Science.gov

Sample records for 1-g model tests

  1. Summary of the modeling and test correlations of a NASTRAN finite element vibrations model for the AH-1G helicopter, task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Berry, V. L.; Dompka, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The AH-1G NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) is described and the correlations with measured data that were conducted to verify the model are summarized. Comparisons of the AH-1G NASTRAN FEM calculations with measured data include the following: (1) fuselage and tailboom static load deflection (stiffness) testing, (2) airframe ground vibration testing (0-30 H<), (3) airframe flight vibration testing (main rotor, 2,4, and 6/rev), and (4) tailboom effective skin static testing. A description of the modeling rationale and techniques used to develop the NASTRAN FEM is presented in conjunction with all previous correlation work. In general, the correlations show good agreement between analysis and test in stiffness and vibration response through 15 to 20 Hz. For higher frequencies (equal to or greater than 4/rev (21.6 Hz)), the vibration responses generally did not agree well. Also, the lateral (2/rev (10.8 Hz)) flight vibration responses were much lower in the FEM than test, indicating that there is a significant excitation source other than at the main rotor hub that is affecting the lateral vibrations, such as downwash impingement on the vertical tail.

  2. Still Just 1 "g": Consistent Results from Five Test Batteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; te Nijenhuis, Jan; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper, Johnson, Bouchard, Krueger, McGue, and Gottesman (2004) addressed a long-standing debate in psychology by demonstrating that the g factors derived from three test batteries administered to a single group of individuals were completely correlated. This finding provided evidence for the existence of a unitary higher-level general…

  3. The Pex1-G844D Mouse: A Model for Mild Human Zellweger Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hacia, Joseph G.; Moser, Ann B.; Faust, Phyllis L.; Liu, Anita; Chowdhury, Nivedita; Huang, Ning; Lauer, Amanda; Bennett, Jean; Watkins, Paul A.; Zack, Donald J.; Braverman, Nancy E.; Raymond, Gerald V.; Steinberg, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a disease continuum that results from inherited defects in PEX genes essential for normal peroxisome assembly. These autosomal recessive disorders impact brain development and also cause postnatal liver, adrenal, and kidney dysfunction, as well as loss of vision and hearing. The hypomorphic PEX1-G843D missense allele, observed in approximately 30% of ZSD patients, is associated with milder clinical and biochemical phenotypes, with some homozygous individuals surviving into early adulthood. Nonetheless, affected children with the PEX1-G843D allele have intellectual disability, failure to thrive, and significant sensory deficits. To enhance our ability to test candidate therapies that improve human PEX1-G843D function, we created the novel Pex1-G844D knock-in mouse model that represents the murine equivalent of the common human mutation. We show that Pex1-G844D homozygous mice recapitulate many classic features of mild ZSD cases, including growth retardation and fatty livers with cholestasis. In addition, electrophysiology, histology, and gene expression studies provide evidence that these animals develop a retinopathy similar to that observed in human patients, with evidence of cone photoreceptor cell death. Similar to skin fibroblasts obtained from ZSD patients with a PEX1-G843D allele, we demonstrate that murine cells homozygous for the Pex1-G844D allele respond to chaperone-like compounds, which normalizes peroxisomal β-oxidation. Thus, the Pex1-G844D mouse provides a powerful model system for testing candidate therapies that address the most common genetic cause of ZSD. In addition, this murine model will enhance studies focused on mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:24503136

  4. Some Important Aspects of Physical Modelling of Liquefaction in 1-g Shaking Table

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Md. Jahangir; Towhata, Ikuo

    2008-07-08

    Physical modeling of liquefaction in 1-g shaking table and dynamic centrifuge test become very popular to simulate the ground behavior during earthquake motion. 1-g shaking table tests require scaled down model ground which can be prepared in three methods; water sedimentation, moist tamping and dry deposition method. Moist tamping and dry deposition method need saturation of model ground which is expensive and very difficult to achieve. Some model tests were performed in 1-g shaking table to see the influence of preparation method of model ground. Wet tamping and water sedimentation method of ground preparation were compared in these tests. Behavior of level ground and slope were also examined. Slope and level ground model test increased the understanding of excess pore pressure generation in both cases. Wet tamping method has a possibility of not being fully saturated. Pore pressure transducers should be fixed vertically so that it can not settle down during shaking but can move with ground. There was insignificant difference in acceleration and excess pore pressure responses between wet tamping and water sedimentation method in case of level ground. Spiky accelerations were prominent in slope prepared by water sedimentation method. Spiky accelerations were the result of lateral displacement induced dilatancy of soil.

  5. Regulation of system x(c)- in the SOD1-G93A mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Albano, Rebecca; Liu, XiaoQian; Lobner, Doug

    2013-12-01

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is critical for the generation of the antioxidant glutathione by transporting cystine into the cell. At the same time, system xc- also releases glutamate, which can potentially lead to excitotoxicity. The dual actions of system xc- make it of great interest in any disease, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in which there is evidence of the involvement of both oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. The present study investigated the regulation of system xc- in the spinal cord of the SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse model of ALS. In acute spinal cord slices of 70day old SOD1-G93A transgenic mice cystine uptake by system xc- was significantly increased compared to age matched non-transgenic mice; but it was not significantly different at 55, 100, or 130days. The 70day old SOD1-G93A transgenic mice also showed significantly increased glutamate release in the presence of cystine. d-Aspartate uptake through excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), the main mechanism by which glutamate is cleared from the extracellular space, was also examined. In spinal cord slices of 70day old SOD1-G93A mice no change in d-aspartate uptake was found. Together, these findings suggest that at 70days of age, SOD1-G93A transgenic mice have increased system xc- activity, but no change in EAAT function. These results raise the possibility that excitotoxicity in the SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse, at least at early time points, may be due to increased system xc- activity and not decreased EAAT function.

  6. Resveratrol Ameliorates Motor Neuron Degeneration and Improves Survival in SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lin; Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Jia; Le, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has recently been used as a supplemental treatment for several neurological and nonneurological diseases. It is not known whether resveratrol has neuroprotective effect on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To assess the effect of resveratrol on the disease, we tested this agent on an ALS model of SOD1G93A transgenic mouse. Rotarod measurement was performed to measure the motor function of the ALS mice. Nissl staining and SMI-32 immunofluorescent staining were used to determine motor neurons survival in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), succinic dehydrogenase (SDH), and cytochrome oxidase (COX) staining were applied to pathologically analyze the skeletal muscles of the ALS mice. We found that resveratrol treatment significantly delayed the disease onset and prolonged the lifespan of the ALS mice. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment attenuated motor neuron loss, relieved muscle atrophy, and improved mitochondrial function of muscle fibers in the ALS mice. In addition, we demonstrated that resveratrol exerted these neuroprotective effects mainly through increasing the expression of Sirt1, consequently suppressing oxidative stress and downregulating p53 and its related apoptotic pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that resveratrol might provide a promising therapeutic intervention for ALS. PMID:25057490

  7. Early detection of motor dysfunction in the SOD1G93A mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) using home cage running wheels.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ellen J; Mead, Richard J; Azzouz, Mimoun; Shaw, Pamela J; Grierson, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The SOD1G93A mouse has been used since 1994 for preclinical testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Despite recent genetic advances in our understanding of ALS, transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1 remain the best available, and most widely used, vertebrate model of the disease. We previously described an optimised and rapid approach for preclinical studies in the SOD1G93A mouse. Here we describe improvements to this approach using home cage running wheels to obtain daily measurements of motor function, with minimal intervention. We show that home cage running wheels detect reductions in motor function at a similar time to the rotarod test, and that the data obtained are less variable allowing the use of smaller groups of animals to obtain satisfactory results. This approach refines use of the SOD1G93A model, and reduces the number of animals undergoing procedures of substantial severity, two central principles of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement of animal use in research). The small group sizes and rapid timescales enable affordable large-scale therapeutic pre-screening in the SOD1G93A mouse, as well as rapid validation of published positive effects in a second laboratory, one of the major stumbling blocks in ALS preclinical therapy development.

  8. Characterization of human sporadic ALS biomarkers in the familial ALS transgenic mSOD1(G93A) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lilo, Eitan; Wald-Altman, Shane; Solmesky, Leonardo J; Ben Yaakov, Keren; Gershoni-Emek, Noga; Bulvik, Shlomo; Kassis, Ibrahim; Karussis, Dimitrios; Perlson, Eran; Weil, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons. Although most cases of ALS are sporadic (sALS) and of unknown etiology, there are also inherited familial ALS (fALS) cases that share a phenotype similar to sALS pathological and clinical phenotype. In this study, we have identified two new potential genetic ALS biomarkers in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) obtained from sALS patients, namely the TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) and SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor). Together with the previously discovered ones-CyFIP2 and RbBP9, we investigated whether these four potential ALS biomarkers may be differentially expressed in tissues obtained from mutant SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice, a model that is relevant for at least 20% of the fALS cases. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of brain, spinal cord and muscle tissues of the mSOD1(G93A) and controls at various time points during the progression of the neurological disease showed differential expression of the four identified biomarkers in correlation with (i) the tissue type, (ii) the stage of the disease and (iii) the gender of the animals, creating thus a novel spatiotemporal molecular signature of ALS. The biomarkers detected in the fALS animal model were homologous to those that were identified in hMSC of our sALS cases. These results support the possibility of a molecular link between sALS and fALS and may indicate common pathogenetic mechanisms involved in both types of ALS. Moreover, these results may pave the path for using the mSOD1(G93A) mouse model and these biomarkers as molecular beacons to evaluate the effects of novel drugs/treatments in ALS.

  9. PRE-SYMPTOMATIC DETECTION OF CHRONIC MOTOR DEFICITS AND GENOTYPE PREDICTION IN CONGENIC B6.SOD1G93A ALS MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Hayworth, C. R.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable progressive paralytic motor neuron disease with limited therapeutic options. Since their creation by Gurney et al. (1994), transgenic SOD1G93A mice have become the benchmark pre-clinical model for screening ALS therapies. Surprisingly, despite physiological, anatomical, ultrastructural and biochemical evidence of early motor system dysfunction it has proven difficult to detect motor performance deficits in pre-symptomatic SOD1G93A mice. As an alternative to conventional forced motor tests, we investigated the progression of motor performance deficits in freely behaving pre-symptomatic congenic B6.SOD1G93A mice. We found that motor performance deficits began several weeks prior to the onset of overt clinical symptoms (postnatal day 45). More importantly, once motor performance deficits manifested, they persisted in parallel with disease progression. In addition, two physical measures of muscle girth revealed progressive hindlimb muscle atrophy that predicted genotype in individual pre-symptomatic mice with 80% accuracy. Together, these data suggest that muscle girth is a reliable and indirect measure of hindlimb muscle denervation and an early, objective marker for disease onset in congenic B6.SOD1G93A ALS mice. Moreover, we present regression equations based on hindlimb muscle girth for predicting genotype in future studies using B6.SOD1G93A mice. These findings support new objective criteria for clinical disease onset and provide objective measures that require little expertise. These studies demonstrate a cost-effective approach for more thorough evaluation of neuroprotective strategies that seek to disrupt disease mechanisms early in the disease process. To our knowledge, these findings are the first to report early chronic motor performance and physical deficits that are coincident with the earliest known motor dysfunction in any ALS mouse model. PMID:19699279

  10. Characterization of early pathogenesis in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS: part II, results and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Vinsant, Sharon; Mansfield, Carol; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Del Gaizo Moore, Victoria; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Hampton, Thomas G; Prevette, David; Caress, James; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Milligan, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Pathological events are well characterized in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse models, but review of the literature fails to identify a specific initiating event that precipitates disease pathology. There is now growing consensus in the field that axon and synapses are first cellular sites of degeneration, but controversy exists over whether axon and synapse loss is initiated autonomously at those sites or by pathology in the cell body, in nonneuronal cells or even in nonmotoneurons (MNs). Previous studies have identified pathological events in the mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) models involving spinal cord, peripheral axons, neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), or muscle; however, few studies have systematically examined pathogenesis at multiple sites in the same study. We have performed ultrastructural examination of both central and peripheral components of the neuromuscular system in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Twenty percent of MNs undergo degeneration by P60, but NMJ innervation in fast fatigable muscles is reduced by 40% by P30. Gait alterations and muscle weakness were also found at P30. There was no change in axonal transport prior to initial NMJ denervation. Mitochondrial morphological changes are observed at P7 and become more prominent with disease progression. At P30 there was a significant decrease in excitatory axo-dendritic and axo-somatic synapses with an increase in C-type axo-somatic synapses. Our study examined early pathology in both peripheral and central neuromuscular system. The muscle denervation is associated with functional motor deficits and begins during the first postnatal month in SOD1G93A mice. Physiological dysfunction and pathology in the mitochondria of synapses and MN soma and dendrites occur, and disease onset in these animals begins more than 2 months earlier than originally thought. This information may be valuable for designing preclinical trials that are more likely to impact disease onset and progression

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Bexarotene in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Riancho, Javier; Ruiz-Soto, María; Berciano, María T.; Berciano, José; Lafarga, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive weakness and muscle atrophy related to the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs) without a curative treatment. There is experimental evidence suggesting that retinoids may be involved in ALS pathogenesis. Bexarotene (Bxt) is a retinoid-X receptor agonist used in the treatment of cutaneous lymphoma with a favorable safety profile whose effects have been recently investigated in other neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we analyze the potential therapeutic effect of Bxt in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Mice were treated with Bxt or vehicle five times per week from day 60 onward. Survival, weight, and neuromuscular function studies together with histological and biochemical analyses were performed. Bxt significantly delayed motor function deterioration, ameliorated the loss of body weight, and extended mice survival up to 30% of the symptomatic period. Histological analyses of the lumbosacral spinal cord revealed that Bxt markedly delayed the early motor-neuron degeneration occurring at presymptomatic stages in ALS-transgenic mice. Bxt treatment contributed to preserve the MN homeostasis in the SOD1G93A mice. Particularly, it reduced the neuronal loss and the chromatolytic response, induced nucleolar hypertrophy, decreased the formation of ubiquitylated inclusions, and modulated the lysosomal response. As an agonist of the retinoic-X receptor (RXR) pathway, Bxt notably increased the nuclear expression of the RXRα throughout transcriptionally active euchromatin domains. Bxt also contributed to protect the MN environment by reducing reactive astrogliosis and preserving perisomatic synapsis. Overall, these neuroprotective effects suggest that treatment with Bxt could be useful in ALS, particularly in those cases related to SOD1 mutations. PMID:26190974

  12. Characterization of early pathogenesis in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS: part I, background and methods

    PubMed Central

    Vinsant, Sharon; Mansfield, Carol; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Del Gaizo Moore, Victoria; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Hampton, Thomas G; Prevette, David; Caress, James; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Milligan, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Charcot first described amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 1869; however, its causes remain largely unknown and effective, long-term treatment strategies are not available. The first mouse model of ALS was developed after the identification of mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene in 1993, and accordingly most of our knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease comes from studies carried out using this animal model. Although numerous preclinical trials have been conducted in the mutant SOD1 mouse models, the results have been disappointing because they did not positively translate to clinical trials. One explanation may be that current understanding of when and where pathogenesis begins is insufficient to accurately guide preclinical trials. Further characterization of these early events may provide insight into disease onset, help in the discovery of presymptomatic diagnostic disease markers, and identify novel therapeutic targets. Here, we describe the rationale, approach, and methods for our extensive analysis of early changes that included an ultrastructural examination of central and peripheral components of the neuromuscular system in the SOD1G93A mouse and correlated these alterations with early muscle denervation, motor dysfunction, and motoneuron death. We also provide a discussion of published work to review what is known regarding early pathology in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS. The significance of this work is that we have examined early pathology simultaneously in both the spinal cord and peripheral neuromuscular system, and the results are presented in the companion paper (Part II, Results and Discussion). Our results provide evidence as to why a thorough characterization of animal models throughout the life span is critical for a strong foundation to design preclinical trials that may produce meaningful results. PMID:24381807

  13. Investigation of difficult component effects on finite element model vibration prediction for the Bell AG-1G helicopter. Volume 2: Correlation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS) program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Previous correlations of the AG-1G showed good agreement between NASTRAN and tests through 15 to 20 Hz, but poor agreement in the higher frequency range of 20 to 30 Hz. Thus, this effort emphasized the higher frequency airframe vibration response correlations and identified areas that need further R and T work. To conduct the investigations, selected difficult components (main rotor pylon, secondary structure, nonstructural doors/panels, landing gear, engine, furl, etc.) were systematically removed to quantify their effects on overall vibratory response of the airframe. The entire effort was planned and documented, and the results reviewed by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the testing, analysis, and correlation exercise. In particular, secondary structure and damping had significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. Also, the nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomer mounts were significant on the low frequency pylon modes below main rotor 1p (5.4 Hz). The results of the NASTRAN FEM correlations are given.

  14. Correlation of AH-1G helicopter flight vibration data and tailboom static test data with NASTRAN analytical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Wilson, H. E.; Berry, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Level flight airframe vibration at main rotor excitation frequencies was calculated. A NASTRAN tailboom analysis was compared with test data for evaluation of methods used to determine effective skin in a semimonocoque sheet-stringer structure. The flight vibration correlation involved comparison of level flight vibration for two helicopter configurations: clean wing, at light gross weight and wing stores at heavy gross weight. In the tailboom correlation, deflections and internal loads were compared using static test data and a NASTRAN analysis. An iterative procedure was used to determine the amount of effective skin of buckled panels under compression load.

  15. Optimised and rapid pre-clinical screening in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Mead, Richard J; Bennett, Ellen J; Kennerley, Aneurin J; Sharp, Paul; Sunyach, Claire; Kasher, Paul; Berwick, Jason; Pettmann, Brigitte; Battaglia, Guiseppe; Azzouz, Mimoun; Grierson, Andrew; Shaw, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    The human SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse has been used extensively since its development in 1994 as a model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In that time, a great many insights into the toxicity of mutant SOD1 have been gained using this and other mutant SOD transgenic mouse models. They all demonstrate a selective toxicity towards motor neurons and in some cases features of the pathology seen in the human disease. These models have two major drawbacks. Firstly the generation of robust preclinical data in these models has been highlighted as an area for concern. Secondly, the amount of time required for a single preclinical experiment in these models (3-4 months) is a hurdle to the development of new therapies. We have developed an inbred C57BL/6 mouse line from the original mixed background (SJLxC57BL/6) SOD1(G93A) transgenic line and show here that the disease course is remarkably consistent and much less prone to background noise, enabling reduced numbers of mice for testing of therapeutics. Secondly we have identified very early readouts showing a large decline in motor function compared to normal mice. This loss of motor function has allowed us to develop an early, sensitive and rapid screening protocol for the initial phases of denervation of muscle fibers, observed in this model. We describe multiple, quantitative readouts of motor function that can be used to interrogate this early mechanism. Such an approach will increase throughput for reduced costs, whilst reducing the severity of the experimental procedures involved.

  16. Clemastine Confers Neuroprotection and Induces an Anti-Inflammatory Phenotype in SOD1(G93A) Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Apolloni, Savina; Fabbrizio, Paola; Parisi, Chiara; Amadio, Susanna; Volonté, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene underlie 14-23 % of familial and 1-7 % of sporadic cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a specific loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are emerging as key players in the pathogenesis of ALS, thus justifying the interest in glial cells and particularly microglia, in addition to motor neurons, as novel therapeutic approaches against ALS. Recently, histamine was proven to participate in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, and particularly, microglia was shown to be sensitive to the histamine challenge mainly through histamine H1 receptors. Clemastine is a first-generation and CNS-penetrant H1 receptor antagonist considered as a safe antihistamine compound that was shown to possess immune suppressive properties. In order to investigate if clemastine might find promising application in the treatment of ALS, in this work, we tested its action in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model which is extensively used in ALS preclinical studies. We demonstrated that chronic clemastine administration in SOD1(G93A) mice reduces microgliosis, modulates microglia-related inflammatory genes, and enhances motor neuron survival. Moreover, in vitro, clemastine is able to modify several activation parameters of SOD1(G93A) microglia, and particularly CD68 and arginase-1 expression, as well as phospho-ERK1/2 and NADPH oxidase 2 levels. Being clemastine a drug already employed in clinical practice, our results strongly encourage its further exploitation as a candidate for preclinical trials and a new modulator of neuroinflammation in ALS.

  17. Soma size and Cav1.3 channel expression in vulnerable and resistant motoneuron populations of the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfeld, Liza; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Fisher, Erika; Quinlan, Katharina A.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Powers, Randall K.; Heckman, Charles J.; Binder, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although the loss of motoneurons is an undisputed feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in man and in its animal models (SOD1 mutant mice), how the disease affects the size and excitability of motoneurons prior to their degeneration is not well understood. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that motoneurons in mutant SOD1G93A mice exhibit an enlargement of soma size (i.e., cross‐sectional area) and an increase in Cav1.3 channel expression at postnatal day 30, well before the manifestation of physiological symptoms that typically occur at p90 (Chiu et al. 1995). We made measurements of spinal and hypoglossal motoneurons vulnerable to degeneration, as well as motoneurons in the oculomotor nucleus that are resistant to degeneration. Overall, we found that the somata of motoneurons in male SOD1G93A mutants were larger than those in wild‐type transgenic males. When females were included in the two groups, significance was lost. Expression levels of the Cav1.3 channels were not differentiated by genotype, sex, or any interaction of the two. These results raise the intriguing possibility of an interaction between male sex steroid hormones and the SOD1 mutation in the etiopathogenesis of ALS. PMID:25107988

  18. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B ameliorates skeletal muscle lesions in a SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Yuki; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Ono, Yoko; Noda, Yasuhiro; Ohuchi, Kazuki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Hara, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons and subsequent muscular atrophy. The quality of life of patients with ALS is significantly improved by ameliorating muscular symptoms. We previously reported that glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB; osteoactivin) might serve as a target for ALS therapy. In the present study, superoxide dismutase 1/glycine residue 93 changed to alanine (SOD1(G93A) ) transgenic mice were used as a model of ALS. Expression of the C-terminal fragment of GPNMB was increased in the skeletal muscles of SOD1(G93A) mice and patients with sporadic ALS. SOD1(G93A) /GPNMB transgenic mice were generated to determine whether GPNMB expression ameliorates muscular symptoms. The weight and cross-sectional area of the gastrocnemius muscle, number and cross-sectional area of myofibers, and denervation of neuromuscular junctions were ameliorated in SOD1(G93A) /GPNMB vs. SOD1(G93A) mice. Furthermore, direct injection of a GPNMB expression plasmid into the gastrocnemius muscle of SOD1(G93A) mice increased the numbers of myofibers and prevented myofiber atrophy. These findings suggest that GPNMB directly affects skeletal muscle and prevents muscular pathology in SOD1(G93A) mice and may therefore serve as a target for therapy of ALS.

  19. Sensorimotor and cognitive functions in a SOD1(G37R) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filali, Mohammed; Lalonde, Robert; Rivest, Serge

    2011-11-20

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurological disorder involving degeneration of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord, leading to progressive atrophy of skeletal muscles and, ultimately, paralysis and death. Copper-mediated oxidative damage is proposed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) - linked hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To understand more clearly the pathogenesis of sensorimotor dysfunction and to find the most appropriate methods for early detection of symptoms and for monitoring them across time, a murine model was assessed at three time points (5, 8, and 11 months). Transgenic mice with the G37R mutation of human SOD1 exhibited earliest signs of dysfunction at 8 months in terms of a pathological hindpaw clasping reflex, as well as slowed movement time on a suspended bar, anomalies in footprint patterns, weaker grip strength, raised somatosensory thresholds, and deficits in passive avoidance learning, yielding a margin of 3-4 months before death to test experimental therapies. PMID:21816178

  20. Administration of 4-(α-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl Isothiocyanate Delays Disease Phenotype in SOD1G93A Rats: A Transgenic Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    4-(α-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl glucosinolate (glucomoringin, GMG) is a compound found in Moringa oleifera seeds. Myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis at neutral pH of GMG releases the biologically active compound 4-(α-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate (GMG-ITC). The present study was designed to test the potential therapeutic effectiveness of GMG-ITC to counteract the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using SOD1tg rats, which physiologically develops SOD1G93A at about 16 weeks of life, and can be considered a genetic model of disease. Rats were treated once a day with GMG (10 mg/Kg) bioactivated with myrosinase (20 µL/rat) via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection for two weeks before disease onset and the treatment was prolonged for further two weeks before the sacrifice. Immune-inflammatory markers as well as apoptotic pathway were investigated to establish whether GMG-ITC could represent a new promising tool in clinical practice to prevent ALS. Achieved data display clear differences in molecular and biological profiles between treated and untreated SOD1tg rats leading to guessing that GMG-ITC can interfere with the pathophysiological mechanisms at the basis of ALS development. Therefore, GMG-ITC produced from myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of pure GMG could be a candidate for further studies aimed to assess its possible use in clinical practice for the prevention or to slow down this disease. PMID:26075221

  1. Lysosomal and phagocytic activity is increased in astrocytes during disease progression in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David J.; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Keatinge, Marcus; Sokhi, Dilraj; Viskaitis, Paulius; Heath, Paul R.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, gene expression profiling of astrocytes from the pre-symptomatic stage of the SOD1G93A model of ALS has revealed reduced lactate metabolism and altered trophic support. Here, we have performed microarray analysis of symptomatic and late-stage disease astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the lumbar spinal cord of the SOD1G93A mouse to complete the picture of astrocyte behavior throughout the disease course. Astrocytes at symptomatic and late-stage disease show a distinct up-regulation of transcripts defining a reactive phenotype, such as those involved in the lysosome and phagocytic pathways. Functional analysis of hexosaminidase B enzyme activity in the spinal cord and of astrocyte phagocytic ability has demonstrated a significant increase in lysosomal enzyme activity and phagocytic activity in SOD1G93A vs. littermate controls, validating the findings of the microarray study. In addition to the increased reactivity seen at both stages, astrocytes from late-stage disease showed decreased expression of many transcripts involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Staining for the master regulator of cholesterol synthesis, SREBP2, has revealed an increased localization to the cytoplasm of astrocytes and motor neurons in late-stage SOD1G93A spinal cord, indicating that down-regulation of transcripts may be due to an excess of cholesterol in the CNS during late-stage disease possibly due to phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Our data reveal that SOD1G93A astrocytes are characterized more by a loss of supportive function than a toxic phenotype during ALS disease progression and future studies should focus upon restorative therapies. PMID:26528138

  2. Fast Skeletal Muscle Troponin Activator tirasemtiv Increases Muscle Function and Performance in the B6SJL-SOD1G93A ALS Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryans, Julie; Russell, Alan J.; Jia, Zhiheng; Hinken, Aaron C.; Morgans, David J.; Malik, Fady I.; Jasper, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss resulting in muscle atrophy, declining muscle function, and eventual paralysis. Patients typically die from respiratory failure 3 to 5 years from the onset of symptoms. Tirasemtiv is a fast skeletal troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium; this mechanism of action amplifies the response of muscle to neuromuscular input producing greater force when nerve input is reduced. Here, we demonstrate that a single dose of tirasemtiv significantly increases submaximal isometric force, forelimb grip strength, grid hang time, and rotarod performance in a female transgenic mouse model (B6SJL-SOD1G93A) of ALS with functional deficits. Additionally, diaphragm force and tidal volume are significantly higher in tirasemtiv-treated female B6SJL-SOD1G93A mice. These results support the potential of fast skeletal troponin activators to improve muscle function in neuromuscular diseases. PMID:24805850

  3. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activator tirasemtiv increases muscle function and performance in the B6SJL-SOD1G93A ALS mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Kennedy, Adam; Ryans, Julie; Russell, Alan J; Jia, Zhiheng; Hinken, Aaron C; Morgans, David J; Malik, Fady I; Jasper, Jeffrey R

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss resulting in muscle atrophy, declining muscle function, and eventual paralysis. Patients typically die from respiratory failure 3 to 5 years from the onset of symptoms. Tirasemtiv is a fast skeletal troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium; this mechanism of action amplifies the response of muscle to neuromuscular input producing greater force when nerve input is reduced. Here, we demonstrate that a single dose of tirasemtiv significantly increases submaximal isometric force, forelimb grip strength, grid hang time, and rotarod performance in a female transgenic mouse model (B6SJL-SOD1 G93A) of ALS with functional deficits. Additionally, diaphragm force and tidal volume are significantly higher in tirasemtiv-treated female B6SJL-SOD1 G93A mice. These results support the potential of fast skeletal troponin activators to improve muscle function in neuromuscular diseases.

  4. A Quick Phenotypic Neurological Scoring System for Evaluating Disease Progression in the SOD1-G93A Mouse Model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Hatzipetros, Theo; Kidd, Joshua D; Moreno, Andy J; Thompson, Kenneth; Gill, Alan; Vieira, Fernando G

    2015-01-01

    The SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse is the most widely used animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At ALS TDI we developed a phenotypic screening protocol, demonstrated in video herein, which reliably assesses the neuromuscular function of SOD1-G93A mice in a quick manner. This protocol encompasses a simple neurological scoring system (NeuroScore) designed to assess hindlimb function. NeuroScore is focused on hindlimb function because hindlimb deficits are the earliest reported neurological sign of disease in SOD1-G93A mice. The protocol developed by ALS TDI provides an unbiased assessment of onset of paresis (slight or partial paralysis), progression and severity of paralysis and it is sensitive enough to identify drug-induced changes in disease progression. In this report, the combination of a detailed manuscript with video minimizes scoring ambiguities and inter-experimenter variability thus allowing for the protocol to be adopted by other laboratories and enabling comparisons between studies taking place at different settings. We believe that this video protocol can serve as an excellent training tool for present and future ALS researchers. PMID:26485052

  5. Gene expression changes in spinal motoneurons of the SOD1G93A transgenic model for ALS after treatment with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Alexandre; Kastner, Stefan; Chatzikonstantinou, Eva; Pitzer, Claudia; Plaas, Christian; Kirsch, Friederike; Wafzig, Oliver; Krüger, Carola; Spoelgen, Robert; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Gretz, Norbert; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable fatal motoneuron disease with a lifetime risk of approximately 1:400. It is characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting, and death ensuing 3–5 years after diagnosis. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a drug candidate for ALS, with evidence for efficacy from animal studies and interesting data from pilot clinical trials. To gain insight into the disease mechanisms and mode of action of G-CSF, we performed gene expression profiling on isolated lumbar motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice, the most frequently studied animal model for ALS, with and without G-CSF treatment. Results: Motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice present a distinct gene expression profile in comparison to controls already at an early disease stage (11 weeks of age), when treatment was initiated. The degree of deregulation increases at a time where motor symptoms are obvious (15 weeks of age). Upon G-CSF treatment, transcriptomic deregulations of SOD1G93A motoneurons were notably restored. Discriminant analysis revealed that SOD1 mice treated with G-CSF has a transcriptom close to presymptomatic SOD1 mice or wild type mice. Some interesting genes modulated by G-CSF treatment relate to neuromuscular function such as CCR4-NOT or Prss12. Conclusions: Our data suggest that G-CSF is able to re-adjust gene expression in symptomatic SOD1G93A motoneurons. This provides further arguments for G-CSF as a promising drug candidate for ALS. PMID:25653590

  6. Semaphorin 3A Signaling Through Neuropilin-1 Is an Early Trigger for Distal Axonopathy in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Venkova, Kalina; Christov, Alexander; Kamaluddin, Zarine; Kobalka, Peter; Siddiqui, Saaid; Hensley, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by progressive distal axonopathy that precedes actual motor neuron death. Triggers for neuromuscular junction degeneration remain to be determined, but the axon repulsion factor semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), which is derived from terminal Schwann cells, is a plausible candidate. This study examines the hypothesis that Sema3A signaling through its motor neuron neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor triggers distal axonopathy and muscle denervation in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Neuropilin-1 was found to be expressed in axonal terminals at the mouse neuromuscular junction in vivo and in NSC-34 motor neuron–like cells in vitro. In differentiated NSC-34 cells, an anti-NRP1A antibody that selectively blocks Sema3A binding to NRP1 prevented Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injections of anti-NRP1A antibody administered twice weekly from age 40 days significantly delayed and even temporarily reversed motor functional decline while prolonging the life span of SOD1G93A mice. Histologic evaluation at 90 and 125 days revealed that anti-NRP1A antibody reduced neuromuscular junction denervation and attenuated pathologic alterations in ventral roots at late-stage disease. These data suggest that peripheral NRP1A signaling is involved in the pathobiology of this ALS model and that antagonizing Sema3A/NRP1 binding or downstream signals could have implications for the treatment of ALS. PMID:24918638

  7. Trehalose decreases mutant SOD1 expression and alleviates motor deficiency in early but not end-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a SOD1-G93A mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Guo, Y; Wang, X; Yu, X; Duan, W; Hong, K; Wang, J; Han, H; Li, C

    2015-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder for which there is currently no effective treatment. Studies indicate that enhancing autophagy in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease can ameliorate the behavioral symptoms and pathological damage associated with the accumulation of pathological mutant proteins such as mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1). This study investigated the effects of trehalose treatment on both early and end-stage disease in a transgenic mouse model of ALS via short-term (30 days after administration) and long-term (from 60 days after administration to death) trehalose treatment experiments. Sixty-day-old female SOD1-G93A transgenic mice were treated daily with 2% (w/v) trehalose in their drinking water for 30 days and monitored until they reached a neurological score of four, whereupon they were euthanized by cervical dislocation. Neurological, rotarod performance test and hanging wire test scores were recorded and body weight monitored. After death, the spinal cord was removed to assess the number of motor neurons and to measure the expression of mutant SOD1, LC3-II and p62. Trehalose significantly reduced the levels of mutant SOD1 and p62 and increased LC3-II in the spinal cords of 90-day-old SOD1-G93A transgenic mice. Furthermore, trehalose treatment significantly postponed disease onset, lengthened the time it took to reach a neurological score of 2 and preserved motor function; however, trehalose became less effective at delaying further disease progression as the disease progressed beyond a neurological score of 2 and it failed to extend the survival of SOD1-G93A transgenic mice. Additionally, independent of autophagy, trehalose consistently inhibited microgliosis and astrogliosis throughout the entire duration of the study. In conclusion, trehalose may be a useful add-on therapy in conjunction with other ALS treatment options to alleviate symptoms in early-stage ALS.

  8. Iron-sulfur cluster damage by the superoxide radical in neural tissues of the SOD1(G93A) ALS rat model.

    PubMed

    Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Mojović, Miloš; Stamenković, Stefan; Jovanović, Miloš; Selaković, Vesna; Andjus, Pavle; Bačić, Goran

    2016-07-01

    Extensive clinical investigations, in hand with biochemical and biophysical research, have associated brain iron accumulation with the pathogenesis of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease. The origin of iron is still not identified, but it is proposed that it forms redox active complexes that can participate in the Fenton reaction generating the toxic hydroxyl radical. In this paper, the state of iron in the neural tissues isolated from SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats was investigated using low temperature EPR spectroscopy and is compared with that of nontransgenic (NTg) littermates. The results showed that iron in neural tissues is present as high- and low-spin, heme and non-heme iron. It appears that the SOD1(G93A) rat neural tissues were most likely exposed in vivo to higher amounts of reactive oxygen species when compared to the corresponding NTg tissues, as they showed increased oxidized [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster content relative to [4Fe-4S](1+). Also, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was found to be reduced in these tissues, which may be associated with the observed uncoupling of heme a3 Fe and CuB in the O2-reduction site of the enzyme. Furthermore, the SOD1(G93A) rat spinal cords and brainstems contained more manganese, presumably from MnSOD, than those of NTg rats. The addition of potassium superoxide to all neural tissues ex vivo, led to the [4Fe-4S]→[3Fe-4S] cluster conversion and concurrent release of Fe. These results suggest that the superoxide anion may be the cause of the observed oxidative damage to SOD1(G93A) rat neural tissues and that the iron-sulfur clusters may be the source of poorly liganded redox active iron implicated in ALS pathogenesis. Low temperature EPR spectroscopy appears to be a valuable tool in assessing the role of metals in neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. State of the field: An informatics-based systematic review of the SOD1-G93A amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Renaid B.; Irvin, Cameron W.; Tilva, Keval R.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous sub-cellular through system-level disturbances have been identified in over 1300 articles examining the superoxide dismutase-1 guanine 93 to alanine (SOD1-G93A) transgenic mouse amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathophysiology. Manual assessment of such a broad literature base is daunting. We performed a comprehensive informatics-based systematic review or ‘field analysis’ to agnostically compute and map the current state of the field. Text mining of recaptured articles was used to quantify published data topic breadth and frequency. We constructed a nine-category pathophysiological function-based ontology to systematically organize and quantify the field's primary data. Results demonstrated that the distribution of primary research belonging to each category is: systemic measures an motor function, 59%; inflammation, 46%; cellular energetics, 37%; proteomics, 31%; neural excitability, 22%; apoptosis, 20%; oxidative stress, 18%; aberrant cellular chemistry, 14%; axonal transport, 10%. We constructed a SOD1-G93A field map that visually illustrates and categorizes the 85% most frequently assessed sub-topics. Finally, we present the literature-cited significance of frequently published terms and uncover thinly investigated areas. In conclusion, most articles individually examine at least two categories, which is indicative of the numerous underlying pathophysiological interrelationships. An essential future path is examination of cross-category pathophysiological interrelationships and their co-correspondence to homeostatic regulation and disease progression. PMID:25998063

  10. Dysregulated expression of death, stress and mitochondrion related genes in the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic SOD1G93A mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Chrystian J.; Maximino, Jessica R.; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells are the main source of paracrine support to motor neurons. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been correlated to motor neuron death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Despite the involvement of Schwann cells in early neuromuscular disruption in ALS, detailed molecular events of a dying-back triggering are unknown. Sciatic nerves of presymptomatic (60-day-old) SOD1G93A mice were submitted to a high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis. DAVID demonstrated the deregulated genes related to death, stress and mitochondrion, which allowed the identification of Cell cycle, ErbB signaling, Tryptophan metabolism and Rig-I-like receptor signaling as the most representative KEGG pathways. The protein-protein interaction networks based upon deregulated genes have identified the top hubs (TRAF2, H2AFX, E2F1, FOXO3, MSH2, NGFR, TGFBR1) and bottlenecks (TRAF2, E2F1, CDKN1B, TWIST1, FOXO3). Schwann cells were enriched from the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic mice using flow cytometry cell sorting. qPCR showed the up regulated (Ngfr, Cdnkn1b, E2f1, Traf2 and Erbb3, H2afx, Cdkn1a, Hspa1, Prdx, Mapk10) and down-regulated (Foxo3, Mtor) genes in the enriched Schwann cells. In conclusion, molecular analyses in the presymptomatic sciatic nerve demonstrated the involvement of death, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial pathways in the Schwann cell non-autonomous mechanisms in the early stages of ALS. PMID:26339226

  11. Depressed excitability and ion currents linked to slow exocytotic fusion pore in chromaffin cells of the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Gallardo, Enrique; de Pascual, Ricardo; Fernández-Morales, José-Carlos; Arranz-Tagarro, Juan-Alberto; Maroto, Marcos; Nanclares, Carmen; Gandía, Luis; de Diego, Antonio M G; Padín, Juan-Fernando; García, Antonio G

    2015-01-01

    Altered synaptic transmission with excess glutamate release has been implicated in the loss of motoneurons occurring in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Hyperexcitability or hypoexcitability of motoneurons from mice carrying the ALS mutation SOD1(G93A) (mSOD1) has also been reported. Here we have investigated the excitability, the ion currents, and the kinetics of the exocytotic fusion pore in chromaffin cells from postnatal day 90 to postnatal day 130 mSOD1 mice, when motor deficits are already established. With respect to wild-type (WT), mSOD1 chromaffin cells had a decrease in the following parameters: 95% in spontaneous action potentials, 70% in nicotinic current for acetylcholine (ACh), 35% in Na(+) current, 40% in Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current, and 53% in voltage-dependent K(+) current. Ca(2+) current was increased by 37%, but the ACh-evoked elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) was unchanged. Single exocytotic spike events triggered by ACh had the following differences (mSOD1 vs. WT): 36% lower rise rate, 60% higher decay time, 51% higher half-width, 13% lower amplitude, and 61% higher quantal size. The expression of the α3-subtype of nicotinic receptors and proteins of the exocytotic machinery was unchanged in the brain and adrenal medulla of mSOD1, with respect to WT mice. A slower fusion pore opening, expansion, and closure are likely linked to the pronounced reduction in cell excitability and in the ion currents driving action potentials in mSOD1, compared with WT chromaffin cells.

  12. A comprehensive assessment of the SOD1G93A low-copy transgenic mouse, which models human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Kalmar, Bernadett; Essa, Shafa; Ricketts, Thomas; Joyce, Peter; Kent, Rosie; Rowe, Claire; Parker, Andy; Gray, Anna; Hafezparast, Majid; Thorpe, Julian R; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2011-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The disorder generally strikes in mid-life, relentlessly leading to paralysis and death, typically 3-5 years after diagnosis. No effective treatments are available. Up to 10% of ALS is familial, usually autosomal dominant. Several causative genes are known and, of these, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is by far the most frequently found, accounting for up to 20% of familial ALS. A range of human mutant SOD1 transgenic mouse strains has been produced, and these largely successfully model the human disease. Of these, the most widely used is the SOD1 mouse, which expresses a human SOD1 transgene with a causative G93A mutation. This mouse model is excellent for many purposes but carries up to 25 copies of the transgene and produces a great excess of SOD1 protein, which might affect our interpretation of disease processes. A variant of this strain carries a deletion of the transgene array such that the copy number is dropped to eight to ten mutant SOD1 genes. This 'deleted' 'low-copy' mouse undergoes a slower course of disease, over many months. Here we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of phenotype, including nerve and muscle physiology and histology, to add to our knowledge of this 'deleted' strain and give baseline data for future studies. We find differences in phenotype that arise from genetic background and sex, and we quantify the loss of nerve and muscle function over time. The slowly progressive pathology observed in this mouse strain could provide us with a more appropriate model for studying early-stage pathological processes in ALS and aid the development of therapies for early-stage treatments. PMID:21540242

  13. Semaphorin 3A signaling through neuropilin-1 is an early trigger for distal axonopathy in the SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Venkova, Kalina; Christov, Alexander; Kamaluddin, Zarine; Kobalka, Peter; Siddiqui, Saaid; Hensley, Kenneth

    2014-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by progressive distal axonopathy that precedes actual motor neuron death. Triggers for neuromuscular junction degeneration remain to be determined, but the axon repulsion factor semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), which is derived from terminal Schwann cells, is a plausible candidate. This study examines the hypothesis that Sema3A signaling through its motor neuron neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor triggers distal axonopathy and muscle denervation in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS. Neuropilin-1 was found to be expressed in axonal terminals at the mouse neuromuscular junction in vivo and in NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells in vitro. In differentiated NSC-34 cells, an anti-NRP1 antibody that selectively blocks Sema3A binding to NRP1 prevented Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injections of anti-NRP1 antibody administered twice weekly from age 40 days significantly delayed and even temporarily reversed motor functional decline while prolonging the life span of SOD1 mice. Histologic evaluation at 90 and 125 days revealed that anti-NRP1 antibody reduced neuromuscular junction denervation and attenuated pathologic alterations in ventral roots at late-stage disease. These data suggest that peripheral NRP1 signaling is involved in the pathobiology of this ALS model and that antagonizing Sema3A/NRP1 binding or downstream signals could have implications for the treatment of ALS.

  14. INaP selective inhibition reverts precocious inter- and motorneurons hyperexcitability in the Sod1-G93R zebrafish ALS model

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Lorena; Ghilardi, Anna; Rottoli, Elsa; De Maglie, Marcella; Prosperi, Laura; Perego, Carla; Baruscotti, Mirko; Bucchi, Annalisa; Del Giacco, Luca; Francolini, Maura

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic role of SOD1 mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was investigated using a zebrafish disease model stably expressing the ALS-linked G93R mutation. In addition to the main pathological features of ALS shown by adult fish, we found remarkably precocious alterations in the development of motor nerve circuitry and embryo behavior, and suggest that these alterations are prompted by interneuron and motor neuron hyperexcitability triggered by anomalies in the persistent pacemaker sodium current INaP. The riluzole-induced modulation of INaP reduced spinal neuron excitability, reverted the behavioral phenotypes and improved the deficits in motor nerve circuitry development, thus shedding new light on the use of riluzole in the management of ALS. Our findings provide a valid phenotype-based tool for unbiased in vivo drug screening that can be used to develop new therapies. PMID:27079797

  15. Mice Overexpressing Both Non-Mutated Human SOD1 and Mutated SOD1G93A Genes: A Competent Experimental Model for Studying Iron Metabolism in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gajowiak, Anna; Styś, Agnieszka; Starzyński, Rafał R.; Bednarz, Aleksandra; Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Staroń, Robert; Lipiński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration and loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex. Up to 10% of ALS cases are inherited (familial, fALS) and associated with mutations, frequently in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Rodent transgenic models of ALS are often used to elucidate a complex pathogenesis of this disease. Of importance, both ALS patients and animals carrying mutated human SOD1 gene show symptoms of oxidative stress and iron metabolism misregulation. The aim of our study was to characterize changes in iron metabolism in one of the most commonly used models of ALS – transgenic mice overexpressing human mutated SOD1G93A gene. We analyzed the expression of iron-related genes in asymptomatic, 2-month-old and symptomatic, 4-month-old SOD1G93A mice. In parallel, respective age-matched mice overexpressing human non-mutated SOD1 transgene and control mice were analyzed. We demonstrate that the overexpression of both SOD1 and SOD1G93A genes account for a substantial increase in SOD1 protein levels and activity in selected tissues and that not all the changes in iron metabolism genes expression are specific for the overexpression of the mutated form of SOD1. PMID:26778957

  16. Adverse effects of a SOD1-peptide immunotherapy on SOD1 G93A mouse slow model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sábado, J; Casanovas, A; Rodrigo, H; Arqué, G; Esquerda, J E

    2015-12-01

    Previous reports from our lab had shown that some anti-purinergic receptor P2X4 antibodies cross-reacted with misfolded forms of mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Cross-reactivity could be caused by the abnormal exposure of an epitope located in the inner hydrophobic region of SOD1 that shared structural homology with the P2X4-immunizing peptide. We had previously raised antibodies against human SOD1 epitope mimicked by the P2X4 immunizing peptide. One of these antibodies, called AJ10, was able to recognize mutant/misfolded forms of ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Here, we used the AJ10 antigen as a vaccine to target neurotoxic species of mutant SOD1 in a slow mouse model of ALS. However, the obtained results showed no improvement in life span, disease onset or weight loss in treated animals; we observed an increased microglial neuroinflammatory response and high amounts of misfolded SOD1 accumulated within spinal cord neurons after AJ10 immunization. An increase of immunoglobulin G deposits was also found due to the treatment. Finally, a significantly worse clinical evolution was displayed by an impairment on motor function as a consequence of AJ10 peptide immunization. PMID:26384962

  17. Adverse effects of a SOD1-peptide immunotherapy on SOD1 G93A mouse slow model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sábado, J; Casanovas, A; Rodrigo, H; Arqué, G; Esquerda, J E

    2015-12-01

    Previous reports from our lab had shown that some anti-purinergic receptor P2X4 antibodies cross-reacted with misfolded forms of mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Cross-reactivity could be caused by the abnormal exposure of an epitope located in the inner hydrophobic region of SOD1 that shared structural homology with the P2X4-immunizing peptide. We had previously raised antibodies against human SOD1 epitope mimicked by the P2X4 immunizing peptide. One of these antibodies, called AJ10, was able to recognize mutant/misfolded forms of ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Here, we used the AJ10 antigen as a vaccine to target neurotoxic species of mutant SOD1 in a slow mouse model of ALS. However, the obtained results showed no improvement in life span, disease onset or weight loss in treated animals; we observed an increased microglial neuroinflammatory response and high amounts of misfolded SOD1 accumulated within spinal cord neurons after AJ10 immunization. An increase of immunoglobulin G deposits was also found due to the treatment. Finally, a significantly worse clinical evolution was displayed by an impairment on motor function as a consequence of AJ10 peptide immunization.

