations available in the literature and investigated to what extent the 1D model can approximate the surface temperatures calculated by the 3D models. Results: The 1D parameter study results in a large range of climates possible for an Earth-sized planet with an Earth-like atmosphere and water reservoir at a certain stellar insolation. At some stellar insolations the full spectrum of climate states could be realized, i.e., uninhabitable conditions due to surface temperatures that are too high or too low as well as habitable surface conditions, depending only on the relative humidity and surface albedo assumed. When

  18. 1D design style implications for mask making and CEBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.

    2013-09-01

    At advanced nodes, CMOS logic is being designed in a highly regular design style because of the resolution limitations of optical lithography equipment. Logic and memory layouts using 1D Gridded Design Rules (GDR) have been demonstrated to nodes beyond 12nm.[1-4] Smaller nodes will require the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. One of the significant advantages of 1D GDR is the ease of splitting layouts into lines and cuts. A lines and cuts approach has been used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin to below 12nm.[4] Line scaling with excellent line-edge roughness (LER) has been demonstrated with self-aligned spacer processing.[5] This change in design style has important implications for mask making: • The complexity of the masks will be greatly reduced from what would be required for 2D designs with very complex OPC or inverse lithography corrections. • The number of masks will initially increase, as for conventional multiple patterning. But in the case of 1D design, there are future options for mask count reduction. • The line masks will remain simple, with little or no OPC, at pitches (1x) above 80nm. This provides an excellent opportunity for continual improvement of line CD and LER. The line pattern will be processed through a self-aligned pitch division sequence to divide pitch by 2 or by 4. • The cut masks can be done with "simple OPC" as demonstrated to beyond 12nm.[6] Multiple simple cut masks may be required at advanced nodes. "Coloring" has been demonstrated to below 12nm for two colors and to 8nm for three colors. • Cut/hole masks will eventually be replaced by e-beam direct write using complementary e-beam lithography (CEBL).[7-11] This transition is gated by the availability of multiple column e-beam systems with throughput adequate for high- volume manufacturing. A brief description of 1D and 2D design styles will be presented, followed by examples of 1D layouts. Mask complexity for 1

  19. Dynamics of the reactions of O(1D) with HCl, DCl, and Cl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumi, Yutaka; Tonokura, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Obi, Kinichi

    1993-05-01

    The reactions O(1D)+HCl→OH+Cl (1a) and OCl+H (1b), O(1D)+DCl→OD+Cl (2a) and OCl+D (2b), and O(1D)+Cl2→OCl+Cl (3) are studied at an average collision energy of 7.6, 7.7, and 8.8 kcal/mol for (1), (2), and (3), respectively. H, D, and Cl atoms are detected by the resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization technique. The average kinetic energies released to the products are estimated from Doppler profile measurements of the product atoms. The relative yields [OCl+H]/[OH+Cl] and [OCl+D]/[OD+Cl] are directly measured, and a strong isotope effect (H/D) on the relative yields is found. The fine-structure branding ratios [Cl(2P1/2]/[Cl(2P3/2)] of the reaction products are also measured. The results suggest that nonadiabatic couplings take place at the exit channels of the reactions (1a) and (2a), while the reaction (3) is totally adiabatic.

  20. Nonlinear Landau damping and formation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal structures for plasmas with q-nonextensive velocity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2013-03-01

    In the past, long-time evolution of an initial perturbation in collisionless Maxwellian plasma (q = 1) has been simulated numerically. The controversy over the nonlinear fate of such electrostatic perturbations was resolved by Manfredi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2815-2818 (1997)] using long-time simulations up to t = 1600 ωp - 1 . The oscillations were found to continue indefinitely leading to Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK)-like phase-space vortices (from here on referred as "BGK structures"). Using a newly developed, high resolution 1D Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic method (PPM) advection scheme, we investigate the nonlinear Landau damping in 1D plasma described by toy q-distributions for long times, up to t = 3000 ωp - 1 . We show that BGK structures are found only for a certain range of q-values around q = 1. Beyond this window, for the generic parameters, no BGK structures were observed. We observe that for values of q < 1 where velocity distributions have long tails, strong Landau damping inhibits the formation of BGK structures. On the other hand, for q > 1 where distribution has a sharp fall in velocity, the formation of BGK structures is rendered difficult due to high wave number damping imposed by the steep velocity profile, which had not been previously reported. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with past work.

  1. Development of the mean velocity distribution in rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Swan, D. H.; Deotte, R. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The mean flowfield of 1 x 2 and 1 x 4 aspect ratio rectangular jets has been measured using a laser Doppler anemometer system. The development of the downstream velocity distribution is analyzed with respect to centerline velocity decay, shear layer growth, axis switching, and velocity profile development. Comparisons are made with axisymmetric, planar, and other rectangular jets.

  2. Localized self-heating in large arrays of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monereo, O.; Illera, S.; Varea, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sauerwald, T.; Schütze, A.; Cirera, A.; Prades, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal efficiency was attributed to the small dimensions of the objects). Infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy were used to map the temperature profiles of films based on random arrangements of carbon nanofibers during self-heating. Both the techniques demonstrate consistently that heating concentrates in small regions, the here-called ``hot-spots''. On correlating dynamic temperature mapping with electrical measurements, we also observed that these minute hot-spots rule the resistance values observed macroscopically. A physical model of a random network of 1D resistors helped us to explain this observation. The model shows that, for a given random arrangement of 1D nanowires, current spreading through the network ends up defining a set of spots that dominate both the electrical resistance and power dissipation. Such highly localized heating explains the high power savings observed in larger nanostructured systems. This understanding opens a path to design highly efficient self-heating systems, based on random or pseudo-random distributions of 1D nanostructures.One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal

  3. A 1-D model study of Arctic sea-ice salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griewank, P. J.; Notz, D.

    2014-03-01

    We use a 1-D model to study how salinity evolves in Arctic sea ice. To do so, we first explore how sea-ice surface melt and flooding can be incorporated into the 1-D thermodynamic SAMSIM sea-ice model presented by Griewank and Notz (2013). We introduce flooding and a flushing parametrization which treats sea ice as a hydraulic network of horizontal and vertical fluxes. Forcing SAMSIM with 36 years of ERA-interim atmospheric reanalysis data, we obtain a modeled Arctic sea-ice salinity that agrees well with ice-core measurements. The simulations hence allow us to identify the main drivers of the observed mean salinity profile in Arctic sea ice. Our results show a 1.5-4 g kg-1 decrease of bulk salinity via gravity drainage after ice growth has ceased and before flushing sets in, which hinders approximating bulk salinity from ice thickness beyond the first growth season. In our simulations, salinity variability of first-year ice is mostly restricted to the top 20 cm. We find that ice thickness, thermal resistivity, freshwater column, and stored energy change by less than 5% on average when the full salinity parametrization is replaced with a prescribed salinity profile. We conclude that for earth system models the impact of fully parametrizing the Arctic temporal salinity evolution is too small to justify the increase in computational cost and model complexity.

  4. The velocity structure of the lunar crust.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Seismic refraction data, obtained at the Apollo 14 and 16 sites, when combined with other lunar seismic data, allow a compressional wave velocity profile of the lunar near-surface and crust to be derived. The regolith, although variable in thickness over the lunar surface, possesses surprisingly similar seismic properties. Underlying the regolith at both the Apollo 14 Fra Mauro site and the Apollo 16 Descartes site is low-velocity brecciated material or impact derived debris. Key features of the lunar seismic velocity profile are: (1) velocity increases from 100 to 300 m/sec in the upper 100 m to about 4 km/sec at 5 km depth, (2) a more gradual increase from about 4 km/sec to about 6 km/sec at 25 km depth,(3) a discontinuity at a depth of 25 km, and (4) a constant value of about 7 km/sec at depths from 25 km to about 60 km.

  5. Ambient noise surface wave tomography to determine the shallow shear velocity structure at Valhall: depth inversion with a Neighbourhood Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, A.; Landès, M.; Shapiro, N. M.; Singh, S. C.; Roux, P.

    2014-09-01

    This study presents a depth inversion of Scholte wave group and phase velocity maps obtained from cross-correlation of 6.5 hr of noise data from the Valhall Life of Field Seismic network. More than 2 600 000 vertical-vertical component cross-correlations are computed from the 2320 available sensors, turning each sensor into a virtual source emitting Scholte waves. We used a traditional straight-ray surface wave tomography to compute the group velocity map. The phase velocity maps have been computed using the Eikonal tomography method. The inversion of these maps in depth are done with the Neighbourhood Algorithm. To reduce the number of free parameters to invert, geological a priori information are used to propose a power-law 1-D velocity profile parametrization extended with a gaussian high-velocity layer where needed. These parametrizations allowed us to create a high-resolution 3-D S-wave model of the first 600 m of the Valhall subsurface and to precise the locations of geological structures at depth. These results would have important implication for shear wave statics and monitoring of seafloor subsidence due to oil extraction. The 3-D model could also be a good candidate for a starting model used in full-waveform inversions.

  6. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how ...

  7. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  8. A Bayesian Algorithm for Reading 1D Barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ender; Coughlan, James

    2010-01-01

    The 1D barcode is a ubiquitous labeling technology, with symbologies such as UPC used to label approximately 99% of all packaged goods in the US. It would be very convenient for consumers to be able to read these barcodes using portable cameras (e.g. mobile phones), but the limited quality and resolution of images taken by these cameras often make it difficult to read the barcodes accurately. We propose a Bayesian framework for reading 1D barcodes that models the shape and appearance of barcodes, allowing for geometric distortions and image noise, and exploiting the redundant information contained in the parity digit. An important feature of our framework is that it doesn’t require that every barcode edge be detected in the image. Experiments on a publicly available dataset of barcode images explore the range of images that are readable, and comparisons with two commercial readers demonstrate the superior performance of our algorithm. PMID:20428491

  9. Morphodynamics and sediment tracers in 1-D (MAST-1D): 1-D sediment transport that includes exchange with an off-channel sediment reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. Wesley; Viparelli, Enrica; Piégay, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Bed material transported in geomorphically active gravel bed rivers often has a local source at nearby eroding banks and ends up sequestered in bars not far downstream. However, most 1-D numerical models for gravel transport assume that gravel originates from and deposits on the channel bed. In this paper, we present a 1-D framework for simulating morphodynamic evolution of bed elevation and size distribution in a gravel-bed river that actively exchanges sediment with its floodplain, which is represented as an off-channel sediment reservoir. The model is based on the idea that sediment enters the channel at eroding banks whose elevation depends on total floodplain sediment storage and on the average elevation of the floodplain relative to the channel bed. Lateral erosion of these banks occurs at a specified rate that can represent either net channel migration or channel widening. Transfer of material out of the channel depends on a typical bar thickness and a specified lateral exchange rate due either to net channel migration or narrowing. The model is implemented using an object oriented framework that allows users to explore relationships between bank supply, bed structure, and lateral change rates. It is applied to a ∼50-km reach of the Ain River, France, that experienced significant reduction in sediment supply due to dam construction during the 20th century. Results are strongly sensitive to lateral exchange rates, showing that in this reach, the supply of sand and gravel at eroding banks and the sequestration of gravel in point bars can have strong influence on overall reach-scale sediment budgets.

  10. Waves in a 1D electrorheological dusty plasma lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M.

    2015-08-01

    The behavior of waves in a one-dimensional (1D) dusty plasma lattice where the dust interacts via Yukawa and electric dipole interactions is discussed theoretically. This study is motivated by recent reports on electrorheological dusty plasmas (e.g. Ivlev et al. 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 095003) where the dipole interaction arises due to an external uniaxial AC electric field that distorts the Debye sphere surrounding each grain. Application to possible dusty plasma experimental parameters is discussed.

  11. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, I.; Kalyabin, D.; Osokin, S.; Klos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.; Nikitov, S.

    2015-03-01

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films.

  12. Constructing 3D interaction maps from 1D epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Mengchi; Medovoy, David; Whitaker, John W.; Ding, Bo; Li, Nan; Zheng, Lina; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is tightly packaged into chromatin whose functional output depends on both one-dimensional (1D) local chromatin states and three-dimensional (3D) genome organization. Currently, chromatin modifications and 3D genome organization are measured by distinct assays. An emerging question is whether it is possible to deduce 3D interactions by integrative analysis of 1D epigenomic data and associate 3D contacts to functionality of the interacting loci. Here we present EpiTensor, an algorithm to identify 3D spatial associations within topologically associating domains (TADs) from 1D maps of histone modifications, chromatin accessibility and RNA-seq. We demonstrate that active promoter–promoter, promoter–enhancer and enhancer–enhancer associations identified by EpiTensor are highly concordant with those detected by Hi-C, ChIA-PET and eQTL analyses at 200 bp resolution. Moreover, EpiTensor has identified a set of interaction hotspots, characterized by higher chromatin and transcriptional activity as well as enriched TF and ncRNA binding across diverse cell types, which may be critical for stabilizing the local 3D interactions. PMID:26960733

  13. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  14. Examining Prebiotic Chemistry Using O(^1D) Insertion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Brian M.; Laas, Jacob C.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus

    2013-06-01

    Aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol are all prebiotic molecules expected to form via photo-driven grain surface chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM). These molecules are expected to be precursors for larger, biologically-relevant molecules in the ISM such as sugars and amino acids. These three molecules have not yet been detected in the ISM because of the lack of available rotational spectra. A high resolution (sub)millimeter spectrometer coupled to a molecular source is being used to study these molecules using O(^1D) insertion reactions. The O(^1D) chemistry is initiated using an excimer laser, and the products of the insertion reactions are adiabatically cooled using a supersonic expansion. Experimental parameters are being optimized by examination of methanol formed from O(^1D) insertion into methane. Theoretical studies of the structure and reaction energies for aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol have been conducted to guide the laboratory studies once the methanol experiment has been optimized. The results of the calculations and initial experimental results will be presented.

  15. 3-D P Wave Velocity Structure of Marmara Region Using Local Earthquake Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Işık, S. E.; Gurbuz, C.

