Science.gov

Sample records for 1-gwh diurnal load-leveling

  1. Wire rope superconducting cable for diurnal load leveling SMES

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a wire rope cable for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is discussed. The superconducting wires in the rope permit the passage of large currents in the relatively small conductors of the windings and hence cause large electromagnetic forces to act on the rope. The diameter of the rope, from a strength point of view, can be considerably reduced by supporting the rope at various points along its length.

  2. Load Leveling Battery System Costs

    1994-10-12

    SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer's monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer's peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer's side of themore » meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer's load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.« less

  3. Load leveling on industrial refrigeration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierenbaum, H. S.; Kraus, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A computer model was constructed of a brewery with a 2000 horsepower compressor/refrigeration system. The various conservation and load management options were simulated using the validated model. The savings available for implementing the most promising options were verified by trials in the brewery. Result show that an optimized methodology for implementing load leveling and energy conservation consisted of: (1) adjusting (or tuning) refrigeration systems controller variables to minimize unnecessary compressor starts, (2) The primary refrigeration system operating parameters, compressor suction pressure, and discharge pressure are carefully controlled (modulated) to satisfy product quality constraints (as well as in-process material cooling rates and temperature levels) and energy evaluating the energy cost savings associated with reject heat recovery, and (4) a decision is made to implement the reject heat recovery system based on a cost/benefits analysis.

  4. Dynamics of power systems at critical load levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis, eigenvalue algorithms used in the commercial software packages (AESOPS and PEALS) to analyze low frequency oscillations in large scale power systems have been explained in terms of commonly understood iterative schemes. These algorithms have been extended to include the calculation of any desired system mode. Next, the voltage instability problem has been addressed from a dynamic viewpoint in the context of critical modes of the linearized system matrix. The eigenvalue algorithms have been used to establish a correspondence between the critical modes and certain system states. Two case studies have been performed to analyze the dynamic nature of the voltage problem. Finally, Hopf bifurcation theory has been used to analyze the nonlinear power system at critical load levels.

  5. Load leveling on industrial refrigeration systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bierenbaum, H.S.; Kraus, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    This project addressed the problem of developing, validating, and demonstrating an optimized methodology for maximizing the benefits of load levelling, energy conservation through efficiency improvements, and reject heat recovery on large, energy intensive industrial compressor systems. A typical industrial food processing plant, a brewery, with a 2000 horsepower compressor/refrigeration system was used as a model facility and as a site for demonstration and validation of strategies developed. The approach used in this work was to construct a computer model of the facility and its energy systems and validate the model against actual data. The next step was to simulate the various conservation and load management options using the validated model. Finally, the savings available for implementing the most promising options were verified by trials in the brewery. Results showed that an optimized methodology for implementing load leveling and energy conservation consisted of first adjusting (or tuning) refrigeration systems controller variables - gain and reset - to minimize unnecessary compressor starts. Second, the primary refrigeration system operating parameters, compressor suction pressure, and discharge pressure are carefully controlled (modulated) to satisfy product quality constraints (as well as in-process material cooling rates and temperature levels) and simultaneously improve energy efficiency and peak demand. Third, energy cost savings for recovery of heat from the reject side of the refrigeration system are estimated using the newly determined compressor operating conditions as a basis for evaluating the energy cost savings associated with reject heat recovery. Fourth, a decision is made to implement the reject heat recovery system based on a cost/benefits analysis.

  6. A high rate clarifier for load levelling in sewerage systems.

    PubMed

    Jago, R A; Davey, A; Li, H

    2003-01-01

    The combining of chemically assisted clarification with a proprietary physical separation technology has led to a high rate process for clarifying flocculated sewage and other waste streams. This hybrid physico-chemical system, known as the CDS Fine Solids Separation (FSS) System, was developed over a two year period within a sewage treatment plant environment. This paper summarises the results of a recent field trial of the system with a Victorian water authority which experiences heavy loading of sewers in a coastal town during holiday periods. The trial sought to evaluate the FSS as a tool for smoothing the load on the 11 km long sewer to the sewage treatment plant (STP). The FSS system could possibly enable the costly augmentation of the sewer to be deferred, particularly as the capacity of the existing sewer pipe is satisfactory for most of the year. Water quality parameters were determined for a range of flowrates and operational conditions over a two month period. Large reductions were achieved in TSS, TP, FC, turbidity and BOD5, with only minimal reductions in NH3 and TON. These results showed that the FSS could meet the authority's objectives for load levelling and would provide a 20-25% increase in effective sewer capacity. The data are also discussed in terms of possible use of the effluent from the FSS for water reuse applications.

  7. Diurnal variations of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1,000 and 1,400 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from 8 close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Though there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ~700 cm-3 below ~1,300 km. Such a plateau is associated with the combination of distinct diurnal variations of light and heavy ions. Light ions (e.g. CH5+, HCNH+, C2H5+) show strong diurnal variation, with clear bite-outs in their nightside distributions. In contrast, heavy ions (e.g. c-C3H3+, C2H3CNH+, C6H7+) present modest diurnal variation, with significant densities observed on the nightside. We propose that the distinctions between light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through "fast" ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through "slow" electron dissociative recombination. The INMS data suggest day-to-night transport as an important source of ions on Titan's nightside, to be distinguished from the conventional scenario of auroral ionization by magnetospheric particles as the only ionizing source on the nightside. This is supported by the strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effects of day-to-night transport on the ionospheric structures of Titan. The predicted diurnal variation has similar general characteristics to those observed, with some apparent discrepancies which could be reconciled by imposing fast horizontal thermal winds in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  8. Thermal load leveling during silicon crystal growth from a melt using anisotropic materials

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Frederick M.; Helenbrook, Brian T.

    2016-10-11

    An apparatus for growing a silicon crystal substrate comprising a heat source, an anisotropic thermal load leveling component, a crucible, and a cold plate component is disclosed. The anisotropic thermal load leveling component possesses a high thermal conductivity and may be positioned atop the heat source to be operative to even-out temperature and heat flux variations emanating from the heat source. The crucible may be operative to contain molten silicon in which the top surface of the molten silicon may be defined as a growth interface. The crucible may be substantially surrounded by the anisotropic thermal load leveling component. The cold plate component may be positioned above the crucible to be operative with the anisotropic thermal load leveling component and heat source to maintain a uniform heat flux at the growth surface of the molten silicon.

  9. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  10. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves an interaction between solar heating, thermal instability, atmospheric turbulence, wind strength, and surface threshold conditions. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convect...

  11. Knowledge-based load leveling and task allocation in human-machine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chignell, M. H.; Hancock, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional human-machine systems use task allocation policies which are based on the premise of a flexible human operator. This individual is most often required to compensate for and augment the capabilities of the machine. The development of artificial intelligence and improved technologies have allowed for a wider range of task allocation strategies. In response to these issues a Knowledge Based Adaptive Mechanism (KBAM) is proposed for assigning tasks to human and machine in real time, using a load leveling policy. This mechanism employs an online workload assessment and compensation system which is responsive to variations in load through an intelligent interface. This interface consists of a loading strategy reasoner which has access to information about the current status of the human-machine system as well as a database of admissible human/machine loading strategies. Difficulties standing in the way of successful implementation of the load leveling strategy are examined.

  12. Laboratory evaluation and analysis of advanced lead-acid load-leveling batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. F.; Mulcahey, T. P.; Christianson, C. C.; Marr, J. J.; Smaga, J. A.

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted an extensive evaluation of advanced lead-acid batteries developed by the Exide Corporation for load-leveling applications. This paper presents the results of performance and accelerated life tests conducted on these batteries over a five-year period. This paper describes the operational reliability and maintenance requirements for this technology, and also includes analyses of the batteries' thermal characteristics, arsine/stibine emission rates, and cell degradation modes as determined from post-test examinations.

  13. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves the interaction between the sun, wind, and earth. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the s...

  14. Development of a long life 35 Ah capacity VRLA battery for load-leveling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yasuhide; Takahashi, Sawako; Hirakawa, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki

    A load-leveling (LL) system is needed for the effective use of electric power to preserve the environment in Japan. Although the valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery is considered to be one of the suitable candidates, high requirements of long cycle life such as 2000 cycles or a calendar life of 7 years needed to be solved. We are currently developing a new VRLA battery for this application, and have succeeded in achieving over 2000 cycles with a 35 Ah class VRLA battery. It was confirmed by the detailed investigation after a cycling test of the battery that this cycle performance was achieved by improving the charge acceptance of the negative plate, avoiding the grid corrosion by applying an optimized charge condition.

  15. Diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1000 and 1300 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from eight close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Although there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ˜700 cm-3 below ˜1300 km. Such a plateau is a combined result of significant depletion of light ions and modest depletion of heavy ones on Titan's nightside. We propose that the distinctions between the diurnal variations of light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through “fast” ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through “slow” electron dissociative recombination. The strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes suggests a scenario in which the ions created on Titan's dayside may survive well to the nightside. The observed asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles also supports such an interpretation. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effect of ion survival associated with solid body rotation alone as well as superrotating horizontal winds. For long-lived ions, the predicted diurnal variations have similar general characteristics to those observed. However, for short-lived ions, the model densities on the nightside are significantly lower than the observed values. This implies that electron precipitation from Saturn's magnetosphere may be an additional and important contributor to the densities of the short-lived ions observed on Titan's nightside.

  16. Diurnal variation of mesospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, G.

    1982-03-01

    Four Petrel rockets were flown from South Uist on October 2, 1979, to investigate the ozone concentration variation predicted by photochemical models between day and night in the mesosphere by means of interference filters that defined an approximately 10 nm bandwidth. The first two rockets contained photometers with wavebands centered at 265 and 290 nm, while the last two employed a single waveband at 265 nm. Results show significant diurnal variation above 54 km, which exceeds a factor of 2 above 65 km and reaches a factor of 10 between night and sunrise at 90 km.

  17. Development of Zinc/Bromine Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eidler, Phillip

    1999-07-01

    The Zinc/Bromine Load-Leveling Battery Development contract (No. 40-8965) was partitioned at the outset into two phases of equal length. Phase 1 started in September 1990 and continued through December 1991. In Phase 1, zinc/bromine battery technology was to be advanced to the point that it would be clear that the technology was viable and would be an appropriate choice for electric utilities wishing to establish stationary energy-storage facilities. Criteria were established that addressed most of the concerns that had been observed in the previous development efforts. The performances of 8-cell and 100-cell laboratory batteries demonstrated that the criteria were met or exceeded. In Phase 2, 100-kWh batteries will be built and demonstrated, and a conceptual design for a load-leveling plant will be presented. At the same time, work will continue to identify improved assembly techniques and operating conditions. This report details the results of the efforts carried out in Phase 1. The highlights are: (1) Four 1-kWh stacks achieved over 100 cycles, One l-kWh stack achieved over 200 cycles, One 1-kWh stack achieved over 300 cycles; (2) Less than 10% degradation in performance occurred in the four stacks that achieved over 100 cycles; (3) The battery used for the zinc loading investigation exhibited virtually no loss in performance for loadings up to 130 mAh/cm{sup 2}; (4) Charge-current densities of 50 ma/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in minicells; (5) Fourteen consecutive no-strip cycles have been conducted on the stack with 300+ cycles; (6) A mass and energy balance spreadsheet that describes battery operation was completed; (7) Materials research has continued to provide improvements in the electrode, activation layer, and separator; and (8) A battery made of two 50-cell stacks (15 kWh) was produced and delivered to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for testing. The most critical development was the ability to assemble a battery stack that remained leak free. The

  18. Upper Limb Muscle and Brain Activity in Light Assembly Task on Different Load Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadry, Hilma Raimona; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md.; Taha, Zahari

    2010-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of load on upper limb muscles and brain activities in light assembly task. The task was conducted at two levels of load (Low and high). Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to measure upper limb muscle activities of twenty subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) was simultaneously recorded with EMG to record brain activities from Fz, Pz, O1 and O2 channels. The EMG Mean Power Frequency (MPF) of the right brachioradialis and the left upper trapezius activities were higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task. The EMG MPF values also decrease as time increases, that reflects muscle fatigue. Mean power of the EEG alpha bands for the Fz-Pz channels were found to be higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task, while for the O1-O2 channels, they were higher on the low-load task than on the high-load task. These results indicated that the load levels effect the upper limb muscle and brain activities. The high-load task will increase muscle activities on the right brachioradialis and the left upper tapezius muscles, and will increase the awareness and motivation of the subjects. Whilst the low-load task can generate drowsiness earlier. It signified that the longer the time and the more heavy of the task, the subjects will be more fatigue physically and mentally.

  19. A system-level mathematical model for evaluation of power train performance of load-leveled electric-vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purohit, G. P.; Leising, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    The power train performance of load leveled electric vehicles can be compared with that of nonload leveled systems by use of a simple mathematical model. This method of measurement involves a number of parameters including the degree of load leveling and regeneration, the flywheel mechanical to electrical energy fraction, and efficiencies of the motor, generator, flywheel, and transmission. Basic efficiency terms are defined and representative comparisons of a variety of systems are presented. Results of the study indicate that mechanical transfer of energy into and out of the flywheel is more advantageous than electrical transfer. An optimum degree of load leveling may be achieved in terms of the driving cycle, battery characteristics, mode of mechanization, and the efficiency of the components. For state of the art mechanically coupled flyheel systems, load leveling losses can be held to a reasonable 10%; electrically coupled systems can have losses that are up to six times larger. Propulsion system efficiencies for mechanically coupled flywheel systems are predicted to be approximately the 60% achieved on conventional nonload leveled systems.

  20. Conceptual designs for utility load-leveling battery with Li/FeS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zivi, S. M.; Kacinskas, H.; Pollack, I.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Grieve, W.; McFarland, B. L.; Sudar, S.

    1980-07-01

    In 1978, a conceptual design of a 100 MW-h load-leveling battery system having Li alloy/FeS cells was developed as a result of a joint effort between ANL and Rockwell International. In this conceptual design, the submodule, which was the basic replaceable unit for the system, had a capacity of 240 kW-h and consisted of ninety-six 2.5 kW-h cells. However, a study by Rockwell indicated that the cost for battery hardware, $60 to 80/kW-h (cells and converters not included), was too high. Most of this cost was contributed by the submodule structure and the charge equalization scheme, which was the same as that developed for electric-vehicle batteries. In 1979, subsequent efforts were concentrated on lowering these hardware costs and resulted in the development of three modified designs, which are presented in this report. The first, developed at ANL, consisted of a 30 kW-h cell/submodule and the electric-vehicle equalization scheme. The hardware cost for this modified design was quite low, about $25/kW-h; however, this design was eventually rejected owing to the apparent impracticality of such a large cell. The two other modified designs had more conservative cell designs. One of them, developed at ANL, consisted of a 120 kW-h submodule consisting of one hundred 1.2 kW-h cells; the other, developed at Rockwell, consisted of a 1020 kW-h submodule consisting of four hundred and eight 2.5 kW-h cells. For both of these designs, an alternative method of equalization, in which fixed resistance shunts are used on each cell, was proposed; this equalization method adds little equipment cost to the system and only sacrifices about 4% of the coulombic and energy efficiencies. The cost of battery hardware for these two designs was estimated to be acceptable, about $22 to 60/kW-h. Some questions remain on the assumed capabilities of the cells and the feasibility of the battery hardware.

  1. Levetiracetam: Probably Associated Diurnal Frequent Urination.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jun; Zou, Li-Ping; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Hu, Lin-Yan; Pang, Ling-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal frequent urination is a common condition in elementary school children who are especially at risk for associated somatic and behavioral problems. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug that has been used in both partial and generalized seizures and less commonly adverse effects including psychiatric and behavioral problems. Diurnal frequent urination is not a well-known adverse effect of LEV. Here, we reported 2 pediatric cases with epilepsy that developed diurnal frequent urination after LEV administration. Case 1 was a 6-year-old male patient who presented urinary frequency and urgency in the daytime since the third day after LEV was given as adjunctive therapy. Symptoms increased accompanied by the raised dosage of LEV. Laboratory tests and auxiliary examinations did not found evidence of organic disease. Diurnal frequent urination due to LEV was suspected, and then the drug was discontinued. As expected, his frequency of urination returned to normal levels. Another 13-year-old female patient got similar clinical manifestations after oral LEV monotherapy and the symptoms became aggravated while in stress state. Since the most common causes of frequent micturition had been ruled out, the patient was considered to be diagnosed with LEV-associated psychogenic frequent urination. The dosage of LEV was reduced to one-third, and the frequency of urination was reduced by 60%. Both patients got the Naranjo score of 6, which indicated that LEV was a "probable" cause of diurnal frequent urination. Although a definite causal link between LEV and diurnal urinary frequency in the 2 cases remains to be established, we argue that diurnal frequent urination associated with LEV deserves clinician's attention. PMID:26938751

  2. Diurnal Cycle of Convection during Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, P. E.; Johnson, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    During the special observing period (SOP) of the DYNAMO/CINDY/AMIE field campaign, conducted over the Indian Ocean from October to November 2011, two sounding networks, one north and one south of the equator, took 4-8 soundings/day. This dataset with 3-hr time resolution offers a unique opportunity to investigate the diurnal cycle of Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) convection which was present within the southern sounding array (SSA) for extended periods during the SOP. For example, during the first half of October 2011 when the ITCZ was located between 3°S and 8°S, TRMM 3B42 3-h rainfall averaged over the SSA exhibited a prominent diurnal cycle with a late night/early morning maximum and an early evening minimum. The rainfall diurnal range during this period over the SSA was 4.8 mm which was ~50% of the daily mean (10.1 mm). Mean rainfall over the northern sounding array was much lighter (0.9 mm) during this period with a diurnal cycle nearly out of phase with that over the SSA. Using primarily sounding and satellite data, we will explore the characteristics of this diurnally varying convection and what, if any, influence it may have had on the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal.

  3. Short-term bulk energy storage system scheduling for load leveling in unit commitment: modeling, optimization, and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Reza; Saboori, Hedayat

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage systems (ESSs) have experienced a very rapid growth in recent years and are expected to be a promising tool in order to improving power system reliability and being economically efficient. The ESSs possess many potential benefits in various areas in the electric power systems. One of the main benefits of an ESS, especially a bulk unit, relies on smoothing the load pattern by decreasing on-peak and increasing off-peak loads, known as load leveling. These devices require new methods and tools in order to model and optimize their effects in the power system studies. In this respect, this paper will model bulk ESSs based on the several technical characteristics, introduce the proposed model in the thermal unit commitment (UC) problem, and analyze it with respect to the various sensitive parameters. The technical limitations of the thermal units and transmission network constraints are also considered in the model. The proposed model is a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) which can be easily solved by strong commercial solvers (for instance CPLEX) and it is appropriate to be used in the practical large scale networks. The results of implementing the proposed model on a test system reveal that proper load leveling through optimum storage scheduling leads to considerable operation cost reduction with respect to the storage system characteristics. PMID:27222741

  4. Short-term bulk energy storage system scheduling for load leveling in unit commitment: modeling, optimization, and sensitivity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati, Reza; Saboori, Hedayat

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage systems (ESSs) have experienced a very rapid growth in recent years and are expected to be a promising tool in order to improving power system reliability and being economically efficient. The ESSs possess many potential benefits in various areas in the electric power systems. One of the main benefits of an ESS, especially a bulk unit, relies on smoothing the load pattern by decreasing on-peak and increasing off-peak loads, known as load leveling. These devices require new methods and tools in order to model and optimize their effects in the power system studies. In this respect, this paper will model bulk ESSs based on the several technical characteristics, introduce the proposed model in the thermal unit commitment (UC) problem, and analyze it with respect to the various sensitive parameters. The technical limitations of the thermal units and transmission network constraints are also considered in the model. The proposed model is a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) which can be easily solved by strong commercial solvers (for instance CPLEX) and it is appropriate to be used in the practical large scale networks. The results of implementing the proposed model on a test system reveal that proper load leveling through optimum storage scheduling leads to considerable operation cost reduction with respect to the storage system characteristics. PMID:27222741

  5. Short-term bulk energy storage system scheduling for load leveling in unit commitment: modeling, optimization, and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Reza; Saboori, Hedayat

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage systems (ESSs) have experienced a very rapid growth in recent years and are expected to be a promising tool in order to improving power system reliability and being economically efficient. The ESSs possess many potential benefits in various areas in the electric power systems. One of the main benefits of an ESS, especially a bulk unit, relies on smoothing the load pattern by decreasing on-peak and increasing off-peak loads, known as load leveling. These devices require new methods and tools in order to model and optimize their effects in the power system studies. In this respect, this paper will model bulk ESSs based on the several technical characteristics, introduce the proposed model in the thermal unit commitment (UC) problem, and analyze it with respect to the various sensitive parameters. The technical limitations of the thermal units and transmission network constraints are also considered in the model. The proposed model is a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) which can be easily solved by strong commercial solvers (for instance CPLEX) and it is appropriate to be used in the practical large scale networks. The results of implementing the proposed model on a test system reveal that proper load leveling through optimum storage scheduling leads to considerable operation cost reduction with respect to the storage system characteristics.

  6. Variability of mesospheric diurnal tides and tropospheric diurnal heating during 1997-1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, R. S.; Riggin, D. M.; Ortland, D. A.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Vincent, R. A.

    2007-10-01

    This study focuses on interannual variations of diurnal tropospheric heating and the response in the mesosphere observed by radars and predicted by a model. The work is prompted by reports of interannual variability in amplitudes of tidal variables at low latitudes. Diurnal tides observed at Hawaii and Christmas Island exhibit a pronounced ``spike'' in amplitude from late 1997 to early 1998. It has been speculated that this variability may be linked to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. We examine diurnal solar heating due to water vapor absorption, and diurnal latent heat release due to deep convection between 1988 and 2005. Both of these heating drives exhibit anomalously higher amplitudes in the tropical central and eastern Pacific during 1997-1998. The altered heating patterns result in a stronger forcing of the migrating diurnal tide by water vapor heating, and excitation of several weaker nonmigrating modes by latent heating. A primitive equation model is used to evaluate how these drives contribute to diurnal winds in the mesosphere. Anomalous water vapor heating results in about 15% increases in model meridional wind amplitudes over climatological values at subtropical latitudes between 300°E and the Greenwich meridian. While the timing of the model amplitude enhancements is consistent with observations at Hawaii, the observed increases are significantly stronger. Our study indicates that water vapor heating is the larger contributor to tidal enhancement observed during 1997-1998.

  7. Reference design of 100 MW-h lithium/iron sulfide battery system for utility load leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Zivi, S.M.; Kacinskas, H.; Pollack, I.; Chilenskas, A.A.; Barney, D.L.; Grieve, W.; McFarland, B.L.; Sudar, S.; Goldstein, E.; Adler, E.

    1980-03-01

    The first year in a two-year cooperative effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Rockwell International to develop a conceptual design of a lithium alloy/iron sulfide battery for utility load leveling is presented. A conceptual design was developed for a 100 MW-h battery system based upon a parallel-series arrangement of 2.5 kW-h capacity cells. The sales price of such a battery system was estimated to be very high, $80.25/kW-h, exclusive of the cost of the individual cells, the dc-to-ac converters, site preparation, or land acquisition costs. Consequently, the second year's efforts were directed towards developing modified designs with significantly lower potential costs.

  8. The diurnal variability of marine stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, David P.; Olsen, Lola M.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the diurnal variation of marine stratocumulus clouds obtained during July 1987 as part of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment are described. The observations show a clear diurnal signature in the structure of the cloud-topped marine boundary layer, with a large variation in the height of the cloud base, with lower heights observed at night. The observational results are numerically simulated using a 1D second-moment turbulence-closure model of Koracin and Rogers (1990) for a hydrostatically incompressible fluid. The model results indicate that the differential heating of the cloud layer promotes mixing in the upper part of the cloud and stabilizes the lower part of the layer.

  9. Observations of the diurnal tide from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Wu, D. L.; Burrage, M. D.; Gell, D. A.; Grassl, H. J.; Lieberman, R. S.; Marshall, A. R.; Morton, Y. T.; Ortland, D. A.; Skinner, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    This study presents a climatology of mesospheric and lower-thermospheric diurnal tidal winds obtained with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). The observations reveal that although tidal structures are present at all times, like the prevailing zonal winds, they exhibit significant semiannual as well as other shorter-term variations in amplitude. Results are presented for a period extending over more than one year from November 1991 to July 1993. The 1,1 diurnal tidal amplitude of the meridional component, characterized by the value at an altitude of 90 km and a latitude of 22 deg, ranges from a minimum at solstice of less than 20 m per sec to an equinox maximum of over 70 m per sec. The vertical wavelength and phase of the tide show only slight variations throughout the year, with a suggestion of semiannual variations in both.

  10. Diurnal behaviour of water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Goody, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical model of the diurnal transport of water across the Martian surface is developed. The atmospheric boundary layer is modeled in terms of local radiative-convective processes, and radiative effects of ice fogs near the surface are included. Diffusion of water in the ground is treated for the cases of adsorption and condensation. The model is applied to the diurnal variation of water vapor in the atmosphere as observed by Barker (1974). The morning rise in the amount of water vapor can be explained in terms of the evaporation of ground fogs. The evening decrease is compatible with the model if adsorption dominates in the soil. The average level of vapor concentration requires that the atmosphere above the boundary layer be relatively dry. The ground fogs persist until midmorning and should be observable. Some consequences of these conclusions are discussed.

  11. Radiobrightness of diurnally heated, freezing soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Anthony W.

    1990-01-01

    Freezing and thawing soils exhibit unique radiometric characteristics. To examine these characteristics, diurnal insolation is modeled as one-dimensional heating of a moist soil half-space during a typical fall at a northern Great Plains site. The one-dimensional heat flow equation is nonlinear because both the enthalpy (the change in internal energy with temperature at constant pressure) and the thermal conductivity of freezing soils are nonlinear functions of temperature. The problem is particularly difficult because phase boundaries propagate in time, and because soils, particularly clay-rich soils, freeze over a range of temperatures rather than at 0 C. Diurnal radiobrightness curves at 10.7, 18.0, and 37.0-GHz were computed for each month. The 37.0-GHz radiobrightness best tracks soil surface temperature; the 10.7-37.0-GHz spectral gradient of thawed soils is strongly positive; the spectral gradient of frozen soils is slightly negative; and the midnight-to-noon spectral gradient is shifted by approximately +0.1 K/GHz by diurnal changes in the surface temperature and the thermal gradient. These observations support the use of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer 37.0-GHz radiobrightness and its 10.7-37.0-GHz spectral gradient as discriminants in a frozen soil classifier for high-latitude prairie.

  12. Diurnal ocean surface layer model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Jeffrey D.; May, Douglas A.; Abell, Fred, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The diurnal ocean surface layer (DOSL) model at the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center forecasts the 24-hour change in a global sea surface temperatures (SST). Validating the DOSL model is a difficult task due to the huge areas involved and the lack of in situ measurements. Therefore, this report details the use of satellite infrared multichannel SST imagery to provide day and night SSTs that can be directly compared to DOSL products. This water-vapor-corrected imagery has the advantages of high thermal sensitivity (0.12 C), large synoptic coverage (nearly 3000 km across), and high spatial resolution that enables diurnal heating events to be readily located and mapped. Several case studies in the subtropical North Atlantic readily show that DOSL results during extreme heating periods agree very well with satellite-imagery-derived values in terms of the pattern of diurnal warming. The low wind and cloud-free conditions necessary for these events to occur lend themselves well to observation via infrared imagery. Thus, the normally cloud-limited aspects of satellite imagery do not come into play for these particular environmental conditions. The fact that the DOSL model does well in extreme events is beneficial from the standpoint that these cases can be associated with the destruction of the surface acoustic duct. This so-called afternoon effect happens as the afternoon warming of the mixed layer disrupts the sound channel and the propagation of acoustic energy.