  18. Tests of Rating Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masin, Sergio Cesare; Busetto, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The study reports empirical tests of Anderson's, Haubensak's, Helson's, and Parducci's rating models when two end anchors are used for rating. The results show that these models cannot predict the judgment effect called here the Dai Pra effect. It is shown that an extension of Anderson's model is consistent with this effect. The results confirm…

  19. Characterization of the Contribution of Genetic Background and Gender to Disease Progression in the SOD1 G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pfohl, Stephen R.; Halicek, Martin T.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequently used model to examine ALS pathophysiology. There is a lack of homogeneity in usage of the SOD1 G93A mouse, including differences in genetic background and gender, which could confound the field’s results. Objective In an analysis of 97 studies, we characterized the ALS progression for the high transgene copy control SOD1 G93A mouse on the basis of disease onset, overall lifespan, and disease duration for male and female mice on the B6SJL and C57BL/6J genetic backgrounds and quantified magnitudes of differences between groups. Methods Mean age at onset, onset assessment measure, disease duration, and overall lifespan data from each study were extracted and statistically modeled as the response of linear regression with the sex and genetic background factored as predictors. Additional examination was performed on differing experimental onset and endpoint assessment measures. Results C57BL/6 background mice show delayed onset of symptoms, increased lifespan, and an extended disease duration compared to their sex-matched B6SJL counterparts. Female B6SJL generally experience extended lifespan and delayed onset compared to their male counterparts, while female mice on the C57BL/6 background show delayed onset but no difference in survival compared to their male counterparts. Finally, different experimental protocols (tremor, rotarod, etc.) for onset determination result in notably different onset means. Conclusions Overall, the observed effect of sex on disease endpoints was smaller than that which can be attributed to the genetic background. The often-reported increase in lifespan for female mice was observed only for mice on the B6SJL background, implicating a strain-dependent effect of sex on disease progression that manifests despite identical mutant SOD1 expression. PMID:26594635

  20. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  1. OCH Strap Model Test

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, K.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-26

    The OCH Model was stacked using the appropriate spacers between each absorber plate. Steel bars measuring 3-inch wide by 1/4-inch thick were welded, using 1/8-inch fillet weld, along all the corner edges, except the outer radius edges. On the outer radius, the straps were bolted to the end plates and to plates 9 and 17. The straps on the outer radius were also set in towards the center by approximately 3-inches. The spacers were then knocked out. Twelve strain gauges were mounted on the model. See figure 1 and the OCH strap Model log book for locations. Each rosette was centered in the gap between two absorber plates. The finite element plate model can predict the primary deformations of the OH module in both the cantilever and crushing modes to within 11% of the measured values. The primary stresses away from the support plate for the cantilever mode can be predicted to within 13% by this model. Near the support plate where large shear stresses exists, ANSYS will overpredict the measured stresses substantially. This is probably due to the models inherent inability to allow for shear stress concentrations at the welds. The same over-prediction was seen in the side straps during the OH crush test comparison and is probably attributable to the high shear force in this mode. The simple finite element plate model will provide suitable model of OH module stiffness for use in the analysis of the module assembly. The calculation of shear stresses can be improved by applying the ANSYS calculated inter-element forces to traditional weld strength calculations

  2. Solubility of chlorargyrite (AgCl(cr./l.)) in water: New experimental data and a predictive model valid for a wide range of temperatures (273-873 K) and water densities (0.01-1 g·cm-3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinfiev, Nikolay N.; Zotov, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    The solubility of chlorargyrite, AgCl(cr./l.), in pure water at 623, 673 and 753 (±2) K as a function of pressure in a wide range aqueous densities (0.01-0.7 g·cm-3) was determined using various experimental approaches. Combined theoretical quantum chemistry simulations of Ag speciation and structure with a recently developed equation of state (EoS) for aqueous neutral species (Akinfiev and Diamond, 2003) were applied to describe published and newly made AgCl(cr./l.) solubility measurements in water. The use of the employed EoS for AgCl(H2O)(aq) cluster is found out to provide a good description of the whole set of experimental measurements in a wide range of temperatures (273-753 K), water densities (0.01-0.7 g·cm-3), and pressures of 0.1-100 MPa. Also, the proposed AgCl(H2O)(aq) thermodynamic description is proved to be valid for a dense aqueous fluid (0.7-1 g·cm-3) at 273-623 K and saturation water pressure. Although silver obviously shows greater affinity to dense aqueous fluid, AgCl hydration in the vapour phase is demonstrated to be also significant. A model extrapolation to magmatic conditions predicts an appreciable silver content even in low density fluids, thus supporting the hypothesis of metal transport with vapour.

  3. The Overexpression of TDP-43 Protein in the Neuron and Oligodendrocyte Cells Causes the Progressive Motor Neuron Degeneration in the SOD1 G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiao; Liang, Huiting; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Renshi

    2016-01-01

    The recent investigation suggested that the TDP-43 protein was closely related to the motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the pathogenesis contributed to motor neuron degeneration largely remained unknown. Therefore, we detected the alteration of TDP-43 expression and distribution in the adult spinal cord of the SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse model for searching the possible pathogenesis of ALS. We examined the TDP-43 expression and distribution in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells in the adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic model by the fluorescent immunohistochemical technology. We revealed that the amount of TDP-43 positive cell was cervical>lumbar>thoracic segment, that in the ventral horn was more than that in the dorsal horn, a few of TDP-43 protein sparsely expressed and distributed in the other regions, the TDP-43 protein weren't detected in the white matter and the central canal. The TDP-43 protein was mostly expressed and distributed in the nuclear of neuron cells and the cytoplasm of oligodendrocyte cells of the gray matter surrounding the central canal of spinal cord by the granular shape in the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice. The amount of TDP-43 positive cell significantly increased at the onset and progression stages of ALS following with the increase of neuron death in spinal cord, particularly in the ventral horn of cervical segment at the progression stage. Our results suggested that the overexpression of TDP-43 protein in the neuron and oligodendrocyte cell causes the progressive motor neuron degeneration in the ALS-like mouse model. PMID:27570488

  4. The Overexpression of TDP-43 Protein in the Neuron and Oligodendrocyte Cells Causes the Progressive Motor Neuron Degeneration in the SOD1 G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiao; Liang, Huiting; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Renshi

    2016-01-01

    The recent investigation suggested that the TDP-43 protein was closely related to the motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the pathogenesis contributed to motor neuron degeneration largely remained unknown. Therefore, we detected the alteration of TDP-43 expression and distribution in the adult spinal cord of the SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse model for searching the possible pathogenesis of ALS. We examined the TDP-43 expression and distribution in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells in the adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic model by the fluorescent immunohistochemical technology. We revealed that the amount of TDP-43 positive cell was cervical>lumbar>thoracic segment, that in the ventral horn was more than that in the dorsal horn, a few of TDP-43 protein sparsely expressed and distributed in the other regions, the TDP-43 protein weren't detected in the white matter and the central canal. The TDP-43 protein was mostly expressed and distributed in the nuclear of neuron cells and the cytoplasm of oligodendrocyte cells of the gray matter surrounding the central canal of spinal cord by the granular shape in the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice. The amount of TDP-43 positive cell significantly increased at the onset and progression stages of ALS following with the increase of neuron death in spinal cord, particularly in the ventral horn of cervical segment at the progression stage. Our results suggested that the overexpression of TDP-43 protein in the neuron and oligodendrocyte cell causes the progressive motor neuron degeneration in the ALS-like mouse model. PMID:27570488

  5. Marked changes in dendritic structure and spine density precede significant neuronal death in vulnerable cortical pyramidal neuron populations in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Matthew J; Mu, Erica W H; Noakes, Peter G; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Bellingham, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterised by the death of upper (corticospinal) and lower motor neurons (MNs) with progressive muscle weakness. This incurable disease is clinically heterogeneous and its aetiology remains unknown. Increased excitability of corticospinal MNs has been observed prior to symptoms in human and rodent studies. Increased excitability has been correlated with structural changes in neuronal dendritic arbors and spines for decades. Here, using a modified Golgi-Cox staining method, we have made the first longitudinal study examining the dendrites of pyramidal neurons from the motor cortex, medial pre-frontal cortex, somatosensory cortex and entorhinal cortex of hSOD1(G93A) (SOD1) mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermate controls at postnatal (P) days 8-15, 28-35, 65-75 and 120. Progressive decreases in dendritic length and spine density commencing at pre-symptomatic ages (P8-15 or P28-35) were observed in layer V pyramidal neurons within the motor cortex and medial pre-frontal cortex of SOD1 mice compared to WT mice. Spine loss without concurrent dendritic pathology was present in the pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex from disease-onset (P65-75). Our results from the SOD1 model suggest that dendritic and dendritic spine changes foreshadow and underpin the neuromotor phenotypes present in ALS and may contribute to the varied cognitive, executive function and extra-motor symptoms commonly seen in ALS patients. Determining if these phenomena are compensatory or maladaptive may help explain differential susceptibility of neurons to degeneration in ALS. PMID:27488828

  6. Test Administration Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kirk A.; Bergstrom, Betty A.

    2013-01-01

    The need for increased exam security, improved test formats, more flexible scheduling, better measurement, and more efficient administrative processes has caused testing agencies to consider converting the administration of their exams from paper-and-pencil to computer-based testing (CBT). Many decisions must be made in order to provide an optimal…

  7. Testing and validating environmental models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirchner, J.W.; Hooper, R.P.; Kendall, C.; Neal, C.; Leavesley, G.

    1996-01-01

    Generally accepted standards for testing and validating ecosystem models would benefit both modellers and model users. Universally applicable test procedures are difficult to prescribe, given the diversity of modelling approaches and the many uses for models. However, the generally accepted scientific principles of documentation and disclosure provide a useful framework for devising general standards for model evaluation. Adequately documenting model tests requires explicit performance criteria, and explicit benchmarks against which model performance is compared. A model's validity, reliability, and accuracy can be most meaningfully judged by explicit comparison against the available alternatives. In contrast, current practice is often characterized by vague, subjective claims that model predictions show 'acceptable' agreement with data; such claims provide little basis for choosing among alternative models. Strict model tests (those that invalid models are unlikely to pass) are the only ones capable of convincing rational skeptics that a model is probably valid. However, 'false positive' rates as low as 10% can substantially erode the power of validation tests, making them insufficiently strict to convince rational skeptics. Validation tests are often undermined by excessive parameter calibration and overuse of ad hoc model features. Tests are often also divorced from the conditions under which a model will be used, particularly when it is designed to forecast beyond the range of historical experience. In such situations, data from laboratory and field manipulation experiments can provide particularly effective tests, because one can create experimental conditions quite different from historical data, and because experimental data can provide a more precisely defined 'target' for the model to hit. We present a simple demonstration showing that the two most common methods for comparing model predictions to environmental time series (plotting model time series

  8. Testing bow shock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefay, Thamer; Meziane, Karim; Hamza, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Space plasmas studies of bow shock dynamics, given the fundamental transport role and impact natural transition boundaries, have continued to attract much interest. With the overwhelming availability of data collected by various space science missions, several empirical models have been put forward to account for the location of the Earth's bow shock. Various solar wind and IMF measured parameters are used to constrain the proposed models published in the literature. For each of these empirical models, the bow shock nose velocity, at the standoff distance, is computed; each of these velocities is then compared with the observed shock speed as determined from a multipoint measurement provided by the Cluster quartet. The present study reveals to what extent the model parameters used are significant and determinant, and suggests that some empirical models are more accurate than others are.

  9. UPWT check standard model test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Installation of the check standard model in test section 2 of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). Testing was conducted as part of a Data Quality Control assessment in the Research Facilities Branch/Aerodynamics Aerothermodynamics Acoustics Competency.

  10. Modeling cylinder test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.K.; Scannapieco, A.J.

    1996-05-01

    The dynamic behavior of a copper tube containing high explosive PBX 9502 is studied. The detonation of the explosive propagating along the axis drives the copper tube radially outward. A multi-process reactive model is used to simulate the explosive burn behavior in an Eulerian hydrodynamic code. In addition, an adaptive mesh refinement technique is featured in controlling the computational mesh size as the detonation wave moves in and out of a region. Comparison with experiments is made to show the capability of the new hydrocode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Modeling cylinder test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.K.; Scannapieco, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    The dynamic behavior of a copper tube containing high explosive PBX 9502 is studied. The detonation of the explosive propagating along the axis drives the copper tube radially outward. A multi-process reactive model is used to simulate the explosive burn behavior in an Eulerian hydrodynamic code. In addition,an adaptive mesh refinement technique is featured in controlling the computational mesh size as the detonation wave moves in and out of a region. Comparison with experiments is made to show the capability of the new hydrocode.

  12. Avian models for toxicity testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of birds as test models in experimental and environmental toxicology as related to health effects is reviewed, and an overview of descriptive tests routinely used in wildlife toxicology is provided. Toxicologic research on birds may be applicable to human health both directly by their use as models for mechanistic and descriptive studies and indirectly as monitors of environmental quality. Topics include the use of birds as models for study of teratogenesis and embryotoxicity, neurotoxicity, behavior, trends of environmental pollution, and for use in predictive wildlife toxicology. Uses of domestic and wild-captured birds are discussed.

  13. Methods for testing transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1991-11-14

    Substantial progress has been made over the past year on six aspects of the work supported by this grant. As a result, we have in hand for the first time a fairly complete set of transport models and improved statistical methods for testing them against large databases. We also have initial results of such tests. These results indicate that careful application of presently available transport theories can reasonably well produce a remarkably wide variety of tokamak data.

  14. Viking Mars lander 1975 dynamic test model/orbiter developmental test model forced vibration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, J.; Brownlee, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Viking Mars Lander 1975 dynamic test model and orbiter developmental test model were subjected to forced vibration sine tests. Flight acceptance (FA) and type approval (TA) test levels were applied to the spacecraft structure in a longitudinal test configuration using a 133,440-N (30,000-lb) force shaker. Testing in the two lateral axes (X, Y) was performed at lower levels using four 667-N (150-lb) force shakers. Forced vibration qualification (TA) test levels were successfully imposed on the spacecraft at frequencies down to 10 Hz. Measured responses showed the same character as analytical predictions, and correlation was reasonably good. Because of control system test tolerances, orbiter primary structure generally did not reach the design load limits attained in earlier static testing. A post-test examination of critical orbiter structure disclosed no apparent damage to the structure as a result of the test environment.

  15. Genetic Biomarkers for ALS Disease in Transgenic SOD1G93A Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Ana C.; Manzano, Raquel; Atencia-Cibreiro, Gabriela; Oliván, Sara; Muñoz, María J.; Zaragoza, Pilar; Cordero-Vázquez, Pilar; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; García-Redondo, Alberto; Osta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of both familial and sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are unknown, although growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle tissue is a primary target of ALS toxicity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed on transgenic SOD1G93A mice, a mouse model of ALS, to determine genetic biomarkers of disease longevity. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane, and three biopsy samples were obtained per animal at the three main stages of the disease. Transcriptional expression levels of seventeen genes, Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbxo32, Gsr, Impa1, Mef2c, Mt2, Myf5, Myod1, Myog, Nnt, Nogo A, Pax7, Rrad, Sln and Snx10, were tested in each muscle biopsy sample. Total RNA was extracted using TRIzol Reagent according to the manufacturer's protocol, and variations in gene expression were assayed by real-time PCR for all of the samples. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the linear correlation between transcriptional expression levels throughout disease progression and longevity. Consistent with the results obtained from total skeletal muscle of transgenic SOD1G93A mice and 74-day-old denervated mice, five genes (Mef2c, Gsr, Col19a1, Calm1 and Snx10) could be considered potential genetic biomarkers of longevity in transgenic SOD1G93A mice. These results are important because they may lead to the exploration of previously unexamined tissues in the search for new disease biomarkers and even to the application of these findings in human studies. PMID:22412900

  16. Testing Strategies for Model-Based Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Whalen, Mike; Rajan, Ajitha; Miller, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an approach for testing artifacts generated in a model-based development process. This approach divides the traditional testing process into two parts: requirements-based testing (validation testing) which determines whether the model implements the high-level requirements and model-based testing (conformance testing) which determines whether the code generated from a model is behaviorally equivalent to the model. The goals of the two processes differ significantly and this report explores suitable testing metrics and automation strategies for each. To support requirements-based testing, we define novel objective requirements coverage metrics similar to existing specification and code coverage metrics. For model-based testing, we briefly describe automation strategies and examine the fault-finding capability of different structural coverage metrics using tests automatically generated from the model.

  17. Multiple Test Equating Using the Rasch Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, S. Leellen; Bashaw, W. L.

    Procedures are presented for equating simultaneously several tests which have been calibrated by the Rasch Model. Three multiple test equating designs are described. A Full Matrix Design equates each test to all others. A Chain Design links tests sequentially. A Vector Design equates one test to each of the other tests. For each design, the Rasch…

  18. Testing Linear Models for Ability Parameters in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; Hendrawan, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Methods for testing hypotheses concerning the regression parameters in linear models for the latent person parameters in item response models are presented. Three tests are outlined: A likelihood ratio test, a Lagrange multiplier test and a Wald test. The tests are derived in a marginal maximum likelihood framework. They are explicitly formulated…

  19. Viking 1975 orbiter development test model/Lander dynamic test model, dynamic environmental testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milder, G.

    1975-01-01

    A series of dynamic environmental tests on the Viking 1975 Orbiter/Lander model provided information regarding damping and linearity. The quality of mode isolation was made with orthogonality checks. A pretest criterion established for orthogonality provided good correlation with test results. Part of the post-test analysis was dedicated to a review of instrumentation selection for control and/or response limiting. Limited load values were also examined.

  20. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  1. 46 CFR 154.431 - Model test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Model test. 154.431 Section 154.431 Shipping COAST GUARD... Model test. (a) The primary and secondary barrier of a membrane tank, including the corners and joints...(c). (b) Analyzed data of a model test for the primary and secondary barrier of the membrane...

  2. 46 CFR 154.431 - Model test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Model test. 154.431 Section 154.431 Shipping COAST GUARD... Model test. (a) The primary and secondary barrier of a membrane tank, including the corners and joints...(c). (b) Analyzed data of a model test for the primary and secondary barrier of the membrane...

  3. 46 CFR 154.431 - Model test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Model test. 154.431 Section 154.431 Shipping COAST GUARD... Model test. (a) The primary and secondary barrier of a membrane tank, including the corners and joints...(c). (b) Analyzed data of a model test for the primary and secondary barrier of the membrane...

  4. 46 CFR 154.449 - Model test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Model test. 154.449 Section 154.449 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF... § 154.449 Model test. The following analyzed data of a model test of structural elements for...

  5. 46 CFR 154.431 - Model test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Model test. 154.431 Section 154.431 Shipping COAST GUARD... Model test. (a) The primary and secondary barrier of a membrane tank, including the corners and joints...(c). (b) Analyzed data of a model test for the primary and secondary barrier of the membrane...

  6. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The existing models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  7. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The exising models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  8. Testing of constitutive models in LAME.

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Scherzinger, William Mark

    2007-09-01

    Constitutive models for computational solid mechanics codes are in LAME--the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering. These models describe complex material behavior and are used in our finite deformation solid mechanics codes. To ensure the correct implementation of these models, regression tests have been created for constitutive models in LAME. A selection of these tests is documented here. Constitutive models are an important part of any solid mechanics code. If an analysis code is meant to provide accurate results, the constitutive models that describe the material behavior need to be implemented correctly. Ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is the goal of a testing procedure that is used with the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) (see [1] and [2]). A test suite for constitutive models can serve three purposes. First, the test problems provide the constitutive model developer a means to test the model implementation. This is an activity that is always done by any responsible constitutive model developer. Retaining the test problem in a repository where the problem can be run periodically is an excellent means of ensuring that the model continues to behave correctly. A second purpose of a test suite for constitutive models is that it gives application code developers confidence that the constitutive models work correctly. This is extremely important since any analyst that uses an application code for an engineering analysis will associate a constitutive model in LAME with the application code, not LAME. Therefore, ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is essential for application code teams. A third purpose of a constitutive model test suite is that it provides analysts with example problems that they can look at to understand the behavior of a specific model. Since the choice of a constitutive model, and the properties that are used in that model, have an enormous effect on the results of an

  9. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  10. Astronaut adaptation to 1 G following long duration space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, John; Greenisen, Michael; Cowell, Lynda L.; Squires, William G.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reviews the results of studies of changes undergone by several physiological systems (including the cardiovascular system, the fluid and electrolyte characteristics, the red blood cells, the bone and the muscle tissues, and the exercise capacity) due to the exposures to microgravity and to the adaptation to 1 G after a long-duration space flight. Special attention is given to the effects of various training protocols and countermeasures used to attenuate the physiological problems encountered upon return from space.

  11. Structural and functional characterization of a novel phosphatase from the Arabidopsis thaliana gene locus At1g05000

    PubMed Central

    Aceti, David J.; Bitto, Eduard; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Proudfoot, Michael; Bingman, Craig A.; Frederick, Ronnie O.; Sreenath, Hassan K.; Vojtik, Frank C.; Wrobel, Russell L.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the protein product of the gene locus At1g05000, a hypothetical protein from A. thaliana, was determined by the multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction method and was refined to an R factor of 20.4% (Rfree = 24.9%) at 3.3 Å. The protein adopts the α/β fold found in cysteine phosphatases, a superfamily of phosphatases that possess a catalytic cysteine and form a covalent thiol-phosphate intermediate during the catalytic cycle. In At1g05000, the analogous cysteine (Cys150) is located at the bottom of a positively-charged pocket formed by residues that include the conserved arginine (Arg156) of the signature active site motif, HCxxGxxRT. Of 74 model phosphatase substrates tested, purified recombinant At1g05000 showed highest activity toward polyphosphate (poly-P12–13) and deoxyribo- and ribonucleoside triphosphates, and less activity toward phosphoenolpyruvate, phosphotyrosine, phosphotyrosine-containing peptides, and phosphatidyl inositols. Divalent metal cations were not required for activity and had little effect on the reaction. PMID:18433060

  12. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    SciTech Connect

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  13. Model test optimization using the virtual environment for test optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Klenke, S.E.; Reese, G.M.; Schoof, L.A.; Shierling, C.

    1995-11-01

    We present a software environment integrating analysis and test-based models to support optimal modal test design through a Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO). The VETO assists analysis and test engineers to maximize the value of each modal test. It is particularly advantageous for structural dynamics model reconciliation applications. The VETO enables an engineer to interact with a finite element model of a test object to optimally place sensors and exciters and to investigate the selection of data acquisition parameters needed to conduct a complete modal survey. Additionally, the user can evaluate the use of different types of instrumentation such as filters, amplifiers and transducers for which models are available in the VETO. The dynamic response of most of the virtual instruments (including the device under test) are modeled in the state space domain. Design of modal excitation levels and appropriate test instrumentation are facilitated by the VETO`s ability to simulate such features as unmeasured external inputs, A/D quantization effects, and electronic noise. Measures of the quality of the experimental design, including the Modal Assurance Criterion, and the Normal Mode Indicator Function are available. The VETO also integrates tools such as Effective Independence and minamac to assist in selection of optimal sensor locations. The software is designed about three distinct modules: (1) a main controller and GUI written in C++, (2) a visualization model, taken from FEAVR, running under AVS, and (3) a state space model and time integration module built in SIMULINK. These modules are designed to run as separate processes on interconnected machines.

  14. Testing the Testing: Validity of a State Growth Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kim Trask

    2008-01-01

    Possible threats to the validity of North Carolina's accountability model used to predict academic growth were investigated in two ways: the state's regression equations were replicated but updated to utilize current testing data and not that from years past as in the state's current model; and the updated equations were expanded to include…

  15. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice: effects on the inflammatory cell response.

    PubMed

    Fleming, S D; Rosenkrans, C F; Chapes, S K

    1990-04-01

    We tested the antiorthostatic suspension model for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. We found no differences in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice and indicate that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  16. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice - Effects on the inflammatory cell response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkrans, Charles F., Jr.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Fleming, Sherry D.

    1990-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model was tested for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. No differences were found in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice, indicating that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  17. Model Based Testing for Agent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Thangarajah, John; Padgham, Lin

    Although agent technology is gaining world wide popularity, a hindrance to its uptake is the lack of proper testing mechanisms for agent based systems. While many traditional software testing methods can be generalized to agent systems, there are many aspects that are different and which require an understanding of the underlying agent paradigm. In this paper we present certain aspects of a testing framework that we have developed for agent based systems. The testing framework is a model based approach using the design models of the Prometheus agent development methodology. In this paper we focus on model based unit testing and identify the appropriate units, present mechanisms for generating suitable test cases and for determining the order in which the units are to be tested, present a brief overview of the unit testing process and an example. Although we use the design artefacts from Prometheus the approach is suitable for any plan and event based agent system.

  18. Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Maheras, Steven J.; Jensen, Philip J.; England, Jeffery L.; LeDuc, Dan

    2014-09-24

    This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

  19. Linear Logistic Test Modeling with R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Purya; Kubinger, Klaus D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper gives a general introduction to the linear logistic test model (Fischer, 1973), an extension of the Rasch model with linear constraints on item parameters, along with eRm (an R package to estimate different types of Rasch models; Mair, Hatzinger, & Mair, 2014) functions to estimate the model and interpret its parameters. The…

  20. 46 CFR 154.431 - Model test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Model test. 154.431 Section 154.431 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Membrane Tanks § 154.431 Model test. (a) The primary...

  1. Field Testing: A Model and Its Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Marjorie T.

    Described is a Social Learning Curriculum (SLC) field test model that focuses on aspects of personnel utilization, communication systems, and the quality of human communication and that highlights the role of the supervisor in the education of the mentally retarded. The four field test model phases discussed are 1) the planning phase (including…

  2. Biglan Model Test Based on Institutional Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskens, Ronald W.; Creswell, John W.

    The Biglan model, a theoretical framework for empirically examining the differences among subject areas, classifies according to three dimensions: adherence to common set of paradigms (hard or soft), application orientation (pure or applied), and emphasis on living systems (life or nonlife). Tests of the model are reviewed, and a further test is…

  3. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Almond, Russell G.

    This paper synthesizes ideas from the fields of graphical modeling and education testing, particularly item response theory (IRT) applied to computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Graphical modeling can offer IRT a language for describing multifaceted skills and knowledge, and disentangling evidence from complex performances. IRT-CAT can offer…

  4. Gottingen Wind Tunnel for Testing Aircraft Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1920-01-01

    Given here is a brief description of the Gottingen Wind Tunnel for the testing of aircraft models, preceded by a history of its development. Included are a number of diagrams illustrating, among other things, a sectional elevation of the wind tunnel, the pressure regulator, the entrance cone and method of supporting a model for simple drag tests, a three-component balance, and a propeller testing device, all of which are discussed in the text.

  5. A model for field toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, Mark S.; Finger, Susan E.

    1996-01-01

    Toxicity tests conducted under field conditions present an interesting challenge for statistical modelling. In contrast to laboratory tests, the concentrations of potential toxicants are not held constant over the test. In addition, the number and identity of toxicants that belong in a model as explanatory factors are not known and must be determined through a model selection process. We present one model to deal with these needs. This model takes the record of mortalities to form a multinomial distribution in which parameters are modelled as products of conditional daily survival probabilities. These conditional probabilities are in turn modelled as logistic functions of the explanatory factors. The model incorporates lagged values of the explanatory factors to deal with changes in the pattern of mortalities over time. The issue of model selection and assessment is approached through the use of generalized information criteria and power divergence goodness-of-fit tests. These model selection criteria are applied in a cross-validation scheme designed to assess the ability of a model to both fit data used in estimation and predict data deleted from the estimation data set. The example presented demonstrates the need for inclusion of lagged values of the explanatory factors and suggests that penalized likelihood criteria may not provide adequate protection against overparameterized models in model selection.

  6. The Vanishing Tetrad Test: Another Test of Model Misspecification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, J. Micah

    2014-01-01

    The Vanishing Tetrad Test (VTT) (Bollen, Lennox, & Dahly, 2009; Bollen & Ting, 2000; Hipp, Bauer, & Bollen, 2005) is an extension of the Confirmatory Tetrad Analysis (CTA) proposed by Bollen and Ting (Bollen & Ting, 1993). VTT is a powerful tool for detecting model misspecification and can be particularly useful in cases in which…

  7. Do Test Design and Uses Influence Test Preparation? Testing a Model of Washback with Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Qin; Andrews, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces Expectancy-value motivation theory to explain the paths of influences from perceptions of test design and uses to test preparation as a special case of washback on learning. Based on this theory, two conceptual models were proposed and tested via Structural Equation Modeling. Data collection involved over 870 test takers of…

  8. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  9. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  10. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; Mislevy, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Considers computerized adaptive testing from the perspective of graphical modeling (GM). GM provides methods for making inferences about multifaceted skills and knowledge and for extracting data from complex performances. Provides examples from language-proficiency assessment. (SLD)

  11. Sample Size Determination for Rasch Model Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draxler, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with supplementing statistical tests for the Rasch model so that additionally to the probability of the error of the first kind (Type I probability) the probability of the error of the second kind (Type II probability) can be controlled at a predetermined level by basing the test on the appropriate number of observations.…

  12. Causal Indicator Models: Identification, Estimation, and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Davis, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the identification, estimation, and testing of structural equation models that have causal indicators. We first provide 2 rules of identification that are particularly helpful in models with causal indicators--the 2C emitted paths rule and the exogenous X rule. We demonstrate how these rules can help us distinguish identified from…

  13. Modeling Answer Changes on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Jeon, Minjeong

    2012-01-01

    The probability of test takers changing answers upon review of their initial choices is modeled. The primary purpose of the model is to check erasures on answer sheets recorded by an optical scanner for numbers and patterns that may be indicative of irregular behavior, such as teachers or school administrators changing answer sheets after their…

  14. Testing a Model of Administrative Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, James Fredericks; Zhou, Ying

    2003-01-01

    Tested a model of administrative job satisfaction using a database of almost 1,200 managers at 120 public and private universities. The robust model explained 54 percent of the variance in overall job satisfaction. Results indicated that few state, campus, and personal characteristics exert direct effects on job satisfaction; they affect work…

  15. Hydrodynamic Tests of Models of Seaplane Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eula, Antonio

    1935-01-01

    This report contains the results of tank tests carried out at free trim on seventeen hulls and floats of various types. The data as to the weight on water, trim, and relative resistance for each model are plotted nondimensionally and are referenced both to the total weight and to the weight on water. Despite the fact that the experiments were not made systematically, a study of the models and of the test data permits nevertheless some general deductions regarding the forms of floats and their resistance. One specific conclusion is that the best models have a maximum relative resistance not exceeding 20 percent of the total weight.

  16. Water Model Tests for Semirigid Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuckerman, L.B.

    1926-01-01

    The design of complicated structures often presents problems of extreme difficulty which are frequently insoluble. In many cases, however, the solution can be obtained by tests on suitable models. These model tests are becoming so important a part of the design of new engineering structures that their theory has become a necessary part of an engineer's knowledge. For balloons and airships water models are used. These are models about 1/30 the size of the airship hung upside down and filled with water under pressure. The theory shows that the stresses in such a model are the same as in the actual airship. In the design of the Army Semirigid Airship RS-1 no satisfactory way was found to calculate the stresses in the keel due to the changing shape of the bag. For this purpose a water model with a flexible keel was built and tested. This report gives the theory of the design, construction, and testing of such a water model.

  17. A 'Turing' Test for Landscape Evolution Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Wise, S. M.; Wainwright, J.; Swift, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Resolving the interactions among tectonics, climate and surface processes at long timescales has benefited from the development of computer models of landscape evolution. However, testing these Landscape Evolution Models (LEMs) has been piecemeal and partial. We argue that a more systematic approach is required. What is needed is a test that will establish how 'realistic' an LEM is and thus the extent to which its predictions may be trusted. We propose a test based upon the Turing Test of artificial intelligence as a way forward. In 1950 Alan Turing posed the question of whether a machine could think. Rather than attempt to address the question directly he proposed a test in which an interrogator asked questions of a person and a machine, with no means of telling which was which. If the machine's answer could not be distinguished from those of the human, the machine could be said to demonstrate artificial intelligence. By analogy, if an LEM cannot be distinguished from a real landscape it can be deemed to be realistic. The Turing test of intelligence is a test of the way in which a computer behaves. The analogy in the case of an LEM is that it should show realistic behaviour in terms of form and process, both at a given moment in time (punctual) and in the way both form and process evolve over time (dynamic). For some of these behaviours, tests already exist. For example there are numerous morphometric tests of punctual form and measurements of punctual process. The test discussed in this paper provides new ways of assessing dynamic behaviour of an LEM over realistically long timescales. However challenges remain in developing an appropriate suite of challenging tests, in applying these tests to current LEMs and in developing LEMs that pass them.

  18. Structural Integrity Recording System (SIR) for U.S. Army AH-1G Helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. G.; Johnson, R. B.; Tyler, M. C.

    1981-03-01

    A Structural Integrity Recording System (SIRS) was designed and developed to track the fatigue damage accumulation on 10 critical helicopter components for the subsequent timely replacement of such components for safer and more economical helicopter operation. SIRS comprises three discrete but interrelated subsystems: an airborne microprocessor-based recorder, a portable flight-line data retrieval unit, and a software system. The validation of SIRS, initially configured for the AH-1G helicopter, consisted of two phases. Phase I (Development Test and Evaluation - DT E) covered the design, fabrication, laboratory qualification testing, reliability analysis, and flight-testing of the prototype SIRS recorder. Phase II (Initial Operational Test and Evaluation - IOT E) covered the evaluation of the entire system operation and the resultant data acquired during a 3-month recording period with five AH-1G's, each equipped with a SIRS recorder. As the documentation of both DT E and IOT E, this report describes the characteristics and functions of the entire system and details the successful performance of the SIRS recorder in the laboratory qualification testing and the flight environment. The SIRS recorder performed as designed, operated reliably, and yielded valid data.

  19. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  20. Tay-Sachs disease in Brazilian patients: prevalence of the IVS7+1g>c mutation.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, R; Martins, A M; Micheletti, C; Mustacchi, Z; Pereira, L V

    2004-01-01

    Seven Brazilian Tay-Sachs disease cases were screened for the most frequent causative mutations. They all presented at least one copy of the IVS7+1g>c mutation. Three patients were homozygotes, three were compound heterozygotes, and in one case only the mother was tested and shown to carry the IVS7+1g>c mutation. In the second allele the compound heterozygotes presented: R178H (the DN allele), InsTATC1278 and an unidentified mutation. The IVS7+1g>c mutation has already been described in three Portuguese patients. In this study, all families were unaware of any Portuguese ancestry. Since Brazil was a Portuguese colony, the mutation most probably came from ancient common ancestry. The initial molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease patients in Brazil indicated a prevalence of the IVS7+1g>c mutation, possibly as a result of genetic drift.

  1. Mathematical Modelling of the Infusion Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslicki, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to improve the well established in clinical practice Marmarou model for intracranial volume-pressure compensation by adding the pulsatile components. It was demonstrated that complicated pulsation and growth in intracranial pressure during infusion test could be successfully modeled by the relatively simple analytical expression derived in this paper. The CSF dynamics were tested in 25 patients with clinical symptoms of hydrocephalus. Basing on the frequency spectrum of the patient's baseline pressure and identified parameters of CSF dynamic, for each patient an "ideal" infusion test curve free from artefacts and slow waves was simulated. The degree of correlation between simulated and real curves obtained from clinical observations gave insight into the adequacy of assumptions of Marmarou model. The proposed method of infusion tests analysis designates more exactly the value of the reference pressure, which is usually treated as a secondary and of uncertain significance. The properly identified value of the reference pressure decides on the degree of pulsation amplitude growth during IT, as well as on the value of elastance coefficient. The artificially generated tests with various pulsation components were also applied to examine the correctness of the used algorithm of identification of the original Marmarou model parameters.

  2. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Gopal P; Jacobs, Travis W; Watts, Mark D; Ghayoomie, S Vahid; Larson, Stephen D; Gerkin, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models. PMID:27635225

  3. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mark D.; Ghayoomie, S. Vahid; Larson, Stephen D.; Gerkin, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models. PMID:27635225

  4. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mark D.; Ghayoomie, S. Vahid; Larson, Stephen D.; Gerkin, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  5. Impact of uncertainty on modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Hugh W.; Brown, Kendall K.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the uncertainties associated with the modeling and testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Engine will greatly aid decisions concerning hardware performance and future development efforts. This report will describe the determination of the uncertainties in the modeling and testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine test program at the Technology Test Bed facility at Marshall Space Flight Center. Section 2 will present a summary of the uncertainty analysis methodology used and discuss the specific applications to the TTB SSME test program. Section 3 will discuss the application of the uncertainty analysis to the test program and the results obtained. Section 4 presents the results of the analysis of the SSME modeling effort from an uncertainty analysis point of view. The appendices at the end of the report contain a significant amount of information relative to the analysis, including discussions of venturi flowmeter data reduction and uncertainty propagation, bias uncertainty documentations, technical papers published, the computer code generated to determine the venturi uncertainties, and the venturi data and results used in the analysis.

  6. Experimental Concepts for Testing Seismic Hazard Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, W.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic hazard analysis is the primary interface through which useful information about earthquake rupture and wave propagation is delivered to society. To account for the randomness (aleatory variability) and limited knowledge (epistemic uncertainty) of these natural processes, seismologists must formulate and test hazard models using the concepts of probability. In this presentation, we will address the scientific objections that have been raised over the years against probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Owing to the paucity of observations, we must rely on expert opinion to quantify the epistemic uncertainties of PSHA models (e.g., in the weighting of individual models from logic-tree ensembles of plausible models). The main theoretical issue is a frequentist critique: subjectivity is immeasurable; ergo, PSHA models cannot be objectively tested against data; ergo, they are fundamentally unscientific. We have argued (PNAS, 111, 11973-11978) that the Bayesian subjectivity required for casting epistemic uncertainties can be bridged with the frequentist objectivity needed for pure significance testing through "experimental concepts." An experimental concept specifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable (i.e., with a joint distribution independent of the data ordering) when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. We illustrate, through concrete examples, experimental concepts useful in the testing of PSHA models for ontological errors in the presence of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. In particular, we describe experimental concepts that lead to exchangeable binary sequences that are statistically independent but not identically distributed, showing how the Bayesian concept of exchangeability generalizes the frequentist concept of experimental repeatability. We also address the issue of testing PSHA models using spatially correlated data.

  7. Accuracy tests of the tessellated SLBM model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A L; Myers, S C

    2007-07-20

    We have compared the Seismic Location Base Model (SLBM) tessellated model (version 2.0 Beta, posted July 3, 2007) with the GNEMRE Unified Model. The comparison is done on a layer/depth-by-layer/depth and layer/velocity-by-layer/velocity comparison. The SLBM earth model is defined on a tessellation that spans the globe at a constant resolution of about 1 degree (Ballard, 2007). For the tests, we used the earth model in file ''unified{_}iasp.grid''. This model contains the top 8 layers of the Unified Model (UM) embedded in a global IASP91 grid. Our test queried the same set of nodes included in the UM model file. To query the model stored in memory, we used some of the functionality built into the SLBMInterface object. We used the method get InterpolatedPoint() to return desired values for each layer at user-specified points. The values returned include: depth to the top of each layer, layer velocity, layer thickness and (for the upper-mantle layer) velocity gradient. The SLBM earth model has an extra middle crust layer whose values are used when Pg/Lg phases are being calculated. This extra layer was not accessed by our tests. Figures 1 to 8 compare the layer depths, P velocities and P gradients in the UM and SLBM models. The figures show results for the three sediment layers, three crustal layers and the upper mantle layer defined in the UM model. Each layer in the models (sediment1, sediment2, sediment3, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and upper mantle) is shown on a separate figure. The upper mantle P velocity and gradient distribution are shown on Figures 7 and 8. The left and center images in the top row of each figure is the rendering of depth to the top of the specified layer for the UM and SLBM models. When a layer has zero thickness, its depth is the same as that of the layer above. The right image in the top row is the difference between in layer depth for the UM and SLBM renderings. The left and center images in the bottom row of the figures are

  8. Tritium transfer in pigs - A model test

    SciTech Connect

    Melintescu, A.; Galeriu, D.

    2008-07-15

    In the frame of IAEA EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) programme, there was developed a scenario for models ' testing starting with unpublished data for a sow fed with OBT for 84 days. The scenario includes model predictions for the dynamics of tritium in urine and faeces and HTO and OBT in organs at sacrifice. There have been done two inter-comparison exercises and most of the models succeeded to give predictions better than a factor 3 to 5, excepting faeces. There has been done an analysis of models' structure, performance and limits in order to be able to build a model of moderate complexity with a reliable predictive power, able to be applied for human dosimetry, also, when OBT data are missing. (authors)

  9. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B.; McGuire, Susan O.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.; Foecking, Eileen M.; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4+ T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1G93A). SOD1G93A mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4+ T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1G93A mice exhibit abnormal CD4+ T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  10. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B; McGuire, Susan O; Sanders, Virginia M; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4(+) T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1(G93A)). SOD1(G93A) mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4(+) T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1(G93A) mice exhibit abnormal CD4(+) T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease.

  11. H, G1, G2 photometric phase function extended to low-accuracy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Shevchenko, V. G.; Wilkman, O.; Muinonen, K.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a constrained nonlinear least-squares algorithm to be used in estimating the parameters in the H, G1, G2 phase function. As the algorithm works directly in the magnitude space, it will surpass the possible bias problem that may be present in the existing H ,G1 ,G2 fit procedure when applied to low-accuracy observations with large magnitude variations. With constraints on the photometric phase-curve shape parameters G1 and G2, it guarantees a physically reasonable phase-curve estimate. With a new data set of 93 asteroids, we re-assess the two-parameter version of the H ,G1 ,G2 function. Finally, we introduce a one-parameter version of the phase function that can give a suggestion of the asteroids taxonomic group based only on its phase curve. A statistical model selection procedure is presented that can automatically select between the different versions of the photometric phase functions. An online tool that implements these algorithms is introduced.

  12. CPAS Parachute Testing, Model Development, & Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Leah M.

    2013-01-01

    Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is the human rated parachute system for the Orion vehicle used during re-entry. Similar to Apollo parachute design. Human rating requires additional system redundancy. A Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) project responsible for: Design; Development testing; Performance modeling; Fabrication; Qualification; Delivery

  13. Advanced air revitalization system modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dall-Baumann, Liese; Jeng, Frank; Christian, Steve; Edeer, Marybeth; Lin, Chin

    1990-01-01

    To support manned lunar and Martian exploration, an extensive evaluation of air revitalization subsystems (ARS) is being conducted. The major operations under study include carbon dioxide removal and reduction; oxygen and nitrogen production, storage, and distribution; humidity and temperature control; and trace contaminant control. A comprehensive analysis program based on a generalized block flow model was developed to facilitate the evaluation of various processes and their interaction. ASPEN PLUS was used in modelling carbon dioxide removal and reduction. Several life support test stands were developed to test new and existing technologies for their potential applicability in space. The goal was to identify processes which use compact, lightweight equipment and maximize the recovery of oxygen and water. The carbon dioxide removal test stands include solid amine/vacuum desorption (SAVD), regenerative silver oxide chemisorption, and electrochemical carbon dioxide concentration (EDC). Membrane-based carbon dioxide removal and humidity control, catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, and catalytic oxidation of trace contaminants were also investigated.

  14. Testing of a steel containment vessel model

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Costello, J.F.

    1997-04-01

    A mixed-scale containment vessel model, with 1:10 in containment geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness, was fabricated to represent an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment vessel. A contact structure, installed over the model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. This paper describes the pretest preparations and the conduct of the high pressure test of the model performed on December 11-12, 1996. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Mechanism test bed. Flexible body model report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, Jimmy

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Mechanism Test Bed is a six degree-of-freedom motion simulation facility used to evaluate docking and berthing hardware mechanisms. A generalized rigid body math model was developed which allowed the computation of vehicle relative motion in six DOF due to forces and moments from mechanism contact, attitude control systems, and gravity. No vehicle size limitations were imposed in the model. The equations of motion were based on Hill's equations for translational motion with respect to a nominal circular earth orbit and Newton-Euler equations for rotational motion. This rigid body model and supporting software were being refined.

  16. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes.

  17. Turbulence Modeling Validation, Testing, and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.; Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of this work is to provide accurate numerical solutions for selected flow fields and to compare and evaluate the performance of selected turbulence models with experimental results. Four popular turbulence models have been tested and validated against experimental data often turbulent flows. The models are: (1) the two-equation k-epsilon model of Wilcox, (2) the two-equation k-epsilon model of Launder and Sharma, (3) the two-equation k-omega/k-epsilon SST model of Menter, and (4) the one-equation model of Spalart and Allmaras. The flows investigated are five free shear flows consisting of a mixing layer, a round jet, a plane jet, a plane wake, and a compressible mixing layer; and five boundary layer flows consisting of an incompressible flat plate, a Mach 5 adiabatic flat plate, a separated boundary layer, an axisymmetric shock-wave/boundary layer interaction, and an RAE 2822 transonic airfoil. The experimental data for these flows are well established and have been extensively used in model developments. The results are shown in the following four sections: Part A describes the equations of motion and boundary conditions; Part B describes the model equations, constants, parameters, boundary conditions, and numerical implementation; and Parts C and D describe the experimental data and the performance of the models in the free-shear flows and the boundary layer flows, respectively.

  18. Application of a nonlinear slug test model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, C.D.

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity distribution is of utmost importance in understanding the dynamics of an aquifer and in planning the consequences of any action taken upon that aquifer. Slug tests have been used extensively to measure hydraulic conductivity in the last 50 years since Hvorslev's (1951) work. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been implemented in this work. The nonlinear model has three parameters: ??, which is related primarily to radius changes in the water column; A, which is related to the nonlinear head losses; and K, the hydraulic conductivity. An additional parameter has been added representing the initial velocity of the water column at slug initiation and is incorporated into an analytical solution to generate the first time step before a sequential numerical solution generates the remainder of the time solution. Corrections are made to the model output for acceleration before it is compared to the experimental data. Sensitivity analysis and least squares fitting are used to estimate the aquifer parameters and produce some diagnostic results, which indicate the accuracy of the fit. Finally, an example of field data has been presented to illustrate the application of the model to data sets that exhibit nonlinear behavior. Multiple slug tests should be taken at a given location to test for nonlinear effects and to determine repeatability.

  19. Testing proton spin models with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G.P. . Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-11-25

    We review models for spin-weighted parton distributions in a proton. Sum rules involving the nonsinglet components of the structure function xg{sub 1}{sup p} help narrow the range of parameters in these models. The contribution of the {gamma}{sub 5} anomaly term depends on the size of the integrated polarized gluon distribution and experimental predictions depend on its size. We have proposed three models for the polarized gluon distributions, whose range is considerable. These model distributions give an overall range is considerable. These model distributions give an overall range of parameters that can be tested with polarized beam experiments. These are discussed with regard to specific predictions for polarized beam experiments at energies typical of UNK.

  20. Parametric Testing of Launch Vehicle FDDR Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Bajwa, Anupa; Berg, Peter; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    For the safe operation of a complex system like a (manned) launch vehicle, real-time information about the state of the system and potential faults is extremely important. The on-board FDDR (Failure Detection, Diagnostics, and Response) system is a software system to detect and identify failures, provide real-time diagnostics, and to initiate fault recovery and mitigation. The ERIS (Evaluation of Rocket Integrated Subsystems) failure simulation is a unified Matlab/Simulink model of the Ares I Launch Vehicle with modular, hierarchical subsystems and components. With this model, the nominal flight performance characteristics can be studied. Additionally, failures can be injected to see their effects on vehicle state and on vehicle behavior. A comprehensive test and analysis of such a complicated model is virtually impossible. In this paper, we will describe, how parametric testing (PT) can be used to support testing and analysis of the ERIS failure simulation. PT uses a combination of Monte Carlo techniques with n-factor combinatorial exploration to generate a small, yet comprehensive set of parameters for the test runs. For the analysis of the high-dimensional simulation data, we are using multivariate clustering to automatically find structure in this high-dimensional data space. Our tools can generate detailed HTML reports that facilitate the analysis.

  1. In vitro models for liver toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    Soldatow, Valerie Y.; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Griffith, Linda G.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, various liver-derived in vitro model systems have been developed to enable investigation of the potential adverse effects of chemicals and drugs. Liver tissue slices, isolated microsomes, perfused liver, immortalized cell lines, and primary hepatocytes have been used extensively. Immortalized cell lines and primary isolated liver cells are currently most widely used in vitro models for liver toxicity testing. Limited throughput, loss of viability, and decreases in liver-specific functionality and gene expression are common shortcomings of these models. Recent developments in the field of in vitro hepatotoxicity include three-dimensional tissue constructs and bioartificial livers, co-cultures of various cell types with hepatocytes, and differentiation of stem cells into hepatic lineage-like cells. In an attempt to provide a more physiological environment for cultured liver cells, some of the novel cell culture systems incorporate fluid flow, micro-circulation, and other forms of organotypic microenvironments. Co-cultures aim to preserve liver-specific morphology and functionality beyond those provided by cultures of pure parenchymal cells. Stem cells, both embryonic- and adult tissue-derived, may provide a limitless supply of hepatocytes from multiple individuals to improve reproducibility and enable testing of the individual-specific toxicity. This review describes various traditional and novel in vitro liver models and provides a perspective on the challenges and opportunities afforded by each individual test system. PMID:23495363

  2. Hexokinase I N-terminal based peptide prevents the VDAC1-SOD1 G93A interaction and re-establishes ALS cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Magrì, Andrea; Belfiore, Ramona; Reina, Simona; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Di Rosa, Maria Carmela; Guarino, Francesca; Leggio, Loredana; De Pinto, Vito; Messina, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide Dismutase 1 mutants associate with 20–25% of familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) cases, producing toxic aggregates on mitochondria, notably in spinal cord. The Voltage Dependent Anion Channel isoform 1 (VDAC1) in the outer mitochondrial membrane is a docking site for SOD1 G93A mutant in ALS mice and the physiological receptor of Hexokinase I (HK1), which is poorly expressed in mouse spinal cord. Our results demonstrate that HK1 competes with SOD1 G93A for binding VDAC1, suggesting that in ALS spinal cord the available HK1-binding sites could be used by SOD1 mutants for docking mitochondria, producing thus organelle dysfunction. We tested this model by studying the action of a HK1-N-terminal based peptide (NHK1). This NHK1 peptide specifically interacts with VDAC1, inhibits the SOD1 G93A binding to mitochondria and restores the viability of ALS model NSC34 cells. Altogether, our results suggest that NHK1 peptide could be developed as a therapeutic tool in ALS, predicting an effective role also in other proteinopathies. PMID:27721436

  3. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2008-10-10

    Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

  4. Empirical tests of evolutionary synthesis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Jean Michel; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2010-04-01

    Spectral synthesis of stellar populations has proven to be one of the most powerful methods to decompose the different mixtures of stellar contributions in galaxies, and applications of this technique routinely appear in the literature nowadays. Our group, for instance, the SEAGal (Semi Empirical Analysis of Galaxies) collaboration, has derived the star formation history of all galaxies in the SDSS with the starlight code, obtaining various results of astrophysical interest. As any other fossil method, the results rely heavily on high spectral resolution evolutionary synthesis models. To test this model dependence we run starlight on samples of star-forming and passive galaxies from the SDSS using different sets of models. We explore models using “Padova 1994” and modified “Padova” evolutionary tracks with a different receipt for the asymptotic giant branch phase, as well as different stellar libraries (STELIB versus MILES+Granada). We then compare derived properties such as mean age, mean metallicity, extinction, star-formation and chemical histories. Despite a broad brush agreement, systematic differences emerge from this comparison. The different evolutionary tracks used lead to essentially the same results, at least insofar as optical spectra are concerned. Different stellar libraries, on the other hand, have a much bigger impact. The newer models produce quantifiably better fits and eliminate some pathologies (like suspicious combinations of base elements, systematical spectral residuals in some windows, and, sometimes, negative extinction) of fits derived with STELIB-based models, but there are still some caveats. These empirical tests provide useful feedback for model makers.