    2014-12-01

    The 3D P wave velocity model of upper and lower crust of the Marmara Region between 40.200- 41.200N and 26.500- 30.500E is obtained by tomographic inversion (Simulps) of 47034 P wave arrivals of local earthquakes recorded at 90 land stations between October 2009 and December 2012 and 30 OBO stations and 14162 shot arrivals recorded at 35 OBO stations (Seismarmara Survey, 2001). We first obtained a 1D minimum model with Velest code in order to obtain an initial model for 3D inversion with 648 well located earthquakes located within the study area. After several 3D inversion trials we decided to create a more adequate initial model for 3D inversion. Choosing the initial model we estimated the 3D P wave velocity model representing the whole region both for land and sea. The results are tested by making Checkerboard , Restoring Resolution and Characteristic Tests, and the reliable areas of the resulting model is defined in terms of RDE, DWS, SF and Hit count distributions. By taking cross sections from the resulting model we observed the vertical velocity change along profiles crossing both land and sea. All the profiles crossing the basins showed that the high velocities of lower crust make extensions towards the basin area which looks like the force that gives a shape to the basins. These extensions of lower crust towards the basins appeared with an average velocity of 6.3 km/s which might be the result of the deformation due the shearing in the region. It is also interpreted that the development of these high velocities coincide with the development of the basins. Thus, both the basins and the high velocity zones around them might be resulted from the entrance of the NAF into the Marmara Sea and at the same time a shear regime was dominated due to the resistance of the northern Marmara Region (Yılmaz, 2010). The seismicity is observed between 5 km and 15 km after the 3D location of the earthquakes. The locations of the earthquakes improved and the seismogenic zone

  16. Ultralow-velocity zone geometries resolved by multidimensional waveform modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Rost, S.; Thorne, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) are thin patches of material with strongly reduced seismic wave speeds situated on top of the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A common phase used to detect ULVZs is SPdKS (SKPdS), an SKS wave with a short diffracted P leg along the CMB. Most previous efforts have examined ULVZ properties using 1-D waveform modelling approaches. We present waveform modelling results using the 2.5-D finite-difference algorithm PSVaxi allowing us better insight into ULVZ structure and location. We characterize ULVZ waveforms based on ULVZ elastic properties, shape and position along the SPdKS ray path. In particular, we vary the ULVZ location (e.g. source or receiver side), ULVZ topographical profiles (e.g. boxcar, trapezoidal or Gaussian) and ULVZ lateral scale along great circle path (2.5°, 5°, 10°). We observe several waveform effects absent in 1-D ULVZ models and show evidence for waveform effects allowing the differentiation between source and receiver side ULVZs. Early inception of the SPdKS/SKPdS phase is difficult to detect for receiver-side ULVZs with maximum shifts in SKPdS initiation of ˜3° in epicentral distance, whereas source-side ULVZs produce maximum shifts of SPdKS initiation of ˜5°, allowing clear separation of source- versus receiver-side structure. We present a case study using data from up to 300 broad-band stations in Turkey recorded between 2005 and 2010. We observe a previously undetected ULVZ in the southern Atlantic Ocean region centred near 45°S, 12.5°W, with a lateral scale of ˜3°, VP reduction of 10 per cent, VS reduction of 30 per cent and density increase of 10 per cent relative to PREM.

  17. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  18. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Uniform Contractivity in Wasserstein Metric for the Original 1D Kac's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauray, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    We study here a very popular 1D jump model introduced by Kac: it consists of N velocities encountering random binary collisions at which they randomly exchange energy. We show the uniform (in N) exponential contractivity of the dynamics in a non-standard Monge-Kantorovich-Wasserstein: precisely the MKW metric of order 2 on the energy. The result is optimal in the sense that for each N, the contractivity constant is equal to the L^2 spectral gap of the generator associated to Kac's dynamic. As a corollary, we get an uniform but non optimal contractivity in the MKW metric of order 4. We use a simple coupling that works better that the parallel one. The estimates are simple and new (to the best of our knowledge).

  20. Survey of Multi-Material Closure Models in 1D Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Maeng, Jungyeoul Brad; Hyde, David Andrew Bulloch

    2015-07-28

    Accurately treating the coupled sub-cell thermodynamics of computational cells containing multiple materials is an inevitable problem in hydrodynamics simulations, whether due to initial configurations or evolutions of the materials and computational mesh. When solving the hydrodynamics equations within a multi-material cell, we make the assumption of a single velocity field for the entire computational domain, which necessitates the addition of a closure model to attempt to resolve the behavior of the multi-material cells’ constituents. In conjunction with a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, we present a variety of both the popular as well as more recently proposed multi-material closure models and survey their performances across a spectrum of examples. We consider standard verification tests as well as practical examples using combinations of fluid, solid, and composite constituents within multi-material mixtures. Our survey provides insights into the advantages and disadvantages of various multi-material closure models in different problem configurations.

  1. An anti-symmetric exclusion process for two particles on an infinite 1D lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, J. R.; Harris, S.; Giuggioli, L.

    2011-12-01

    A system of two biased, mutually exclusive random walkers on an infinite 1D lattice is studied whereby the intrinsic bias of one particle is equal and opposite to that of the other. The propagator for this system is solved exactly and expressions for the mean displacement and mean square displacement (MSD) are found. Depending on the nature of the intrinsic bias, the system’s behaviour displays two regimes, characterised by (i) the particles moving towards each other and (ii) away from each other, both qualitatively different from the case of no bias. The continuous-space limit of the propagator is found and is shown to solve a Fokker-Planck equation for two biased, mutually exclusive Brownian particles with equal and opposite drift velocity. Connections to territorial dynamics in animal populations are discussed.

  2. O/1D/ and H2O/+/ in comet Bennett 1970. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    The spatial distribution of O(1D) in comet Bennett on April 18 implies the existence of an average scale length of about 10,000 km for the source of one or several parents, and an average scale length also of about 10,000 km for their destruction. The spatial distribution of H2O(+) has also been studied sunward and tailward for the same comet and the same date. Two spectra taken 20 minutes apart show recognizable wave patterns moving tailward with a velocity of 17 km/sec. The interaction of the H2O(+) ions with the solar wind gives clues to the onset of the plasma tail. A characteristic time of 800 sec seems to be associated with the instabilities seen at the onset of the tail.

  3. Simulation of cirrus clouds with a quasi 2-moment microphysical scheme: a 1D case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, J.-P.

    2003-04-01

    Cirrus clouds are receiving a great scientific interest because of their importance on the climate system through their impact on the radiation budget and on the physico-chemical balance of the upper troposphere. In this presentation, we concentrate on the application of a mixed-phase 2-moment microphysical scheme to simulate cirrus cloud properties with various ice nucleation modes. The complete scheme is implemented in the multi-purpose mesoscale model MésoNH with several capabilities (3D real vs. academic flows, grid-nesting, etc.). The 1D FIRE and subvisible test cases of Jensen et al. (1994 and 1996 both in JGR) are selected in the present study. The simulations are performed with a similar a thermo-dynamical and dynamical framework and microphysical results are analysed. Additional variations of some critical input parameters (CCN and IN concentrations, vertical velocity and ice characteristics) are explored to test the sensitivity of the microphysical scheme.

  4. Exploring the impacts of multiple tidal constituents and varying river flow on long-term, large-scale estuarine morphodynamics by means of a 1-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Leicheng; Wegen, Mick; Wang, Zheng Bing; Roelvink, Dano; He, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Tidal asymmetry is an important mechanism generating tidal residual sediment transport (TRST) in tidal environments. So far, it is known that a number of tidal interactions (e.g., M2-M4 and M2-O1-K1) can induce tidal asymmetry and associated TRST; however, their variability and morphodynamic impacts are insufficiently explored. Inspired by the river and tidal forcing conditions in the Yangtze River Estuary, we explore the morphodynamic development of a 560 km long estuary under the boundary forcing conditions of varyingly combined tidal constituents and river discharges using a schematized 1-D morphodynamic model for long-term (millennial) simulations. We then employ an analytical scheme which integrates sediment transport as a function of flow velocities to decompose the contribution of different tidal interactions on TRST and to explain how the river and tidal interactions control TRST and associated morphodynamics. Model results display varying equilibrium bed profiles. Analytical results suggest that (1) a series of tidal interactions creates multiple tidal asymmetries and associated TRST, (2) river flow modulates tidal asymmetry nonlinearly in space, and (3) more tidal constituents at the sea boundary persistently enhance the seaward TRST through river-tide interactions. It is the combined effects of multiple tidal asymmetries and river-tide interactions that determine the net TRST and consequent morphodynamic development. It thus suggests that tidal harmonics of significant amplitudes need to be considered properly as boundary conditions for long-term, large-scale morphodynamic modeling.

  5. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  6. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  7. Spatial coherence of polaritons in a 1D channel

    SciTech Connect

    Savenko, I. G.; Iorsh, I. V.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    We analyze time evolution of spatial coherence of a polariton ensemble in a quantum wire (1D channel) under constant uniform resonant pumping. Using the theoretical approach based on the Lindblad equation for a one-particle density matrix, which takes into account the polariton-phonon and excitonexciton interactions, we study the behavior of the first-order coherence function g{sup 1} for various pump intensities and temperatures in the range of 1-20 K. Bistability and hysteresis in the dependence of the first-order coherence function on the pump intensity is demonstrated.

  8. Structural stability of a 1D compressible viscoelastic fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Xiaokai; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with a compressible viscoelastic fluid model proposed by Öttinger. Although the model has a convex entropy, the Hessian matrix of the entropy does not symmetrize the system of first-order partial differential equations due to the non-conservative terms in the constitutive equation. We show that the corresponding 1D model is symmetrizable hyperbolic and dissipative and satisfies the Kawashima condition. Based on these, we prove the global existence of smooth solutions near equilibrium and justify the compatibility of the model with the Navier-Stokes equations.

  9. Phthalocyanine based 1D nanowires for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.

    2012-06-01

    1D nanowires (NWs) of Cu (II) 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-Phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu)8) molecule have been grown on different substrates by cost effective solution processing technique. The density of NWs is found to be strongly dependent on the concentration of solution. The possible formation mechanism of these structures is π-π interaction between phthalocyanine molecules. The improved conductivity of these NWs as compared to spin coated film indicates their potential for molecular device applications.

  10. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschikin, Maria; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2012-10-01

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  11. Deconvolution/identification techniques for 1-D transient signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a variety of nonparametric deconvolution and identification techniques that we have developed for application to 1-D transient signal problems. These methods are time-domain techniques that use direct methods for matrix inversion. Therefore, they are not appropriate for large data'' problems. These techniques involve various regularization methods and permit the use of certain kinds of a priori information in estimating the unknown. These techniques have been implemented in a package using standard FORTRAN that should make the package readily transportable to most computers. This paper is also meant to be an instruction manual for the package. 25 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Crossed molecular beams study of O({sup 1}D) reactions with H{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Miau, T.T.

    1995-05-01

    Reaction dynamics of O({sup 1}D) atoms with H{sub 2} molecules was reinvestigated using the crossed molecular beams technique with pulsed beams. The O({sup 1}D) beam was generated by photodissociating O{sub 3} molecules at 248 nm. Time-of-flight spectra and the laboratory angular distribution of the OH products were measured. The derived OH product center-of-mass flux-velocity contour diagram shows more backward scattered intensity with respect to the O({sup 1}D) beam. In contrast to previous studies which show that the insertion mechanism is the dominant process, our results indicate that the contribution from the collinear approach of the O({sup 1}D) atom to the H{sub 2} molecule on the first excited state potential energy surface is significant and the energy barrier for the collinear approach is therefore minimal. Despite the increased time resolution in this experiment, no vibrational structure in the OH product time-of-flight spectra was resolved. This is in agreement with LIF studies, which have shown that the rotational distributions of the OH products in all vibrational states are broad and highly inverted.

  13. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  14. 3-D crustal velocity model for Lithuania and its application to local event studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budraitis, M.; Kozlovskaya, E.; Janutyte, I.; Motuza, G.

    2009-12-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 project (PASsive Seismic Experiment in TESZ) aimed at studying the lithosphere-asthenosphere system around the TransEuropean Suture Zone (TESZ)- the transition between old Proterozoic platform of north and east Europe and younger Phanerozoic platform in central and western Europe. The experiment was a seismic array research aiming to retrieve the structure of the crust and Earth's mantle down to the mantle transition zone, including mapping of upper mantle seismic velocity variations and discontinuities (Moho, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, mantle transition zone) using all available techniques. During the experiment 26 seismic stations (including four broadband stations) were installed in Lithuania and operated since June, 2006 till January, 2008. One of the main reasons of PASSEQ deployment in Lithuania is identification and characterisation of the local seismic activity. During the data acquisition period a number of local seismic events was identified and preliminary event location was made using LocSat and VELEST algorithms and 1-D velocity models. These standard procedures is not enough precise for Lithuania, however, because the thickness of the crust varies significantly in the region (from 45 to 55 km). Another problem was low quality of S-wave arrivals due to thick (up to 2 km) sediments in most part of Lithuania. In order to improve event location, we compiled a 3-D seismic velocity model of the crust down to a depth of 60 km. The model, consisting of four major layers (sediments, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and uppermost mantle) was interpolated from 2-D velocity models along previous wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles into a regular grid. The quality of the approximation was analysed using comparison of travel times of P-waves recorded by controlled source experiments and calculated travel times through the 3-D velocity model. The model was converted into a density model using a special procedure, in which

  15. Blood flow quantification using 1D CFD parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosig, Richard; Kowarschik, Markus; Maday, Peter; Katouzian, Amin; Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir

    2014-03-01

    Patient-specific measurements of cerebral blood flow provide valuable diagnostic information concerning cerebrovascular diseases rather than visually driven qualitative evaluation. In this paper, we present a quantitative method to estimate blood flow parameters with high temporal resolution from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) image sequences. Using a 3D DSA dataset and a 2D+t DSA sequence, the proposed algorithm employs a 1D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for estimation of time-dependent flow values along a cerebral vessel, combined with an additional Advection Diffusion Equation (ADE) for contrast agent propagation. The CFD system, followed by the ADE, is solved with a finite volume approximation, which ensures the conservation of mass. Instead of defining a new imaging protocol to obtain relevant data, our cost function optimizes the bolus arrival time (BAT) of the contrast agent in 2D+t DSA sequences. The visual determination of BAT is common clinical practice and can be easily derived from and be compared to values, generated by a 1D-CFD simulation. Using this strategy, we ensure that our proposed method fits best to clinical practice and does not require any changes to the medical work flow. Synthetic experiments show that the recovered flow estimates match the ground truth values with less than 12% error in the mean flow rates.