  13. Plateau effects on diurnal circulation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.R.; Tang, M.

    1984-04-01

    The diurnal variation of 850 mb heights, the detailed distribution of which could be assessed by the inclusion of surface data, and of resultant winds over, and in the vicinity of, the Great Basin reveals clearly a plateau-wind circulation during summer. This circulation reverses between day and night and appears to include the low-level jet stream over Texas and Oklahoma, as well as the time of occurrence of thunderstorms. This plateau circulation system interacts with local mountain-valley breeze systems. The thickness of the daytime inflow and nighttime outflow layer over the plateau is approximately 2 km. 19 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  14. Diurnal variability of precipitation from TRMM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen

    2006-12-01

    This investigation focuses on developing a better understanding of the assorted mechanisms controlling the global distribution of diurnal rainfall variability. The horizontal distributions of precipitation's diurnal cycle, based on eight years of TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) measurements involving three TRMM standard algorithms, are analyzed in detail at various spatiotemporal scales. Results demonstrate the prominence of the late-evening to early-morning precipitation maxima over oceans and the mid- to late-afternoon maxima over continents, but also reveal a widespread distribution of secondary maxima occurring over both oceans and continents, maxima which generally mirror their counterpart regime's behavior. That is, many ocean regions exhibit clear-cut secondary afternoon precipitation maxima while many continental areas exhibit just as evident secondary morning maxima. Notably, this investigation represents the first comprehensive study of these secondary maxima and their widespread nature when analyzed using a global precipitation dataset. The characteristics of the secondary maxima are thoroughly mapped and described on a global grid. In addition, a Fourier harmonic decomposition scheme is used to examine detailed amplitude and phase properties of the primary and secondary maxima -- as well as tertiary and quartern modes. Accordingly, the advantages, ambiguities, and pitfalls resulting from using harmonic analysis are also examined.

  15. On the diurnal variation of noctilucent clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Thomas, Gary E.; Toon, Owen B.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between nuctilucent clouds (NLC), which are observed from the ground usually within 2 or 3 hrs of local midnight, and the polar mesospheric clouds (PMC), which are observed by satellites in full daylight, as well as the reason for the differences in their optical properties and their observed heights are investigated. Based on a suggestion that these differences can be attributed to a diurnal variation in the properties of a single type of cloud, two published models of the diurnal and semidiurnal variations of temperature, vertical wind speed, and eddy diffusion coefficient at high latitude to simulate the evolution of ice clouds over a 24-hr period. The results show that the minimum in temperature at about 2000 hours LT causes a sharp maximum in scattered brightness to occur about 1 hour before local midnight, with up to a factor of 7 variation in cloud brightness between noon and midnight. It is noted, however, that considerable uncertainties exist in these tidal models.

  16. How snowpack heterogeneity affects diurnal streamflow timing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundquist, J.D.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Diurnal cycles of streamflow in snow-fed rivers can be used to infer the average time a water parcel spends in transit from the top of the snowpack to a stream gauge in the river channel. This travel time, which is measured as the difference between the hour of peak snowmelt in the afternoon and the hour of maximum discharge each day, ranges from a few hours to almost a full day later. Travel times increase with longer percolation times through deeper snowpacks, and prior studies of small basins have related the timing of a stream's diurnal peak to the amount of snow stored in a basin. However, in many larger basins the time of peak flow is nearly constant during the first half of the melt season, with little or no variation between years. This apparent self-organization at larger scales can be reproduced by employing heterogeneous observations of snow depths and melt rates in a model that couples porous medium flow through an evolving snowpack with free surface flow in a channel. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Diurnal tides in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalik, Z.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D numerical model with a space grid of about 14 km is applied to calculate diurnal tidal constituents K(1) and O(1) in the Arctic Ocean. Calculated corange and cotidal charts show that along the continental slope, local regions of increased sea level amplitude, highly variable phase and enhanced currents occur. It is shown that in these local regions, shelf waves (topographic waves) of tidal origin are generated. In the Arctic Ocean and Northern Atlantic Ocean more than 30 regions of enhanced currents are identified. To prove the near-resonant interaction of the diurnal tides with the local bottom topography, the natural periods of oscillations for all regions have been calculated. The flux of energy averaged over the tidal period depicts the gyres of semitrapped energy, suggesting that the shelf waves are partially trapped over the irregularities of the bottom topography. It is shown that the occurrence of near-resonance phenomenon changes the energy flow in the tidal waves. First, the flux of energy from the astronomical sources is amplified in the shelf wave regions, and afterwards the tidal energy is strongly dissipated in the same regions.

  18. Diurnal variations in optical depth at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Viking lander camera images of the Sun were used to compute atmospheric optical depth at two sites over a period of 1 to 1/3 martian years. The complete set of 1044 optical depth determinations is presented in graphical and tabular form. Error estimates are presented in detail. Otpical depths in the morning (AM) are generally larger than in the afternoon (PM). The AM-PM differences are ascribed to condensation of water vapor into atmospheric ice aerosols at night and their evaporation in midday. A smoothed time series of these differences shows several seasonal peaks. These are simulated using a one-dimensional radiative convective model which predicts martial atmospheric temperature profiles. A calculation combinig these profiles with water vapor measurements from the Mars Atmospheric Water Detector is used to predict when the diurnal variations of water condensation should occur. The model reproduces a majority of the observed peaks and shows the factors influencing the process. Diurnal variation of condensation is shown to peak when the latitude and season combine to warm the atmosphere to the optimum temperature, cool enough to condense vapor at night and warm enough to cause evaporation at midday.

  19. Diurnal variations from muon data at Takeyama underground station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, K.; Imai, K.; Imai, T.; Kudo, S.; Wada, M.

    1985-01-01

    An underground station, Takeyama, is introduced, and some results of the solar diurnal and semi-diurnal variations for the period between 1967 and 1984 are presented. There are clear tendencies of double and single solar cycle variations in the daily variations which are in good accord with those detected by other underground and neutron monitor observations.

  20. Diurnal hypercapnia in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2010-03-01

    Subjects with progressive neuromuscular diseases undergo a typical sequence of respiratory compromise, leading from normal unassisted gas exchange to nocturnal hypoventilation with normal daytime gas exchange, and eventually to respiratory failure requiring continuous ventilatory support. Several different abnormalities in respiratory pump function have been described to explain the development of respiratory failure in subjects with neuromuscular weakness. Early in the progression of respiratory failure, the use of nocturnal assisted ventilation can reverse both night- and day-time hypercapnia. Eventually, however, diurnal hypercapnia will persist despite correction of nocturnal hypoventilation. The likely beneficial effects of mechanical ventilatory support include resting fatigue-prone respiratory muscles and resetting of the central chemoreceptors to PaCO(2). Recent experience shows that select patients who require daytime ventilation can be supported with non-invasive ventilation continuously to correct gas exchange abnormalities while avoiding detrimental aspects of tracheostomy placement.

  1. Multitemporal diurnal AVIRIS images of a forested ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Smith, Milton O.; Adams, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Both physiological and ecosystem structural information may be derived from diurnal images. Structural information may be inferred from changes in canopy shadows between images and from changes in spectral composition due to changes in proportions of subpixel mixing resulting from the differences in sun/view angles. Physiological processes having diurnal scales also may be measurable if a stable basis for spectral comparison can be established. Six diurnal images of an area east of Mt. Shasta, CA were acquired on 22 Sep. 1989. This unique diurnal data set provided an opportunity to test the consistency of endmember fractions and residuals. It was expected that shade endmember abundances would show the greatest change as lighting geometry changed and less change in the normalized fractional proportion of other endmembers. Diurnal changes in spectral features related to physiological characteristics may be identifiable as changes in wavelength specific residuals.

  2. Diurnal Emotional States Impact the Sleep Course

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Julien; Mandai, Osamu; Honoré, Jacques; Kobayashi, Toshinori; Sequeira, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Background Diurnal emotional experiences seem to affect several characteristics of sleep architecture. However, this influence remains unclear, especially for positive emotions. In addition, electrodermal activity (EDA), a sympathetic robust indicator of emotional arousal, differs depending on the sleep stage. The present research has a double aim: to identify the specific effects of pre-sleep emotional states on the architecture of the subsequent sleep period; to relate such states to the sympathetic activation during the same sleep period. Methods Twelve healthy volunteers (20.1 ± 1.0 yo.) participated in the experiment and each one slept 9 nights at the laboratory, divided into 3 sessions, one per week. Each session was organized over three nights. A reference night, allowing baseline pre-sleep and sleep recordings, preceded an experimental night before which participants watched a negative, neutral, or positive movie. The third and last night was devoted to analyzing the potential recovery or persistence of emotional effects induced before the experimental night. Standard polysomnography and EDA were recorded during all the nights. Results Firstly, we found that experimental pre-sleep emotional induction increased the Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep rate following both negative and positive movies. While this increase was spread over the whole night for positive induction, it was limited to the second half of the sleep period for negative induction. Secondly, the valence of the pre-sleep movie also impacted the sympathetic activation during Non-REM stage 3 sleep, which increased after negative induction and decreased after positive induction. Conclusion Pre-sleep controlled emotional states impacted the subsequent REM sleep rate and modulated the sympathetic activity during the sleep period. The outcomes of this study offer interesting perspectives related to the effect of diurnal emotional influences on sleep regulation and open new avenues for potential

  3. Mesosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Forcing. 1; Diurnal and Semi-Diurnal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results from a nonlinear, 3D, time dependent numerical spectral model (NSM), which extends from the ground up into the thermosphere and incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW). Our focal point is the mesosphere that is dominated by wave interactions. We discuss diurnal and semi-diurnal tides ill the present paper (Part 1) and planetary waves in the companion paper (Part 2). To provide an understanding of the seasonal variations of tides, in particular with regard to gravity wave processes, numerical experiments are performed that lead to the following conclusions: 1. The large semiannual variations in tile diurnal tide (DT), with peak amplitudes observed around equinox, are produced primarily by GW interactions that involve, in part, planetary waves. 2. The DT, like planetary waves, tends to be amplified by GW momentum deposition, which reduces also the vertical wavelength. 3.Variations in eddy viscosity associated with GW interactions tend to peak in late spring and early fall and call also influence the DT. 4. The semidiurnal semidiurnal tide (SDT), and its phase in particular, is strongly influenced by the mean zonal circulation. 5. The SDT, individually, is amplified by GW's. But the DT filters out GW's such that the wave interaction effectively reduces the amplitude of the SDT, effectively producing a strong nonlinear interaction between the DT and SDT. 6.) Planetary waves generated internally by baroclinic instability and GW interaction produce large amplitude modulations of the DT and SDT.

  4. Diurnal variation of the potassium layer in the upper atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Feng, W.; Höffner, J.; Marsh, D. R.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dawkins, E. C. M.; Viehl, T. P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Measurements of the diurnal cycle of potassium (K) atoms between 80 and 110 km have been made during October (for the years 2004–2011) using a Doppler lidar at Kühlungsborn, Germany (54.1°N, 11.7°E). A pronounced diurnal variation is observed in the K number density, which is explored by using a detailed description of the neutral and ionized chemistry of K in a three‐dimensional chemistry climate model. The model captures both the amplitude and phase of the diurnal and semidiurnal variability of the layer, although the peak diurnal amplitude around 90 km is overestimated. The model shows that the total potassium density (≈ K + K+ + KHCO3) exhibits little diurnal variation at each altitude, and the diurnal variations are largely driven by photochemical conversion between these reservoir species. In contrast, tidally driven vertical transport has a small effect at this midlatitude location, and diurnal fluctuations in temperature are of little significance because they are small and the chemistry of K is relatively temperature independent. PMID:27478284

  5. Heterogeneity in diurnal variation of tropospheric convection over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed, Muhsin; Sunilkumar, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    The tropical Tropopause and the features of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) are governed by troposheric convection from below and radiative heating from above (stratosphere). The brightness temperature in the thermal infrared channel (IRBT) is used as a proxy for identifying tropospheric convection and deep convective clouds. IRBT from Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) onboard KALPANA-1 during different seasons of 2008 to 2014 is being used to examine the heterogeneity of tropospheric convection. Over Indian peninsula, 36 regions have been identified with a spatial resolution of ±0.7° (81 pixels) with equal distance in both longitude and latitude. During monsoon season, a clear diurnal variation in convection is noticed over land when compared with over ocean. Over inland regions, the occurrence of deeper convection occurs during evening and early morning with different diurnal patterns. This can be due to the inhomogeneity of the terrain. It can be noted that the diurnal convection pattern over Arabian Sea is different than Bay of Bengal diurnal convection pattern. Regions near to the western-ghat do not show a clear diurnal variation and shows high occurrence of midlevel clouds (IRBT<265K). During winter (DJF), the occurrence of IRBT below 280K is very less at any time of the day over both land and ocean, which indicates the occurrence of deeper convection is rare. Hence, during winter, the diurnal variations of convection over both land and ocean has insignificant diurnal pattern.

  6. The Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K. P.; Fowler, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Position and intensity data from the International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) are combined with global, gridded precipitation estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) for the period 1998 to 2013 to study diurnal variability of precipitation in tropical cyclones. The comprehensive global coverage and large sample size afforded by the two data sets allow robust statistical analysis of storm-averaged diurnal variations and permit stratification of the data in various ways. There is a clearly detectable diurnal variation of precipitation in tropical cyclones with peak rainfall occurring near 0600 local time. For storms of all intensities the amplitude of the diurnal harmonic, which dominates the diurnal cycle, is approximately 7% of the mean rain rate. This corresponds to a peak-to-peak variation of about 15% over the course of the day. The diurnal cycle is similar in all ocean basins. There is evidence that the amplitude of the diurnal cycle increases with increasing storm intensity, but the results are not statistically significant. The results have implications for hurricane forecasting and for our understanding of the processes that regulate oceanic convection.

  7. [Diurnal activity rhythm of Clethrionomys rufocanus].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianli; Zhang, Chunmei; Yang, Chunwen

    2003-06-01

    The diurnal activity rhythm of Clethrionomys rufocanus was studied under three different food conditions in a laboratory. The activity occurred both in the daytime and at night, but mainly at night (19:00-4:00). The mice fed with Mouse food exhibited six small peaks in their daily activity, and those fed with grass or hay exhibited seven, but the peak of the out-nest night activity was 2-3 hours earlier. The activity amount of out-nest was 30,518.0 +/- 3,694.9 s for those fed with grass, the next was 21,811.7 +/- 2,288.0 s for those fed with hay, and the least was 15,038.0 +/- 666.0 s for those fed with mouse food. The activity amount of feeding was 10,867.3 +/- 1,612.1 s for those fed with grass, much more than those fed with mouse food and hay. The activity amount for drinking was 988.5 +/- 79.1 s (fed with hay), 568.9 +/- 60.9 s (fed with mouse food) and 139.3 +/- 47.2 s (fed with grass).

  8. Diurnal blood pressure variation and related behavioral factors.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuhei

    2011-03-01

    Blood pressure (BP) varies according to many internal and external factors, and behavioral factors have an important role in diurnal BP variation. BP rises sharply on waking in the morning and falls during sleep at night, although it varies throughout the day and night. These changes in BP are closely related to mental and physical activities, and the sympathetic nervous system mainly contributes to the diurnal variation in BP. Other behavioral factors, such as food consumption and obesity, dietary intake of sodium, drinking and smoking habits, consumption of coffee and tea, and bathing, also affect the diurnal variation in BP. Alterations in diurnal BP variation due to behavioral factors are frequently seen in patients with hypertension and can be classified as morning hypertension, daytime hypertension and nighttime hypertension. Appropriate lifestyle modifications may normalize or improve both the level and rhythm of BP in these patients.

  9. Diurnal Thermal Cycling Effects on Backscatter of Thin Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Gow, A. J.; Perovich, D. K.; Hsu, C. C.; Ding, K. H.; Kong, J. A.; Grenfell, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    To invesigate effects on polarimetric backscatter of sea ice grown under diurnal cycling conditions, we carried out an experiment inJanuary 1994 at the outdoor Geophysical Research Facility in the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory.

  10. Biophysical information in asymmetric and symmetric diurnal bidirectional canopy reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Caldwell, William F.; Pettigrew, Rita E.; Ustin, Susan L.; Martens, Scott N.; Rousseau, Robert A.; Berger, Kevin M.; Ganapol, B. D.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Clark, Jenny A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a theory for partitioning the information content in diurnal bidirectional reflectance measurements in order to detect differences potentially related to biophysical variables. The theory, which divides the canopy reflectance into asymmetric and symmetric functions of solar azimuth angle, attributes asymmetric variation to diurnal changes in the canopy biphysical properties. The symmetric function is attributed to the effects of sunlight interacting with a hypothetical average canopy which would display the average diurnal properties of the actual canopy. The authors analyzed radiometer data collected diurnally in the Thematic Mapper wavelength bands from two walnut canopies that received differing irrigation treatments. The reflectance of the canopies varied with sun and view angles and across seven bands in the visible, near-infrared, and middle infrared wavelength regions. Although one of the canopies was permanently water stressed and the other was stressed in mid-afternoon each day, no water stress signature was unambiguously evident in the reflectance data.

  11. Diurnal Variation of Precipitation During MC3E Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Matsui, Toshi; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur; Rienecker, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The diurnal variation of precipitation processes in the United States (US) is well recognized but incompletely understood (Cabone et al. 2002). The diurnal cycle of precipitation has been studied using surface rainfall data, radar reflectivity data, and satellite-derived cloudiness and precipitation (Wallace 1975; Dai et al. 1999; Carbone et al. 2002; Carbone and Tuttle, 2008; Parker and Ahijevych, 2007; Matsui et al. 2010 and others). These observations indicate that the summer-time precipitation most of the North America and typically feature late-afternoon precipitation maxima. These diurnal variation of precipitation can also be generally categorized into three different types: 1) afternoon rainfall maxima due to mesoscale and local circulations over the south and east of the Mississippi and Ohio valleys, 2) nocturnal rainfall maxima from eastward-propagating mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) over the Lee side of Rocky Mountain regions and 3) afternoon rainfall maxima in the Appalachian Mountains, and then propagate eastward toward the coast. The main objective of this paper is to use a regional cloud-scale model with very high-resolution (i.e., WRF) to examine the WRF ability to simulate diurnal variation of precipitation. Specifically, the study will (1) identify the physical processes responsible to diurnal variation of precipitation, (2) examine the sensitivity of resolution (2, 6, 18, and 30 km) to model simulated diurnal variation of precipitation and (3) identify the relationships between microphysics and cumulus parameterization schemes.

  12. Projected Increase in Diurnal and Inter-Diurnal Variations of European Summer Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattiaux, J.; Douville, H.; Schoetter, R.; Parey, S.; Yiou, P.

    2014-12-01

    The current European warming is expected to be associated with an increased temperature variability in summer, particularly at the daily time-scale. Such an increase would affect hot extremes and accentuate the societal and environmental impacts caused by the mean warming. Here we investigate future changes in the short-term variability of European summer temperatures using two indices that have been seldom documented so far: the variations within one day (diurnal temperature range, DTR) and the variations from one day to the next (inter-diurnal temperature variability, ITV). These rapid variations represent key issues for impact communities, in particular energy providers vulnerable to sudden surges in electricity demand. Besides, the ITV provides a measure of daily variability that is not disturbed by longer-term variations in the mean (e.g., seasonal cycle and/or a multi-year trend), whereas traditional measures such as standard deviation or variance are. We use 21st-century projections performed by 34 models of the CMIP5 ensemble under the three RCP 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. Models are evaluated over the present-day period against the E-OBS dataset. In Europe, both indices of summer temperature variability are projected to increase, with a rather good model agreement on the sign, while uncertainties remain on the amplitude. In particular, we show that extremely high day-to-day and/or diurnal temperature variations are expected to occur more frequently. We highlight the singularity of the European area, since ITV and DTR changes do not systematically coincide over other regions (e.g., the U.S). Then we investigate the physical processes underlying these ITV and DTR changes in the CMIP5 projections. The respective contributions of the summer drying of European soils, the reduction in cloud cover and the changes in large-scale dynamics are estimated. Finally, the possibility of reducing model uncertainties through constraints emerging from both present

  13. Annual Climatology of the Diurnal Cycle on the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    We show the annual climatology of the diurnal cycle, stratified by opaque cloud, using the full hourly resolution of the Canadian Prairie data. The opaque cloud field itself has distinct cold and warm season diurnal climatologies; with a near-sunrise peak of cloud in the cold season and an early afternoon peak in the warm season. There are two primary climate states on the Canadian Prairies, separated by the freezing point of water, because a reflective surface snow cover acts as a climate switch. Both cold and warm season climatologies can be seen in the transition months of November, March and April with a large difference in mean temperature. In the cold season with snow, the diurnal ranges of temperature and relative humidity increase quasi-linearly with decreasing cloud, and increase from December to March with increased solar forcing. The warm season months, April to September, show a homogeneous coupling to the cloud cover, and a diurnal cycle of temperature and humidity that depends only on net longwave. Our improved representation of the diurnal cycle shows that the warm season coupling between diurnal temperature range and net longwave is weakly quadratic through the origin, rather than the linear coupling shown in earlier papers. We calculate the conceptually important 24-h imbalances of temperature and relative humidity (and other thermodynamic variables) as a function of opaque cloud cover. In the warm season under nearly clear skies, there is a warming of +2oC and a drying of -6% over the 24-h cycle, which is about 12% of their diurnal ranges. We summarize results on conserved variable diagrams and explore the impact of surface windspeed on the diurnal cycle in the cold and warm seasons. In all months, the fall in minimum temperature is reduced with increasing windspeed, which reduces the diurnal temperature range. In July and August, there is an increase of afternoon maximum temperature and humidity at low windspeeds, and a corresponding rise in

  14. Progress in Research on Diurnal and Semidiurnal Earth Rotation Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xueqing

    2015-08-01

    We mainly focus on the progress of research on high frequency changes in the earth rotation. Firstly, we review the development course and main motivating factors of the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation change. In recent decades, earth orientation has been monitored with increasing accuracy by advanced space-geodetic techniques, including lunar and satellite laser ranging, very long baseline interferometry and the global positioning system. We are able to obtain the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP, polar motion and rotation rate changes) by even 1 to 2 hours observation data, form which obvious diurnal and semidiurnal signals can be detected, and compare them with the predicted results by the ocean model. Both the amplitude and phase are in good agreement in the main diurnal and semidiurnal wave frequency, especially for the UT1, whose compliance is 90%, and 60% for polar motion, there are 30% motivating factor of the diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion have not been identified. Then we comprehensively review the different types of global ocean tidal correction models since the last eighties century, as well as the application research on diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion and UT1, the current ocean tidal correction models have 10% to 20% uncertainty, and need for further refinement.

  15. Progress in Research on Diurnal and Semidiurnal Earth Rotation Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Dong, D.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We mainly focus on the progress of research on high frequency changes in the earth rotation. Firstly, we review the development course and main motivating factors of the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation change. In recent decades, earth orientation has been monitored with increasing accuracy by advanced space-geodetic techniques, including lunar and satellite laser ranging, very long baseline interferometry and the global positioning system. We are able to obtain the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP, polar motion and rotation rate changes) by even 1 to 2 hours observation data, form which obvious diurnal and semidiurnal signals can be detected, and compare them with the predicted results by the ocean model. Both the amplitude and phase are in good agreement in the main diurnal and semidiurnal wave frequency, especially for the UT1, whose compliance is 90%, and 60% for polar motion, there are 30% motivating factor of the diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion have not been identified. Then we comprehensively review the different types of global ocean tidal correction models since the last eighties century, as well as the application research on diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion and UT1, the current ocean tidal correction models have 10% to 20% uncertainty, and need for further refinement.

  16. Diurnal heating of ocean: Experiments and model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, A.V.; Kudryavtsev, Y.N.; Grodsky, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Presented are the results of investigation of the ocean upper layer diurnal heating, when absorption of isolation in the near-surface layer leads to formation of the diurnal thermocline. Turbulence suppression below the heated layer leads to the fact that the impulse incoming from the atmosphere does not propagate below the diurnal thermocline in which main current velocity shears are concentrated. Motion of this layer is determined by wind stress and the Coriolis force. At evening time due to growth of the heating layer depth it starts to decelerate fast. Groups of internal waves are recorded in the diurnal thermocline. The thermocline shear instability may be the source of their generation. Experimental data are analyzed by the model based on the concept of the diurnal thermocline shear instability. The combined analysis permitted us to reveal peculiarities of the heating layer dynamics in wide range of wind velocities and the Coriolis parameter, and also to obtain semi-empirical dependencies appropriate for its realization.

  17. Patterns of Diurnal Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Fraction Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Yuter, S. E.

    2015-04-01

    The spatial patterns of subtropical marine stratocumulus cloud fraction variability on diurnal time scales are examined using high temporal resolution cloud masks based on 30-min 4 km x 4 km geosynchronous IR data for the period 2003-2010. This data set permits comparison of low cloud fraction variability characteristics among the three marine stratocumulus regions in the southeast Pacific, southeast Atlantic and northeast Pacific. In all three regions, the largest diurnal cycles and earliest time of cloud break up occur on the edges of the cloud field where cloud fractions are in general lower. During the peak season of cloudiness in the southeast Pacific and southeast Atlantic the amplitude of the diurnal cycle on the edges of the cloud deck was greater than 40%, more than double the value found in the center of each cloud deck. The rate at which the cloud breaks up during the day is closely tied to starting cloud fraction at dawn and the shortwave radiative flux. The maximum rate of cloud breakup occurs near 1200 LT. Cloud fraction begins to increase at 1600 LT (before the sun sets) and reaches its maximum value just before dawn. The diurnal cycle characteristics of the southeast Pacific and southeast Atlantic marine stratocumulus cloud decks are more similar to each other than to those in the northeast Pacific. The northeast Pacific cloud deck has weaker diurnal variation, slower rates of cloud breakup during the day for a given cloud fraction at dawn, and higher probabilities for cloud break up overnight.

  18. Diurnal variation of outgoing longwave radiation in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D. L.; Recker, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The diurnal harmonic in longwave emission in the tropical belt (30 deg N-30 deg S) is estimated from nine years of NOAA polar-orbiting satellite data. The results are compared successfully with Nimbus-7 ERB scanner data and with GOES-West geosynchronous satellite data. An interesting and consistent diurnal variation in longwave emission is found over the regions of intense oceanic convection, such as the ITCZ and SPCZ regions, with a peak-to-peak variation of 6-8 W/sq m and a maximum in the morning (0600-1200 LST). Histogram analysis indicates that this variation is associated with a diurnal variation in convective cloud (about 400 mb). Over regions of very intense convection, a diurnal variation of very high clouds (above 100 mb), which is out of phase with the variations at lower levels in the atmosphere, reduces the magnitude of the diurnal harmonic in longwave emission. It is interesting that histograms based on data averaged over 8-km and 250-km boxes give the same qualitative information about cloud and emission variability.

  19. Intimate partner violence and diurnal cortisol patterns in couples

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun K.; Tiberio, Stacey S.; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Shortt, Joann Wu; Squires, Erica C.; Snodgrass, J. Josh

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study examined whether physical intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization was associated with diurnal patterns of salivary cortisol in a community sample of 122 couples in their 30s from predominantly lower socioeconomic status backgrounds. Findings indicate that women with higher levels of victimization exhibited flatter patterns of diurnal cortisol characterized by both higher midday levels and more attenuated decreases in cortisol levels across the day, compared to women with lower levels of victimization. However, men's victimization was not associated with their diurnal cortisol levels. This study advances our understanding of the association between physical IPV victimization and dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning in women, which is likely to have further implications for their subsequent mental and physical health. PMID:25286224

  20. Diurnal variation of overdense meteor echo duration and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simek, Milos

    1992-01-01

    The diurnal variation of the median duration of overdense sporadic radar meteor echoes is examined. The meteors recorded in August, December, and January by the Ondrejov meteor radar during the period 1958-1990 were used for the analysis. A maximum median echo duration 1-3 hours after the time of local sunrise in the meteor region confirms the already known sunrise effect. Minimum echo duration occurring at the time of sunset seems to be the most important point of diurnal variation of the echo duration, when ozone is no longer dissociated by solar UV radiation. The effect of diurnal changes of the echo duration should be considered when the mass distribution of meteor showers is analyzed.