  5. Testing the Model of Oscillating Magnetic Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaforz, Ż.; Tomczak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the model of oscillating magnetic traps (the OMT model), proposed by Jakimiec and Tomczak ( Solar Phys. 261, 233, 2010). This model describes the process of excitation of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during solar flares. In the OMT model energetic electrons are accelerated within a triangular, cusp-like structure situated between the reconnection point and the top of a flare loop as seen in soft X-rays. We analyzed QPPs in hard X-ray light curves for 23 flares as observed by Yohkoh. Three independent methods were used. We also used hard X-ray images to localize magnetic traps and soft X-ray images to diagnose thermal plasmas inside the traps. We found that the majority of the observed pulsation periods correlates with the diameters of oscillating magnetic traps, as was predicted by the OMT model. We also found that the electron number density of plasma inside the magnetic traps in the time of pulsation disappearance is strongly connected with the pulsation period. We conclude that the observations are consistent with the predictions of the OMT model for the analyzed set of flares.

  6. Correlation of AH-1G airframe flight vibration data with a coupled rotor-fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, K.; Shamie, J.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation and features of the Rotor-Airframe Comprehensive Analysis Program (RACAP) is described. The analysis employs a frequency domain, transfer matrix approach for the blade structural model, a time domain wake or momentum theory aerodynamic model, and impedance matching for rotor-fuselage coupling. The analysis is applied to the AH-1G helicopter, and a correlation study is conducted on fuselage vibration predictions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art in helicopter fuselage vibration prediction technology. The fuselage vibration predicted using RACAP are fairly good in the vertical direction and somewhat deficient in the lateral/longitudinal directions. Some of these deficiencies are traced to the fuselage finite element model.

  7. Differential Gene-Expression of Metallothionein 1M and 1G in Response to Zinc in Sertoli TM4 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Nourmohammadi, Issa; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Firoozrai, Mohsen; Ahmadi Faghih, Mohammad Amin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Zinc (Zn) as an important trace element is essential for testicular development and spermatogenesis. Molecular mechanism of Zn action in the reproductive system may be related to metal binding low-molecular weight proteins, metallothioneins (MT). Our objective was to determine the effect of Zn on two important isoforms of MT, MT1M and MT1G genes expression on testicular sertoli cells. Methods: Cultured sertoli TM4 cells were exposed to different concentrations of Zn at different time points. Cellular uptake of Zn was tested using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The cellular viability and gene expression were assessed by MTT and real-time PCR methods, respectively. Results: The treated cells resulted in higher Zn concentration and cellular viability. The expression of MT1M and MT1G genes in the treated cells were greater than those of the untreated cells (P<0.05). In the high dosage treated group (100 and 500 μM), Zn concentration and expression of MT1M and MT1G genes increased three h after treatment; MT1G gene expression increased more at sixth h. At 18th h of treatment, the expression of both genes especially MT1G, increased dramatically while Zn concentration decreased. Conclusion: Since the increase of MT1G mRNA was coincident with cellular Zn level, it seems that MT1G has a more prominent role than MT1M in the homeostasis of Zn. In addition, Zn at dosage of 50 μM (pharmacologic concentration) may protect cells by increasing the expression of MT genes at longer periods. PMID:20683493

  8. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM is developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA (see upcoming REV 02 of CRWMS M&O 2000 [153314]), which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model (see BSC 2003 [161530]). The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model; (3) to use inverse modeling to calibrate the SCM and to estimate seepage-relevant, model-related parameters on the drift scale; (4) to estimate the epistemic uncertainty of the derived parameters, based on the goodness-of-fit to the observed data and the sensitivity of calculated seepage with respect to the parameters of interest; (5) to characterize the aleatory uncertainty of

  9. Model-Based Software Testing for Object-Oriented Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Model-based testing is one of the best solutions for testing object-oriented software. It has a better test coverage than other testing styles. Model-based testing takes into consideration behavioural aspects of a class, which are usually unchecked in other testing methods. An increase in the complexity of software has forced the software industry…

  10. Model-independent tests of cosmic gravity.

    PubMed

    Linder, Eric V

    2011-12-28

    Gravitation governs the expansion and fate of the universe, and the growth of large-scale structure within it, but has not been tested in detail on these cosmic scales. The observed acceleration of the expansion may provide signs of gravitational laws beyond general relativity (GR). Since the form of any such extension is not clear, from either theory or data, we adopt a model-independent approach to parametrizing deviations to the Einstein framework. We explore the phase space dynamics of two key post-GR functions and derive a classification scheme, and an absolute criterion on accuracy necessary for distinguishing classes of gravity models. Future surveys will be able to constrain the post-GR functions' amplitudes and forms to the required precision, and hence reveal new aspects of gravitation.

  11. Model-independent tests of cosmic gravity.

    PubMed

    Linder, Eric V

    2011-12-28

    Gravitation governs the expansion and fate of the universe, and the growth of large-scale structure within it, but has not been tested in detail on these cosmic scales. The observed acceleration of the expansion may provide signs of gravitational laws beyond general relativity (GR). Since the form of any such extension is not clear, from either theory or data, we adopt a model-independent approach to parametrizing deviations to the Einstein framework. We explore the phase space dynamics of two key post-GR functions and derive a classification scheme, and an absolute criterion on accuracy necessary for distinguishing classes of gravity models. Future surveys will be able to constrain the post-GR functions' amplitudes and forms to the required precision, and hence reveal new aspects of gravitation. PMID:22084288

  12. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    SciTech Connect

    S. Finsterle

    2004-09-02

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM was developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). This Model Report has been revised in response to a comprehensive, regulatory-focused evaluation performed by the Regulatory Integration Team [''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Evaluation of Analysis and Model Reports Supporting the TSPA-LA'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169653])]. The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross-Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA [''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167652])], which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model [see ''Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170338])]. The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross-Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross-Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model

  13. Testing Cosmological Models with Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Schuecker, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Galaxy clusters are ideal probes for the large-scale structure of the Universe and for the tests of cosmological models. We use, REFLEX, the currently largest and best defined cluster X-ray survey to illustrate this application of galaxy cluster studies. Based on this survey of X-ray selected clusters of galaxies we determine statistical properties of the galaxy cluster population, their spatial correlation, and the density fluctuation power spectrum of the cosmic matter distribution on large scales up to about 1 Gpc. Comparing these results with predictions of cosmological models we obtain tight constrains for the matter density parameter of the Universe, consistent with the combined results from observations of the microwave background anisotropies and distant type Ia supernovae. The only difference between the present results and the ``concordance model'' is a low value for the σ8-normalization. Exploring the parameter space of the cosmic matter density and the equation of state parameter of dark energy most favoured by the combined observations of REFLEX clusters and distant type Ia supernovae we find that the conventional cosmological constant model is best consistent with the observational data.

  14. Test Cases for Reentry Survivability Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailor, W.; Hallman, W.; Steckel, G.; Weaver, M.

    2012-01-01

    One approved approach for minimizing the long-term hazards posed by space debris is to reenter space hardware into the atmosphere at end-of-mission or to place hardware in an orbit with a relatively short lifetime. Selection of a short lifetime orbit vice a deorbited reentry into a safe area depends on predictions of the hazards posed by random reentry of the object. If the object is left in orbit, what is the casualty expectation associated with its eventual reentry? Clearly, having high confidence in reentry hazard prediction tools is important to this decision-making process and the final choice can have significant mission and cost impacts. This paper describes a set of test cases that can be used to validate reentry hazard models. The test cases were assembled from reentry cases where "known" and tracked objects reentered the atmosphere and debris from the reentries was subsequently found on the ground and was analyzed. The test cases include best estimates of the state, mass properties, and physical description of each object prior to reentry, the wind profile through which the debris fell (for one case), and the impact location and physical description of each surviving object. The report also summarizes results of metallurgical analyses conducted on surviving debris, which places limits on the maximum temperatures reached during reentry. Details on a specific reentry are included as an example.

  15. Thermal Model of the Promoted Combustion Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Flammability of metals in high pressure, pure oxygen environments, such as rocket engine turbopumps, is commonly evaluated using the Promoted Combustion Test (PCT). The PCT emphasizes the ability of an ignited material to sustain combustion, as opposed to evaluating the sample's propensity to ignite in the first place. A common arrangement is a rod of the sample material hanging in a chamber in which a high pressure, pure oxygen environment is maintained. An igniter of some energetically combusting material is fixed to the bottom of the rod and fired. This initiates combustion, and the sample burns and melts at its bottom tip. A ball of molten material forms, and this ball detaches when it grows too large to be supported by surface tension with the rod. In materials which do not sustain combustion, the combustion then extinguishes. In materials which do sustain combustion, combustion re-initiates from molten residue left on the bottom of the rod, and the melt ball burns and grows until it detaches again. The purpose of this work is development of a PCT thermal simulation model, detailing phase change, melt detachment, and the several heat transfer modes. Combustion is modeled by a summary rate equation, whose parameters are identified by comparison to PCT results. The sensitivity of PCT results to various physical and geometrical parameters is evaluated. The identified combustion parameters may be used in design of new PCT arrangements, as might be used for flammability assessment in flow-dominated environments. The Haynes 214 nickel-based superalloy, whose PCT results are applied here, burns heterogeneously (fuel and oxidizer are of different phases; combustion takes place on the fuel surface). Heterogeneous combustion is not well understood. (In homogeneous combustion, the metal vaporizes, and combustion takes place in an analytically treatable cloud above the surface). Thermal modeling in heterogeneous combustion settings provides a means for linking test

  16. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Testing Solar Flare Models with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to use high-sensitivity Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) hard X-ray observations to test the thick-target and electric field acceleration models of solar flares. We will compare the predictions made by these models with hard X-ray spectral observations obtained with BATSE and simultaneous soft X-ray Ca XIX emission observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). The increased sensitivities of the BATSE and BCS (relative to previous detectors) permits a renewed study of the relationship between heating and dynamical motions during the crucial rise phase of flares. With these observations, we will: (1) investigate the ability of the thick-target model to explain the temporal evolution of hard X-ray emission relative to the soft X-ray blueshift during the earliest stages of the impulsive phase; and (2) search for evidence of electric-field acceleration as implied by temporal correlations between hard X-ray spectral breaks and the Ca XIX blueshift. The proposed study will utilize hard X-ray lightcurve and spectral measurements in the 10-100 keV energy range obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors (LAD). The DISCLA and CONT data will be the primary data products used in this analysis.

  18. Paradigm shift in toxicity testing and modeling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongmao; Xia, Menghang; Austin, Christopher P; Huang, Ruili

    2012-09-01

    The limitations of traditional toxicity testing characterized by high-cost animal models with low-throughput readouts, inconsistent responses, ethical issues, and extrapolability to humans call for alternative strategies for chemical risk assessment. A new strategy using in vitro human cell-based assays has been designed to identify key toxicity pathways and molecular mechanisms leading to the prediction of an in vivo response. The emergence of quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) technology has proved to be an efficient way to decompose complex toxicological end points to specific pathways of targeted organs. In addition, qHTS has made a significant impact on computational toxicology in two aspects. First, the ease of mechanism of action identification brought about by in vitro assays has enhanced the simplicity and effectiveness of machine learning, and second, the high-throughput nature and high reproducibility of qHTS have greatly improved the data quality and increased the quantity of training datasets available for predictive model construction. In this review, the benefits of qHTS routinely used in the US Tox21 program will be highlighted. Quantitative structure-activity relationships models built on traditional in vivo data and new qHTS data will be compared and analyzed. In conjunction with the transition from the pilot phase to the production phase of the Tox21 program, more qHTS data will be made available that will enrich the data pool for predictive toxicology. It is perceivable that new in silico toxicity models based on high-quality qHTS data will achieve unprecedented reliability and robustness, thus becoming a valuable tool for risk assessment and drug discovery.

  19. Testing spherical evolution for modelling void abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achitouv, Ixandra; Neyrinck, Mark; Paranjape, Aseem

    2015-08-01

    We compare analytical predictions of void volume functions to those measured from N-body simulations, detecting voids with the ZOBOV void finder. We push to very small, non-linear voids, below few Mpc radius, by considering the unsampled dark matter density field. We also study the case where voids are identified using haloes. We develop analytical formula for the void abundance of both the excursion set approach and the peaks formalism. These formulas are valid for random walks smoothed with a top-hat filter in real space, with a large class of realistic barrier models. We test the extent to which the spherical evolution approximation, which forms the basis of the analytical predictions, models the highly aspherical voids that occur in the cosmic web, and are found by a watershed-based algorithm such as ZOBOV. We show that the volume function returned by ZOBOV is quite sensitive to the choice of treatment of subvoids, a fact that has not been appreciated previously. For reasonable choices of subvoid exclusion, we find that the Lagrangian density δv of the ZOBOV voids - which is predicted to be a constant δv ≈ -2.7 in the spherical evolution model - is different from the predicted value, showing substantial scatter and scale dependence. This result applies to voids identified at z = 0 with effective radius between 1 and 10 h-1 Mpc. Our analytical approximations are flexible enough to give a good description of the resulting volume function; however, this happens for choices of parameter values that are different from those suggested by the spherical evolution assumption. We conclude that analytical models for voids must move away from the spherical approximation in order to be applied successfully to observations, and we discuss some possible ways forward.

  20. Testing of transition-region models: Test cases and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Dinavahi, Surya; Iyer, Venkit

    1991-01-01

    Mean flow quantities in the laminar turbulent transition region and in the fully turbulent region are predicted with different models incorporated into a 3-D boundary layer code. The predicted quantities are compared with experimental data for a large number of different flows and the suitability of the models for each flow is evaluated.

  1. Computerized Classification Testing with the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Theo J. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    If classification in a limited number of categories is the purpose of testing, computerized adaptive tests (CATs) with algorithms based on sequential statistical testing perform better than estimation-based CATs (e.g., Eggen & Straetmans, 2000). In these computerized classification tests (CCTs), the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) (Wald,…

  2. PTA test bed aircraft engine inlet model test report, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The inlet duct test for the Propfan Testbed Assessment (PTA) program was completed in November 1984. The basic test duct was designed using the Lockheed QUADPAN computational code. Test objectives were to experimentally evaluate, modify as required, and eventually verify satisfactory performance as well as duct/engine compatibility. Measured total pressure recovery for the basic duct was 0.993 with no swirl and 0.989 for inflow with a 30 degree simulated swirl angle. This compared to a predicted recovery of 0.979 with no swirl. Measured circumferential distortion with swirl, based on a least-square curve fit of the data, was 0.204 compared to a maximum allowable value of 0.550. Other measured distortion parameters did as well or better relative to their respective maximum allowable values. The basic duct configuration with no refinements is recommended for the PTA inlet as a minimum cost installation.

  3. Experimental tests of the standard model.

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.

    1998-11-11

    The title implies an impossibly broad field, as the Standard Model includes the fermion matter states, as well as the forces and fields of SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). For practical purposes, I will confine myself to electroweak unification, as discussed in the lectures of M. Herrero. Quarks and mixing were discussed in the lectures of R. Aleksan, and leptons and mixing were discussed in the lectures of K. Nakamura. I will essentially assume universality, that is flavor independence, rather than discussing tests of it. I will not pursue tests of QED beyond noting the consistency and precision of measurements of {alpha}{sub EM} in various processes including the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron, and the quantum Hall effect. The fantastic precision and agreement of these predictions and measurements is something that convinces people that there may be something to this science enterprise. Also impressive is the success of the ''Universal Fermi Interaction'' description of beta decay processes, or in more modern parlance, weak charged current interactions. With one coupling constant G{sub F}, most precisely determined in muon decay, a huge number of nuclear instabilities are described. The slightly slow rate for neutron beta decay was one of the initial pieces of evidence for Cabbibo mixing, now generalized so that all charged current decays of any flavor are covered.

  4. Initial test results using the GEOS-3 engineering model altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayne, G. S.; Clary, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Data from a series of experimental tests run on the engineering model of the GEOS 3 radar altimeter using the Test and Measurement System (TAMS) designed for preflight testing of the radar altimeter are presented. These tests were conducted as a means of preparing and checking out a detailed test procedure to be used in running similar tests on the GEOS 3 protoflight model altimeter systems. The test procedures and results are also included.

  5. Testing constrained sequential dominance models of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkeroth, Fredrik; King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    Constrained sequential dominance (CSD) is a natural framework for implementing the see-saw mechanism of neutrino masses which allows the mixing angles and phases to be accurately predicted in terms of relatively few input parameters. We analyze a class of CSD(n) models where, in the flavour basis, two right-handed neutrinos are dominantly responsible for the ‘atmospheric’ and ‘solar’ neutrino masses with Yukawa couplings to ({ν }e,{ν }μ ,{ν }τ ) proportional to (0,1,1) and (1,n,n-2), respectively, where n is a positive integer. These coupling patterns may arise in indirect family symmetry models based on A 4. With two right-handed neutrinos, using a χ 2 test, we find a good agreement with data for CSD(3) and CSD(4) where the entire Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing matrix is controlled by a single phase η, which takes simple values, leading to accurate predictions for mixing angles and the magnitude of the oscillation phase | {δ }{CP}| . We carefully study the perturbing effect of a third ‘decoupled’ right-handed neutrino, leading to a bound on the lightest physical neutrino mass {m}1{{≲ }}1 meV for the viable cases, corresponding to a normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss a direct link between the oscillation phase {δ }{CP} and leptogenesis in CSD(n) due to the same see-saw phase η appearing in both the neutrino mass matrix and leptogenesis.

  6. Effects of spaceflight on rhesus quadrupedal locomotion after return to 1G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Recktenwald, M. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Roy, R. R.; Riazanski, S.; McCall, G. E.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Washburn, D. A.; Fanton, J. W.; Edgerton, V. R.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Effects of spaceflight on Rhesus quadrupedal locomotion after return to 1G. Locomotor performance, activation patterns of the soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis (VL), and tibialis anterior (TA) and MG tendon force during quadrupedal stepping were studied in adult Rhesus before and after 14 days of either spaceflight (n = 2) or flight simulation at 1G (n = 3). Flight simulation involved duplication of the spaceflight conditions and experimental protocol in a 1G environment. Postflight, but not postsimulation, electromyographic (EMG) recordings revealed clonus-like activity in all muscles. Compared with preflight, the cycle period and burst durations of the primary extensors (Sol, MG, and VL) tended to decrease postflight. These decreases were associated with shorter steps. The flexor (TA) EMG burst duration postflight was similar to preflight, whereas the burst amplitude was elevated. Consequently, the Sol:TA and MG:TA EMG amplitude ratios were lower following flight, reflecting a "flexor bias." Together, these alterations in mean EMG amplitudes reflect differential adaptations in motor-unit recruitment patterns of flexors and extensors as well as fast and slow motor pools. Shorter cycle period and burst durations persisted throughout the 20-day postflight testing period, whereas mean EMG returned to preflight levels by 17 days postflight. Compared with presimulation, the simulation group showed slight increases in the cycle period and burst durations of all muscles. Mean EMG amplitude decreased in the Sol, increased in the MG and VL, and was unchanged in the TA. Thus adaptations observed postsimulation were different from those observed postflight, indicating that there was a response unique to the microgravity environment, i.e., the modulations in the nervous system controlling locomotion cannot merely be attributed to restriction of movement but appear to be the result of changes in the interpretation of load-related proprioceptive feedback

  7. Testing for Local Dependence in Rasch's Multiplicative Gamma Model for Speed Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Margo G. H.

    2007-01-01

    The author considers a latent trait model for the response time on a (set of) pure speed test(s), the multiplicative gamma model (MGM), which is based on the assumption that the test response times are approximately gamma distributed, with known index parameters and scale parameters depending on subject ability and test difficulty parameters. Like…

  8. Testing Bayesian models of human coincidence timing.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Makoto; Nozaki, Daichi; Nakajima, Yasoichi

    2005-07-01

    A sensorimotor control task often requires an accurate estimation of the timing of the arrival of an external target (e.g., when hitting a pitched ball). Conventional studies of human timing processes have ignored the stochastic features of target timing: e.g., the speed of the pitched ball is not generally constant, but is variable. Interestingly, based on Bayesian theory, it has been recently shown that the human sensorimotor system achieves the optimal estimation by integrating sensory information with prior knowledge of the probabilistic structure of the target variation. In this study, we tested whether Bayesian integration is also implemented while performing a coincidence-timing type of sensorimotor task by manipulating the trial-by-trial variability (i.e., the prior distribution) of the target timing. As a result, within several hundred trials of learning, subjects were able to generate systematic timing behavior according to the width of the prior distribution, as predicted by the optimal Bayesian model. Considering the previous studies showing that the human sensorimotor system uses Bayesian integration in spacing and force-grading tasks, our result indicates that Bayesian integration is fundamental to all aspects of human sensorimotor control. Moreover, it was noteworthy that the subjects could adjust their behavior both when the prior distribution was switched from wide to narrow and vice versa, although the adjustment was slower in the former case. Based on a comparison with observations in a previous study, we discuss the flexibility and adaptability of Bayesian sensorimotor learning.

  9. Checking the Assumptions of Rasch's Model for Speed Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, M. G. H.; Glas, C. A. W.

    2005-01-01

    Two new tests for a model for the response times on pure speed tests by Rasch (1960) are proposed. The model is based on the assumption that the test response times are approximately gamma distributed, with known index parameters and unknown rate parameters. The rate parameters are decomposed in a subject ability parameter and a test difficulty…

  10. Modeling Information Accumulation in Psychological Tests Using Item Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a latent trait model is proposed for the response times in psychological tests. The latent trait model is based on the linear transformation model and subsumes popular models from survival analysis, like the proportional hazards model and the proportional odds model. Core of the model is the assumption that an unspecified monotone…

  11. WELLTON GOVERNMENT CAMP, PERMANENT GARAGE TYPE 1G. PLAN, ELEVATIONS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WELLTON GOVERNMENT CAMP, PERMANENT GARAGE TYPE 1-G. PLAN, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTIONS. Drawing 50-308-4552, dated October 25, 1949. U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Yuma, Arizona - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Permanent Garage Type 1-G, 30601 Wellton-Mohawk Drive, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  12. Association between cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Hang; You, Xue-Mei; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhu, Shao-Liang; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyclin D1 (CCND1) G870A polymorphism may be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk, but the results of previous studies were inconsistent. Available evidence was meta-analyzed to assess their potential association. Methods Databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Google Scholar were systematically searched. Meta-analyses were performed to investigate the association of G870A polymorphism with HCC risk by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the data of relevant case–control studies. Results Results of this meta-analysis of six case–control studies involving 1,030 cases and 1,683 controls indicate that G870A polymorphism was not associated with HCC risk in any of the five genetic models tested (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.95–2.00, P=0.09; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.87–2.20, P=0.17; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =1.60, 95% CI =0.87–2.94, P=0.13; heterozygous model: AG vs GG: OR =1.24, 95% CI =0.86–1.79, P=0.25; allelic model: A vs G: OR =1.30, 95% CI =0.95–1.80, P=0.10). Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity showing marginally significant association between this single nucleotide polymorphism and HCC risk indicate that G870A may be significantly associated with HCC risk in Caucasian populations (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =2.34, 95% CI =1.60–3.42, P<0.0001; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =2.44, 95% CI =1.19–4.97, P=0.01; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =3.42, 95% CI =1.80–6.50, P=0.0002; allelic model: A vs G: OR =2.06, 95% CI =1.31–3.24, P=0.002), but not in Asian populations. Conclusion Available evidence suggests that no significant association between G870A polymorphism and HCC risk was found in either total populations or Asian populations. However, significant association was found in Caucasian populations. These

  13. The Internationalization of Testing and New Models of Test Delivery on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartram, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The Internet has opened up a whole new set of opportunities for advancing the science of psychometrics and the technology of testing. It has also created some new challenges for those of us involved in test design and testing. In particular, we are seeing impacts from internationalization of testing and new models for test delivery. These are…

  14. A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

  15. The dynamic modelling of a slotted test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumas, G.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model of the wind tunnel dynamics was developed. The modelling techniques were restricted to the use of one dimensional unsteady flow. The dynamic characteristics of slotted test section incorporated into the model are presented.

  16. Versatile Support For Electromagnetic-Test Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Ford, Eddie D.

    1994-01-01

    Supporting apparatus holds model for measurements of electromagnetic properties. Includes rigid swept strut, on end of which model oriented over range of angles. Designed to interfere minimally with electromagnetic measurements.

  17. Optimization models for flight test scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holian, Derreck

    As threats around the world increase with nations developing new generations of warfare technology, the Unites States is keen on maintaining its position on top of the defense technology curve. This in return indicates that the U.S. military/government must research, develop, procure, and sustain new systems in the defense sector to safeguard this position. Currently, the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Lightning II is being developed, tested, and deployed to the U.S. military at Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP). The simultaneous act of testing and deployment is due to the contracted procurement process intended to provide a rapid Initial Operating Capability (IOC) release of the 5th Generation fighter. For this reason, many factors go into the determination of what is to be tested, in what order, and at which time due to the military requirements. A certain system or envelope of the aircraft must be assessed prior to releasing that capability into service. The objective of this praxis is to aide in the determination of what testing can be achieved on an aircraft at a point in time. Furthermore, it will define the optimum allocation of test points to aircraft and determine a prioritization of restrictions to be mitigated so that the test program can be best supported. The system described in this praxis has been deployed across the F-35 test program and testing sites. It has discovered hundreds of available test points for an aircraft to fly when it was thought none existed thus preventing an aircraft from being grounded. Additionally, it has saved hundreds of labor hours and greatly reduced the occurrence of test point reflight. Due to the proprietary nature of the JSF program, details regarding the actual test points, test plans, and all other program specific information have not been presented. Generic, representative data is used for example and proof-of-concept purposes. Apart from the data correlation algorithms, the optimization associated

  18. Test Driven Development of Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Test-Driven Development (TDD), a software development process that promises many advantages for developer productivity and software reliability, has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD practitioners alternate between writing short automated tests and producing code that passes those tests. Although this overly simplified description will undoubtedly sound prohibitively burdensome to many uninitiated developers, the advent of powerful unit-testing frameworks greatly reduces the effort required to produce and routinely execute suites of tests. By testimony, many developers find TDD to be addicting after only a few days of exposure, and find it unthinkable to return to previous practices.After a brief overview of the TDD process and my experience in applying the methodology for development activities at Goddard, I will delve more deeply into some of the challenges that are posed by numerical and scientific software as well as tools and implementation approaches that should address those challenges.

  19. Information Model for Machine-Tool-Performance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y. Tina; Soons, Johannes A.; Donmez, M. Alkan

    2001-01-01

    This report specifies an information model of machine-tool-performance tests in the EXPRESS [1] language. The information model provides a mechanism for describing the properties and results of machine-tool-performance tests. The objective of the information model is a standardized, computer-interpretable representation that allows for efficient archiving and exchange of performance test data throughout the life cycle of the machine. The report also demonstrates the implementation of the information model using three different implementation methods. PMID:27500031

  20. Test report SEPS solar array root section model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication and test of a solar array functional root section model to verify preliminary array design concepts is presented. The root section model is full scale width and contains a model array blanket. The blanket contains 1/8 live electrical modules and the remainder contains solar cell mass simulators. A storable Astromast is used for array blanket extension and retraction. The model component and system assembly hardware, tests, and test results are described.

  1. Test Driven Development of Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Test-Driven Development (TDD) is a software development process that promises many advantages for developer productivity and has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD practitioners alternate between writing short automated tests and producing code that passes those tests. Although this overly simplified description will undoubtedly sound prohibitively burdensome to many uninitiated developers, the advent of powerful unit-testing frameworks greatly reduces the effort required to produce and routinely execute suites of tests. By testimony, many developers find TDD to be addicting after only a few days of exposure, and find it unthinkable to return to previous practices. Of course, scientific/technical software differs from other software categories in a number of important respects, but I nonetheless believe that TDD is quite applicable to the development of such software and has the potential to significantly improve programmer productivity and code quality within the scientific community. After a detailed introduction to TDD, I will present the experience within the Software Systems Support Office (SSSO) in applying the technique to various scientific applications. This discussion will emphasize the various direct and indirect benefits as well as some of the difficulties and limitations of the methodology. I will conclude with a brief description of pFUnit, a unit testing framework I co-developed to support test-driven development of parallel Fortran applications.

  2. Aeroelastic model helicopter rotor testing in the Langley TDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Hamouda, M. N.; Cramer, R. G., Jr.; Langston, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Wind-tunnel testing of a properly scaled aeroelastic model helicopter rotor is considered a necessary phase in the design development of new or existing rotor systems. For this reason, extensive testing of aeroelastically scaled model rotors is done in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) located at the NASA Langley Research Center. A unique capability of this facility, which enables proper dynamic scaling, is the use of Freon as a test medium. A description of the TDT and a discussion of the benefits of using Freon as a test medium are presented. A description of the model test bed used, the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES), is also provided and examples of recent rotor tests are cited to illustrate the advantages and capabilities of aeroelastic model rotor testing in the TDT. The importance of proper dynamic scaling in identifying and solving rotorcraft aeroelastic problems, and the importance of aeroelastic testing of model rotor systems in the design of advanced rotor systems are demonstrated.

  3. Gap test modeling to predict wedge tests initiation of PBXN-103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton T.

    1998-07-01

    The experimental initiation of PBXN-103 by the standard wedge test has been modeled by using the HVRB initiation and growth model in the CTH code. The P-081 plane wave lens was used as initiator in these experiments. The wedge test was converted to a gap test by replacing the PBXN-103 wedge by a PBXN-103 cylinder. By modeling this gap test, shock initiation in PBXN-103 was calculated. The results of these calculations are in agreement with the data of the wedge test experiments. Comparison of the CTH code calculations with the wedge test data was accomplished by using an auxiliary program called the BCAT code. In particular, it computes the "pop plot" and compares it to the wedge test data. Shock initiation of PBX-9404 was also calculated by the HVRB model and the results compared to the initiation of PBX-9404 using the Lee-Tarver model. The two calculations from both of the models are very compatible.

  4. Model Based Analysis and Test Generation for Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Schumann, Johann M.; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Lowry, Mike R.; Karsai, Gabor; Nine, Harmon; Neema, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We describe a framework for model-based analysis and test case generation in the context of a heterogeneous model-based development paradigm that uses and combines Math- Works and UML 2.0 models and the associated code generation tools. This paradigm poses novel challenges to analysis and test case generation that, to the best of our knowledge, have not been addressed before. The framework is based on a common intermediate representation for different modeling formalisms and leverages and extends model checking and symbolic execution tools for model analysis and test case generation, respectively. We discuss the application of our framework to software models for a NASA flight mission.

  5. Free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a 1-g field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free vibration characteristics of a large split blanket solar array in both a 0-g and a 1-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The 0-g configuration corresponds to an in-orbit configuration of the array; the 1-g configuration is a typical ground test configuration. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the mode shapes and frequencies of the array; the second method uses the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. In the Rayleigh-Ritz method the array displacements are represented by string modes and cantilevered beam modes. The results of this investigation are summarized by a series of graphs illustrating the effects of various array parameters on the mode shapes and frequencies of the system. The results of the two methods are also compared in tabular form.

  6. Surface characterization through shape oscillations of drops in microgravity and 1-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Holt, R. Glynn; Tian, Yuren; Shi, Tao; Zheng, Xiao-Yu

    1994-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to determine the rheological properties of liquid drops of single or multiple components in the presence or absence of surface active materials by exciting drops into their quadrupole resonance and observing their free decay. The resulting data coupled with appropriate theory should give a better description of the physics of the underlying phenomena, providing a better foundation than earlier empirical results could. The space environment makes an idealized geometry available (spherical drops) so that theory and experiment can be properly compared, and allows a 'clean' environment, by which is meant an environment in which no solid surfaces come in contact with the drops during the test period. Moreover, by considering the oscillations of intentionally deformed drops in microgravity, a baseline is established for interpreting surface characterization experiments done on the ground by other groups and ours. Experiments performed on the United States Microgravity Laboratory Laboratory (USML-1) demonstrated that shape oscillation experiments could be performed over a wide parameter range, and with a variety of surfactant materials. Results, however, were compromised by an unexpected, slow drop tumbling, some problems with droplet injection, and the presence of bubbles in the drop samples. Nevertheless, initial data suggests that the space environment will be useful in providing baseline data that can serve to validate theory and permit quantitative materials characterization at 1-g.

  7. Type I Vs. Type II Cytokine Levels as a Function of SOD1 G93A Mouse Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeyachandran, Amilia; Mertens, Benjamin; McKissick, Eric A.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motoneuron disease that is characterized by the degradation of neurons throughout the central nervous system. Inflammation have been cited a key contributor to ALS neurodegeneration, but the timeline of cytokine upregulation remains unresolved. The goal of this study was to temporally examine the correlation between the varying levels of pro-inflammatory type I cytokines (IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-12, TNF-α, and GFAP) and anti-inflammatory type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) throughout the progression of ALS in the SOD1 G93A mouse model. Cytokine level data from high copy SOD1 G93A transgenic mice was collected from 66 peer-reviewed studies. For each corresponding experimental time point, the ratio of transgenic to wild type (TG/WT) cytokine was calculated. One-way ANOVA and t-tests with Bonferonni correction were used to analyze the data. Meta-analysis was performed for four discrete stages: early, pre-onset, post-onset, and end stage. A significant increase in TG cytokine levels was found when compared to WT cytokine levels across the entire SOD1 G93A lifespan for majority of the cytokines. The rates of change of the individual cytokines, and type I and type II were not significantly different; however, the mean fold change of type I was expressed at significantly higher levels than type II levels across all stages with the difference between the means becoming more pronounced at the end stage. An overexpression of cytokines occurred both before and after the onset of ALS symptoms. The trend between pro-inflammatory type I and type II cytokine mean levels indicate a progressive instability of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as anti-inflammatory cytokines fail to mediate the pronounced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Very early immunoregulatory treatment is necessary to successfully interrupt ALS-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:26648846

  8. Modulation of statolith mass and grouping in white clover (Trifolium repens) growth in 1-g, microgravity and on the clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. D.; Todd, P.; Staehelin, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    Current models of gravity perception in higher plants focus on the buoyant weight of starch-filled amyloplasts as the initial gravity signal susceptor (statolith). However, no tests have yet determined if statolith mass is regulated to increase or decrease gravity stimulus to the plant. To this end, the root caps of white clover (Trifolium repens) grown in three gravity environments with three different levels of gravity stimulation have been examined: (i) 1-g control with normal static gravistimulation, (ii) on a slow clinostat with constant gravistimulation, and (iii) in the stimulus-free microgravity aboard the Space Shuttle. Seedlings were germinated and grown in the BioServe Fluid Processing Apparatus and root cap structure was examined at both light and electron microscopic levels, including three-dimensional cell reconstruction from serial sections. Quantitative analysis of the electron micrographs demonstrated that the starch content of amyloplasts varied with seedling age but not gravity condition. It was also discovered that, unlike in starch storage amyloplasts, all of the starch granules of statolith amyloplasts were encompassed by a fine filamentous, ribosome-excluding matrix. From light micrographic 3-D cell reconstructions, the absolute volume, number, and positional relationships between amyloplasts showed (i) that individual amyloplast volume increased in microgravity but remained constant in seedlings grown for up to three days on the clinostat, (ii) the number of amyloplasts per cell remained unchanged in microgravity but decreased on the clinostat, and (iii) the three-dimensional positions of amyloplasts were not random. Instead amyloplasts in microgravity were grouped near the cell centers while those from the clinostat appeared more dispersed. Taken together, these observations suggest that changing gravity stimulation can elicit feedback control over statolith mass by changing the size, number, and grouping of amyloplasts. These results

  9. Similitude requirements and scaling relationships as applied to model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Brown, J. S., Jr.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The similitude requirements for the most general test conditions are presented. These similitude requirements are considered in relation to the scaling relationships, test technique, test conditions (including supersonic flow), and test objectives. Particular emphasis is placed on satisfying the various similitude requirements for incompressible and compressible flow conditions. For free flying models tests, the test velocities for incompressible flow are scaled from Froude number similitude requirements and those for compressible flow are scaled from Mach number similitude requirements. The limitations of various test techniques are indicated, with emphasis on the free flying model.

  10. Capillary brazing under microgravity (TEXUS-II) and 1g conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieler, K.; Phlippovich, N.; Stickler, R.; Bathke, W.

    Experiments of vacuum brazing under both microgravity and 1-g conditions show the effect of hydrostatic pressure on ga-filling. The absence of buoyancy forces under microgravity affects the microstructure of the solidified braze in the joint.

  11. Myo1g is an active player in maintaining cell stiffness in B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Ortega, O; Ovalle-García, E; Ortega-Blake, I; Antillón, A; Chávez-Munguía, B; Patiño-López, G; Fragoso-Soriano, R; Santos-Argumedo, L

    2016-05-01

    B-lymphocytes are migrating cells that specialize in antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and endocytosis; these processes implicate the modulation of plasma membrane elasticity. Cell stiffness is a force generated by the interaction between the actin-cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane, which requires the participation of several proteins. These proteins include class I myosins, which are now considered to play a role in controlling membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In this study, we identified the motor protein Myosin 1g (Myo1g) as a mediator of this phenomenon. The absence of Myo1g decreased the cell stiffness, affecting cell adhesion, cell spreading, phagocytosis, and endocytosis in B-lymphocytes. The results described here reveal a novel molecular mechanism by which Myo1g mediates and regulates cell stiffness in B-lymphocytes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27106882

  12. Myo1g is an active player in maintaining cell stiffness in B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Ortega, O; Ovalle-García, E; Ortega-Blake, I; Antillón, A; Chávez-Munguía, B; Patiño-López, G; Fragoso-Soriano, R; Santos-Argumedo, L

    2016-05-01

    B-lymphocytes are migrating cells that specialize in antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and endocytosis; these processes implicate the modulation of plasma membrane elasticity. Cell stiffness is a force generated by the interaction between the actin-cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane, which requires the participation of several proteins. These proteins include class I myosins, which are now considered to play a role in controlling membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In this study, we identified the motor protein Myosin 1g (Myo1g) as a mediator of this phenomenon. The absence of Myo1g decreased the cell stiffness, affecting cell adhesion, cell spreading, phagocytosis, and endocytosis in B-lymphocytes. The results described here reveal a novel molecular mechanism by which Myo1g mediates and regulates cell stiffness in B-lymphocytes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Calpastatin inhibits motor neuron death and increases survival of hSOD1(G93A) mice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mala V; Campbell, Jabbar; Palaniappan, Arti; Kumar, Asok; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron disease with a poorly understood cause and no effective treatment. Given that calpains mediate neurodegeneration in other pathological states and are abnormally activated in ALS, we investigated the possible ameliorative effects of inhibiting calpain over-activation in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic (Tg) mice in vivo by neuron-specific over-expression of calpastatin (CAST), the highly selective endogenous inhibitor of calpains. Our data indicate that over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) mice, which lowered calpain activation to levels comparable to wild-type mice, inhibited the abnormal breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (spectrin, MAP2 and neurofilaments), and ameliorated motor axon loss. Disease onset in hSOD1(G93A) /CAST mice compared to littermate hSOD1(G93A) mice is delayed, which accounts for their longer time of survival. We also find that neuronal over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice inhibited production of putative neurotoxic caspase-cleaved tau and activation of Cdk5, which have been implicated in neurodegeneration in ALS models, and also reduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers. Our data indicate that inhibition of calpain with CAST is neuroprotective in an ALS mouse model. CAST (encoding calpastatin) inhibits hyperactivated calpain to prevent motor neuron disease operating through a cascade of events as indicated in the schematic, with relevance to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We propose that over-expression of CAST in motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) mice inhibits activation of CDK5, breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (NFs, MAP2 and Tau) and regulatory molecules (Cam Kinase IV, Calcineurin A), and disease-causing proteins (TDP-43, α-Synuclein and Huntingtin) to prevent neuronal loss and delay neurological deficits. In our experiments, CAST could also inhibit cleavage of Bid, Bax, AIF to prevent mitochondrial, ER and lysosome-mediated cell death mechanisms. Similarly, CAST

  14. Development and application of an acceptance testing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, Rex D.; Noonan, Caroline H.; Hall, Kenneth R.

    1992-01-01

    The process of acceptance testing large software systems for NASA has been analyzed, and an empirical planning model of the process constructed. This model gives managers accurate predictions of the staffing needed, the productivity of a test team, and the rate at which the system will pass. Applying the model to a new system shows a high level of agreement between the model and actual performance. The model also gives managers an objective measure of process improvement.

  15. A Functional Test Platform for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Thornton, Peter E; King, Anthony Wayne; Steed, Chad A; Gu, Lianhong; Schuchart, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A functional test platform is presented to create direct linkages between site measurements and the process-based ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM). The platform consists of three major parts: 1) interactive user interfaces, 2) functional test model and 3) observational datasets. It provides much needed integration interfaces for both field experimentalists and ecosystem modelers to improve the model s representation of ecosystem processes within the CESM framework without large software overhead.

  16. Using the NPSS Environment to Model an Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Thomas M.; Owen, Albert K.; Huffman, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    An altitude test facility was modeled using Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). This altitude test facility model represents the most detailed facility model developed in the NPSS architecture. The current paper demonstrates the use of the NPSS system to define the required operating range of a component for the facility. A significant number of additional component models were easily developed to complete the model. Discussed in this paper are the additional components developed and what was done in the development of these components.

  17. Examining the Gm18 and m1G Modification Positions in tRNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Mayavan; Srinivasan, Thangavelu

    2014-01-01

    The tRNA structure contains conserved modifications that are responsible for its stability and are involved in the initiation and accuracy of the translation process. tRNA modification enzymes are prevalent in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. tRNA Gm18 methyltransferase (TrmH) and tRNA m1G37 methyltransferase (TrmD) are prevalent and essential enzymes in bacterial populations. TrmH involves itself in methylation process at the 2'-OH group of ribose at the 18th position of guanosine (G) in tRNAs. TrmD methylates the G residue next to the anticodon in selected tRNA subsets. Initially, m1G37 modification was reported to take place on three conserved tRNA subsets (tRNAArg, tRNALeu, tRNAPro); later on, few archaea and eukaryotes organisms revealed that other tRNAs also have the m1G37 modification. The present study reveals Gm18, m1G37 modification, and positions of m1G that take place next to the anticodon in tRNA sequences. We selected extremophile organisms and attempted to retrieve the m1G and Gm18 modification bases in tRNA sequences. Results showed that the Gm18 modification G residue occurs in all tRNA subsets except three tRNAs (tRNAMet, tRNAPro, tRNAVal). Whereas the m1G37 modification base G is formed only on tRNAArg, tRNALeu, tRNAPro, and tRNAHis, the rest of the tRNAs contain adenine (A) next to the anticodon. Thus, we hypothesize that Gm18 modification and m1G modification occur irrespective of a G residue in tRNAs. PMID:25031570

  18. Testing gravity-induced collapse models with torsion pendulums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Bassam; Wipf, Christopher; Chen, Yanbei

    2016-03-01

    Wavefunction collapse models have been proposed to resolve the measurement problem in QM. Some, , such as Diosi-Penrose model, are motivated by gravity. We first present the theory of such models, highlighting new results, such as fixing the only free paramater in the model. We then propose torsion pendulums as a promising optomechanical platform to test such models.

  19. Oxygen consumption during cold exposure at 2.1 G in rats adapted to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J.; Patterson, S.; Monson, C.

    1985-01-01

    The thermoregulation ability of rats exposed to various gravitational fields is examined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 22 C and 1 G, and 9 C and 2.1 G in experiment one, 1 G, 2.4 G, 5.8 G and 22 + or - 1.5 C in experiment two, and 1 G, 19-22 C, and 5 C in experiment three. It is observed that the core temperature in the control rats was 36.8 + or 0.4 C at 22C and 30.8 + or - 0.6 C at 9 C, and oxygen consumption dropped from 37 + or - 0.3 C core temperature at 22 C, 36.4 + or - 0.3 C at 9 C, 0.4 oxygen consumption was 8.18 + or - 0.9 ml/min at 22 C, and 14.2 + or - 0.4 ml/min at 9 C. The data from experiment two reveal that tail temperature in the control rats peaked at 2.4 G and at 5.8 G for the acclimated rats, and in experiment three a greater decrease in core temperature is detected in the 2.1-G rats. It is noted that prior acclimation to 2.1 G enhances the thermoregulation ability when exposed to the cold.

  20. Lack of Association of the APOL1 G3 Haplotype in African Americans with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Divers, Jasmin; Lea, Janice P.; Okusa, Mark D.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 variants are strongly associated with progressive nondiabetic nephropathy in populations with recent African ancestry. Selection for these variants occurred as a result of protection from human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Resequencing of this region in 10 genetically and geographically distinct African populations residing in HAT endemic regions identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in strong linkage disequilibrium and comprising a novel G3 haplotype. To determine whether the APOL1 G3 haplotype was associated with nephropathy, G1, G2, and G3 SNPs and 70 ancestry informative markers spanning the genome were genotyped in 937 African Americans with nondiabetic ESRD, 965 African Americans with type 2 diabetes–associated ESRD, and 1029 non-nephropathy controls. In analyses adjusting for age, sex, APOL1 G1/G2 risk (recessive), and global African ancestry, the G3 haplotype was not significantly associated with ESRD (P=0.05 for nondiabetic ESRD, P=0.57 for diabetes-associated ESRD, and P=0.27 for all-cause ESRD). We conclude that variation in APOL1 G3 makes a nominal, if any, contribution to ESRD in African Americans; G1 and G2 variants explain the vast majority of nondiabetic nephropathy susceptibility. PMID:25249559

  1. Lack of Association of the APOL1 G3 Haplotype in African Americans with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Nicholette D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Langefeld, Carl D; Divers, Jasmin; Lea, Janice P; Okusa, Mark D; Kimberly, Robert P; Bowden, Donald W; Freedman, Barry I

    2015-05-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 variants are strongly associated with progressive nondiabetic nephropathy in populations with recent African ancestry. Selection for these variants occurred as a result of protection from human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Resequencing of this region in 10 genetically and geographically distinct African populations residing in HAT endemic regions identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in strong linkage disequilibrium and comprising a novel G3 haplotype. To determine whether the APOL1 G3 haplotype was associated with nephropathy, G1, G2, and G3 SNPs and 70 ancestry informative markers spanning the genome were genotyped in 937 African Americans with nondiabetic ESRD, 965 African Americans with type 2 diabetes-associated ESRD, and 1029 non-nephropathy controls. In analyses adjusting for age, sex, APOL1 G1/G2 risk (recessive), and global African ancestry, the G3 haplotype was not significantly associated with ESRD (P=0.05 for nondiabetic ESRD, P=0.57 for diabetes-associated ESRD, and P=0.27 for all-cause ESRD). We conclude that variation in APOL1 G3 makes a nominal, if any, contribution to ESRD in African Americans; G1 and G2 variants explain the vast majority of nondiabetic nephropathy susceptibility.

  2. A Model for Random Student Drug Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Judith A.; Rose, Nancy L.; Lutz, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to examine random student drug testing in one school district relevant to: (a) the perceptions of students participating in competitive extracurricular activities regarding drug use and abuse; (b) the attitudes and perceptions of parents, school staff, and community members regarding student drug involvement; (c)…

  3. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    ``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  4. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  5. Beyond Testing: Empirical Models of Insurance Markets

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Levin, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We describe recent advances in the empirical analysis of insurance markets. This new research proposes ways to estimate individual demand for insurance and the relationship between prices and insurer costs in the presence of adverse and advantageous selection. We discuss how these models permit the measurement of welfare distortions arising from asymmetric information and the welfare consequences of potential government policy responses. We also discuss some challenges in modeling imperfect competition between insurers and outline a series of open research questions. PMID:21572939

  6. Landing Procedure in Model Ditching Tests of Bf 109

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W.