  16. Validation of 3D/1D Analysis of ICRF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Lancellotti, V.; Kyrytsya, V.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Parisot, A.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2004-11-01

    An innovative tool has been realized for the 3D/1D simulation of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF), i.e. accounting for antennas in a realistic 3D geometry and with an accurate 1D plasma model. The approach to the problem is based on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. The environment has been subdivided in two coupled region: the plasma region and the vacuum region. The two problems are linked by means of electromagnetic current distribution on the aperture between the two regions. The plasma enters the formalism via a surface impedance matrix for this reason any plasma model can be used. The source term directly models the TEM mode of the coax feeding the antenna and the current in the coax is determined self-consistently, giving the input impedance/admittance of the antenna itself. The suite, called TOPICA, has been used in the design of various ICRF antennas and also for the performance prediction of the ALCATOR C-MOD D and E antenna. An extensive set of comparisons between measured and simulated antenna parameters during ALCATOR C-MOD operation will be presented.

  17. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  18. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  19. 3-D crustal velocity model for Lithuania and its application to local event studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, Elena; Budraitis, Mantas; Janutyte, Ilma; Motuza, Gediminas; Lazauskiene, Jurga; Passeq-Working Group

    2010-05-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 project (PASsive Seismic Experiment in TESZ) aimed at studying the lithosphere-asthenosphere system around the TransEuropean Suture Zone (TESZ)- the transition between old Proterozoic platform of north and east Europe and younger Phanerozoic platform in central and western Europe. The experiment was a seismic array research aiming to retrieve the structure of the crust and Earth's mantle down to the mantle transition zone, including mapping of upper mantle seismic velocity variations and discontinuities (Moho, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, mantle transition zone) using all available techniques. During the experiment 26 seismic stations (including four broadband stations) were installed in Lithuania. One of the main targets of PASSEQ deployment in Lithuania was identification and characterization of the local seismic activity. The PASSEQ stations in Lithuania were in operation since June, 2006 till January, 2008. During this period a number of local seismic events was recorded and preliminary event location was made using the LocSat algorithm and 1-D velocity model. This standard procedure is not enough precise for Lithuania, however, because the thickness of the crust varies significantly in the region (from 45 to 55 km). In order to improve event location, we separated the events into several groups and located each group separately using a VELEST algorithms and own 1-D velocity model for each group. We also compiled a 3-D seismic velocity of the crust down to a depth of 60 km. The model, consisting of four major layers (sediments, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and uppermost mantle) was interpolated from 2-D velocity models along previous wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles into a regular grid. The quality of the approximation was analysed using comparison of travel times of P-waves recorded along previous controlled source profiles and synthetic travel times calculated using the 3-D velocity model. The model was converted

  20. A seismic reflection velocity study of a Mississippian mud-mound in the Illinois basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaweera, Chamila Kumari

    Two mud-mounds have been reported in the Ullin limestone near, but not in, the Aden oil field in Hamilton County, Illinois. One mud-mound is in the Broughton oil field of Hamilton County 25 miles to the south of Aden. The second mud-mound is in the Johnsonville oil field in Wayne County 20 miles to the north of Aden. Seismic reflection profiles were shot in 2012 adjacent to the Aden oil field to evaluate the oil prospects and to investigate the possibility of detecting Mississippian mud-mounds near the Aden field. A feature on one of the seismic profiles was interpreted to be a mud-mound or carbonate buildup. A well drilled at the location of this interpreted structure provided digital geophysical logs and geological logs used to refine the interpretation of the seismic profiles. Geological data from the new well at Aden, in the form of drill cuttings, have been used to essentially confirm the existence of a mud-mound in the Ullin limestone at a depth of 4300 feet. Geophysical well logs from the new well near Aden were used to create 1-D computer models and synthetic seismograms for comparison to the seismic data. The reflection seismic method is widely used to aid interpreting subsurface geology. Processing seismic data is an important step in the method as a properly processed seismic section can give a better image of the subsurface geology whereas a poorly processed section could mislead the interpretation. Seismic reflections will be more accurately depicted with careful determination of seismic velocities and by carefully choosing the processing steps and parameters. Various data processing steps have been applied and parameters refined to produce improved stacked seismic records. The resulting seismic records from the Aden field area indicate a seismic response similar to what is expected from a carbonate mud-mound. One-dimensional synthetic seismograms were created using the available sonic and density logs from the well drilled near the Aden seismic lines

  1. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  2. Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaky, W.; Devlin, J. F.; Gillham, R. W.

    2009-04-01

    Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in a sheet pile-bounded alleyway in which bulk flow rate and direction could be controlled. PVP velocities were compared with those estimated from bulk flow, a Geoflo® instrument, borehole dilution, colloidal borescope measurements, and a forced gradient tracer test. In addition, the velocity profiles were compared with vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) measured by permeameter testing of core samples and in situ high-resolution slug tests. There was qualitative agreement between the trends in velocity and K among all the various methods. The PVP and Geoflo® meter tests returned average velocity magnitudes of 30.2 ± 7.7 to 34.7 ± 13.1 cm/d (depending on prior knowledge of flow direction in PVP tests) and 36.5 ± 10.6, respectively, which were near the estimated bulk velocity (20 cm/d). The other direct velocity measurement techniques yielded velocity estimates 5 to 12 times the bulk velocity. Best results with the PVP instrument were obtained by jetting the instrument into place, though this method may have introduced a slight positive bias to the measured velocities. The individual estimates of point velocity direction varied, but the average of the point velocity directions agreed quite well with the expected bulk flow direction. It was concluded that the PVP method is a viable technique for use in the field, where high-resolution velocity data are required.

  3. NOKIN1D: one-dimensional neutron kinetics based on a nodal collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdú, G.; Ginestar, D.; Miró, R.; Jambrina, A.; Barrachina, T.; Soler, Amparo; Concejal, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    The TRAC-BF1 one-dimensional kinetic model is a formulation of the neutron diffusion equation in the two energy groups' approximation, based on the analytical nodal method (ANM). The advantage compared with a zero-dimensional kinetic model is that the axial power profile may vary with time due to thermal-hydraulic parameter changes and/or actions of the control systems but at has the disadvantages that in unusual situations it fails to converge. The nodal collocation method developed for the neutron diffusion equation and applied to the kinetics resolution of TRAC-BF1 thermal-hydraulics, is an adaptation of the traditional collocation methods for the discretization of partial differential equations, based on the development of the solution as a linear combination of analytical functions. It has chosen to use a nodal collocation method based on a development of Legendre polynomials of neutron fluxes in each cell. The qualification is carried out by the analysis of the turbine trip transient from the NEA benchmark in Peach Bottom NPP using both the original 1D kinetics implemented in TRAC-BF1 and the 1D nodal collocation method.

  4. (7)Li in situ 1D NMR imaging of a lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Klamor, S; Zick, K; Oerther, T; Schappacher, F M; Winter, M; Brunklaus, G

    2015-02-14

    The spatial distribution of charge carriers in lithium ion batteries during current flow is of fundamental interest for a detailed understanding of transport properties and the development of strategies for future improvements of the electrolyte-electrode interface behaviour. In this work we explored the potential of (7)Li 1D in situ NMR imaging for the identification of concentration gradients under constant current load in a battery cell. An electrochemical cell based on PTFE body and a stack of glass microfiber discs that are soaked with a technically relevant electrolyte suitable for high-temperature application and squeezed between a Li metal and a nano-Si-graphite composite electrode was assembled to acquire (7)Li 1D in situ NMR profiles with an improved NMR pulse sequence as function of time and state of charge, thereby visualizing the course of ion concentration during charge and discharge. Surface localized changes of Li concentration were attributed to processes such as solid electrolyte interphase formation or full lithiation of the composite electrode. The method allows the extraction of lithium ion transport properties. PMID:25578436

  5. Evaluation of 2 1-D cloud models for the analysis of VAS soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluation of the satellite Visual Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder (VISSR) has begun to document several of its critical shortcomings as far as numerical cloud models are concerned: excessive smoothing of thermal inversions; imprecise measurement of boundary layer moisture; and tendency to exaggerate atmospheric stability. The sensitivity of 1-D cloud models to their required inputs is stressed with special attention to those parameters obtained from atmospheric soundings taken by the VAS or rawinsonde. In addition to performing model experiments using temperature and moisture profiles having the general characteristics of VAS soundings, standard input sensitivity tests were made and 1-D model performance was compared with observations and the results of a 2-D model experiment using AVE/VAS data (Atmospheric Variability Experiment). Although very encouraging, the results are not sufficient to make any specific conclusions. In general, the VAS soundings are likely to be inadequate to provide the cloud base (and subcloud layer) information needed for inputs to current cumulus models. Above cloud base, the tendency to exaggerate the stability of the atmosphere requires solution before meaningful model experiments are run.

  6. On the parameterization of 1D vertical mixing in planetary atmospheres: insights from 2D and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-11-01

    Most of the current atmospheric chemistry models for planets (e.g., Krasnopolsky & Parshev 1981; Yung & Demore 1982; Yung, Allen & Pinto 1984; Lavvas et al. 2008; Zhang et al. 2012) and exoplanets (e.g., Line, Liang & Yung 2010; Moses et al. 2011; Hu & Seager 2014) adopt a one-dimensional (1D) chemical-diffusion approach in the vertical coordinate. Although only a crude approximation, these 1D models have succeeded in explaining the global-averaged vertical profiles of many chemical species in observations. One of the important assumptions of these models is that all chemical species are transported via the same eddy diffusion profile--that is, the assumption is made that the eddy diffusivity is a fundamental property of the dynamics alone, and does not depend on the chemistry. Here we show that, as also noticed in the Earth community (e.g., Holton 1986), this “homogenous eddy diffusion” assumption generally breaks down. We first show analytically why the 1D eddy diffusivity must generally depend both on the horizontal eddy mixing and the chemical lifetime of the species. This implies that the long-lived species and short-lived chemical species will generally exhibit different eddy diffusion profiles, even in a given atmosphere with identical dynamics. Next, we present tracer-transport simulations in a 2D chemical-diffusion-advection model (Shia et al. 1989; Zhang, Shia & Yung 2013) and a 3D general circulation model (MITgcm, e.g., Liu & Showman 2013), for both rapid-rotating planets and tidally-locked exoplanets, to further explore the effect of chemical timescales on the eddy diffusivity. From the 2D and 3D simulation outputs, we derive effective 1D eddy diffusivity profiles for chemical tracers exhibiting a range of chemical timescales. We show that the derived eddy diffusivity can depend strongly on the horizontal eddy mixing and chemistry, although the dependences are more complex than the analytic model predicts. Overall, these results suggest that

  7. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

    2006-01-30

    measuring 1D water velocity magnitudes has been previously demonstrated by the authors, the feasibility of resolving 3D water velocity vectors given the heterogeneity of the flow field was unknown before this study’s data were collected. Both the 1D and 3D data were collected by deploying three ADCPs on dual-axis rotators directly above the draft tube exit of Turbine Unit 16. These instruments collected 1D data during both the mobile reconnaissance campaign and a later one-week period with zero spillway discharge. During the zero spillway discharge period, Turbine Unit 16 was operated over a range of discharges. Approximately 12 hours of 1D velocity data were collected at low (12 kcfs), middle (16.2 kcfs), and high (19.2 kcfs) turbine discharges. The 1D dataset indicates large differences in flow patterns and RMS velocity fluctuations among the various discharge levels. Results from this project show that it is technically feasible to measure 3D water velocities directly downstream of an operating turbine unit using a narrow beam swath (i.e., 6-degree) ADCP. Data products from these 3D velocity data include a measurement of the draft tube barrel flow distribution (a.k.a., the flow split), directional changes and the general decay of velocity as flow exits the draft tube and enters the tailrace, and a relative measure of the homogeneity of the flow field.

  8. Detecting different correlation regimes in a 1D Bose gas using in-situ absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salces-Carcoba, Francisco; Sugawa, Seiji; Yue, Yuchen; Putra, Andika; Spielman, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We present the realization of a single 1D Bose gas (1DBG) using a tightly focused Laguerre-Gauss beam as a waveguide for a 87Rb cloud. Axial confinement is provided by a weak trap that also sets the final density profile. A homogeneous 1DBG at T = 0 can be fully described by the dimensionless interaction parameter γ ~ 1/n, where n is the linear density; at sufficiently low densities the system becomes strongly interacting. An inhomogeneous (trapped) system can enter this description within the local density approximation (LDA) where the interaction parameter becomes position dependent γ(x) ~ 1/n(x). The system then displays different correlation regimes over its extension which can be detected by measuring its equation of state (EoS) or the density density correlations in real space using in-situ absorption imaging.

  9. PROM4: 1D isothermal and isobaric modeler for solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttebroze, P.; Labrosse, N.

    2013-06-01

    PROM4 computes simple models of solar prominences which consist of plane-parallel slabs standing vertically above the solar surface. Each model is defined by 5 parameters: temperature, density, geometrical thickness, microturbulent velocity and height above the solar surface. PROM4 solves the equations of radiative transfer, statistical equilibrium, ionization and pressure equilibria, and computes electron and hydrogen level populations and hydrogen line profiles. Written in Fortran 90 and with two versions available (one with text in English, one with text in French), the code needs 64-bit arithmetic for real numbers.