  1. Epigenetic mechanisms in diurnal cycles of metabolism and neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Powell, Weston T; LaSalle, Janine M

    2015-10-15

    The circadian cycle is a genetically encoded clock that drives cellular rhythms of transcription, translation and metabolism. The circadian clock interacts with the diurnal environment that also drives transcription and metabolism during light/dark, sleep/wake, hot/cold and feast/fast daily and seasonal cycles. Epigenetic regulation provides a mechanism for cells to integrate genetic programs with environmental signals in order produce an adaptive and consistent output. Recent studies have revealed that DNA methylation is one epigenetic mechanism that entrains the circadian clock to a diurnal environment. We also review recent circadian findings in the epigenetic neurodevelopmental disorders Prader-Willi, Angelman and Rett syndromes and hypothesize a link between optimal brain development and intact synchrony between circadian and diurnal rhythms. PMID:26105183

  2. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal variations in atmospheric integrated water vapor (IWV) are studied employing IWV estimates, with a 30 minutes sampling rate, derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations during the period 2007-2013. The analysis was performed in 73 GNSS tracking sites (GPS + GLONASS) which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, with different diurnal variations of the integrated total humidity content. There are many processes that could induce diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor (Dai et al, 1999 a,b), the most relevant causes are: surface evapotranspiration, atmospheric large-scale vertical motion, atmospheric low-level moisture convergence and precipitation and vertical mixing (which affects the vertical distribution of water vapor but does not affect the IWV). The numerical tools, Singular Value Decomposition and classical Multidimensional Scaling methods, are used to study these variations, considering the measurements made at each stations, as sample in the analysis. The aim of this investigation is to identify the IWV variability with respect to the local time associated to the different climate regions. In order to improve our analysis, all available weather information, such as radiosondes measurements (which are few), measurements of pressure and temperature and Numerical Weather Models reanalysis data, are used. Reference: Dai, A., K. E. Trenberth, and T. R. Karl, 1999 a: Effects of clouds, soil moisture, precipitation and water vapor on diurnal temperature range. J. Climate, 12, 2451-2473. Dai, A., F. Giorgi, and K. E. Trenberth, 1999 b: Observed and model simulated precipitation diurnal cycle over the contiguous United States.J. Geophys. Res., 104, 6377-6402. KEYWORDS: water vapor, diurnal cycle, GNSS

  3. Assimilating Satellite SST Observations into a Diurnal Cycle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, S.; Haines, K.; Nichols, N. K.

    2006-12-01

    The wealth of satellite sea surface temperature (SST) data now available opens the possibility of large improvements in SST estimation. However the use of such data is not straight forward; a major difficulty in assimilating satellite observations is that they represent a near surface temperature, whereas in ocean models the top level represents the temperature at a greater depth. During the day, under favourable conditions of clear skies and calm winds, the near surface temperature is often seen to have a diurnal cycle that is picked up in satellite observations. Current ocean models do not have the vertical or temporal resolution to adequately represent this daytime warming. The usual approach is to discard daytime observations as they are considered diurnally `corrupted'. A new assimilation technique is developed here that assimilates observations into a diurnal cycle model. The diurnal cycle of SSTs are modelled using a 1-D mixed layer model with fine near surface resolution and 6 hourly forcing from NWP analyses. The accuracy of the SST estimates are hampered by uncertainties in the forcing data. The extent of diurnal SST warming at a particular location and time is predominately governed by a non-linear response to cloud cover and sea surface wind speeds which greatly affect the air-sea fluxes. The method proposed here combines infrared and microwave SST satellite observations in order to derive corrections to the cloud cover and wind speed values over the day. By adjusting the forcing, SST estimation and air-sea fluxes should be improved and are at least more consistent with each other. This new technique for assimilating SST data can be considered a tool for producing more accurate diurnal warming estimates.

  4. Diurnal changes in ocean color in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, Robert; Vandermeulen, Ryan; Ladner, Sherwin; Ondrusek, Michael; Kovach, Charles; Yang, Haoping; Salisbury, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Coastal processes can change on hourly time scales in response to tides, winds and biological activity, which can influence the color of surface waters. These temporal and spatial ocean color changes require satellite validation for applications using bio-optical products to delineate diurnal processes. The diurnal color change and capability for satellite ocean color response were determined with in situ and satellite observations. Hourly variations in satellite ocean color are dependent on several properties which include: a) sensor characterization b) advection of water masses and c) diurnal response of biological and optical water properties. The in situ diurnal changes in ocean color in a dynamic turbid coastal region in the northern Gulf of Mexico were characterized using above water spectral radiometry from an AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET -WavCIS CSI-06) site that provides up to 8-10 observations per day (in 15-30 minute increments). These in situ diurnal changes were used to validate and quantify natural bio-optical fluctuations in satellite ocean color measurements. Satellite capability to detect changes in ocean color was characterized by using overlapping afternoon orbits of the VIIRS-NPP ocean color sensor within 100 minutes. Results show the capability of multiple satellite observations to monitor hourly color changes in dynamic coastal regions that are impacted by tides, re-suspension, and river plume dispersion. Hourly changes in satellite ocean color were validated with in situ observation on multiple occurrences during different times of the afternoon. Also, the spatial variability of VIIRS diurnal changes shows the occurrence and displacement of phytoplankton blooms and decay during the afternoon period. Results suggest that determining the temporal and spatial changes in a color / phytoplankton bloom from the morning to afternoon time period will require additional satellite coverage periods in the coastal zone.

  5. Nonmigrating diurnal tides in the equatorial middle atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) are used to analyze the diurnal tides in the middle atmosphere. A novel aspect of this study is the emphasis on the relative importance of the nonmigrating components. These modes display a high degree of temporal variability during the LIMS observing period, and contribute substantially to the diurnal signal in wind and temperature. Their observed vertical phase variations are variable; however there is evidence for upward energy propagation. It has long been hypothesized that nonmigrating tides are driven by the diurnally-varying zonally asymmetric tropospheric heating constituents. This premise is examined by employing a linear tidal model to simulate the response of the atmosphere to realistic tidal drives. These quantities are calculated from the NCAR Community Climate Model. The large-scale CCM2 diurnal surface pressure, OLR and hydrology are well simulated under July and January conditions. The CCM2 diurnal fields of short-wave radiative, convective and diffusive PBL heating are used as input to a linear tidal model with Newtonian cooling. This model successfully reproduces many observed features of the migrating and nonmigrating diurnal surface pressure tides at low latitudes. In the middle atmosphere, tropospheric solar heating is the dominant source of the migrating tide. The zonal means and eastward migrating wavenumber one components are also associated with radiative heating. The eastward migrating wavenumber three pattern is strongly linked to the dry and moist convective heating as well. The observed eastward migrating tides are harder to simulate, due in part to the failure of the linear model to incorporate the dissipative effects to which they are prone.

  6. Direct evidence of transport processes in the thermospheric diurnal tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Spencer, N. W.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Porter, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of neutral composition and temperature obtained between December 6, 1975, and September 17, 1976, with instruments aboard the near-equatorial AE-E satellite are analyzed to determine the diurnal variations at altitudes from 145 to 295 km. The general trends, including the shift in oxygen phase from afternoon at high altitudes to morning at low altitudes, are reproduced by circulation theories. The oxygen and helium variations show small departures from diffusive equilibrium below 200 km that are consistent with wind-induced diffusion and provide the first direct evidence of transport processes in the diurnal tide of the thermosphere.

  7. Diurnal variations of HOx and NOx in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Turco, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The diurnal variations of odd hydrogen (OH, HO2, H2O2) and odd nitrogen compounds (NO, NO2, HNO3) are investigated by using a one-dimensional time-dependent model containing both chemistry and eddy transport. These variations are discussed in terms of relevant processes.-

  8. Successful Use of the Nocturnal Urine Alarm for Diurnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; Vollmer, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    A urine alarm, typically used to treat nocturnal enuresis, was effectively used to treat diurnal enuresis in a 15-year-old female with depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and conduct disorder. The study indicated that the alarm eliminated wetting in both treatment phases and that continence was maintained at three-month and…

  9. 40 CFR 86.1233-96 - Diurnal emission test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a fixed-volume enclosure that allows airflow into and out of the enclosure, the effect of makeup air... test is conducted in a fixed-volume enclosure that allows airflow into and out of the enclosure, the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diurnal emission test....

  10. [Diurnal rhythm of serum leptin in patients with solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Gaja, A

    2004-04-01

    Leptin is a protein produced by fat tissue. It has many regulatory effects in the area of energetic metabolism, immunity and haematopoiesis. Its role in tumour diseases especially in states with cachexia is studied. Its physiological diurnal rhythm is very well known. There is lack of information about diurnal rhythm of leptin in tumour diseases except some endocrine tumours. In this study 10 patients with breast and colorectal cancer without marks of kachexia and mostly without pre-existing chemotherapy were examined. The diurnal rhythm of leptin was preserved in cancer patients (morning minimum 10.5 +/- 4.2 ng/ml and nocturnal maximum 17.9 +/- 10.1 ng/ml). The difference between males and females (p < 0.01) and correlation of concentrations of leptin with BMI (r = 0.61, p < 0.001) were preserved too. Basal concentrations of leptin were not different from values of healthy blood donors (10.2 +/- 4.3 ng/ml). Maybe preservation of diurnal rhythm of leptin can be important in planning of cytostatic and immunomodulatory therapy in future. PMID:15214301

  11. Diurnal water relations of walnut trees - Implications for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, James A.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1991-01-01

    Leaflet water content (WC), relative water content (RWC), and water potential, Phi(lf) were measured as indicators of diurnal change in tree water status in an experimental walnut orchard receiving two irrigation treatments: 100 and 33 percent of potential evapotranspiration (PET). Diurnal change was greatest in Phi(lf) throughout the experimental period, with minima occurring each day in early to mid-afternoon and maxima between midnight and sunrise. Leaflet WC and RWC were lower in the afternoon than at night, but had greater variability so that the diurnal pattern was not as clear. Comparison between the pattern of Phi(lf) and dielectric constants (DCs) measured from probes inserted 2 cm into a tree hole showed that both declined nearly in parallel in the morning. Phi(lf) recovered more rapidly than DC in the afternoon. This temporal discrepancy could be caused by cavitation of xylem elements in the vicinity of the DC probe. Microwave backscatter for L- and X-bands also measured diurnal variation that had local minima in the afternoon, but the pattern among wavelength and polarization signatures was complex.

  12. A model of the diurnal variation in lake surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Jonathan L.

    Satellite measurements of water surface temperature can benefit several environmental applications such as predictions of lake evaporation, meteorological forecasts, and predictions of lake overturning events, among others. However, limitations on the temporal resolution of satellite measurements restrict these improvements. A model of the diurnal variation in lake surface temperature could potentially increase the effective temporal resolution of satellite measurements of surface temperature, thereby enhancing the utility of these measurements in the above applications. Herein, a one-dimensional transient thermal model of a lake is used in combination with surface temperature measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites, along with ambient atmospheric conditions from local weather stations, and bulk temperature measurements to calculate the diurnal surface temperature variation for the five major lakes in the Savannah River Basin in South Carolina: Lakes Jocassee, Keowee, Hartwell, Russell, and Thurmond. The calculated solutions are used to obtain a functional form for the diurnal surface temperature variation of these lakes. Differences in diurnal variation in surface temperature between each of these lakes are identified and potential explanations for these differences are presented.

  13. Diurnal Patterns of Blowing Dust on the Llano Estacado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM), hourly dust data was collected in Lubbock, Texas, from January 1, 2003, to January 1, 2008. Diurnal patterns of dust concentration were computed by averaging hourly values associated with a given “time of day” for all days within the 5-yr sa...

  14. Correction of fluvial fluxes of chemical species for diurnal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Howden, N. J. K.; Moody, C. S.; Burt, T. P.

    2013-02-01

    SummaryMany river solute concentrations exhibit a diurnal cycle, caused by slower in-stream biogeochemical processes at night compared to daylight hours. So, if sample observations of such solutes are not taken across the diurnal cycle, derived estimates of solute concentrations and fluxes will be subject to bias. We developed a simple two-rate model to correct daily sampling results using estimates of in-stream residence time and day length and applied the method to the example of a monitoring point on the River Tees in northern England for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and flux. Estimates of day and night-time degradation rates combined with assessment of the daily in-stream residence time suggest that derived fluxes would be overestimated by up to 19% when diurnal variation was considered due to the highest concentrations of DOC and highest flows being in winter when day lengths are shortest. The maximum correction for diurnal differences in degradation rates was 17%. There was a significant interaction between model degradation rates and in-stream residence times but the effect of latitude on day length was insignificant. We propose a general method to estimate the correction factor and in-stream residence time based on gauging station data, which is relevant to other rivers where sufficient data are available to support the method.

  15. 40 CFR 1060.105 - What diurnal requirements apply for equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... diurnal emissions specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3) Recreational vehicles are not subject to diurnal... requirements specified in CP-902 and TP-902, including the requirements related to fuel caps in Title 13...

  16. 40 CFR 1060.105 - What diurnal requirements apply for equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... diurnal emissions specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3) Recreational vehicles are not subject to diurnal... performance standards specified in Title 13 CCR § 2754(a) based on the applicable requirements specified in...

  17. 40 CFR 1060.105 - What diurnal requirements apply for equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... diurnal emissions specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3) Recreational vehicles are not subject to diurnal... performance standards specified in Title 13 CCR § 2754(a) based on the applicable requirements specified in...

  18. 40 CFR 1060.105 - What diurnal requirements apply for equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... diurnal emissions specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3) Recreational vehicles are not subject to diurnal... performance standards specified in Title 13 CCR § 2754(a) based on the applicable requirements specified in...

  19. 40 CFR 1060.105 - What diurnal requirements apply for equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... diurnal emissions specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3) Recreational vehicles are not subject to diurnal... performance standards specified in Title 13 CCR § 2754(a) based on the applicable requirements specified in...

  20. Diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Isaac; Arkin, Philip; Ferraro, Ralph; Eriksson, Patrick; Fetzer, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of water vapor especially in the tropical region, the diurnal variations of water vapor have not been completely investigated in the past due to the lack of adequate observations. Measurements from Sondeur Atmosphérique du Profil d'Humidité Intertropicale par Radiométrie (SAPHIR) onboard the low inclination Megha-Tropiques satellite with frequent daily revisits provide a valuable dataset for investigating the diurnal and spatial variation of tropospheric relative humidity in the tropical region. In this study, we first transformed SAPHIR observations into layer-averaged relative humidity, then partitioned the data based on local observation time into 24 bins with a grid resolution of one degree. Afterwards, we fitted Fourier series to the binned data. Finally, the mean, amplitude, and diurnal peak time of relative humidity in tropical regions were calculated for each grid point using either the measurements or Fourier series. The results were separately investigated for different SAPHIR channels as well as for relative humidity with respect to both liquid and ice phases. The results showed that the wet and dry regions are, respectively, associated with convective and subsidence regions which is consistent with the previous studies. The mean tropospheric humidity values reported in this study are generally 10 to 15 % higher than those reported using infrared observations which is because of strict cloud screening for infrared measurements. The results showed a large inhomogeneity in diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical region. The diurnal amplitude was larger over land than over ocean and the oceanic amplitude was larger over convective regions than over subsidence regions. The results showed that the diurnal amplitude is less than 10 % in middle and upper troposphere, but it is up to 30 % in lower troposphere over land. Although the peak of RH generally occurs over night or in early morning, there are several

  1. Low cost electronic ultracapacitor interface technique to provide load leveling of a battery for pulsed load or motor traction drive applications

    DOEpatents

    King, Robert Dean; DeDoncker, Rik Wivina Anna Adelson

    1998-01-01

    A battery load leveling arrangement for an electrically powered system in which battery loading is subject to intermittent high current loading utilizes a passive energy storage device and a diode connected in series with the storage device to conduct current from the storage device to the load when current demand forces a drop in battery voltage. A current limiting circuit is connected in parallel with the diode for recharging the passive energy storage device. The current limiting circuit functions to limit the average magnitude of recharge current supplied to the storage device. Various forms of current limiting circuits are disclosed, including a PTC resistor coupled in parallel with a fixed resistor. The current limit circuit may also include an SCR for switching regenerative braking current to the device when the system is connected to power an electric motor.

  2. DIURNAL CYCLE OF PRECIPITABLE WATER VAPOR OVER SPAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Bennouna, Yasmine; de Frutos, A. M.

    2011-05-20

    Despite the importance of the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor (PWV), its knowledge is very limited due to the lack of data with sufficient temporal resolution. Currently, from GPS receivers, PWV can be obtained with high temporal resolution in all weather conditions for all hours of the day. In this study we have calculated the diurnal cycle of PWV for ten GPS stations over Spain. The minimum value is reached approximately at the same time at all the stations, ~0400-0500 UTC, whereas the maximum is reached in the second half of the day, but with a larger dispersion of its occurrence between stations. The amplitude of the cycle ranges between 0.72 mm and 1.78 mm. The highest values are recorded at the stations on the Mediterranean coast, with a doubling of the values of the stations on the Atlantic coast or inland. The amplitude of the PWV cycle, relative to the annual mean value, ranges between 8.8 % on the Mediterranean coast and 3.6 % on the Atlantic coast. Two distinctly different seasonal diurnal cycles have been identified, one in winter and other in summer, with spring and autumn being only transition states. The winter cycle is quite similar at all locations, whereas in summer, local effects are felt strongly, making the diurnal cycle quite different between stations. The amplitude of the summer cycle is 1.69 mm, it is almost double the winter one (0.93 mm). Analogous to the annual cycles, the seasonal cycles of the different stations are more similar during the night and early morning hours than during the afternoon. The observed features of the PWV diurnal cycle are explained in a qualitative way on the basis of the air temperature, the transport of moisture by local winds, and the turbulent vertical mixing.

  3. Diurnal regulation of hypothalamic kisspeptin is disrupted during mouse pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yap, Cassandra C; Wharfe, Michaela D; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2016-06-01

    Kisspeptin, the neuropeptide product of the Kiss1 gene, is critical in driving the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Kisspeptin neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and arcuate nucleus (Arc) of the hypothalamus mediate differential effects, with the Arc regulating negative feedback of sex steroids and the AVPV regulating positive feedback, vital for the preovulatory surge and gated under circadian control. We aimed to characterize hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression in nonpregnant and pregnant mice, and investigate potential circadian regulation. Anterior and posterior hypothalami were collected from C57BL/6J mice at diestrus, proestrus, and days 6, 10, 14, and 18 of pregnancy, at six time points across 24h, for real-time PCR analysis of gene expression. Analysis confirmed that Kiss1 mRNA expression in the AVPV increased at ZT13 during proestrus, with a luteinizing hormone surge observed thereafter. No diurnal regulation was seen at diestrus or at any stage of pregnancy. Anterior hypothalamic Avp mRNA expression exhibited no diurnal variation, but Avpr1a peaked at 12:00h during proestrus, possibly reflecting the circadian input from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to AVPV Kiss1 neurons. Rfrp (Npvf) expression in the posterior hypothalamus did not demonstrate diurnal variation at any stage. Clock genes Bmal1 and Rev-erbα were strongly diurnal, but there was little change between diestrus/proestrus and pregnancy. Our data indicate the absence of the circadian input to Kiss1 in pregnancy, despite high gestational estradiol levels and normal clock gene expression, and may suggest a disruption of a kisspeptin-specific diurnal rhythm that operates in the nonpregnant state.

  4. Diurnal cycle of convection during the CAIPEEX 2011 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmi, EA; Malap, Neelam; Kulkarni, Gayatri; Murugavel, P.; Nair, Sathy; Burger, Roelof; Prabha, Thara V.

    2016-10-01

    The diurnal cycle of convective storm events is investigated in the study with the help of C-band radar reflectivity data during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX 2011) in combination with other ground-based observations. A threshold reflectivity of 25 dBZ is used to identify the initiation of storms. Observations from collocated sensors such as a microwave radiometer profiler, water vapor measurement from eddy covariance system, and wind lidar measurements are used to investigate the characteristic features and diurnal cycle of convectively initiated storms from 21st September to 5th November 2011. The maximum reflectivity follows a normal distribution with a mean value of 40 dBZ. The cloud depth over the domain varied between 5 and 15 km corresponding to a range of reflectivity of 30-50 dBZ values. In the diurnal cycle, double maximum in the precipitation flux is noted—one during the afternoon hours associated with the diurnal heating and the other in the nocturnal periods. The nocturnal precipitation maximum is attributed to initiation of several single-cell storms (of congestus type) with a duration that is larger than the storms initiated during the daytime. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) showed a diurnal variation and was directly linked with the surface level water vapor content. The high CAPE favored single storms with a reflectivity >40 dBZ and higher echo top heights. In the evening or late night hours, a nocturnal low-level jet present over the location together with the reduced stability above the cloud base favored enhancement of low-level moisture, CAPE, and further initiation of new convection. The study illustrated how collocated observations could be used to study storm initiation and associated thermodynamic features.

  5. Diurnality of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Moyer, R.; Poe, A.; Pan, D.; Abraha, M.; Chen, J.; Zondlo, M. A.; Robertson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are important contributors to the greenhouse gas balance of the atmosphere. Agricultural soils contribute ~65% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Understanding temporal and spatial variability of N2O emissions from agricultural soils is vital for closure of the global N2O budget and the development of mitigation opportunities. Recent studies have observed higher N2O fluxes during the day and lower at night. Understanding the mechanisms of such diurnality may have important consequences for our understanding of the N cycle. We tested the hypothesis that diurnal cycles are driven by root carbon exudes that stimulate denitrification and therefore N2O production. Alternatively, we considered that the cycle could result from higher afternoon temperatures that accelerate soil microbial activity. We removed all plants from a corn field plot and left another plot untouched. We measured soil N2O emissions in each plot using a standard static chamber technique throughout the corn growing season. And also compared static chamber results to ecosystem level N2O emissions as measured by eddy covariance tower equipped with an open-path N2O sensor. We also measured soil and air temperatures and soil water and inorganic N contents. Soil N2O emissions followed soil inorganic N concentrations and in control plot chambers ranged from 10 μg N m-2 hr-1 before fertilization to 13×103 after fertilization. We found strong diurnal cycles measured by both techniques with emissions low during night and morning hours and high during the afternoon. Corn removal had no effect on diurnality, but had a strong effect on the magnitude of soil N2O emissions. Soil temperature exhibited a weak correlation with soil N2O emissions and could not explain diurnal patterns. Further studies are underway to explore additional mechanisms that might contribute to this potentially important phenomena.

  6. Interannual and Intraseasonal Variability of the Diurnal Tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggin, D. M.; Ortland, D. A.; Lieberman, R. S.; Oberheide, J.; Murayama, Y.; Hocking, W. K.; Vincent, R. A.; Reid, I. M.; Kumar, G. K.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    Temporal variations in the amplitude of the diurnal tide (DT) have been observed by radars with a seasonal dependence that is typically semiannual in the tropics. During some years the wind variation departs from the normal seasonal behavior with anomalously large amplitudes compared to most other years. This anomaly often takes the form of a greatly enhanced boreal spring equinoctal maximum. The boreal spring of 2008 is a example of this behavior. Diurnal amplitudes in the meridional winds are shown in the figure below for the first 6 months of 2008. Note that the diurnal tide undergoes a sharp increase in amplitude up to 80 ms-1 during this event. The characteristics of this event are diagnosed in a variety of global data sets. These include our own physics-based assimilation of SABER temperatures, and gridded analyses from the national weather services (NCAR/NCEP and ECMWF). Tidal amplitude variations are sometimes attributed to nonlinear interaction. However, this type of interaction would be expected to produce non-migrating tides, e.g., westward-2 or standing. SABER data show that the amplitude anomaly is mainly in the migrating DT. The global data sets allow us to explore properties of the anomaly, such as its origin, evolution in time, and associated momentum flux. In addition to this case study, we also investigate the general characteristics of DT interannual variability during the years of the SABER mission (2002-present). Diurnal tide momentum deposition plays a significant role in controlling the zonal mean wind in the mesosphere, We demonstrate its importance in driving the mesospheric semiannual oscillation (MSAO). Diurnal tide wind amplitudes in the meridional component observed at two radar sites, Rarotonga, Cook Islands (22.1°S, 159.8°W), and at Guanacaste, Costa Rica (10.3°N, 85.6°W).

  7. Observations of SST diurnal variability in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qianguang; Pan, Delu; Hao, Zengzhou; Chen, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a 3-hourly time resolution gap free sea surface temperature (SST) analysis is generated to resolve the diurnal cycle in the South China Sea (SCS, 0°-25°N, 100°-125°E).It takes advantage of hourly geostationary satellite MTSAT observations and combines three infrared and two microwave polar satellite observations at different local times. First, all the data are classified into eight SST datasets at 3 hour intervals and then remapped to 0.05°resolution grids. A series of critical quality control is done to remove the outliers.Then bias adjustment is applied to the polar satellite observations with reference to the MTSAT data. Finally, the six satellites SST data are blended by using the optimal interpolated algorithm. The 3-hourly blended SST is compared against buoy measurements. It shows a good agreement that the biases do not exceed 0.2 °C and root mean square errors range from 0.5 to 0.65 °C. A typical diurnal cycle similar to sine wave is observed. The minimum SST occurs at around 0600h and warming peak occurring between 1300h and 1500h local solar time and then decrease in the late afternoon, tapering off at night on March 13, 2008 for example. The frequency of diurnal warming events derived from four years of the blended SST provides solid statistics to investigate the seasonal and spatial distributions of the diurnal warming in the SCS. The sea surface diurnal warming tends to appear more easily in spring, especially in the coastal regions than other seasons and the central regions.

  8. Sampling of the Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation using TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Bell, Thomas L.; Xu, Li-Ming; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examine the temporal sampling of tropical regions using observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR). We conclude that PR estimates at any one hour, even using three years of data, are inadequate to describe the diurnal cycle of precipitation over regions smaller than 12 degrees, due to high spatial variability in sampling. We show that the optimum period of accumulation is four hours. Diurnal signatures display half as much sampling error when averaged over four hours of local time. A similar pattern of sampling variability is found in the TMI data, despite the TMI's wider swath and increased sampling. These results are verified using an orbital model. The sensitivity of the sampling to satellite altitude is presented, as well as sampling patterns at the new TRMM altitude of 402.5 km.

  9. Diurnal changes in the rabbit's visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, A C; Krul, W H; Brandenburg, J

    1978-01-01

    Rabbits that have been exposed to the natural cycles of day and night exhibit marked diurnal changes in the shape of their Visual Evoked Potential in constant environmental conditions. The results of exposure to artificial 24 hr light-dark cycles strongly suggest that it is the regular alternation of daylight and darkness which acts as the synchronizing "Zeitgeber" for the V.E.P. rhythm which exists after exposure to the natural cycles of day and night. It would seem further that the V.E.P. changes reflect a square-wave like rhythm in the sensitivity of the visual system to photic stimuli, in which the sensitivity is much higher at night than in the day-time. The probable importance of the diurnal V.E.P. rhythm for the occurrence of daily fluctuations in behaviour is discussed. PMID:563382

  10. Do Diurnal Aerosol Changes Affect Daily Average Radiative Forcing?

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-06-17

    Strong diurnal variability of aerosol has been observed frequently for many urban/industrial regions. How this variability may alter the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF), however, is largely unknown. To quantify changes in the time-averaged DARF, we perform an assessment of 29 days of high temporal resolution ground-based data collected during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) on Cape Cod, which is downwind of metropolitan areas. We demonstrate that strong diurnal changes of aerosol loading (about 20% on average) have a negligible impact on the 24-h average DARF, when daily averaged optical properties are used to find this quantity. However, when there is a sparse temporal sampling of aerosol properties, which may preclude the calculation of daily averaged optical properties, large errors (up to 100%) in the computed DARF may occur. We describe a simple way of reducing these errors, which suggests the minimal temporal sampling needed to accurately find the forcing.

  11. Combined Effects of Diurnal and Nonsynchronous Surface Stresses on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stempel, M. M.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Wahr, J.; Barr, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    To date, modeling of the surface stresses on Europa has considered tidal, nonsynchronous, and polar wander sources of stress. The results of such models can be used to match lineament orientations with candidate stress patterns. We present a rigorous surface stress model for Europa that will facilitate comparison of principal stresses to lineament orientation, and which will be available in the public domain. Nonsynchronous rotation and diurnal motion contribute to a stress pattern that deforms the surface of Europa. Over the 85-hour orbital period, the diurnal stress pattern acts on the surface, with a maximum magnitude of approximately 0.1 MPa. The nonsynchronous stress pattern sweeps over the surface due to differential rotation of the icy shell relative to the tidally locked interior of the moon. Nonsynchronous stress builds cumulatively with approximately 0.1 MPa per degree of shell rotation.