    1949-01-01

    The purpose of the model tests is to clarify the motions in the alighting on water of a land plane. After discussion of the model laws, the test method and test procedure are described. The deceleration-time-diagrams of the landing of a model of the Bf 109 show a high deceleration peek of greater than 20g which can be lowered to 4 to 6g by radiator cowling and brake skid.

  7. Testing Pearl Model In Three European Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouraoui, F.; Bidoglio, G.

    The Plant Protection Product Directive (91/414/EEC) stresses the need of validated models to calculate predicted environmental concentrations. The use of models has become an unavoidable step before pesticide registration. In this context, European Commission, and in particular DGVI, set up a FOrum for the Co-ordination of pes- ticide fate models and their USe (FOCUS). In a complementary effort, DG research supported the APECOP project, with one of its objective being the validation and im- provement of existing pesticide fate models. The main topic of research presented here is the validation of the PEARL model for different sites in Europe. The PEARL model, actually used in the Dutch pesticide registration procedure, was validated in three well- instrumented sites: Vredepeel (the Netherlands), Brimstone (UK), and Lanna (Swe- den). A step-wise procedure was used for the validation of the PEARL model. First the water transport module was calibrated, and then the solute transport module, using tracer measurements keeping unchanged the water transport parameters. The Vrede- peel site is characterised by a sandy soil. Fourteen months of measurements were used for the calibration. Two pesticides were applied on the site: bentazone and etho- prophos. PEARL predictions were very satisfactory for both soil moisture content, and pesticide concentration in the soil profile. The Brimstone site is characterised by a cracking clay soil. The calibration was conducted on a time series measurement of 7 years. The validation consisted in comparing predictions and measurement of soil moisture at different soil depths, and in comparing the predicted and measured con- centration of isoproturon in the drainage water. The results, even if in good agreement with the measuremens, highlighted the limitation of the model when the preferential flow becomes a dominant process. PEARL did not reproduce well soil moisture pro- file during summer months, and also under-predicted the arrival of

  8. Statistical and Practical Significance of the Likelihood Ratio Test of the Linear Logistic Test Model versus the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandrowicz, Rainer W.

    2011-01-01

    The linear logistic test model (LLTM) is a valuable and approved tool in educational research, as it allows for modelling cognitive components involved in a cognitive task. It allows for a rigorous assessment of fit by means of a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT). This approach is genuine to the Rasch family of models, yet it suffers from the unsolved…

  9. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy - 4 Swedish families with an associated PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Anneli; Åström-Aneq, Meriam; Widlund, Kjerstin Ferm; Fluur, Christina; Green, Anna; Rehnberg, Malin; Gunnarsson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the genotype-phenotype correlations in four unrelated families with a PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were studied. Our primary aim was to determine the carriers that fulfilled the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) diagnostic criteria of 2010. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether any specific clinical characteristics can be attributed to this particular gene variant. Index patients were assessed using next generation ARVC panel sequencing technique and their family members were assessed by Sanger sequencing targeted at the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant. The gene variant carriers were offered a clinical follow-up, with evaluation based on the patient’s history and a standard set of non-invasive testing. The PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant was found in 23 of 41 patients who underwent the examination. Twelve of the 19 family members showed “possible ARVC”. One with “borderline ARVC” and the rest with “definite ARVC” demonstrated re-polarization disturbances, but arrhythmia was uncommon. A lethal event occurred in a 14-year-old boy. In the present study, no definitive genotype-phenotype correlations were found, where the majority of the family members carrying the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were diagnosed with “possible ARVC”. These individuals should be offered a long-term follow-up since they are frequently symptomless but still at risk for insidious sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:27335691

  10. A Parameterized Web-Based Testing Model for Project Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodea, Constanta-Nicoleta; Dascalu, Maria

    This paper proposes a web-based testing model for project management. The model is based on ontology for encoding project management knowledge, so it is able to facilitate resource extraction in the web-based testware environment. It also allows generation of parameterized tests, according to the targeted difficulty level. The authors present the theoretical approaches that led to the model: semantic nets and concept space graphs have an important role in model designing. The development of the ontology model is made with SemanticWorks software. The test ontology has applicability in project management certification, especially in those systems with different levels, as the IPMA four-level certification system.

  11. Asteroid phase curve analysis with the H, G 1, G 2 photometric phase function: application to the PTF survey observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, Antti; Cellino, Alberto; Lu, Xiaoping; Shevchenko, Vasilij G.; Muinonen, Karri

    2016-10-01

    Estimation of an asteroid's absolute magnitude H from its photometry is extremely important. The absolute magnitude relates the brightness of the asteroid to its size, if the geometric albedo is known. The shape of the phase curve can serve as a proxy for the taxonomic type of the asteroid in cases with no spectral information available [1,2].In 2012, the IAU adopted the H,G1,G2 function to replace the H,G function for phase curve analysis [3]. This new function improves the backscattering behavior of the curve with high- and low-albedo asteroids. The phase function (PF) can be applied to asteroids with multiple high-quality observations. If the number of observations is small, or their accuracy is low, problems may arise. The most apparent problem is that the parameter G or the parameters G1, G2 might be poorly estimated. The solution has been to fix to value of G or values of G1, G2 and estimate only the H. In our recent work [4], we offer a solution that can improve the current situation with the photometric fits with a small number of low-accuracy observations. We present a constrained nonlinear least-squares method for fitting the H,G1,G2 function that can improve the possible bias with low-accuracy data. Then, we revisit the two-parameter PF with new data and offer a new version, the H,G12* PF. Finally, we assess the problem with fixed G or G1, G2 parameters by introducing one-parameter models that relate to five taxonomic asteroid groups. We tie all the models together with three or two parameters, or a single parameter, with a statistical model selection procedure to select the best version for a particular data set.We have developed practical tools for the abovementioned algorithms. We apply the tools to a dataset of 8,900 asteroids with almost 500,000 photometric observations from the Palomar Transient Factory survey [5]. We report the effect of the revised H estimates on the geometric albedos in cases where WISE-mission size estimates are available.[1] D

  12. Model Modification in Covariance Structure Modeling: A Comparison among Likelihood Ratio, Lagrange Multiplier, and Wald Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Chih-Ping; Bentler, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The empirical performance under null/alternative hypotheses of the likelihood ratio difference test (LRDT); Lagrange Multiplier test (evaluating the impact of model modification with a specific model); and Wald test (using a general model) were compared. The new tests for covariance structure analysis performed as well as did the LRDT. (RLC)

  13. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Khaled Y.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls.

  14. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Khaled Y; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls. PMID:26177849

  15. Upgraded Analytical Model of the Cylinder Test

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. Clark; Lauderbach, Lisa; Garza, Raul; Ferranti, Louis; Vitello, Peter

    2013-03-15

    A Gurney-type equation was previously corrected for wall thinning and angle of tilt, and now we have added shock wave attenuation in the copper wall and air gap energy loss. Extensive calculations were undertaken to calibrate the two new energy loss mechanisms across all explosives. The corrected Gurney equation is recommended for cylinder use over the original 1943 form. The effect of these corrections is to add more energy to the adiabat values from a relative volume of 2 to 7, with low energy explosives having the largest correction. The data was pushed up to a relative volume of about 15 and the JWL parameter ω was obtained directly. Finally, the total detonation energy density was locked to the v = 7 adiabat energy density, so that the Cylinder test gives all necessary values needed to make a JWL.

  16. The Development and Testing of a School Improvement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Jantzi, Doris; McElheron-Hopkins, Charryn

    2006-01-01

    This multimethod study generated and tested a "best evidence" model of school improvement processes (SIP) capable of improving student achievement. Initially developed through the review of a comprehensive body of previous empirical research, the model was further refined through a 2, 5-year longitudinal study in 10 schools. A quantitative test of…

  17. An Item Response Model for Characterizing Test Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2002-01-01

    Developed an item response model for characterizing test-compromise that enables the estimation of item preview and score-gain distributions. In the approach, models parameters and posterior distributions are estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedures. Simulation study results suggest that when at least some test items are known to be…

  18. Simple Spreadsheet Models For Interpretation Of Fractured Media Tracer Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analysis of a gas-phase partitioning tracer test conducted through fractured media is discussed within this paper. The analysis employed matching eight simple mathematical models to the experimental data to determine transport parameters. All of the models tested; two porous...

  19. Testing Structural Equation Models or Detection of Misspecifications?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saris, Willem E.; Satorra, Albert; van der Veld, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the correctness of a structural equation model is essential to avoid drawing incorrect conclusions from empirical research. In the past, the chi-square test was recommended for assessing the correctness of the model but this test has been criticized because of its sensitivity to sample size. As a reaction, an abundance of fit indexes…

  20. Locally Dependent Linear Logistic Test Model with Person Covariates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Edward H.; Smits, Dirk J. M.; De Boeck, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The article proposes a family of item-response models that allow the separate and independent specification of three orthogonal components: item attribute, person covariate, and local item dependence. Special interest lies in extending the linear logistic test model, which is commonly used to measure item attributes, to tests with embedded item…

  1. Multicomponent Equilibrium Models for Testing Geothermometry Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D. Craig; Palmer, Carl D.; Smith, Robert W.; McLing, Travis L.

    2013-02-01

    Geothermometry is an important tool for estimating deep reservoir temperature from the geochemical composition of shallower and cooler waters. The underlying assumption of geothermometry is that the waters collected from shallow wells and seeps maintain a chemical signature that reflects equilibrium in the deeper reservoir. Many of the geothermometers used in practice are based on correlation between water temperatures and composition or using thermodynamic calculations based a subset (typically silica, cations or cation ratios) of the dissolved constituents. An alternative approach is to use complete water compositions and equilibrium geochemical modeling to calculate the degree of disequilibrium (saturation index) for large number of potential reservoir minerals as a function of temperature. We have constructed several “forward” geochemical models using The Geochemist’s Workbench to simulate the change in chemical composition of reservoir fluids as they migrate toward the surface. These models explicitly account for the formation (mass and composition) of a steam phase and equilibrium partitioning of volatile components (e.g., CO2, H2S, and H2) into the steam as a result of pressure decreases associated with upward fluid migration from depth. We use the synthetic data generated from these simulations to determine the advantages and limitations of various geothermometry and optimization approaches for estimating the likely conditions (e.g., temperature, pCO2) to which the water was exposed in the deep subsurface. We demonstrate the magnitude of errors that can result from boiling, loss of volatiles, and analytical error from sampling and instrumental analysis. The estimated reservoir temperatures for these scenarios are also compared to conventional geothermometers. These results can help improve estimation of geothermal resource temperature during exploration and early development.

  2. Testing Model with "Check Technique" for Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Cihat

    2016-01-01

    As the number, date and form of the written tests are structured and teacher-oriented, it is considered that it creates fear and anxiety among the students. It has been found necessary and important to form a testing model which will keep the students away from the test anxiety and allows them to learn only about the lesson. For this study,…

  3. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  4. Item Response Theory Models for Performance Decline during Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Sometimes, test-takers may not be able to attempt all items to the best of their ability (with full effort) due to personal factors (e.g., low motivation) or testing conditions (e.g., time limit), resulting in poor performances on certain items, especially those located toward the end of a test. Standard item response theory (IRT) models fail to…

  5. Linear Model to Assess the Scale's Validity of a Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tristan, Agustin; Vidal, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Wright and Stone had proposed three features to assess the quality of the distribution of the items difficulties in a test, on the so called "most probable response map": line, stack and gap. Once a line is accepted as a design model for a test, gaps and stacks are practically eliminated, producing an evidence of the "scale validity" of the test.…

  6. Engineering model development and test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, John A.

    1993-08-01

    The correctability of the primary mirror spherical error in the Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) is sensitive to the precise alignment of the incoming aberrated beam onto the corrective elements. Articulating fold mirrors that provide +/- 1 milliradian of tilt in 2 axes are required to allow for alignment corrections in orbit as part of the fix for the Hubble space telescope. An engineering study was made by Itek Optical Systems and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to investigate replacement of fixed fold mirrors within the existing WF/PC optical bench with articulating mirrors. The study contract developed the base line requirements, established the suitability of lead magnesium niobate (PMN) actuators and evaluated several tilt mechanism concepts. Two engineering model articulating mirrors were produced to demonstrate the function of the tilt mechanism to provide +/- 1 milliradian of tilt, packaging within the space constraints and manufacturing techniques including the machining of the invar tilt mechanism and lightweight glass mirrors. The success of the engineering models led to the follow on design and fabrication of 3 flight mirrors that have been incorporated into the WF/PC to be placed into the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the servicing mission scheduled for late 1993.

  7. Development of the GPM Observatory Thermal Vacuum Test Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Kan; Peabody, Hume

    2012-01-01

    A software-based thermal modeling process was documented for generating the thermal panel settings necessary to simulate worst-case on-orbit flight environments in an observatory-level thermal vacuum test setup. The method for creating such a thermal model involved four major steps: (1) determining the major thermal zones for test as indicated by the major dissipating components on the spacecraft, then mapping the major heat flows between these components; (2) finding the flight equivalent sink temperatures for these test thermal zones; (3) determining the thermal test ground support equipment (GSE) design and initial thermal panel settings based on the equivalent sink temperatures; and (4) adjusting the panel settings in the test model to match heat flows and temperatures with the flight model. The observatory test thermal model developed from this process allows quick predictions of the performance of the thermal vacuum test design. In this work, the method described above was applied to the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory spacecraft, a joint project between NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) which is currently being integrated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for launch in Early 2014. From preliminary results, the thermal test model generated from this process shows that the heat flows and temperatures match fairly well with the flight thermal model, indicating that the test model can simulate fairly accurately the conditions on-orbit. However, further analysis is needed to determine the best test configuration possible to validate the GPM thermal design before the start of environmental testing later this year. Also, while this analysis method has been applied solely to GPM, it should be emphasized that the same process can be applied to any mission to develop an effective test setup and panel settings which accurately simulate on-orbit thermal environments.

  8. Monoaminergic control of spinal locomotor networks in SOD1G93A newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Léa; Barrière, Grégory; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene that encodes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are the cause of approximately 20% of familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. While ALS symptoms appear in adulthood, spinal motoneurons exhibit functional alterations as early as the embryonic and postnatal stages in the murine model of ALS, the SOD1 mice. Monoaminergic – i.e., dopaminergic (DA), serotoninergic (5-HT), and noradrenergic (NA) – pathways powerfully control spinal networks and contribute significantly to their embryonic and postnatal maturation. Alterations in monoaminergic neuromodulation during development could therefore lead to impairments in the motoneuronal physiology. In this study, we sought to determine whether the monoaminergic spinal systems are modified in the early stages of development in SOD1 mice. Using a post-mortem analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), monoaminergic neuromodulators and their metabolites were quantified in the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1 and wild-type (WT) mice aged one postnatal day (P1) and P10. This analysis underscores an increased content of DA in the SOD1 lumbar spinal cord compared to that of WT mice but failed to reveal any modification of the other monoaminergic contents. In a next step, we compared the efficiency of the monoaminergic compounds in triggering and modulating fictive locomotion in WT and SOD1 mice. This study was performed in P1–P3 SOD1 mice and age-matched control littermates using extracellular recordings from the lumbar ventral roots in the in vitro isolated spinal cord preparation. This analysis revealed that the spinal networks of SOD1G93A mice could generate normal locomotor activity in the presence of NMA-5-HT. Interestingly, we also observed that SOD1 spinal networks have an increased sensitivity to NA compared to WT spinal circuits but exhibited similar DA responses. PMID:25071458

  9. Specification test for Markov models with measurement errors*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonjin; Zhao, Zhibiao

    2014-01-01

    Most existing works on specification testing assume that we have direct observations from the model of interest. We study specification testing for Markov models based on contaminated observations. The evolving model dynamics of the unobservable Markov chain is implicitly coded into the conditional distribution of the observed process. To test whether the underlying Markov chain follows a parametric model, we propose measuring the deviation between nonparametric and parametric estimates of conditional regression functions of the observed process. Specifically, we construct a nonparametric simultaneous confidence band for conditional regression functions and check whether the parametric estimate is contained within the band. PMID:25346552

  10. Interferometric tests of Planckian quantum geometry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ohkyung; Hogan, Craig J.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Planck scale quantum geometrical effects on measurements with interferometers is estimated with standard physics, and with a variety of proposed extensions. It is shown that effects are negligible in standard field theory with canonically quantized gravity. Statistical noise levels are estimated in a variety of proposals for nonstandard metric fluctuations, and these alternatives are constrained using upper bounds on stochastic metric fluctuations from LIGO. Idealized models of several interferometer system architectures are used to predict signal noise spectra in a quantum geometry that cannot be described by a fluctuating metric, in which position noise arises from holographic bounds on directional information. Predictions in this case are shown to be close to current and projected experimental bounds.

  11. Boron-10 ABUNCL Models of Fuel Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNP simulations of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) active configuration model with fuel pins previously measured at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A comparison of the GE-ABUNCL simulations and simulations of 3He based UNCL-II active counter (the system for which the GE-ABUNCL was targeted to replace) with the same fuel pin assemblies is also provided.

  12. A mouse model for testing remyelinating therapies.

    PubMed

    Bai, C Brian; Sun, Sunny; Roholt, Andrew; Benson, Emily; Edberg, Dale; Medicetty, Satish; Dutta, Ranjan; Kidd, Grahame; Macklin, Wendy B; Trapp, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Used in combination with immunomodulatory therapies, remyelinating therapies are a viable therapeutic approach for treating individuals with multiple sclerosis. Studies of postmortem MS brains identified greater remyelination in demyelinated cerebral cortex than in demyelinated brain white matter and implicated reactive astrocytes as an inhibitor of white matter remyelination. An animal model that recapitulates these phenotypes would benefit the development of remyelination therapeutics. We have used a modified cuprizone protocol that causes a consistent and robust demyelination of mouse white matter and cerebral cortex. Spontaneous remyelination occurred significantly faster in the cerebral cortex than in white matter and reactive astrocytes were more abundant in white matter lesions. Remyelination of white matter and cerebral cortex was therapeutically enhanced by daily injections of thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3). In summary, we describe an in vivo demyelination/remyelination paradigm that can be powered to determine efficacy of therapies that enhance white matter and cortical remyelination. PMID:27384502

  13. Interferometric tests of Planckian quantum geometry models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwon, Ohkyung; Hogan, Craig J.

    2016-04-19

    The effect of Planck scale quantum geometrical effects on measurements with interferometers is estimated with standard physics, and with a variety of proposed extensions. It is shown that effects are negligible in standard field theory with canonically quantized gravity. Statistical noise levels are estimated in a variety of proposals for nonstandard metric fluctuations, and these alternatives are constrained using upper bounds on stochastic metric fluctuations from LIGO. Idealized models of several interferometer system architectures are used to predict signal noise spectra in a quantum geometry that cannot be described by a fluctuating metric, in which position noise arises from holographicmore » bounds on directional information. Lastly, predictions in this case are shown to be close to current and projected experimental bounds.« less

  14. Using Laboratory Models to Test Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Lewis; O'Donnell, Carl R.; Gilman, Sean A.; Lansing, Robert W.; Schwartzstein, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Opioids are commonly used to relieve dyspnea, but clinical data are mixed and practice varies widely. Objectives: Evaluate the effect of morphine on dyspnea and ventilatory drive under well-controlled laboratory conditions. Methods: Six healthy volunteers received morphine (0.07 mg/kg) and placebo intravenously on separate days (randomized, blinded). We measured two responses to a CO2 stimulus: (1) perceptual response (breathing discomfort; described by subjects as “air hunger”) induced by increasing partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) during restricted ventilation, measured with a visual analog scale (range, “neutral” to “intolerable”); and (2) ventilatory response, measured in separate trials during unrestricted breathing. Measurements and Main Results: We determined the PetCO2 that produced a 60% breathing discomfort rating in each subject before morphine (median, 8.5 mm Hg above resting PetCO2). At the same PetCO2 after morphine administration, median breathing discomfort was reduced by 65% of its pretreatment value; P < 0.001. Ventilation fell 28% at the same PetCO2; P < 0.01. The effect of morphine on breathing discomfort was not significantly correlated with the effect on ventilatory response. Placebo had no effect. Conclusions: (1) A moderate morphine dose produced substantial relief of laboratory dyspnea, with a smaller reduction of ventilation. (2) In contrast to an earlier laboratory model of breathing effort, this laboratory model of air hunger established a highly significant treatment effect consistent in magnitude with clinical studies of opioids. Laboratory studies require fewer subjects and enable physiological measurements that are difficult to make in a clinical setting. Within-subject comparison of the response to carefully controlled laboratory stimuli can be an efficient means to optimize treatments before clinical trials. PMID:21778294

  15. Gap Test Modeling to Predict Wedge Tests Initiation of PBXN-103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton Thomas

    1997-07-01

    The experimental Initiation of PBXN-103 by the standard wedge test has been modeled by using the HVRB initiation and growth model in the CTH code. The P-081 plane wave lens was used as initiator in these experiments. The wedge test was converted to a gap test by replacing the PBXN-103 wedge by a PBXN-103 cylinder. By modeling this gap test, shock initiation in the PBXN-103 was calculated. The results of these calculations are in agreement with the experimental results of the wedge tests. Comparison of the CTH code calculations with the wedge test data was accomplished by using an auxiliary program to the CTH code called the BCAT code. In particular, it computes the ``pop plot'' and compares it to the wedge test data. It also predicts other fundamental results of the wedge test. Shock initiation of PBX-9404 was also calculated by the HVRB model and compared to the same calculation using the Lee-Tarver model. Comparison of the two calculations indicate that the HVRB model is apparently as good as the Lee-Tarver model.

  16. Testing parameters in structural equation modeling: every "one" matters.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R; Griffin, D

    2001-09-01

    A problem with standard errors estimated by many structural equation modeling programs is described. In such programs, a parameter's standard error is sensitive to how the model is identified (i.e., how scale is set). Alternative but equivalent ways to identify a model may yield different standard errors, and hence different Z tests for a parameter, even though the identifications produce the same overall model fit. This lack of invariance due to model identification creates the possibility that different analysts may reach different conclusions about a parameter's significance level even though they test equivalent models on the same data. The authors suggest that parameters be tested for statistical significance through the likelihood ratio test, which is invariant to the identification choice. PMID:11570231

  17. Test plan for hydrologic modeling of protective barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.

    1990-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared this test plan for the Model Applications and Validation Task of the Hanford Protective Barriers Program, which is managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. The objectives of this plan are to outline the conceptual hydrologic model of protective barriers, discuss the available computer codes, describe the interrelationships between the modeling task and the other tasks of the Protective Barriers Program, present the barrier modeling tests, and estimate the schedule and costs of the hydrologic modeling task for planning purposes by the Protective Barriers Program. The purpose of the tests is to validate models that will be used to confirm the long-term performance of the barrier in minimizing drainage. A second purpose of the tests is to provide information to other parts of the Protective Barriers Program that require such information. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. DKIST enclosure modeling and verification during factory assembly and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrakoetxea, Ibon; McBride, William; Marshall, Heather K.; Murga, Gaizka

    2014-08-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) is unique as, apart from protecting the telescope and its instrumentation from the weather, it holds the entrance aperture stop and is required to position it with millimeter-level accuracy. The compliance of the Enclosure design with the requirements, as of Final Design Review in January 2012, was supported by mathematical models and other analyses which included structural and mechanical analyses (FEA), control models, ventilation analysis (CFD), thermal models, reliability analysis, etc. During the Enclosure Factory Assembly and Testing the compliance with the requirements has been verified using the real hardware and the models created during the design phase have been revisited. The tests performed during shutter mechanism subsystem (crawler test stand) functional and endurance testing (completed summer 2013) and two comprehensive system-level factory acceptance testing campaigns (FAT#1 in December 2013 and FAT#2 in March 2014) included functional and performance tests on all mechanisms, off-normal mode tests, mechanism wobble tests, creation of the Enclosure pointing map, control system tests, and vibration tests. The comparison of the assumptions used during the design phase with the properties measured during the test campaign provides an interesting reference for future projects.

  19. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Weyl, E. Glen; Frederickson, Megan E.; Yu, Douglas W.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host–symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume–rhizobia and yucca–moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature. PMID:20733067

  20. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Weyl, E Glen; Frederickson, Megan E; Yu, Douglas W; Pierce, Naomi E

    2010-09-01

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host-symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume-rhizobia and yucca-moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature.

  1. Bankruptcy risk model and empirical tests

    PubMed Central

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M.; Urošević, Branko; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the size dependence and temporal stability of firm bankruptcy risk in the US economy by applying Zipf scaling techniques. We focus on a single risk factor—the debt-to-asset ratio R—in order to study the stability of the Zipf distribution of R over time. We find that the Zipf exponent increases during market crashes, implying that firms go bankrupt with larger values of R. Based on the Zipf analysis, we employ Bayes’s theorem and relate the conditional probability that a bankrupt firm has a ratio R with the conditional probability of bankruptcy for a firm with a given R value. For 2,737 bankrupt firms, we demonstrate size dependence in assets change during the bankruptcy proceedings. Prepetition firm assets and petition firm assets follow Zipf distributions but with different exponents, meaning that firms with smaller assets adjust their assets more than firms with larger assets during the bankruptcy process. We compare bankrupt firms with nonbankrupt firms by analyzing the assets and liabilities of two large subsets of the US economy: 2,545 Nasdaq members and 1,680 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) members. We find that both assets and liabilities follow a Pareto distribution. The finding is not a trivial consequence of the Zipf scaling relationship of firm size quantified by employees—although the market capitalization of Nasdaq stocks follows a Pareto distribution, the same distribution does not describe NYSE stocks. We propose a coupled Simon model that simultaneously evolves both assets and debt with the possibility of bankruptcy, and we also consider the possibility of firm mergers. PMID:20937903

  2. Bankruptcy risk model and empirical tests.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M; Urosevic, Branko; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-10-26

    We analyze the size dependence and temporal stability of firm bankruptcy risk in the US economy by applying Zipf scaling techniques. We focus on a single risk factor--the debt-to-asset ratio R--in order to study the stability of the Zipf distribution of R over time. We find that the Zipf exponent increases during market crashes, implying that firms go bankrupt with larger values of R. Based on the Zipf analysis, we employ Bayes's theorem and relate the conditional probability that a bankrupt firm has a ratio R with the conditional probability of bankruptcy for a firm with a given R value. For 2,737 bankrupt firms, we demonstrate size dependence in assets change during the bankruptcy proceedings. Prepetition firm assets and petition firm assets follow Zipf distributions but with different exponents, meaning that firms with smaller assets adjust their assets more than firms with larger assets during the bankruptcy process. We compare bankrupt firms with nonbankrupt firms by analyzing the assets and liabilities of two large subsets of the US economy: 2,545 Nasdaq members and 1,680 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) members. We find that both assets and liabilities follow a Pareto distribution. The finding is not a trivial consequence of the Zipf scaling relationship of firm size quantified by employees--although the market capitalization of Nasdaq stocks follows a Pareto distribution, the same distribution does not describe NYSE stocks. We propose a coupled Simon model that simultaneously evolves both assets and debt with the possibility of bankruptcy, and we also consider the possibility of firm mergers.

  3. Bankruptcy risk model and empirical tests.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M; Urosevic, Branko; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-10-26

    We analyze the size dependence and temporal stability of firm bankruptcy risk in the US economy by applying Zipf scaling techniques. We focus on a single risk factor--the debt-to-asset ratio R--in order to study the stability of the Zipf distribution of R over time. We find that the Zipf exponent increases during market crashes, implying that firms go bankrupt with larger values of R. Based on the Zipf analysis, we employ Bayes's theorem and relate the conditional probability that a bankrupt firm has a ratio R with the conditional probability of bankruptcy for a firm with a given R value. For 2,737 bankrupt firms, we demonstrate size dependence in assets change during the bankruptcy proceedings. Prepetition firm assets and petition firm assets follow Zipf distributions but with different exponents, meaning that firms with smaller assets adjust their assets more than firms with larger assets during the bankruptcy process. We compare bankrupt firms with nonbankrupt firms by analyzing the assets and liabilities of two large subsets of the US economy: 2,545 Nasdaq members and 1,680 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) members. We find that both assets and liabilities follow a Pareto distribution. The finding is not a trivial consequence of the Zipf scaling relationship of firm size quantified by employees--although the market capitalization of Nasdaq stocks follows a Pareto distribution, the same distribution does not describe NYSE stocks. We propose a coupled Simon model that simultaneously evolves both assets and debt with the possibility of bankruptcy, and we also consider the possibility of firm mergers. PMID:20937903

  4. Association between matrix metalloproteinase 1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis including 19706 subjects.

    PubMed

    Han, Guoda; Wei, Zhijiang; Lu, Zhiliang; Cui, Haibin; Bai, Xiyong; Ge, Huai'e; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk has been reported, but results remained controversial and ambiguous. To assess the association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk, a meta-analysis was performed. Based on comprehensive searches of the PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), we identified outcome data from all articles estimating the association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Thirty-eight studies involving 10178 cases and 9528 controls were included. Overall, significant association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer susceptibility was observed for additive model (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.09-1.35), for codominant model (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.10-1.63), for dominant model (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.34), for recessive model (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.14-1.52). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the significant association was found among Asians but not among Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis by site of cancer, significant associations were found among lung cancer, colorectal cancer, head and neck cancer and bladder cancer. This meta-analysis demonstrated that the MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk.

  5. Modal test and analysis: Multiple tests concept for improved validation of large space structure mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Kuo, C-P.; Glaser, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    For the structural dynamic analysis of large space structures, the technology in structural synthesis and the development of structural analysis software have increased the capability to predict the dynamic characteristics of the structural system. The various subsystems which comprise the system are represented by various displacement functions; the displacement functions are then combined to represent the total structure. Experience has indicated that even when subsystem mathematical models are verified by test, the mathematical representations of the total system are often in error because the mathematical model of the structural elements which are significant when loads are applied at the interconnection points are not adequately verified by test. A multiple test concept, based upon the Multiple Boundary Condition Test (MBCT), is presented which will increase the accuracy of the system mathematical model by improving the subsystem test and test/analysis correlation procedure.

  6. A Lognormal Model for Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    A lognormal model for the response times of a person on a set of test items is investigated. The model has a parameter structure analogous to the two-parameter logistic response models in item response theory, with a parameter for the speed of each person as well as parameters for the time intensity and discriminating power of each item. It is…

  7. Large Hadron collider tests of the little Higgs model.

    PubMed

    Burdman, Gustavo; Perelstein, Maxim; Pierce, Aaron

    2003-06-20

    The little Higgs model provides an alternative to traditional candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. The new heavy gauge bosons predicted by this model should be observable at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We discuss how the LHC experiments could test the little Higgs model by studying the production and decay of these particles. PMID:12857187

  8. Stochastic Models of Quality Control on Test Misgrading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianjun

    Stochastic models are developed in this article to examine the rate of test misgrading in educational and psychological measurement. The estimation of inadvertent grading errors can serve as a basis for quality control in measurement. Limitations of traditional Poisson models have been reviewed to highlight the need to introduce new models using…

  9. A Sharing Item Response Theory Model for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2004-01-01

    A new sharing item response theory (SIRT) model is presented that explicitly models the effects of sharing item content between informants and test takers. This model is used to construct adaptive item selection and scoring rules that provide increased precision and reduced score gains in instances where sharing occurs. The adaptive item selection…

  10. Engineering in software testing: statistical testing based on a usage model applied to medical device development.

    PubMed

    Jones, P L; Swain, W T; Trammell, C J

    1999-01-01

    When a population is too large for exhaustive study, as is the case for all possible uses of a software system, a statistically correct sample must be drawn as a basis for inferences about the population. A Markov chain usage model is an engineering formalism that represents the population of possible uses for which a product is to be tested. In statistical testing of software based on a Markov chain usage model, the rich body of analytical results available for Markov chains provides numerous insights that can be used in both product development and test planing. A usage model is based on specifications rather than code, so insights that result from model building can inform product decisions in the early stages of a project when the opportunity to prevent problems is the greatest. Statistical testing based on a usage model provides a sound scientific basis for quantifying the reliability of software. PMID:10459417

  11. Overview of Shipyard coast line with Piers G1, G2, G3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of Shipyard coast line with Piers G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, and G-5 in view, view facing east-southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pier & Quay Walls, Entrance to Dry Dock No. 2 & Repair Wharfs, east & west sides of Dry Dock No. 2 & west side of Dry Dock No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Analysis of posture and eye movement responses to Coriolis stimulation under 1 G and microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Motoki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Iida, Masahiro

    2009-12-20

    To detect the effect of microgravity on vestibular responses, we conducted Coriolis stimulation experiments at 1 G and μ G. Five men with vision occluded were asked to tilt their head forward while rotating at 100 degrees/sec. Postural changes were recorded by a 3D linear accelerometer, and the distance of upper body movement was derived from recordings of linear acceleration. Eye movements were recorded by a CCD camera. For a second period after commencing head tilt, the upper body moved 10 cm in the direction of inertia input at 1 G, but it moved to the opposite direction at μ G, i.e., 4 cm in the direction of inertia force. Nystagmus peak slow-phase velocity immediately after head tilt and its attenuation process did not differ between 1 G and μ G. The strength of movement sensation and the severity of motion sickness were far weaker at μ G than at 1 G. It was concluded that inertia input is valid to induce postural and sensation responses only when the external reference is given Z axis by gravity. Vestibular ocular response may be maintained at μ G because the head reference is valid even after the external reference becomes arbitrary.

  13. Centrifuge model tests of rainfall-induced slope failures for the investigation of the initiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matziaris, Vasileios; Marshall, Alec; Yu, Hai-Sui

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are very common natural disasters which cause damage to properties and infrastructure and may result in the loss of human lives. These phenomena often take place in unsaturated soil slopes and are triggered by the saturation of the soil profile, due to rain infiltration, which leads to a loss of shear strength. The aim of this study is to determine rainfall thresholds for the initiation of landslides under different initial conditions. Model tests of rainfall-induced landslides are conducted in the Nottingham Centre for Geomechanics 50g-T geotechnical centrifuge. Initially unsaturated plane-strain slope models made with fine silica sand are prepared at varying densities at 1g and accommodated within a climatic chamber which provides controlled environmental conditions. During the centrifuge flight at 60g, rainfall events of varying intensity and duration are applied to the slope models causing the initiation of slope failure. The impact of soil state properties and rainfall characteristics on the landslide initiation process are discussed. The variation of pore water pressures within the slope before, during and after simulated rainfall events is recorded using miniature pore pressure transducers buried in the soil model. Slope deformation is determined by using a high-speed camera and digital image analysis techniques.

  14. Ground Shake Test of the Boeing Model 360 Helicopter Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, D. A.; Gabel, R.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopters, together with other U.S. Helicopter manufacturers, is engaged in a finite element applications program designed to emplace in the U.S. a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models in support of helicopter airframe structurel design. This program was given the acronym DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS). The test plan is reviewed and results are presented for a shake test of the Boeing Model 360 helicopter. Results of the test will serve as the basis for validation of a finite element vibration model of the helicopter.

  15. A new fit-for-purpose model testing framework: Decision Crash Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolson, Bryan; Craig, James

    2016-04-01

    Decision-makers in water resources are often burdened with selecting appropriate multi-million dollar strategies to mitigate the impacts of climate or land use change. Unfortunately, the suitability of existing hydrologic simulation models to accurately inform decision-making is in doubt because the testing procedures used to evaluate model utility (i.e., model validation) are insufficient. For example, many authors have identified that a good standard framework for model testing called the Klemes Crash Tests (KCTs), which are the classic model validation procedures from Klemeš (1986) that Andréassian et al. (2009) rename as KCTs, have yet to become common practice in hydrology. Furthermore, Andréassian et al. (2009) claim that the progression of hydrological science requires widespread use of KCT and the development of new crash tests. Existing simulation (not forecasting) model testing procedures such as KCTs look backwards (checking for consistency between simulations and past observations) rather than forwards (explicitly assessing if the model is likely to support future decisions). We propose a fundamentally different, forward-looking, decision-oriented hydrologic model testing framework based upon the concept of fit-for-purpose model testing that we call Decision Crash Tests or DCTs. Key DCT elements are i) the model purpose (i.e., decision the model is meant to support) must be identified so that model outputs can be mapped to management decisions ii) the framework evaluates not just the selected hydrologic model but the entire suite of model-building decisions associated with model discretization, calibration etc. The framework is constructed to directly and quantitatively evaluate model suitability. The DCT framework is applied to a model building case study on the Grand River in Ontario, Canada. A hypothetical binary decision scenario is analysed (upgrade or not upgrade the existing flood control structure) under two different sets of model building

  16. Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

  17. Neurovestibular adaptation in the utricular otolith in fish to hypergravity exposure and re-adaptation to 1G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, R.; Popova, Ye.; Varelas, J.; Mofrad, A.

    after 16-day exposure. Return to control values following 16-day exposure is on the order of 8 days. On-Center Controls (228/s rotation about Earth vertical) at 4-and 16-days do not show any difference compare to ground controls. Utricular sensitivity is strongly regulated by altered gravity exposure, and transition from hypergravity to normal gravity seem to resemble the transfer from 1G to microgravity, and might be used as a ground-based model to study the neural response to transitions in gravity. Preliminary analysis of the afferent distributions changes caused by adaptation to hyper-G and re-adaptation to 1G that uses PDF allows us to assume that hyper-G and G cause the redistribution of afferents with different gains: those with higher gains become more activated (sensitive) than those with lower gains. The case of down-regulation corresponds to decrease of the PDF dispersion. It should be noted that efferent vestibular actions are not uniform on hair cells and afferents, and it is proposed that the changes brought on in otolith afferents by the transitions from one gravity state to another will be most prevalent and coincident in afferents strongly affected by efferent activation. Support Contributed By: NASA 03-OBPR-04

  18. Retrospective tests of hybrid operational earthquake forecasting models for Canterbury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, D. A.; Liukis, M.; Christophersen, A.; Gerstenberger, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Canterbury, New Zealand, earthquake sequence, which began in September 2010, occurred in a region of low crustal deformation and previously low seismicity. Because, the ensuing seismicity in the region is likely to remain above previous levels for many years, a hybrid operational earthquake forecasting model for Canterbury was developed to inform decisions on building standards and urban planning for the rebuilding of Christchurch. The model estimates occurrence probabilities for magnitudes M ≥ 5.0 in the Canterbury region for each of the next 50 yr. It combines two short-term, two medium-term and four long-term forecasting models. The weight accorded to each individual model in the operational hybrid was determined by an expert elicitation process. A retrospective test of the operational hybrid model and of an earlier informally developed hybrid model in the whole New Zealand region has been carried out. The individual and hybrid models were installed in the New Zealand Earthquake Forecast Testing Centre and used to make retrospective annual forecasts of earthquakes with magnitude M > 4.95 from 1986 on, for time-lags up to 25 yr. All models underpredict the number of earthquakes due to an abnormally large number of earthquakes in the testing period since 2008 compared to those in the learning period. However, the operational hybrid model is more informative than any of the individual time-varying models for nearly all time-lags. Its information gain relative to a reference model of least information decreases as the time-lag increases to become zero at a time-lag of about 20 yr. An optimal hybrid model with the same mathematical form as the operational hybrid model was computed for each time-lag from the 26-yr test period. The time-varying component of the optimal hybrid is dominated by the medium-term models for time-lags up to 12 yr and has hardly any impact on the optimal hybrid model for greater time-lags. The optimal hybrid model is considerably more

  19. Design driven test patterns for OPC models calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Imam, Mohamed

    2009-03-01

    In the modern photolithography process for manufacturing integrated circuits, geometry dimensions need to be realized on silicon which are much smaller than the exposure wavelength. Thus Resolution Enhancement Techniques have an indispensable role towards the implementation of a successful technology process node. Finding an appropriate RET recipe, that answers the needs of a certain fabrication process, usually involves intensive computational simulations. These simulations have to reflect how different elements in the lithography process under study will behave. In order to achieve this, accurate models are needed that truly represent the transmission of patterns from mask to silicon. A common practice in calibrating lithography models is to collect data for the dimensions of some test structures created on the exposure mask along with the corresponding dimensions of these test structures on silicon after exposure. This data is used to tune the models for good predictions. The models will be guaranteed to accurately predict the test structures that has been used in its tuning. However, real designs might have a much greater variety of structures that might not have been included in the test structures. This paper explores a method for compiling the test structures to be used in the model calibration process using design layouts as an input. The method relies on reducing structures in the design layout to the essential unique structure from the lithography models point of view, and thus ensuring that the test structures represent what the model would actually have to predict during the simulations.

  20. Penetration Test Modelling in a Coarse Granular Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breul, P.; Benz, M.; Gourvès, R.; Saussine, G.

    2009-06-01

    Penetration test is a simple and useful test to characterize soils and granular materials. Several studies have shown the link between cone penetration resistance and density for a given material if the relation connecting these two parameters has been established beforehand. A granular materials bank currently including more than 35 granular materials has been developed to this end. Unfortunately, to be able to generalize and cover the broadest possible material range, it would be necessary to multiply the tests and the number of materials. Moreover in coarse granular media, it is necessary to carry out a large number of tests in order to achieve a reliable relation between density and cone resistance.Consequently, being able to model this test in a realistic way will enable increasing the number of tests on a material and carry out more precise parametric studies to evaluate the influence of any parameter on the test response. This article presents the work carried out to model a penetration test within a coarse granular medium. The penetrometer used is a light penetrometer with a 2 cm2 cone. The first part will present the experimental protocol developed with the material bank in order to establish the relation between cone resistance and material density. The results obtained on a coarse material of a railway ballast type will be presented. The second part will present the test modelling using discrete elements and parameter identification to obtain the relation found in the experimental tests and connecting cone resistance to material density.

  1. Formulation of consumables management models: Test plan for the mission planning processor working model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The test plan and test procedures to be used in the verification and validation of the software being implemented in the mission planning processor working model program are documented. The mission planning processor is a user oriented tool for consumables management and is part of the total consumables subsystem management concept. An overview of the working model is presented. Execution of the test plan will comprehensively exercise the working model software. An overview of the test plan, including a testing schedule, is presented along with the test plan for the unit, module, and system levels. The criteria used to validate the working model results for each consumables subsystem is discussed.

  2. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  3. Functional Testing Protocols for Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software

    SciTech Connect

    Jump, David; Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael

    2013-09-06

    This document describes procedures for testing and validating proprietary baseline energy modeling software accuracy in predicting energy use over the period of interest, such as a month or a year. The procedures are designed according to the methodology used for public domain baselining software in another LBNL report that was (like the present report) prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric Company: ?Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing Protocols? (referred to here as the ?Model Analysis Report?). The test procedure focuses on the quality of the software?s predictions rather than on the specific algorithms used to predict energy use. In this way the software vendor is not required to divulge or share proprietary information about how their software works, while enabling stakeholders to assess its performance.

  4. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H End of FY-06 Irradiation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-1D, AFC-1G and

    2006-09-01

    The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. The AFC-1 irradiation experiments on transmutation fuels are expected to provide irradiation performance data on non-fertile and low-fertile fuel forms specifically, irradiation growth and swelling, helium production, fission gas release, fission product and fuel constituent migration, fuel phase equilibria, and fuel-cladding chemical interaction. Contained in this report are the to-date physics evaluations performed on three of the AFC-1 experiments; AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H. The AFC-1D irradiation experiment consists of metallic non-fertile fuel compositions with minor actinides for potential use in accelerator driven systems and AFC-1G and AFC-1H irradiation experiments are part of the fast neutron reactor fuel development effort. The metallic fuel experiments and nitride experiment are high burnup analogs to previously irradiated experiments and are to be irradiated to = 40 at.% burnup and = 25 at.% burnup, respectively. Based on the results of the physics evaluations it has been determined that the AFC-1D experiment will remain in the ATR for approximately 4 additional cycles, the AFC-1G experiment for an additional 4-5 cycles, and the AFC-1H experiment for approximately 8 additional cycles, in order to reach the desired programmatic burnup. The specific irradiation schedule for these tests will be determined based on future physics evaluations and all results will be documented in subsequent reports.

  5. Generalized F test and generalized deviance test in two-way ANOVA models for randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juan; He, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting treatment effects in a randomized trial in the presence of an additional covariate. By reexpressing a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) model in a logistic regression framework, we derive generalized F tests and generalized deviance tests, which provide better power in detecting common location-scale changes of treatment outcomes than the classical F test. The null distributions of the test statistics are independent of the nuisance parameters in the models, so the critical values can be easily determined by Monte Carlo methods. We use simulation studies to demonstrate how the proposed tests perform compared with the classical F test. We also use data from a clinical study to illustrate possible savings in sample sizes.

  6. On Insensitivity of the Chi-Square Model Test to Nonlinear Misspecification in Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooijaart, Ab; Satorra, Albert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we show that for some structural equation models (SEM), the classical chi-square goodness-of-fit test is unable to detect the presence of nonlinear terms in the model. As an example, we consider a regression model with latent variables and interactions terms. Not only the model test has zero power against that type of…

  7. The association between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and cancer susceptibility: Evidence from 33 studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyi; Gao, Yisha; He, Jing; Cai, Jiao; Ta, Na; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Jinhong; Zheng, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant folate metabolism is closely related to tumorigenesis. Genetic variations in the Reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) may alter the progress of folate metabolism, and thereby cause the initiation and progress of the cancer. Considerable studies have performed to investigate the association between RFC1 G80A (rs1051266) polymorphism and cancer susceptibility, but the conclusions were conflicting. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to reevaluate the association of RFC1 G80A polymorphism with cancer risk. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for eligible studies. The association of RFC1 G80A polymorphism and cancer risk was evaluated by the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The significant association was found between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and hematological malignance susceptibility (A vs. G: OR=1.11, 95%CI=1.003-1.23, P=0.045; GA vs. GG: OR=1.18, 95%CI=1.06-1.31, P=0.002; AA+GA vs. GG: OR=1.18, 95%CI=1.07-1.29, P=0.001). Stratified analysis by ethnicity indicated that the association became more prominent among Caucasians (GA vs. GG: OR=1.28, 95%CI=1.12-1.45, P<0.001; AA+GA vs. GG: OR=1.21, 95%CI=1.08-1.36, P=0.001). In term of the cancer type, this polymorphism significantly increased the risk of acute lymphoblast leukemia (GA vs. GG: OR=1.13, 95%CI=1.001-1.28, P=0.048; AA+GA vs. GG: OR=1.28, 95%CI=1.13-1.46, P<0.001) and acute myeloid leukemia (GA vs. GG: OR=2.57, 95%CI=1.37-4.85, P=0.003). No significant association between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and overall solid cancer risk was observed, but a protective association with digestive cancer risk was found (GA vs. GG: OR=0.89, 95%CI= 0.81-0.99, P=0.030). The comprehensive meta-analysis encouraged the notion that RFC1 G80A polymorphism may play an important role in hematopoietic system malignance. These findings need further validation in the large multicenter investigations. PMID:26819637

  8. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent translational regulation of Id1 involves the PPM1G phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaiming; Wang, Lanfang; Feng, Wei; Feng, Yue; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.

    2016-01-01

    Id1 is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional modulator that increases the aggressiveness of malignant glial neoplasms. Since most glioblastomas (GBMs) show increased phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K) signaling, we sought to determine whether this pathway regulates Id1 expression. Higher basal Id1 expression correlates with dysregulated PI-3K signaling in multiple established GBM cell lines. Further characterization of PI-3K-dependent Id1 regulation reveals that chemical or genetic inhibition of PI-3K signaling reduces Id1 protein but not mRNA expression. Overall, PI-3K signaling appears to enhance Id1 translation with no significant effect on its stability. PI-3K signaling is known to regulate protein translation through mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, which reduces its association with and inhibition of the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Interestingly, while inhibition of PI-3K and AKT lowers 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and expression of Id1 in all cases, inhibition of TORC1 with rapamycin does not consistently have a similar effect suggesting an alternative mechanism for PI-3K-dependent regulation of Id1 translation. We now identify a potential role for the serine-threonine phosphatase PPM1G in translational regulation of Id1 protein expression. PPM1G knockdown by siRNA increase both 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and Id1 expression and PPM1G and 4E-BP1 co-associates in GBM cells. Furthermore, PPM1G is a phosphoprotein and this phosphorylation appears to be regulated by PI-3K activity. Finally, PI-3K inhibition increases PPM1G activity when assessed by an in vitro phosphatase assay. Our findings provide the first evidence that the PI-3K/AKT signaling pathway modulates PPM1G activity resulting in a shift in the balance between hyper- and hypo-phosphorylated 4E-BP1 and translational regulation of Id1 expression. PMID:27065332

  9. Instrumentation and testing of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    SciTech Connect

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Pace, D.W.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1997-04-01

    Static overpressurization tests of two scale models of nuclear containment structures - a steel containment vessel (SCV) representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR) - are being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper discusses plans for instrumentation and testing of the PCCV model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Modeling Student Test-Taking Motivation in the Context of an Adaptive Achievement Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.; Kingsbury, G. Gage

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the utility of response time-based analyses in understanding the behavior of unmotivated test takers. For the data from an adaptive achievement test, patterns of observed rapid-guessing behavior and item response accuracy were compared to the behavior expected under several types of models that have been proposed to represent…

  11. Model-Driven Test Generation of Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easwaran, Arvind; Hall, Brendan; Schweiker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a novel test generation technique for distributed systems. Utilizing formal models and formal verification tools, spe cifically the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL) tool-suite from SRI, we present techniques to generate concurrent test vectors for distrib uted systems. These are initially explored within an informal test validation context and later extended to achieve full MC/DC coverage of the TTEthernet protocol operating within a system-centric context.