  10. Lithospheric Shear Velocity and Discontinuity Structure of Hudson Bay from S-to-P Receiver Functions and Jointly Inverted P-to-S Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hudson Bay overlies some of the thickest Precambrian lithosphere on Earth, whose internal structures contain important clues to the earliest workings of plate formation. The Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) has thus far constrained its seismic wavespeed, anisotropy, and discontinuity structures. However, previous work has either focused on a single imaging method or briefly compared two independent methods. In this study, we combine surface wave dispersion curves with P to S receiver functions (PRF) to jointly invert for 1D shear velocity, and also compute independent S to P receiver functions (SRF) using teleseismic earthquakes recorded at 36 broadband seismic stations from the HuBLE experiment and 9 additional regional stations. High shear velocities are observed to depths of 200-300 km in the region, indicating a thick depleted lithospheric keel, with maximum thickness in the center of Hudson Bay. The 1D shear velocity profiles typically exhibit a low-velocity zone in the lower crust, consistent with the hypothesis of post-orogenic or syn-orogenic lower crustal flow or the tectonic burial of metasediments. Observations of a flat Moho in the Rae domain of northwestern Hudson Bay are consistent with an Archean-aged crust, which has remained unaltered since formation. Structures observed within the mantle lithosphere in the depth-stacked S to P receiver functions appear to dip from the Hearne domain towards the Rae domain, suggestive of lithospheric formation through plate tectonic processes. This implies that plate tectonic processes were in action during the Archean when these provinces formed.

  11. Measurement of the Bichromatic Force in 1-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. R.; Chi, F.; Cashen, M. T.; Metcalf, H. J.

    1998-05-01

    We have demonstrated atomic beam steering using the bichromatic force(J. Söding et al)., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1420 (1997).. This force is large and has the same sign for all velocities between v \\cong ± δ / 2 k for counterpropagating laser beams each having frequencies ω ± δ. Thus, all atoms with |v| < δ / 2 k are eventually accelerated to v \\cong δ/ 2 k. With a frequency shift Δ of both components of one laser beam relative to the other, this description is appropriate for a reference frame moving at v=Δ/2k. A terminal velocity of v=0 in the lab frame can be achieved by choosing Δ=δ. The four frequencies needed for this scheme can be generated with a single AOM (at drive frequency δ) with almost no wasted light. This is done by equalizing the power in the unshifted and 1^st order up-shifted beams, and then retroreflecting both through the AOM. Two spatially separated output beams are created, one with ω ± δ and the other with ω and ω + 2δ. With these frequencies, the moving frame has velocity v=δ / 2 k which is just what is needed to produce a beam at v=0 in the lab frame. Using δ=2π × 50 MHz the capture angle for Rb at 350 m/s is 0.1 radian.

  12. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  13. Stepwise shockwave velocity determinator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Timothy E.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    To provide an uncomplicated and inexpensive method for measuring the far-field velocity of a surface shockwave produced by an explosion, a stepwise shockwave velocity determinator (SSVD) was developed. The velocity determinator is constructed of readily available materials and works on the principle of breaking discrete sensors composed of aluminum foil contacts. The discrete sensors have an average breaking threshold of approximately 7 kPa. An incremental output step of 250 mV is created with each foil contact breakage and is logged by analog-to-digital instrumentation. Velocity data obtained from the SSVD is within approximately 11 percent of the calculated surface shockwave velocity of a muzzle blast from a 30.06 rifle.

  14. Magnetic behavior of some 1D Cu chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Roger D.; Gomez-García, Carlos J.; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2004-05-01

    The magnetic properties of three 1D copper(II) salts are reported. The compound Cu(14ane)Cu(N 3) 4 contains alternating site chains with weak FM coupling with J/k=0.635 K . Magnetization studies are reported on Cu(TIM)CuCl 4, an alternating site, alternating FM/AFM exchange system with J FM/k=29.7 K and J AFM/k=-8.66 K. (HPy) 2Cu 3Cl 8.2H 2O contains FM chains composed of alternating Cu 2Cl 62- dimers and CuCl 2(H 2O) 2 monomers, with intradimer coupling J 1/k=17.35 K and dimer-monomer coupling J 2/k=1.93 K .

  15. Quadratic Finite Element Method for 1D Deterministic Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tolar, Jr., D R; Ferguson, J M

    2004-01-06

    In the discrete ordinates, or SN, numerical solution of the transport equation, both the spatial ({und r}) and angular ({und {Omega}}) dependences on the angular flux {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}are modeled discretely. While significant effort has been devoted toward improving the spatial discretization of the angular flux, we focus on improving the angular discretization of {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}. Specifically, we employ a Petrov-Galerkin quadratic finite element approximation for the differencing of the angular variable ({mu}) in developing the one-dimensional (1D) spherical geometry S{sub N} equations. We develop an algorithm that shows faster convergence with angular resolution than conventional S{sub N} algorithms.

  16. Electron Energy Levels in the 1D-2D Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Michael; Sanjeev, Kumar; Thomas, Kalarikad; Creeth, Graham; English, David; Ritchie, David; Griffiths, Jonathan; Farrer, Ian; Jones, Geraint

    Using GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures we have investigated the behaviour of electron energy levels with relaxation of the potential confining a 2D electron gas into a 1D configuration. In the ballistic regime of transport, when the conductance shows quantized plateaux, different types of behaviour are found according to the spins of interacting levels, whether a magnetic field is applied and lifting of the momentum degeneracy with a source-drain voltage. We have observed both crossing and anti-crossing of levels and have investigated the manner in which they can be mutually converted. In the presence of a magnetic field levels can cross and lock together as the confinement is altered in a way which is characteristic of parallel channels. The overall behaviour is discussed in terms of electron interactions and the wavefunction flexibility allowed by the increasing two dimensionality of the electron distribution as the confinement is weakened. Work supported by UK EPSRC.

  17. Directed enzymatic activation of 1-D DNA tiles.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sudhanshu; Chandran, Harish; Gopalkrishnan, Nikhil; LaBean, Thomas H; Reif, John

    2015-02-24

    The tile assembly model is a Turing universal model of self-assembly where a set of square shaped tiles with programmable sticky sides undergo coordinated self-assembly to form arbitrary shapes, thereby computing arbitrary functions. Activatable tiles are a theoretical extension to the Tile assembly model that enhances its robustness by protecting the sticky sides of tiles until a tile is partially incorporated into a growing assembly. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate a simplified version of the Activatable tile assembly model. In particular, we demonstrate the simultaneous assembly of protected DNA tiles where a set of inert tiles are activated via a DNA polymerase to undergo linear assembly. We then demonstrate stepwise activated assembly where a set of inert tiles are activated sequentially one after another as a result of attachment to a growing 1-D assembly. We hope that these results will pave the way for more sophisticated demonstrations of activated assemblies. PMID:25625898

  18. Robust recognition of 1D barcodes using Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwinell, John; Bian, Peng; Bian, Long Xiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for the recognition of 1D barcodes using the Hough transform, which is highly robust regarding the typical degraded image. The algorithm addresses various typical image distortions, such as inhomogeneous illumination, reflections, damaged barcode or blurriness etc. Other problems arise from recognizing low quality printing (low contrast or poor ink receptivity). Traditional approaches are unable to provide a fast solution for handling such complex and mixed noise factors. A multi-level method offers a better approach to best manage competing constraints of complex noise and fast decode. At the lowest level, images are processed in gray scale. At the middle level, the image is transformed into the Hough domain. At the top level, global results, including missing information, is processed within a global context including domain heuristics as well as OCR. The three levels work closely together by passing information up and down between levels.

  19. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-01

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  20. MX chains: 1-D analog of CuO planes

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T.; Batistic, I.; Bishop, A.R.; Loh, E.Y. Jr.; Marianer, S.

    1989-01-01

    We study a two-band Peierls-Hubbard model for halogen-bridged mixed-valence transition metal linear chain complexes (MX chains). We include electron-electron correlations (both Hubbard and PPP-like expressions) using several techniques including calculations in the zero-hopping limit, exact diagonalization of small systems, mean field approximation, and a Gutzwiller-like Ansatz for quantum phonons. The adiabatic optical absorption and phonon spectra for both photo-excited and doping induced defects (kinks, polarons, bipolarons, and excitons) are discussed. A long period phase which occurs even at commensurate filling for certain parameter values may be related to twinning. The effect of including the electron-phonon in addition to the electron-electron interaction on the polaron/bipolaron (pairing) competition is especially interesting when this class of compounds is viewed as a 1-D analog of high-temperature superconductors. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Effective theory of black holes in the 1/D expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (e.g. Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this `black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/ D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for `black droplets', i.e. black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  2. Validation of 1-D transport and sawtooth models for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.W.; Turner, M.F.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe progress on validating a number of local transport models by comparing their predictions with relevant experimental data from a range of tokamaks in the ITER profile database. This database, the testing procedure and results are discussed. In addition a model for sawtooth oscillations is used to investigate their effect in an ITER plasma with alpha-particles.

  3. SCEC CVM-Toolkit (CVM-T) -- High Performance Meshing Tools for SCEC Community Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Ely, G. P.; Olsen, K. B.; Withers, K.; Graves, R. W.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The SCEC Community Velocity Model Toolkit (CVM-T) enables earthquake modelers to quickly build, visualize, and validate large-scale 3D velocity meshes using SCEC CVM-H or CVM-4. CVM-T is comprised of three main components: (1) a current SCEC community velocity model for Southern California, (2) tools for extracting meshes from this model and visualizing them, and (3) an automated test framework for evaluating new releases of CVMs using SCEC’s AWP-ODC forward wave propagation software and one, or more, ground motion goodness of fit (GoF) algorithms. CVM-T is designed to help SCEC modelers build large-scale velocity meshes by extracting material properties from the most current version of Community Velocity Model H (CVM-H) and to provide a consistent interface as new CVM-H versions are developed. The CVM-T software provides a highly-scalable interface to CVM-H 6.2 (and later) voxets. Along with an improved interface to CVM-H material properties, the CVM-T software adds a geotechnical layer (GTL) to CVM-H 6.2+ based on Ely’s Vs30-derived GTL. The initial release of CVM-T also extends the coverage region for CVM-H 6.2 with a Hadley-Kanamori 1D background. Smoothing is performed within the transition boundary between the core model and the 1D background. The user interface now includes a C API that allows applications to query the model either by elevation or depth. The Extraction and Visualization Tools (EVT) include a parallelized 3D mesh generator which can quickly generate meshes (consisting of Vp, Vs, and density) from either CVM-H or CVM-4 with over 100 billion points. Python plotting scripts can be employed to plot horizontal or profile slices from existing meshes or directly from either CVM. The Automated Test Framework (ATF) is a system for quantitatively evaluating new versions of CVM-H and ensuring that the model improves against prior versions. The ATF employs the CruiseControl build and test framework to run an AWP-ODC simulation for the 2008 Chino

  4. FAME Radial Velocity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Gould, A.

    2000-12-01

    Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) belongs to a new generation of astrometry satellites and will probe the surrounding space some 20 times deeper than its predecessor Hipparcos. As a result we will acquire precise knowledge of 5 out of 6 components of phase-space for millions of stars. The remaining coordinate, radial velocity, will remain unknown. In this study, we look at how the knowledge of radial velocity affects the determination of the structure of the Galaxy, and its gravitational potential. We therefore propose a radial velocity survey of FAME stars, and discuss its feasibility and technical requirements.

  5. S-wave velocity structure of the North China from inversion of Rayleigh wave phase velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao-peng; Zhu, Liang-bao; Wang, Qing-dong; Zhang, Pan; Yang, Ying-hang

    2014-07-01

    We constructed the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle (10-100 km) beneath the North China based on the teleseismic data recorded by 187 portable broadband stations deployed in this region. The traditional two-step inversion scheme was adopted. Firstly, we measured the interstation fundamental Rayleigh wave phase velocity of 10-60 s and imaged the phase velocity distributions using the Tarantola inversion method. Secondly, we inverted the 1-D S-wave velocity structure with a grid spacing of 0.25° × 0.25° and constructed the 3-D S-wave velocity structure of the North China. The 3-D S-wave velocity model provides valuable information about the destruction mechanism and geodynamics of the North China Craton (NCC). The S-wave velocity structures in the northwestern and southwestern sides of the North-South Gravity Lineament (NSGL) are obviously different. The southeastern side is high velocity (high-V) while the northeastern side is low velocity (low-V) at the depth of 60-80 km. The upwelling asthenosphere above the stagnated Pacific plate may cause the destruction of the Eastern Block and form the NSGL. A prominent low-V anomaly exists around Datong from 50 to 100 km, which may due to the upwelling asthenosphere originating from the mantle transition zone beneath the Western Block. The upwelling asthenosphere beneath the Datong may also contribute to the destruction of the Eastern Block. The Zhangjiakou-Penglai fault zone (ZPFZ) may cut through the lithosphere and act as a channel of the upwelling asthenosphere. A noticeable low-V zone also exists in the lower crust and upper mantle lid (30-50 km) beneath the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan (BTT) region, which may be caused by the upwelling asthenosphere through the ZPFZ.

  6. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  7. Investigation of Slipstream Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr

    1925-01-01

    These experiments were made at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, to investigate the velocity of the air in the slipstream in horizontal and climbing flight to determine the form of expression giving the slipstream velocity in terms of the airspeed of the airplane. The method used consisted in flying the airplane both on a level course and in climb at full throttle and measuring the slipstream velocity at seven points in the slipstream for the whole speed range of the airplane in both conditions. In general the results show that for both condition, horizontal and climbing flights, the slipstream velocity v subscript 3 and airspeed v can be represented by straight lines and consequently the equations are of the form: v subscript s = mv+b where m and b are constant. (author)

  8. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  9. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  10. A comparison of measured and modeled suspended sediment concentration profiles during different types of meteorological events on the inner-shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, P. A.; Ma, Y.