  12. Validation of Predicted Diurnal and Semi-diurnal Tidal Variations in Polar Motion with GPS-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shailen; Sibois, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we reconcile predicted diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal variations in polar motion using observations from the Global Positioning System (GPS) space geodetic technique. We demonstrate closure at the level of less than 4 microarcseconds of the budget between our adopted models for predicted polar motion tidal variations and our GPS-based observations. Our GPS-based observations are composed of a 10-year continuous time series of polar motion estimates with 15-minute temporal resolution. Our adopted models account for the contribution from the relative angular momentum of the ocean tides and so-called libration. We compute predicted ocean tide contributions using a modern hydrodynamic model of tide heights and currents that assimilates satellite altimetry data. We use the model for libration effects provided by the current IERS conventions, as taken from Mathews and Bretagnon [2003]. We also show that the currently recommended models from the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) conventions do not close the budget with respect to our GPS-based observations. In particular, residual diurnal and semidiurnal tidal variations in polar motion are observed when using the current IERS conventions for ocean tide effects and libration. We infer that the root source for these residual tidal variations is errors in the 20-year old model for ocean tide effects from the IERS conventions, and that predicted ocean tide effects from a modern model mitigates these errors. The noise floor of our high-rate GPS-based times series of polar motion is less than 4 microarcseconds in the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal frequency bands, and is well below the level of the predicted effects of both the ocean tide and libration effects. Diurnal and semidiurnal tidal variations in polar motion are predominantly caused by the ocean tides, which have amplitudes of a few hundred microarcseconds. Libration, namely the effect of external luni-solar torques acting on the triaxial Earth

  13. Nodical Modulation of Tides in Mixed Semi-diurnal Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud-Roam, K.

    2001-12-01

    Mixed semi-diurnal tides and associated processes in estuaries and other coastal waters are substanially modulated by variations in lunar declination, which has a 27.21 day "nodical month" period, although these influences are generally ascribed to the more obvious changes in lunar phase, which varies with the 29.53 day synodical month. Analyses of archival sea level data, primarily in the San Francisco (California) Estuary, demonstrate previously undescribed patterns at a range of temporal scales. First, "ambiguous" high and low tides (neither HHW, LHW, HLW, nor LLW) recur in a consistent 13.61 day pattern of 1, 3, 5, or 7 adjacent ambiguous HW followed by 1 or 3 ambiguous LW. Thus, the dominant tidal current (LLW-HHW or HHW-LLW) of any mixed semi-diurnal estuary reverses every 13.61 days for a few days, with potentially dramatic influences on water body and sediment fluxes. Second, while the diurnal timing of HHW or LLW typically advances about 50 minutes each solar day, the "tidal pattern cross-over" resets the timing of HHW and LLW by 12.42 hours every 13.61 days, resulting in a strong apparent seasonality in the diurnal timing of tidal maxima and minima. This seasonality significantly controls the temporal and spatial distribution of processes influenced both by hydroperiod and temperature or solar insolation. Finally, while the resulting "seasonal" pattern is stable over short series of observations, it in fact reflects a 366.34 day pattern, which means that the seasonality itself has a 335 year period. Thus, coastal areas which are now generally flooded (HHW) at night in the summer and during the day in the winter had the opposite pattern about 170 years ago. This means that many century-scale physical and biotic changes in estuaries may be due to nodical tidal phenomena rather than solely to anthropogenic causes.

  14. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Langel, Jennifer L.; Smale, Laura; Esquiva, Gema; Hannibal, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The direct effects of photic stimuli on behavior are very different in diurnal and nocturnal species, as light stimulates an increase in activity in the former and a decrease in the latter. Studies of nocturnal mice have implicated a select population of retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs) in mediation of these acute responses to light. ipRGCs are photosensitive due to the expression of the photopigment melanopsin; these cells use glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) as neurotransmitters. PACAP is useful for the study of central ipRGC projections because, in the retina, it is found exclusively within melanopsin cells. Little is known about the central projections of ipRGCs in diurnal species. Here, we first characterized these cells in the retina of the diurnal Nile grass rat using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The same basic subtypes of melanopsin cells that have been described in other mammals were present, but nearly 25% of them were displaced, primarily in its superior region. PACAP was present in 87.7% of all melanopsin cells, while 97.4% of PACAP cells contained melanopsin. We then investigated central projections of ipRGCs by examining the distribution of immunoreactive PACAP fibers in intact and enucleated animals. This revealed evidence that these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), pretectum, and superior colliculus. This distribution was confirmed with injections of cholera toxin subunit β coupled with Alexa Fluor 488 in one eye and Alexa Fluor 594 in the other, combined with IHC staining of PACAP. These studies also revealed that the ventral and dorsal LGN and the caudal olivary pretectal nucleus receive less innervation from ipRGCs than that reported in nocturnal rodents. Overall, these data suggest that although ipRGCs and their projections are very similar in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, they may not be identical. PMID:26236201

  15. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Langel, Jennifer L; Smale, Laura; Esquiva, Gema; Hannibal, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The direct effects of photic stimuli on behavior are very different in diurnal and nocturnal species, as light stimulates an increase in activity in the former and a decrease in the latter. Studies of nocturnal mice have implicated a select population of retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs) in mediation of these acute responses to light. ipRGCs are photosensitive due to the expression of the photopigment melanopsin; these cells use glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) as neurotransmitters. PACAP is useful for the study of central ipRGC projections because, in the retina, it is found exclusively within melanopsin cells. Little is known about the central projections of ipRGCs in diurnal species. Here, we first characterized these cells in the retina of the diurnal Nile grass rat using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The same basic subtypes of melanopsin cells that have been described in other mammals were present, but nearly 25% of them were displaced, primarily in its superior region. PACAP was present in 87.7% of all melanopsin cells, while 97.4% of PACAP cells contained melanopsin. We then investigated central projections of ipRGCs by examining the distribution of immunoreactive PACAP fibers in intact and enucleated animals. This revealed evidence that these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), pretectum, and superior colliculus. This distribution was confirmed with injections of cholera toxin subunit β coupled with Alexa Fluor 488 in one eye and Alexa Fluor 594 in the other, combined with IHC staining of PACAP. These studies also revealed that the ventral and dorsal LGN and the caudal olivary pretectal nucleus receive less innervation from ipRGCs than that reported in nocturnal rodents. Overall, these data suggest that although ipRGCs and their projections are very similar in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, they may not be identical.

  16. Visualizing diurnal population change in urban areas for emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Medina, Richard M; Cova, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management. PMID:21491706

  17. Cold and hunger induce diurnality in a nocturnal mammal.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Riede, Sjaak J; Gorter, Jenke A; Eijer, Willem G; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael; Daan, Serge; Pilorz, Violetta; Hut, Roelof A

    2014-10-21

    The mammalian circadian system synchronizes daily timing of activity and rest with the environmental light-dark cycle. Although the underlying molecular oscillatory mechanism is well studied, factors that influence phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns (temporal niche switching, chronotype) are presently unknown. Molecular evidence suggests that metabolism may influence the circadian molecular clock, but evidence at the level of the organism is lacking. Here we show that a metabolic challenge by cold and hunger induces diurnality in otherwise nocturnal mice. Lowering ambient temperature changes the phase of circadian light-dark entrainment in mice by increasing daytime and decreasing nighttime activity. This effect is further enhanced by simulated food shortage, which identifies metabolic balance as the underlying common factor influencing circadian organization. Clock gene expression analysis shows that the underlying neuronal mechanism is downstream from or parallel to the main circadian pacemaker (the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus) and that the behavioral phenotype is accompanied by phase adjustment of peripheral tissues. These findings indicate that nocturnal mammals can display considerable plasticity in circadian organization and may adopt a diurnal phenotype when energetically challenged. Our previously defined circadian thermoenergetics hypothesis proposes that such circadian plasticity, which naturally occurs in nocturnal mammals, reflects adaptive maintenance of energy balance. Quantification of energy expenditure shows that diurnality under natural conditions reduces thermoregulatory costs in small burrowing mammals like mice. Metabolic feedback on circadian organization thus provides functional benefits by reducing energy expenditure. Our findings may help to clarify relationships between sleep-wake patterns and metabolic phenotypes in humans. PMID:25288753

  18. Cold and hunger induce diurnality in a nocturnal mammal.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Riede, Sjaak J; Gorter, Jenke A; Eijer, Willem G; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael; Daan, Serge; Pilorz, Violetta; Hut, Roelof A

    2014-10-21

    The mammalian circadian system synchronizes daily timing of activity and rest with the environmental light-dark cycle. Although the underlying molecular oscillatory mechanism is well studied, factors that influence phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns (temporal niche switching, chronotype) are presently unknown. Molecular evidence suggests that metabolism may influence the circadian molecular clock, but evidence at the level of the organism is lacking. Here we show that a metabolic challenge by cold and hunger induces diurnality in otherwise nocturnal mice. Lowering ambient temperature changes the phase of circadian light-dark entrainment in mice by increasing daytime and decreasing nighttime activity. This effect is further enhanced by simulated food shortage, which identifies metabolic balance as the underlying common factor influencing circadian organization. Clock gene expression analysis shows that the underlying neuronal mechanism is downstream from or parallel to the main circadian pacemaker (the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus) and that the behavioral phenotype is accompanied by phase adjustment of peripheral tissues. These findings indicate that nocturnal mammals can display considerable plasticity in circadian organization and may adopt a diurnal phenotype when energetically challenged. Our previously defined circadian thermoenergetics hypothesis proposes that such circadian plasticity, which naturally occurs in nocturnal mammals, reflects adaptive maintenance of energy balance. Quantification of energy expenditure shows that diurnality under natural conditions reduces thermoregulatory costs in small burrowing mammals like mice. Metabolic feedback on circadian organization thus provides functional benefits by reducing energy expenditure. Our findings may help to clarify relationships between sleep-wake patterns and metabolic phenotypes in humans.

  19. Visualizing Diurnal Population Change in Urban Areas for Emergency Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Medina, Richard M; Cova, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

  20. Visualizing diurnal population change in urban areas for emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Medina, Richard M; Cova, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

  1. Coastal diurnal cycle of summer clouds of Western Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, João P. A.; Cardoso, Rita M.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Trigo, Isabel F.; Moreira, Nuno

    2014-05-01

    During the summer, anticyclonic conditions are frequent off the coast of Iberia, causing prevailing northerly winds, large-scale subsidence, coastal upwelling and colder SSTs. These conditions allow the maintenance of extensive stratocumulus decks off the coast. In coastal regions and during nighttime, these decks frequently penetrate inland together with the marine boundary layer, leading to overcast and often foggy conditions which are dissipated during the morning. The aim of this study is to further explore and characterize this process, since little climatological information about it exists so far. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) has recently released the so-called cloud property dataset using SEVIRI (CLAAS), which is a Climate Data Record (CDR) of cloud, surface albedo and radiation properties covering 9 years (2004-2013) of SEVIRI measurements. Their monthly mean diurnal cycle of cloud properties products are used here to explore the coastal diurnal cycle, in terms of cloud fractions and heights. These observations show the alternation between two different convection regimes over Iberian coastal regions: on one hand, diurnal deep convection development over land, with the growth of a well developed boundary layer due to strong surface heating followed by the formation of shallow cumulus that eventually become deeper over the afternoon; on the other the penetration of the stratocumulus decks over land during the night, with lower boundary layers and higher cloud fraction. The results are compared to regional climate simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) over Iberia, forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis and two resolutions; a 50km Euro-Cordex and high 9km resolution. The model reproduces the observed diurnal cycle of clouds in the summer remarkably well, especially regarding the evolution of the spatial patterns of cloudiness during the diurnal cycle. The model is then used to explain

  2. Diurnal Cycles in Water Quality Across the Periodic Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Diurnal cycles in water quality can provide important clues to the processes that regulate aquatic chemistry, but they often are masked by longer-term, larger-amplitude variability, making their detection and quantification difficult. Here I outline several methods that can detect diurnal cycles even when they are massively obscured by statistically ill-behaved noise. I demonstrate these methods using high-frequency water quality data from the Plylimon catchment in mid-Wales (Neal et al., 2013; Kirchner and Neal, 2013). Several aspects combine to make the Plynlimon data set unique worldwide. Collected at 7-hour intervals, the Plynlimon data set is much more densely sampled than typical long-term weekly or monthly water quality data. This 7-hour sampling was also continued for two years, much longer than typical intensive sampling campaigns, and the resulting time series encompass a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions. Furthermore, each sample was analyzed for a wide range of solutes with diverse sources in the natural environment. However, the 7-hour sampling frequency is both coarse and irregular in comparison to diurnal cycles, making their detection and quantification difficult. Nonetheless, the methods outlined here enable detection of statistically significant diurnal cycles in over 30 solutes at Plynlimon, including alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), alkaline earths (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba), transition metals (Al, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb), nonmetals (B, NO3, Si, As, and Se), lanthanides and actinides (La, Ce, Pr, and U), as well as total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Gran alkalinity, pH, and electrical conductivity. These solutes span every row of the periodic table, and more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. Many of these diurnal cycles are subtle, representing only a few percent, at most, of the total variance in the concentration time series. Nonetheless they are diagnostically

  3. Tropical Cyclone Diurnal Cycle as Observed by TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leppert, Kenneth D., II; Cecil, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using infrared satellite data, previous work has shown a consistent diurnal cycle in the pattern of cold cloud tops around mature tropical cyclones. In particular, an increase in the coverage by cold cloud tops often occurs in the inner core of the storm around the time of sunset and subsequently propagates outward to several hundred kilometers over the course of the following day. This consistent cycle may have important implications for structure and intensity changes of tropical cyclones and the forecasting of such changes. Because infrared satellite measurements are primarily sensitive to cloud top, the goal of this study is to use passive and active microwave measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR), respectively, to examine and better understand the tropical cyclone diurnal cycle throughout a larger depth of the storm's clouds. The National Hurricane Center's best track dataset was used to extract all PR and TMI pixels within 1000 km of each tropical cyclone that occurred in the Atlantic basin between 1998-2011. Then the data was composited according to radius (100-km bins from 0-1000 km) and local standard time (LST; 3-hr bins). Specifically, PR composites involved finding the percentage of pixels with reflectivity greater than or equal to 20 dBZ at various heights (i.e., 2-14 km in increments of 2 km) as a function of radius and time. The 37- and 85- GHz TMI channels are especially sensitive to scattering by precipitation-sized ice in the mid to upper portions of clouds. Hence, the percentage of 37- and 85-GHz polarization corrected temperatures less than various thresholds were calculated using data from all storms as a function of radius and time. For 37 GHz, thresholds of 260 K, 265 K, 270 K, and 275 K were used, and for 85 GHz, thresholds of 200-270 K in increments of 10 K were utilized. Note that convection forced by the interactions of a tropical cyclone with land (e.g., due

  4. Diurnal Reflectance Changes in Vegetation Observed with AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Ustin, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    Among the most important short-term dynamic biological processes are diurnal changes in canopy water relations. Plant regulation of water transport through stomatal openings affects other gaseous transport processes, often dramatically decreasing photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide during periods of water stress. Water stress reduces stomatal conductance of water vapor through the leaf surface and alters the diurnal timing of stomatal opening. Under non-water stressed conditions, stomates typically open soon after dawn and transpire water vapor throughout the daylight period. During stress periods, stomates may close for part of the day, generally near mid-day. Under prolonged stress conditions, stomatal closure shifts to earlier times during the day; stomates may close by mid-morning and remain closed until the following morning - or remain closed entirely. Under these conditions the relationship between canopy greenness (e.g., measured with a vegetation index or by spectral mixture analysis) and photosynthetic fixation of carbon is lost and the remotely sensed vegetation metric is a poor predictor of gas exchange. Prediction of stomatal regulation and exchange of water and trace gases is critical for ecosystem and climate models to correctly estimate budgets of these gases and understand or predict other processes like gross and net ecosystem primary production. Plant gas exchange has been extensively studied by physiologists at the leaf and whole plant level and by biometeorologists at somewhat larger scales. While these energy driven processes follow a predictable if somewhat asymmetric diurnal cycle dependent on soil water availability and the constraints imposed by the solar energy budget, they are nonetheless difficult to measure at the tree and stand levels using conventional methods. Ecologists have long been interested in the potential of remote sensing for monitoring physiological changes using multi-temporal images. Much of this research has

  5. Future changes in propagating and non-propagating diurnal rainfall over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Wang, S.-Y. Simon

    2016-09-01

    The characteristics of diurnal rainfall in the East Asian continent consist of a propagating regime over the Yangtze River and a non-propagating regime in southeast China. Simulations of these two diurnal rainfall regimes by 18 CMIP5 models were evaluated from the historical experiment of 1981-2005. The evaluation led to the identification of one model, the CMCC-CM that replicated the key characteristics of diurnal rainfall regimes including the propagation of moisture convergence. Using the CMCC-CM to assess the future (2076-2100) change of diurnal evolution and propagation projected by the RCP4.5 experiment, it was found that propagating diurnal rainfall will enhance and expand southward into the non-propagating regime in southeast China. This change in diurnal rainfall is attributed to the intensification of diurnal land-sea thermal contrast over eastern China and the southward shift of the upper-level jet stream over 20°-30°N. Similar projected changes in diurnal rainfall and associated large-scale dynamical mechanisms were also depicted by four other models (GFDL-ESM2G, GFDL-ESM2M, MRI-CGCM3, and MRI-ESM1) showing a higher skill in representing the diurnal rainfall regimes over East Asia. If such model projection holds true, southeast China will experience an increase in the eastward propagating diurnal rainfall, which could further impact Taiwan.

  6. Diurnal cycles in water quality across the periodic table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, James

    2014-05-01

    Diurnal cycles in water quality can provide important clues to the processes that regulate aquatic chemistry, but they often are masked by longer-term, larger-amplitude variability, making their detection and quantification difficult. Here I outline methods that can detect diurnal cycles even when they are massively obscured by statistically ill-behaved noise. I demonstrate these methods using high-frequency water quality data from the Plylimon catchment in mid-Wales (Neal et al., 2013; Kirchner and Neal, 2013). Several aspects combine to make the Plynlimon data set unique worldwide. Collected at 7-hour intervals, the Plynlimon data set is much more densely sampled than typical long-term weekly or monthly water quality data. This 7-hour sampling was also continued for two years, much longer than typical intensive sampling campaigns, and the resulting time series encompass a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions. Furthermore, each sample was analyzed for a wide range of solutes with diverse sources in the natural environment. However, the 7-hour sampling frequency is both coarse and irregular in comparison to diurnal cycles, making their detection and quantification difficult. Nonetheless, the methods outlined here enable detection of statistically significant diurnal cycles in over 30 solutes at Plynlimon, including alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), alkaline earths (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba), transition metals (Al, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb), nonmetals (B, NO3, Si, As, and Se), lanthanides and actinides (La, Ce, Pr, and U), as well as total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Gran alkalinity, pH, and electrical conductivity. These solutes span every row of the periodic table, and more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. Many of these diurnal cycles are subtle, representing only a few percent, at most, of the total variance in the concentration time series. Nonetheless they are diagnostically useful

  7. A statistical model of diurnal variation in human growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Jin, Moonsoo; Maliszewski, Anne M.; Brown, Emery N.

    2003-01-01

    The diurnal pattern of growth hormone (GH) serum levels depends on the frequency and amplitude of GH secretory events, the kinetics of GH infusion into and clearance from the circulation, and the feedback of GH on its secretion. We present a two-dimensional linear differential equation model based on these physiological principles to describe GH diurnal patterns. The model characterizes the onset times of the secretory events, the secretory event amplitudes, as well as the infusion, clearance, and feedback half-lives of GH. We illustrate the model by using maximum likelihood methods to fit it to GH measurements collected in 12 normal, healthy women during 8 h of scheduled sleep and a 16-h circadian constant-routine protocol. We assess the importance of the model components by using parameter standard error estimates and Akaike's Information Criterion. During sleep, both the median infusion and clearance half-life estimates were 13.8 min, and the median number of secretory events was 2. During the constant routine, the median infusion half-life estimate was 12.6 min, the median clearance half-life estimate was 11.7 min, and the median number of secretory events was 5. The infusion and clearance half-life estimates and the number of secretory events are consistent with current published reports. Our model gave an excellent fit to each GH data series. Our analysis paradigm suggests an approach to decomposing GH diurnal patterns that can be used to characterize the physiological properties of this hormone under normal and pathological conditions.

  8. CART peptide diurnal variations in blood and brain.

    PubMed

    Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2006-08-01

    The central role of CART peptide in feeding, drug abuse and stress has been widely researched however, CART's role in the peripheral system are less explored. CART peptide is present in a variety of peripheral tissues including sympathetic ganglion neurons, adrenal glands, gut, pancreas and blood. Studies that examined circulating CART demonstrated that the active fragment with a molecular weight of CART55-102 is present in the blood of rats and rhesus macaques. Interestingly, CART expression in these species exhibits a distinctive diurnal rhythm which correlates with the respective daily rhythms of corticosterone and feeding. In the rat, adrenalectomy significantly reduces blood CART levels and abolishes its daily rhythm while corticosterone replacement reinstates CART expression to control levels. In addition, direct administration of corticosterone significantly increases CART blood levels while administration of corticosterone synthesis blocker metyrapone, inhibits CART blood levels. These data suggest that the adrenal gland could be a source of blood CART and that glucocorticoids may play a role in the generation of CART's diurnal rhythm. Moreover, fuel availability may be important in the control of CART levels and its daily rhythm, since 24 h food restriction alters CART levels and abolishes its rhythm. In addition to blood, both CART peptide and mRNA exhibit food-dependent diurnal rhythm in discrete rat brain areas including the nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hypothalamus. Altogether, these findings suggest that CART is influenced by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal interactions and that it may play a role in multiple physiological processes possibly involving feeding, stress, reward and motivation. PMID:16697078

  9. Diurnal rhythm of melatonin binding in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, J.T.; Castren, E.; Vakkuri, O.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    We used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to localize and characterize 2-/sup 125/I-melatonin binding sites in the rat suprachiasmatic nuclei in relation to pineal melatonin production. In a light:dark cycle of 12:12 h, binding density exhibited significant diurnal variation with a peak at the dark-light transition and a trough 12 hours later. Saturation studies suggested that the decreased binding at light-dark transition might be due to a shift of the putative melatonin receptor to a low affinity state.

  10. Behavior of the Sq Diurnal Magnetic Variation over Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, E.; Mahrous, A.; El-Hawary, R.; Yumoto, K.

    2011-12-01

    The diurnal variation of the solar quiet (Sq) in the geomagnetic north-south component (H) and geomagnetic eastwest component (D), along the Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) stations in Egypt during year 2009 have been studied. MAGDAS was successfully installed at two stations in Egypt Fayum (FYM) and Aswan (ASW). Several forms of Abnormal Quiet Days (AQDs) have been found in both of Sq (H) and Sq (D). These AQDs of Sq (H) are expected to be related to counter or reversed electrojet while AQDs of Sq (D) is presumably due to the currents of the (2, 3) mode.

  11. Diurnal Growth of Tall Fescue Leaf Blades 1

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Hans; Nelson, Curtis J.

    1988-01-01

    Tall fescue leaf blades elongate at near constant rates during most of the light and dark periods of the diurnal cycle, with the dark rate being higher by 60 to 65%. Our objective was to determine relationships among diurnal rates of leaf elongation, deposition of water and deposition of dry matter (DM) into the elongation zone. Two separate experiments were conducted, both with a 15-hour photoperiod and constant 21°C at the growth zone. Increased rates of leaf elongation in darkness were due to proportionally increased rates of elongation of 4-millimeter segments of the elongation zone. Length of the total elongation zone was 30 millimeters in both light and darkness. The spatial distribution of water contents in the elongation zone varied little during the diurnal cycle. Thus, dark stimulation of leaf elongation rate (+65%) and of water deposition (+77%) into elongation zones were similar. Water content per unit leaf length increased by 50% between the basal and distal limits of the elongation zone, indicating that tissue also grew in the lateral and vertical dimensions. Longitudinal growth of tissue, however, allowed 5 to 7 times more water deposition into the elongation zone than growth in cross-sectional area. This relationship was similar in light and darkness. In both light and darkness net rates of DM deposition (microgram per millimeter leaf length per hour) increased from the zone of cell division towards the region of most active elongation, 10 to 15 millimeters from the ligule, then decreased towards the distal end of the elongation zone. Net DM deposition rates (microgram per hour) integrated over the 30-millimeter elongation zone were similar during light and darkness. Thus, DM in the elongation zone was diluted during darkness as a result of increased water deposition. Net DM deposition rates at and above the distal end of the elongation zone were clearly positive during the light, but were close to zero or negative in darkness. Thus, DM deposition

  12. Estimation of soil moisture from diurnal surface temperature observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Camillo, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A coupled heat and moisture balance model was used to determine the thermal inertia of a grass covered top soil under different meteorological conditions. Relations between thermal inertia and soil moisture were established using the De Vries models for thermal conductivity and heat capacity to relate soil moisture and thermal inertia as a function of soil type. A sensitivity study of the surface roughness length and thermal inertia on diurnal surface temperature shows the necessity of focusing on the night time surface temperature rather than on the day time surface temperature, in order to estimate the soil moisture content of the top soil.

  13. First diurnal results from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. F.; Minnis, P.; Brooks, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Early results are reported from measurements of the diurnal variability of total and clear-sky regional radiative parameters by the ERBE instruments on one dedicated satellite and the polar-orbiting NOAA-9 satellite. Attention is focused on November 1984, the first complete data set. The scene is identified in terms of longwave and shortwave radiances (daytime) or longwave radiation (night) and maximum likelihood estimates carried out with the addition of Earth Radiation Budget data from Nimbus-7. Analysis of the first data set revealed significant differences between total and clear-sky albedo. The clear-sky and LRE both reach maximum around noon and minimum values at midnight.

  14. Analysis of Diurnal, Planetary and Mean Wind Activity using TIMED, MF and Meteor Radar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, Ruth S.; Riggin, Dennis R.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this research are: 1) To validate TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) winds using ground-based MF and meteor winds; and 2) To examine short-term (i. e., day-to-day and week-to-week) variability of the diurnal tide. This objective was to have originally been met using comparisons of short-term diurnal tidal determinations from ground-based (GB) winds with planetary-scale diurnal nonmigrating tidal definitions from TIDI winds.

  15. Spatial and diurnal variations of storm heights in the East Asia summer monsoon: storm height regimes and large-scale diurnal modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myung-Sook; Lee, Myong-In; Kim, Hyerim; Im, Jungho; Yoo, Jung-Moon

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the spatial and diurnal variation of storm height in the East Asia summer monsoon region using 13-year Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar data. Precipitating storms are classified as shallow (<5 km), middle (5-10 km), and deep (>10 km) depending the height. Four different regimes are identified to characterize the region: the continental (CT) shallow regime over inland China with elevated terrain, the CT deep over the Chinese Plain, the coastal (CS) middle over the East China Sea and South Sea of Korea, and the CS shallow over the south coastal area of Japan. This regime separation reflects well the distinctive regional difference in the rainfall contribution by each storm type. The occurrence frequencies of shallow, middle, and deep storms exhibit pronounced diurnal variation as well, but with significant differences in the amplitude and phase across the regimes. These lead to a diversity in the diurnal variation of surface rainfall such as bimodal morning and late evening peaks in the two CT regimes and the single morning peak in the two CS regimes. Processes involved in the diurnal variation of storms are different across the regimes, indicating difference in the contributing role of surface heating, large-scale diurnal circulation, and diurnal propagations of convective systems. The storm height also affects the rain intensity. This study highlights that the East Asia summer monsoon has distinctive sub-regional variation of the storm height distribution, thereby providing unique differences in the rainfall amount, intensity, and the diurnal variation.

  16. Diurnal patterns in lightning activity over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, Eldo E.; Bürgesser, Rodrigo E.; Castellano, Nesvit E.; Nicora, M. Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Satellite observations of lightning flash distribution data are used to examine the diurnal cycle of lightning activity over the tropical and subtropical regions of South America. A harmonic analysis is used to study the spatial variations in the peak and strength of diurnal lightning activity across this area. Results show that in the northern and central regions of South America, the times of maxima in lightning activity was concentrated from late afternoon to evening hours (between 14:00 and 18:00 local time), which may be associated with the peaking of the local convective activity connected with heating of the surface caused by daytime insolation. In subtropical South America, particularly in the area limited by 25°S, 35°S of latitude and 70°W, 50°W of longitude, the time of maximum lightning activity was shifted to nocturnal hours, extending from close to midnight to early morning hours. This behavior can be associated to the peak in mesoscale convective systems in the region which occurs in the morning hours. The annual flash densities in the tropical and subtropical parts of the continent were found to have comparable magnitudes. However, the contribution of the continental tropics to the global electric circuit dominates over the continental subtropics contribution throughout all seasons, since the surface covered by the tropical region is more than twice the area covered by the subtropical region.