  12. Testing of a Buran flight-model fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schautz, M.; Dudley, G.; Baron, F.; Popov, V.; Pospelov, B.

    A demonstration test program has been performed at European Space Research & Technology Center (ESTEC) on a flight-model Russian 'Photon' fuel cell. The tests, conducted at various power levels up to 23 kW, included current/voltage characteristics, transient behavior, autothermal startup, and impedance measurements. In addition, the product water and the purge gas were analyzed. All test goals were met and no electrochemical limitations were apparent.

  13. 5. Historic photo of scale model of rocket engine test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic photo of scale model of rocket engine test facility, June 18, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45264. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. Three Tests of the Learned Helplessness Model of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Paul H.; Willis, Max H.

    1978-01-01

    Three studies, testing predictions derived from Seligman's helplessness model of depression and generally supported by earlier research, are reported. The first addressed the finding that depressed individuals evidence a perception of noncontingency, the second tested the prediction that undergraduates in whom helplessness had been induced would…

  15. Improving Schools through Inservice Test Construction: The Rossville Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, David Alan

    A method for improving curriculum and schools through the local development of competency tests in basic skills--the Competency-Rossville Model (CRM)--is outlined. The method was originated in the school system of Rossville (Illinois) and has been tested in five other midwestern school systems. The approach leads the faculty of the school, with…

  16. Testing and modeling of PBX-9591 shock initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kim; Foley, Timothy; Novak, Alan; Dickson, Peter; Parker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing effort to develop a detonation sensitivity test for PBX-9501 that is suitable for studying pristine and damaged HE. The approach involves testing and comparing the sensitivities of HE pressed to various densities and those of pre-damaged samples with similar porosities. The ultimate objectives are to understand the response of pre-damaged HE to shock impacts and to develop practical computational models for use in system analysis codes for HE safety studies. Computer simulation with the CTH shock physics code is used to aid the experimental design and analyze the test results. In the calculations, initiation and growth or failure of detonation are modeled with the empirical HVRB model. The historical LANL SSGT and LSGT were reviewed and it was determined that a new, modified gap test be developed to satisfy the current requirements. In the new test, the donor/spacer/acceptor assembly is placed in a holder that is designed to work with fixtures for pre-damaging the acceptor sample. CTH simulations were made of the gap test with PBX-9501 samples pressed to three different densities. The calculated sensitivities were validated by test observations. The agreement between the computed and experimental critical gap thicknesses, ranging from 9 to 21 mm under various test conditions, is well within 1 mm. These results show that the numerical modeling is a valuable complement to the experimental efforts in studying and understanding shock initiation of PBX-9501.

  17. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  18. Testing for Equivalence: A Methodology for Computational Cognitive Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Terrence; West, Robert

    2010-12-01

    The equivalence test (Stewart and West, 2007; Stewart, 2007) is a statistical measure for evaluating the similarity between a model and the system being modelled. It is designed to avoid over-fitting and to generate an easily interpretable summary of the quality of a model. We apply the equivalence test to two tasks: Repeated Binary Choice (Erev et al., 2010) and Dynamic Stocks and Flows (Gonzalez and Dutt, 2007). In the first case, we find a broad range of statistically equivalent models (and win a prediction competition) while identifying particular aspects of the task that are not yet adequately captured. In the second case, we re-evaluate results from the Dynamic Stocks and Flows challenge, demonstrating how our method emphasizes the breadth of coverage of a model and how it can be used for comparing different models. We argue that the explanatory power of models hinges on numerical similarity to empirical data over a broad set of measures.

  19. Testing and reference model analysis of FTTH system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiancheng; Cui, Wanlong; Chen, Ying

    2009-08-01

    With rapid development of Internet and broadband access network, the technologies of xDSL, FTTx+LAN , WLAN have more applications, new network service emerges in endless stream, especially the increase of network game, meeting TV, video on demand, etc. FTTH supports all present and future service with enormous bandwidth, including traditional telecommunication service, traditional data service and traditional TV service, and the future digital TV and VOD. With huge bandwidth of FTTH, it wins the final solution of broadband network, becomes the final goal of development of optical access network.. Fiber to the Home (FTTH) will be the goal of telecommunications cable broadband access. In accordance with the development trend of telecommunication services, to enhance the capacity of integrated access network, to achieve triple-play (voice, data, image), based on the existing optical Fiber to the curb (FTTC), Fiber To The Zone (FTTZ), Fiber to the Building (FTTB) user optical cable network, the optical fiber can extend to the FTTH system of end-user by using EPON technology. The article first introduced the basic components of FTTH system; and then explain the reference model and reference point for testing of the FTTH system; Finally, by testing connection diagram, the testing process, expected results, primarily analyze SNI Interface Testing, PON interface testing, Ethernet performance testing, UNI interface testing, Ethernet functional testing, PON functional testing, equipment functional testing, telephone functional testing, operational support capability testing and so on testing of FTTH system. ...

  20. Test model designs for advanced refractory ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of space vehicles will be subjected to severe aerothermal loads and will require an improved thermal protection system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle components. In order to ensure the satisfactory performance system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle materials and components, testing is to be performed in environments similar to space flight. The design and fabrication of the test models should be fairly simple but still accomplish test objectives. In the Advanced Refractory Ceramic Materials test series, the models and model holders will need to withstand the required heat fluxes of 340 to 817 W/sq cm or surface temperatures in the range of 2700 K to 3000 K. The model holders should provide one dimensional (1-D) heat transfer to the samples and the appropriate flow field without compromising the primary test objectives. The optical properties such as the effective emissivity, catalytic efficiency coefficients, thermal properties, and mass loss measurements are also taken into consideration in the design process. Therefore, it is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the design schemes for different models and model holders that would accommodate these test requirements and ensure the safe operation in a typical arc jet facility.

  1. Testing the reward prediction error hypothesis with an axiomatic model.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Robb B; Dean, Mark; Caplin, Andrew; Glimcher, Paul W

    2010-10-01

    Neuroimaging studies typically identify neural activity correlated with the predictions of highly parameterized models, like the many reward prediction error (RPE) models used to study reinforcement learning. Identified brain areas might encode RPEs or, alternatively, only have activity correlated with RPE model predictions. Here, we use an alternate axiomatic approach rooted in economic theory to formally test the entire class of RPE models on neural data. We show that measurements of human neural activity from the striatum, medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and posterior cingulate cortex satisfy necessary and sufficient conditions for the entire class of RPE models. However, activity measured from the anterior insula falsifies the axiomatic model, and therefore no RPE model can account for measured activity. Further analysis suggests the anterior insula might instead encode something related to the salience of an outcome. As cognitive neuroscience matures and models proliferate, formal approaches of this kind that assess entire model classes rather than specific model exemplars may take on increased significance.

  2. Performance and endurance tests of a laboratory model multipropellant resistojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl; Whalen, Margaret V.; Sovey, James S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an effort to demonstrate the technological readiness of a long-life multipropellant resistojet for Space Station auxiliary propulsion. A laboratory model resistojet made from grain-stabilized platinum served as a test bed to evaluate the design characteristics, fabrication methods, and operating strategies for an engineering model multipropellant resistojet developed as part of the NASA Space Station propulsion system Advanced Development Program. The laboratory model thruster was characterized for performance on a variety of fluids expected to be available onboard a Space Station, then subjected to a 2000-h, 2400-thermal-cycle endurance test using carbon dioxide propellant. Maximum thruster temperatures were approximately 1400 C. Significant observations from the laboratory model thruster performance and endurance tests are discussed as they relate to the design of the engineering model thruster.

  3. Calculation of flight vibration levels of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with existing flight vibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopher, R.; Twomey, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley is sponsoring a rotorcraft structural dynamics program with the objective to establish in the U.S. a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models for calculations to support industrial design of helicopter airframe structures. In the initial phase of the program, teams from the major U.S. manufacturers of helicopter airframes will apply extant finite element analysis methods to calculate loads and vibrations of helicopter airframes, and perform correlations between analysis and measurements. The aforementioned rotorcraft structural dynamics program was given the acronym DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Method for Vibrations). Sikorsky's RDYNE Rotorcraft Dynamics Analysis used for the correlation study, the specifics of the application of RDYNE to the AH-1G, and comparisons of the predictions of the method with flight data for loads and vibrations on the AH-1G are described. RDYNE was able to predict trends of variations of loads and vibrations with airspeed, but in some instances magnitudes differed from measured results by factors of two or three to one. Sensitivities were studied of predictions to rotor inflow modeling, effects of torsional modes, number of blade bending modes, fuselage structural damping, and hub modal content.

  4. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    PubMed

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing.

  5. Estrogen receptor testing and 10-year mortality from breast cancer: A model for determining testing strategy

    PubMed Central

    Naugler, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Background: The use of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER) expressing breast carcinomas represents a major advance in personalized cancer treatment. Because there is no benefit (and indeed there is increased morbidity and mortality) associated with the use of tamoxifen therapy in ER-negative breast cancer, its use is restricted to women with ER expressing cancers. However, correctly classifying cancers as ER positive or negative has been challenging given the high reported false negative test rates for ER expression in surgical specimens. In this paper I model practice recommendations using published information from clinical trials to address the question of whether there is a false negative test rate above which it is more efficacious to forgo ER testing and instead treat all patients with tamoxifen regardless of ER test results. Methods: I used data from randomized clinical trials to model two different hypothetical treatment strategies: (1) the current strategy of treating only ER positive women with tamoxifen and (2) an alternative strategy where all women are treated with tamoxifen regardless of ER test results. The variables used in the model are literature-derived survival rates of the different combinations of ER positivity and treatment with tamoxifen, varying true ER positivity rates and varying false negative ER testing rates. The outcome variable was hypothetical 10-year survival. Results: The model predicted that there will be a range of true ER rates and false negative test rates above which it would be more efficacious to treat all women with breast cancer with tamoxifen and forgo ER testing. This situation occurred with high true positive ER rates and false negative ER test rates in the range of 20-30%. Conclusions: It is hoped that this model will provide an example of the potential importance of diagnostic error on clinical outcomes and furthermore will give an example of how the effect of that error could be

  6. Test Driven Development: Lessons from a Simple Scientific Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clune, T. L.; Kuo, K.

    2010-12-01

    In the commercial software industry, unit testing frameworks have emerged as a disruptive technology that has permanently altered the process by which software is developed. Unit testing frameworks significantly reduce traditional barriers, both practical and psychological, to creating and executing tests that verify software implementations. A new development paradigm, known as test driven development (TDD), has emerged from unit testing practices, in which low-level tests (i.e. unit tests) are created by developers prior to implementing new pieces of code. Although somewhat counter-intuitive, this approach actually improves developer productivity. In addition to reducing the average time for detecting software defects (bugs), the requirement to provide procedure interfaces that enable testing frequently leads to superior design decisions. Although TDD is widely accepted in many software domains, its applicability to scientific modeling still warrants reasonable skepticism. While the technique is clearly relevant for infrastructure layers of scientific models such as the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), numerical and scientific components pose a number of challenges to TDD that are not often encountered in commercial software. Nonetheless, our experience leads us to believe that the technique has great potential not only for developer productivity, but also as a tool for understanding and documenting the basic scientific assumptions upon which our models are implemented. We will provide a brief introduction to test driven development and then discuss our experience in using TDD to implement a relatively simple numerical model that simulates the growth of snowflakes. Many of the lessons learned are directly applicable to larger scientific models.

  7. Crush testing, characterizing, and modeling the crashworthiness of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, David Michael, Jr.

    Research in the field of crashworthiness of composite materials is presented. A new crush test method was produced to characterize the crush behavior of composite laminates. In addition, a model of the crush behavior and a method for rank ordering the energy absorption capability of various laminates were developed. The new crush test method was used for evaluating the crush behavior of flat carbon/epoxy composite specimens at quasi-static and dynamic rates. The University of Utah crush test fixture was designed to support the flat specimen against catastrophic buckling. A gap, where the specimen is unsupported, allowed unhindered crushing of the specimen. In addition, the specimen's failure modes could be clearly observed during crush testing. Extensive crush testing was conducted wherein the crush force and displacement data were collected to calculate the energy absorption, and high speed video was captured during dynamic testing. Crush tests were also performed over a range of fixture gap heights. The basic failure modes were buckling, crack growth, and fracture. Gap height variations resulted in poorly, properly, and overly constrained specimens. In addition, guidelines for designing a composite laminate for crashworthiness were developed. Modeling of the crush behavior consisted of the delamination and fracture of a single ply or group of like plies during crushing. Delamination crack extension was modeled using the mode I energy release rate, G lc, where an elastica approach was used to obtain the strain energy. Variations in Glc were briefly explored with double cantilever beam tests wherein crack extension occurred along a multidirectional ply interface. The model correctly predicted the failure modes for most of the test cases, and offered insight into how the input parameters affect the model. The ranking method related coefficients of the laminate and sublaminate stiffness matrices, the ply locations within the laminate, and the laminate thickness. The

  8. Therapeutic rAAVrh10 Mediated SOD1 Silencing in Adult SOD1(G93A) Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Borel, Florie; Gernoux, Gwladys; Cardozo, Brynn; Metterville, Jake P; Toro Cabreja, Gabriela C; Song, Lina; Su, Qin; Gao, Guang Ping; Elmallah, Mai K; Brown, Robert H; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease; survival in ALS is typically 3-5 years. No treatment extends patient survival by more than three months. Approximately 20% of familial ALS and 1-3% of sporadic ALS patients carry a mutation in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). In a transgenic ALS mouse model expressing the mutant SOD1(G93A) protein, silencing the SOD1 gene prolongs survival. One study reports a therapeutic effect of silencing the SOD1 gene in systemically treated adult ALS mice; this was achieved with a short hairpin RNA, a silencing molecule that has raised multiple safety concerns, and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) 9. We report here a silencing method based on an artificial microRNA termed miR-SOD1 systemically delivered using adeno-associated virus rAAVrh10, a serotype with a demonstrated safety profile in CNS clinical trials. Silencing of SOD1 in adult SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice with this construct profoundly delayed both disease onset and death in the SOD1(G93A) mice, and significantly preserved muscle strength and motor and respiratory functions. We also document that intrathecal delivery of the same rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 in nonhuman primates significantly and safely silences SOD1 in lower motor neurons. This study supports the view that rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 merits further development for the treatment of SOD1-linked ALS in humans. PMID:26710998

  9. Therapeutic rAAVrh10 Mediated SOD1 Silencing in Adult SOD1G93A Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Florie; Gernoux, Gwladys; Cardozo, Brynn; Metterville, Jake P.; Toro Cabreja, Gabriela C.; Song, Lina; Su, Qin; Gao, Guang Ping; Elmallah, Mai K.; Brown, Robert H.; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease; survival in ALS is typically 3–5 years. No treatment extends patient survival by more than three months. Approximately 20% of familial ALS and 1–3% of sporadic ALS patients carry a mutation in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). In a transgenic ALS mouse model expressing the mutant SOD1G93A protein, silencing the SOD1 gene prolongs survival. One study reports a therapeutic effect of silencing the SOD1 gene in systemically treated adult ALS mice; this was achieved with a short hairpin RNA, a silencing molecule that has raised multiple safety concerns, and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) 9. We report here a silencing method based on an artificial microRNA termed miR-SOD1 systemically delivered using adeno-associated virus rAAVrh10, a serotype with a demonstrated safety profile in CNS clinical trials. Silencing of SOD1 in adult SOD1G93A transgenic mice with this construct profoundly delayed both disease onset and death in the SOD1G93A mice, and significantly preserved muscle strength and motor and respiratory functions. We also document that intrathecal delivery of the same rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 in nonhuman primates significantly and safely silences SOD1 in lower motor neurons. This study supports the view that rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 merits further development for the treatment of SOD1-linked ALS in humans. PMID:26710998

  10. Transgenic Mouse Models Transferred into the Test Tube: New Perspectives for Developmental Toxicity Testing In Vitro?

    PubMed

    Kugler, Josephine; Luch, Andreas; Oelgeschläger, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Despite our increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling embryogenesis, the identification and characterization of teratogenic substances still heavily relies on animal testing. Embryonic development depends on cell-autonomous and non-autonomous processes including spatiotemporally regulated extracellular signaling activities. These have been elucidated in transgenic mouse models harboring easily detectable reporter genes under the control of evolutionarily conserved signaling cascades. We propose combining these transgenic mouse models and cells derived thereof with existing alternative toxicological testing strategies. This would enable the plausibility of in vitro data to be verified in light of in vivo data and, ultimately, facilitate regulatory acceptance of in vitro test methods.

  11. Residual flexibility test method for verification of constrained structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for deriving constrained modes and frequencies from a model correlated to a set of free-free test modes and a set of measured residual flexibilities. The method involves a simple modification of the MacNeal and Rubin component mode representation to allow verification of a constrained structural model. Results for two spaceflight structures show quick convergence of constrained modes using an easily measurable set of free-free modes plus the residual flexibility matrix or its boundary partition. This paper further validates the residual flexibility approach as an alternative test/analysis method when fixed-base testing proves impractical.

  12. Testing Mediation in Structural Equation Modeling: The Effectiveness of the Test of Joint Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leth-Steensen, Craig; Gallitto, Elena

    2016-01-01

    A large number of approaches have been proposed for estimating and testing the significance of indirect effects in mediation models. In this study, four sets of Monte Carlo simulations involving full latent variable structural equation models were run in order to contrast the effectiveness of the currently popular bias-corrected bootstrapping…

  13. GSD-1G and MPI-DING Reference Glasses for In Situ and Bulk Isotopic Determination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jochum, K.P.; Wilson, S.A.; Abouchami, W.; Amini, M.; Chmeleff, J.; Eisenhauer, A.; Hegner, E.; Iaccheri, L.M.; Kieffer, B.; Krause, J.; McDonough, W.F.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Raczek, I.; Rudnick, R.L.; Scholz, Donna K.; Steinhoefel, G.; Stoll, B.; Stracke, A.; Tonarini, S.; Weis, D.; Weis, U.; Woodhead, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contains the results of an extensive isotopic study of United States Geological Survey GSD-1G and MPI-DING reference glasses. Thirteen different laboratories were involved using high-precision bulk (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS) and microanalytical (LA-MC-ICP-MS, LA-ICP-MS) techniques. Detailed studies were performed to demonstrate the large-scale and small-scale homogeneity of the reference glasses. Together with previously published isotopic data from ten other laboratories, preliminary reference and information values as well as their uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were determined for H, O, Li, B, Si, Ca, Sr, Nd, Hf, Pb, Th and U isotopes using the recommendations of the International Association of Geoanalysts for certification of reference materials. Our results indicate that GSD-1G and the MPI-DING glasses are suitable reference materials for microanalytical and bulk analytical purposes. Ce document contient les r??sultats d'une importante ??tude isotopique des verres de r??f??rence USGS GSD-1G et MPI-DING. Treize laboratoires diff??rents ont particip?? au travers de techniques analytiques de haute pr??cision travaillant soit sur ??chantillon total (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS) soit par microanalyse ??in situ?? (LA-MC-ICP-MS, LA-ICP-MS). ?? 2010 The Authors. Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research ?? 2010 International Association of Geoanalysts.

  14. Complete genome of a European hepatitis C virus subtype 1g isolate: phylogenetic and genetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bracho, Maria A; Saludes, Verónica; Martró, Elisa; Bargalló, Ana; González-Candelas, Fernando; Ausina, Vicent

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus isolates have been classified into six main genotypes and a variable number of subtypes within each genotype, mainly based on phylogenetic analysis. Analyses of the genetic relationship among genotypes and subtypes are more reliable when complete genome sequences (or at least the full coding region) are used; however, so far 31 of 80 confirmed or proposed subtypes have at least one complete genome available. Of these, 20 correspond to confirmed subtypes of epidemic interest. Results We present and analyse the first complete genome sequence of a HCV subtype 1g isolate. Phylogenetic and genetic distance analyses reveal that HCV-1g is the most divergent subtype among the HCV-1 confirmed subtypes. Potential genomic recombination events between genotypes or subtype 1 genomes were ruled out. We demonstrate phylogenetic congruence of previously deposited partial sequences of HCV-1g with respect to our sequence. Conclusion In light of this, we propose changing the current status of its subtype-specific designation from provisional to confirmed. PMID:18533988

  15. TASS Model Application for Testing the TDWAP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, George F.

    2009-01-01

    One of the operational modes of the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) model simulates the three-dimensional interaction of wake vortices within turbulent domains in the presence of thermal stratification. The model allows the investigation of turbulence and stratification on vortex transport and decay. The model simulations for this work all assumed fully-periodic boundary conditions to remove the effects from any surface interaction. During the Base Period of this contract, NWRA completed generation of these datasets but only presented analysis for the neutral stratification runs of that set (Task 3.4.1). Phase 1 work began with the analysis of the remaining stratification datasets, and in the analysis we discovered discrepancies with the vortex time to link predictions. This finding necessitated investigating the source of the anomaly, and we found a problem with the background turbulence. Using the most up to date version TASS with some important defect fixes, we regenerated a larger turbulence domain, and verified the vortex time to link with a few cases before proceeding to regenerate the entire 25 case set (Task 3.4.2). The effort of Phase 2 (Task 3.4.3) concentrated on analysis of several scenarios investigating the effects of closely spaced aircraft. The objective was to quantify the minimum aircraft separations necessary to avoid vortex interactions between neighboring aircraft. The results consist of spreadsheets of wake data and presentation figures prepared for NASA technical exchanges. For these formation cases, NASA carried out the actual TASS simulations and NWRA performed the analysis of the results by making animations, line plots, and other presentation figures. This report contains the description of the work performed during this final phase of the contract, the analysis procedures adopted, and sample plots of the results from the analysis performed.

  16. Model validation of the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine using substructure modal-testing

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Lauffer, J.P.; Gomez, A.J.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine is a vertical-axis wind turbine, thirty-four meters in diameter, designed to provide a test-bed for research in aerodynamics, structures and control. In order to design a large wind turbine, knowledge of the modal frequencies and mode shapes is essential for predicting structural response. During the design, analytical or finite element models are utilized for estimates of these modal parameters. However, when hardware becomes available, modal testing can be used to verify or update the models. The concept of substructure modal testing was developed for the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed in order to more fully evaluate the accuracy of the finite element model. Instead of performing only one test on the entire turbine, separate tests and analyses were performed on major substructures of the turbine, including three separate blade sections, the tower supported by the guy cables, and the entire turbine. The results were then compared to analytical predictions from the finite element models of the substructures and the entire turbine. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Animal models for testing anti-prion drugs.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Elezgarai, Saioa R; Eraña, Hasier; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases belong to a group of fatal infectious diseases with no effective therapies available. Throughout the last 35 years, less than 50 different drugs have been tested in different experimental animal models without hopeful results. An important limitation when searching for new drugs is the existence of appropriate models of the disease. The three different possible origins of prion diseases require the existence of different animal models for testing anti-prion compounds. Wild type, over-expressing transgenic mice and other more sophisticated animal models have been used to evaluate a diversity of compounds which some of them were previously tested in different in vitro experimental models. The complexity of prion diseases will require more pre-screening studies, reliable sporadic (or spontaneous) animal models and accurate chemical modifications of the selected compounds before having an effective therapy against human prion diseases. This review is intended to put on display the more relevant animal models that have been used in the search of new antiprion therapies and describe some possible procedures when handling chemical compounds presumed to have anti-prion activity prior to testing them in animal models.

  18. An Empirical Test of a Model of Resistance to Persuasion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Burgoon, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Tests a model of resistance to persuasion based upon variables not considered by earlier congruity and inoculation models. Supports the prediction that the kind of critical response set induced and the target of the criticism are mediators of resistance to persuasion. (JMF)

  19. Premarital Contraceptive Use: A Test of Two Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamater, John; Maccorquodale, Patricia

    1978-01-01

    Tests the utility of two models for explaining contraceptive use by sexually active women (N=391). Significant relationships were found between use and permissive premarital standards and standard-behavior consistency. Neither model is particularly applicable to the contraceptive reports of sexually active males (N=354). (Author)

  20. A Negative Binomial Regression Model for Accuracy Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Lai-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Rasch used a Poisson model to analyze errors and speed in reading tests. An important property of the Poisson distribution is that the mean and variance are equal. However, in social science research, it is very common for the variance to be greater than the mean (i.e., the data are overdispersed). This study embeds the Rasch model within an…

  1. Using fMRI to Test Models of Complex Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John R.; Carter, Cameron S.; Fincham, Jon M.; Qin, Yulin; Ravizza, Susan M.; Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the potential of fMRI to test assumptions about different components in models of complex cognitive tasks. If the components of a model can be associated with specific brain regions, one can make predictions for the temporal course of the BOLD response in these regions. An event-locked procedure is described for dealing…

  2. Unit-Weighted Scales Imply Models that Should Be Tested!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauducel, Andre; Leue, Anja

    2013-01-01

    In several studies unit-weighted sum scales based on the unweighted sum of items are derived from the pattern of salient loadings in confirmatory factor analysis. The problem of this procedure is that the unit-weighted sum scales imply a model other than the initially tested confirmatory factor model. In consequence, it remains generally unknown…

  3. The Reformulated Model of Learned Helplessness: An Empirical Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothblum, Esther D.; Green, Leon

    Abramson, Seligman and Teasdale's reformulated model of learned helplessness hypothesized that an attribution of causality intervenes between the perception of noncontingency and the future expectation of future noncontingency. To test this model, relationships between attribution and performance under failure, success, and control conditions were…

  4. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  5. Learning-Testing Process in Classroom: An Empirical Simulation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buda, Rodolphe

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical micro-simulation model of the teaching and the testing process in the classroom (Programs and sample data are available--the actual names of pupils have been hidden). It is a non-econometric micro-simulation model describing informational behaviors of the pupils, based on the observation of the pupils'…

  6. Software Testing and Verification in Climate Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, Thomas L.; Rood, RIchard B.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 30 years most climate models have grown from relatively simple representations of a few atmospheric processes to a complex multi-disciplinary system. Computer infrastructure over that period has gone from punch card mainframes to modem parallel clusters. Model implementations have become complex, brittle, and increasingly difficult to extend and maintain. Existing verification processes for model implementations rely almost exclusively upon some combination of detailed analysis of output from full climate simulations and system-level regression tests. In additional to being quite costly in terms of developer time and computing resources, these testing methodologies are limited in terms of the types of defects that can be detected, isolated and diagnosed. Mitigating these weaknesses of coarse-grained testing with finer-grained "unit" tests has been perceived as cumbersome and counter-productive. In the commercial software sector, recent advances in tools and methodology have led to a renaissance for systematic fine-grained testing. We discuss the availability of analogous tools for scientific software and examine benefits that similar testing methodologies could bring to climate modeling software. We describe the unique challenges faced when testing complex numerical algorithms and suggest techniques to minimize and/or eliminate the difficulties.

  7. Modeling cross-hole slug tests in an unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    A modified version of a published slug test model for unconfined aquifers is applied to cross-hole slug test data collected in field tests conducted at the Widen site in Switzerland. The model accounts for water-table effects using the linearized kinematic condition. The model also accounts for inertial effects in source and observation wells. The primary objective of this work is to demonstrate applicability of this semi-analytical model to multi-well and multi-level pneumatic slug tests. The pneumatic perturbation was applied at discrete intervals in a source well and monitored at discrete vertical intervals in observation wells. The source and observation well pairs were separated by distances of up to 4 m. The analysis yielded vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and specific yield at observation well locations. The hydraulic parameter estimates are compared to results from prior pumping and single-well slug tests conducted at the site, as well as to estimates from particle size analyses of sediment collected from boreholes during well installation. The results are in general agreement with results from prior tests and are indicative of a sand and gravel aquifer. Sensitivity analysis show that model identification of specific yield is strongest at late-time. However, the usefulness of late-time data is limited due to the low signal-to-noise ratios.

  8. Testing goodness of fit of parametric models for censored data.

    PubMed

    Nysen, Ruth; Aerts, Marc; Faes, Christel

    2012-09-20

    We propose and study a goodness-of-fit test for left-censored, right-censored, and interval-censored data assuming random censorship. Main motivation comes from dietary exposure assessment in chemical risk assessment, where the determination of an appropriate distribution for concentration data is of major importance. We base the new goodness-of-fit test procedure proposed in this paper on the order selection test. As part of the testing procedure, we extend the null model to a series of nested alternative models for censored data. Then, we use a modified AIC model selection to select the best model to describe the data. If a model with one or more extra parameters is selected, then we reject the null hypothesis. As an alternative to the use of the asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic, we define a bootstrap-based procedure. We illustrate the applicability of the test procedure on data of cadmium concentrations and on data from the Signal Tandmobiel study and demonstrate its performance characteristics through simulation studies. PMID:22714389

  9. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  10. Atmospheric Probe Model: Construction and Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Jerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The material contained in this document represents a summary of the results of a low speed wind tunnel test program to determine the performance of an atmospheric probe at low speed. The probe configuration tested consists of a 2/3 scale model constructed from a combination of hard maple wood and aluminum stock. The model design includes approximately 130 surface static pressure taps. Additional hardware incorporated in the baseline model provides a mechanism for simulating external and internal trailing edge split flaps for probe flow control. Test matrix parameters include probe side slip angle, external/internal split flap deflection angle, and trip strip applications. Test output database includes surface pressure distributions on both inner and outer annular wings and probe center line velocity distributions from forward probe to aft probe locations.

  11. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Steam Generator Few Tube Test model post-test examination

    SciTech Connect

    Impellezzeri, J.R.; Camaret, T.L.; Friske, W.H.

    1981-03-11

    The Steam Generator Few Tube Test (FTT) was part of an extensive testing program carried out in support of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) steam generator design. The testing of full-length seven-tube evaporator and three-tube superheater models of the CRBRP design was conducted to provide steady-state thermal/hydraulic performance data to full power per tube and to verify the absence of multi-year endurance problems. This paper describes the problems encountered with the mechanical features of the FTT model design which led to premature test termination, and the results of the post-test examination. Conditions of tube bowing and significant tube and tube support gouging was observed. An interpretation of the visual and metallurgical observations is also presented. The CRBRP steam generator has undergone design evaluations to resolve observed deficiences found in the FFTM.

  12. Semi-span model testing in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokani, Ndaona; Milholen, William E., II

    1993-01-01

    A semi-span testing technique has been proposed for the NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Semi-span testing has several advantages including (1) larger model size, giving increased Reynolds number capability; (2) improved model fidelity, allowing ease of flap and slat positioning which ultimately improves data quality; and (3) reduced construction costs compared with a full-span model. In addition, the increased model size inherently allows for increased model strength, reducing aeroelastic effects at the high dynamic pressure levels necessary to simulate flight Reynolds numbers. The Energy Efficient Transport (EET) full-span model has been modified to become the EET semi-span model. The full-span EET model was tested extensively at both NASA LRC and NASA Ames Research Center. The available full-span data will be useful in validating the semi-span test strategy in the NTF. In spite of the advantages discussed above, the use of a semi-span model does introduce additional challenges which must be addressed in the testing procedure. To minimize the influence of the sidewall boundary layer on the flow over the semi-span model, the model must be off-set from the sidewall. The objective is to remove the semi-span model from the sidewall boundary layer by use of a stand-off geometry. When this is done however, the symmetry along the centerline of the full-span model is lost when the semi-span model is mounted on the wind tunnel sidewall. In addition, the large semi-span model will impose a significant pressure loading on the sidewall boundary layer, which may cause separation. Even under flow conditions where the sidewall boundary layer remains attached, the sidewall boundary layer may adversely effect the flow over the semi-span model. Also, the increased model size and sidewall mounting requires a modified wall correction strategy. With these issues in mind, the semi-span model has been well instrumented with surface pressure taps to

  13. Rapid Model Fabrication and Testing for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced methods for rapid fabrication and instrumentation of hypersonic wind tunnel models are being developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center. Rapid aeroheating model fabrication and measurement techniques using investment casting of ceramic test models and thermographic phosphors are reviewed. More accurate model casting techniques for fabrication of benchmark metal and ceramic test models are being developed using a combination of rapid prototype patterns and investment casting. White light optical scanning is used for coordinate measurements to evaluate the fabrication process and verify model accuracy to +/- 0.002 inches. Higher-temperature (<210C) luminescent coatings are also being developed for simultaneous pressure and temperature mapping, providing global pressure as well as global aeroheating measurements. Together these techniques will provide a more rapid and complete experimental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic database for future aerospace vehicles.

  14. Modeling cross-hole slug tests in an unconfined aquifer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-06-28

    Cross-hole slug test date are analyzed with an extended version of a recently published unconfined aquifer model accounting for waterable effects using the linearized kinematic condition. The use of cross-hole slug test data to characterize aquifer heterogeneity and source/observation well oscillation parameters is evaluated. The data were collected in a series of multi-well and multi-level pneumatic slug tests conducted at a site in Widen, Switzerland. Furthermore, the tests involved source and observation well pairs separated by distances of up to 4 m, and instrumented with pressure transducers to monitor aquifer response in discrete intervals.

  15. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.; Costello, J.F.

    1998-04-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11--12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented.

  16. Testing and modelling autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity of streamflow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; van Gelder, P. H. A. J. M.; Vrijling, J. K.; Ma, J.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional streamflow models operate under the assumption of constant variance or season-dependent variances (e.g. ARMA (AutoRegressive Moving Average) models for deseasonalized streamflow series and PARMA (Periodic AutoRegressive Moving Average) models for seasonal streamflow series). However, with McLeod-Li test and Engle's Lagrange Multiplier test, clear evidences are found for the existence of autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (i.e. the ARCH (AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity) effect), a nonlinear phenomenon of the variance behaviour, in the residual series from linear models fitted to daily and monthly streamflow processes of the upper Yellow River, China. It is shown that the major cause of the ARCH effect is the seasonal variation in variance of the residual series. However, while the seasonal variation in variance can fully explain the ARCH effect for monthly streamflow, it is only a partial explanation for daily flow. It is also shown that while the periodic autoregressive moving average model is adequate in modelling monthly flows, no model is adequate in modelling daily streamflow processes because none of the conventional time series models takes the seasonal variation in variance, as well as the ARCH effect in the residuals, into account. Therefore, an ARMA-GARCH (Generalized AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity) error model is proposed to capture the ARCH effect present in daily streamflow series, as well as to preserve seasonal variation in variance in the residuals. The ARMA-GARCH error model combines an ARMA model for modelling the mean behaviour and a GARCH model for modelling the variance behaviour of the residuals from the ARMA model. Since the GARCH model is not followed widely in statistical hydrology, the work can be a useful addition in terms of statistical modelling of daily streamflow processes for the hydrological community.

  17. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  18. Computer model to simulate testing at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Hannon, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the processes involved in the operation of the National Transonic Facility (NTF), a large cryogenic wind tunnel at the Langley Research Center. The simulation was verified by comparing the simulated results with previously acquired data from three experimental wind tunnel test programs in the NTF. The comparisons suggest that the computer model simulates reasonably well the processes that determine the liquid nitrogen (LN2) consumption, electrical consumption, fan-on time, and the test time required to complete a test plan at the NTF. From these limited comparisons, it appears that the results from the simulation model are generally within about 10 percent of the actual NTF test results. The use of actual data acquisition times in the simulation produced better estimates of the LN2 usage, as expected. Additional comparisons are needed to refine the model constants. The model will typically produce optimistic results since the times and rates included in the model are typically the optimum values. Any deviation from the optimum values will lead to longer times or increased LN2 and electrical consumption for the proposed test plan. Computer code operating instructions and listings of sample input and output files have been included.

  19. Evaluation of thermographic phosphor technology for aerodynamic model testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.; Tobin, K.W.; Smith, D.B.

    1990-08-01

    The goal for this project was to perform technology evaluations applicable to the development of higher-precision, higher-temperature aerodynamic model testing at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) in Tullahmoa, Tennessee. With the advent of new programs for design of aerospace craft that fly at higher speeds and altitudes, requirements for detailed understanding of high-temperature materials become very important. Model testing is a natural and critical part of the development of these new initiatives. The well-established thermographic phosphor techniques of the Applied Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are highly desirable for diagnostic evaluation of materials and aerodynamic shapes as studied in model tests. Combining this state-of-the-art thermographic technique with modern, higher-temperature models will greatly improve the practicability of tests for the advanced aerospace vehicles and will provide higher precision diagnostic information for quantitative evaluation of these tests. The wavelength ratio method for measuring surface temperatures of aerodynamic models was demonstrated in measurements made for this project. In particular, it was shown that the appropriate phosphors could be selected for the temperature range up to {approximately}700 {degree}F or higher and emission line ratios of sufficient sensitivity to measure temperature with 1% precision or better. Further, it was demonstrated that two-dimensional image- processing methods, using standard hardware, can be successfully applied to surface thermography of aerodynamic models for AEDC applications.

  20. Tensegrity finite element models of mechanical tests of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Bursa, Jiri; Lebis, Radek; Holata, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of a vascular smooth muscle cell is based on models published recently; it comprehends elements representing cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, and a complex tensegrity structure representing the cytoskeleton. In contrast to previous models of eucaryotic cells, this tensegrity structure consists of several parts. Its external and internal parts number 30 struts, 60 cables each, and their nodes are interconnected by 30 radial members; these parts represent cortical, nuclear and deep cytoskeletons, respectively. This arrangement enables us to simulate load transmission from the extracellular space to the nucleus or centrosome via membrane receptors (focal adhesions); the ability of the model was tested by simulation of some mechanical tests with isolated vascular smooth muscle cells. Although material properties of components defined on the basis of the mechanical tests are ambiguous, modelling of different types of tests has shown the ability of the model to simulate substantial global features of cell behaviour, e.g. "action at a distance effect" or the global load-deformation response of the cell under various types of loading. Based on computational simulations, the authors offer a hypothesis explaining the scatter of experimental results of indentation tests. PMID:22508025

  1. Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 2: A Centerline Supported Fullspan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This is part 2 of a two part document. Part 1 is titled: "Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 1: A Sidewall Supported Semispan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation and Flutter Suppression." A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, flexible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind tunnel model of a joined wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind tunnel model was mated to a new, two degree of freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at10 percent static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be flown in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free flying wind tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  2. Computational Modeling of NEXT 2000-Hour Wear Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Shane P.

    2004-01-01

    Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools for the design of ion optics systems. In this study, a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This model is a gun code which has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model for erosion estimates. The model uses commercially available solid design and meshing software, allowing high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. This computational model is compared to experimental results from the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) 2000-hour wear test, including over-focusing along the edge apertures, pit-and-groove erosion due to charge exchange, and beamlet distortion at the edge of the hole pattern.

  3. Computational Modeling of NEXT 2000-hour Wear Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Shane; Soulas, George

    2004-11-01

    Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools for the design of ion optics systems. In this study, a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This model is a gun code which has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model for erosion estimates. The model uses commercially available solid design and meshing software, allowing high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. This computational model is compared to experimental results from the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) 2000-hour wear test, including over-focusing along the edge apertures, pit-and-groove erosion due to charge exchange, and beamlet distortion at the edge of the hole pattern.

  4. Genetic testing and mental health: the model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, J K; Schutte, D L

    2000-01-01

    Genetic aspects of mental health disorders are being identified through human genome and family research. Gene discovery makes diagnostic and presymptomatic testing possible. The discovery of a gene mutation for Huntington Disease (HD) enables at-risk persons to request presymptomatic genetic testing. When HD genetic testing is offered through HD testing centers, a multi-visit protocol is followed in which education and counseling are provided for persons considering the option to have HD gene testing. A case study illustrates the clinical and ethical issues regarding privacy and disclosure as well as the personal and family consequences of gene mutation knowledge. Analysis of the impact of genetic knowledge on persons being tested for HD provides a model for the integration of emerging genetic information into mental health nursing practice for other mental health disorders.

  5. Modeling Local Item Dependence Due to Common Test Format with a Multidimensional Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Purya; Aryadoust, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that test method can exert a significant impact on test takers' performance and thereby contaminate test scores. We argue that common test method can exert the same effect as common stimuli and violate the conditional independence assumption of item response theory models because, in general, subsets of items which have a…

  6. Development of Test-Analysis Models (TAM) for correlation of dynamic test and analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelucci, Filippo; Javeed, Mehzad; Mcgowan, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of structural analysis of aerospace applications is to obtain a verified finite element model (FEM). The verified FEM can be used for loads analysis, evaluate structural modifications, or design control systems. Verification of the FEM is generally obtained as the result of correlating test and FEM models. A test analysis model (TAM) is very useful in the correlation process. A TAM is essentially a FEM reduced to the size of the test model, which attempts to preserve the dynamic characteristics of the original FEM in the analysis range of interest. Numerous methods for generating TAMs have been developed in the literature. The major emphasis of this paper is a description of the procedures necessary for creation of the TAM and the correlation of the reduced models with the FEM or the test results. Herein, three methods are discussed, namely Guyan, Improved Reduced System (IRS), and Hybrid. Also included are the procedures for performing these analyses using MSC/NASTRAN. Finally, application of the TAM process is demonstrated with an experimental test configuration of a ten bay cantilevered truss structure.

  7. Stiffness of Carpentry Connections - Numerical Modelling vs. Experimental Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekeliak, Miloš; Gocál, Jozef; Vičan, Josef

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, numerical modelling of the traditional carpentry connection with mortise and tenon is presented. Numerical modelling is focused on its stiffness and the results are compared to results of experimental tests carried out by (Feio, 2005) [6]. To consider soft behaviour of wood in carpentry connections, which are related to its surface roughness and geometrical accuracy of the contact surfaces, the characteristics of the normal contact stiffness, determined experimentally, are introduced in the numerical model. Parametric study by means of numerical modelling with regard to the sensitivity of connection stiffness to contact stiffness is presented. Based on the study results, in conclusion there are presented relevant differences between the results of numerical modelling and experimental tests (Feio, 2005) [6].

  8. A Process for Testing a Methematical Model for the Solution of a Practical Problem: Applications to Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, James B.

    A general process for testing the feasibility of applying alternative mathematical or statistical models to the solution of a practical problem is presented and flowcharted. The system is used to compare five models for test equating: (1) anchor test equating using classical test theory; (2) anchor test equating using the one-parameter logistic…

  9. Verified clinical failure with cefotaxime 1g for treatment of gonorrhoea in the Netherlands: a case report.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Alje P; van Ogtrop, Marc L; Golparian, Daniel; Mehrtens, Jan; de Vries, Henry J C; Unemo, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    We describe the first case of treatment failure of gonorrhoea with a third generation cephalosporin, cefotaxime 1g intramuscularly, in the Netherlands. The case was from a high-frequency transmitting population (men having sex with men) and was caused by the internationally spreading multidrug-resistant gonococcal NG-MAST ST1407 clone. The patient was clinically cured after treatment with ceftriaxone 500 mg intramuscularly and this is the only third generation cephalosporin that should be used for first-line empiric treatment of gonorrhoea. Increased awareness of failures with third generation cephalosporins, enhanced monitoring and appropriate verification of treatment failures including more frequent test-of-cures, and strict adherence to regularly updated treatment guidelines are essential globally.

  10. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  11. Testing Modeling Assumptions in the West Africa Ebola Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Keith; Verzijl, Christopher; Huang, Junming; Ingram, Matthew; Song, Binyang; Hasne, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus in West Africa has infected almost 30,000 and killed over 11,000 people. Recent models of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) have often made assumptions about how the disease spreads, such as uniform transmissibility and homogeneous mixing within a population. In this paper, we test whether these assumptions are necessarily correct, and offer simple solutions that may improve disease model accuracy. First, we use data and models of West African migration to show that EVD does not homogeneously mix, but spreads in a predictable manner. Next, we estimate the initial growth rate of EVD within country administrative divisions and find that it significantly decreases with population density. Finally, we test whether EVD strains have uniform transmissibility through a novel statistical test, and find that certain strains appear more often than expected by chance. PMID:27721505

  12. A modal test design strategy for model correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Dohrmann, C.R.

    1994-12-01

    When a modal test is to be performed for purposes of correlation with a finite element model, one needs to design the test so that the resulting measurements will provide the data needed for the correlation. There are numerous issues to consider in the design of a modal test; two important ones are the number and location of response sensors, and the number, location, and orientation of input excitation. From a model correlation perspective, one would like to select the response locations to allow a definitive, one-to-one correspondence between the measured modes and the predicted modes. Further, the excitation must be designed to excite all the modes of interest at a sufficiently high level so that the modal estimation algorithms can accurately extract the modal parameters. In this paper these two issues are examined in the context of model correlation with methodologies presented for obtaining an experiment design.

  13. Asteroid modeling for testing spacecraft approach and landing.

    PubMed

    Martin, Iain; Parkes, Steve; Dunstan, Martin; Rowell, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration of asteroids presents autonomous-navigation challenges that can be aided by virtual models to test and develop guidance and hazard-avoidance systems. Researchers have extended and applied graphics techniques to create high-resolution asteroid models to simulate cameras and other spacecraft sensors approaching and descending toward asteroids. A scalable model structure with evenly spaced vertices simplifies terrain modeling, avoids distortion at the poles, and enables triangle-strip definition for efficient rendering. To create the base asteroid models, this approach uses two-phase Poisson faulting and Perlin noise. It creates realistic asteroid surfaces by adding both crater models adapted from lunar terrain simulation and multiresolution boulders. The researchers evaluated the virtual asteroids by comparing them with real asteroid images, examining the slope distributions, and applying a surface-relative feature-tracking algorithm to the models. PMID:25051570

  14. Dynamic Model Tests of Models in the McDonnell Design of Project Mercury Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Dynamic Model Tests of Models in the McDonnell Design of Project Mercury Capsule in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel. On 11 May 1959, 24 tests of the aerodynamic response of the McDonnell model Project Mercury capsule were conducted. The initial test demonstrated free-fall; a parachute was used in the remaining test. Several tests included the addition of baffles. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030952. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  15. Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

  16. Methods for testing transport models. Second year annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1991-11-14

    Substantial progress has been made over the past year on six aspects of the work supported by this grant. As a result, we have in hand for the first time a fairly complete set of transport models and improved statistical methods for testing them against large databases. We also have initial results of such tests. These results indicate that careful application of presently available transport theories can reasonably well produce a remarkably wide variety of tokamak data.

  17. A Model Based Security Testing Method for Protocol Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu Long; Xin, Xiao Long

    2014-01-01

    The security of protocol implementation is important and hard to be verified. Since the penetration testing is usually based on the experience of the security tester and the specific protocol specifications, a formal and automatic verification method is always required. In this paper, we propose an extended model of IOLTS to describe the legal roles and intruders of security protocol implementations, and then combine them together to generate the suitable test cases to verify the security of protocol implementation. PMID:25105163

  18. Parameter selection and testing the soil water model SOIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGechan, M. B.; Graham, R.; Vinten, A. J. A.; Douglas, J. T.; Hooda, P. S.

    1997-08-01

    The soil water and heat simulation model SOIL was tested for its suitability to study the processes of transport of water in soil. Required parameters, particularly soil hydraulic parameters, were determined by field and laboratory tests for some common soil types and for soils subjected to contrasting treatments of long-term grassland and tilled land under cereal crops. Outputs from simulations were shown to be in reasonable agreement with independently measured field drain outflows and soil water content histories.

  19. Functional interplay between PPM1G and the transcription elongation machinery

    PubMed Central

    Gudipaty, Swapna Aravind; D’Orso, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Transcription elongation is a critical regulatory step in the gene expression cycle. One key regulator of the switch between transcription initiation and elongation is the P-TEFb kinase, which phosphorylates RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and several negative elongation factors to relieve the elongation block at paused promoters to facilitate productive elongation. Here, we highlight recent findings signifying the role of the PPM1G/PP2Cγ phosphatase in activating and maintaining the active transcription elongation state by regulating the availability of P-TEFb and blocking its assembly into the catalytic inactive 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex. PMID:27088130

  20. Precarious Rock Methodology for Seismic Hazard: Physical Testing, Numerical Modeling and Coherence Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anooshehpoor, Rasool; Purvance, Matthew D.; Brune, James N.; Preston, Leiph A.; Anderson, John G.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the following projects: Shake table tests of precarious rock methodology, field tests of precarious rocks at Yucca Mountain and comparison of the results with PSHA predictions, study of the coherence of the wave field in the ESF, and a limited survey of precarious rocks south of the proposed repository footprint. A series of shake table experiments have been carried out at the University of Nevada, Reno Large Scale Structures Laboratory. The bulk of the experiments involved scaling acceleration time histories (uniaxial forcing) from 0.1g to the point where the objects on the shake table overturned a specified number of times. The results of these experiments have been compared with numerical overturning predictions. Numerical predictions for toppling of large objects with simple contact conditions (e.g., I-beams with sharp basal edges) agree well with shake-table results. The numerical model slightly underpredicts the overturning of small rectangular blocks. It overpredicts the overturning PGA for asymmetric granite boulders with complex basal contact conditions. In general the results confirm the approximate predictions of previous studies. Field testing of several rocks at Yucca Mountain has approximately confirmed the preliminary results from previous studies, suggesting that he PSHA predictions are too high, possibly because the uncertainty in the mean of the attenuation relations. Study of the coherence of wavefields in the ESF has provided results which will be very important in design of the canisters distribution, in particular a preliminary estimate of the wavelengths at which the wavefields become incoherent. No evidence was found for extreme focusing by lens-like inhomogeneities. A limited survey for precarious rocks confirmed that they extend south of the repository, and one of these has been field tested.