    2010-12-01

    An instrumented quadrapod was deployed on the inner-shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina at a depth of approximately 7 meters from July 2008 - December 2009. A multi-frequency Acoustic Backscatter Sensor (ABS) and a pulse-coherent Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (PC-ADCP) were used to collect co-located long-term measurements of suspended sediment concentrations and high-resolution velocity profiles throughout the bottom boundary layer. To invert the acoustic backscatter voltage collected by the ABS, a semi-empirical backscattering theory (Thorne and Hanes, 2002) was first verified with sediment chamber measurements using local sediments. The verified theory was then employed to determine sediment grain size and suspended sediment concentrations. Additionally, to complement the field observations, two different 1-D bottom boundary layer models (Styles and Glenn, 2000 and Wiberg and Smith, 1983) were applied to estimate the bed shear stress, velocity and suspended sediment concentration profiles. Although both models are based on boundary layer theory (Smith,1977; Grant and Madsen, 1979), and require as inputs of wave and current velocities as well as characteristics of sea-bed sediment, they are distinct in some practical applications such as eddy-viscosity profile, ripple dimension estimation, model gridding, etc. Recorded waves, currents, and acoustic backscatter data revealed that nineteen sediment transport events occurred during the eighteen month study period, which resulted in an order of magnitude range of suspended sediment concentrations. Comparisons of sediment concentration profiles between the two 1-D models and the field measurements were conducted during several different types of sediment transport events. The events that were used for the comparisons included two types of frequently occurring frontal systems, as well a direct hit from Tropical Storm Hannah. During the selected events near-bottom orbital velocities ranged from 20 - 60 cm s-1 and

  11. Dynamic decoupling in the presence of 1D random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Arnab; Chakraborty, Ipsita; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet

    2016-05-01

    In the recent past, many dynamic decoupling sequences have been proposed for the suppression of decoherence of spins connected to thermal baths of various natures. Dynamic decoupling schemes for suppressing decoherence due to Gaussian diffusion have also been developed. In this work, we study the relative performances of dynamic decoupling schemes in the presence of a non-stationary Gaussian noise such as a 1D random walk. Frequency domain analysis is not suitable to determine the performances of various dynamic decoupling schemes in suppressing decoherence due to such a process. Thus, in this work, we follow a time domain calculation to arrive at the following conclusions: in the presence of such a noise, we show that (i) the traditional Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) sequence outperforms Uhrig’s dynamic decoupling scheme, (ii) CPMG remains the optimal sequence for suppression of decoherence due to random walk in the presence of an external field gradient. Later, the theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on spin 1/2 particles diffusing in a liquid medium.

  12. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  13. 1D X-ray Beam Compressing Monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Korytar, D.; Dobrocka, E.; Konopka, P.; Zaprazny, Z.; Ferrari, C.; Mikulik, P.; Vagovic, P.; Ac, V.; Erko, A.; Abrosimov, N.

    2010-04-06

    A total beam compression of 5 and 10 corresponding to the asymmetry angles of 9 deg. and 12 deg. is achieved with V-5 and V-10 monochromators, respectively, in standard single crystal pure germanium (220) X-ray beam compressing (V-shaped) monochromators for CuKalpha{sub 1} radiation. A higher 1D compression of X-ray beam is possible using larger angles of asymmetry, however it is achieved at the expense of the total intensity, which is decreased due to the refraction effect. To increase the monochromator intensity, several ways are considered both theoretically and experimentally. Linearly graded germanium rich Ge{sub x}Si{sub (1-x)} single crystal was used to prepare a V-21 single crystal monochromator with 15 deg. asymmetry angles (compression factor of 21). Its temperature gradient version is discussed for CuKalpha{sub 1} radiation. X-ray diffraction measurements on the graded GeSi monochromator showed more than 3-times higher intensity at the output compared with that of a pure Ge monochromator.

  14. Graphs on uniform points in [0,1]d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Martin J. B.; Russo, Ralph P.; Yang, King J.

    1995-06-01

    Statistical problems in pattern or structure recognition for a random multidimensional point set may be addressed by variations on the random graph model of Erdos and Renyui. The imposition of graph structure with a variable edge criterion on a large random point set allows a search for signature quantities or behavior under the given distributional hypothesis. The work is motivated by the question of how to make statistical inferences from sensed mine field data. This article describes recent results obtained in the following special cases. On independent random points U1,...,Un distributed uniformly on [0,1]d, a random graph Gn(x) is constructed in which two distinct such points are joined by an edge if the l(infinity )-distance between them is at most some prescribed value 0 = 2.

  15. Optical bullets in (2+1)D photonic structures and their interaction with localized defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Tomas

    2005-11-01

    This dissertation studies light propagation in Kerr-nonlinear two dimensional waveguides with a Bragg resonant, periodic structure in the propagation direction. The model describing evolution of the electric field envelopes is the system of 2D Nonlinear Coupled Mode Equations (2D CME). The periodic structure induces a range of frequencies (frequency gap) in which linear waves do not propagate. It is shown that, similarly to the ID case of a fiber grating, the 2D nonlinear system supports localized solitary wave solutions, referred to as 2D gap solitons, which have frequencies inside the linear gap and can travel at, any speed smaller than or equal to the speed of light in the corresponding homogeneous medium. Such solutions are constructed numerically via Newton's iteration. Convergence is obtained only near the upper edge of the gap. Gap solitons with a nonzero velocity are constructed by numerically following a bifurcation curve parameterized by the velocity v. It is shown that gap solitons are saddle points of the corresponding Hamiltonian functional and that no (constrained) local minima of the Hamiltonian exist. The linear stability problem is formulated and reasons for the failure of the standard Hamiltonian PDE approach for determining linear stability are discussed. In the second part of the dissertation interaction of 2D gap solitons with localized defects is studied and trapping of slow enough 2D gap solitons is demonstrated. This study builds on [JOSA B 19, 1635 (2002)], where such trapping of 1D gap solitons is considered. Analogously to this 1D problem trapping in the 2D model is explained as a resonant energy transfer into one or more defect modes existent for the particular defect. For special localized defects exact linear modes are found explicitly via the separation of variables. Numerical computation of linear defect modes is used for more general defects. Corresponding nonlinear modes are then constructed via Newton's iteration by following a

  16. Bubble Velocities in Slowly Sheared Bubble Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Many complex fluids, such as foams, emulsions, colloids, and granular matter, exhibit interesting flow behavior when subjected to slow, steady rates of strain. The flow is characterized by irregular fluctuations in the stress with corresponding nonlinear rearrangements of the individual particles. We focus on the flow behavior of a model two-dimensional system: bubble rafts. Bubble rafts consist of a single layer of soap bubbles floating on the surface of a liquid subphase, usually a soap-water solution. The bubbles are sheared using a Couette geometry, i.e. concentric cylinders. We rotate the outer cylinder at a constant rate and measure the motions of individual bubbles and the stress on the inner cylinder. We will report on the velocity profiles of the bubbles averaged over long-times and averaged over individual stress events. The long-time average velocities are well described by continuum models for fluids with the one surprising feature that there exists a critical radius at which the shear-rate is discontinuous. The individual profiles are highly nonlinear and strongly correlated with the stress fluctuations. We will discuss a number of interesting questions. Can the average profiles be understood in a simple way given the individual velocities? Is there a clear "classification" for the individual profiles, or are they purely random? What sets the critical radius for a given set of flow conditions?

  17. MARVELS 1D Pipeline Development, Optimization, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, Jian; Grieves, Nolan; Li, Rui; Sithajan, Sirinrat

    2016-04-01

    We describe the processing pipeline of one-dimensional spectra from the SDSS III Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). This medium-resolution interferometric spectroscopic survey observed over 3300 stars over the course of four years with the primary goal of detecting and characterizing giant planets (>0.5 M Jup) from within a large, homogeneous sample of FGK stars. The successful extraction of radial velocities (RVs) from MARVELS is complicated by several instrument effects. The wide field nature of this multi-object spectrograph provides spectra that are initially distorted and require conditioning of the raw images for precise RV extraction. Also, the simultaneous observation of sixty stars per exposure leads to several effects not typically seen in a single-object instrument. For instance, fiber illumination changes over time can easily create the dominant source of RV measurement error when these changes are different for the stellar and calibration optical paths. We present a method for statistically quantifying these instrument effects to combat the difficulty of giant planet detection due to systematic RV errors. We also present an overview of the performance of the entire survey as it stands for the SDSS III DR 12 as well as key results from the very latest improvements. This includes a novel technique, called lucky RV, by which stable regions of spectra can be statistically determined and emphasized during RV extraction, leading to a large reduction of the long-term RV offsets in the MARVELS data. These improved RV data are to be released via NASA Exoplanet Archive in the fall of 2015.

  18. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  19. Synthesis and properties of a few 1-D cobaltous fumarates

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, Sanchay J.; Das, Birinchi K.

    2012-08-15

    Metal fumarates are often studied in the context of metal organic framework solids. Preparation, structure and properties of three cobalt(II) fumarates, viz. [Co(fum)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O 1, [Co(fum)(py){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] 2, and [Co(fum)(4-CNpy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] 3 (fum=fumarate, py=pyridine, 4-CNpy=4-cyanopyridine) are described. All three are chain polymers involving bridging fumarato ligands between each pair of octahedral Co(II) centres, but while the first one is zigzag in structure, the latter two are linear. Indexed powder X-ray diffraction patterns, solid state electronic spectra and magnetic properties of the species are reported. Thermal decomposition behaviour of the compounds suggests that they may be suitable as precursors to make Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} via pyrolysis below 600 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: Structure and properties of three chain-polymeric cobalt(II) fumarates are described. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three fumarate bridged 1-D coordination polymers of cobalt(II) are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer While Co(II) fumarate pentahydrate is zigzag, the species having both pyridine and water as co-ligands are linear in structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prominent lines in the powder X-ray diffraction patterns have been indexed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal decomposition of the species yields Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} as the final product.

  20. Dynamical functions of a 1D correlated quantum liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Bozi, D.; Penc, K.

    2008-10-01

    The dynamical correlation functions in one-dimensional electronic systems show power-law behaviour at low energies and momenta close to integer multiples of the charge and spin Fermi momenta. These systems are usually referred to as Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids. However, near well defined lines of the (k,ω) plane the power-law behaviour extends beyond the low-energy cases mentioned above, and also appears at higher energies, leading to singular features in the photoemission spectra and other dynamical correlation functions. The general spectral-function expressions derived in this paper were used in recent theoretical studies of the finite-energy singular features in photoemission of the organic compound tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) metallic phase. They are based on a so-called pseudofermion dynamical theory (PDT), which allows us to systematically enumerate and describe the excitations in the Hubbard model starting from the Bethe ansatz, as well as to calculate the charge and spin object phase shifts appearing as exponents of the power laws. In particular, we concentrate on the spin-density m\\rightarrow 0 limit and on effects in the vicinity of the singular border lines, as well as close to half filling. Our studies take into account spectral contributions from types of microscopic processes that do not occur for finite values of the spin density. In addition, the specific processes involved in the spectral features of TTF-TCNQ are studied. Our results are useful for the further understanding of the unusual spectral properties observed in low-dimensional organic metals and also provide expressions for the one- and two-atom spectral functions of a correlated quantum system of ultracold fermionic atoms in a 1D optical lattice with on-site two-atom repulsion.

  1. Evidence against dopamine D1/D2 receptor heteromers

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Aliya L.; Yano, Hideaki; Trifilieff, Pierre; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Biezonski, Dominik; Mészáros, József; Sibley, David R.; Kellendonk, Christoph; Sonntag, Kai C.; Graham, Devon L.; Colbran, Roger J.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hetero-oligomers of G-protein-coupled receptors have become the subject of intense investigation because their purported potential to manifest signaling and pharmacological properties that differ from the component receptors makes them highly attractive for the development of more selective pharmacological treatments. In particular, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors have been proposed to form hetero-oligomers that couple to Gαq proteins, and SKF83959 has been proposed to act as a biased agonist that selectively engages these receptor complexes to activate Gαq and thus phospholipase C. D1/D2 heteromers have been proposed as relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and schizophrenia. We used in vitro bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), ex vivo analyses of receptor localization and proximity in brain slices, and behavioral assays in mice to characterize signaling from these putative dimers/oligomers. We were unable to detect Gαq or Gα11 protein coupling to homomers or heteromers of D1 or D2 receptors using a variety of biosensors. SKF83959-induced locomotor and grooming behaviors were eliminated in D1 receptor knockout mice, verifying a key role for D1-like receptor activation. In contrast, SKF83959-induced motor responses were intact in D2 receptor and Gαq knockout mice, as well as in knock-in mice expressing a mutant Ala286-CaMKIIα, that cannot autophosphorylate to become active. Moreover, we found that in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, even in neurons in which D1 and D2 receptor promoters are both active, the receptor proteins are segregated and do not form complexes. These data are not compatible with SKF83959 signaling through Gαq or through a D1–D2 heteromer and challenge the existence of such a signaling complex in the adult animals that we used for our studies. PMID:25560761

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Peter Mchael

    The roster of materials exhibiting metal---insulator transitions with sharply discontinuous switching of electrical conductivity close to room temperature remains rather sparse despite the fundamental interest in the electronic instabilities manifested in such materials and the plethora of potential technological applications, ranging from frequency-agile metamaterials to electrochromic coatings and Mott field-effect transistors. Vanadium oxide bronzes with the general formula MxV2O 5, provide a wealth of compositions and frameworks where strong electron correlation can be systematically (albeit thus far only empirically) tuned. Charge fluctuations along the quasi-1D frameworks of MxV 2O5 bronzes have evinced much recent interest owing to the manifestation of colossal metal---insulator transitions and superconductivity. We start with a general review on the phase transitions, both electronic and structural, of vanadium oxide bronzes in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate an unprecedented reversible transformation between double-layered (delta) and tunnel (beta) quasi-1D geometries for nanowires of a divalent vanadium bronze CaxV2O5 (x ˜0.23) upon annealing-induced dehydration and hydrothermally-induced hydration. Such a facile hydration/dehydration-induced interconversion between two prominent quasi-1D structures (accompanied by a change in charge ordering motifs) has not been observed in the bulk and is posited to result from the ease of propagation of crystallographic slip processes across the confined nanowire widths for the delta→beta conversion and the facile diffusion of water molecules within the tunnel geometries for the beta→delta reversion. We demonstrate in Chapter 3 unprecedented pronounced metal-insulator transitions induced by application of a voltage for nanowires of a vanadium oxide bronze with intercalated divalent cations, beta-PbxV 2O5 (x ˜0.33). The induction of the phase transition through application of an electric field at room