  17. Adaptations for nocturnal and diurnal vision in the hawkmoth lamina.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Anna L; Ribi, Willi A; Warrant, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Animals use vision over a wide range of light intensities, from dim starlight to bright sunshine. For animals active in very dim light the visual system is challenged by several sources of visual noise. Adaptations in the eyes, as well as in the neural circuitry, have evolved to suppress the noise and enhance the visual signal, thereby improving vision in dim light. Among neural adaptations, spatial summation of visual signals from neighboring processing units is suggested to increase the reliability of signal detection and thus visual sensitivity. In insects, the likely neural candidates for carrying out spatial summation are the lamina monopolar cells (LMCs) of the first visual processing area of the insect brain (the lamina). We have classified LMCs in three species of hawkmoths with considerably different activity periods but very similar ecology-the diurnal Macroglossum stellatarum, the nocturnal Deilephila elpenor and the crepuscular-nocturnal Manduca sexta. Using this classification, we investigated the anatomical adaptations of hawkmoth LMCs suited for spatial summation. We found that specific types of LMCs have dendrites extending to significantly more neighboring cartridges in the two nocturnal and crepuscular species than in the diurnal species, making these LMC types strong candidates for spatial summation. Moreover, while the absolute number of cartridges visited by the LMCs differed between the two dim-light species, their dendritic extents were very similar in terms of visual angle, possibly indicating a limiting spatial acuity. The overall size of the lamina neuropil did not correlate with the size of its LMCs. PMID:26100612

  18. Short communication: Diurnal feeding pattern of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    DeVries, T J; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Beauchemin, K A

    2003-12-01

    The objectives of this research were to: 1) describe the diurnal variation in feed alley attendance patterns of lactating dairy cows, 2) describe the sources of variation in these patterns, and 3) determine the effects of altering the feed push-up schedule on these patterns. An electronic monitoring system was used to record individual cow presence (6-s resolution) at the feed alley for 24 cows housed in a free-stall barn. Cows were subjected to 2 feeding schedules: 1) baseline schedule, where cows were fed at 0600 and 1515 h and feed was pushed closer to the cows at 1100 and 2130 h; and 2) experimental schedule, where 2 additional feed push-ups at 0030 and 0330 h were added to the baseline schedule. With the data collected from the monitoring system, description of the feed alley attendance patterns on a per minute basis of the group of cows was undertaken. Feed alley attendance was consistently higher during the day and early evening compared with the late night and early morning hours. The greatest percentage of cows attending the feed alley was seen after the delivery of fresh feed and the return from milking. The addition of extra feed push-ups in the early morning hours did little to increase feeding activity. It can be concluded that milking and delivery of fresh feed had a much greater affect on the diurnal pattern of feed alley attendance than did the feed push-ups.

  19. Seasonal and diurnal calling patterns of Ross and leopards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Tracey L.; Rowney, Gayle A.; Ciaglia, Michaela B.; Cato, Douglas H.

    2005-09-01

    The temporal calling patterns of two Antarctic pack ice seals, the leopard and Ross seal, were examined. This included seasonal onset and decline of calling (coinciding with their breeding season) as well as diurnal changes. Understanding of calling behavior has important implications for acoustic surveying, since this allows the number of calls to be related to an index of the number of animals present and to estimate abundance. The monthly changes in diurnal calling and haul-out patterns (measured via satellite telemetry) were compared. Underwater acoustic recordings were made between 14 October 2003 and 10 January 2004 off Mawson, Eastern Antarctica (660 44.243S and 690 48.748E). Recordings were made using an Acoustics Recording Package (ARP by Dr. John Hildebrand, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA) which is designed to sit on the seafloor and passively record acoustic signals. The package was deployed at a depth of 1320.7 m. The sampling rate was 500 Hz and the effective bandwidth from 10 to 250 Hz, covering the bandwidth of only the low-frequency calls of the Ross and leopard seal.

  20. Listening to music affects diurnal variation in muscle power output.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, H; Chaouachi, A; Hammouda, O; Chamari, K; Souissi, N

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of listening to music while warming-up on the diurnal variations of power output during the Wingate test. 12 physical education students underwent four Wingate tests at 07:00 and 17:00 h, after 10 min of warm-up with and without listening to music. The warm-up consisted of 10 min of pedalling at a constant pace of 60 rpm against a light load of 1 kg. During the Wingate test, peak and mean power were measured. The main finding was that peak and mean power improved from morning to afternoon after no music warm-up (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). These diurnal variations disappeared for mean power and persisted with an attenuated morning-evening difference (p<0.05) for peak power after music warm-up. Moreover, peak and mean power were significantly higher after music than no music warm-up during the two times of testing. Thus, as it is a legal method and an additional aid, music should be used during warm-up before performing activities requiring powerful lower limbs' muscles contractions, especially in the morning competitive events.

  1. The Effect of Diurnal Variations on Ionospheric Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi; Withers, Paul; Schinder, Paul J.; Moses, Julianne I.; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Radio occultations are a powerful technique for the study of atmospheres and ionospheres by planetary spacecraft. For missions to the outer solar system, the occultations always probe the terminator region of the planet. The analysis of radio occultations typically assumes symmetry along the ray path in the horizontal direction about the tangent point. While this is an excellent assumption for the neutral atmosphere where the scale length of horizontal gradients is large, it is suspect for the ionosphere where electron densities decrease rapidly from day to night. Diurnal variations in peak electron density are often several orders of magnitude and may occur over a region of a few degrees. We investigate the consequences of diurnal variations on ionospheric occultations with a ray tracing calculation for the angular deflection and frequency residual of the radio wave. The calculations are based on photochemical/diffusion models for the ionospheres of Saturn and Titan. Differences from analysis based on the assumption of horizontal symmetry are most pronounced in the bottom side ionosphere where chemical time constants are short.

  2. Seasonal and diurnal characteristics of atmospheric carbonyls in Nanning, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Songjun; Chen, Mei; Tan, Jihua

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, atmospheric carbonyls were measured to identify seasonal and diurnal variations in Nanning from October 2011 to July 2012. Formaldehyde (6.79 ± 3.39 μg/m3), acetaldehyde (15.81 ± 10.48 μg/m3) and acetone (5.43 ± 6.91 μg/m3) were the three most abundant carbonyls, accounting for ~ 85% of the total carbonyls. The average total concentrations of carbonyls and three abundant carbonyls showed significant high levels in summer compared to those in winter. Diurnal variations suggested that photochemical conditions, combustion of charcoal and straw, and solvent usage are important for the distributions of atmospheric carbonyls. The highest average C1/C2 ratio was observed in summer (0.75) compared to those (0.31-0.70) in other seasons, implying the positive effect of photochemical activities on raising C1/C2 ratio, and the significant low C2/C3 ratio (12.01-18.23) in winter and autumn than those (95.83-24.49) in both spring and summer suggested the important anthropogenic emissions such as charcoal and biomass combustion. O3 formation potentials in summer and spring were significantly higher by ~ 2 times than those in autumn and winter. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are the top two carbonyls which contribute 82-97% to total O3 formation potentials.

  3. Food restriction alters the diurnal distribution of sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Roky, R; Kapás, L; Taishi, T P; Fang, J; Krueger, J M

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of restricting food and water intake to the light period on sleep and brain temperature (Tbr). Sprague-Dawley male rats were anesthetized and provided with electrodes and thermistors for electroencephalographic (EEG) and Tbr recordings. Baseline recordings were performed after a 3-week recovery period. After baseline recordings, access to food and water was restricted (FWR) to the light period for 29 days. During FWR, the diurnal distribution of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and Tbr were reversed, while the distribution of non-REMS (NREMS) between the dark and light periods was attenuated. Daily food and water intake, body weight, and the diurnal distribution of EEG slow-wave activity within NREMS remained unchanged. In a separate study, sham-operated and pinealectomized rats were studied in a similar manner. The sleep responses of pinealectomized and sham-operated rats to FWR were similar. Further, FWR did not affect melatonin levels in the sham-operated rats, thereby suggesting that the pineal gland does not mediate the effects of FWR on sleep.

  4. Coordinated radar observations of atmospheric diurnal tides in equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Isoda, Fusako; Nakamura, Takuji; Vincent, Robert A.; Reid, Iain M.; Harijono, Sri Woro B.; Sribimawati, Tien; Nuryanto, Agus; Wiryosumarto, Harsono

    1999-07-01

    The long-term behavior of atmospheric tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere has been observed with the meteor wind radar (MWR) in Jakarta, Indonesia (6°S, 107°E) from November 1992 to August 1997. The amplitudes and phases of the diurnal tides show systematic seasonal variations, particularly distinct in the meridional component. In addition, substantial interannual variability is evident, characterized by a biennial periodicity of tidal parameters, and considerably small tidal amplitudes exclusively seen in 1996. The MWR results are compared with the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM) as well as MF radar data collected in two equatorial sites in Pontianak (0.03°N, 109°E) and Christmas Island (2°N, 158°W) for November 1995-July 1997 and January 1996-October 1997, respectively. Comparison studies of these radar data have revealed the detailed latitudinal structure of the diurnal tide near the equator. The GSWM has successfully described the general characteristics of the radar results, although some discrepancies are recognized. In 1996 when radar data are available at all the three sites, the monthly mean values of tidal amplitudes at 90 km agreed very well between Jakarta and Pontianak, while significant discrepancy was found for Christmas Island, suggesting the existence of geographical effects such as non-migrating tides.

  5. Diurnal Cycles of Tree Mass Obtained Using Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas, R. A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.; Lintz, H. E.; Kleinknecht, G. J.; Miller, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    We used a non-invasive technique to estimate the mass of trees using accelerometers. The technique was inspired by Selker et al., 2011 who performed experiments with an oak tree to estimate the time-varying canopy mass. The technique consists of placing an accelerometer on the trunk of a live tree. The resonance frequency is related to the mass of the tree. Wind drives the tree and the accelerometer data are analyzed to obtain estimates of the resonance frequency and mass of the tree. In addition to wind speed and direction, we also collected ambient temperature and rain accumulation using co-located instruments. We collected data for 3 months using several accelerometers configured for different sampling rates. Analysis of the data revealed diurnal cycles in temperature, wind speed, and tree mass derived from the tree resonance frequency. We used the Welch method for power spectral density estimation to obtain hourly estimates of the tree resonance frequency. Our hypothesis is that the mass diurnal cycle is related to the tree water content.

  6. Modeling multi-frequency diurnal backscatter from a walnut orchard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) is used to model scatterometer data that were obtained during the August 1987 EOS (Earth Observing System) synergism study. During this experiment, truck-based scatterometers were used to measure radar backscatter from a walnut orchard in Fresno County, California. Multipolarized L- and X-band data were recorded for orchard plots for which dielectric and evapotranspiration characteristics were monitored. MIMICS is used to model a multiangle data set in which a single orchard plot was observed at varying impedance angles and a series of diurnal measurements in which backscatter from this same plot was measured continuously over several 24-h periods. MIMICS accounts for variations in canopy backscatter driven by changes in canopy state that occur diurnally as well as on longer time scales. L-band backscatter is dependent not only on properties of the vegetation but also on properties of the underlying soil surface. The behavior of the X-band backscatter is dominated by properties of the tree crowns.

  7. Termite mounds harness diurnal temperature oscillations for ventilation

    PubMed Central

    King, Hunter; Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    Many species of millimetric fungus-harvesting termites collectively build uninhabited, massive mound structures enclosing a network of broad tunnels that protrude from the ground meters above their subterranean nests. It is widely accepted that the purpose of these mounds is to give the colony a controlled microclimate in which to raise fungus and brood by managing heat, humidity, and respiratory gas exchange. Although different hypotheses such as steady and fluctuating external wind and internal metabolic heating have been proposed for ventilating the mound, the absence of direct in situ measurement of internal air flows has precluded a definitive mechanism for this critical physiological function. By measuring diurnal variations in flow through the surface conduits of the mounds of the species Odontotermes obesus, we show that a simple combination of geometry, heterogeneous thermal mass, and porosity allows the mounds to use diurnal ambient temperature oscillations for ventilation. In particular, the thin outer flutelike conduits heat up rapidly during the day relative to the deeper chimneys, pushing air up the flutes and down the chimney in a closed convection cell, with the converse situation at night. These cyclic flows in the mound flush out CO2 from the nest and ventilate the colony, in an unusual example of deriving useful work from thermal oscillations. PMID:26316023

  8. Shiftwork and Diurnal Salivary Cortisol Patterns Among Police Officers

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Luenda E.; Fekedulegn, Desta; Burchfiel, Cecil M.; Hartley, Tara A.; Andrew, Michael E.; Violanti, John M.; Miller, Diane B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between shiftwork and diurnal salivary cortisol among 319 police officers (77.7% men) Methods Information on shiftwork was obtained from the City of Buffalo, NY electronic payroll records. Saliva was collected using Salivettes at seven time points and analyzed for free cortisol concentrations (nmol/L) using a chemiluminescence immunoassay. Mean slopes and areas under the curve were compared across shift schedule using analysis of variance (ANOVA)/analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results Officers working primarily on the night shift had a significantly shallower slope. Mean slope (nmol/L/minutes) of the cortisol curve varied significantly across shifts (day: −0.00332 ± 0.00017, afternoon: −0.00313 ± 0.00018, night: −0.00257 ± 0.0002); adjusted P = 0.023. Conclusions Our results suggest that night shiftwork is a work-place factor that may alter the response of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis to the circadian cues responsible for the pattern of the diurnal cortisol curve. PMID:27129020

  9. Diurnal temperature asymmetries and fog at Churchill, Manitoba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, William A.; He, Dianze

    2015-07-01

    A variety of methods are available to calculate daily mean temperature. We explore how the difference between two commonly used methods provides insight into the local climate of Churchill, Manitoba. In particular, we found that these differences related closely to seasonal fog. A strong statistically significant correlation was found between the fog frequency (hours per day) and the diurnal temperature asymmetries of the surface temperature using the difference between the min/max and 24-h methods of daily temperature calculation. The relationship was particularly strong for winter, spring and summer. Autumn appears to experience the joint effect of fog formation and the radiative effect of snow cover. The results of this study suggests that subtle variations of diurnality of temperature, as measured in the difference of the two mean temperature methods of calculation, may be used as a proxy for fog detection in the Hudson Bay region. These results also provide a cautionary note for the spatial analysis of mean temperatures using data derived from the two different methods particularly in areas that are fog prone.

  10. Laser Doppler flowmetry: reproducibility, reliability, and diurnal blood flow variations.

    PubMed

    Roeykens, Herman J J; Deschepper, Ellen; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was (1) to evaluate the reliability of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) taking into consideration the use of a silicone splint and the inclination of the probe towards the buccal surface of a human tooth and (2) to determine whether diurnal variations of pulpal blood flow can be registered by means of LDF. Forty-one splints were made by one and the same principal investigator for the registration of pulpal blood flow in vivo in a maxillary right central incisor. Thirty dentists, without experience in LDF recording, were then asked to drill a right-angled shaft in a pre-manufactured splint with a referral point at 2 mm from the enamel-cement border central on the buccal surface of the right central upper incisor. The remaining 11 splints were handled by the principal investigator. The shafts in the 30 splints were analysed using Cone Beam CT imaging of the axial and sagittal angles and compared these to the 11 shafts prepared by the trained principal investigator. LDF was recorded for 90 s in each splint and statistically analysed. LDF values without the use of a splint were statistically significantly different (p < 0.05) and the variance was greater, indicating the superiority of splint use. Significant diurnal variations on LDF values were observed, indicating that special attention should be paid to registration during the day, especially when multiple measurements are to be compared.

  11. Termite mounds harness diurnal temperature oscillations for ventilation.

    PubMed

    King, Hunter; Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L

    2015-09-15

    Many species of millimetric fungus-harvesting termites collectively build uninhabited, massive mound structures enclosing a network of broad tunnels that protrude from the ground meters above their subterranean nests. It is widely accepted that the purpose of these mounds is to give the colony a controlled microclimate in which to raise fungus and brood by managing heat, humidity, and respiratory gas exchange. Although different hypotheses such as steady and fluctuating external wind and internal metabolic heating have been proposed for ventilating the mound, the absence of direct in situ measurement of internal air flows has precluded a definitive mechanism for this critical physiological function. By measuring diurnal variations in flow through the surface conduits of the mounds of the species Odontotermes obesus, we show that a simple combination of geometry, heterogeneous thermal mass, and porosity allows the mounds to use diurnal ambient temperature oscillations for ventilation. In particular, the thin outer flutelike conduits heat up rapidly during the day relative to the deeper chimneys, pushing air up the flutes and down the chimney in a closed convection cell, with the converse situation at night. These cyclic flows in the mound flush out CO2 from the nest and ventilate the colony, in an unusual example of deriving useful work from thermal oscillations.

  12. A stochastic differential equation model of diurnal cortisol patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. N.; Meehan, P. M.; Dempster, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Circadian modulation of episodic bursts is recognized as the normal physiological pattern of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol levels. The primary physiological factors underlying these diurnal patterns are the ultradian timing of secretory events, circadian modulation of the amplitude of secretory events, infusion of the hormone from the adrenal gland into the plasma, and clearance of the hormone from the plasma by the liver. Each measured plasma cortisol level has an error arising from the cortisol immunoassay. We demonstrate that all of these three physiological principles can be succinctly summarized in a single stochastic differential equation plus measurement error model and show that physiologically consistent ranges of the model parameters can be determined from published reports. We summarize the model parameters in terms of the multivariate Gaussian probability density and establish the plausibility of the model with a series of simulation studies. Our framework makes possible a sensitivity analysis in which all model parameters are allowed to vary simultaneously. The model offers an approach for simultaneously representing cortisol's ultradian, circadian, and kinetic properties. Our modeling paradigm provides a framework for simulation studies and data analysis that should be readily adaptable to the analysis of other endocrine hormone systems.

  13. Hearing in a diurnal, mute butterfly, Morpho peleides (Papilionoidea, Nymphalidae).

    PubMed

    Lane, Karla A; Lucas, Kathleen M; Yack, Jayne E

    2008-06-10

    Butterflies use visual and chemical cues when interacting with their environment, but the role of hearing is poorly understood in these insects. Nymphalidae (brush-footed) butterflies occur worldwide in almost all habitats and continents, and comprise more than 6,000 species. In many species a unique forewing structure--Vogel's organ--is thought to function as an ear. At present, however, there is little experimental evidence to support this hypothesis. We studied the functional organization of Vogel's organ in the common blue morpho butterfly, Morpho peleides, which represents the majority of Nymphalidae in that it is diurnal and does not produce sounds. Our results confirm that Vogel's organ possesses the morphological and physiological characteristics of a typical insect tympanal ear. The tympanum has an oval-shaped outer membrane and a convex inner membrane. Associated with the inner surface of the tympanum are three chordotonal organs, each containing 10-20 scolopidia. Extracellular recordings from the auditory nerve show that Vogel's organ is most sensitive to sounds between 2-4 kHz at median thresholds of 58 dB SPL. Most butterfly species that possess Vogel's organ are diurnal, and mute, so bat detection and conspecific communication can be ruled out as roles for hearing. We hypothesize that Vogel's organs in butterflies such as M. peleides have evolved to detect flight sounds of predatory birds. The evolution and taxonomic distribution of butterfly hearing organs are discussed.

  14. Diurnal blood pressure variation in kidney-pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Marx, M A; Gardner, S F; Ketel, B L

    1996-08-01

    Blood pressure normally follows a characteristic pattern throughout the 24 h cycle with daytime pressures higher than nighttime pressures. Patients lacking a nocturnal decrease in pressure have a higher incidence of end organ damage. This investigation was designed to characterize the diurnal pattern of blood pressure and to evaluate blood pressure load in patients who have received a combined kidney-pancreas (KP) transplant. Ten patients (mean 10 months posttransplant) underwent 48 h of noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring using a commercially available device (SpaceLabs 90202 or 90207). Blood pressure was measured every 15 min from 6 AM to 9 PM and every 30 min from 9 PM to 6 AM. Ambulatory monitoring revealed a markedly increased nocturnal blood pressure (up to 25% greater than daytime pressures). These patients were found to have a higher nocturnal blood pressure load than during the day. No relationship was demonstrated between diurnal blood pressure variation and immunosuppression regimen, elapsed time after transplantation, or antihypertensive treatment. These results indicate that close attention must be given to the nocturnal blood pressure of KP recipients and suggest that standard antihypertensive medication regimens do not adequately treat the nocturnal hypertension in these patients. This may predispose these patients to further cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications.

  15. Diurnal variations in optical depth at Mars: Observations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    Viking lander camera images of the Sun were used to compute atmospheric optical depth at two sites over a period of 1 to 1/3 martian years. The complete set of 1044 optical depth determinations is presented in graphical and tabular form. Error estimates are presented in detail. Optical depths in the morning (AM) are generally larger than in the afternoon (PM). The AM-PM differences are ascribed to condensation of water vapor into atmospheric ice aerosols at night and their evaporation in midday. A smoothed time series of these differences shows several seasonal peaks. These are simulated using a one-dimensional radiative convective model which predicts martial atmospheric temperature profiles. A calculation combining these profiles with water vapor measurements from the Mars Atmospheric Water Detector is used to predict when the diurnal variations of water condensation should occur. The model reproduces a majority of the observed peaks and shows the factors influencing the process. Diurnal variation of condensation is shown to peak when the latitude and season combine to warm the atmosphere to the optimum temperature, cool enough to condense vapor at night and warm enough to cause evaporation at midday.

  16. A stochastic differential equation model of diurnal cortisol patterns.

    PubMed

    Brown, E N; Meehan, P M; Dempster, A P

    2001-03-01

    Circadian modulation of episodic bursts is recognized as the normal physiological pattern of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol levels. The primary physiological factors underlying these diurnal patterns are the ultradian timing of secretory events, circadian modulation of the amplitude of secretory events, infusion of the hormone from the adrenal gland into the plasma, and clearance of the hormone from the plasma by the liver. Each measured plasma cortisol level has an error arising from the cortisol immunoassay. We demonstrate that all of these three physiological principles can be succinctly summarized in a single stochastic differential equation plus measurement error model and show that physiologically consistent ranges of the model parameters can be determined from published reports. We summarize the model parameters in terms of the multivariate Gaussian probability density and establish the plausibility of the model with a series of simulation studies. Our framework makes possible a sensitivity analysis in which all model parameters are allowed to vary simultaneously. The model offers an approach for simultaneously representing cortisol's ultradian, circadian, and kinetic properties. Our modeling paradigm provides a framework for simulation studies and data analysis that should be readily adaptable to the analysis of other endocrine hormone systems. PMID:11171600

  17. Termite mounds harness diurnal temperature oscillations for ventilation.

    PubMed

    King, Hunter; Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L

    2015-09-15

    Many species of millimetric fungus-harvesting termites collectively build uninhabited, massive mound structures enclosing a network of broad tunnels that protrude from the ground meters above their subterranean nests. It is widely accepted that the purpose of these mounds is to give the colony a controlled microclimate in which to raise fungus and brood by managing heat, humidity, and respiratory gas exchange. Although different hypotheses such as steady and fluctuating external wind and internal metabolic heating have been proposed for ventilating the mound, the absence of direct in situ measurement of internal air flows has precluded a definitive mechanism for this critical physiological function. By measuring diurnal variations in flow through the surface conduits of the mounds of the species Odontotermes obesus, we show that a simple combination of geometry, heterogeneous thermal mass, and porosity allows the mounds to use diurnal ambient temperature oscillations for ventilation. In particular, the thin outer flutelike conduits heat up rapidly during the day relative to the deeper chimneys, pushing air up the flutes and down the chimney in a closed convection cell, with the converse situation at night. These cyclic flows in the mound flush out CO2 from the nest and ventilate the colony, in an unusual example of deriving useful work from thermal oscillations. PMID:26316023

  18. Cumulus moistening, the diurnal cycle, and large-scale tropical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, James H., Jr.

    Observations and modeling techniques are employed to diagnose the importance of the diurnal cycle in large-scale tropical climate. In the first part of the study, soundings, radar, and surface flux measurements collected in the Indian Ocean DYNAMO experiment (Dynamics of the Madden--Julian Oscillation, or MJO) are employed to study MJO convective onset. According to these observations, MJO onset takes place as follows: moistening of the low--midtroposphere is accomplished by cumuliform clouds that deepen as the drying by large-scale subsidence and horizontal advection simultaneously wane. This relaxing of subsidence is tied to decreasing column radiative cooling, which links back to the evolving cloud population. A new finding from these observations is the high degree to which the diurnal cycle linked to air-sea and radiative fluxes invigorates clouds and drives column moistening each day. This diurnally modulated cloud field exhibits pronounced mesoscale organization in the form of open cells and horizontal convective rolls. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that the diurnal cycle and mesoscale cloud organization represent two manners in which local convective processes promote more vigorous day-to-day tropospheric moistening than would otherwise occur. A suite of model tests are carried out in the second part of the study to 1) test the hypothesis that the diurnal cycle drives moistening on longer timescales, and 2) better understand the relative roles of diurnally varying sea surface temperature (SST) and direct atmospheric radiative heating in the diurnal cycle of convection. Moist convection is explicitly represented in the model, the diurnal cycle of SST is prescribed, and cloud-interactive radiation is simulated with a diurnal cycle in shortwave heating. The large-scale dynamics are parameterized using the spectral weak temperature gradient (WTG) technique recently introduced by Herman and Raymond. In this scheme, external (i.e., large

  19. TIMED/SABER observations of global cold point mesopause variability at diurnal and planetary wave scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Sherine Rachel; Kumar, Karanam Kishore

    2011-06-01

    Cold point mesopause is characterized by the coldest point in the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere. TIMED/SABER observations of cold point mesopause and its variability at diurnal and planetary wave scales are discussed in this study. For the first time, the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal modulations of mesopause are quantified on a global scale during all the four seasons, namely, winter, vernal equinox, summer, and autumnal equinox. The composite of diurnal variations of mesopause height and temperature are discussed during each season and using least squares fit, diurnal and semidiurnal tidal amplitudes and phases are obtained. Most of the features exhibited by the diurnal variation of mesopause height are consistent with the present understanding of the migrating tides. The diurnal tidal modulations of mesopause show its peak over equatorial latitude and change its phase around 20° latitude. The phase of the diurnal tidal modulation is consistent during all seasons expect for a phase shift of 4-6 h observed during boreal summer. The similarities/discrepancies between the latitudinal structure of migrating tides and the diurnal variation of mesopause height are discussed. The results reveal that the diurnal tidal modulations of mesopause height show hemispherical asymmetry, which is not reflected in mesopause temperature. The diurnal and semidiurnal amplitudes in mesopause height across the globe are comparable in magnitude and it is found that over equatorial and low latitudes, the variability of mesopause is maximum at these scales as compared to seasonal scales. Quantification of mesopause height at diurnal scales is very important as it also changes the chemistry of that region. In the present study, an attempt is also made to demonstrate the modulation of the mesopause by propagating planetary waves. The results emphatically show that propagating planetary waves do modulate the mesopause height.

  20. Diurnally Varying Hydrogen Volatiles or Regolith Temperature? Mare and Highlands Studies of the Moon's Diurnally Modulating Epithermal Neutron Flux Using LRO's LEND, Diviner, and LOLA Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; LEND Team; Parsons, A. M.; Williams, J. P.; Mazarico, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we seek to discriminate the source of variation that is diurnally modulating the Moon's neutron emission flux. We characterize the neutron emission flux from the topography in the northern mare and highlands regions.

  1. Annual and diurnal african biomass burning temporal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G.; Wooster, M. J.; Lagoudakis, E.