  1. Model test vs virtual simulation of a VLCC FPSO hookup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jun; Sun, Yu-Zhu; Wu, Zi-Quan; Wang, Alan

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes the model test and the virtual simulation respectively for the VLCC class FPSO hookup, as well as addresses their different applications to the mating operation between the FPSO and the soft yoke mooring system (SYMS) in extremely shallow water. The scope of the model test and the virtual simulation covers various installation stages including a series of positioning trials, positioning keeping and temporary mooring to the pre-installed SYMS mooring tower, pendulum mating, and yoke ballasting to storm-safe. The model test is to accurately verify bollard pull capacity to keep the FPSO in position and assess motion responses and mooring loads for the FPSO and installation vessels during various installation stages. The virtual simulation is to provide a virtual-reality environment, thus realistically replicating the hookup operation at the Simulation Test Center (STC) facility and identifying any deficiencies in key installation personnel, execution plan, or operation procedures. The methodologies of the model test and the virtual simulation addressed here can be easily extended to the deepwater applications such as positioning and installation operations of various floating systems.

  2. Results of a sub-scale model rotor icing test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemming, Robert J.; Bond, Thomas H.; Britton, Randall K.

    1991-01-01

    A heavily instrumented sub-scale model of a helicopter main rotor was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in September and November 1989. The four-bladed main rotor had a diameter of 1.83 m (6.00 ft) and the 0.124 m (4.9 in) chord rotor blades were specially fabricated for this experiment. The instrumented rotor was mounted on a Sikorsky Aircraft Powered Force Model, which enclosed a rotor balance and other measurement systems. The model rotor was exposed to a range of icing conditions that included variations in temperature, liquid water content, and median droplet diameter, and was operated over ranges of advance ratio, shaft angle, tip Mach number (rotor speed) and weight coefficient to determine the effect of these parameters on ice accretion. In addition to strain gage and balance data, the test was documented with still, video, and high speed photography, ice profile tracings, and ice molds. The sensitivity of the model rotor to the test parameters, is given, and the result to theoretical predictions are compared. Test data quality was excellent, and ice accretion prediction methods and rotor performance prediction methods (using published icing lift and drag relationships) reproduced the performance trends observed in the test. Adjustments to the correlation coefficients to improve the level of correlation are suggested.

  3. Cyclic Oxidation Testing and Modelling: A NASA Lewis Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center has been heavily involved in the cyclic oxidation of high temperature materials for 30 years. Cyclic furnace and burner rig apparati have been developed, refined, and replicated to provide a large scale facility capable of evaluating many materials by a standard technique. Material behavior is characterized by weight change data obtained throughout the test, which has been modelled in a step-wise process of scale growth and spallation. This model and a coupled diffusion model have successfully described cyclic behavior for a number of systems and have provided insights regarding life prediction and variations in the spalling process. Performance ranking and mechanistic studies are discussed primarily for superalloys and coating alloys. Similar cyclic oxidation studies have been performed on steels, intermetallic compounds, thermal barrier coatings, ceramics, and ceramic composites. The most common oxidation test was performed in air at temperatures ranging from 800 deg. to 1600 C, for times up to 10000 h, and for cycle durations of 0.1 to 1000 h. Less controlled, but important, test parameters are the cooling temperature and humidity level. Heating and cooling rates are not likely to affect scale spallation. Broad experience has usually allowed for considerable focus and simplification of these test parameters, while still revealing the principal aspects of material behavior and performance. Extensive testing has been performed to statistically model the compositional effects of experimental alloys and to construct a comprehensive database of complex commercial alloys.

  4. Ground Contact Modeling for the Morpheus Test Vehicle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The Morpheus vertical test vehicle is an autonomous robotic lander being developed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to test hazard detection technology. Because the initial ground contact simulation model was not very realistic, it was decided to improve the model without making it too computationally expensive. The first development cycle added capability to define vehicle attachment points (AP) and to keep track of their states in the lander reference frame (LFRAME). These states are used with a spring damper model to compute an AP contact force. The lateral force is then overwritten, if necessary, by the Coulomb static or kinetic friction force. The second development cycle added capability to use the PolySurface class as the contact surface. The class can load CAD data in STL (Stereo Lithography) format, and use the data to compute line of sight (LOS) intercepts. A polygon frame (PFRAME) is computed from the facet intercept normal and used to convert the AP state to PFRAME. Three flat plane tests validate the transitions from kinetic to static, static to kinetic, and vertical impact. The hazardous terrain test will be used to test for visual reasonableness. The improved model is numerically inexpensive, robust, and produces results that are reasonable.

  5. Ground Contact Modeling for the Morpheus Test Vehicle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The Morpheus vertical test vehicle is an autonomous robotic lander being developed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to test hazard detection technology. Because the initial ground contact simulation model was not very realistic, it was decided to improve the model without making it too computationally expensive. The first development cycle added capability to define vehicle attachment points (AP) and to keep track of their states in the lander reference frame (LFRAME). These states are used with a spring damper model to compute an AP contact force. The lateral force is then overwritten, if necessary, by the Coulomb static or kinetic friction force. The second development cycle added capability to use the PolySurface class as the contact surface. The class can load CAD data in STL (Stereo Lithography) format, and use the data to compute line of sight (LOS) intercepts. A polygon frame (PFRAME) is computed from the facet intercept normal and used to convert the AP state to PFRAME. Three flat plane tests validate the transitions from kinetic to static, static to kinetic, and vertical impact. The hazardous terrain test will be used to test for visual reasonableness. The improved model is numerically inexpensive, robust, and produces results that are reasonable.

  6. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Benchmark Tests in Three Spatial Orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the aging alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. This test effort marks the final phase of a 5-yr development program that began under the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, transitioned into the Next Generation Launch Technologies (NGLT) Program, and continued under Constellation Systems in the Exploration Technology Development Program. Initially, the engineering model (EM) powerplant was evaluated with respect to its performance as compared to acceptance tests carried out at the manufacturer. This was to determine the sensitivity of the powerplant performance to changes in test environment. In addition, a series of tests were performed with the powerplant in the original standard orientation. This report details the continuing EM benchmark test results in three spatial orientations as well as extended duration testing in the mission profile test. The results from these tests verify the applicability of PEM fuel cells for future NASA missions. The specifics of these different tests are described in the following sections.

  7. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  8. SOFIA 2 model telescope wind tunnel test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keas, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This document outlines the tests performed to make aerodynamic force and torque measurements on the SOFIA wind tunnel model telescope. These tests were performed during the SOFIA 2 wind tunnel test in the 14 ft wind tunnel during the months of June through August 1994. The test was designed to measure the dynamic cross elevation moment acting on the SOFIA model telescope due to aerodynamic loading. The measurements were taken with the telescope mounted in an open cavity in the tail section of the SOFIA model 747. The purpose of the test was to obtain an estimate of the full scale aerodynamic disturbance spectrum, by scaling up the wind tunnel results (taking into account differences in sail area, air density, cavity dimension, etc.). An estimate of the full scale cross elevation moment spectrum was needed to help determine the impact this disturbance would have on the telescope positioning system requirements. A model of the telescope structure, made of a light weight composite material, was mounted in the open cavity of the SOFIA wind tunnel model. This model was mounted via a force balance to the cavity bulkhead. Despite efforts to use a 'stiff' balance, and a lightweight model, the balance/telescope system had a very low resonant frequency (37 Hz) compared to the desired measurement bandwidth (1000 Hz). Due to this mechanical resonance of the balance/telescope system, the balance alone could not provide an accurate measure of applied aerodynamic force at the high frequencies desired. A method of measurement was developed that incorporated accelerometers in addition to the balance signal, to calculate the aerodynamic force.

  9. Comparison of Tests on Air Propellers in Flight with Wind Tunnel Model Tests on Similar Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, W F; Lesley, E P

    1926-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the performance, characteristics, and coefficients of full-sized air propellers in flight and to compare these results with those derived from wind-tunnel tests on reduced scale models of similar geometrical form. The full-scale equipment comprised five propellers in combination with a VE-7 airplane and Wright E-4 engine. This part of the work was carried out at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, between May 1 and August 24, 1924, and was under the immediate charge of Mr. Lesley. The model or wind-tunnel part of the investigation was carried out at the Aerodynamic Laboratory of Stanford University and was under the immediate charge of Doctor Durand. A comparison of the curves for full-scale results with those derived from the model tests shows that while the efficiencies realized in flight are close to those derived from model tests, both thrust developed and power absorbed in flight are from 6 to 10 per cent greater than would be expected from the results of model tests.

  10. Goodness-of-fit test for proportional subdistribution hazards model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingqing; Fine, Jason; Laird, Glen

    2013-09-30

    This paper concerns using modified weighted Schoenfeld residuals to test the proportionality of subdistribution hazards for the Fine-Gray model, similar to the tests proposed by Grambsch and Therneau for independently censored data. We develop a score test for the time-varying coefficients based on the modified Schoenfeld residuals derived assuming a certain form of non-proportionality. The methods perform well in simulations and a real data analysis of breast cancer data, where the treatment effect exhibits non-proportional hazards.

  11. SLS Scale Model Acoustic Test Liftoff Results and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Giacomoni, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible design phase test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments.

  12. Evaluating planetary digital terrain models-The HRSC DTM test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heipke, C.; Oberst, J.; Albertz, J.; Attwenger, M.; Dorninger, P.; Dorrer, E.; Ewe, M.; Gehrke, S.; Gwinner, K.; Hirschmuller, H.; Kim, J.R.; Kirk, R.L.; Mayer, H.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Rengarajan, R.; Rentsch, M.; Schmidt, R.; Scholten, F.; Shan, J.; Spiegel, M.; Wahlisch, M.; Neukum, G.

    2007-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) has been orbiting the planet Mars since January 2004 onboard the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express mission and delivers imagery which is being used for topographic mapping of the planet. The HRSC team has conducted a systematic inter-comparison of different alternatives for the production of high resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) from the multi look HRSC push broom imagery. Based on carefully chosen test sites the test participants have produced DTMs which have been subsequently analysed in a quantitative and a qualitative manner. This paper reports on the results obtained in this test. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2010-01-01

    Testing of air breathing propulsion systems in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center depends on compressed air turbines for power. The drive rig turbines exhaust directly to the wind tunnel test section, and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the model being tested. In order to mitigate this acoustic contamination, a muffler can be attached downstream of the drive rig turbine. The modern engine designs currently being tested produce much less noise than traditional engines, and consequently a lower noise floor is required of the facility. An acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate this extraneous noise is presented, and a noise reduction of 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz was documented, significantly improving the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  14. A simple discrete-element-model of Brazilian test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumanta; Stroisz, Anna; Pradhan, Srutarshi

    2016-05-01

    We present a statistical model which is able to capture some interesting features exhibited in the Brazilian test of rock samples. The model is based on elements which break irreversibly when the force experienced by the elements exceed their own load capacity. If an element breaks the load capacity of the neighboring elements are decreased by a certain amount, assuming weakening effect around the defected zone. From the model we numerically investigate the stress-strain behavior, the strength of the system, how it scales with the system size and also its fluctuation for both uniform and Weibull distribution of breaking thresholds in the system. To check the validity of our statistical model we perform few Brazilian tests on Sandstone and Chalk samples. The stress-strain curve from model results agree qualitatively well with the lab-test data. Also, the damage profile right at the point when the stress-strain curve reaches its maximum is seen to mimic the crack patterns observed in our Brazilian test experiments.

  15. Forecasting in foodservice: model development, testing, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miller, J L; Thompson, P A; Orabella, M M

    1991-05-01

    This study was designed to develop, test, and evaluate mathematical models appropriate for forecasting menu-item production demand in foodservice. Data were collected from residence and dining hall foodservices at Ohio State University. Objectives of the study were to collect, code, and analyze the data; develop and test models using actual operation data; and compare forecasting results with current methods in use. Customer count was forecast using deseasonalized simple exponential smoothing. Menu-item demand was forecast by multiplying the count forecast by a predicted preference statistic. Forecasting models were evaluated using mean squared error, mean absolute deviation, and mean absolute percentage error techniques. All models were more accurate than current methods. A broad spectrum of forecasting techniques could be used by foodservice managers with access to a personal computer and spread-sheet and database-management software. The findings indicate that mathematical forecasting techniques may be effective in foodservice operations to control costs, increase productivity, and maximize profits.

  16. Notes on the Construction and Testing of Model Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1922-01-01

    Here, it is shown that the construction of an airplane model can and should be simplified in order to obtain the most reliable test data. General requirements for model construction are given, keeping in mind that the general purpose of wind tunnel tests on a model airplane is to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics, the static balance, and the efficiency of controls for the particular combination of wings, tail surfaces, fuselage, and landing gear employed in the design. These parts must be exact scale reproductions. Any appreciable variation from scale reproduction must be in the remaining parts of the model, i.e., struts, wires, fittings, control horns, radiators, engines, and the various attachments found exposed to the wind in special airplanes. Interplane bracing is discussed in some detail.

  17. Forecasting in foodservice: model development, testing, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miller, J L; Thompson, P A; Orabella, M M

    1991-05-01

    This study was designed to develop, test, and evaluate mathematical models appropriate for forecasting menu-item production demand in foodservice. Data were collected from residence and dining hall foodservices at Ohio State University. Objectives of the study were to collect, code, and analyze the data; develop and test models using actual operation data; and compare forecasting results with current methods in use. Customer count was forecast using deseasonalized simple exponential smoothing. Menu-item demand was forecast by multiplying the count forecast by a predicted preference statistic. Forecasting models were evaluated using mean squared error, mean absolute deviation, and mean absolute percentage error techniques. All models were more accurate than current methods. A broad spectrum of forecasting techniques could be used by foodservice managers with access to a personal computer and spread-sheet and database-management software. The findings indicate that mathematical forecasting techniques may be effective in foodservice operations to control costs, increase productivity, and maximize profits. PMID:2019699

  18. A Test of a Counting Model for Chiasma Interference

    PubMed Central

    Foss, E. J.; Stahl, F. W.

    1995-01-01

    According to the model of FOSS, LANDE, STAHL and STEINBERG, chiasma interference is a reflection of the requirement for crossovers to be separated by an organism-specific number of potential conversion events without associated crossovers. This model predicts that tetrads with close double crossovers should be enriched for conversion events that themselves are not associated with crossing over. We tested this prediction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found it to be unfulfilled. PMID:7768433

  19. Model of risk assessment under ballistic statistical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrovski, Ivan; Karakaneva, Juliana

    The material presents the application of a mathematical method for risk assessment under statistical determination of the ballistic limits of the protection equipment. The authors have implemented a mathematical model based on Pierson's criteria. The software accomplishment of the model allows to evaluate the V50 indicator and to assess the statistical hypothesis' reliability. The results supply the specialists with information about the interval valuations of the probability determined during the testing process.

  20. Light Spectrum Related Responses of 1-g and Clino-Rotated Cress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakleviciene, D.; Svegzdiene, D.; Losinska, R.

    2008-06-01

    Growth and positioning of cress on a 50-rpm horizontal clinostat in response to blue (450 nm), red (660 nm) and far red (735 nm) light spectral components and their combinations (red & far red or blue & red & far red) were estimated and compared with cress grown in the usual vertical position with and without illumination. No gravity-related alterations have been determined in the elongation of dark-grown hypocotyls, though leaves slightly responded to clino-rotation. Impact of light of 450, 660 and 735 nm wavelengths applied at a comparatively low density of the photon flux (5, 13, 0.8-1 μmol m-2s-1, respectively) had a stronger inhibiting effect on the elongation of hypocotyls on clinostat than at 1 g. Growth of 1-g petioles responded to light spectrum which was not the case with clino-rotated ones. However, radial expansion of cells in palisade and spongy mesophyll tissues of clino-rotated laminas was promoted under combined blue & red & far red illumination (50 μmol·m-2s-1). Gravity-dependent alteration of the positioning of leaf petioles and laminas was suppressed by light. The obtained data confirm the interactions between responses of cress seedlings induced by changed gravity and by spectral components of light.

  1. Re-Adaptation to 1-G of Pregnant Rats Following Exposure to Spaceflight or Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. E.; Ronca, A. E.; Alberts, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Late-pregnant rat dams were flown on a 9-day Space Shuttle mission or exposed to 1.5, 1.75 or 2-g centrifugation and compared with 1 .O-g vivarium controls. Exposure to altered gravity began on the 11th day and recovery occurred on the 20th day of the dams' 22-day pregnancy. In the 1 st experiment, comparisons were made between Flight (FLT), Synchronous (SYN; identically-housed) and Vivarium (VIV) controls. In the 2nd experiment, comparisons were made between dams centrifuged at 2-G, 1.75-G, 1.5-G, Rotational controls (1.08-G) or Stationary controls (1 G). Within three hours of recovery from either spaceflight or centrifugation, the dams' locomotor behavior was videotaped for 2 min. FLT dams showed dramatically reduced movement relative to both SYN and VIV control conditions, with significantly greater amounts of locomotor activity observed in SYN as compared to VIV dams. Significantly greater locomotor activity was observed in SYN as compared to VIV controls. In the second experiment, no differences were observed between dams exposed either 1, 1.5, 1.75, or 2-G. In both studies, the dams showed similar patterns of hindlimb rearing. Together, these findings provide quantitative evidence for decreased locomotor activity during re-adaptation to 1-g following spaceflight, but not centrifugation.

  2. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occur during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological flight experiments on animals was discussed. The mouse model is an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to the one used with rats. It is shown that this murine model yield similar results to the rat model of antiorthostatic suspension for simulating some aspects of weightlessness. It is also shown that mice suspended in this model have decreased interferon-alpha/beta production as compared to control, nonsuspended mice or to orthostatically suspended mice. It is suggested that the conditions occuring during space flight could possibly affect interferon production. The regulatory role of interferon in nonviral diseases is demonstrated including several bacterial and protozoan infections indicating the great significance of interferon in resistance to many types of infectious diseases.

  3. Using Cepheid Period Changes to Test Stellar Evolutionary Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, David; Abdel-Sabour Abdel-Latif, Mohamed; Berdnikov, Leonid N.

    2005-08-01

    Rate of period change in Cepheid variables is a parameter that can be predicted from stellar evolutionary models, provided the instability strip-crossing mode is known. Different evolutionary models predict different rates of period change for the same strip crossing, which suggests that observed rates of period change in Cepheids are useful for testing how well different models match real stars. From a compilation of observed period changes in about 200 Cepheids that we have completed in recent years, we examine how closely the observational data match model predictions. In general, the observations are consistent with model predictions, yet there are a number of distinct differences indicating a need for further refinements to existing stellar evolutionary models. In addition, rate of period change for Cepheids is a parameter that may be useful for establishing the location of individual Cepheids within the instability strip, independent of interstellar extinction.

  4. Tank Tests of Model 11-G Flying-boat Hull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J B

    1935-01-01

    The NACA model 11-G flying-boat hull, a modification of NACA model 11-A was tested over a range of loadings. The planing bottom of model 11-G has a variable-radius flare, or concavity, at the chines in contrast to the straight V planing bottom of model 11-A. The results are given as curves of resistance and trimming moment plotted against speed for various angles of trim. The characteristics of the form at the optimum angles of trim are given in non-dimensional form as curves of resistance coefficient, best trim angle, and trimming-moment coefficient plotted against speed coefficient. As compared with the original form, model 11-G is shown to have higher resistance at all loads and speeds and higher maximum trimming moments at heavy loads. The spray pattern, however, is generally more favorable, indicating that the service performance of model 11-A would be improved by some form of chime flare.

  5. A nonlinear model for analysis of slug-test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, C.D.; Zenner, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    While doing slug tests in high-permeability aquifers, we have consistently seen deviations from the expected response of linear theoretical models. Normalized curves do not coincide for various initial heads, as would be predicted by linear theories, and are shifted to larger times for higher initial heads. We have developed a general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the well bore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer, which explains these data features. The model produces a very good fit for both oscillatory and nonoscillatory field data, using a single set of physical parameters to predict the field data for various initial displacements at a given well. This is in contrast to linear models which have a systematic lack of fit and indicate that hydraulic conductivity varies with the initial displacement. We recommend multiple slug tests with a considerable variation in initial head displacement to evaluate the possible presence of nonlinear effects. Our conclusion is that the nonlinear model presented here is an excellent tool to analyze slug tests, covering the range from the underdamped region to the overdamped region.

  6. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the aerostructures test wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  7. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  8. Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, J.S.; Haas, R.C.; Diana, J.S.; Breck, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

  9. Modification of Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility for Rapid Testing of Cable-In Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, D. R.; Miller, J. R.; Martovetsky, N.; Kenney, S. J.

    2010-04-01

    This document describes proposed design modifications to the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency that will allow rapid test and changeout of central solenoid (CS) conductor samples and more precise and reliable characterization than is presently achievable elsewhere. Typically CS testing at the CSMC Test Facility is followed by testing at the SULTAN facility in Switzerland. The SULTAN facility has very short in-field length and a short length between the high field zone and the joints. This makes it difficult to obtain uniform distribution of current in the cable at low voltage levels, which defines the current sharing temperature. In a working magnet, like the ITER CS, there is a long length of conductor in the highest field, which provides a more uniform current distribution near current sharing. The modified facility will serve as an economical tool for ITER conductor testing. The test item will be a three turn sample, about 15 m long, placed in the background field of the CSMC. This new mode of operation will reduce the time of cooldown, warmup, and installation of the sample into the CSMC facility, which should significantly reduce the testing cost per sample.

  10. Estimating, Testing, and Comparing Specific Effects in Structural Equation Models: The Phantom Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macho, Siegfried; Ledermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The phantom model approach for estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects within structural equation models (SEMs) is presented. The rationale underlying this novel method consists in representing the specific effect to be assessed as a total effect within a separate latent variable model, the phantom model that is added to the main…

  11. Response of shallow geothermal energy pile from laboratory model tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marto, A.; Amaludin, A.

    2015-09-01

    In shallow geothermal energy pile systems, the thermal loads from the pile, transferred and stored in the soil will cause thermally induced settlement. This factor must be considered in the geotechnical design process to avoid unexpected hazards. Series of laboratory model tests were carried out to study the behaviour of energy piles installed in kaolin soil, subjected to thermal loads and a combination of axial and thermal loads (henceforth known as thermo-axial loads). Six tests which included two thermal load tests (35°C and 40°C) and four thermo-axial load tests (100 N and 200 N, combined with 35°C and 40°C thermal loads) were conducted. To simulate the behaviour of geothermal energy piles during its operation, the thermo-axial tests were carried out by applying an axial load to the model pile head, and a subsequent application of thermal load. The model soil was compacted at 90% maximum dry density and had an undrained shear strength of 37 kPa, thus classified as having a firm soil consistency. The behaviour of model pile, having the ultimate load capacity of 460 N, was monitored using a linear variable displacement transducer, load cell and wire thermocouple, to measure the pile head settlement, applied axial load and model pile temperature. The acquired data from this study was used to define the thermo-axial response characteristics of the energy pile model. In this study, the limiting settlement was defined as 10% of the model pile diameter. For thermal load tests, higher thermal loads induced higher values of thermal settlement. At 40°C thermal load an irreversible settlement was observed after the heating and cooling cycle was applied to the model pile. Meanwhile, the pile response to thermo-axial loads were attributed to soil consistency and the magnitude of both the axial and thermal loads applied to the pile. The higher the thermoaxial loads, the higher the settlements occurred. A slight hazard on the model pile was detected, since the settlement

  12. Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2011-03-22

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  13. Exact Tests for the Rasch Model via Sequential Importance Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yuguo; Small, Dylan

    2005-01-01

    Rasch proposed an exact conditional inference approach to testing his model but never implemented it because it involves the calculation of a complicated probability. This paper furthers Rasch's approach by (1) providing an efficient Monte Carlo methodology for accurately approximating the required probability and (2) illustrating the usefulness…

  14. Project Physics Tests 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 5 are presented in this booklet. Included are 70 multiple-choice and 23 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of atomic model are examined on aspects of relativistic corrections, electron emission, photoelectric effects, Compton effect, quantum theories, electrolysis experiments, atomic number and mass,…

  15. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  16. Intergroup Conflict in Russia: Testing the Group Position Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minescu, Anca; Poppe, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    The group position model (Blumer 1958; Bobo and Tuan 2006) assumes that attempting to secure a privileged position for the ingroup is a main determinant of perceived intergroup conflict. This assumption is tested with survey data collected in 1999 and 2000 among eight titular groups in autonomous republics of the Russian Federation. The survey…

  17. Item Response Theory Modeling of the Philadelphia Naming Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergadiotis, Gerasimos; Kellough, Stacey; Hula, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigated the fit of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach, Schwartz, Martin, Grewal, & Brecher, 1996) to an item-response-theory measurement model, estimated the precision of the resulting scores and item parameters, and provided a theoretical rationale for the interpretation of PNT overall scores by relating…

  18. Instruction manual model 600F, data transmission test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Information necessary for the operation and maintenance of the Model 600F Data Transmission Test Set is presented. A description is contained of the physical and functional characteristics; pertinent installation data; instructions for operating the equipment; general and detailed principles of operation; preventive and corrective maintenance procedures; and block, logic, and component layout diagrams of the equipment and its major component assemblies.

  19. Computerized Classification Testing under the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Liu, Chen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM) has been recently developed to describe item responses to Likert items (agree-disagree) in attitude measurement. In this study, the authors (a) developed two item selection methods in computerized classification testing under the GGUM, the current estimate/ability confidence interval method and the cut…

  20. A Coupled THMC model of FEBEX mock-up test

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier

    2008-09-15

    FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) is a demonstration and research project for the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository in granite. It includes two full-scale heating and hydration tests: the in situ test performed at Grimsel (Switzerland) and a mock-up test operating at CIEMAT facilities in Madrid (Spain). The mock-up test provides valuable insight on thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) behavior of EBS because its hydration is controlled better than that of in situ test in which the buffer is saturated with water from the surrounding granitic rock. Here we present a coupled THMC model of the mock-up test which accounts for thermal and chemical osmosis and bentonite swelling with a state-surface approach. The THMC model reproduces measured temperature and cumulative water inflow data. It fits also relative humidity data at the outer part of the buffer, but underestimates relative humidities near the heater. Dilution due to hydration and evaporation near the heater are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species while surface complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation and cation exchanges affect significantly reactive species as well. Results of sensitivity analyses to chemical processes show that pH is mostly controlled by surface complexation while dissolved cations concentrations are controlled by cation exchange reactions.

  1. Simulated lightning test shuttle .03 scale model. [(space shuttle orbiter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lightning Attach Point tests were conducted for the space shuttle launch configuration (Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters). A series of 250 long spark tests (15 to 20 foot sparks) determined that the orbiter may be struck on the nose, windshield brow, tail and wingtips during launch but not on the main engine nozzles which have been shown to be vulnerable to lightning damage. The orbiter main engine and SRB exhaust plumes were simulated electrically with physical models coated with graded resistance paints. The tests showed that the exhaust plumes from the SRB provide additional protection for the main engine nozzles. However, the tests showed that the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS), which has also been shown to be vulnerable to lightning damage, may be struck during launch. Therefore further work is indicated in the areas of swept stroke studies on the model and on TPS panels. Further attach point testing is also indicated on the free-flying orbiter. Photographs of the test setup are shown.

  2. Cognitive mechanisms of mindfulness: A test of current models.

    PubMed

    Isbel, Ben; Mahar, Doug

    2015-12-15

    Existing models of mindfulness describe the self-regulation of attention as primary, leading to enhanced decentering and ability to access and override automatic cognitive processes. This study compared 23 experienced and 21 non-meditators on tests of mindfulness, attention, decentering, and ability to override automatic cognitive processes to test the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie mindfulness practice. Experienced meditators had significantly higher mindfulness and decentering than non-meditators. No significant difference between groups was found on measures of attention or ability to override automatic processes. These findings support the prediction that mindfulness leads to enhanced decentering, but do not support the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie such enhancement. Since mindfulness practice primarily involves internally directed attention, it may be the case that cognitive tests requiring externally directed attention and timed responses do not accurately assess mindfulness-induced cognitive changes. Implications for the models of mindfulness and future research are discussed.

  3. Glass Dissolution: Testing and Modeling for Long-Term Behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M. )

    2001-09-01

    The basic concepts of thermodynamics and kinetics are discussed in relationship to glass dissolution testing. While it seems like these subjects are too basic to be discussed in a journal article, it is often the case that we forget these concepts when planning and designing dissolution tests and interpreting the results that come from these tests. The possible connection between the composition of the dissolving glass and its long-term behavior is discussed. Results from a preliminary study suggest that the aluminum content of a glass is important to its long-term behavior. The formation of a zeolite can cause the glass dissolution rate to increase under certain conditions that can be modeled. Results indicate that complex glasses can be modeled with a glass containing as little as six components.

  4. Testing an uncertainty model for women with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Crigger, N J

    1996-03-01

    This study sought to explain adaptation to the uncertainty of multiple sclerosis (MS) in women. A casual model, developed from the literature and from interviews with four women with MS, was tested on a sample of 90 women with MS. Successful adaptation was measured by self-esteem and mastery. The model accounted for 26% of the variance in mastery, with an empirical model accounting for a higher degree of variance (41%). Findings suggest that the negative impact of uncertainty in women with MS is significantly reduced by their spiritual and social relationships.

  5. Group association test using a hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yichen; Dai, James Y; Kooperberg, Charles

    2016-04-01

    In the genomic era, group association tests are of great interest. Due to the overwhelming number of individual genomic features, the power of testing for association of a single genomic feature at a time is often very small, as are the effect sizes for most features. Many methods have been proposed to test association of a trait with a group of features within a functional unit as a whole, e.g. all SNPs in a gene, yet few of these methods account for the fact that generally a substantial proportion of the features are not associated with the trait. In this paper, we propose to model the association for each feature in the group as a mixture of features with no association and features with non-zero associations to explicitly account for the possibility that a fraction of features may not be associated with the trait while other features in the group are. The feature-level associations are first estimated by generalized linear models; the sequence of these estimated associations is then modeled by a hidden Markov chain. To test for global association, we develop a modified likelihood ratio test based on a log-likelihood function that ignores higher order dependency plus a penalty term. We derive the asymptotic distribution of the likelihood ratio test under the null hypothesis. Furthermore, we obtain the posterior probability of association for each feature, which provides evidence of feature-level association and is useful for potential follow-up studies. In simulations and data application, we show that our proposed method performs well when compared with existing group association tests especially when there are only few features associated with the outcome. PMID:26420797

  6. Tests of scanning model observers for myocardial SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, H. C.; Pretorius, P. H.; Brankov, J. G.

    2009-02-01

    Many researchers have tested and applied human-model observers as part of their evaluations of reconstruction methods for SPECT perfusion imaging. However, these model observers have generally been limited to signal-known- exactly (SKE) detection tasks. Our objective is to formulate and test scanning model observers that emulate humans in detection-localization tasks involving perfusion defects. Herein, we compare several models based on the channelized nonprewhitening (CNPW) observer. Simulated Tc-99m images of the heart with and without defects were created using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom. Reconstructions were performed with an iterative algorithm and postsmoothed with a 3D Gaussian filter. Human and model-observer studies were conducted to assess the optimal number of iterations and the smoothing level of the filter. The human-observer study was a multiple-alternative forced-choice (MAFC) study with five defects. The CNPW observer performed the MAFC study, but also performed an SKE-but-variable (SKEV) study and a localization ROC (LROC) study. A separate LROC study applied an observer based on models of human search in mammograms. The amount of prior knowledge about the possible defects differed for these four model-observer studies. The trend was towards improved agreement with the human observers as prior knowledge decreased.

  7. Testing a Theoretical Model of Immigration Transition and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Im, Eun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to develop a theoretical model to explain the relationships between immigration transition and midlife women's physical activity and test the relationships among the major variables of the model. A theoretical model, which was developed based on transitions theory and the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity theory, consists of 4 major variables, including length of stay in the United States, country of birth, level of acculturation, and midlife women's physical activity. To test the theoretical model, a secondary analysis with data from 127 Hispanic women and 123 non-Hispanic (NH) Asian women in a national Internet study was used. Among the major variables of the model, length of stay in the United States was negatively associated with physical activity in Hispanic women. Level of acculturation in NH Asian women was positively correlated with women's physical activity. Country of birth and level of acculturation were significant factors that influenced physical activity in both Hispanic and NH Asian women. The findings support the theoretical model that was developed to examine relationships between immigration transition and physical activity; it shows that immigration transition can play an essential role in influencing health behaviors of immigrant populations in the United States. The NH theoretical model can be widely used in nursing practice and research that focus on immigrant women and their health behaviors. Health care providers need to consider the influences of immigration transition to promote immigrant women's physical activity. PMID:26502554

  8. Testing a Theoretical Model of Immigration Transition and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Im, Eun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to develop a theoretical model to explain the relationships between immigration transition and midlife women's physical activity and test the relationships among the major variables of the model. A theoretical model, which was developed based on transitions theory and the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity theory, consists of 4 major variables, including length of stay in the United States, country of birth, level of acculturation, and midlife women's physical activity. To test the theoretical model, a secondary analysis with data from 127 Hispanic women and 123 non-Hispanic (NH) Asian women in a national Internet study was used. Among the major variables of the model, length of stay in the United States was negatively associated with physical activity in Hispanic women. Level of acculturation in NH Asian women was positively correlated with women's physical activity. Country of birth and level of acculturation were significant factors that influenced physical activity in both Hispanic and NH Asian women. The findings support the theoretical model that was developed to examine relationships between immigration transition and physical activity; it shows that immigration transition can play an essential role in influencing health behaviors of immigrant populations in the United States. The NH theoretical model can be widely used in nursing practice and research that focus on immigrant women and their health behaviors. Health care providers need to consider the influences of immigration transition to promote immigrant women's physical activity.

  9. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  10. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  11. Improved techniques for thermomechanical testing in support of deformation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.; Ellis, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of generating precise thermomechanical deformation data to support constitutive model development was investigated. Here, the requirement is for experimental data that is free from anomalies caused by less than ideal equipment and procedures. A series of exploratory tests conducted on Hastelloy X showed that generally accepted techniques for strain controlled tests were lacking in at least three areas. Specifically, problems were encountered with specimen stability, thermal strain compensation, and temperature/mechanical strain phasing. The source of these difficulties was identified and improved thermomechanical testing techniques to correct them were developed. These goals were achieved by developing improved procedures for measuring and controlling thermal gradients and by designing a specimen specifically for thermomechanical testing. In addition, innovative control strategies were developed to correctly proportion and phase the thermal and mechanical components of strain. Subsequently, the improved techniques were used to generate deformation data for Hastelloy X over the temperature range, 200 to 1000 C.

  12. Modeling solid-state transformations occurring in dissolution testing.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Timo; Aaltonen, Jaakko

    2013-04-15

    Changes in the solid-state form can occur during dissolution testing of drugs. This can often complicate interpretation of results. Additionally, there can be several mechanisms through which such a change proceeds, e.g. solvent-mediated transformation or crystal growth within the drug material itself. Here, a mathematical model was constructed to study the dissolution testing of a material, which undergoes such changes. The model consisted of two processes: the recrystallization of the drug from a supersaturated liquid state caused by the dissolution of the more soluble solid form and the crystal growth of the stable solid form at the surface of the drug formulation. Comparison to experimental data on theophylline dissolution showed that the results obtained with the model matched real solid-state changes and that it was able to distinguish between cases where the transformation was controlled either by solvent-mediated crystallization or solid-state crystal growth. PMID:23506958

  13. Acoustic test and analyses of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.; Metzger, F. B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 inch) diameter models of the prop-fan (a small diameter, highly loaded. Multi-bladed variable pitch advanced turboprop) are presented. Results show that there is little difference in the noise produced by unswept and slightly swept designs. However, the model designed for noise reduction produces substantially less noise at test conditions simulating 0.8 Mach number cruise speed or at conditions simulating takeoff and landing. In the near field at cruise conditions the acoustically designed. In the far field at takeoff and landing conditions the acoustically designed model is 5 db quieter than unswept or slightly swept designs. Correlation between noise measurement and theoretical predictions as well as comparisons between measured and predicted acoustic pressure pulses generated by the prop-fan blades are discussed. The general characteristics of the pulses are predicted. Shadowgraph measurements were obtained which showed the location of bow and trailing waves.

  14. Skipped Stage Modeling and Testing of the CPAS Main Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varela, Jose G.; Ray, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) has undergone the transition from modeling a skipped stage event using a simulation that treats a cluster of parachutes as a single composite canopy to the capability of simulating each parachute individually. This capability along with data obtained from skipped stage flight tests has been crucial in modeling the behavior of a skipping canopy as well as the crowding effect on non-skipping ("lagging") neighbors. For the finite mass inflation of CPAS Main parachutes, the cluster is assumed to inflate nominally through the nominal fill time, at which point the skipping parachute continues inflating. This sub-phase modeling method was used to reconstruct three flight tests involving skipped stages. Best fit inflation parameters were determined for both the skipping and lagging canopies.

  15. Over-the-wing model thrust reverser noise tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J.; Gutierrez, O.

    1977-01-01

    Static acoustic tests were conducted on a 1/12 scale model over-the-wing target type thrust reverser. The model configuration simulates a design that is applicable to the over-the-wing short-haul advanced technology engine. Aerodynamic screening tests of a variety of reverser designs identified configurations that satisfied a reverse thrust requirement of 35 percent of forward thrust at a nozzle pressure ratio of 1.29. The variations in the reverser configuration included, blocker door angle, blocker door lip angle and shape, and side skirt shape. Acoustic data are presented and compared for the various configurations. The model data scaled to a single full size engine show that peak free field perceived noise (PN) levels at a 152.4 meter sideline distance range from 98 to 104 PNdb.

  16. Development, testing, and numerical modeling of a foam sandwich biocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachra, Ricky

    This study develops a novel sandwich composite material using plant based materials for potential use in nonstructural building applications. The face sheets comprise woven hemp fabric and a sap based epoxy, while the core comprises castor oil based foam with waste rice hulls as reinforcement. Mechanical properties of the individual materials are tested in uniaxial compression and tension for the foam and hemp, respectively. The sandwich composite is tested in 3 point bending. Flexural results are compared to a finite element model developed in the commercial software Abaqus, and the validated model is then used to investigate alternate sandwich geometries. Sandwich model responses are compared to existing standards for nonstructural building panels, showing that the novel material is roughly half the strength of equally thick drywall. When space limitations are not an issue, a double thickness sandwich biocomposite is found to be a structurally acceptable replacement for standard gypsum drywall.

  17. Breeding canvasbacks: a test of a habitat model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Hammond, M.C.; McDonald, T.L.; Nustad, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Schroeder (1984) proposed a habitat suitability model for breeding canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) based on the size, water regime, and emergent vegetation of wetlands. We evaluated the model with data from surveys of canvasbacks on 2265 wetlands in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. The model proved inadequate as a predictor of canvasback pair density; the correlation between values produced by the model and canvasback pair densities was r = 0.0023 (P = 0.911). There were, however, suggestions of (1) higher canvasback density and frequency of occurrence on wetlands with more open interiors, and (2) a relation between canvasback density and wetland size that varied according to wetland permanence. We recommend that the model be improved by testing these relations, and possibly by incorporating determinants of water quality or pondweed (Potamogeton spp.) occurrence.

  18. Modal parameters of space structures in 1 G and 0 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicos, Andrew S.; Crawley, Edward F.; Barlow, Mark S.; Van Schoor, Marthinus C.; Masters, Brett

    1993-01-01

    Analytic and experimental results are presented from a study of the changes in the modal parameters of space structural test articles from one- to zero-gravity. Deployable, erectable, and rotary modules was assembled to form three one- and two-dimensional structures, in which variations in bracing wire and rotary joint preload could be introduced. The structures were modeled as if hanging from a suspension system in one gravity, and unconstrained, as if free floating in zero-gravity. The analysis is compared with ground experimental measurements, which were made on a spring-wire suspension system with a nominal plunge frequency of one Hertz, and with measurements made on the Shuttle middeck. The degree of change in linear modal parameters as well as the change in nonlinear nature of the response is examined. Trends in modal parameters are presented as a function of force amplitude, joint preload, reassembly, shipset, suspension, and ambient gravity level.

  19. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  20. Plasticity of Neurovestibular Systems Following Micro- and Hyper-Gravity Exposure and Readaptation to Earth's 1G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The gravity-sensing organs sense the sum of inertial force due to head translation and head orientation relative to gravity. Normally gravity is constant, and yet the neural sensors show remarkable plasticity. When the force of gravity changes, such as in spaceflight or during centrifugation, the neurovestibular system responds by regulating its neural output, and this response is similar for the vertebrate utricular nerve afferents and for the statocyst hair cell in invertebrates. First, we examine the response of utricular afferents in toadfish following exposure to G on two orbital missions (STS-90 and 95). Within the first day after landing, magnitude of neural response to an applied acceleration was significantly elevated, and re-adaptation back to control values occurred within approximately 30 hours. Time course of return to normal approximately parallels the decrease in vestibular disorientation in astronauts following return. Next, we use well-controlled hyper-G experiments in the vertebrate model to address: If G leads to adaptation and subsequent re-adaptation neural processes, does the transfer from 1G to hyper-G impart the opposite effects and do the effects accompanying transfer from the hyper-G back to the 1G conditions resemble as an analog the transfer from 1G to the microG Results show a biphasic pattern in reaction to 3G exposures: an initial sensitivity up-regulation (3- and 4-day) followed by a significant decrease after longer exposure. Return to control values is on the order of 4-8 days. Utricular sensitivity is strongly regulated up or down by gravity load and the duration of exposure. Interestingly, we found no correlation of response and hair cell synaptic body counts despite the large gain difference between 4- and 16-Day subjects. Lastly, we examine responses of statocyst receptors in land snail following exposure to G on two unmanned Russian Orbital missions (Foton M-2 and -3). Here, we have the ability to measure the output directly

  1. An Approach to Model Based Testing of Multiagent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Aamer

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous agents perform on behalf of the user to achieve defined goals or objectives. They are situated in dynamic environment and are able to operate autonomously to achieve their goals. In a multiagent system, agents cooperate with each other to achieve a common goal. Testing of multiagent systems is a challenging task due to the autonomous and proactive behavior of agents. However, testing is required to build confidence into the working of a multiagent system. Prometheus methodology is a commonly used approach to design multiagents systems. Systematic and thorough testing of each interaction is necessary. This paper proposes a novel approach to testing of multiagent systems based on Prometheus design artifacts. In the proposed approach, different interactions between the agent and actors are considered to test the multiagent system. These interactions include percepts and actions along with messages between the agents which can be modeled in a protocol diagram. The protocol diagram is converted into a protocol graph, on which different coverage criteria are applied to generate test paths that cover interactions between the agents. A prototype tool has been developed to generate test paths from protocol graph according to the specified coverage criterion. PMID:25874263

  2. Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-23

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  3. An approach to model based testing of multiagent systems.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Shafiq; Nadeem, Aamer

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous agents perform on behalf of the user to achieve defined goals or objectives. They are situated in dynamic environment and are able to operate autonomously to achieve their goals. In a multiagent system, agents cooperate with each other to achieve a common goal. Testing of multiagent systems is a challenging task due to the autonomous and proactive behavior of agents. However, testing is required to build confidence into the working of a multiagent system. Prometheus methodology is a commonly used approach to design multiagents systems. Systematic and thorough testing of each interaction is necessary. This paper proposes a novel approach to testing of multiagent systems based on Prometheus design artifacts. In the proposed approach, different interactions between the agent and actors are considered to test the multiagent system. These interactions include percepts and actions along with messages between the agents which can be modeled in a protocol diagram. The protocol diagram is converted into a protocol graph, on which different coverage criteria are applied to generate test paths that cover interactions between the agents. A prototype tool has been developed to generate test paths from protocol graph according to the specified coverage criterion. PMID:25874263

  4. Formation damage and filter cake buildup in laboratory core tests: Modeling and model-assisted analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Civan, F.

    1996-03-01

    A mathematical model for the analysis of formation damage in laboratory core tests is presented. The model considers filter cake buildup on sand face, invasion of external particles, release of formation fines, migration and retention of external particles and formation fines, interphase transfer of particles, and alteration of porosity and permeability. The effects of wettabilities of fine particles and pore surfaces, relative permeabilities and capillary pressure on formation damage in two-phase flow conditions are also included. Simulation results from the model are in good agreement with experimental results from core tests. This model can be used for the analysis of formation damage due to particulate processes in laboratory core tests.

  5. Restraint hypothermia in cold-exposed rats at 3 G and 1 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, C. B.; Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between heat loss, heat production, and hypothermia was investigated in experiments with rats which determined if hypergravity affects heat production by altering oxygen consumption and if restraint modifies the ability of the rats to activate thermogenic mechanisms after cold exposure in a hypergravic field. Restrained and unrestrained rats were exposed for 1 hr periods to 1 G and 3 G at ambient temperatures of 24 C or 10 C, and the rate of oxygen consumption, the core temperatures, and the tail temperatures were measured. Results show that thermoregulatory mechanisms are impaired when rats are exposed to 3 G fields, and at 24 C as well as at 10 C this impairment leads to an inappropriate increase in heat loss.

  6. [Silencing HSV1 gD expression in cultured cells by RNA interference].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qin-Chang; Ren, Zhe; Zhang, Chun-Long; Zhang, Mei-Ying; Liao, Hong-Juan; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Zhuo; Li, Jiu-Xiang; Hu, Chao-Feng; Wang, Hua-Dong; Wang, Yi-Fei

    2007-01-01

    To explore the anti-HSV-1 effect of silencing gD gene expression by RNA interference, five 21-nucleotide duplex small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) targeting the HSV1 gD sequence were designed and the gD-EGFP fusion gene expression vector was constructed, then co-transfected into Vero cell, and screened the effective siRNA through analyzing the intensity of the EGFP fluorescence. Finally, the anti-HSV1 effect was confirmed by plaque reduction assay, real-time PCR and daughter virus titration of HSV1 infected Vero cells transfected with siRNAs. The study demonstrated that siRNAs could effectively and specifically inhibit gD gene expression in HSV1-infected cells, but only had a little effect on HSV1 infection, so taking gD as the target of siRNA against HSV1 needs further study.

  7. System model of a natural circulation integral test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, Mark R.

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics (NE/RHP) at Oregon State University (OSU) has been developing an innovative modular reactor plant concept since being initiated with a Department of Energy (DoE) grant in 1999. This concept, the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR), is an integral pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant that utilizes natural circulation flow in the primary and employs advanced passive safety features. The OSU MASLWR test facility is an electrically heated integral effects facility, scaled from the MASLWR concept design, that has been previously used to assess the feasibility of the concept design safety approach. To assist in evaluating operational scenarios, a simulation tool that models the test facility and is based on both test facility experimental data and analytical methods has been developed. The tool models both the test facility electric core and a simulated nuclear core, allowing evaluation of a broad spectrum of operational scenarios to identify those scenarios that should be explored experimentally using the test facility or design-quality multi-physics tools. Using the simulation tool, the total cost of experimentation and analysis can be reduced by directing time and resources towards the operational scenarios of interest.

  8. Vibration testing and dynamic modeling of automotive shock absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mohan D.; Gruenberg, Scott B.; Torab, Homa; Griffiths, David

    2000-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of previously presented research work involving the dynamic characterization of automotive shock absorbers. The objective was to develop new testing and analysis methodologies for obtaining equivalent linear stiffness and damping of the shock absorbers for use in CAE- NVH low-to-mid frequency chassis models. It is well known that a hydraulic actuated elastomer test machine is not suitable for testing shocks in the mid-to-high frequency range where the typical road input displacements fall within the noise floor of the hydraulic machine. Hence, initially in this project, an electrodynamic shaker was used for exciting the shock absorbers under displacements less than 0.05 mm up to 500 Hz. Furthermore, instead of the swept sine technique, actual road data were used to excite the shocks. Equivalent linear spring-damper models were developed based on least- squares curve-fitting of the test data. The type of road profile did not influence the stiffness and damping values significantly for the range of amplitudes and frequencies considered. The success of the characterization of shock absorbers on the electrodynamic shaker using non-sinusoidal input has led to the development of a similar methodology to be employed on the hydraulic actuated elastomer test machine.