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Peter Mchael

    The roster of materials exhibiting metal---insulator transitions with sharply discontinuous switching of electrical conductivity close to room temperature remains rather sparse despite the fundamental interest in the electronic instabilities manifested in such materials and the plethora of potential technological applications, ranging from frequency-agile metamaterials to electrochromic coatings and Mott field-effect transistors. Vanadium oxide bronzes with the general formula MxV2O 5, provide a wealth of compositions and frameworks where strong electron correlation can be systematically (albeit thus far only empirically) tuned. Charge fluctuations along the quasi-1D frameworks of MxV 2O5 bronzes have evinced much recent interest owing to the manifestation of colossal metal---insulator transitions and superconductivity. We start with a general review on the phase transitions, both electronic and structural, of vanadium oxide bronzes in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate an unprecedented reversible transformation between double-layered (delta) and tunnel (beta) quasi-1D geometries for nanowires of a divalent vanadium bronze CaxV2O5 (x ˜0.23) upon annealing-induced dehydration and hydrothermally-induced hydration. Such a facile hydration/dehydration-induced interconversion between two prominent quasi-1D structures (accompanied by a change in charge ordering motifs) has not been observed in the bulk and is posited to result from the ease of propagation of crystallographic slip processes across the confined nanowire widths for the delta→beta conversion and the facile diffusion of water molecules within the tunnel geometries for the beta→delta reversion. We demonstrate in Chapter 3 unprecedented pronounced metal-insulator transitions induced by application of a voltage for nanowires of a vanadium oxide bronze with intercalated divalent cations, beta-PbxV 2O5 (x ˜0.33). The induction of the phase transition through application of an electric field at room

  4. SCCRO3 (DCUN1D3) Antagonizes the Neddylation and Oncogenic Activity of SCCRO (DCUN1D1)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Stock, Cameron; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Weeda, Víola B.; Shah, Kushyup; Bains, Sarina; Buss, Elizabeth; Shaha, Manish; Rechler, Willi; Ramanathan, Suresh Y.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2014-01-01

    The activity of cullin-RING type ubiquitination E3 ligases is regulated by neddylation, a process analogous to ubiquitination that culminates in covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to cullins. As a component of the E3 for neddylation, SCCRO/DCUN1D1 plays a key regulatory role in neddylation and, consequently, cullin-RING ligase activity. The essential contribution of SCCRO to neddylation is to promote nuclear translocation of the cullin-ROC1 complex. The presence of a myristoyl sequence in SCCRO3, one of four SCCRO paralogues present in humans that localizes to the membrane, raises questions about its function in neddylation. We found that although SCCRO3 binds to CAND1, cullins, and ROC1, it does not efficiently bind to Ubc12, promote cullin neddylation, or conform to the reaction processivity paradigms, suggesting that SCCRO3 does not have E3 activity. Expression of SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO-promoted neddylation by sequestering cullins to the membrane, thereby blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO transforming activity. The inhibitory effects of SCCRO3 on SCCRO-promoted neddylation and transformation require both an intact myristoyl sequence and PONY domain, confirming that membrane localization and binding to cullins are required for in vivo functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that SCCRO3 functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing the neddylation activity of SCCRO. PMID:25349211

  5. Deep Mantle Large Low Shear-Wave Velocity Provinces: Principally Thermal Structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    The two large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that dominate lower-mantle structure may hold key information on Earth's thermal and chemical evolution. It is generally accepted that these provinces are hotter than background mantle and are likely the main source of mantle plumes. Increasingly, it is also proposed that they hold a dense (primitive and/or recycled) compositional component. The principle evidence that LLSVPs may represent thermo-chemical `piles' comes from seismic constraints, including: (i) their long-wavelength nature; (ii) sharp gradients in shear-wave velocity at their margins; (iii) non-Gaussian distributions of deep mantle shear-wave velocity anomalies; (iv) anti-correlated shear-wave and bulk-sound velocity anomalies (and elevated ratios between shear- and compressional-wave velocity anomalies); (v) anti-correlated shear-wave and density anomalies; and (vi) 1-D/radial profiles of seismic velocity that deviate from those expected for an isochemical, well-mixed mantle. In addition, it has been proposed that hotspots and the reconstructed eruption sites of large igneous provinces correlate in location with LLSVP margins. Here, we review recent results, which indicate that the majority of these constraints do not require thermo-chemical piles: they are equally well (or poorly) explained by thermal heterogeneity alone. Our analyses and conclusions are largely based on comparisons between imaged seismic structure and synthetic seismic structures from a set of thermal and thermo-chemical mantle convection models, which are constrained by 300 Myr of plate motion histories. Modelled physical structure (temperature, pressure and composition) is converted into seismic velocities via a thermodynamic approach that accounts for elastic, anelastic and phase contributions and, subsequently, a tomographic resolution filter is applied to account for the damping and geographic bias inherent to seismic imaging. Our results indicate that, in terms of

  6. Gas hydrate and P-Wave Velocity Distribution in the Yaquina Basin at the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebscher, C.; Gajewski, D.; Grobys, J.; Kukowski, N.; Netzeband, G.; Wagner, M.; Bialas, J.

    2003-04-01

    The lower boundary of the methane hydrate stability zone in continental margin sediments is often marked by a strong, phase reversed reflection subparallel to the seafloor, called the bottom simulating reflector (BSR). High resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) data from the Yaquina Basin offshore Peru at 8 deg S show a BSR that is varying laterally in amplitude as well as in continuity. The amplitudes of the reflections above the BSR also vary with the appearance of the BSR. Where the BSR is strong, the reflections above it are weaker compared to areas where the BSR is weak. And although the strong part of the BSR is underlain immediately by strong reflections, reflections several hundred meters beneath the BSR appear weaker than those where the BSR is weak. This variation indicates significant heterogeneity in the distribution of gas and gas hydrate in this area. Chemoherms observed at the Yaquina Basin sea floor indicate the presence of free gas in the sediments up to the seafloor. The presence of gas and gas hydrate within the sediment sequence significantly influences the P-wave velocity in the affected layers. Therefore a detailed analysis of velocity variations enables to understand the apparently different conditions for the formation of gas hydrate along the BSR and the migration paths of the free gas. Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from profiles coincident with the MCS data can provide such detailed velocity depth information. Velocity analysis from OBS data included 2D-ray tracing and 1D-interval-velocity analysis by means of DIX-inversion. In order to find a trade-off between vertical resolution and minimization of errors caused by the sensitivity of the DIX' formula to velocity variations in thin layers, the data have undergone a Kirchhoff wave-equation datuming and adjacent coherence filtering was applied to the data to eliminate the one sided travel path through the water column of the OBS-observations. The derived velocity structure confirms

  7. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  8. Velocity operator approach to quantum fluid dynamics in a three-dimensional neutron-proton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Seiya; da Providência, João

    2016-07-01

    In the preceeding paper, introducing isospin-dependent density operators and defining exact momenta (collective variables), we could get an exact canonically momenta approach to a one-dimensional (1D) neutron-proton (NP) system. In this paper, we attempt at a velocity operator approach to a 3D NP system. Following Sunakawa, after introducing momentum density operators, we define velocity operators, denoting classical fluid velocities. We derive a collective Hamiltonian in terms of the collective variables.

  9. Higher-order local and non-local correlations for 1D strongly interacting Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandani, EJKP; Römer, Rudolf A.; Tan, Shina; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-05-01

    The correlation function is an important quantity in the physics of ultracold quantum gases because it provides information about the quantum many-body wave function beyond the simple density profile. In this paper we first study the M-body local correlation functions, g M , of the one-dimensional (1D) strongly repulsive Bose gas within the Lieb–Liniger model using the analytical method proposed by Gangardt and Shlyapnikov (2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 010401; 2003 New J. Phys. 5 79). In the strong repulsion regime the 1D Bose gas at low temperatures is equivalent to a gas of ideal particles obeying the non-mutual generalized exclusion statistics with a statistical parameter α =1-2/γ , i.e. the quasimomenta of N strongly interacting bosons map to the momenta of N free fermions via {k}i≈ α {k}iF with i=1,\\ldots ,N. Here γ is the dimensionless interaction strength within the Lieb–Liniger model. We rigorously prove that such a statistical parameter α solely determines the sub-leading order contribution to the M-body local correlation function of the gas at strong but finite interaction strengths. We explicitly calculate the correlation functions g M in terms of γ and α at zero, low, and intermediate temperatures. For M = 2 and 3 our results reproduce the known expressions for g 2 and g 3 with sub-leading terms (see for instance (Vadim et al 2006 Phys. Rev. A 73 051604(R); Kormos et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 210404; Wang et al 2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 043634). We also express the leading order of the short distance non-local correlation functions < {{{\\Psi }}}\\dagger ({x}1)\\cdots {{{\\Psi }}}\\dagger ({x}M){{\\Psi }}({y}M)\\cdots {{\\Psi }}({y}1)> of the strongly repulsive Bose gas in terms of the wave function of M bosons at zero collision energy and zero total momentum. Here {{\\Psi }}(x) is the boson annihilation operator. These general formulas of the higher-order local and non-local correlation functions of the 1D Bose gas provide new insights into the

  10. Nanoelectronic Modeling (NEMO): Moving from commercial grade 1-D simulation to prototype 3-D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2001-03-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of commercially pursued heterostructure devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared photodetectors, and quantum well lasers are enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The creation of these heterostructure devices is realized in a vast design space of material compositions, layer thicknesses and doping profiles. The full experimental exploration of this design space is unfeasible and a reliable design tool is needed. The Nanoelectronic Modeling tool (NEMO) is one of the first commercial grade attempts for such a modeling tool. NEMO was developed as a general-purpose quantum mechanics-based 1-D device design and analysis tool from 1993-97 by the Central Research Laboratory of Texas Instruments (later Raytheon Systems). NEMO enables(R. Lake, G. Klimeck, R. C. Bowen, and D. Jovanovic, J. Appl. Phys. 81), 7845 (1997). the fundamentally sound inclusion of the required(G. Klimeck et al.), in the 1997 55th Annual Device Research Conference Digest, (IEEE, NJ, 1997), p. 92^,(R. C. Bowen et al.), J. Appl. Phys 81, 3207 (1997). physics: bandstructure, scattering, and charge self-consistency based on the non-equilibrium Green function approach. A new class of devices which require full 3-D quantum mechanics based models is starting to emerge: quantum dots, or in general semiconductor based deca-nano devices. We are currently building a 3-D modeling tool based on NEMO to include the important physics to understand electronic stated in such superscaled structures. This presentation will overview various facets of the NEMO 1-D tool such electron transport physics in RTDs, numerical technology, software engineering and graphical user interface. The lessons learned from that work are now entering the NEMO 3-D development and first results using the NEMO 3-D prototype will be shown. More information about

  11. Systematic comparison of initial velocities for neutron stars in different models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taani, Ali

    2016-07-01

    I have studied the initial velocity (Maxwellian and exponential distributions) and the scale height of isolated old (aged ≥ 109 yr) neutron stars (NSs) at different Galactocentric distances R in three population models. The smooth time-independent 3-D axisymmetric gravitational potentials (Miyamoto-Nagai and Paczyński models) were also used. The correlation between these quantities significantly affects the shapes of the profiles and distributions of the simulated sample, because the differences in the initial kick can arise from differences in the formation and evolution of NSs with other physical parameters. The scale height of the density distribution increases systematically with R. I have also shown that the distribution of old NSs in these population models agrees with the observed structure of the Galaxy in terms of initial velocities (1-D and 3-D), as well as the scale height distributions. These distributions tend to have an asymptotic behavior at the point R = 2.75 kpc. This means that the quality of the models can be described in terms of a mean of the fitted Gaussian, and this could also give an overall perspective of the phase space properties of nearby old NSs on a given gravitational potential.

  12. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

    2006-01-26

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and

  13. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hodges, James N; McCall, Benjamin J

    2016-05-14

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined. PMID:27179476

  14. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  15. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  16. Propagation of excitation in long 1D chains: Transition from regular quantum dynamics to stochastic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Benderskii, V. A.; Kats, E. I.

    2013-01-15

    The quantum dynamics problem for a 1D chain consisting of 2N + 1 sites (N Much-Greater-Than 1) with the interaction of nearest neighbors and an impurity site at the middle differing in energy and in coupling constant from the sites of the remaining chain is solved analytically. The initial excitation of the impurity is accompanied by the propagation of excitation over the chain sites and with the emergence of Loschmidt echo (partial restoration of the impurity site population) in the recurrence cycles with a period proportional to N. The echo consists of the main (most intense) component modulated by damped oscillations. The intensity of oscillations increases with increasing cycle number and matrix element C of the interaction of the impurity site n = 0 with sites n = {+-}1 (0 < C {<=} 1; for the remaining neighboring sites, the matrix element is equal to unity). Mixing of the components of echo from neighboring cycles induces a transition from the regular to stochastic evolution. In the regular evolution region, the wave packet propagates over the chain at a nearly constant group velocity, embracing a number of sites varying periodically with time. In the stochastic regime, the excitation is distributed over a number of sites close to 2N, with the populations varying irregularly with time. The model explains qualitatively the experimental data on ballistic propagation of the vibrational energy in linear chains of CH{sub 2} fragments and predicts the possibility of a nondissipative energy transfer between reaction centers associated with such chains.

  17. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC. PMID:26714478

  18. Preliminary abatement device evaluation: 1D-2D KGM cyclone design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are predominately used in controlling cotton gin particulate matter (PM) emissions. The most commonly used cyclone designs are the 2D-2D and 1D-3D; however other designs such as the 1D-2D KGM have or are currently being used. A 1D-2D cyclone has a barrel length equal to the barrel diamete...