    2009-05-01

    Africa is the single largest continental source of biomass burning emissions. Here we conduct the first analysis of one full year of geostationary active fire detections and fire radiative power data recorded over Africa at 15-min temporal interval and a 3 km sub-satellite spatial resolution by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) imaging radiometer onboard the Meteosat-8 satellite. We use these data to provide new insights into the rates and totals of open biomass burning over Africa, particularly into the extremely strong seasonal and diurnal cycles that exist across the continent. We estimate peak daily biomass combustion totals to be 9 and 6 million tonnes of fuel per day in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively, and total fuel consumption between February 2004 and January 2005 is estimated to be at least 855 million tonnes. Analysis is carried out with regard to fire pixel temporal persistence, and we note that the majority of African fires are detected only once in consecutive 15 min imaging slots. An investigation of the variability of the diurnal fire cycle is carried out with respect to 20 different land cover types, and whilst differences are noted between land covers, the fire diurnal cycle characteristics for most land cover type are very similar in both African hemispheres. We compare the Fire Radiative Power (FRP) derived biomass combustion estimates to burned-areas, both at the scale of individual fires and over the entire continent at a 1-degree scale. Fuel consumption estimates are found to be less than 2 kg/m2 for all land cover types noted to be subject to significant fire activity, and for savanna grasslands where literature values are commonly reported the FRP-derived median fuel consumption estimate of 300 g/m2 is well within commonly quoted values. Meteosat-derived FRP data of the type presented here is now available freely to interested users continuously and in near real-time for Africa, Europe and parts

  2. The influence of diurnal temperature variation on degree-day accumulation and insect life history.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Fleischer, Shelby J; Saunders, Michael C; Thomas, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Ectotherms, such as insects, experience non-constant temperatures in nature. Daily mean temperatures can be derived from the daily maximum and minimum temperatures. However, the converse is not true and environments with the same mean temperature can exhibit very different diurnal temperate ranges. Here we apply a degree-day model for development of the grape berry moth (Paralobesia viteana, a significant vineyard pest in the northeastern USA) to investigate how different diurnal temperature range conditions can influence degree-day accumulation and, hence, insect life history. We first consider changes in diurnal temperature range independent of changes in mean temperatures. We then investigate grape berry moth life history under potential climate change conditions, increasing mean temperature via variable patterns of change to diurnal temperature range. We predict that diurnal temperature range change can substantially alter insect life history. Altering diurnal temperature range independent of the mean temperature can affect development rate and voltinism, with the magnitude of the effects dependent on whether changes occur to the daily minimum temperature (Tmin), daily maximum temperature (Tmax), or both. Allowing for an increase in mean temperature produces more marked effects on life history but, again, the patterns and magnitude depend on the nature of the change to diurnal temperature range together with the starting conditions in the local environment. The study highlights the importance of characterizing the influence of diurnal temperature range in addition to mean temperature alone.

  3. 40 CFR 1060.525 - How do I test fuel systems for diurnal emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tank with the carbon canister and vent line in a SHED meeting the specifications of 40 CFR 86.107-96(a... measure diurnal emissions: (1) Diurnal measurements are based on a representative temperature cycle. For marine fuel tanks, the temperature cycle specifies fuel temperatures rather than ambient...

  4. 40 CFR 1060.525 - How do I test fuel systems for diurnal emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tank with the carbon canister and vent line in a SHED meeting the specifications of 40 CFR 86.107-96(a... measure diurnal emissions: (1) Diurnal measurements are based on a representative temperature cycle. For marine fuel tanks, the temperature cycle specifies fuel temperatures rather than ambient...

  5. The Influence of Diurnal Temperature Variation on Degree-Day Accumulation and Insect Life History

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi; Fleischer, Shelby J.; Saunders, Michael C.; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Ectotherms, such as insects, experience non-constant temperatures in nature. Daily mean temperatures can be derived from the daily maximum and minimum temperatures. However, the converse is not true and environments with the same mean temperature can exhibit very different diurnal temperate ranges. Here we apply a degree-day model for development of the grape berry moth (Paralobesia viteana, a significant vineyard pest in the northeastern USA) to investigate how different diurnal temperature range conditions can influence degree-day accumulation and, hence, insect life history. We first consider changes in diurnal temperature range independent of changes in mean temperatures. We then investigate grape berry moth life history under potential climate change conditions, increasing mean temperature via variable patterns of change to diurnal temperature range. We predict that diurnal temperature range change can substantially alter insect life history. Altering diurnal temperature range independent of the mean temperature can affect development rate and voltinism, with the magnitude of the effects dependent on whether changes occur to the daily minimum temperature (Tmin), daily maximum temperature (Tmax), or both. Allowing for an increase in mean temperature produces more marked effects on life history but, again, the patterns and magnitude depend on the nature of the change to diurnal temperature range together with the starting conditions in the local environment. The study highlights the importance of characterizing the influence of diurnal temperature range in addition to mean temperature alone. PMID:25790195

  6. Melatonin in Epilepsy: A New Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kijonka, Marek; Pęcka, Marcin; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The main objective of the study was to create a mathematical model that describes the melatonin circadian secretion and, then the functionality of the model was tested by a comparison of the melatonin secretions in children with and without epilepsy. Material and Methods. The patients were divided into the epilepsy group (EG, n = 52) and the comparison group (CG, n = 30). The melatonin level was assessed by a radioimmunoassay method. The diurnal melatonin secretion was described using a nonlinear least squares method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was chosen to estimate the dependence of the acquired data. The model reproduces blood concentration profiles and its parameters were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and logistic regression. Results. The correlation analysis performed for the EG and CG groups showed moderate correlations between age and the melatonin secretion model parameters. Patients with epilepsy are characterized by an increased phase shift of melatonin release. PMID:27478439

  7. Diurnal variation of wind-chill at Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balafoutis, Ch. J.

    1989-12-01

    The diurnal variations of wind-chill at Thessaloniki, Greece, are considered using hourly data from January 1960 to December 1977. This is the first attempt in Greece to describe bioclimatic conditions using wind-chill data. The hourly values of wind-chill were calculated by Siple-Passel's formula which still appears to be most widely used. The values of wind-chill are discussed in terms of Terjung's scale. Thessaloniki does not experience “frost-bite” conditions during the coldest months but does experience “warm” conditions during the summer period. A comparison of hourly and daily mean values show that the means do not indicate the real range of wind-chill during the day.

  8. Diurnal Differences in OLR Climatologies and Anomaly Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena; Loeb, Norm

    2015-01-01

    AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) Version-6 OLR (Outgoing Long-Wave Radiation) matches CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) Edition-2.8 OLR very closely on a 1x1 latitude x longitude scale, both with regard to absolute values, and also with regard to anomalies of OLR. There is a bias of 3.5 watts per meter squared, which is nearly constant both in time and space. Contiguous areas contain large positive or negative OLR difference between AIRS and CERES are where the day-night difference of OLR is large. For AIRS, the larger the diurnal cycle, the more likely that sampling twice a day is inadequate. Lower values of OLRclr (Clear Sky OLR) and LWCRF (Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing) in AIRS compared to CERES is at least in part a result of AIRS sampling over cold and cloudy cases.

  9. Physical models for the normal YORP and diurnal Yarkovsky effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubov, O.; Kravets, Y.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an analytic model for the normal Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) and diurnal Yarkovsky effects experienced by a convex asteroid. Both the YORP torque and the Yarkovsky force are expressed as integrals of a universal function over the surface of an asteroid. Although in general this function can only be calculated numerically from the solution of the heat conductivity equation, approximate solutions can be obtained in quadratures for important limiting cases. We consider three such simplified models: Rubincam's approximation (zero heat conductivity), low thermal inertia limit (including the next order correction and thus valid for small heat conductivity), and high thermal inertia limit (valid for large heat conductivity). All three simplified models are compared with the exact solution.

  10. Melatonin in Epilepsy: A New Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion.

    PubMed

    Paprocka, Justyna; Kijonka, Marek; Pęcka, Marcin; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The main objective of the study was to create a mathematical model that describes the melatonin circadian secretion and, then the functionality of the model was tested by a comparison of the melatonin secretions in children with and without epilepsy. Material and Methods. The patients were divided into the epilepsy group (EG, n = 52) and the comparison group (CG, n = 30). The melatonin level was assessed by a radioimmunoassay method. The diurnal melatonin secretion was described using a nonlinear least squares method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was chosen to estimate the dependence of the acquired data. The model reproduces blood concentration profiles and its parameters were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and logistic regression. Results. The correlation analysis performed for the EG and CG groups showed moderate correlations between age and the melatonin secretion model parameters. Patients with epilepsy are characterized by an increased phase shift of melatonin release. PMID:27478439

  11. Diurnal oscillation of SBE expression in sorghum endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chuanxin; Mutisya, J.; Rosenquist, S.; Baguma, Y.; Jansson, C.

    2009-01-15

    Spatial and temporal expression patterns of the sorghum SBEI, SBEIIA and SBEIIB genes, encoding, respectively, starch branching enzyme (SBE) I, IIA and IIB, in the developing endosperm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were studied. Full-length genomic and cDNA clones for sorghum was cloned and the SBEIIA cDNA was used together with gene-specific probes for sorghum SBEIIB and SBEI. In contrast to sorghum SBEIIB, which was expressed primarily in endosperm and embryo, SBEIIA was expressed also in vegetative tissues. All three genes shared a similar temporal expression profile during endosperm development, with a maximum activity at 15-24 days after pollination. This is different from barley and maize where SBEI gene activity showed a significantly later onset compared to that of SBEIIA and SBEIIB. Expression of the three SBE genes in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle.

  12. Providing Diurnal Sky Cover Data at ARM Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Klebe, Dimitri I.

    2015-03-06

    The Solmirus Corporation was awarded two-year funding to perform a comprehensive data analysis of observations made during Solmirus’ 2009 field campaign (conducted from May 21 to July 27, 2009 at the ARM SGP site) using their All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA) instrument. The objective was to develop a suite of cloud property data products for the ASIVA instrument that could be implemented in real time and tailored for cloud modelers. This final report describes Solmirus’ research and findings enabled by this grant. The primary objective of this award was to develop a diurnal sky cover (SC) data product utilizing the ASIVA’s infrared (IR) radiometrically-calibrated data and is described in detail. Other data products discussed in this report include the sky cover derived from ASIVA’s visible channel and precipitable water vapor, cloud temperature (both brightness and color), and cloud height inferred from ASIVA’s IR channels.

  13. Impact of land-sea breezes at different scales on the diurnal rainfall in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Wang, Shih-Yu

    2014-10-01

    The formation mechanism of diurnal rainfall in Taiwan is commonly recognized as a result of local forcings involving solar thermal heating and island-scale land-sea breeze (LSB) interacting with orography. This study found that the diurnal variation of the large-scale circulation over the East Asia-Western North Pacific (EAWNP) modulates considerably the diurnal rainfall in Taiwan. It is shown that the interaction between the two LSB systems—the island-scale LSB and the large-scale LSB over EAWNP—facilitates the formation of the early morning rainfall in western Taiwan, afternoon rainfall in central Taiwan, and nighttime rainfall in eastern Taiwan. Moreover, the post-1998 strengthening of a shallow, low-level southerly wind belt along the coast of Southeast China appears to intensify the diurnal rainfall activity in Taiwan. These findings reveal the role of the large-scale LSB and its long-term variation in the modulation of local diurnal rainfall.

  14. Lidar observation campaigns on diurnal variations of the sodium layer in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jihong

    2016-07-01

    Based on observations from daytime lidars in eastern China, diurnal cycles of the sodium layer over Beijing (40.5°N, 116°E) are investigated. Diurnal variations of Na density, root mean square (RMS) layer width, and centroid height of the sodium layer are analyzed. Results reveal that the large diurnal cycles of the sodium layer are controlled mainly by 24-hr oscillations at the Beijing observation site. The diurnal variation over Beijing was controlled principally by photoionization and photochemistry effects during another campaign, and there was little evidence of direct tidal perturbations. The comparisons suggest that the diurnal variation of the sodium layer perhaps has obvious regional characteristics across China. The variation can be either controlled mainly by tidal perturbations or by photoionization and photochemistry effects in different seasons.

  15. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  16. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenstein, O.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand / biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  17. [Diurnal and seasonal variations of energy balance over Horqin meadow].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-dong; Guan, De-Xin; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Ren, Yan; Wang, An-Zhi; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Based on the measurements of eddy flux and micrometeorological factors, this paper analyzed the diurnal and seasonal variations of energy balance over Horqin meadow. The results showed that annual energy balance ratio (EBR) of the eddy covariance system was 0.77, and EBR was biggest in growing season, middle in bare soil period and smallest in snow-covered period. Diurnal variations of energy components all presented bell-shaped curves. The peak of net radiation appeared around 12:00 and peaks of other components slightly lagged. Seasonal variation of net radiation presented a single-peak curve, and the annual average was 5.71 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1). Seasonal variation of latent heat flux was similar to that of net radiation, and the annual average was 2.84 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1). Seasonal variation of sensible heat flux presented a double-peak curve, and the peaks appeared in April and September, respectively. Annual averaged sensible heat flux was 1.87 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1). Maximum soil heat flux (3.47 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1)) appeared in April, and the soil heat flux became negative after September. Annual budget ratios of energy components presented a decreasing order of latent heat flux, sensible heat flux and soil heat flux, which accounted for 49.8%, 35.8% and 3.1% of net radiation, respectively. Seasonal variation of Bowen ratio (beta) presented a 'U' shape, and the annual average was 1.61. beta was small (0.18) and relatively stable in growing season, while it was large (2.39) and fluctuated severely in non-growing season.

  18. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales. PMID:25437760

  19. Diurnality as an energy-saving strategy: energetic consequences of temporal niche switching in small mammals.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Gorter, Jenke A; Riede, Sjaak J; Hut, Roelof A

    2015-08-01

    Endogenous daily (circadian) rhythms allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment. Most mammals are specialized to be active during the night (nocturnal) or day (diurnal). However, typically nocturnal mammals become diurnal when energetically challenged by cold or hunger. The circadian thermo-energetics (CTE) hypothesis predicts that diurnal activity patterns reduce daily energy expenditure (DEE) compared with nocturnal activity patterns. Here, we tested the CTE hypothesis by quantifying the energetic consequences of relevant environmental factors in mice. Under natural conditions, diurnality reduces DEE by 6-10% in energetically challenged mice. Combined with night-time torpor, as observed in mice under prolonged food scarcity, DEE can be reduced by ∼20%. The dominant factor determining the energetic benefit of diurnality is thermal buffering provided by a sheltered resting location. Compared with nocturnal animals, diurnal animals encounter higher ambient temperatures during both day and night, leading to reduced thermogenesis costs in temperate climates. Analysis of weather station data shows that diurnality is energetically beneficial on almost all days of the year in a temperate climate region. Furthermore, diurnality provides energetic benefits at all investigated geographical locations on European longitudinal and latitudinal transects. The reduction of DEE by diurnality provides an ultimate explanation for temporal niche switching observed in typically nocturnal small mammals under energetically challenging conditions. Diurnality allows mammals to compensate for reductions in food availability and temperature as it reduces energetic needs. The optimal circadian organization of an animal ultimately depends on the balance between energetic consequences and other fitness consequences of the selected temporal niche.

  20. Diurnal variation of oxygen and carbonate system parameters in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Dufore, C.; Smiley, N.; Jackson, C.; Halley, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen and carbonate system parameters were measured, in situ, over diurnal cycles in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay, Florida. All system parameters showed distinct diurnal trends in Tampa Bay with an average range of diurnal variation of 39.1 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 165.1 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.22 for pH, 0.093 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 218.1 μatm for pCO2. Average range of diurnal variation for system parameters in Tampa Bay was 73% to 93% of the seasonal range of variability for dissolved oxygen and pH. All system parameters measured in Florida Bay showed distinct variation over diurnal time-scales. However, clear diurnal trends were less evident. The average range of diurnal variability in Florida Bay was 62.8 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 130.4 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.13 for pH, 0.053 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 139.8 μatm for pCO2. The average range of diurnal variation was 14% to 102% of the seasonal ranges for these parameters. Diurnal variability in system parameters was most influenced by primary productivity and respiration of benthic communities in Tampa Bay, and by precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate in Florida Bay. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability may impart significant error in calculations of annual carbon and oxygen budgets. These observations reinforce the need for higher temporal resolution measurements of oxygen and carbon system parameters in coastal ecosystems.

  1. Inferring land surface parameters from the diurnal variability of microwave and infrared temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, Hamidreza; Temimi, Marouane; AghaKouchak, Amir; Azarderakhsh, Marzieh; Khanbilvardi, Reza; Shields, Gerarda; Tesfagiorgis, Kibrewossen

    This study investigates the properties of the diurnal cycle of microwave brightness temperatures (TB), namely the phase and the amplitude, and their variability in time and space over the globe to infer information on key land surface parameters like changes in soil texture spatial distribution, soil moisture conditions, and vegetation density. The phase corresponds to the lag between Land Surface Temperature (LST) and TB diurnal cycles. The amplitude is determined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum of TB diurnal cycle. The diurnal cycle of TB was constructed using observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The latter offer a series of sensors, namely, F13, F14, and F15 that were used in this study for a higher temporal coverage and more accurate diurnal cycle determination. LST estimates, which are available every 3 h from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database were used to build the LST diurnal cycle. ISCCP LST data is an infrared-based temperature with almost no penetration and is the representative of top skin temperature. The analyses of the diurnal cycles showed that the diurnal amplitude of TB decreases as the vegetation density increases, especially in the case of low frequencies which penetrate deeper into the canopy which makes them more sensitive to changes in vegetation density. The interannual variations of TB diurnal amplitudes were also in agreement with the seasonality of the vegetation cover. Over desert and rain forest regions where surface conditions do not vary significantly throughout the year, the changes in diurnal amplitudes were the lowest. A relationship between phase and amplitude values was established. It was found that the amplitude of TB diurnal cycle decreases when the phase lag increases. The spatial distribution of the determined diurnal properties, namely, phase and amplitude of TB

  2. The Efficacy of a Transurethral Incision for Diurnal and Nocturnal Enuresis in Young Males

    PubMed Central

    Tobu, Shohei; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Takahara, Kohei; Ichibagase, Yuka; Ikoma, Saya; Udo, Kazuma; Nanri, Maki; Uozumi, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we investigated the effects of treatment with a transurethral incision (TUI) for congenital urethral stenosis, which was accompanied by diurnal and nocturnal enuresis. Methods We recruited 21 young males who presented to our department for the treatment of diurnal and nocturnal enuresis from January 2010 to March 2014. All patients underwent TUI due to urethral stricture found by a close investigation. We surveyed each case to evaluate the improvement of diurnal and/or nocturnal enuresis after TUI. Results One and a half years after TUI, an improvement in diurnal enuresis was observed in 17 of 21 cases (80.9%), whereas that of nocturnal enuresis was observe in only 7 of 21 cases (33.3%), showing the significant contribution of TUI to the improvement of diurnal enuresis (p = 0.001). In the case of diurnal enuresis, continual improvement was observed more than a year after surgery, whereas no improvement was observed in nocturnal enuresis at more than 6 months after surgery. Conclusion TUI is more effective for diurnal enuresis than nocturnal enuresis. At postoperative 6 months, clinicians should thus consider other etiologies for unresponsive cases and start other treatment options. PMID:27390580

  3. Diurnal variations of mesospheric ozone obtained by ground-based microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zommerfelds, W. C.; Kunzi, K. F.; Summers, M. E.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Strobel, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    From December 1986 until April 1987 ground-based microwave observations of the diurnal variation of mesospheric ozone were made over Bern, Switzerland. These data were of sufficient quality to define the characteristics diurnal behavior of the ozone mixing ratio during winter and equinoctial conditions. The observed diurnal variation of ozone peaks at about 74 km, where its amplitude is about a factor of 6. At 65 km the observed diurnal variation is a factor of 3, whereas at 55 km it is only a factor of 1.4. One-dimensional model calculations accurately reproduce the relative diurnal variation of ozone at equinox, suggesting that the model value of the ozone photolysis rate coefficient is accurate to better that 10 percent. For winter conditions, however, the model underpredicts the observed relative diurnal variation by a factor of 2; a major part of this discrepancy is due to an observed postmidnight increase in ozone. Various suggested changes in model parameters to better produce the ozone abundance vertical profile result in only small differences in the relative diurnal variation, indicating that these observations do not provide a sensitive test of the mesospheric chemistry controlling the abundance of odd oxygen.

  4. Regional Climate Simulations of Summer Diurnal Rainfall Variations over East Asia and Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.-R.; Chan, J. C. L.

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluates the simulations of summer (June-August) precipitation over East Asia by the Regional Climate Model Version 3 (RegCM3), with emphasis on the diurnal variations of precipitation over Southeast China (PSEC) during the 1998-2002 summer seasons. The evaluation focuses on the maintenance mechanisms of the diurnal variations in PSEC as proposed by previous observational studies. It is found that the diurnal variations of PSEC are sensitive to the choice of cumulus parameterization schemes (CPSs). In particular, the Grell scheme with the Frisch-Chappell convective closure assumption (GFC) produces reasonable diurnal variations of PSEC. Other CPSs such as the Emanuel scheme produces a weaker late-afternoon maximum of PSEC, and the Kuo scheme as well as the Grell scheme with the Arakawa-Schubert closure assumption (GAS) is unable to simulate the occurrence of the late-afternoon maximum of PSEC. The simulations show that the adoption of the GFC scheme reproduces the large-scale land-sea breeze circulation and the moisture flux convergence that have been documented by previous studies as the maintenance mechanisms of the diurnal variations of PSEC. This feature illustrates the importance of convective cloud feedback at the diurnal timescale in maintaining the large-scale circulation. Furthermore, when the simulation domain covers the entire Tibetan Plateau, the diurnal variations of precipitation over East Asia are found to exhibit a noticeable improvement without changes in the physics schemes.

  5. Multiscale Interactions over the Maritime Continent: Feedbacks between Atmospheric Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves and Diurnal Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, D.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKW), initiated over the Indian Ocean, and the diurnally varying convection over the Maritime Continent are primary interest of this presentation. Mutliscale interactions between local and propagating convection lead to substantial enhancement of the local diurnal cycle over that region. CCKW activity strongly modulates magnitude of the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the Maritime Continent, but not its temporal evolution, which maintains characteristics of a diurnal cycle. The impact is such that precipitation is highly increased during convective part of the CCKW and little suppressed during its non-convective part. Timing of the increase in diurnal cycle magnitude strongly depends on the time of the day of the CCKW approach to the Maritime Continent. It is shown that precipitation anomaly associated with CCKW is phase locked with local diurnal cycle of precipitation over the Maritime Continent and that has implications for CCKW ability to propagate across that region. The composite daily-zonal evolution of the precipitation anomaly associated with CCKW is such that it is "in-phase" with local diurnal cycle over Sumatra, Borneo and surrounding seas. This presentation is based on analysis of TRMM precipitation data and newly developed CCKW trajectories database.

  6. Sensitivity of Amazonian TOA flux diurnal cycle composite monthly variability to choice of reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, J. Brant; Taylor, Patrick C.

    2016-05-01

    Amazonian deep convection experiences a strong diurnal cycle driven by the cycle in surface sensible heat flux, which contributes to a significant diurnal cycle in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux. Even when accounting for seasonal variability, the TOA flux diurnal cycle varies significantly on the monthly timescale. Previous work shows evidence supporting a connection between variability in the convective and radiative cycles, likely modulated by variability in monthly atmospheric state (e.g., convective instability). The hypothesized relationships are further investigated with regression analysis of the radiative diurnal cycle and atmospheric state using additional meteorological variables representing convective instability and upper tropospheric humidity. The results are recalculated with three different reanalyses to test the reliability of the results. The radiative diurnal cycle sensitivity to upper tropospheric humidity is about equal in magnitude to that of convective instability. In addition, the results are recalculated with the data subdivided into the wet and dry seasons. Overall, clear-sky radiative effects have a dominant role in radiative diurnal cycle variability during the dry season. Because of this, even in a convectively active region, the clear-sky radiative effects must be accounted for in order to fully explain the monthly variability in diurnal cycle. Finally, while there is general agreement between the different reanalysis-based results when examining the full data time domain (without regard to time of year), there are significant disagreements when the data are divided into wet and dry seasons. The questionable reliability of reanalysis data is a major limitation.

  7. Profiles of ocean surface heating (POSH): A new model of upper ocean diurnal warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentemann, Chelle L.; Minnett, Peter J.; Ward, Brian

    2009-07-01

    Shipboard radiometric measurements of diurnal warming at the ocean surface and profiles through the diurnal thermocline were utilized to assess the temporal and vertical variability and to develop a new physics-based model of near-surface warming. The measurements and modeled diurnal warming were compared, with the goal of comprehensively evaluating differences between the data and model results. On the basis of these results, the diurnal model was refined while attempting to maintain agreement with the measurements. Simplified bulk models commonly do not provide information on the vertical structure within the warm layer, but this new model predicts the vertical temperature profile within the diurnal thermocline using an empirically derived function dependent on wind speed. The vertical profile of temperature provides both a straightforward methodology for modeling differences due to diurnal warming between measurements made at different depths (e.g., in situ measurements at various depths and measurements of the surface temperatures by satellite radiometers) and information on upper ocean thermal structure. Additionally, the model estimates of diurnal warming at the ocean surface are important for air-sea heat and gas flux calculations, blending satellite sea surface temperature fields, and air-sea interaction studies.