  9. GIS Modelling of Radionuclide Transport from the Semipalatinsk Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakay, L.; Zakarin, E.; Mahura, A.; Baklanov, A.; Sorensen, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the software complex GIS-project MigRad (Migration of Radionuclide) was developed, tested and applied for the territory of the Semipalatinsk test site/ polygon (Republic of Kazakhstan), where since 1961, in total 348 underground nuclear explosions were conducted. The MigRad is oriented on integration of large volumes of different information (mapping, ground-based, and satellite-based survey): and also includes modeling on its base local redistribution of radionuclides by precipitation and surface waters and by long-range transport of radioactive aerosols. The existing thermal anomaly on territory of the polygon was investigated in details, and the object-oriented analysis was applied for the studied area. Employing the RUNOFF model, the simulation of radionuclides migration with surface waters was performed. Employing the DERMA model, the simulation of long-term atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition patterns for cesium was conducted from 3 selected locations (Balapan, Delegen, and Experimental Field). Employing geoinformation technology, the mapping of the of the high temperature zones and epicenters of radioactive aerosols transport for the territory of the test site was carried out with post-processing and integration of modelling results into GIS environment. Contamination levels of pollution due to former nuclear explosions for population and environment of the surrounding polygon territories of Kazakhstan as well as adjacent countries were analyzed and evaluated. The MigRad was designed as instrument for comprehensive analysis of complex territorial processes influenced by former nuclear explosions on the territory of Semipalatinsk test site. It provides possibilities in detailed analyses for (i) extensive cartographic material, remote sensing, and field measurements data collected in different level databases; (ii) radionuclide migration with flows using accumulation and redistribution of soil particles; (iii) thermal anomalies

  10. Dynamic Model Tests of Models of the McDonnell Design of Project Mercury Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dynamic Model Tests of Models of the McDonnell Design of Project Mercury Capsule in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel. On 10 June 1961, 33 tests of the aerodynamic response of the McDonnell model Mercury capsule were conducted. Variables included spin, different parachute tethers, and the addition of baffles. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030951. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  11. Comparison of dendritic calcium transients in juvenile wild type and SOD1(G93A) mouse lumbar motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Katharina A; Lamano, Jonathan B; Samuels, Julienne; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of spinal motoneurons in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown alterations long before disease onset, including increased dendritic branching, increased persistent Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents, and impaired axonal transport. In this study dendritic Ca(2+) entry was investigated using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp of juvenile (P4-11) motoneurons. Neurons were filled with both Ca(2+) Green-1 and Texas Red dextrans, and line scans performed throughout. Steps were taken to account for different sources of variability, including (1) dye filling and laser penetration, (2) dendritic anatomy, and (3) the time elapsed from the start of recording. First, Ca(2+) Green-1 fluorescence was normalized by Texas Red; next, neurons were reconstructed so anatomy could be evaluated; finally, time was recorded. Customized software detected the largest Ca(2+) transients (area under the curve) from each line scan and matched it with parameters above. Overall, larger dendritic diameter and shorter path distance from the soma were significant predictors of larger transients, while time was not significant up to 2 h (data thereafter was dropped). However, Ca(2+) transients showed additional variability. Controlling for previous factors, significant variation was found between Ca(2+) signals from different processes of the same neuron in 3/7 neurons. This could reflect differential expression of Ca(2+) channels, local neuromodulation or other variations. Finally, Ca(2+) transients in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons were significantly smaller than in non-transgenic motoneurons. In conclusion, motoneuron processes show highly variable Ca(2+) transients, but these transients are smaller overall in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons. PMID:25914627

  12. GLT1 overexpression in SOD1(G93A) mouse cervical spinal cord does not preserve diaphragm function or extend disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hala, Tamara J; Seetharam, Suneil; Poulsen, David J; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by relatively rapid degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons, with death normally occurring 2-5years following diagnosis primarily due to respiratory paralysis resulting from phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) loss and consequent diaphragm denervation. In ALS, cellular abnormalities are not limited to MNs. For example, decreased levels and aberrant functioning of the major central nervous system (CNS) glutamate transporter, GLT1, occur in spinal cord and motor cortex astrocytes of both humans with ALS and in SOD1(G93A) rodents, a widely studied ALS animal model. This results in dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis and consequent glutamate excitotoxicity, a primary mechanism responsible for MN loss in ALS animal models and in the human disease. Given these observations of GLT1 dysfunction in areas of MN loss, as well as the importance of testing therapeutic strategies for preserving PhMNs in ALS, we evaluated intraspinal delivery of an adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8)-Gfa2 vector to the cervical spinal cord ventral horn of SOD1(G93A) ALS mice for focally restoring intraspinal GLT1 expression. AAV8 was specifically injected into the ventral horn bilaterally throughout the cervical enlargement at 110days of age, a clinically-relevant time point coinciding with phenotypic/symptomatic disease onset. Intraspinal delivery of AAV8-Gfa2-GLT1 resulted in robust transduction primarily of GFAP(+) astrocytes that persisted until disease endstage, as well as a 2-3-fold increase in total intraspinal GLT1 protein expression in the ventral horn. Despite this robust level of astrocyte transduction and GLT1 elevation, GLT1 overexpression did not protect PhMNs, preserve histological PhMN innervation of the diaphragm NMJ, or prevent decline in diaphragmatic respiratory function as assessed by phrenic nerve-diaphragm compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recordings compared to control AAV8-Gfa2-eGFP injected

  13. Computational analysis of semi-span model test techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II; Chokani, Ndaona

    1996-01-01

    A computational investigation was conducted to support the development of a semi-span model test capability in the NASA LaRC's National Transonic Facility. This capability is required for the testing of high-lift systems at flight Reynolds numbers. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to compute the low-speed flow over both a full-span configuration and a semi-span configuration. The computational results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The computational results indicate that the stand-off height has a strong influence on the flow over a semi-span model. The semi-span model adequately replicates the aerodynamic characteristics of the full-span configuration when a small stand-off height, approximately twice the tunnel empty sidewall boundary layer displacement thickness, is used. Several active sidewall boundary layer control techniques were examined including: upstream blowing, local jet blowing, and sidewall suction. Both upstream tangential blowing, and sidewall suction were found to minimize the separation of the sidewall boundary layer ahead of the semi-span model. The required mass flow rates are found to be practicable for testing in the NTF. For the configuration examined, the active sidewall boundary layer control techniques were found to be necessary only near the maximum lift conditions.

  14. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including Limit Cycle Oscillation behavior.

  15. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations of clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including LCO behavior.

  16. Tank Tests of Model 36 Flying Boat Hull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, John

    1938-01-01

    N.A.C.A. Model 36, a hull form with parallel middle body for half the length of the forebody and designed particularly for use with stub wings, was tested according to the general fixed-trim method over the range of practical loads, trims, and speeds. It was also tested free to trim with the center of gravity at two different positions. The results are given in the form of nondimensional coefficients. The resistance at the hump was exceptionally low but, at high planing speeds, afterbody interference made the performance only mediocre.

  17. X-33 Metal Model Testing In Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The countrys next generation of space transportation, a reusable launch vehicle (RLV), continues to undergo wind tunnel testing at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. All four photos are a metal model of the X-33 reusable launch vehicle (about 15 inches long by 15 inches wide) being tested for Lockheed Martin Skunk Works in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) at NASA Langley Research Center. Tests are being conducted by members of the Aerothermodynamics Branch. According to Kelly Murphy of Langleys Aerothermodynamics Branch, the aluminum and stainless steel model of the X-33 underwent aerodynamic testing in the tunnel. *The subsonic tests were conducted at the speed of Mach 25,* she said. *Force and moment testing and measurement in this tunnel lasted about one week.* Future testing of the metal model is scheduled for Langleys 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, from the end of March to mid-April 1997, and the Unitary Wind Tunnel, from mid-April to the beginning of May. Other tunnel testing for X-33 models are scheduled from the present through June in the hypersonic tunnels, and the 14- by 22-Foot Tunnel from about mid-June to mid-July. Since 1991 Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. has been the lead center for coordinating the Agencys X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, an industry-led effort, which NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin has declared the agency's highest priority new program. The RLV Technology Program is a partnership among NASA, the United States Air Force and private industry to develop world leadership in low-cost space transportation. The goal of the program is to develop technologies and new operational concepts that can radically reduce the cost of access to space. The RLV program also hopes to speed the commercialization of space and improve U.S. economic competitiveness by making access to space as routine and reliable as today's airline industry, while reducing costs and enhancing safety and reliability. The RLV

  18. X-33 Metal Model Testing In Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The countrys next generation of space transportation, a reusable launch vehicle (RLV), continues to undergo wind tunnel testing at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. All four photos are a metal model of the X-33 reusable launch vehicle (about 15 inches long by 15 inches wide) being tested for Lockheed Martin Skunk Works in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) at NASA Langley Research Center. Tests are being conducted by members of the Aerothermodynamics Branch. According to Kelly Murphy of Langleys Aerothermodynamics Branch, the aluminum and stainless steel model of the X-33 underwent aerodynamic testing in the tunnel. *The subsonic tests were conducted at the speed of Mach .25,* she said. *Force and moment testing and measurement in this tunnel lasted about one week.* Future testing of the metal model is scheduled for Langleys 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, from the end of March to mid-April 1997, and the Unitary Wind Tunnel, from mid-April to the beginning of May. Other tunnel testing for X-33 models are scheduled from the present through June in the hypersonic tunnels, and the 14- by 22-Foot Tunnel from about mid-June to mid-July. Since 1991 Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. has been the lead center for coordinating the Agencys X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, an industry-led effort, which NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin has declared the agency's highest priority new program. The RLV Technology Program is a partnership among NASA, the United States Air Force and private industry to develop world leadership in low-cost space transportation. The goal of the program is to develop technologies and new operational concepts that can radically reduce the cost of access to space. The RLV program also hopes to speed the commercialization of space and improve U.S. economic competitiveness by making access to space as routine and reliable as today's airline industry, while reducing costs and enhancing safety and reliability. The RLV

  19. Wildlife species richness in shelterbelts: test of a habitat model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Richard L.; Cable, Ted T.; Haire, Sandra L.

    1992-01-01

    Shelterbelts are human-made habitats consisting of rows of shrubs and trees planted either in fields or on the windward side of farmstead dwellings. Shelterbelts provide wooded habitat for a large variety of birds and other wildlife. A model to predict wildlife species richness in shelterbelts (Schroeder 1986) was published as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model series (Schamberger et al. 1982). HSI models have been used extensively by wildlife managers and land use planners to assess habitat quality. Several HSI models have become the focus of a test program that includes analysis of field data for corroboration, refutation, or modification of model hypotheses. Previous tests of HSI models focused either on single species (e.g., Cook and Irwin 1985, Morton et al. 1989, Schroeder 1990) or examined portions of HSI models, such as the relationship between cavity abundance and tree diameter (Allen and Corn 1990). The shelterbelt model, however, assesses habitat value at the community level. The effects of habitat characteristics, area, and perimeter on diversity and abundance of bird and mammal species in shelterbelts were first studied by Yahner (1983a, b). Johnson and Beck (1988) confirmed the importance of shelterbelts to wildlife and identified area, perimeter, and diversity and complexity of vegetation as key measurements of habitat quality. The shelterbelt model incorporates both specific habitat variables and larger scale parameters, such as area and configuration, to predict wildlife species richness. This shift in perspective comes at a time of increasing interest in conservation and planning beyond the species levels (e.g., Graul and Miller 1984, Hutto et al. 1987, Schroeder 1987: 26). We report results of a 3-year study of spatial and vegetative parameters and their relationship to breeding bird species richness (BSR) in 34 Kansas shelterbelts. Our objectives were to test the hypothesis presented in the original

  20. Numerical Modeling and Test Data Comparison of Propulsion Test Article Helium Pressurization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Kimberly; Majumdar, Alok; Steadman, Todd; Hedayat, Ali; Fogle, Frank R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A transient model of the propulsion test article (PTA) helium pressurization system was developed using the generalized fluid system simulation program (GFSSP). The model included pressurization lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and liquid oxygen (lox) and rocket propellant-1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space, and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSP's capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant, and the tank wall as well as conduction in the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 sec of lower feed system priming, 420 sec of fuel and lox pump priming, and 150 sec of engine firing.

  1. Model validation in aquatic toxicity testing: implications for regulatory practice.

    PubMed

    McCarty, L S

    2012-08-01

    Toxicity test validity is contingent on whether models and assumptions are appropriate and sufficient. A quality control evaluation of the acute toxicity testing protocol using the US. EPA fathead minnow database focused around three key assumptions that ensure results represent valid toxicological metrics: 1, it must be possible to estimate steady-state LC50s; 2, LC50s should occur at equivalent exposure durations; 3, all substantive toxicity modifying factors should be adequately controlled. About 8% of the tests failed the first assumption and are invalid and unusable. Examination of remaining data indicated variance from unquantified effects of toxicity modifying factors remained in LC50s, thereby failing assumption three. Such flaws in toxicity data generated via recommended LC50 testing protocols means resultant data do not represent consistent, comparable measures of relative toxicity. Current regulations employing LC50 testing data are acceptable due to the use of semiquantitative, policy-driven development guidance that considers such data uncertainty. Quantitative applications such as QSARs, mixture toxicity, and regulatory chemical grouping can be compromised. These validation failures justify a formal quality control review of the LC50 toxicity testing protocol. Interim improvements in the design, execution, interpretation, and regulatory applications of LC50 and related protocols using exposure-based dose surrogates are warranted.

  2. Perceived game realism: a test of three alternative models.

    PubMed

    Ribbens, Wannes

    2013-01-01

    Perceived realism is considered a key concept in explaining the mental processing of media messages and the societal impact of media. Despite its importance, little is known about its conceptualization and dimensional structure, especially with regard to digital games. The aim of this study was to test a six-factor model of perceived game realism comprised of simulational realism, freedom of choice, perceptual pervasiveness, social realism, authenticity, and character involvement and to assess it against an alternative single- and five-factor model. Data were collected from 380 male digital game users who judged the realism of the first-person shooter Half-Life 2 based upon their previous experience with the game. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to investigate which model fits the data best. The results support the six-factor model over the single- and five-factor solutions. The study contributes to our knowledge of perceived game realism by further developing its conceptualization and measurement.

  3. Analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator with permanent magnet fluxbiasing is presented. An AMCD consists of a spinning annular rim which is suspended by a noncontacting linear electromagnetic spin motor. The actuator is treated as a lumped-parameter electromechanical system in the development of the model.

  4. Report on Tests of Metal Model Propellers in Combination with a Model VE-7 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesley, E P

    1926-01-01

    This report, prepared at the request of the NACA, describes tests of three metal model propellers, in a free air stream and in front of a model of a VE-7 airplane. The effect of introducing the model airplane is shown to be an increase in thrust and power coefficients and efficiency at small slip, and a decrease in the same at large slip.

  5. Effects of Latent Variable Nonnormality and Model Misspecification on Testing Structural Equation Modeling Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Shaojing; Konold, Timothy R.; Fan, Xitao

    2011-01-01

    Interest in testing interaction terms within the latent variable modeling framework has been on the rise in recent years. However, little is known about the influence of nonnormality and model misspecification on such models that involve latent variable interactions. The authors used Mattson's data generation method to control for latent variable…

  6. NASTRAN Modeling of Flight Test Components for UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idosor, Florentino R.; Seible, Frieder

    1993-01-01

    Based upon the recommendations of the UH-60A Airloads Program Review Committee, work towards a NASTRAN remodeling effort has been conducted. This effort modeled and added the necessary structural/mass components to the existing UH-60A baseline NASTRAN model to reflect the addition of flight test components currently in place on the UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration used in NASA-Ames Research Center's Modern Technology Rotor Airloads Program. These components include necessary flight hardware such as instrument booms, movable ballast cart, equipment mounting racks, etc. Recent modeling revisions have also been included in the analyses to reflect the inclusion of new and updated primary and secondary structural components (i.e., tail rotor shaft service cover, tail rotor pylon) and improvements to the existing finite element mesh (i.e., revisions of material property estimates). Mode frequency and shape results have shown that components such as the Trimmable Ballast System baseplate and its respective payload ballast have caused a significant frequency change in a limited number of modes while only small percent changes in mode frequency are brought about with the addition of the other MTRAP flight components. With the addition of the MTRAP flight components, update of the primary and secondary structural model, and imposition of the final MTRAP weight distribution, modal results are computed representative of the 'best' model presently available.

  7. Testing Geyser Models using Down-vent Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Munoz, C.; Ingebritsen, S.; King, E.

    2013-12-01

    Geysers are often studied as an analogue to magmatic volcanoes because both involve the transfer of mass and energy that leads to eruption. Several conceptual models have been proposed to explain geyser eruption, but no definitive test has been performed largely due to scarcity of down-vent data. In this study we compare simulated time histories of pressure and temperature against published data for the Old Faithful geyser in the Yellowstone National Park and new down-vent measurements from geysers in the El Tatio geyser field of northern Chile. We test two major types of geyser models by comparing simulated and field results. In the chamber model, the geyser system is approximated as a fissure-like conduit connected to a subsurface chamber of water and steam. Heat supplied to the chamber causes water to boil and drives geyser eruptions. Here the Navier-Stokes equation is used to simulate the flow of water and steam. In the fracture-zone model, the geyser system is approximated as a saturated fracture zone of high permeability and compressibility, surrounded by rock matrix of relatively low permeability and compressibility. Heat supply from below causes pore water to boil and drives geyser eruption. Here a two-phase form of Darcy's law is assumed to describe the flow of water and steam (Ingebritsen and Rojstaczer, 1993). Both models can produce P-T time histories qualitatively similar to field results, but the simulations are sensitive to assumed parameters. Results from the chamber model are sensitive to the heat supplied to the system and to the width of the conduit, while results from the fracture-zone model are most sensitive to the permeability of the fracture zone and the adjacent wall rocks. Detailed comparison between field and simulated results, such as the phase lag between changes of pressure and temperature, may help to resolve which model might be more realistic.

  8. Testing and extension of a sea lamprey feeding model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochran, Philip A.; Swink, William D.; Kinziger, Andrew P.

    1999-01-01

    A previous model of feeding by sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus predicted energy intake and growth by lampreys as a function of lamprey size, host size, and duration of feeding attachments, but it was applicable only to lampreys feeding at 10°C and it was tested against only a single small data set of limited scope. We extended the model to other temperatures and tested it against an extensive data set (more than 700 feeding bouts) accumulated during experiments with captive sea lampreys. Model predictions of instantaneous growth were highly correlated with observed growth, and a partitioning of mean squared error between model predictions and observed results showed that 88.5% of the variance was due to random variation rather than to systematic errors. However, deviations between observed and predicted values varied substantially, especially for short feeding bouts. Predicted and observed growth trajectories of individual lampreys during multiple feeding bouts during the summer tended to correspond closely, but predicted growth was generally much higher than observed growth late in the year. This suggests the possibility that large overwintering lampreys reduce their feeding rates while attached to hosts. Seasonal or size-related shifts in the fate of consumed energy may provide an alternative explanation. The lamprey feeding model offers great flexibility in assessing growth of captive lampreys within various experimental protocols (e.g., different host species or thermal regimes) because it controls for individual differences in feeding history.

  9. Survey of Experimental Tests of the IBA Model

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of experimental tests of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) Model is presented covering even and odd mass nuclei in the region from A ≈ 80 to A ≈ 230. Both positive and negative parity states with both high and low spin are discussed. Topics included concern energy levels, electromagnetic transition rates, two nucleon transfer and inelastic scattering. Special attention is given to nuclear symmetries and transitional regions. Comparison with other models is made where appropriate. The distinction between IBA-1 and IBA-2 is discussed including their respective areas of applicability.

  10. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  11. Development and Testing of a Groundwater Management Model for the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test, Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas P. Boyle; Gregg Lamorey; Scott Bassett; Greg Pohll; Jenny Chapman

    2006-01-25

    This document describes the development and application of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) and surrounding areas that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and state personnel to evaluate the impact of future proposed scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage the necessary temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the CNTA and surrounding Hot Creek Valley. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, geothermal energy production, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to the region near CNTA and others did not, together they demonstrate the usefulness of the management tool for managers who need to evaluate the impact proposed changes in groundwater use in or near CNTA may have on radionuclide migration.

  12. Residual flexibility test method for verification of constrained structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for deriving constrained modes and frequencies from a reduced model based on a subset of the free-free modes plus the residual effects of neglected modes. The method involves a simple modification of the MacNeal and Rubin component mode representation to allow development of a verified constrained (fixed-base) structural model. Results for two spaceflight structures having translational boundary degrees of freedom show quick convergence of constrained modes using a measureable number of free-free modes plus the boundary partition of the residual flexibility matrix. This paper presents the free-free residual flexibility approach as an alternative test/analysis method when fixed-base testing proves impractical.

  13. Testing a positional model of the Hebb effect.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Nick; Page, Mike; Norris, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the hypothesis that a strengthening of position-item associations underlies the improvement seen in performance on an immediate serial recall task, for a list that is surreptitiously repeated every third trial. Having established a strong effect of repetition, performance was tested on transfer lists in which half the items held the same position as in the repeated list (S-items) and the remainder moved (D-items). In Experiment 1, S-items showed a small advantage in order errors over control and D-items. A second experiment tested whether a design feature in Experiment 1 underlay this advantage. When the experimental design was better controlled, no improvement was shown for either S- or D-items over controls. These data were shown to be inconsistent with the results of computer simulations of a positional model. An alternative model is outlined.

  14. Modeling and Testing of Docking and Berthing Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. P.; Slone, M. M.; Tobbe, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The Contact Dynamics Simulation Laboratory (CDSL) of the Marshall Space Flight Center provides for refined hardware-in-the-loop real-time simulation of docking and berthing mechanisms and associated control systems. This facility is employed to verify the performance of docking/berthing mechanisms during Earth-orbit operations, determine the capture envelope of dockingherthing devices, measure contact loads at vehicle interfaces, and evaluate visual cues for man-in-the-loop operations. The CDSL has developed test verified analytical models of such systems as the ISS Common Berthing Mechanism and HST Three Point Docking Mechanism. This paper will describe the modeling and test techniques employed at the CDSL and present results from recent programs.

  15. Scale model testing of drogues for free drifting buoys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented model drogue tests were conducted in a ship model towing tank. The purpose of the tests was to observe and measure deployment and drag characteristics of such shapes as parachutes, crossed vanes, and window shades which may be employed in conjunction with free drifting buoys. Both Froude and Reynolds scaling laws were applied while scaling to full scale relative velocities of from 0 to 0.2 knots. A weighted window shade drogue is recommended because of its performance, high drag coefficient, simplicity, and low cost. Detailed theoretical performance curves are presented for parachutes, crossed vanes, and window shade drogues. Theoretical estimates of depth locking accuracy and buoy-induced dynamic loads pertinent to window shade drogues are presented as a design aid. An example of a window shade drogue design is presented.

  16. Testing Modified Gravity Models using Gravitational Waves Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahya, Emre

    2016-07-01

    Rotation curves of spiral galaxies and weak lensing as well as CMBR Power Spectrum point towards a need for different kind of matter in the universe that is not interacting electromagnetically. Alternatively one can explain rotation curves by modifying Newton's Laws which is called MOND. Relativistic versions of MOND work surprisingly good in producing structure and the community started taking these models seriously. We would like to offer a test which can test the validity of these class of models where one would get non-coincident arrival for gravitational waves and photons. We will explain why one should get a time lag between these two massless particles in the context of these so-called Dark Matter Emulators. And give an order of magnitude estimate for Shapiro delay for object which are very far away as well as more accurate ones for sources in Milky-way.

  17. Thermal Environmental Testing of NSTAR Engineering Model Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.; Becker, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium program will fly a xenon ion propulsion system on the Deep Space 1 Mission. Tests were conducted under NASA's Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) Program with 3 different engineering model ion thrusters to determine thruster thermal characteristics over the NSTAR operating range in a variety of thermal environments. A liquid nitrogen-cooled shroud was used to cold-soak the thruster to -120 C. Initial tests were performed prior to a mature spacecraft design. Those results and the final, severe, requirements mandated by the spacecraft led to several changes to the basic thermal design. These changes were incorporated into a final design and tested over a wide range of environmental conditions.

  18. LOX/Methane Main Engine Igniter Tests and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.; Ajmani, Kumund

    2008-01-01

    The LOX/methane propellant combination is being considered for the Lunar Surface Access Module ascent main engine propulsion system. The proposed switch from the hypergolic propellants used in the Apollo lunar ascent engine to LOX/methane propellants requires the development of igniters capable of highly reliable performance in a lunar surface environment. An ignition test program was conducted that used an in-house designed LOX/methane spark torch igniter. The testing occurred in Cell 21 of the Research Combustion Laboratory to utilize its altitude capability to simulate a space vacuum environment. Approximately 750 ignition test were performed to evaluate the effects of methane purity, igniter body temperature, spark energy level and frequency, mixture ratio, flowrate, and igniter geometry on the ability to obtain successful ignitions. Ignitions were obtained down to an igniter body temperature of approximately 260 R with a 10 torr back-pressure. The data obtained is also being used to anchor a CFD based igniter model.

  19. Transfer as a Two-Way Process: Testing a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Rita; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this exploratory research is to test the model of training transfer as a two-way process. Design/methodology/approach: Based on self-report data gathered from 58 to 44 respondents in a field experiment, it is argued that there is not just learning in the context of training and not just application in the context of work.…

  20. Incorporating Spatial Models in Visual Field Test Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Nikki J.; McKendrick, Allison M.; Turpin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a perimetric algorithm (Spatially Weighted Likelihoods in Zippy Estimation by Sequential Testing [ZEST] [SWeLZ]) that uses spatial information on every presentation to alter visual field (VF) estimates, to reduce test times without affecting output precision and accuracy. Methods SWeLZ is a maximum likelihood Bayesian procedure, which updates probability mass functions at VF locations using a spatial model. Spatial models were created from empirical data, computational models, nearest neighbor, random relationships, and interconnecting all locations. SWeLZ was compared to an implementation of the ZEST algorithm for perimetry using computer simulations on 163 glaucomatous and 233 normal VFs (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2). Output measures included number of presentations and visual sensitivity estimates. Results There was no significant difference in accuracy or precision of SWeLZ for the different spatial models relative to ZEST, either when collated across whole fields or when split by input sensitivity. Inspection of VF maps showed that SWeLZ was able to detect localized VF loss. SWeLZ was faster than ZEST for normal VFs: median number of presentations reduced by 20% to 38%. The number of presentations was equivalent for SWeLZ and ZEST when simulated on glaucomatous VFs. Conclusions SWeLZ has the potential to reduce VF test times in people with normal VFs, without detriment to output precision and accuracy in glaucomatous VFs. Translational Relevance SWeLZ is a novel perimetric algorithm. Simulations show that SWeLZ can reduce the number of test presentations for people with normal VFs. Since many patients have normal fields, this has the potential for significant time savings in clinical settings. PMID:26981329

  1. Computer tomography of flows external to test models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prikryl, I.; Vest, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographic techniques for reconstruction of three-dimensional aerodynamic density fields, from interferograms recorded from several different viewing directions were studied. Emphasis is on the case in which an opaque object such as a test model in a wind tunnel obscures significant regions of the interferograms (projection data). A method called the Iterative Convolution Method (ICM), existing methods in which the field is represented by a series expansions, and analysis of real experimental data in the form of aerodynamic interferograms are discussed.

  2. Cryogenic modelling of the ISOCAM experiment from test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    An overview is presented of cryogenic test results and fundamental measurements on the ISOCAM, an infrared camera to be mounted aboard the ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) satellite. Thermal conductances and heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor are evaluated by model fitting. Phenomena such as 'chopped' function of motors and two-time temperature rise after continuous motor functioning are studied.

  3. Post Test Analysis of a PCCV Model Dynamically Tested Under Simulated Design-Basis Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.; Chokshi, N.; James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Tsurumaki, S.; Zhang, L.

    1998-11-09

    In a collaborative program between the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan under sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Ihdustry, the seismic behavior of Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels (PCCV) is being investigated. A 1:10 scale PCCV model has been constructed by NUPEC and subjected to seismic simulation tests using the high performance shaking table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory. A primary objective of the testing program is to demonstrate the capability of the PCCV to withstand design basis earthquakes with a significant safety margin against major damage or failure. As part of the collaborative program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting research in state-of-the-art analytical methods for predicting the seismic behavior of PCCV structures, with the eventual goal of understanding, validating, and improving calculations dated to containment structure performance under design and severe seismic events. With the increased emphasis on risk-informed- regulatory focus, more accurate ch&@erization (less uncertainty) of containment structural and functional integri~ is desirable. This paper presents results of post-test calculations conducted at ANATECH to simulate the design level scale model tests.

  4. Fastener load tests and retention systems tests for cryogenic wind-tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A-286 stainless steel screws were tested to determine the tensile load capability and failure mode of various screw sizes and types at both cryogenic and room temperature. Additionally, five fastener retention systems were tested by using A-286 screws with specimens made from the primary metallic alloys that are currently used for cryogenic models. The locking system effectiveness was examined by simple no-load cycling to cryogenic temperatures (-275 F) as well as by dynamic and static loading at cryogenic temperatures. In general, most systems were found to be effective retention devices. There are some differences between the various devices with respect to ease of application, cleanup, and reuse. Results of tests at -275 F imply that the cold temperatures act to improve screw retention. The improved retention is probably the result of differential thermal contraction and/or increased friction (thread-binding effects). The data provided are useful in selecting screw sizes, types, and locking devices for model systems to be tested in cryogenic wind tunnels.

  5. Decision Models for Determining the Optimal Life Test Sampling Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechval, Nicholas A.; Nechval, Konstantin N.; Purgailis, Maris; Berzins, Gundars; Strelchonok, Vladimir F.

    2010-11-01

    Life test sampling plan is a technique, which consists of sampling, inspection, and decision making in determining the acceptance or rejection of a batch of products by experiments for examining the continuous usage time of the products. In life testing studies, the lifetime is usually assumed to be distributed as either a one-parameter exponential distribution, or a two-parameter Weibull distribution with the assumption that the shape parameter is known. Such oversimplified assumptions can facilitate the follow-up analyses, but may overlook the fact that the lifetime distribution can significantly affect the estimation of the failure rate of a product. Moreover, sampling costs, inspection costs, warranty costs, and rejection costs are all essential, and ought to be considered in choosing an appropriate sampling plan. The choice of an appropriate life test sampling plan is a crucial decision problem because a good plan not only can help producers save testing time, and reduce testing cost; but it also can positively affect the image of the product, and thus attract more consumers to buy it. This paper develops the frequentist (non-Bayesian) decision models for determining the optimal life test sampling plans with an aim of cost minimization by identifying the appropriate number of product failures in a sample that should be used as a threshold in judging the rejection of a batch. The two-parameter exponential and Weibull distributions with two unknown parameters are assumed to be appropriate for modelling the lifetime of a product. A practical numerical application is employed to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  6. The StrataTest® human skin model, a consistent in vitro alternative for toxicological testing.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Cathy; Gratz, Ken; Liebel, Frank; Southall, Michael; Garay, Michelle; Bhattacharyya, Surjya; Simon, Nick; Vander Zanden, Marie; Van Winkle, Kelly; Pirnstill, John; Pirnstill, Sara; Comer, Allen; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2010-10-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro skin models provide an alternative to animal testing for assessing tissue damage caused by chemical or physical agents and for the identification and characterization of agents formulated to mitigate this damage. The StrataTest® human skin model made with pathogen-free NIKS® keratinocyte progenitors is a fully-stratified tissue containing epidermal and dermal components that possesses barrier function as determined by measurements of electrical impedance. Independent batches of skin tissues responded consistently to known chemical irritants even after refrigerated storage for up to 7 days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected after exposure of skin tissues to ozone, cigarette smoke or ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Pretreatment with the antioxidant parthenolide-depleted (PD)-Feverfew extract prevented cigarette smoke-induced or UV irradiation-mediated increases in ROS. Interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) secretion increased in a dose dependent manner following UV irradiation but cytokine release was abrogated by pretreatment with a UVA/UVB sunscreen. Similarly, immunohistochemical detection showed increased thymidine dimer formation in UV-irradiated skin tissue that was prevented with sunscreen pretreatment. These results demonstrate that the StrataTest® human skin model is broadly applicable to a wide range of in vitro toxicological assays.

  7. Computational Plume Modeling of COnceptual ARES Vehicle Stage Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Ahuja, Vineet

    2007-01-01

    The plume-induced environment of a conceptual ARES V vehicle stage test at the NASA Stennis Space Center (NASA-SSC) was modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A full-scale multi-element grid was generated for the NASA-SSC B-2 test stand with the ARES V stage being located in a proposed off-center forward position. The plume produced by the ARES V main power plant (cluster of five RS-68 LOX/LH2 engines) was simulated using a multi-element flow solver - CRUNCH. The primary objective of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of the ARES V plume and its impingement characteristics on the B-2 flame-deflector. The location, size and shape of the impingement region were quantified along with the un-cooled deflector wall pressures, temperatures and incident heating rates. Issues with the proposed tests were identified and several of these addressed using the CFD methodology. The final results of this modeling effort will provide useful data and boundary conditions in upcoming engineering studies that are directed towards determining the required facility modifications for ensuring safe and reliable stage testing in support of the Constellation Program.

  8. Toward a model of impaired reality testing in rats.

    PubMed

    McDannald, Michael; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2009-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic brain disorder that affects about 1.1% of the adult US population annually. Hallucinations, delusions, and impaired reality testing are prominent symptoms of the disorder. Modeling these symptoms is difficult because it is unclear how to assess impaired reality testing in animals. Animals cannot discuss their beliefs; however, a century of learning experiments has shown us that they, like us, construct complex internal representations of their world. Presumably, these representations can become confused with reality for animals in much the same way that they do for schizophrenic patients. Indeed, there is evidence from studies of Pavlovian conditioning that this happens even in normal animals. For example, early in training a cue that has been paired with reward elicits a highly realistic, sensory representation of that reward, which is to some extent indistinguishable from reality. With further training, this sensory hallucination of reward is replaced by a more abstract representation, termed a reward expectancy. Reward expectancies reflect the sensory and other qualities of the impending reward but are distinguishable from the actual reward. Notably, the hallucinatory representations depend on subcortical regions, such as amygdala, whereas reward expectancies require the progressive involvement of prefrontal areas, such as orbitofrontal cortex. Abnormal prefrontal function is associated with schizophrenia; impaired reality testing may result from a failure of the normal shift from highly realistic, sensory representations to more abstract, prefrontal expectancies. The Pavlovian procedures discussed here could be applied to animal models and schizophrenic patients to test this hypothesis. PMID:19460880

  9. Pescara benchmark: overview of modelling, testing and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellino, A.; Brancaleoni, F.; Bregant, L.; Carminelli, A.; Catania, G.; Di Evangelista, A.; Gabriele, S.; Garibaldi, L.; Marchesiello, S.; Sorrentino, S.; Spina, D.; Valente, C.; Zuccarino, L.

    2011-07-01

    The `Pescara benchmark' is part of the national research project `BriViDi' (BRIdge VIbrations and DIagnosis) supported by the Italian Ministero dell'Universitá e Ricerca. The project is aimed at developing an integrated methodology for the structural health evaluation of railway r/c, p/c bridges. The methodology should provide for applicability in operating conditions, easy data acquisition through common industrial instrumentation, robustness and reliability against structural and environmental uncertainties. The Pescara benchmark consisted in lab tests to get a consistent and large experimental data base and subsequent data processing. Special tests were devised to simulate the train transit effects in actual field conditions. Prestressed concrete beams of current industrial production both sound and damaged at various severity corrosion levels were tested. The results were collected either in a deterministic setting and in a form suitable to deal with experimental uncertainties. Damage identification was split in two approaches: with or without a reference model. In the first case f.e. models were used in conjunction with non conventional updating techniques. In the second case, specialized output-only identification techniques capable to deal with time-variant and possibly non linear systems were developed. The lab tests allowed validating the above approaches and the performances of classical modal based damage indicators.

  10. Zebrafish as a systems toxicology model for developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yuhei; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Umemoto, Noriko; Shimada, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Toshio

    2015-02-01

    The developing brain is extremely sensitive to many chemicals. Exposure to neurotoxicants during development has been implicated in various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Although rodents have been widely used for developmental neurotoxicity testing, experiments using large numbers of rodents are time-consuming, expensive, and raise ethical concerns. Using alternative non-mammalian animal models may relieve some of these pressures by allowing testing of large numbers of subjects while reducing expenses and minimizing the use of mammalian subjects. In this review, we discuss some of the advantages of using zebrafish in developmental neurotoxicity testing, focusing on central nervous system development, neurobehavior, toxicokinetics, and toxicodynamics in this species. We also describe some important examples of developmental neurotoxicity testing using zebrafish combined with gene expression profiling, neuroimaging, or neurobehavioral assessment. Zebrafish may be a systems toxicology model that has the potential to reveal the pathways of developmental neurotoxicity and to provide a sound basis for human risk assessments.

  11. Toward a model of impaired reality testing in rats.

    PubMed

    McDannald, Michael; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2009-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic brain disorder that affects about 1.1% of the adult US population annually. Hallucinations, delusions, and impaired reality testing are prominent symptoms of the disorder. Modeling these symptoms is difficult because it is unclear how to assess impaired reality testing in animals. Animals cannot discuss their beliefs; however, a century of learning experiments has shown us that they, like us, construct complex internal representations of their world. Presumably, these representations can become confused with reality for animals in much the same way that they do for schizophrenic patients. Indeed, there is evidence from studies of Pavlovian conditioning that this happens even in normal animals. For example, early in training a cue that has been paired with reward elicits a highly realistic, sensory representation of that reward, which is to some extent indistinguishable from reality. With further training, this sensory hallucination of reward is replaced by a more abstract representation, termed a reward expectancy. Reward expectancies reflect the sensory and other qualities of the impending reward but are distinguishable from the actual reward. Notably, the hallucinatory representations depend on subcortical regions, such as amygdala, whereas reward expectancies require the progressive involvement of prefrontal areas, such as orbitofrontal cortex. Abnormal prefrontal function is associated with schizophrenia; impaired reality testing may result from a failure of the normal shift from highly realistic, sensory representations to more abstract, prefrontal expectancies. The Pavlovian procedures discussed here could be applied to animal models and schizophrenic patients to test this hypothesis.

  12. Modal testing for model validation of structures with discrete nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    Ewins, D. J.; Weekes, B.; delli Carri, A.

    2015-01-01

    Model validation using data from modal tests is now widely practiced in many industries for advanced structural dynamic design analysis, especially where structural integrity is a primary requirement. These industries tend to demand highly efficient designs for their critical structures which, as a result, are increasingly operating in regimes where traditional linearity assumptions are no longer adequate. In particular, many modern structures are found to contain localized areas, often around joints or boundaries, where the actual mechanical behaviour is far from linear. Such structures need to have appropriate representation of these nonlinear features incorporated into the otherwise largely linear models that are used for design and operation. This paper proposes an approach to this task which is an extension of existing linear techniques, especially in the testing phase, involving only just as much nonlinear analysis as is necessary to construct a model which is good enough, or ‘valid’: i.e. capable of predicting the nonlinear response behaviour of the structure under all in-service operating and test conditions with a prescribed accuracy. A short-list of methods described in the recent literature categorized using our framework is given, which identifies those areas in which further development is most urgently required. PMID:26303924

  13. Model Testing Using Data on 131I Released from Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, Kathleen M.; Napier, Bruce A.; Filistovic, Vitold; Homma, Toshimitsu; Kanyar, Bela; Krajewski, Pawel; Kryshev, Alexander I.; Nedveckaite, Tatjana; Nenyei, Arpad; Sazykina, Tatiana G.; Tveten, Ulf; Sjoblom, Kirsti-Liisa; Robinson, Carol

    2005-06-21

    The Hanford test scenario described an accidental release of 131I to the environment from the Hanford Purex Chemical Separations Plant in September 1963. Based on monitoring data collected after the release, this scenario was used by the Dose Reconstruction Working Group of BIOMASS to test models typically used in dose reconstructions. The primary exposure pathway in terms of contribution to human doses was ingestion of contaminated milk and vegetables. Predicted mean doses to the thyroid of reference individuals from ingestion of 131I ranged from 0.0001 to 0.8 mSv. Predicted doses to actual children with high milk consumption ranged from 0.006 to 2 mSv. The predicted deposition at any given location varied among participants by a factor of 5 to 80. Predicted ingestion doses for children, normalized for predicted deposition, varied by about a factor of 10. The exercise provided an opportunity for comparison of assessment methods and conceptual approaches, testing model predictions against measurements, and identifying the most important contributors to uncertainty in the assessment result. Key factors affecting predictions included the approach to handling incomplete data, interpretation of input information, selection of parameter values, adjustment of models for site-specific conditions, and treatment of uncertainties.

  14. Model testing using data on 131I released from Hanford.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, K M; Napier, B A; Filistovic, V; Homma, T; Kanyár, B; Krajewski, P; Kryshev, A I; Nedveckaite, T; Nényei, A; Sazykina, T G; Tveten, U; Sjöblom, K-L; Robinson, C

    2005-01-01

    The Hanford test scenario described an accidental release of 131I to the environment from the Hanford Purex Chemical Separations Plant in September 1963. Based on monitoring data collected after the release, this scenario was used by the Dose Reconstruction Working Group of BIOMASS to test models typically used in dose reconstructions. The primary exposure pathway in terms of contribution to human doses was ingestion of contaminated milk and vegetables. Predicted mean doses to the thyroid of reference individuals from ingestion of 131I ranged from 0.0001 to 0.8 mSv. For one location, predicted doses to the thyroids of two children with high milk consumption ranged from 0.006 to 2 mSv. The predicted deposition at any given location varied among participants by a factor of 5-80. The exercise provided an opportunity for comparison of assessment methods and conceptual approaches, testing model predictions against measurements, and identifying the most important contributors to uncertainty in the assessment result. Key factors affecting predictions included the approach to handling incomplete data, interpretation of input information, selection of parameter values, adjustment of models for site-specific conditions, and treatment of uncertainties. PMID:15975695

  15. Six-Tube Freezable Radiator Testing and Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Navarro, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the spacecraft s surroundings and because of different thermal loads rejected during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a freezable radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. These predictions are a critical step in gaining the capability to quickly design and produce optimized freezable radiators for a range of mission requirements. This paper builds upon previous efforts made to correlate a Thermal Desktop(TradeMark) model with empirical testing data from two test articles, with additional model modifications and empirical data from a sub-component radiator for a full scale design. Two working fluids were tested, namely MultiTherm WB-58 and a 50-50 mixture of DI water and Amsoil ANT.

  16. Six-Tube Freezable Radiator Testing and Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilibridge, Sean T.; Navarro, Moses

    2012-01-01

    Freezable Radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the spacecraft?s surroundings and because of different thermal loads rejected during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recov ering) a freezable radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. These predictions are a critical step in gaining the capability to quickly design and produce optimized freezable radiators for a range of mission requirements. This paper builds upon previous efforts made to correlate a Thermal Desktop(TM) model with empirical testing data from two test articles, with additional model modifications and empirical data from a sub-component radiator for a full scale design. Two working fluids were tested: MultiTherm WB-58 and a 50-50 mixture of DI water and Amsoil ANT.

  17. Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.

    PubMed

    Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions.

  18. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice

    2016-10-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions (CSMF) of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass halos changes behavior at a characteristic redshift zc ˜ 2. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environment, becoming zc ˜ 4 in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model is used to understand how galaxies form and evolve in dark matter halos, and to make predictions for other statistical properties of the galaxy population, such as the stellar mass functions of galaxies at high z, the star formation and stellar mass assembly histories in dark matter halos. A comparison of our model predictions with those of other empirical models shows that different models can make vastly different predictions, even though all of them are tuned to match the observed stellar mass functions of galaxies.

  19. Analysis of single ring infiltrometer test by direct numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réfloch, Aurore; Oxarango, Laurent; Rossier, Yvan; Gaudet, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    The well field of the Lyon metropolitan area provides drinking water to approximately 1,300,000 inhabitants. It is equipped with 12 infiltration basins. These basins have two main goals: sustaining the water table in times of peak demand for water, and preventing a possible contamination from the Rhône river by inverting groundwater flow direction. The water infiltration under the basins is thus crucial for the overall hydrogeologic behavior of the site. In order to characterize this phenomenon, a set of infiltrometer tests were performed to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. The soil is a coarse alluvial deposits. In order to deal with its sparse granulometric curve, a large single ring infiltrometer (1 meter in diameter) was used. A constant hydraulic head (=0.07 m) was imposed during the test. Two kinds of data are recorded: the amount of water infiltrated over time and the extension of the moisture stain around the ring. The main hydraulic properties are estimated using Richard's equation in a 2D axi-symmetric configuration. Simulations are performed using a finite element commercial software package (Comsol Multiphysics 5.1). According to simplified numerical models, an average homogeneous saturated permeability of the alluvial deposits is estimated at 5.0 10-6 m.s-1. However, such a simple model is not able to represent accurately the moisture stain at the soil surface. More complex models introduce anisotropy of permeability in the alluvium layer, with mono or bi-layer domain. In these cases, experimental and modeling results are consistent, both for the amount of water infiltrated over time and the extension of the moisture stain around the ring. The hydraulic anisotropy in the soil could be due to the stratified nature of alluvial deposits and to soil compaction during the construction of infiltration basins. Keywords: Single ring infiltrometer test, artificial aquifer recharge, numerical modeling.

  20. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  1. Development of Semi-Span Model Test Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulnam, L. Elwood (Technical Monitor); Milholen, William E., II; Chokani, Ndaona; McGhee, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A computational investigation was performed to support the development of a semi-span model test capability in the NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility. This capability is desirable for the testing of advanced subsonic transport aircraft at full-scale Reynolds numbers. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to examine methods to improve the flow over a semi-span configuration. First, a parametric study is conducted to examine the influence of the stand-off height on the flow over the semi-span model. It is found that decreasing the stand-off height, below the maximum fuselage radius, improves the aerodynamic characteristics of the semi-span model. Next, active sidewall boundary layer control techniques are examined. Juncture region blowing jets, upstream tangential blowing, and sidewall suction are found to improve the flow over the aft portion of the semi-span model. Both upstream blowing and suction are found to reduce the sidewall boundary layer separation. The resulting near surface streamline patterns are improved, and found to be quite similar to the full-span results. Both techniques however adversely affect the pitching moment coefficient.

  2. Development of Semi-Span Model Test Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II; Chokani, Ndaona; McGhee, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A computational investigation was performed to support the development of a semispan model test capability in the NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility. This capability is desirable for the testing of advanced subsonic transport aircraft at full-scale Reynolds numbers. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to examine methods to improve the flow over a semi-span configuration. First, a parametric study is conducted to examine the influence of the stand-off height on the flow over the semispan model. It is found that decreasing the stand-off height, below the maximum fuselage radius, improves the aerodynamic characteristics of the semi-span model. Next, active sidewall boundary layer control techniques are examined. Juncture region blowing jets, upstream tangential blowing, and sidewall suction are found to improve the flow over the aft portion of the semispan model. Both upstream blowing and suction are found to reduce the sidewall boundary layer separation. The resulting near surface streamline patterns are improved, and found to be quite similar to the full-span results. Both techniques however adversely affect the pitching moment coefficient.

  3. Testing simulation and structural models with applications to energy demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Hendrik

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation deals with energy demand and consists of two parts. Part one proposes a unified econometric framework for modeling energy demand and examples illustrate the benefits of the technique by estimating the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital. Part two assesses the energy conservation policy of Daylight Saving Time and empirically tests the performance of electricity simulation. In particular, the chapter "Imposing Monotonicity and Curvature on Flexible Functional Forms" proposes an estimator for inference using structural models derived from economic theory. This is motivated by the fact that in many areas of economic analysis theory restricts the shape as well as other characteristics of functions used to represent economic constructs. Specific contributions are (a) to increase the computational speed and tractability of imposing regularity conditions, (b) to provide regularity preserving point estimates, (c) to avoid biases existent in previous applications, and (d) to illustrate the benefits of our approach via numerical simulation results. The chapter "Can We Close the Gap between the Empirical Model and Economic Theory" discusses the more fundamental question of whether the imposition of a particular theory to a dataset is justified. I propose a hypothesis test to examine whether the estimated empirical model is consistent with the assumed economic theory. Although the proposed methodology could be applied to a wide set of economic models, this is particularly relevant for estimating policy parameters that affect energy markets. This is demonstrated by estimating the Slutsky matrix and the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital, which are crucial parameters used in computable general equilibrium models analyzing energy demand and the impacts of environmental regulations. Using the Berndt and Wood dataset, I find that capital and energy are complements and that the data are significantly consistent with duality

  4. Monopropellant hydrazine resistoject: Engineering model fabrication and test task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murch, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The monopropellant hydrazine resistojet, termed the electrothermal hydrazine thruster (EHT) by TRW systems, thermally decomposes anhydrous hydrazine propellant to produce a high-temperature, low-molecular-weight gas for expulsion through a propulsive nozzle. The EHT developed for this program required about 3-5 watts of electrical power and produced 0.020 to 0.070 pound of thrust over the inlet pressure range of 100 to 400 psia. The thruster was designed for both pulsed and steady state operation. A summary of the GSFC original requirements and GSFC modified requirements, and the performance of the engineering model EHT is given. The experimental program leading to the engineering model EHT design, modifications necessary to achieve the required thruster life capability, and the results of the life test prgram. Other facets of the program, including analyses, preliminary design, specifications, data correlation, and recommendations for a flight model are discussed.

  5. A photocapture test of DX-center models

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, H.P.; Kurtz, S.R.; Brennan, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    The DX-center model is widely used to explain data for the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect. An analysis of the DX-center model suggests a new experiment to test its correctness. In this experiment, photons near the threshold energy of the photoionization cross-section for the DX-center induce transitions from the partially occupied conduction band to empty DX-centers. This mechanism, which we call photocapture, competes with the usual photoionization which empties the DX-centers. The photocapture cross-section is estimated and an experimental attempt is made to detect photocapture. The null result suggests that the DX-center model is incorrect. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  6. A minimum column density of 1 g cm(-2) for massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Mark R; McKee, Christopher F

    2008-02-28

    Massive stars are very rare, but their extreme luminosities make them both the only type of young star we can observe in distant galaxies and the dominant energy sources in the Universe today. They form rarely because efficient radiative cooling keeps most star--forming gas clouds close to isothermal as they collapse, and this favours fragmentation into stars of one solar mass or lower. Heating of a cloud by accreting low-mass stars within it can prevent fragmentation and allow formation of massive stars, but the necessary properties for a cloud to form massive stars-and therefore where massive stars form in a galaxy--have not yet been determined. Here we show that only clouds with column densities of at least 1 g cm(-2) can avoid fragmentation and form massive stars. This threshold, and the environmental variation of the stellar initial mass function that it implies, naturally explain the characteristic column densities associated with massive star clusters and the difference between the radial profiles of Halpha and ultraviolet emission in galactic disks. The existence of a threshold also implies that the initial mass function should show detectable variation with environment within the Galaxy, that the characteristic column densities of clusters containing massive stars should vary between galaxies, and that star formation rates in some galactic environments may have been systematically underestimated.