  19. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  20. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  1. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  2. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  3. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  4. From nonfinite to finite 1D arrays of origami tiles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai Chin; Rahman, Masudur; Norton, Michael L

    2014-06-17

    average solution structures for blocks is more readily achieved using computer models than using direct imaging methods. The development of scalable 1D-origami arrays composed of uniquely addressable components is a logical, if not necessary, step in the evolution of higher order fully addressable structures. Our research into the fabrication of arrays has led us to generate a listing of several important areas of future endeavor. Of high importance is the re-enforcement of the mechanical properties of the building blocks and the organization of multiple arrays on a surface of technological importance. While addressing this short list of barriers to progress will prove challenging, coherent development along each of these lines of inquiry will accelerate the appearance of commercial scale molecular manufacturing. PMID:24803094

  5. A 1D model of the arterial circulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Aslanidou, Lydia; Trachet, Bram; Reymond, Philippe; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Segers, Patrick; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    At a time of growing concern over the ethics of animal experimentation, mouse models are still an indispensable source of insight into the cardiovascular system and its most frequent pathologies. Nevertheless, reference data on the murine cardiovascular anatomy and physiology are lacking. In this work, we developed and validated an in silico, one dimensional model of the murine systemic arterial tree consisting of 85 arterial segments. Detailed aortic dimensions were obtained in vivo from contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography in 3 male, C57BL/6J anesthetized mice and 3 male ApoE(-/-) mice, all 12-weeks old. Physiological input data were gathered from a wide range of literature data. The integrated form of the Navier-Stokes equations was solved numerically to yield pressures and flows throughout the arterial network. The resulting model predictions have been validated against invasive pressure waveforms and non-invasive velocity and diameter waveforms that were measured in vivo on an independent set of 47 mice. In conclusion, we present a validated one-dimensional model of the anesthetized murine cardiovascular system that can serve as a versatile tool in the field of preclinical cardiovascular research. PMID:26555250

  6. Enhanced reduction of velocity data obtained during CETA flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, Tom D.; Wong, Douglas T.; Tripp, John S.

    1993-05-01

    A newly developed technique for enhanced data reduction provides an improved procedure that allows least squares minimization to become possible between data sets with an unequal number of data points. This technique was applied in the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) experiment on the STS-37 Shuttle flight in April 1991 to obtain the velocity profile from the acceleration data. The new technique uses a least-squares method to estimate the initial conditions and calibration constants. These initial conditions are estimated by least-squares fitting the displacements indicated by the Hall-effect sensor data to the corresponding displacements obtained from integrating the acceleration data. The velocity and displacement profiles can then be recalculated from the corresponding acceleration data using the estimated parameters. This technique, which enables instantaneous velocities to be obtained from the test data instead of only average velocities at varying discrete times, offers more detailed velocity information, particularly during periods of large acceleration or deceleration.

  7. Enhanced reduction of velocity data obtained during CETA flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom D.; Wong, Douglas T.; Tripp, John S.

    1993-01-01

    A newly developed technique for enhanced data reduction provides an improved procedure that allows least squares minimization to become possible between data sets with an unequal number of data points. This technique was applied in the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) experiment on the STS-37 Shuttle flight in April 1991 to obtain the velocity profile from the acceleration data. The new technique uses a least-squares method to estimate the initial conditions and calibration constants. These initial conditions are estimated by least-squares fitting the displacements indicated by the Hall-effect sensor data to the corresponding displacements obtained from integrating the acceleration data. The velocity and displacement profiles can then be recalculated from the corresponding acceleration data using the estimated parameters. This technique, which enables instantaneous velocities to be obtained from the test data instead of only average velocities at varying discrete times, offers more detailed velocity information, particularly during periods of large acceleration or deceleration.

  8. Genetic variation in aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) affects the expression and activity of multiple cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Amarjit S; Thirumaran, Ranjit K; Yasuda, Kazuto; Yang, Xia; Fan, Yiping; Strom, Stephen C; Schuetz, Erin G

    2013-08-01

    Human liver gene regulatory (Bayesian) network analysis was previously used to identify a cytochrome P450 (P450) gene subnetwork with Aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) as a key regulatory driver of this subnetwork. This study assessed the biologic importance of AKR1D1 [a key enzyme in the synthesis of bile acids, ligand activators of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), known transcriptional regulators of P450s] to hepatic P450 expression. Overexpression of AKR1D1 in primary human hepatocytes led to increased expression of CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6. Conversely, AKR1D1 knockdown decreased expression of these P450s. We resequenced AKR1D1 from 98 donor livers and identified a 3'-untranslated region (UTR) (rs1872930) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) significantly associated with higher AKR1D1 mRNA expression. AKR1D1 3'-UTR-luciferase reporter studies showed that the variant allele resulted in higher luciferase activity, suggesting that the SNP increases AKR1D1 mRNA stability and/or translation efficiency. Consistent with AKR1D1's putative role as a driver of the P450 subnetwork, the AKR1D1 3'-UTR SNP was significantly associated with increased hepatic mRNA expression of multiple P450s (CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6) and CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6 activities. After adjusting for multiple testing, the association remained significant for AKR1D1, CYP2C9, and CYP2C8 mRNA expression and CYP2C8 activity. These results provide new insights into the variation in expression and activity of P450s that can account for interindividual differences in drug metabolism/efficacy and adverse drug events. In conclusion, we provide the first experimental evidence supporting a role for AKR1D1 as a key genetic regulator of the P450 network. PMID:23704699

  9. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  10. EEF1D modulates proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Flores, Isadora L; Kawahara, Rebeca; Miguel, Márcia C C; Granato, Daniela C; Domingues, Romênia R; Macedo, Carolina C S; Carnielli, Carolina M; Yokoo, Sami; Rodrigues, Priscila C; Monteiro, Bárbara V B; Oliveira, Carine E; Salmon, Cristiane R; Nociti, Francisco H; Lopes, Márcio A; Santos-Silva, Alan; Winck, Flavia V; Coletta, Ricardo D; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2016-05-01

    EEF1D (eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1δ) is a subunit of the elongation factor 1 complex of proteins that mediates the elongation process during protein synthesis via enzymatic delivery of aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome. Although the functions of EEF1D in the translation process are recognized, EEF1D expression was found to be unbalanced in tumours. In the present study, we demonstrate the overexpression of EEF1D in OSCC (oral squamous cell carcinoma), and revealed that EEF1D and protein interaction partners promote the activation of cyclin D1 and vimentin proteins. EEF1D knockdown in OSCC reduced cell proliferation and induced EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) phenotypes, including cell invasion. Taken together, these results define EEF1D as a critical inducer of OSCC proliferation and EMT. PMID:26823560

  11. Grid Cell Responses in 1D Environments Assessed as Slices through a 2D Lattice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, KiJung; Lewallen, Sam; Kinkhabwala, Amina A; Tank, David W; Fiete, Ila R

    2016-03-01

    Grid cells, defined by their striking periodic spatial responses in open 2D arenas, appear to respond differently on 1D tracks: the multiple response fields are not periodically arranged, peak amplitudes vary across fields, and the mean spacing between fields is larger than in 2D environments. We ask whether such 1D responses are consistent with the system's 2D dynamics. Combining analytical and numerical methods, we show that the 1D responses of grid cells with stable 1D fields are consistent with a linear slice through a 2D triangular lattice. Further, the 1D responses of comodular cells are well described by parallel slices, and the offsets in the starting points of the 1D slices can predict the measured 2D relative spatial phase between the cells. From these results, we conclude that the 2D dynamics of these cells is preserved in 1D, suggesting a common computation during both types of navigation behavior. PMID:26898777

  12. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  13. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  14. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  15. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  16. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  17. HYBRID COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH STREAM VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Thacker, Robert J.

    2013-07-10

    In the early universe, substantial relative ''stream'' velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To assess the impact of these velocities on high-redshift structure formation, we carry out a suite of high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations, which use smoothed particle hydrodynamic data sets as initial conditions, converted using a new tool developed for this work. These simulations resolve structures with masses as small as a few 100 M{sub Sun }, and we focus on the 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} ''mini-halos'' in which the first stars formed. At z Almost-Equal-To 17, the presence of stream velocities has only a minor effect on the number density of halos below 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, but it greatly suppresses gas accretion onto all halos and the dark matter structures around them. Stream velocities lead to significantly lower halo gas fractions, especially for Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} objects, an effect that is likely to depend on the orientation of a halo's accretion lanes. This reduction in gas density leads to colder, more compact radial profiles, and it substantially delays the redshift of collapse of the largest halos, leading to delayed star formation and possibly delayed reionization. These many differences suggest that future simulations of early cosmological structure formation should include stream velocities to properly predict gas evolution, star formation, and the epoch of reionization.

  18. Separation of scattering and absorption in 1-D random media. 2: Numerical experiments on stationary problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.S.; Xie, X.B.

    1994-12-31

    The theory of spatial distribution of seismic energy density in one dimensional (1D) random media derived in part 1 (Wu, 1993) is tested by numerical experiments using a full wave propagation matrix method. The geometry of numerical experiment mimics the configuration of zero-offset VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) along a borehole. A procedure of octave-band frequency averaging is applied to the measured data to reduce fluctuation of spatial energy distribution, so that stable estimations of medium parameters can be achieved without resorting to ensemble averaging. Results from Monte-Carlo numerical experiments for both infinite random media and finite random slabs with or without bottom reflections show good agreement for dark-to-gray (weak to intermediate scattering compared with absorption) media. When scattering is very strong (when backscattering-absorption ratio S{sub b} > 3), results from single realization fluctuate substantially. However, most the practical situations of sedimentary rocks in the crust fall into the validity region of the energy transfer theory.

  19. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  20. Seismic waves converted from velocity gradient anomalies in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.

    1999-09-01

    Modelling of elastic wave propagation in 1-D structures is frequently performed using reflectivity techniques in which the Earth's velocity profile is approximated by stacks of homogeneous layers. The complete reflection/transmission (R/T) response of a zone with arbitrary 1-D depth variation (including both gradients and discontinuities in material properties) can, however, be calculated using invariant embedding techniques. Results from earlier studies are here extended to derive exact expressions for R/T matrices in arbitrary, 1-D anisotropic media using a form of Born approxi-mation valid for thin scatterers and which does not assume small perturbations in material properties. The R/T matrices are solutions to a system of non-linear, ordinary differential equations of Ricatti type and may be manipulated using standard R/T matrix algebra. In an equivalent description, the wavefield within the heterogeneous zone is considered in terms of depth-dependent contributions from up- and downgoing waves propagating within the embedding reference medium. This leads to efficient calculation of the internal wavefield using R/T matrices of the heterogeneous stratification and portions thereof at minor additional expense. Mode conversion of teleseismic P and S phases from velocity gradients is examined by way of examples and comparison with three-component data from broad-band stations of the Yellowknife seismic array. The frequency dependence of such wave interactions depends on the differences in vertical slowness between incident and scattered modes. It is shown that significant energy is converted from transition zones with extent L

  1. Endogenous N-terminal Domain Cleavage Modulates α1D-Adrenergic Receptor Pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kountz, Timothy S; Lee, Kyung-Soon; Aggarwal-Howarth, Stacey; Curran, Elizabeth; Park, Ji-Min; Harris, Dorathy-Ann; Stewart, Aaron; Hendrickson, Joseph; Camp, Nathan D; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Wang, Edith H; Scott, John D; Hague, Chris

    2016-08-26

    The α1D-adrenergic receptor (ADRA1D) is a key regulator of cardiovascular, prostate, and central nervous system functions. This clinically relevant G protein-coupled receptor has proven difficult to study, as it must form an obligate modular homodimer containing the PDZ proteins scribble and syntrophin or become retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as non-functional protein. We previously determined that targeted removal of the N-terminal (NT) 79 amino acids facilitates ADRA1D plasma membrane expression and agonist-stimulated functional responses. However, whether such an event occurs in physiological contexts was unknown. Herein, we report the ADRA1D is subjected to innate NT processing in cultured human cells. SNAP near-infrared imaging and tandem-affinity purification revealed the ADRA1D is expressed as both full-length and NT truncated forms in multiple human cell lines. Serial truncation mapping identified the cleavage site as Leu(90)/Val(91) in the 95-amino acid ADRA1D NT domain, suggesting human cells express a Δ1-91 ADRA1D species. Tandem-affinity purification MS/MS and co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicate NT processing of ADRA1D is not required to form scribble-syntrophin macromolecular complexes. Yet, label-free dynamic mass redistribution signaling assays demonstrate that Δ1-91 ADRA1D agonist responses were greater than WT ADRA1D. Mutagenesis of the cleavage site nullified the processing event, resulting in ADRA1D agonist responses less than the WT receptor. Thus, we propose that processing of the ADRA1D NT domain is a physiological mechanism employed by cells to generate a functional ADRA1D isoform with optimal pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:27382054

  2. Derivation of vertical air velocity from conventional Radiosonde ascents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguttathil Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Samson, Titu; Kottayil, Ajil; Varadarajan, Rakesh; Rebello, Rejoy

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we devise a method to estimate air vertical velocity from ascending radiosondes similar to that described in published results, but with certain differences in deriving the balloon parameters and the drag coefficient, while not considering explicitly the heat exchange between the balloon and the environment. We basically decompose the observed balloon ascent rate into vertical velocity in still air due to buoyancy force and that due to vertical air motion. The first part is computed from basic hydrodynamical principles and the vertical velocity is derived as the difference between observed ascent rate and the estimated still air vertical velocity. The derived values agree reasonably well (r=0.66) with vertical velocities observed with a collocated wind profiler radar, and the sources of uncertainties are discussed. Since vertical velocity is a difficult quantity to measure directly without expensive methods, derivation of the same from the conventional radiosonde ascents could be of great importance to the meteorological communities.