  8. Diurnal cycling of urban aerosols under different weather regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorič, Asta; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Remškar, Maja; Vaupotič, Janja; Stanič, Samo

    2016-04-01

    A one month measurement campaign was performed in summer 2014 in Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia (population 280,000), aiming to study temporal and spatial distribution of urban aerosols and the mixing state of primary and secondary aerosols. Two background locations were chosen for this purpose, the first one in the city center (urban background - KIS) and the second one in the suburban background (Brezovica). Simultaneous measurements of black carbon (BC) and particle number size distribution of submicron aerosols (PM1) were conducted at both locations. In the summer season emission from traffic related sources is expected to be the main local contribution to BC concentration. Concentrations of aerosol species and gaseous pollutants within the planetary boundary layer are controlled by the balance between emission sources of primary aerosols and gases, production of secondary aerosols, chemical reactions of precursor gases under solar radiation and the rate of dilution by mixing within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) as well as with tropospheric air. Only local emission sources contribute to BC concentration during the stable PBL with low mixing layer height, whereas during the time of fully mixed PBL, regionally transported BC and other aerosols can contribute to the surface measurements. The study describes the diurnal behaviour of the submicron aerosol at the urban and suburban background location under different weather regimes. Particles in three size modes - nucleation (< 25 nm, NUM), Aitken (25 - 90 nm, AIM) and accumulation mode (90 - 800 nm, ACM), as well as BC mass concentration were evaluated separately for sunny, cloudy and rainy days, taking into account modelled values of PBL height. Higher particle number and black carbon concentrations were observed at the urban background (KIS) than at the suburban background location (Brezovica). Significant diurnal pattern of total particle concentration and black carbon concentration was observed at both

  9. Diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance of plants in naturally high UV environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Slusser, James R; Gao, Wei; Ryel, Ronald J

    2008-06-01

    Studies were conducted on three herbaceous plant species growing in naturally high solar UV environments in the subalpine of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA, to determine if diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance (T(UV)) occur in these species, and to test whether manipulation of the solar radiation regime could alter these diurnal patterns. Additional field studies were conducted at Logan, Utah, USA, to determine if solar UV was causing diurnal T(UV) changes and to evaluate the relationship between diurnal changes in T(UV) and UV-absorbing pigments. Under clear skies, T(UV), as measured with a UV-A-pulse amplitude modulation fluorometer for leaves of Verbascum thapsus and Oenothera stricta growing in native soils and Vicia faba growing in pots, was highest at predawn and sunset and lowest at midday. These patterns in T(UV) closely tracked diurnal changes in solar radiation and were the result of correlated changes in fluorescence induced by UV-A and blue radiation but not photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) or initial fluorescence yield (F(o)). The magnitude of the midday reduction in T(UV) was greater for young leaves than for older leaves of Verbascum. Imposition of artificial shade eliminated the diurnal changes in T(UV) in Verbascum, but reduction in solar UV had no effect on diurnal T(UV) changes in Vicia. In Vicia, the diurnal changes in T(UV) occurred without detectable changes in the concentration of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds. Results suggest that plants actively control diurnal changes in UV shielding, and these changes occur in response to signals other than solar UV; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for rapid changes in T(UV) remain unclear. PMID:18346077

  10. Reproducibility of summertime diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility of diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models in their historical runs were evaluated, in comparison with station data (NCDC-9813) and satellite data (GSMaP-V5). We first calculated diurnal cycles by averaging precipitation at each local solar time (LST) in June-July-August during 1981-2000 over the continent of northern Eurasia (0-180E, 45-90N). Then we examined occurrence time of maximum precipitation and a contribution of diurnally varying precipitation to the total precipitation.The contribution of diurnal precipitation was about 21% in both NCDC-9813 and GSMaP-V5. The maximum precipitation occurred at 18LST in NCDC-9813 but 16LST in GSMaP-V5, indicating some uncertainties even in the observational datasets. The diurnal contribution of the CMIP5 models varied largely from 11% to 62%, and their timing of the precipitation maximum ranged from 11LST to 20LST. Interestingly, the contribution and the timing had strong negative correlation of -0.65. The models with larger diurnal precipitation showed precipitation maximum earlier around noon. Next, we compared sensitivity of precipitation to surface temperature and tropospheric humidity between 5 models with large diurnal precipitation (LDMs) and 5 models with small diurnal precipitation (SDMs). Precipitation in LDMs showed high sensitivity to surface temperature, indicating its close relationship with local instability. On the other hand, synoptic disturbances were more active in SDMs with a dominant role of the large scale condensation, and precipitation in SDMs was more related with tropospheric moisture. Therefore, the relative importance of the local instability and the synoptic disturbances was suggested to be an important factor in determining the contribution and timing of the diurnal precipitation. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

  11. Diurnal Variations of Titan's Surface Temperatures From Cassini -CIRS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor; Jennings, Don; Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert; Irwin, Patrick; Flasar, F. Michael

    The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, are providing us with the ability to detect the surface temperature of the planet by studying its outgoing radiance through a spectral window in the thermal infrared at 19 m (530 cm-1) characterized by low opacity. Since the first acquisitions of CIRS Titan data the in-strument has gathered a large amount of spectra covering a wide range of latitudes, longitudes and local times. We retrieve the surface temperature and the atmospheric temperature pro-file by modeling proper zonally averaged spectra of nadir observations with radiative transfer computations. Our forward model uses the correlated-k approximation for spectral opacity to calculate the emitted radiance, including contributions from collision induced pairs of CH4, N2 and H2, haze, and gaseous emission lines (Irwin et al. 2008). The retrieval method uses a non-linear least-squares optimal estimation technique to iteratively adjust the model parameters to achieve a spectral fit (Rodgers 2000). We show an accurate selection of the wide amount of data available in terms of footprint diameter on the planet and observational conditions, together with the retrieved results. Our results represent formal retrievals of surface brightness temperatures from the Cassini CIRS dataset using a full radiative transfer treatment, and we compare to the earlier findings of Jennings et al. (2009). The application of our methodology over wide areas has increased the planet coverage and accuracy of our knowledge of Titan's surface brightness temperature. In particular we had the chance to look for diurnal variations in surface temperature around the equator: a trend with slowly increasing temperature toward the late afternoon reveals that diurnal temperature changes are present on Titan surface. References: Irwin, P.G.J., et al.: "The NEMESIS planetary atmosphere radiative transfer and retrieval tool" (2008). JQSRT, Vol. 109, pp

  12. Wavy and Cycloidal Lineament Formation on Europa from Combined Diurnal and Nonsynchronous Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleeson, Damhnait; Crawford, Zane; Barr, Amy C.; Mullen, McCall; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Prockter, Louise M.; Stempel, Michelle M.; Wahr, John

    2005-01-01

    In a companion abstract, we show that fractures propagated into combined diurnal and nonsynchronous rotation (NSR) stress fields can be cycloidal, "wavy," or arcuate in planform as the relative proportion of NSR stress in increased. These transitions occur as NSR stress accumulates over approx. 0 to 10 deg of ice shell rotation, for average fracture propagation speeds of approx. 1 to 3 m/s. Here we consider the NSR speed parameter space for these morphological transitions, and explore the effects on cycloids of adding NSR to diurnal stress. Fitting individual Europan lineaments can constrain the combined NSR plus diurnal stress field at the time of formation.

  13. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  14. Diurnal changes of earthquake activity and geomagnetic Sq-variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, G.; Ruzhin, Y.

    Statistic analyses demonstrate that the probability of earthquake occurrence in many earthquake regions strongly depends on the time of day, that is on Local Time (e.g. Conrad, 1909, 1932; Shimshoni, 1971; Duma, 1997; Duma and Vilardo, 1998). This also applies to strong earthquake activity. Moreover, recent observations reveal an involvement of the regular diurnal variations of the Earth's magnetic field, commonly known as Sq-variations, in this geodynamic process of changing earthquake activity with the time of day (Duma, 1996, 1999). In the article it is attempted to quantify the forces which result from the interaction between the induced Sq-variation currents in the Earth's lithosphere and the regional Earth's magnetic field, in order to assess the influence on the tectonic stress field and on seismic activity. A reliable model is obtained, which indicates a high energy involved in this process. The effect of Sq-induction is compared with the results of the large scale electromagnetic experiment "Khibiny" (Velikhov, 1989), where a giant artificial current loop was activated in the Barents Sea.

  15. Diurnal characteristics of volatile organic compounds in the Seoul atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Kwangsam; Kim, Yong Pyo; Moon, Kil Choo

    Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at a site in central Seoul from 8 to 13 September 1998. On each sampling day, three 2-h-integrated canister samples were collected in the morning, afternoon and evening, respectively, to observe diural variations of VOCs. Most of the VOCs species showed diurnal variations with higher concentrations during the morning and evening, and lower concentrations during the afternoon. However, in the afternoon, the concentrations of aromatic compounds, closely correlated with solvent usage such as toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-xylene, and o-xylene, were slightly higher than or comparable to those in the morning. This may be due to the increase of evaporative emissions derived from the rise in ambient temperature and additional sources such as the use of solvents in painting, printing and dry cleaning. To estimate the participation of individual VOCs in ozone formation, propylene equivalent concentrations were calculated. The results showed that toluene was the most dominant contributor to ozone formation as well as ambient VOC concentrations. Toluene/benzene and m-/ p-xylene/benzene ratios showed a high observed in the afternoon and a low observed in the morning and evening. This may be because the contribution of evaporative emissions by solvent usage on the ambient VOC concentrations is more dominant than those of vehicle-related emissions and photochemical loss.

  16. Diurnal modulation signal from dissipative hidden sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, R.; Vagnozzi, S.

    2015-09-01

    We consider a simple generic dissipative dark matter model: a hidden sector featuring two dark matter particles charged under an unbroken U(1) ‧ interaction. Previous work has shown that such a model has the potential to explain dark matter phenomena on both large and small scales. In this framework, the dark matter halo in spiral galaxies features nontrivial dynamics, with the halo energy loss due to dissipative interactions balanced by a heat source. Ordinary supernovae can potentially supply this heat provided kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength ɛ ∼10-9. This type of kinetically mixed dark matter can be probed in direct detection experiments. Importantly, this self-interacting dark matter can be captured within the Earth and shield a dark matter detector from the halo wind, giving rise to a diurnal modulation effect. We estimate the size of this effect for detectors located in the Southern hemisphere, and find that the modulation is large (≳ 10%) for a wide range of parameters.

  17. Large diurnal temperature range increases bird sensitivity to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Climate variability is changing on multiple temporal scales, and little is known of the consequences of increases in short-term variability, particularly in endotherms. Using mortality data with high temporal resolution of zebra finches living in large outdoor aviaries (5 years, 359.220 bird-days), we show that mortality rate increases almost two-fold per 1°C increase in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Interestingly, the DTR effect differed between two groups with low versus high experimentally manipulated foraging costs, reflecting a typical laboratory ‘easy’ foraging environment and a ‘hard’ semi-natural environment respectively. DTR increased mortality on days with low minimum temperature in the easy foraging environment, but on days with high minimum temperature in the semi-natural environment. Thus, in a natural environment DTR effects will become increasingly important in a warming world, something not detectable in an ‘easy’ laboratory environment. These effects were particularly apparent at young ages. Critical time window analyses showed that the effect of DTR on mortality is delayed up to three months, while effects of minimum temperature occurred within a week. These results show that daily temperature variability can substantially impact the population viability of endothermic species. PMID:26563993

  18. Passive Microwave Observation of Diurnal Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Swift, Calvin T.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave radiometers operating at low frequencies are sensitive to surface soil moisture changes. Few studies have been conducted that have involved multifrequency observations at frequencies low enough to measure a significant soil depth and not be attenuated by the vegetation cover. Another unexplored aspect of microwave observations at low frequencies has been the impact of diurnal variations of the soil moisture and temperature on brightness temperature. In this investigation, observations were made using a dual frequency radiometer (1.4 and 2.65 GHz) over bare soil and corn for extended periods in 1994. Comparisons of emissivity and volumetric soil moisture at four depths for bare soils showed that there was a clear correspondence between the 1 cm soil moisture and the 2.65-GHz emissivity and between the 3-5 cm soil moisture and the 1.4-GHZ emissivity, which confirms previous studies. Observations during drying and rainfall demonstrate that new and unique information for hydrologic and energy balance studies can be extracted from these data.

  19. An Improved Simulation of the Diurnally Varying Street Canyon Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Kleissl, Jan; Paw U, Kyaw Tha

    2012-11-01

    The impact of diurnal variation of temperature distribution over building and ground surfaces on the wind flow and scalar transport in street canyons is numerically investigated using the PArallelized LES Model (PALM). The Temperature of Urban Facets Indoor-Outdoor Building Energy Simulator (TUF-IOBES) is used for predicting urban surface heat fluxes as boundary conditions for a modified version of PALM. TUF-IOBES dynamically simulates indoor and outdoor building surface temperatures and heat fluxes in an urban area taking into account weather conditions, indoor heat sources, building and urban material properties, composition of the building envelope (e.g. windows, insulation), and HVAC equipment. Temperature (and heat flux) distribution over urban surfaces of the 3-D raster-type geometry of TUF-IOBES makes it possible to provide realistic, high resolution boundary conditions for the numerical simulation of flow and scalar transport in an urban canopy. Compared to some previous analyses using uniformly distributed thermal forcing associated with urban surfaces, the present analysis shows that resolving non-uniform thermal forcings can provide more detailed and realistic patterns of the local air flow and pollutant dispersion in urban canyons.

  20. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  1. Large diurnal temperature range increases bird sensitivity to climate change.

    PubMed

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Climate variability is changing on multiple temporal scales, and little is known of the consequences of increases in short-term variability, particularly in endotherms. Using mortality data with high temporal resolution of zebra finches living in large outdoor aviaries (5 years, 359.220 bird-days), we show that mortality rate increases almost two-fold per 1°C increase in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Interestingly, the DTR effect differed between two groups with low versus high experimentally manipulated foraging costs, reflecting a typical laboratory 'easy' foraging environment and a 'hard' semi-natural environment respectively. DTR increased mortality on days with low minimum temperature in the easy foraging environment, but on days with high minimum temperature in the semi-natural environment. Thus, in a natural environment DTR effects will become increasingly important in a warming world, something not detectable in an 'easy' laboratory environment. These effects were particularly apparent at young ages. Critical time window analyses showed that the effect of DTR on mortality is delayed up to three months, while effects of minimum temperature occurred within a week. These results show that daily temperature variability can substantially impact the population viability of endothermic species. PMID:26563993

  2. Diurnal Variations of Thermal Roughness Height over a Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun

    The thermal roughness height associated with the surface radiation temperature has been previously found to vary between different surface types. This study finds that the thermal roughness height varies diurnally even over a homogeneous senescent grassland. The corresponding roughness length for momentum is relatively constant.Both the aerodynamic temperature and the surface radiation temperature are found to be closely related to the air temperature in the middle of the grass canopy. However, the aerodynamic temperature is strongly influenced by the horizontally integrated heat transfer, while the surface radiation temperature represents the integrated thermal emission through the grass depth within the field of view of the radiometer. The aerodynamic temperature is less sensitive to variations and measurement errors in sensible heat flux, wind speed, and air temperature than the thermal roughness height. We find that formulating the aerodynamic temperature in terms of the surface radiation temperature is better posed for use in the bulk formula than using the surface radiation temperature directly and adjusting the thermal roughness length.

  3. Winter habitat associations of diurnal raptors in Californias Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pandolrno, E.R.; Herzog, M.P.; Hooper, S.L.; Smith, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The wintering raptors of California's Central Valley are abundant and diverse. Despite this, little information exists on the habitats used by these birds in winter. We recorded diurnal raptors along 19 roadside survey routes throughout the Central Valley for three consecutive winters between 2007 and 2010. We obtained data sufficient to determine significant positive and negative habitat associations for the White-tailed Kite (Elanus leucurus), Bald Eagle {Haliaeetus leucocephalus), Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus), Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis), Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus), American Kestrel (Falco sparverius), and Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus). The Prairie Falcon and Ferruginous and Rough-legged hawks showed expected strong positive associations with grasslands. The Bald Eagle and Northern Harrier were positively associated not only with wetlands but also with rice. The strongest positive association for the White-tailed Kite was with wetlands. The Red-tailed Hawk was positively associated with a variety of habitat types but most strongly with wetlands and rice. The American Kestrel, Northern Harrier, and White-tailed Kite were positively associated with alfalfa. Nearly all species were negatively associated with urbanized landscapes, orchards, and other intensive forms of agriculture. The White-tailed Kite, Northern Harrier, Redtailed Hawk, Ferruginous Hawk, and American Kestrel showed significant negative associations with oak savanna. Given the rapid conversion of the Central Valley to urban and intensive agricultural uses over the past few decades, these results have important implications for conservation of these wintering raptors in this region.

  4. Industrial emissions cause extreme urban ozone diurnal variability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renyi; Lei, Wenfang; Tie, Xuexi; Hess, Peter

    2004-04-27

    Simulations with a regional chemical transport model show that anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO(2)) lead to a dramatic diurnal variation of surface ozone (O(3)) in Houston, Texas. During the daytime, photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds catalyzed by NO(x) results in episodes of elevated ambient O(3) levels significantly exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. The O(3) production rate in Houston is significantly higher than those found in other cities over the United States. At night, a surface NO(x) maximum occurs because of continuous NO emission from industrial sources, and, consequently, an extensive urban-scale "hole" of surface ozone (<10 parts per billion by volume in the entire Houston area) is formed as a result of O(3) removal by NO. The results suggest that consideration of regulatory control of O(3) precursor emissions from the industrial sources is essential to formulate ozone abatement strategies in this region. PMID:15084740

  5. Industrial emissions cause extreme urban ozone diurnal variability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renyi; Lei, Wenfang; Tie, Xuexi; Hess, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Simulations with a regional chemical transport model show that anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) lead to a dramatic diurnal variation of surface ozone (O3) in Houston, Texas. During the daytime, photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds catalyzed by NOx results in episodes of elevated ambient O3 levels significantly exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. The O3 production rate in Houston is significantly higher than those found in other cities over the United States. At night, a surface NOx maximum occurs because of continuous NO emission from industrial sources, and, consequently, an extensive urban-scale “hole” of surface ozone (<10 parts per billion by volume in the entire Houston area) is formed as a result of O3 removal by NO. The results suggest that consideration of regulatory control of O3 precursor emissions from the industrial sources is essential to formulate ozone abatement strategies in this region. PMID:15084740

  6. Diurnal temperature fluctuations in an artificial small shallow water body.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Adrie F G; Heusinkveld, Bert G; Kraai, Aline; Paaijmans, Krijn P

    2008-03-01

    For aquatic biological processes, diurnal and annual cycles of water temperature are very important to plants as well as to animals and microbes living in the water. An existing one-dimensional model has been extended to simulate the temperature profile within a small water body. A year-round outdoor experiment has been conducted to estimate the model input parameters and to verify the model. Both model simulations and measurements show a strong temperature stratification in the water during daytime. Throughout the night, however, a well-mixed layer starting at the water surface develops. Because the water body is relatively small, it appears that the sediment heat flux has a strong effect on the behaviour of the water temperature throughout the seasons. In spring, the water temperature remains relatively low due to the cold surrounding soil, while in autumn the opposite occurs due to the relatively warm soil. It appears that, in small water bodies, the total amount of incoming long wave radiation is sensitive to the sky view factor. In our experiments, the intensity of precipitation also appears to have a small effect on the stratification of the water temperature. PMID:17926069

  7. Diurnal temperature fluctuations in an artificial small shallow water body.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Adrie F G; Heusinkveld, Bert G; Kraai, Aline; Paaijmans, Krijn P

    2008-03-01

    For aquatic biological processes, diurnal and annual cycles of water temperature are very important to plants as well as to animals and microbes living in the water. An existing one-dimensional model has been extended to simulate the temperature profile within a small water body. A year-round outdoor experiment has been conducted to estimate the model input parameters and to verify the model. Both model simulations and measurements show a strong temperature stratification in the water during daytime. Throughout the night, however, a well-mixed layer starting at the water surface develops. Because the water body is relatively small, it appears that the sediment heat flux has a strong effect on the behaviour of the water temperature throughout the seasons. In spring, the water temperature remains relatively low due to the cold surrounding soil, while in autumn the opposite occurs due to the relatively warm soil. It appears that, in small water bodies, the total amount of incoming long wave radiation is sensitive to the sky view factor. In our experiments, the intensity of precipitation also appears to have a small effect on the stratification of the water temperature.

  8. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R. H.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between Ka-band temperature estimates, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR) temperature estimates and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the models ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations have only a small delay of about 15 min with the TIR observations which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  9. Diurnal variation of the global electric circuit from clustered thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Michael L.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Brundell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The diurnal variation of the global electric circuit is investigated using the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), which has been shown to identify nearly all thunderstorms (using WWLLN data from 2005). To create an estimate of global electric circuit activity, a clustering algorithm is applied to the WWLLN data set to identify global thunderstorms from 2010 to 2013. Annual, seasonal, and regional thunderstorm activity is investigated in this new WWLLN thunderstorm data set in order to estimate the source behavior of the global electric circuit. Through the clustering algorithm, the total number of active thunderstorms are counted every 30 min creating a measure of the global electric circuit source function. The thunderstorm clusters are compared to precipitation radar data from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission satellite and with case studies of thunderstorm evolution. The clustering algorithm reveals an average of 660±70 thunderstorms active at any given time with a peak-to-peak variation of 36%. The highest number of thunderstorms occurs in November (720±90), and the lowest number occurs in January (610±80). Thunderstorm cluster and electrified storm cloud activity are combined with thunderstorm overflight current measurements to estimate the global electric circuit thunderstorm contribution current to be 1090±70 A with a variation of 24%. By utilizing the global coverage and high time resolution of WWLLN, the total active thunderstorm count and current is shown to be less than previous estimates based on compiled climatologies.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Diurnal Variation in Martian Surface Fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, A.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2001-11-01

    A one-dimensional model of the formation and evolution of the Martian surface fogs is presented. The model includes the micro-physical processes of coagulation, heterogeneous nucleation, condensation, and sublimation. It simulates the diurnal variations in the radii of ice-coated particles and hence the water ice volume on the particles within a 1 km thick layer near the surface. The temperature and pressure profiles used are obtained from the European Martian Climate Database (Forget et al., 1999, JGR, 104, 24155). The places of the Pathfinder landing site (19.2N, 33.2W) and the Memnonia region (15.0S, 145.0W) where the surface fogs were imaged by Viking Orbiter 1 were selected for the simulations. Although the vertical water vapor profile is not well known, the recent data from the Imager for the Mars Pathfinder indicate that the mixing ratio can be as high as 600 ppm in the near surface layer of 1 to 3 km. The dependence of fog formation on the value of this mixing ratio is also discussed. This research was carried out under partial support of JSPS Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  11. Large diurnal temperature range increases bird sensitivity to climate change.

    PubMed

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-11-13

    Climate variability is changing on multiple temporal scales, and little is known of the consequences of increases in short-term variability, particularly in endotherms. Using mortality data with high temporal resolution of zebra finches living in large outdoor aviaries (5 years, 359.220 bird-days), we show that mortality rate increases almost two-fold per 1°C increase in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Interestingly, the DTR effect differed between two groups with low versus high experimentally manipulated foraging costs, reflecting a typical laboratory 'easy' foraging environment and a 'hard' semi-natural environment respectively. DTR increased mortality on days with low minimum temperature in the easy foraging environment, but on days with high minimum temperature in the semi-natural environment. Thus, in a natural environment DTR effects will become increasingly important in a warming world, something not detectable in an 'easy' laboratory environment. These effects were particularly apparent at young ages. Critical time window analyses showed that the effect of DTR on mortality is delayed up to three months, while effects of minimum temperature occurred within a week. These results show that daily temperature variability can substantially impact the population viability of endothermic species.

  12. Quasi-Biennial Oscillation signatures in the diurnal tidal winds over Cachoeira Paulista

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues de Araujo, Luciana; Jacobi, Christoph; Batista, Paulo; Lima, Lourivaldo

    2016-07-01

    The solar diurnal tidal plays an important role in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region at low latitudes, in which its amplitude for horizontal winds maximizes around 20 degrees. The tides are excited in the lower atmosphere and stratosphere and can be affected by short and long-term local variations during their upward propagation. In this work, the meteor winds obtained over Cachoeira Paulista (22.7° S, 45.0° W), Brazil, have been used to investigate interannual variability in the amplitude of the diurnal tidal winds. The monthly diurnal tidal displays year to year variations. Amplitudes are strongest when the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) at the 30 mb level is eastward. This behavior can be observed in all seasons in the meridional component, whilst it is more clearly expressed during austral autumn in the zonal component, just when the diurnal tidal is strongest at this latitude.

  13. Thermospheric tides at equinox: Simulations with coupled composition and auroral forcings. 1. Diurnal component

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, C.G. ); Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Thermospheric tidal components calculated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermospheric general circulation model have been revised by including the effects of self-consistent composition couplings and auroral processes. Calculations are presented for equinox conditions at solar cycle minimum and maximum. The diurnal neutral winds and perturbation temperatures predicted by the model are compared with radar observations and the MSIS-86 model at low, mid, and high latitudes. Sensitivity tests indicate that the feedback between composition and dynamics affects the diurnal tidal temperature amplitudes up to 50% and the diurnal winds by about 15%. The calculated phases are within an hour of uncoupled composition calculations. Auroral processes dominate the diurnal waves at high latitudes, where the wind amplitudes may be double or triple those calculated for solar forcing only. The high-latitude energy and momentum sources must be included in the model formulations in order to reproduce observations of the September 1984 Equinox Transition Study exospheric temperatures.

  14. Consideration of diurnal variations in human blood NAD and NADP concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2009-06-01

    The sum of the urinary excretion of nicotinamide and its catabolites, which are metabolites of NAD and NADP, were observed to have clear diurnal variations in human urine. Then, we examined whether NAD and NADP in blood also showed the diurnal variation. All subjects were housed in the same facility and given the same diet during the experiment. In addition, we examined whether diurnal variations were affected by the intakes of dietary nicotinamide or not. As a result, neither the NAD nor the NADP content of the blood shows the diurnal variation regardless of the administered amount of nicotinamide. The concentrations of NAD and NADP did not increase according to the intake of nicotinamide. The existence of a mechanism by which NAD and the NADP levels of the blood are constantly maintained by the adjustment of the amount of excretion to the urinary bladder, was suggested.

  15. Variability in diurnal testosterone, exposure to violence, and antisocial behavior in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Peckins, Melissa K; Susman, Elizabeth J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide evidence of an association between within-person variability in diurnal testosterone over 1 year, lifetime exposure to violence, and the manifestation of antisocial behavior in 135 pubertal-aged adolescents across 1 year. Adolescents' sex and lifetime history of violence exposure moderated the association between within-person variability in diurnal testosterone and antisocial behavior. Furthermore, sex-stratified analyses revealed that lifetime history of exposure to violence moderated the association between within-person variability in diurnal testosterone and antisocial behavior in females only. This report is unique in that it illuminates sex differences in within-person associations among exposure to violence, individual variability in diurnal testosterone, and antisocial behavior.

  16. Resonant Third-Degree Diurnal Tides in the Seas Off Western Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Third-degree diurnal tides are estimated from long time series of sea level measurements at three North Atlantic tide gauges. Although their amplitudes are only a few mm or less, their admittances are far larger than those of second-degree diurnal tides, just as Cartwright discovered for the M(sub 1) constituent. The tides are evidently resonantly enhanced owing to high spatial correlation between the third-degree spherical harmonic of the tidal potential and a near-diurnal oceanic normal mode that is most pronounced in the North Atlantic. By estimating the ocean tidal response across the diurnal band (5 tidal constituents plus nodal modulations), the period and Q of this mode and one nearby mode are estimated.

  17. Impacts of the diurnal cycle of solar radiation on spiral rainbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shunwu; Ma, Yue; Ge, Xuyang

    2016-09-01

    Based on idealized numerical simulations, the impacts of the diurnal cycle of solar radiation on the diurnal variation of outer rainbands in a tropical cyclone are examined. It is found that cold pools associated with precipitation-driven downdrafts are essential for the growth and propagation of spiral rainbands. The downdrafts result in surface outflows, which act as a lifting mechanism to trigger the convection cell along the leading edge of the cold pools. The diurnal cycle of solar radiation may modulate the diurnal behavior of the spiral rainbands. In the daytime, shortwave radiation will suppress the outer convection and thus weaken the cold pools. Meanwhile, the limited cold pool activity leads to a strong modification of the moisture field, which in turn inhibits further convection development.

  18. Linking diurnal cycles of river flow to interannual variations in climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundquist, Jessica D.; Dettinger, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Many rivers in the Western United States have diurnal variations exceeding 10% of their mean flow in the spring and summer months. The shape and timing of the diurnal cycle is influenced by an interplay of the snow, topography, vegetation, and meteorology in a basin, and the measured result differs between wet and dry years. The largest interannual differences occur during the latter half of the melt season, as the snowline retreats to the highest elevations and most shaded slopes in a basin. In most basins, during this period, the hour of peak discharge shifts to later in the day, and the relative amplitude of the diurnal cycle decreases. The magnitude and rate of these changes in the diurnal cycle vary between years and may provide clues about how long- term hydroclimatic variations affect short-term basin dynamics.

  19. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  20. Effect of suprachiasmatic lesions on diurnal heart rate rhythm in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, M. A.; Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Heart rate and locomotor activity of rats kept under 12L/12D illumination regimen were recorded every six minutes for ten days using implantable radio transmitters. Some of the rats then received bilateral RF lesions into the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Control sham operations were performed on the rest of the animals. After recovery from surgery, recording of heart rate and locomotor activity was continued for ten days. SCN-lesioned rats showed no significant diurnal fluctuation in heart rate, while normal and sham-operated rats showed the normal diurnal rhythm in that function. The arrhythmic diurnal heart-rate pattern of SCN rats appeared to be correlated with their sporadic activity pattern. The integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus is therefore necessary for the generation and/or expression of diurnal rhythmicity in heart rate in the rat.

  1. New fire diurnal cycle characterizations to improve fire radiative energy assessments made from MODIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andela, N.; Kaiser, J. W.; van der Werf, G. R.; Wooster, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate near real time fire emissions estimates are required for air quality forecasts. To date, most approaches are based on satellite-derived estimates of fire radiative power (FRP), which can be converted to fire radiative energy (FRE) which is directly related to fire emissions. Uncertainties in these FRE estimates are often substantial. This is for a large part because the most often used low-Earth orbit satellite-based instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have a relatively poor sampling of the usually pronounced fire diurnal cycle. In this paper we explore the spatial variation of this fire diurnal cycle and its drivers using data from the geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). In addition, we sampled data from the SEVIRI instrument at MODIS detection opportunities to develop two approaches to estimate hourly FRE based on MODIS active fire detections. The first approach ignored the fire diurnal cycle, assuming persistent fire activity between two MODIS observations, while the second approach combined knowledge on the climatology of the fire diurnal cycle with active fire detections to estimate hourly FRE. The full SEVIRI time series, providing full coverage of the fire diurnal cycle, were used to evaluate the results. Our study period comprised of 3 years (2010-2012), and we focused on Africa and the Mediterranean basin to avoid the use of potentially lower quality SEVIRI data obtained at very far off-nadir view angles. We found that the fire diurnal cycle varies substantially over the study region, and depends on both fuel and weather conditions. For example, more "intense" fires characterized by a fire diurnal cycle with high peak fire activity, long duration over the day, and with nighttime fire activity are most common in areas of large fire size (i.e., large burned area per fire event). These areas are most prevalent in relatively arid regions. Ignoring the fire diurnal

  2. Controls on diurnal streamflow cycles in a high altitude catchment in the Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutzner, R.; Weijs, S. V.; Tarolli, P.; Calaf, M.; Oldroyd, H. J.; Parlange, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    The study of streamflow diurnal cycles is of primary importance to understand hydrological processes happening at various spatial scales. In high altitude alpine catchments, streamflow diurnal cycles are typically dominated by snow or icemelt. During a field campaign in the summer 2012 in a small catchment in the Swiss Alps (Val Ferret catchment, draining area of 20.4 km2, mean altitude of 2423 m above sea level (asl), ranging from 1773 m to 3206 m asl, glaciarized area: 2%), we observed streamflow diurnal cycles throughout the season in two monitored sub-basins of the watershed. To study in detail the diurnal cycles, we make use of a wireless network of meteorological stations, time-lapse photography, a fully equipped energy-balance station and water electrical conductivity monitored at the gauging stations. In the first sub-basin, we observed a transition from a snowmelt to an evapotranspiration induced diurnal streamflow cycle. In the second sub-basin, we observed a snowmelt/icemelt dominated diurnal cycle during the entire season due to the presence of a small glacier. Comparisons between icemelt and evapotranspiration cycles showed that the two processes were happening at the same times of day but with a different sign. The amplitude of the icemelt cycle decreased exponentially during the season and was larger than of the amplitude of the evapotranspiration cycle which was relatively constant during the season. A conceptual model was applied to estimate the effect of evapotranspiration on the diurnal streamflow cycle in the icemelt dominated sub-basin. The model makes use of the latent heat measured at the energy balance station, the streamflow loss due to evapotranspiration and the computation of active evapotranspiration areas. Our study suggests that evapotranspiration from the riparian area damps the icemelt-diurnal streamflow cycle resulting in a possible underestimation of glacier mass changes.