  7. Fish otolith growth in 1g and 3g depends on the gravity vector.

    PubMed

    Anken, R H; Werner, K; Breuer, J; Rahmann, H

    2000-01-01

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right side) as well as calcium (Ca) content of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were determined after a long-term stay at hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge). Both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure as compared to parallely raised 1g-control specimens and the absolute amount of otolith-Ca was diminished. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry concerning lapilli was markedly decreased. In the course of another experiment larvae were raised in aquarium hatch baskets, from which one was placed directly above aeration equipment which resulted in random water circulation shifting the fish around ("shifted" specimens). The lapillar asymmetry of the "stationary" specimens showed a highly significant increase during early development when larvae were forced to lay on their sides due to their prominent yolk-sacs. In later developmental stages, when they began to swim freely, a dramatic decrease in lapillar asymmetry was apparent. Taken together with own previous findings according to which otolith growth stops after vestibular nerve transaction, the results presented here suggest that the growth and the development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths is guided by the environmental gravity vector, obviously involving a feedback loop between the brain and the inner ear. PMID:11542852

  8. Evaluation of IDH1G105 polymorphism as prognostic marker in intermediate-risk AML.

    PubMed

    Fasan, Annette; Haferlach, Claudia; Eder, Christiane; Alpermann, Tamara; Quante, Anne; Peters, Annette; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    Germline polymorphisms in genes mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may have prognostic impact. Therefore, the relevance of the polymorphism IDH1G105 (IDH1105(GGT) minor allele) was evaluated in the context of concomitant molecular mutations in a cohort of 507 AML cases with intermediate-risk cytogenetics. In addition, a cohort of 475 healthy controls was analyzed for this polymorphism. IDH1105(GGT) minor allele was found in 10 % of AML patients and 9 % of healthy controls. While no differences were seen with regard to cytomorphology or cytogenetics, immunophenotyping revealed significantly reduced expression of the progenitor marker CD34 in AML cases harboring IDH1105(GGT) minor allele. Cases with IDH1105(GGT) minor allele as compared to those with the IDH1105(GGC) major allele had significantly longer event-free survival (EFS) (median 16 vs 11 months, p = 0.013) which was most pronounced in the age group >60 years (median 14 vs 9 months, p = 0.007) and in the NPM1 mutated/FLT3-ITD/FLT3wt ratio <0.5 group (median 61 vs 13 months, p = 0.012). However, this association is not independent of other prognostic parameters, and we conclude that IDH1105(GGT) minor allele has to be considered in the context of the genetic background of the individual AML analyzed. PMID:26351014

  9. Quantifying Biomechanical Characteristics of Jumping Exercises in 1G and in Simulated and True Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. L.; DAndrea, S. E.; Perusek, G.; Orlando, T.

    1999-01-01

    Exercise in microgravity is one of the most promising countermeasures to the dual problems of space flight-induced bone loss and muscle atrophy. Although exercise in microgravity has been studied extensively from a metabolic standpoint, little research has focused on the efficacy of different forms of exercise for maintaining musculoskeletal integrity. Exercise protocols have not been effective in preventing muscle atrophy and bone loss during space flight, especially in the lower extremities. In 1-G, however, animal experiments have clearly indicated that: (1) certain bone strains and strain rates do stimulate bone deposition, and (2) repetitive loading of the lower extremity can increase osteonal bone formation even as proximally as the vertebral column. Such studies have also indicated that a relatively small number of appropriate loading cycles may lead to bone deposition. This suggests that an optimal exercise regimen might be able to maintain bone and muscle integrity during space flight. Since there is evidence that the bones and muscles of the lower limbs are particularly affected by space flight, the present study addressed two major aims: (1) quantify externally applied impact loads and rates of loading under the feet during tethered jumping exercises, and (2) determine the amount of eccentric and concentric whole-muscle activity during these jumping exercises in true and in simulated zero-gravity.

  10. Free-to-roll tests of X-31 and F-18 subscale models with correlation to flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David L., II; Nelson, Robert C.; Fisher, David F.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation will concentrate on a series of low-speed wind tunnel tests conducted on a 2.5 percent subscale F-18 model and a 2 percent subscale X-31 model. The model's control surfaces were unaugmented; and for the most part, were deflected at a constant angle throughout the tests. The tests consisted mostly of free-to-roll experiments conducted with the use of an air-bearing, surface pressure measurements, off-surface flow visualization, and force-balance tests. Where possible the results of the subscale tests have been compared to flight test data, or to other wind tunnel data taken at higher Reynolds numbers.

  11. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  12. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project "Suborbital Launcher for Testing" (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  13. Testing Transition State Theory on Kac-Zwanzig Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariel, G.; vanden-Eijnden, E.

    2007-01-01

    A variant of the Kac-Zwanzig model is used to test the prediction of transition state theory (TST) and variational transition state theory (VTST). The model describes the evolution of a distinguished particle moving in a double-well external potential and coupled to N free particles through linear springs. While the Kac-Zwanzig model is deterministic, under appropriate choice of the model parameters the evolution of the distinguished particle can be approximated by a two-state Markov chain whose transition rate constants can be computed exactly in suitable limit. Here, these transition rate constants are compared with the predictions of TST and VTST. It is shown that the application of TST with a naive (albeit natural) choice of dividing surface leads to the wrong prediction of the transition rate constants. This is due to crossings of the dividing surface that do not correspond to actual transition events. However, optimizing over the dividing surface within VTST allows one to eliminate completely these spurious crossings, and therefore derive the correct transition rate constants for the model. The reasons why VTST is successful in this model are discussed, which allows one to speculate on the reliability of VTST in more complicated systems.

  14. Using Radiocarbon to Test Models of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S.; Lin, H.; Randerson, J.

    2007-05-01

    The radiocarbon content of carbon stored in and respired by ecosystems provides a direct measure of ecosystem carbon dynamics that can be directly compared to model predictions. Because carbon cycles through ecosystems on a variety of timescales, the mean age of C in standing biomass and soil organic matter pools is older than the mean age of microbially respired carbon. In turn, each pathway for C transit through ecosystems my respond differently to edaphic conditions; for example, soil organic matter mean age is controlled by factors affecting stabilization of C on very long timescales, such as mineralogy, while a factor like litter quality that effects decomposition rates reflects vegetation and climate characteristics. We compare the radiocarbon signature of heterotrophically respired CO2 across a number of ecosystems with models predicted using the CASA ecosystem model. The major controls of microbially respired CO2 from ecosystems include the residence time of C in living plant pools (i.e. the age of C in litter inputs to soil) and factors that control decomposition rates (litter quality and climate). Major differences between model and measured values at low latitudes are related to how woody debris pools are treated differently in models and measurements. The time lag between photosynthesis and respiration is a key ecosystem property that defines its potential to store or release carbon given variations in annual net primary production. Radiocarbon provides a rare case where models can be directly compared with measurements to provide a test of this parameter.

  15. Secondary Students' Dynamic Modeling Processes: Analyzing, Reasoning About, Synthesizing, and Testing Models of Stream Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratford, Steven J.; Krajcik, Joseph; Soloway, Elliot

    1998-09-01

    In this paper, we explore dynamic modeling as an opportunity for students to think about the science content they are learning. We examined the "Cognitive Strategies for Modeling" (CSMs) in which students engaged as they created dynamic models. We audio- and videotape-recorded eight pairs of ninth grade science students and analyzed their conversations and actions. In analyzing appropriate objects and factors for their model, some students merely enumerated potential factors whereas others engaged in rich, substantial, mindful analysis. In reasoning about their models, students discussed relationships in depth, concentrated only on the most important key relationships, or encountered difficulty distinguishing between causal and correlational relationships. In synthesizing working models, students mapped their model to aid visualization, focused on their goal, or talked about their model's appearance or form. Students attempted to articulate explanations for their relationships, but sometimes their explanations were shallow. In testing their models, some students tested thoroughly but only a few persisted in debugging their model's behavior so that it matched their expectations. In our conclusion we suggest that creating dynamic models has great potential for use in classrooms to engage students in thought about science content, particularly in those thinking strategies best fostered by dynamic modeling: analysis, relational reasoning, synthesis, testing and debugging, and making explanations.

  16. Experimental testing and computational modeling of flat oval duct deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Smolinski, P.J.; Palmer, G.S.

    1998-10-01

    The deflection characteristics of spiral seam flat oval HVAC duct are examined in this study, and the effects of duct size, wall thickness, and the size spacing, and type of external reinforcement on the duct deformation are investigated. A duct test setup and a deflection measurement frame were developed for measuring the deformation of flat oval duct, and experimental testing was performed on a variety of duct configurations to measure the duct deflections at various positive and negative internal pressures. Finite element computer models of the ducts were developed to predict the deflections. The correlation between the predictions of the computer model and the data from the experimental testing is highly variable with differences ranging from a few percent to several hundred percent. In general, it was found that there was closer agreement between the finite element results and the experimental measurements for smaller duct and at locations of type 2 external reinforcements. This may be due to the fact that the finite element model assumed the idealized flat oval shape and this shape was better matched by smaller ducts and near the external reinforcement. It was also found that in some cases, unreinforced duct could achieve higher pressures than type 1 reinforced duct before exceeding the deflection limits. Sources of error include the uneven surface of the mastic in the measurement of the duct joint deflection and the variance of the actual duct shape from the idealized shape used in the finite element model. This study did not examine the variability of the experimental results due to differences in duct shape or manufacture.

  17. Combinatorial QSAR modeling of chemical toxicants tested against Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Tropsha, Alexander; Fourches, Denis; Varnek, Alexandre; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola; Oberg, Tomas; Dao, Phuong; Cherkasov, Artem; Tetko, Igor V

    2008-04-01

    Selecting most rigorous quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approaches is of great importance in the development of robust and predictive models of chemical toxicity. To address this issue in a systematic way, we have formed an international virtual collaboratory consisting of six independent groups with shared interests in computational chemical toxicology. We have compiled an aqueous toxicity data set containing 983 unique compounds tested in the same laboratory over a decade against Tetrahymena pyriformis. A modeling set including 644 compounds was selected randomly from the original set and distributed to all groups that used their own QSAR tools for model development. The remaining 339 compounds in the original set (external set I) as well as 110 additional compounds (external set II) published recently by the same laboratory (after this computational study was already in progress) were used as two independent validation sets to assess the external predictive power of individual models. In total, our virtual collaboratory has developed 15 different types of QSAR models of aquatic toxicity for the training set. The internal prediction accuracy for the modeling set ranged from 0.76 to 0.93 as measured by the leave-one-out cross-validation correlation coefficient ( Q abs2). The prediction accuracy for the external validation sets I and II ranged from 0.71 to 0.85 (linear regression coefficient R absI2) and from 0.38 to 0.83 (linear regression coefficient R absII2), respectively. The use of an applicability domain threshold implemented in most models generally improved the external prediction accuracy but at the same time led to a decrease in chemical space coverage. Finally, several consensus models were developed by averaging the predicted aquatic toxicity for every compound using all 15 models, with or without taking into account their respective applicability domains. We find that consensus models afford higher prediction accuracy for the

  18. Laboratory tests of IEC DER object models for grid applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, John D.; Menicucci, David F.; Byrd, Thomas, Jr.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ginn, Jerry W.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan

    2007-02-01

    This report describes a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District (SRP) and Sandia National Laboratories to jointly develop advanced methods of controlling distributed energy resources (DERs) that may be located within SRP distribution systems. The controls must provide a standardized interface to allow plug-and-play capability and should allow utilities to take advantage of advanced capabilities of DERs to provide a value beyond offsetting load power. To do this, Sandia and SRP field-tested the IEC 61850-7-420 DER object model (OM) in a grid environment, with the goal of validating whether the model is robust enough to be used in common utility applications. The diesel generator OM tested was successfully used to accomplish basic genset control and monitoring. However, as presently constituted it does not enable plug-and-play functionality. Suggestions are made of aspects of the standard that need further development and testing. These problems are far from insurmountable and do not imply anything fundamentally unsound or unworkable in the standard.

  19. Vibrational testing of trabecular bone architectures using rapid prototype models.

    PubMed

    Mc Donnell, P; Liebschner, M A K; Tawackoli, Wafa; Mc Hugh, P E

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if standard analysis of the vibrational characteristics of trabecular architectures can be used to detect changes in the mechanical properties due to progressive bone loss. A cored trabecular specimen from a human lumbar vertebra was microCT scanned and a three-dimensional, virtual model in stereolithography (STL) format was generated. Uniform bone loss was simulated using a surface erosion algorithm. Rapid prototype (RP) replicas were manufactured from these virtualised models with 0%, 16% and 42% bone loss. Vibrational behaviour of the RP replicas was evaluated by performing a dynamic compression test through a frequency range using an electro-dynamic shaker. The acceleration and dynamic force responses were recorded and fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyses were performed to determine the response spectrum. Standard resonant frequency analysis and damping factor calculations were performed. The RP replicas were subsequently tested in compression beyond failure to determine their strength and modulus. It was found that the reductions in resonant frequency with increasing bone loss corresponded well with reductions in apparent stiffness and strength. This suggests that structural dynamics has the potential to be an alternative diagnostic technique for osteoporosis, although significant challenges must be overcome to determine the effect of the skin/soft tissue interface, the cortex and variabilities associated with in vivo testing. PMID:18555727

  20. Mixed discrete-continuum models: A summary of experiences in test interpretation and model prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesus; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes

    A number of conceptual models have been proposed for simulating groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured systems. They span the range from continuum porous equivalents to discrete channel networks. The objective of this paper is to show the application of an intermediate approach (mixed discrete-continuum models) to three cases. The approach consists of identifying the dominant fractures (i.e., those carrying most of the flow) and modeling them explicitly as two-dimensional features embedded in a three-dimensional continuum representing the remaining fracture network. The method is based on the observation that most of the water flows through a few fractures, so that explicitly modeling them should help in properly accounting for a large portion of the total water flow. The applicability of the concept is tested in three cases. The first one refers to the Chalk River Block (Canada) in which a model calibrated against a long crosshole test successfully predicted the response to other tests performed in different fractures. The second case refers to hydraulic characterization of a large-scale (about 2 km) site at El Cabril (Spain). A model calibrated against long records (five years) of natural head fluctuations could be used to predict a one-month-long hydraulic test and heads variations after construction of a waste disposal site. The last case refers to hydraulic characterization performed at the Grimsel Test Site in the context of the Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment (FEBEX). Extensive borehole and geologic mapping data were used to build a model that was calibrated against five crosshole tests. The resulting large-scale model predicted steady-state heads and inflows into the test tunnel. The conclusion is that, in all cases, the difficulties associated with the mixed discrete-continuum approach could be overcome and that the resulting models displayed some predictive capabilities.

  1. Test models for improving filtering with model errors through stochastic parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gershgorin, B.; Harlim, J. Majda, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The filtering skill for turbulent signals from nature is often limited by model errors created by utilizing an imperfect model for filtering. Updating the parameters in the imperfect model through stochastic parameter estimation is one way to increase filtering skill and model performance. Here a suite of stringent test models for filtering with stochastic parameter estimation is developed based on the Stochastic Parameterization Extended Kalman Filter (SPEKF). These new SPEKF-algorithms systematically correct both multiplicative and additive biases and involve exact formulas for propagating the mean and covariance including the parameters in the test model. A comprehensive study is presented of robust parameter regimes for increasing filtering skill through stochastic parameter estimation for turbulent signals as the observation time and observation noise are varied and even when the forcing is incorrectly specified. The results here provide useful guidelines for filtering turbulent signals in more complex systems with significant model errors.

  2. Liver-specific expression of carboxylesterase 1g/esterase-x reduces hepatic steatosis, counteracts dyslipidemia and improves insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bahitham, Wesam; Watts, Russell; Nelson, Randal; Lian, Jihong; Lehner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Ces1g/Es-x deficiency in mice results in weight gain, insulin resistance, fatty liver and hyperlipidemia through upregulation of de novo lipogenesis and oversecretion of triacylglycerol (TG)-rich lipoproteins. Here, we show that restoration of Ces1g/Es-x expression only in the liver significantly reduced hepatic TG concentration accompanied by decreased size of lipid droplets, reduced secretion of very low-density lipoproteins and improved insulin-mediated signal transduction in the liver. Collectively, these results demonstrate that hepatic Ces1g/Es-x plays a critical role in limiting hepatic steatosis, very low-density lipoprotein assembly and in augmenting insulin sensitivity.

  3. Liver-specific expression of carboxylesterase 1g/esterase-x reduces hepatic steatosis, counteracts dyslipidemia and improves insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bahitham, Wesam; Watts, Russell; Nelson, Randal; Lian, Jihong; Lehner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Ces1g/Es-x deficiency in mice results in weight gain, insulin resistance, fatty liver and hyperlipidemia through upregulation of de novo lipogenesis and oversecretion of triacylglycerol (TG)-rich lipoproteins. Here, we show that restoration of Ces1g/Es-x expression only in the liver significantly reduced hepatic TG concentration accompanied by decreased size of lipid droplets, reduced secretion of very low-density lipoproteins and improved insulin-mediated signal transduction in the liver. Collectively, these results demonstrate that hepatic Ces1g/Es-x plays a critical role in limiting hepatic steatosis, very low-density lipoprotein assembly and in augmenting insulin sensitivity. PMID:26976727

  4. Readaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex to 1g-Condition in immature lower vertebrates ( Xenopus laevis) after micro- or hypergravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.; Eβeling, K.; Neubert, J.

    The effects of altered gravitational conditions (AGC) on the development of the static vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and readaptation to 1g were investigated in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles were exposed to microgravity (μg) during the German Space Mission D-2 for 10 days, using the STATEX closed survival system, or to 3g for 9 days during earth-bound experiments. At the beginning of AGC, the tadpoles had not yet developed the static VOR. The main results were: (i) Tadpoles with ug- or 3g-experience had a lower gain of the static VOR than the 1g-controls during the 2nd and 5th post-AGC days, (ii) Readaptation to response levels of 1g-reared controls usually occurred during the following weeks, except in slowly developing tadpoles with 3g-experience. Readaptation was less pronounced if, during the acute VOR test, tadpoles were rolled from the inclined to the normal posture than in the opposite test situation. It is postulated that (i) gravity is necessarily involved in the development of the static VOR, but only during a period including the time before onset of the first behavioural response; and (ii) readaptation which is superimposed by the processes of VOR development depends on many factors including the velocity of development, the actual excitation level of the vestibular systems and the neuroplastic properties of its specific pathways.

  5. Association Between RFC1 G80A Polymorphism and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: a Review and Meta-Analysis of 10 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Forat-Yazdi, M; Hosseini-Biouki, F; Salehi, J; Neamatzadeh, H; Masoumi Dehshiri, R; Sadri, Z; Ghanizadeh, F; Sheikhpour, R; Zare-Zardini, H

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates RFC1 G80A polymorphism as a risk factor for a number of cancers. Increasing studies have been conducted on the association of RFC1 G80A polymorphism with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) risk. However, the results were controversial. The aim of the present study was to derive a more precise estimation of the relationship. Materials and Method PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane database, and Google Scholar were searched to get the genetic association studies between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and ALL. All eligible studies for the period up to February 2016 were identified. Subgroup analyses regarding ethnicity were also implemented. All statistical analyses were done with CMA 2.0. Results A total of ten studies comprising of 2,168 ALL cases and 2,693 healthy controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was detected for allelic model (OR = 1.029, 95 % CI 0.754- 1.405, P=0.000), Dominant model (OR = 1.619, 95 % CI 0.847-3.094, P=0.145), recessive model (OR = 1.169, 95 % CI 10.764-1.790, P=0.429), and homozygote model (OR = 1.288, 95 % CI 0.928-1.788, P=0.130). However, there was an obvious association under the heterozygote model (OR = 1.368, 95 % CI 1.056- 1.772, P=0.018). Also, in the stratified analysis by ethnicity, no significant association of this polymorphism with risk of OC was found in the Asian and Caucasian populations. However, there was not significant heterogeneity between heterozygote genetic model (P = 0.15, I2 = 33%) in Caucasian. Therefore, we utilized the fixed-effect model to merge OR value. Conclusion Based on the available evidence, no association between RFC1 G80A Polymorphism and ALL risk was observed, even in the subanalysis by ethnicity. The direction of further research should focus not only on the simple relationship of RFC1 G80A Polymorphism and ALL risk, but also on gene–gene and gene-environment interaction. PMID:27222703

  6. Numerical modeling of Thermal Response Tests in Energy Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Toledo, M.; Moffat, R.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, thermal response tests (TRT) are used as the main tools for the evaluation of low enthalpy geothermal systems such as heat exchangers. The results of TRT are used for estimating thermal conductivity and thermal resistance values of those systems. We present results of synthetic TRT simulations that model the behavior observed in an experimental energy pile system, which was installed at the new building of the Faculty of Engineering of Universidad de Chile. Moreover, we also present a parametric study to identify the most influent parameters in the performance of this type of tests. The modeling was developed using the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics, which allows the incorporation of flow and heat transport processes. The modeled system consists on a concrete pile with 1 m diameter and 28 m deep, which contains a 28 mm diameter PEX pipe arranged in a closed circuit. Three configurations were analyzed: a U pipe, a triple U and a helicoid shape implemented at the experimental site. All simulations were run considering transient response in a three-dimensional domain. The simulation results provided the temperature distribution on the pile for a set of different geometry and physical properties of the materials. These results were compared with analytical solutions which are commonly used to interpret TRT data. This analysis demonstrated that there are several parameters that affect the system response in a synthetic TRT. For example, the diameter of the simulated pile affects the estimated effective thermal conductivity of the system. Moreover, the simulation results show that the estimated thermal conductivity for a 1 m diameter pile did not stabilize even after 100 hours since the beginning of the test, when it reached a value 30% below value used to set up the material properties in the simulation. Furthermore, we observed different behaviors depending on the thermal properties of concrete and soil. According to the simulations, the thermal

  7. Overview of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    Launch environments, such as lift-off acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe for component survivability, reduction of the environment itself is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the Ares I LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. An additional objective was to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. ASMAT was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116 (TS 116). The ASMAT program is described in this presentation.

  8. Strengthening Theoretical Testing in Criminology Using Agent-based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Groff, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency (JRCD) has published important contributions to both criminological theory and associated empirical tests. In this article, we consider some of the challenges associated with traditional approaches to social science research, and discuss a complementary approach that is gaining popularity—agent-based computational modeling—that may offer new opportunities to strengthen theories of crime and develop insights into phenomena of interest. Method: Two literature reviews are completed. The aim of the first is to identify those articles published in JRCD that have been the most influential and to classify the theoretical perspectives taken. The second is intended to identify those studies that have used an agent-based model (ABM) to examine criminological theories and to identify which theories have been explored. Results: Ecological theories of crime pattern formation have received the most attention from researchers using ABMs, but many other criminological theories are amenable to testing using such methods. Conclusion: Traditional methods of theory development and testing suffer from a number of potential issues that a more systematic use of ABMs—not without its own issues—may help to overcome. ABMs should become another method in the criminologists toolbox to aid theory testing and falsification. PMID:25419001

  9. Testing the potential model in the UPSILON system

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.

    1985-01-01

    Tests of the non-relativistic potential model for bound b anti b states are discussed, using results from the Crystal Ball and ARGUS detectors at DORIS II (DESY) and the CUSB and CLEO detectors at CESR (Cornell). There are many many people who have developed potential models. While the author tries to be complete in reviewing the experimental data, he limits his discussion of potentials to a few contrasting examples. The talk is divided into two main parts. In the first he discusses the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ b anti b states UPSILON, UPSILON', ..., whose measured masses, leptonic widths, and leptonic branching ratios are used to check the static potential V(r) and the strong coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub 3/. In the second part, results on the /sup 3/P, b anti b states chi/sub b/, chi'/sub b/ are used to check the spin dependence of the potential. There are several other classes of states (c anti c, s anti s, c anti q, b anti q, and the as-yet-not seen eta/sub b/ and /sup 1/P/sub 1/ of the b anti b family) which are also important in testing the potential model, but which he did not cover in this talk. 47 references.

  10. Lot A2 test, THC modelling of the bentonite buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itälä, Aku; Olin, Markus; Lehikoinen, Jarmo

    Finnish spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of deep in the crystalline bedrock of the Olkiluoto island. In such a repository, the role of the bentonite buffer is considered to be central. The initially unsaturated bentonite emplaced around a spent-fuel canister will become fully saturated by the groundwater from the host rock. In order to assess the long-term safety of a deep repository, it is essential to determine how temperature influences the chemical stability of bentonite. The aim of this study was to achieve an improved understanding of the factors governing the thermo-hydro-chemical evolution of the bentonite buffer subject to heat generation from the disposed fuel and in contact with a highly permeable rock fracture intersecting a canister deposition hole. TOUGHREACT was used to model a test known as the long-term test of buffer material adverse-2, which was conducted at the Äspö hard rock laboratory in Sweden. The results on the evolution of cation-exchange equilibria, bentonite porewater chemistry, mineralogy, and saturation of the buffer are presented and discussed. The calculated model results show similarity to the experimental results. In particular, the spatial differences in the saturation and porewater chemistry of the bentonite buffer were clearly visible in the model.

  11. Generalized Symbolic Execution for Model Checking and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurshid, Sarfraz; Pasareanu, Corina; Visser, Willem; Kofmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern software systems, which often are concurrent and manipulate complex data structures must be extremely reliable. We present a novel framework based on symbolic execution, for automated checking of such systems. We provide a two-fold generalization of traditional symbolic execution based approaches: one, we define a program instrumentation, which enables standard model checkers to perform symbolic execution; two, we give a novel symbolic execution algorithm that handles dynamically allocated structures (e.g., lists and trees), method preconditions (e.g., acyclicity of lists), data (e.g., integers and strings) and concurrency. The program instrumentation enables a model checker to automatically explore program heap configurations (using a systematic treatment of aliasing) and manipulate logical formulae on program data values (using a decision procedure). We illustrate two applications of our framework: checking correctness of multi-threaded programs that take inputs from unbounded domains with complex structure and generation of non-isomorphic test inputs that satisfy a testing criterion. Our implementation for Java uses the Java PathFinder model checker.

  12. Testing Atmosphere and Evolution Models with Brown Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Travis S.; Konopacky, Q. M.; Ghez, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Precise dynamical masses are available for many brown dwarf binaries, covering late-M, L and T spectral types. With known masses and equal ages within a binary, the range of predicted luminosity, effective temperature, and surface gravity of each dwarf narrows significantly providing important tests for interior and evolution models. Furthermore, the consistency between the basic properties inferred from evolutionary cooling tracks and those inferred only from atmosphere model comparisons is best tested with brown dwarf binaries. Our recent Hubble Space Telescope program extends the spatially resolved photometric coverage of 11 binaries (all with dynamical masses measured to a precision of 10%, or better) into the optical, allowing precise effective temperatures and bolometric luminosities to be determined. By comparing these new data to models, limits are placed on the brown dwarf cooling evolution across a range of masses. In addition to photometry, ground-based spatially resolved near-IR spectroscopy (obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics system on the W.M. Keck II telescope and the NIRSPAO spectrograph) is used to estimate surface gravities and further constrain the effective temperatures for a few systems.

  13. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  14. Large animal models for vaccine development and testing.

    PubMed

    Gerdts, Volker; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, Francois; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Wilson, Don; Walker, Stewart; Wheler, Colette; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    The development of human vaccines continues to rely on the use of animals for research. Regulatory authorities require novel vaccine candidates to undergo preclinical assessment in animal models before being permitted to enter the clinical phase in human subjects. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in reducing and replacing the number of animals used for preclinical vaccine research through the use of bioinformatics and computational biology to design new vaccine candidates. However, the ultimate goal of a new vaccine is to instruct the immune system to elicit an effective immune response against the pathogen of interest, and no alternatives to live animal use currently exist for evaluation of this response. Studies identifying the mechanisms of immune protection; determining the optimal route and formulation of vaccines; establishing the duration and onset of immunity, as well as the safety and efficacy of new vaccines, must be performed in a living system. Importantly, no single animal model provides all the information required for advancing a new vaccine through the preclinical stage, and research over the last two decades has highlighted that large animals more accurately predict vaccine outcome in humans than do other models. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of large animal models for human vaccine development and demonstrate that much of the success in bringing a new vaccine to market depends on choosing the most appropriate animal model for preclinical testing.

  15. Non-linear model for compression tests on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Alfio; Guaily, Amr; Giverso, Chiara; Federico, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Hydrated soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, are often modeled as biphasic systems with individually incompressible solid and fluid phases, and biphasic models are employed to fit experimental data in order to determine the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the tissues. Two of the most common experimental setups are confined and unconfined compression. Analytical solutions exist for the unconfined case with the linear, isotropic, homogeneous model of articular cartilage, and for the confined case with the non-linear, isotropic, homogeneous model. The aim of this contribution is to provide an easily implementable numerical tool to determine a solution to the governing differential equations of (homogeneous and isotropic) unconfined and (inhomogeneous and isotropic) confined compression under large deformations. The large-deformation governing equations are reduced to equivalent diffusive equations, which are then solved by means of finite difference (FD) methods. The solution strategy proposed here could be used to generate benchmark tests for validating complex user-defined material models within finite element (FE) implementations, and for determining the tissue's mechanical and hydraulic properties from experimental data.

  16. Variable Stiffness Spar Wind-Tunnel Model Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, James R.; Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Lively, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of exploiting wing flexibility to improve aerodynamic performance was investigated in the wind tunnel by employing multiple control surfaces and by varying wing structural stiffness via a Variable Stiffness Spar (VSS) mechanism. High design loads compromised the VSS effectiveness because the aerodynamic wind-tunnel model was much stiffer than desired in order to meet the strength requirements. Results from tests of the model include stiffness and modal data, model deformation data, aerodynamic loads, static control surface derivatives, and fuselage standoff pressure data. Effects of the VSS on the stiffness and modal characteristics, lift curve slope, and control surface effectiveness are discussed. The VSS had the most effect on the rolling moment generated by the leading-edge outboard flap at subsonic speeds. The effects of the VSS for the other control surfaces and speed regimes were less. The difficulties encountered and the ability of the VSS to alter the aeroelastic characteristics of the wing emphasize the need for the development of improved design and construction methods for static aeroelastic models. The data collected and presented is valuable in terms of understanding static aeroelastic wind-tunnel model development.

  17. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-02-15

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed.

  18. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling.

    PubMed

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-02-01

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed.

  19. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Models And Initial Active Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-04-23

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNPX model simulations and initial testing of the active mode variation of the Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was previously reported.

  20. Modeling of thermomechanical conditions in Sigmajig weldability test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z.; Zacharia, T.; David, S. A.

    A finite element model has been developed to evaluate quantitatively the thermomechanical conditions for weld metal solidification cracking of a nickel based superalloy single-crystal in a laboratory weldability test, namely, the Sigmajig test. The effects of weld pool solidification on the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the specimen were considered. Stress-temperature-location diagrams were constructed to reveal the complex local stress development at the trailing edge of the weld pool. The calculated local stress in the solidification temperature range is used to explain the experimentally observed initiation of solidification cracking of the single-crystal under different welding and loading conditions, based on the material resistance versus the mechanical driving force.

  1. Modeling behavioral responses to eliminating the retirement earnings test.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Anya; Romig, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The retirement earnings test (RET) is an often-misunderstood aspect of the Social Security program. Proposed RET reforms meant to encourage working at older ages could also cause earlier benefit claiming. We use Modeling Income in the Near Term data to analyze the complete repeal of the earnings test for beneficiaries aged 60 or older, first assuming no behavioral responses to repeal and secondly assuming changes to benefit claiming and workforce participation behaviors. We find that beneficiaries affected by RET repeal would generally receive significantly higher benefits when they are younger than the full retirement age (FRA), and somewhat lower benefits after reaching FRA. RET repeal would not significantly change individuals' lifetime benefits and we find no significant changes in the overall poverty rate under either scenario. We find that assumed behavioral responses-particularly the benefit claiming change--have a bigger effect on lifetime benefits than the RET policy change itself.

  2. Model testing of a deep water compliant tower

    SciTech Connect

    Kriebel, D.L.; Waters, J.K.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory tests were conducted on a 1-to-100 scale model of a compliant offshore tower under deep water conditions. Tests were performed in both regular and irregular waves while measurements of the structure`s deck deflection, base shear force, and overturning moment about the base were obtained. Measured values are compared to simplified theory based on a Single-Degree of Freedom (SDOF) analysis and, in general, the SDOF analysis is shown to adequately describe the structure`s response in regular waves as well as the RMS structural response in random waves. The severe responses in random waves are the result of the impulsive nature of the extreme wave loading and are found to be 5 to 6 times the RMS response.

  3. Verification of Compartmental Epidemiological Models using Metamorphic Testing, Model Checking and Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Steed, Chad A; Pullum, Laura L

    2012-01-01

    Compartmental models in epidemiology are widely used as a means to model disease spread mechanisms and understand how one can best control the disease in case an outbreak of a widespread epidemic occurs. However, a significant challenge within the community is in the development of approaches that can be used to rigorously verify and validate these models. In this paper, we present an approach to rigorously examine and verify the behavioral properties of compartmen- tal epidemiological models under several common modeling scenarios including birth/death rates and multi-host/pathogen species. Using metamorphic testing, a novel visualization tool and model checking, we build a workflow that provides insights into the functionality of compartmental epidemiological models. Our initial results indicate that metamorphic testing can be used to verify the implementation of these models and provide insights into special conditions where these mathematical models may fail. The visualization front-end allows the end-user to scan through a variety of parameters commonly used in these models to elucidate the conditions under which an epidemic can occur. Further, specifying these models using a process algebra allows one to automatically construct behavioral properties that can be rigorously verified using model checking. Taken together, our approach allows for detecting implementation errors as well as handling conditions under which compartmental epidemiological models may fail to provide insights into disease spread dynamics.

  4. Tests of Substorm Models' Predictions Using ISTP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Ennio R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides progress to test the predictions of substorm models using ISTP observations. During the first year, two investigations were initiated in collaboration with a number of ISTP researchers. Both investigations use a combination of simultaneous measurements from high-, low-, and ground-altitude instruments to: (1) explore the role of MHD resonances in the onset and evolution of substorms, and (2) establish the timing of events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere during the substorm evolution beginning with the growth phase and ending with the recovery phase.

  5. A gravitational test of wave reinforcement versus fluid density models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jacqueline Umstead

    1990-01-01

    Spermatozoa, protozoa, and algae form macroscopic patterns somewhat analogous to thermally driven convection cells. These bioconvective patterns have attracted interest in the fluid dynamics community, but whether in all cases these waves were gravity driven was unknown. There are two conflicting theories, one gravity dependent (fluid density model), the other gravity independent (wave reinforcement theory). The primary objectives of the summer faculty fellows were to: (1) assist in sample collection (spermatozoa) and preparation for the KC-135 research airplane experiment; and (2) to collaborate on ground testing of bioconvective variables such as motility, concentration, morphology, etc., in relation to their macroscopic patterns. Results are very briefly given.

  6. Verification and Uncertainty Reduction of Amchitka Underground Nuclear Testing Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

    2006-02-01

    The modeling of Amchitka underground nuclear tests conducted in 2002 is verified and uncertainty in model input parameters, as well as predictions, has been reduced using newly collected data obtained by the summer 2004 field expedition of CRESP. Newly collected data that pertain to the groundwater model include magnetotelluric (MT) surveys conducted on the island to determine the subsurface salinity and porosity structure of the subsurface, and bathymetric surveys to determine the bathymetric maps of the areas offshore from the Long Shot and Cannikin Sites. Analysis and interpretation of the MT data yielded information on the location of the transition zone, and porosity profiles showing porosity values decaying with depth. These new data sets are used to verify the original model in terms of model parameters, model structure, and model output verification. In addition, by using the new data along with the existing data (chemistry and head data), the uncertainty in model input and output is decreased by conditioning on all the available data. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is adapted for developing new input parameter distributions conditioned on prior knowledge and new data. The MCMC approach is a form of Bayesian conditioning that is constructed in such a way that it produces samples of the model parameters that eventually converge to a stationary posterior distribution. The Bayesian MCMC approach enhances probabilistic assessment. Instead of simply propagating uncertainty forward from input parameters into model predictions (i.e., traditional Monte Carlo approach), MCMC propagates uncertainty backward from data onto parameters, and then forward from parameters into predictions. Comparisons between new data and the original model, and conditioning on all available data using MCMC method, yield the following results and conclusions: (1) Model structure is verified at Long Shot and Cannikin where the high-resolution bathymetric data collected by CRESP

  7. Stereovision vibration measurement test of a masonry building model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Baohua; Gao, Yunli; Shen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    To monitor 3D deformations of structural vibration response, a stereovision-based 3D deformation measurement method is proposed in paper. The world coordinate system is established on structural surface, and 3D displacement equations of structural vibration response are acquired through coordinate transformation. The algorithms of edge detection, center fitting and matching constraint are developed for circular target. A shaking table test of a masonry building model under Taft and El Centro earthquake at different acceleration peak is performed in lab, 3D displacement time histories of the model are acquired by the integrated stereovision measurement system. In-plane displacement curves obtained by two methods show good agreement, this suggests that the proposed method is reliable for monitoring structural vibration response. Out-of-plane displacement curves indicate that the proposed method is feasible and useful for monitoring 3D deformations of vibration response.

  8. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, N.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  9. An adaptive atmospheric transport model for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.W.; Randerson, D.

    1998-12-31

    The need to accurately calculate the transport of hazardous material is paramount to environmental safety and health activities, as well as to establish a sound emergency response capability, in the western United States and at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Current efforts are under way at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory in Las Vegas to develop a state-of-the-art atmospheric flow and species transport model that will accurately calculate wind fields and atmospheric particulate transport over complex terrain. In addition, research efforts are needed to improve predictive capabilities for catastrophic events, e.g., volcanic eruptions, thunderstorms, heavy rains and floods, and dust storms. The model has a wide range of environmental, safety, and health applications as required by the US Department of Energy for NTS programs, including those activities associated with emergency response, the Hazard Material Spill Center, and site restoration and remediation.

  10. X-34 Ceramic Model Tested In NASA Langley Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A ceramic aerothermodynamic heat transfer model of the X-34 is being prepared for testing in the 31-Inch Mach 10 Wind Tunnel located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The model is a 0.018-scale version of the X-34 advanced technology flight demonstration vehicle. The X-34 is an autonomous rocket-powered, air-launched winged concept that is smaller, lighter and much less expensive than other lifting body vehicles, for example, the X-33. The X-34 is intended for hypersonic flight up to speeds of Mach 8, and would be used to demonstrate technologies for future reusable space transportation vehicles. The first flight of the X-34 vehicle is currently scheduled for early 1999.

  11. Tests for robustness of dynamical models of arms races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer-Kress, G.

    1997-05-01

    The theory of dynamical systems-especially in the form of discrete maps and automata-makes it very easy to convert conceptual ideas of arms races or other forms of social interactions into formal, dynamical models. Modern interfaces and interpreters also allow a quick, interactive parameter search and display of attractors or other long term behavior. This situation makes it also easy to forgetthat the qualitative behavior of non-linear dynamical systems with a high-dimensional parameter (control) space can change dramatically with a change of parameters that often is well within the resolution accuracy of the model. In order to obtain trustworthy interpretations of numerical simulations, it is essential that multiple tests of robustness are performed. We discuss stochastic methods based on Chapman-Kolmogorov equations, search methods based on neural nets and genetic algorithms, geometrical methods based on multi-dimensional tableau-representations bifurcation diagrams and other methods whose application often depends on the context.

  12. An innovation in physical modelling for testing marine renewables technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, David; Whitehouse, Richard; Harris, John; Liddiard, Mark

    2015-04-01

    HR Wallingford has undertaken physical modelling of scour around structures since its creation as a government research laboratory in 1947. Since privatisation in 1982 HR Wallingford has carried out a large number of studies for offshore developments including renewable energy developments and offshore wind in particular, looking at scour around offshore foundations and cables. To maintain our position as both a research and consultancy organisation delivering high quality work we have developed a new purpose built physical modelling facility. The Fast Flow Facility is a dual-channel, race track shaped flume and the only large scale physical modelling facility of this kind offering wave, fast tidal current and recirculating sediment capabilities. The 75 m long, 8 m wide and 2.5 m deep Fast Flow Facility has two working channels of 4 m and 2.6 m width. Holding up to a million litres of water the facility can generate waves with significant wave heights, Hs, of up to 0.5 m and maximum wave heights of up to 1 m in combination with flows of up to 2 m/s (~4 knots). This state-of-the-art facility combines fast, reversible currents with wave generation and sediment transport modelling in a single flume, allowing us to further develop our understanding of sediment transport within the marine environment and keep us at the forefront of sediment transport research. The facility has been designed with the marine renewables sector in mind, with a 4 x 4 x 1m deep sediment pit in the centre of the flume allowing investigations to provide improved understanding of the detailed processes which lead to scour, and enabling improvements in prediction capabilities for marine scour in different sediment seabed compositions (non-cohesive and cohesive) for a range of structure types (monopiles, jackets, gravity base foundations, jack-ups etc.). The facility also enables the testing of scour protection methodologies at relatively large scale (typically 1: 10 - 1:20) and allows for

  13. Overexpressing the Multiple-Stress Responsive Gene At1g74450 Reduces Plant Height and Male Fertility in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, Anne M.; Belfield, Eric J.; Vlad, Daniela; Irani, Niloufer; Moore, Ian; Harberd, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be up-regulated in response to a wide range of different environmental stress factors. However, not all of these genes are characterized as yet with respect to their functions. In this study, we used transgenic knockout, overexpression and reporter gene approaches to try to elucidate the biological roles of five unknown multiple-stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis. The selected genes have the following locus identifiers: At1g18740, At1g74450, At4g27652, At4g29780 and At5g12010. Firstly, T-DNA insertion knockout lines were identified for each locus and screened for altered phenotypes. None of the lines were found to be visually different from wildtype Col-0. Secondly, 35S-driven overexpression lines were generated for each open reading frame. Analysis of these transgenic lines showed altered phenotypes for lines overexpressing the At1g74450 ORF. Plants overexpressing the multiple-stress responsive gene At1g74450 are stunted in height and have reduced male fertility. Alexander staining of anthers from flowers at developmental stage 12–13 showed either an absence or a reduction in viable pollen compared to wildtype Col-0 and At1g74450 knockout lines. Interestingly, the effects of stress on crop productivity are most severe at developmental stages such as male gametophyte development. However, the molecular factors and regulatory networks underlying environmental stress-induced male gametophytic alterations are still largely unknown. Our results indicate that the At1g74450 gene provides a potential link between multiple environmental stresses, plant height and pollen development. In addition, ruthenium red staining analysis showed that At1g74450 may affect the composition of the inner seed coat mucilage layer. Finally, C-terminal GFP fusion proteins for At1g74450 were shown to localise to the cytosol. PMID:26485022

  14. Test of a Power Transfer Model for Standardized Electrofishing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.; Dolan, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    Standardization of electrofishing in waters with differing conductivities is critical when monitoring temporal and spatial differences in fish assemblages. We tested a model that can help improve the consistency of electrofishing by allowing control over the amount of power that is transferred to the fish. The primary objective was to verify, under controlled laboratory conditions, whether the model adequately described fish immobilization responses elicited with various electrical settings over a range of water conductivities. We found that the model accurately described empirical observations over conductivities ranging from 12 to 1,030 ??S/cm for DC and various pulsed-DC settings. Because the model requires knowledge of a fish's effective conductivity, an attribute that is likely to vary according to species, size, temperature, and other variables, a second objective was to gather available estimates of the effective conductivity of fish to examine the magnitude of variation and to assess whether in practical applications a standard effective conductivity value for fish may be assumed. We found that applying a standard fish effective conductivity of 115 ??S/cm introduced relatively little error into the estimation of the peak power density required to immobilize fish with electrofishing. However, this standard was derived from few estimates of fish effective conductivity and a limited number of species; more estimates are needed to validate our working standard.

  15. CP violation tests of alignment models at LHCII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Diptimoy; Paradisi, Paride; Perez, Gilad; Spada, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    We analyse the low-energy phenomenology of alignment models both model-independently and within supersymmetric (SUSY) scenarios focusing on their CP violation tests at LHCII. Assuming that New Physics (NP) contributes to {K}^0-{overline{K}}^0 and {D}^0-{overline{D}}^0 mixings only through non-renormalizable operators involving SU(2) L quark-doublets, we derive model-independent correlations among CP violating observables of the two systems. Due to universality of CP violation in Δ F = 1 processes the bound on CP violation in Kaon mixing generically leads to an upper bound on the size of CP violation in D mixing. Interestingly, this bound is similar in magnitude to the current sensitivity reached by the LHCb experiment which is starting now to probe the natural predictions of alignment models. Within SUSY, we perform an exact analytical computation of the full set of contributions for the {D}^0-{overline{D}}^0 mixing amplitude. We point out that chargino effects are comparable and often dominant with respect to gluino contributions making their inclusion in phenomenological analyses essential. As a byproduct, we clarify the limit of applicability of the commonly used mass insertion approximation in scenarios with quasi-degenerate and split squarks.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin and flucloxacillin following the simultaneous intravenous administration of 4 g and 1 g, respectively.

    PubMed

    Adam, D; Koeppe, P; Heilmann, H D

    1983-01-01

    The combination of amoxicillin and flucloxacillin not only widens the spectrum of pathogenic organisms covered by either of the substances alone; synergy has also been observed, particularly against beta-lactamase-producing organisms. For this reason, the possible interaction of these two penicillins regarding their pharmacokinetics was investigated with respect to therapeutic application. The parameters were calculated on the basis of an open two-compartment model. The highest serum levels of amoxicillin from 551 to 1074 mg/l when 4 g were administered alone, and from 403 to 1133 mg/l when administered together with 1 g flucloxacillin. Flucloxacillin concentrations ranged from 118 to 357 mg/l when administered alone, and from 151 to 226 mg/l in the presence of amoxicillin. Thus, there is no significant difference in the peak levels of either substance when given alone or in combination. The pharmacokinetic parameters of both substances basically do not depend on the presence of the other. A slight decrease was observed in the distribution rate of amoxicillin from the central to the peripheral compartment in the presence of flucloxacillin. Its relevance is questionable, however, since the effect was only minor.

  17. Low Frequency Noise Contamination in Fan Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft engine noise research and development depends on the ability to study and predict the noise created by each engine component in isolation. The presence of a downstream pylon for a model fan test, however, may result in noise contamination through pylon interactions with the free stream and model exhaust airflows. Additionally, there is the problem of separating the fan and jet noise components generated by the model fan. A methodology was therefore developed to improve the data quality for the 9 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center that identifies three noise sources: fan noise, jet noise, and rig noise. The jet noise and rig noise were then measured by mounting a scale model of the 9 15 LSWT model fan installation in a jet rig to simulate everything except the rotating machinery and in duct components of fan noise. The data showed that the spectra measured in the LSWT has a strong rig noise component at frequencies as high as 3 kHz depending on the fan and airflow fan exit velocity. The jet noise was determined to be significantly lower than the rig noise (i.e., noise generated by flow interaction with the downstream support pylon). A mathematical model for the rig noise was then developed using a multi-dimensional least squares fit to the rig noise data. This allows the rig noise to be subtracted or removed, depending on the amplitude of the rig noise relative to the fan noise, at any given frequency, observer angle, or nozzle pressure ratio. The impact of isolating the fan noise with this method on spectra, overall power level (OAPWL), and Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) is studied.

  18. A Flexible Bayesian Model for Testing for Transmission Ratio Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Joaquim; Manunza, Arianna; Mercader, Anna; Quintanilla, Raquel; Amills, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Current statistical approaches to investigate the nature and magnitude of transmission ratio distortion (TRD) are scarce and restricted to the most common experimental designs such as F2 populations and backcrosses. In this article, we describe a new Bayesian approach to check TRD within a given biallelic genetic marker in a diploid species, providing a highly flexible framework that can accommodate any kind of population structure. This model relies on the genotype of each offspring and thus integrates all available information from either the parents’ genotypes or population-specific allele frequencies and yields TRD estimates that can be corroborated by the calculation of a Bayes factor (BF). This approach has been evaluated on simulated data sets with appealing statistical performance. As a proof of concept, we have also tested TRD in a porcine population with five half-sib families and 352 offspring. All boars and piglets were genotyped with the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip, whereas genotypes from the sows were not available. The SNP-by-SNP screening of the pig genome revealed 84 SNPs with decisive evidences of TRD (BF > 100) after accounting for multiple testing. Many of these regions contained genes related to biological processes (e.g., nucleosome assembly and co-organization, DNA conformation and packaging, and DNA complex assembly) that are critically associated with embryonic viability. The implementation of this method, which overcomes many of the limitations of previous approaches, should contribute to fostering research on TRD in both model and nonmodel organisms. PMID:25271302

  19. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  20. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damagemore » around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.« less