  3. Improved 1D model for calculating hydraulic properties in meandering rivers: Comparisons with measurements and 3D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Mohammadi, M.; Kang, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-known that meander bends impose local losses of energy to the flow in rivers. These local losses should be added together with friction loss to get the total loss of energy. In this work, we strive to develop a framework that considers the effect of bends in meandering rivers for one-dimensional (1-D) homogenous equations of flow. Our objective is to develop a simple, yet physically sound, and efficient model for carrying out engineering computations of flow through meander bends. We consider several approaches for calculating 1-D hydraulic properties of meandering rivers such as friction factor and Manning coefficient. The method of Kasper et al. (2005), which is based on channel top width, aspect ratio and radius of curvature, is adopted for further calculations. In this method, a correction is implemented in terms of local energy loss, due to helical motion and secondary currents of fluid particles driven by centrifugal force, in meanders. To validate the model, several test cases are simulated and the computed results are compared with the reported data in the literature in terms of water surface elevation, shear velocity, etc. For all cases the computed results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. 3-D RANS turbulent flow simulations are also carried out, using the method of Kang et al. (Adv. In Water Res., vol. 34, 2011), for different geometrical parameters of Kinoshita Rivers to determine the spatial distribution of shear stress on river bed and banks, which is the key factor in scour/deposition patterns. The 3-D solutions are then cross-sectionally averaged and compared with the respective solutions from the 1-D model. The comparisons show that the improved 1D model, which incorporates the effect of local bend loss, captures key flow parameters with reasonable accuracy. Our results also underscore the range of validity and limitations of 1D models for meander bend simulations. This work was supported by NSF Grants (as part of

  4. 2D and 3D Shear-Wave Velocity Structure to >1 Km Depth from Ambient and Active Surface Waves: Three "Deep Remi" Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Pancha, A.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Refraction microtermor routinely assesses 1D and 2D velocity-depth profiles to shallow depths of approximately 100 m primarily for engineering applications. Estimation of both shallow and deep (>100 m) shear-velocity structure are key elements in the assessment of urban areas for potential earthquake ground shaking, damage, and the calibration of recorded ground motions. Three independent studies investigated the ability of the refraction microtremor technology to image deep velocity structure, to depths exceeding 1 km (Deep ReMi). In the first study, we were able to delineate basin thicknesses of up to 900 m and the deep-basin velocity structure beneath the Reno-area basin. Constraints on lateral velocity changes in 3D as well as on velocity profiles extended down to 1500 m, and show a possible fault offset. This deployment used 30 stand-alone wireless instruments mated to 4.5 Hz geophones, along each of five arrays 2.9 to 5.8 km long. Rayleigh-wave dispersion was clear at frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz using 120 sec ambient urban noise records. The results allowed construction of a 3D velocity model, vetted by agreement with gravity studies. In a second test, a 5.8 km array delimited the southern edge of the Tahoe Basin, with constraints from gravity. There, bedrock depth increased by 250 m in thickness over a distance of 1600 m, with definition of the velocity of the deeper basin sediments. The third study delineated the collapse region of an underground nuclear explosion within a thick sequence of volcanic extrusives, using a shear-wave minivibe in a radial direction, and horizontal geophones. Analysis showed the cavity extends to 620 m depth, with a width of 180 m and a height of 220 m. Our results demonstrate that deep velocity structure can be recovered using ambient noise. This technique offers the ability to define 2D and 3D structural representations essential for seismic hazard evaluation.

  5. A new instrumentation for particle velocity and velocity related measurements under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weijia

    This dissertation investigates the capability of a new instrument for small particle velocity measurement and velocity related signal analysis in an underwater environment. This research started from the laser beam quality test, which was performed in air. It was conducted mainly by means of an optical fiber sensor combined with a computer controlled stepping motor as well as two other methods, edge detection and needle-tip scattering. The stepping motor offers a constant velocity to the fiber sensor, so that the beam separation can be accurately measured by using the constant velocity value and the transit time determined by the cross correlation function of two digital signals. Meanwhile, information of the beam intensity profile, the parallelism of the two beams and the in-air beam widths can also be obtained in the test. By using the calibrated beam separation of the ribbon pair in the beam quality test, particle velocity measurements are carried out based on the relation between velocity, displacement and time in a 500-liter open water tank. The time delay for a particle crossing over the two ribbons in sequence is obtained by computing the cross correlation of the two signals. In fact, the time delay is actually a statistical mean value of many particles that cross over the ribbons in a short time. So is the measured velocity. The third part of this research is the practical study on pulse shape analysis based on the data sets of the velocity measurement. Several computer programs are developed to explore the pulse height distribution in a data set, to study the pulse degeneration, the relationship between the pulse width and the velocity, and the in-water beam width information. Some important reference materials are displayed in the appendices such as the fundamentals of the cross correlation and auto correlation, three main MATLAB programs developed for this research, the theoretical analysis of particle diffraction.

  6. A matter of measurement: rotation velocities and the velocity function of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Chris B.; Shankar, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The velocity function derived from large-scale surveys can be compared with the predictions of Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, by matching the measured rotation velocities Vrot of galaxies to the maximum circular velocity of dark matter (DM) haloes Vmax. For Vrot < 50 kms-1, a major discrepancy arises between the observed and ΛCDM velocity functions. However, the manner in which different observational measures of Vrot are associated with Vmax is not straightforward in dwarf galaxies. We instead relate galaxies to DM haloes using the empirical baryon-mass to halo-mass relation, and show that different observational measures of Vrot result in very different velocity functions. We show how the W50 velocity function, i.e. using the H I profile linewidth at 50 per cent of peak H I flux to measure Vrot, can be reconciled with a ΛCDM cosmology. Our semi-empirical methodology allows us to determine the region of rotation curves that are probed by H I measurements (R_{H I}), and shows that the Vrot of dwarfs are generally measured at a fraction of Rmax, explaining their tendency to have rising rotation curves. We provide fitting formulae for relating R_{H I} and Reff (the effective radius) to the virial radius of DM haloes. To continue to use velocity functions as a probe of ΛCDM cosmology, it is necessary to be precise about how the different measures of rotation velocity are probing the mass of the DM haloes, dropping the assumption that any measure of rotational velocity can be equally used as a proxy for Vmax.

  7. Constraining fault interpretation through tomographic velocity gradients: application to northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, K.

    2012-02-01

    Spatial gradients of tomographic velocities are seldom used in interpretation of subsurface fault structures. This study shows that spatial velocity gradients can be used effectively in identifying subsurface discontinuities in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three-dimensional velocity models constructed through tomographic inversion of active source and/or earthquake traveltime data are generally built from an initial 1-D velocity model that varies only with depth. Regularized tomographic inversion algorithms impose constraints on the roughness of the model that help to stabilize the inversion process. Final velocity models obtained from regularized tomographic inversions have smooth three-dimensional structures that are required by the data. Final velocity models are usually analyzed and interpreted either as a perturbation velocity model or as an absolute velocity model. Compared to perturbation velocity model, absolute velocity models have an advantage of providing constraints on lithology. Both velocity models lack the ability to provide sharp constraints on subsurface faults. An interpretational approach utilizing spatial velocity gradients applied to northern Cascadia shows that subsurface faults that are not clearly interpretable from velocity model plots can be identified by sharp contrasts in velocity gradient plots. This interpretation resulted in inferring the locations of the Tacoma, Seattle, Southern Whidbey Island, and Darrington Devil's Mountain faults much more clearly. The Coast Range Boundary fault, previously hypothesized on the basis of sedimentological and tectonic observations, is inferred clearly from the gradient plots. Many of the fault locations imaged from gradient data correlate with earthquake hypocenters, indicating their seismogenic nature.

  8. Constraining fault interpretation through tomographic velocity gradients: application to Northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, K.

    2011-09-01

    Spatial gradients of tomographic velocities are seldom used in interpretation of subsurface fault structures. This study shows that spatial velocity gradients can be used effectively in identifying subsurface discontinuities in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three-dimensional velocity models constructed through tomographic inversion of active source and/or earthquake traveltime data are generally built from an initial 1-D velocity model that varies only with depth. Regularized tomographic inversion algorithms impose constraints on the roughness of the model that help to stabilize the inversion process. Final velocity models obtained from regularized tomographic inversions have smooth three-dimensional structures that are required by the data. Final velocity models are usually analyzed and interpreted either as a perturbation velocity model or as an absolute velocity model. Compared to perturbation velocity model, absolute velocity model has an advantage of providing constraints on lithology. Both velocity models lack the ability to provide sharp constraints on subsurface faults. An interpretational approach utilizing spatial velocity gradients applied to northern Cascadia shows that subsurface faults that are not clearly interpretable from velocity model plots can be identified by sharp contrasts in velocity gradient plots. This interpretation resulted in inferring the locations of Tacoma Fault, Seattle Fault, Southern Whidbey Island Fault, and Darrington Devils Mountain fault much clearly. The Coast Range Boundary Fault, previously hypothesized on the basis of sedimentological and tectonic observations, is inferred clearly from the gradient plots. Many of the fault locations imaged from gradient data correlate with earthquake hypocenters indicating their seismogenic nature.

  9. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast.

    PubMed

    Locke, Shannon M; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static "snapshot" model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  10. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Shannon M.; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static “snapshot” model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  11. Reducing Uncertainties in the Velocities Determined by Inversion of Phase Velocity Dispersion Curves by Using Synthetic Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, M.; Pezeshk, S.; Pujol, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The use of Rayleigh waves phase velocity dispersion curves for the determination of shallow shear-wave velocity profiles is widespread in the context of geotechnical, earthquake engineering, and seismic hazard applications because it is a low-cost technique. A significant problem with this technique, however, is its intrinsic non-uniqueness, and although this problem is widely recognized, there have not been systematic efforts to develop approaches to reduce the pervasive uncertainty that affects the velocity profiles determined by the inversion. To minimize the lack of uniqueness different methodologies can be combined together. Genetic algorithms (GA) can be used to maximize the probability of finding the global optimum. Furthermore, considering higher modes of propagation will help reducing the non-uniqueness problem. Here, we present one approach based on the use of synthetic seismograms, which has been tested successfully with synthetic data designed to resemble actual data. For example, two completely different velocity models produce essentially the same dispersion curves for the fundamental mode and the first three higher modes, which mean that there is no objective way to discriminate between the two models. On the other hand, the corresponding synthetic traces have significant differences, which allow choosing the appropriate velocity model. The goal of this study is to apply the synthetic seismogram technique to data collected with method of multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW). We use simulated tests to assess the usefulness and the limitations of this technique. We use a target velocity profile with an assumed water level for calculation of synthetic experimental dispersion curve, which is used in the inversion process. The inversion process results in several different inverted velocity profiles with theoretical dispersion curves similar to the target dispersion curve. Applying the synthetic seismogram technique, it is possible to robustly

  12. 1D numerical model of muddy subaqueous and subaerial debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imran, J.; Parker, G.; Locat, J.; Lee, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 1D numerical model of the downslope flow and deposition of muddy subaerial and subaqueous debris flows is presented. The model incorporates the Herschel-Bulkley and bilinear rheologies of viscoplastic fluid. The more familiar Bingham model is integrated into the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model. The conservation equations of mass and momentum of single-phase laminar debris flow are layer-integrated using the slender flow approximation. They are then expressed in a Lagrangian framework and solved numerically using an explicit finite difference scheme. Starting from a given initial shape, a debris flow is allowed to collapse and propagate over a specified topography. Comparison between the model predictions and laboratory experiments shows reasonable agreement. The model is used to study the effect of the ambient fluid density, initial shape of the failed mass, and rheological model on the simulated propagation of the front and runout characteristics of muddy debris flows. It is found that initial failure shape influence the front velocity but has little bearing on the final deposit shape. In the Bingham model, the excess of shear stress above the yield strength is proportional to the strain rate to the first power. This exponent is free to vary in the Herschel-Bulkley model. When it is set at a value lower than unity, the resulting final deposits are thicker and shorter than in the case of the Bingham rheology. The final deposit resulting from the bilinear model is longer and thinner than that from the Bingham model due to the fact that the debris flow is allowed to act as a Newtonian fluid at low shear rate in the bilinear model.

  13. Molecular characterization of the maize Rp1-D rust resistance haplotype and its mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, N; Drake, J; Ayliffe, M; Sun, Q; Ellis, J; Hulbert, S; Pryor, T

    1999-01-01

    The Rp1-D gene for resistance to maize common rust (Puccinia sorghi) is a member of a complex locus (haplotype) composed of Rp1-D and approximately eight other gene homologs. The identity of Rp1-D was demonstrated by using two independent gene-tagging approaches with the transposons Mutator and Dissociation. PIC20, a disease resistance (R) gene analog probe previously mapped to the rp1 locus, detected insertion of Dissociation in an Rp1-D mutation and excision in three revertants. Independent libraries probed with the PIC20 or Mutator probes resulted in isolation of the same gene sequence. Rp1-D belongs to the nucleotide binding site, leucine-rich repeat class of R genes. However, unlike the rust resistance genes M and L6 from flax, the maize Rp1-D gene does not encode an N-terminal domain with similarity to the signal transduction domains of the Drosophila Toll protein and mammalian interleukin-1 receptor. Although the abundance of transcripts of genes from the rp1 complex changed with leaf age, there was no evidence of any change due to inoculation with avirulent or virulent rust biotypes. A set of 27 Rp1-D mutants displayed at least nine different deletions of Rp1-D gene family members that were consistent with unequal crossing-over events. One mutation (Rp1-D*-24) resulted in deletion of all but one gene family member. Other unique deletions were observed in the disease lesion mimic Rp1-D*-21 and the partially susceptible mutant Rp1-D*-5. Different rp1 specificities have distinct DNA fingerprints (haplotypes). Analysis of recombinants between rp1 specificities indicated that recombination had occurred within the rp1 gene complex. Similar analyses indicated that the rust R genes at the rp5 locus, 2 centimorgans distal to rp1, are not closely related to Rp1-D. PMID:10402435

  14. Molecular characterization of the maize Rp1-D rust resistance haplotype and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Collins, N; Drake, J; Ayliffe, M; Sun, Q; Ellis, J; Hulbert, S; Pryor, T

    1999-07-01

    The Rp1-D gene for resistance to maize common rust (Puccinia sorghi) is a member of a complex locus (haplotype) composed of Rp1-D and approximately eight other gene homologs. The identity of Rp1-D was demonstrated by using two independent gene-tagging approaches with the transposons Mutator and Dissociation. PIC20, a disease resistance (R) gene analog probe previously mapped to the rp1 locus, detected insertion of Dissociation in an Rp1-D mutation and excision in three revertants. Independent libraries probed with the PIC20 or Mutator probes resulted in isolation of the same gene sequence. Rp1-D belongs to the nucleotid