  3. Characteristics of high energy cosmic ray diurnal anisotropy on day-to-day basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, C. M.; Tiwari, D. P.

    2008-10-01

    Diurnal variation of cosmic ray intensity for the period of 1989 to 2000 at Kiel, Haleakakla, Rome, Hermanus, Calgary, and Goose Bay neutron monitors has been studied. Frequency histograms are generated for each year by using the daily values of amplitudes and phases. In the present analysis we have derived the yearly mean amplitude and phase of the diurnal variation of cosmic ray intensity. It has been concluded from the analysis that the diurnal amplitude is mostly concentrated in between the amplitude values of 0.1% and 0.4%, whereas the phase of diurnal anisotropy is concentrated in the belt of 100 to 225 degrees. As such, the various characteristics of long-term diurnal variation of cosmic ray intensity for the maxima of solar activity cycle 22 to the next maxima of solar activity cycle 23 have been studied. The minimum amplitudes are apparent for the minimum solar activity periods starting from 1995 and up to 1997 at Kiel, Haleakakla, Rome, Hermanus, Calgary and Goose Bay stations. The diurnal amplitude has been found to have almost recovered to its values observed during 1989 to 1990. It is also seen that the diurnal amplitudes are much larger by a factor of two at high/middle latitude stations as compared to that for low latitude stations, where the amplitudes are even ˜01% or less during 1996. The phase is significantly earlier during 1996 and 1997 with some significant change starting in 1995. As such, competitive is a continuous decreasing trend in the diurnal phase with smaller change at high/middle latitude and significantly much larger change at low latitudes.

  4. Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of the Diurnal Pattern Recorder System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-05-31

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the diurnal pattern recorder system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the diurnal pattern recorder system's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27236873

  5. Diurnal effect in cosmic rays at middle latitudes according to stratospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asatryan, G. A.; Babayan, V. K.; Stozhkov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    Results of measurements of the diurnal wave of the cosmic ray (CR) intensity in stratosphere at the latitude with the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity R sub c = 7.6 GV are presented. Measurements of diurnal variation of the CR intensity were carried by means of radiosondes: by a detector composed of a gas discharge counter CTC-6 and a telescope containing two counters with a 7 mm aluminum filter between them.

  6. Diurnal heating and cloudiness in the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.S.; Leovy, C.B. ); Boville, B.A.; Briegleb, B.P. )

    1994-06-01

    In this paper, the authors assess the suitability of the heating fields in the latest version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) for modeling the thermal forcing of atmospheric tides. Accordingly, diurnal variations of the surface pressure, outgoing longwave radiation, cloudiness, and precipitation are examined in the CCM2. The fields of radiative, sensible, and latent heating are similarly analyzed. These results are subjectively compared with available data. Equatorial diurnal surface pressure tides are fairly well simulated by CCM2. The model successfully reproduces the semidiurnal surface pressure tides; however, this may result in part from reflection of wave energy at the upper boundary. The CCM2 large-scale diurnal OLR is generally consistent with observations. The moist-convective scheme in the model is able to reproduce the diurnally varying cloudiness and precipitation patterns associated with land-sea contrasts; however, the amplitudes of CCM2 diurnal continental convective cloudiness are weaker than observations. The CCM2 boundary-layer sensible heating is consistent with a very limited set of observations, and with estimates obtained from simple models of diffusive heating. Although the CCM2 tropospheric solar radiative heating is similar in magnitude to previous estimates, there are substantial differences in the vertical structures. A definitive assessment of the validity of the CCM2 diurnal cycle is precluded by the lack of detailed observations and the limitations of our CCM2 sample. Nevertheless, the authors conclude that the global-scale components of the CCM2 diurnal heating are useful proxies for the true diurnal forcing of the tides. 45 refs., 18 figs.

  7. Assessment of downscaled current and future projections of diurnal rainfall patterns for the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, B. C.; Sobolowski, Stefan; King, Martin P.

    2014-11-01

    In this study we investigate the diurnal precipitation cycle in high-resolution regional climate simulations for present (2000-2010) and future time periods (2030-2040 and 2040-2050) over subregions of the Himalayas. The future periods are simulated under a high-emission scenario, Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) in order to maximize any projected externally driven precipitation signal. For present climate, 4-hourly simulated precipitation is first evaluated against observations to establish model credibility. The diurnal cycle, which is typically characterized by a bimodal structure with primary (secondary) maxima in nighttime (afternoon), is reasonably well represented in the present, giving us confidence when assessing potential future changes. The timing of the precipitation maxima and minima is found to match the observed timings well in the diurnal cycle. In general, the Weather Research and Forecasting model captures the principal shape of the diurnal cycle observed over all the subregions. Under projected future conditions, no significant changes in the diurnal cycle occur. The results suggest modest changes in diurnal precipitation under RCP8.5 emission scenario, as evidenced by an increase in afternoon precipitation around the Himalayas. Although the projected future changes of precipitation presented in this article are within of the expected range of precipitation changes caution must be exercised when interpreting single-model experiments.

  8. Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm Is Associated With Increased Risky Decision Making in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Joshua A.; Buchanan, Tony W.; Shackleford, Crystal; Morganstern, Arielle; Hartman, Joshua J.; Yuska, Jonathan; Denburg, Natalie L.

    2014-01-01

    Although past research has suggested a link between chronic stress and both physical and mental well-being in older adults, less is known about the degree to which neuroendocrine markers of stress are associated with higher-order cognitive processes such as decision-making. In a sample of healthy older adults (55–85 years), we tested the degree to which variation in the diurnal cortisol rhythm, an index of hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary axis dynamics, was related to differences in risky decision making. We found that diurnal cortisol fall predicted performance on the Cups Task, a risky decision making task that independently tests risk taking to achieve gains and risk taking to avoid losses. For potential gains, we found that greater risk-taking was associated with lower diurnal cortisol fall, independent of age or sex of the participant. For risks to avoid potential losses, we found that lower diurnal fall selectively was associated with suboptimal decision-making for men only. Compared to males with more typical diurnal fall, those who displayed lower diurnal fall made more risky choices and demonstrated lower sensitivity to the expected value of the risky choice. We integrate these results with the extant literature on the effects of stress on cognitive aging. PMID:24955995

  9. Simulation of the Universal-Time Diurnal Variation of the Global Electric Circuit Charging Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackerras, D.; Darvenzia, M.; Orville, R. E.; Williams, E. R.; Goodman, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    A global lightning model that includes diurnal and annual lightning variation, and total flash density versus latitude for each major land and ocean, has been used as the basis for simulating the global electric circuit charging rate. A particular objective has been to reconcile the difference in amplitude ratios [AR=(max-min)/mean] between global lightning diurnal variation (AR approx. = 0.8) and the diurnal variation of typical atmospheric potential gradient curves (AR approx. = 0.35). A constraint on the simulation is that the annual mean charging current should be about 1000 A. The global lightning model shows that negative ground flashes can contribute, at most, about 10-15% of the required current. For the purpose of the charging rate simulation, it was assumed that each ground flash contributes 5 C to the charging process. It was necessary to assume that all electrified clouds contribute to charging by means other than lightning, that the total flash rate can serve as an indirect indicator of the rate of charge transfer, and that oceanic electrified clouds contribute to charging even though they are relatively inefficient in producing lightning. It was also found necessary to add a diurnally invariant charging current component. By trial and error it was found that charging rate diurnal variation curves in Universal time (UT) could be produced with amplitude ratios and general shapes similar to those of the potential gradient diurnal variation curves measured over ocean and arctic regions during voyages of the Carnegie Institute research vessels.

  10. Salt overly sensitive pathway members are influenced by diurnal rhythm in rice.

    PubMed

    Soni, Praveen; Kumar, Gautam; Soda, Neelam; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2013-07-01

    The diurnal rhythm controls many aspects of plant physiology such as flowering, photosynthesis and growth. Rice is one of the staple foods for world's population. Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, heat and cold severely affect rice production. Under salinity stress, maintenance of ion homeostasis is a major challenge, which also defines the tolerance level of a given genotype. Salt overly sensitive (SOS) pathway is well documented to play a key role in maintaining the Na(+) homeostasis in plant cell. However, it is not reported yet whether the transcriptional regulation of genes of this pathway are influenced by diurnal rhythm. In the present work, we have studied the diurnal pattern of transcript abundance of SOS pathway genes in rice at seedling stage.To rule out the effect of temperature fluctuations on the expression patterns of these genes, the seedlings were grown under constant temperature. We found that OsSOS3 and OsSOS2 exhibited a rhythmic and diurnal expression pattern, while OsSOS1did not have any specific pattern of expression. This analysis establishes a cross-link between diurnal rhythm and SOS pathway and suggests that SOS pathway is influenced by diurnal rhythm in rice.

  11. Solar cycle and diurnal dependence of auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partamies, N.; Whiter, D.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Kauristie, K.

    2014-10-01

    In order to facilitate usage of optical data in space climate studies, we have developed an automated algorithm to quantify the complexity of auroral structures as they appear in ground-based all-sky images. The image analysis is based on a computationally determined "arciness" value, which describes how arc like the auroral structures in the image are. With this new automatic method we have analyzed the type of aurora in about 1 million images of green aurora (λ = 557.7nm) captured at five camera stations in Finnish and Swedish Lapland in 1996-2007. We found that highly arc like structures can be observed in any time sector and their portion of the auroral structures varies much less than the fraction of more complex forms. The diurnal distribution of arciness is in agreement with an earlier study with high arc occurrence rate in the evening hours and steadily decreasing toward the late morning hours. The evolution of less arc-like auroral structures is more dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar cycle than the occurrence of arcs. The median arciness is higher during the years close to the solar minimum than during the rest of the solar cycle. Unlike earlier proposed, the occurrence rate of both arcs and more complex auroral structures increases toward the solar maximum and decreases toward the solar minimum. The cyclic behavior of auroral structures seen in our data is much more systematic and clear than previously reported visual studies suggest. The continuous arciness index describing the complexity of auroral structures can improve our understanding on auroral morphology beyond the few commonly accepted structure classes, such as arcs, patches, and omega bands. Arciness can further be used to study the relationship of auroral structures at different complexity levels and magnetospheric dynamics.

  12. Diurnal Rhythms of Bone Turnover Markers in Three Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Jean; Fulford, Anthony J.; Jarjou, Landing; Zhou, Bo; Prentice, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Context: Ethnic groups differ in fragility fracture risk and bone metabolism. Differences in diurnal rhythms (DRs) of bone turnover and PTH may play a role. Objective: We investigated the DRs of plasma bone turnover markers (BTMs), PTH, and 1,25(OH)2D in three groups with pronounced differences in bone metabolism and plasma PTH. Participants: Healthy Gambian, Chinese, and white British adults (ages 60–75 years; 30 per country). Interventions: Observational study with sample collection every 4 hours for 24 hours. Main Outcomes: Levels of plasma C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, procollagen type-1 N-propeptide, N-mid osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, PTH, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were measured. DRs were analyzed with random-effects Fourier regression and cross-correlation and regression analyses to assess associations between DRs and fasting and 24-hour means of BTMs and PTH. Results: Concentrations of BTMs, PTH, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were higher in Gambians compared to other groups (P < .05). The DRs were significant for all variables and groups (P < .03) and were unimodal, with a nocturnal peak and a daytime nadir for BTMs, whereas PTH had two peaks. The DRs of BTMs and PTH were significantly cross-correlated for all groups (P < .05). There was a significant positive association between C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen and PTH in the British and Gambian groups (P = .03), but not the Chinese group. Conclusions: Despite ethnic differences in plasma BTMs and PTH, DRs were similar. This indicates that alteration of rhythmicity and loss of coupling of bone resorption and formation associated with an elevated PTH in other studies may not uniformly occur across different populations and needs to be considered in the interpretation of PTH as a risk factor of increased bone loss. PMID:27294326

  13. Diurnal cortisol rhythms among Latino immigrants in Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Squires, Erica C; McClure, Heather H; Martinez, Charles R; Eddy, J Mark; Jiménez, Roberto A; Isiordia, Laura E; Snodgrass, J Josh

    2012-01-01

    One of the most commonly used stress biomarkers is cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone released by the adrenal glands that is central to the physiological stress response. Free cortisol can be measured in saliva and has been the biomarker of choice in stress studies measuring the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Chronic psychosocial stress can lead to dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and results in an abnormal diurnal cortisol profile. Little is known about objectively measured stress and health in Latino populations in the United States, yet this is likely an important factor in understanding health disparities that exist between Latinos and whites. The present study was designed to measure cortisol profiles among Latino immigrant farmworkers in Oregon (USA), and to compare quantitative and qualitative measures of stress in this population. Our results indicate that there were no sex differences in average cortisol AUCg (area under the curve with respect to the ground) over two days (AvgAUCg; males = 1.38, females = 1.60; P = 0.415). AUCg1 (Day 1 AUCg) and AvgAUCg were significantly negatively associated with age in men (P<0.05). AUCg1 was negatively associated with weight (P<0.05), waist circumference (P<0.01) and waist-to-stature ratio (P<0.05) in women, which is opposite of the expected relationship between cortisol and waist-to-stature ratio, possibly indicating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. Among men, more time in the United States and immigration to the United States at older ages predicted greater AvgAUCg. Among women, higher lifestyle incongruity was significantly related to greater AvgAUCg. Although preliminary, these results suggest that chronic psychosocial stress plays an important role in health risk in this population.

  14. Diurnal variation in the quantitative EEG in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, L; Dane, A; Rhodes, J; Lynch, P; Hughes, A M

    2000-01-01

    Aims To define the change in power in standard waveband frequencies of quantitative cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) data over a 24 h period, in a drug free representative healthy volunteer population. Methods This was an open, non randomised study in which 18 volunteers (9 male and 9 female) were studied on 1 study day, over a 24 h period. Volunteers had a cortical EEG recording taken at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 and 24 h. Each recording lasted for 6 min (3 min eyes open, 3 min eyes closed). All EEG recordings were taken in a quietened ward environment with the curtains drawn round the bed and the volunteer supine. During the 3 min eyes open, volunteers were asked to look at a red circle on a screen at the foot of the bed, and refrain from talking. Results Plots produced of geometric mean power by time of the standard wave band frequencies gave some indication of a circadian rhythm over the 24 h period for θ (4.75–6.75 Hz), α1 (7.0–9.5 Hz) and β1 (12.75–18.50 Hz) wavebands. Mixed models were fitted to both the eyes open and eyes closed data which confirmed a change in mean waveband power with time with statistical significance at the conventional 5% level (P < 0.05). Conclusions These data indicate the presence of a diurnal variation in the cortical quantitative EEG. They support the use of a placebo control group when designing clinical trials which utilize quantitative EEG to screen for central nervous system (CNS) activity of pharmaceutical agents, to control for the confounding variable of time of day at which the EEG recordings were made. PMID:10886113

  15. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R. H.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth-orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between temperature estimates from microwave Ka-band, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR), and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13 (both averaged over Africa and Europe). Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the model's ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. The equivalent average timing for Ka-band is 13:44, which is influenced by the effect of increased sensing depth in desert areas. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations lag the TIR observations by only 15 min, which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  16. Adrenal-dependent diurnal modulation of conditioned fear extinction learning.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Chun, Lauren E; Fardi, Sara; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2015-06-01

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with altered conditioned fear extinction expression and impaired circadian function including dysregulation of glucocorticoid hormone secretion. We examined in adult male rats the relationship between conditioned fear extinction learning, circadian phase, and endogenous glucocorticoids (CORT). Rats maintained on a 12h light:dark cycle were trained and tested across 3 separate daily sessions (conditioned fear acquisition and 2 extinction sessions) that were administered during either the rats' active or inactive circadian phase. In an initial experiment we found that rats at both circadian phases acquired and extinguished auditory cue conditioned fear to a similar degree in the first extinction session. However, rats trained and tested at zeitgeber time-16 (ZT16) (active phase) showed enhanced extinction memory expression during the second extinction session compared to rats trained and tested at ZT4 (inactive phase). In a follow-up experiment, adrenalectomized (ADX) or sham surgery rats were similarly trained and tested across 3 separate daily sessions at either ZT4 or ZT16. ADX had no effect on conditioned fear acquisition or conditioned fear memory. Sham ADX rats trained and tested at ZT16 exhibited better extinction learning across the two extinction sessions compared to all other groups of rats. These results indicate that conditioned fear extinction learning is modulated by time of day, and this diurnal modulation requires the presence of adrenal hormones. These results support an important role of CORT-dependent circadian processes in regulating conditioned fear extinction learning, which may be capitalized upon to optimize effective treatment of PTSD.

  17. The association between diurnal temperature range and childhood bacillary dysentery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Li-ying; Zhao, Ke-fu; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Xu; Yang, Hui-hui; Li, Ke-sheng; Xu, Zhi-wei; Su, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have found that mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures were associated with bacillary dysentery (BD). However, little is known about whether the within-day variation of temperature has any impact on bacillary dysentery. The current study aimed to identify the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and BD in Hefei, China. Daily data on BD counts among children aged 0-14 years from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2012 were retrieved from Hefei Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Daily data on ambient temperature and relative humidity covering the same period were collected from the Hefei Bureau of Meteorology. A Poisson generalized linear regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used in the analysis after controlling the effects of season, long-term trends, mean temperature, and relative humidity. The results showed that there existed a statistically significant relationship between DTR and childhood BD. The DTR effect on childhood bacillary dysentery increased when DTR was over 8 °C. And it was greatest at 1-day lag, with an 8 % (95 % CI = 2.9-13.4 %) increase of BD cases per 5 °C increment of DTR. Male children and children aged 0-5 years appeared to be more vulnerable to the DTR effect. The data indicate that large DTR may increase the incidence of childhood BD. Caregivers and health practitioners should be made aware of the potential threat posed by large DTR. Therefore, DTR should be taken into consideration when making targeted health policies and programs to protect children from being harmed by climate impacts.

  18. The association between diurnal temperature range and childhood bacillary dysentery.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-ying; Zhao, Ke-fu; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Xu; Yang, Hui-hui; Li, Ke-sheng; Xu, Zhi-wei; Su, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have found that mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures were associated with bacillary dysentery (BD). However, little is known about whether the within-day variation of temperature has any impact on bacillary dysentery. The current study aimed to identify the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and BD in Hefei, China. Daily data on BD counts among children aged 0-14 years from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2012 were retrieved from Hefei Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Daily data on ambient temperature and relative humidity covering the same period were collected from the Hefei Bureau of Meteorology. A Poisson generalized linear regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used in the analysis after controlling the effects of season, long-term trends, mean temperature, and relative humidity. The results showed that there existed a statistically significant relationship between DTR and childhood BD. The DTR effect on childhood bacillary dysentery increased when DTR was over 8 °C. And it was greatest at 1-day lag, with an 8% (95% CI = 2.9-13.4%) increase of BD cases per 5 °C increment of DTR. Male children and children aged 0-5 years appeared to be more vulnerable to the DTR effect. The data indicate that large DTR may increase the incidence of childhood BD. Caregivers and health practitioners should be made aware of the potential threat posed by large DTR. Therefore, DTR should be taken into consideration when making targeted health policies and programs to protect children from being harmed by climate impacts.

  19. Diurnal rhythm of agouti-related protein and its relation to corticosterone and food intake.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin-Yun; Shieh, Kun-Ruey; Kabbaj, Mohamed; Barsh, Gregory S; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J

    2002-10-01

    In the present study we examined the diurnal patterns of agouti-related protein (AGRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus and their relation to circulating glucocorticoids and food intake. Animals were killed at 4-h intervals throughout the 24-h diurnal cycle, and the expression of AGRP and POMC mRNA was evaluated by semiquantitative in situ hybridization analysis. We observed a significant diurnal rhythm in AGRP mRNA expression, with a marked peak at 2200 h (4 h after lights off) and a trough at 1000 h (4 h after lights on), consistent with the overall day-night rhythm of food intake. In contrast, POMC mRNA levels did not show a significant fluctuation across the diurnal cycle, although there was a tendency for levels to decrease after the onset of the dark cycle. Corticosterone secretion temporally coincided with the rising phase of AGRP mRNA expression. Depletion of corticosterone by adrenalectomy abolished the AGRP diurnal rhythm by suppressing the nighttime expression, but did not alter the feeding rhythm. Exposure of adrenalectomized rats to constant corticosterone replacement (10 or 50 mg continuous release corticosterone pellet) resulted in fixed AGRP mRNA expression throughout the 12-h light, 12-h dark cycle. A relatively high level of corticosterone (50 mg) significantly increased AGRP mRNA expression, with a positive correlation between these two measures. These results indicate that 1) the diurnal expression of AGRP mRNA is regulated by corticosterone independently of the light/dark cue; and 2) a normal endogenous corticosterone rhythm is required for generating the diurnal AGRP rhythm.

  20. Mechanisms for Diurnal Variability of Global Tropical Rainfall Observed from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Smith, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior and various controls of diurnal variability in tropical-subtropical rainfall are investigated using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation measurements retrieved from: (1) TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), (2) Precipitation Radar (PR), and (3) TMI/PR Combined, standard level 2 algorithms for the 1998 annual cycle. Results show that the diurnal variability characteristics of precipitation are consistent for all three algorithms, providing assurance that TRMM retrievals are providing consistent estimates of rainfall variability. As anticipated, most ocean areas exhibit more rainfall at night, while over most land areas rainfall peaks during daytime ,however, various important exceptions are found. The dominant feature of the oceanic diurnal cycle is a rainfall maximum in late-evening/early-morning (LE-EM) hours, while over land the dominant maximum occurs in the mid- to late-afternoon (MLA). In conjunction with these maxima are pronounced seasonal variations of the diurnal amplitudes. Amplitude analysis shows that the diurnal pattern and its seasonal evolution are closely related to the rainfall accumulation pattern and its seasonal evolution. In addition, the horizontal distribution of diurnal variability indicates that for oceanic rainfall there is a secondary MLA maximum, co-existing with the LE-EM maximum, at latitudes dominated by large scale convergence and deep convection. Analogously, there is a preponderance for an LE-EM maximum over land, co-existing with the stronger MLA maximum, although it is not evident that this secondary continental feature is closely associated with the large scale circulation. The ocean results clearly indicate that rainfall diurnal variability associated with large scale convection is an integral part of the atmospheric general circulation.

  1. The Diurnal Cycle over the Maritime Continent and its Interaction with the MJO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, A. J.; Peatman, S.; Baranowski, D. B.; Stevens, D. P.; Heywood, K. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Schmidtko, S.

    2014-12-01

    The complex land-sea distribution and topography of the maritime continent acts to disrupt or even completely block the eastward propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) from the Indian Ocean to the western Pacific. This leads to changes in tropical latent heat release and subsequent impacts on global circulation. Convection over the maritime continent is dominated by the diurnal cycle. Where the mean diurnal cycle is strong (over the islands and surrounding seas), 80% of the MJO precipitation signal in the maritime continent is accounted for by changes in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle. The canonical view of the MJO as the smooth eastward propagation of a large-scale precipitation envelope also breaks down over the islands of the Maritime Continent. Instead, a vanguard of precipitation jumps ahead of the main body by approximately 6 days or 2000 km. Hence, there can be enhanced precipitation over Sumatra, Borneo or New Guinea when the large-scale MJO envelope over the surrounding ocean is one of suppressed precipitation. This behaviour is discussed in terms of an interaction between the diurnal cycle and the MJO circulation. The diurnal cycle is also strong in the ocean. Seaglider measurements taken during the CINDY/DYNAMO campaign show the existence of a diurnal warm layer in the upper few metres of the ocean. This has a significant effect on the surface fluxes, of an order of Watts per square metre. The diurnal warm layer is favoured during the inactive phase of the MJO and may act to help precondition the atmosphere to convection. The activities of the MJO Task Force and Subseasonal to Seasonal Prediction project will be discussed in this context.

  2. Changes in diurnal temperature range and national cereal yields

    SciTech Connect

    Lobell, D

    2007-04-26

    Models of yield responses to temperature change have often considered only changes in average temperature (Tavg), with the implicit assumption that changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) can safely be ignored. The goal of this study was to evaluate this assumption using a combination of historical datasets and climate model projections. Data on national crop yields for 1961-2002 in the 10 leading producers of wheat, rice, and maize were combined with datasets on climate and crop locations to evaluate the empirical relationships between Tavg, DTR, and crop yields. In several rice and maize growing regions, including the two major nations for each crop, there was a clear negative response of yields to increased DTR. This finding reflects a nonlinear response of yields to temperature, which likely results from greater water and heat stress during hot days. In many other cases, the effects of DTR were not statistically significant, in part because correlations of DTR with other climate variables and the relatively short length of the time series resulted in wide confidence intervals for the estimates. To evaluate whether future changes in DTR are relevant to crop impact assessments, yield responses to projected changes in Tavg and DTR by 2046-2065 from 11 climate models were estimated. The mean climate model projections indicated an increase in DTR in most seasons and locations where wheat is grown, mixed projections for maize, and a general decrease in DTR for rice. These mean projections were associated with wide ranges that included zero in nearly all cases. The estimated impacts of DTR changes on yields were generally small (<5% change in yields) relative to the consistently negative impact of projected warming of Tavg. However, DTR changes did significantly affect yield responses in several cases, such as in reducing US maize yields and increasing India rice yields. Because DTR projections tend to be positively correlated with Tavg, estimates of yields

  3. Diurnal variation in gait characteristics and transition speed.

    PubMed

    Bessot, Nicolas; Lericollais, Romain; Gauthier, Antoine; Sesboüé, Bruno; Bulla, Jan; Moussay, Sebastien

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of time-of-day on Preferred Transition Speed (PTS) and spatiotemporal organization of walking and running movements. Twelve active male subjects participated in the study (age: 27.2 ± 4.9 years; height: 177.9 ± 5.4 cm; body mass: 75.9 ± 5.86 kg). First, PTS was determined at 08:00 h and 18:00 h. The mean of the two PTS recorded at the two times-of-day tested was used as a reference (PTSm). Then, subjects were asked to walk and run on a treadmill at three imposed speeds (PTSm, PTSm + 0.3 m.s(-1), and PTSm - 0.3 m.s(-1)) at 08:00 h and 18:00 h. Mean stride length, temporal stride, spatial stride variability, and temporal stride variability were used for gait analysis. The PTS observed at 08:00 h (2.10 ± 0.17 m.s(-1)) tends to be lower (p = 0.077) than that recorded at 18:00 h (2.14 ± 0.19 m.s(-1)). Stride lengths recorded while walking (p = 0.038) and running (p = 0.041) were shorter at 08:00 h than 18:00 h. No time-of-day effect was observed for stride frequency during walking and running trials. When walking, spatial stride variability (p = 0.020) and temporal stride variability (p = 0.028) were lower at 08:00 h than at 18:00 h. When running, no diurnal variation of spatial stride variability or temporal stride variability was detected. PMID:25229209

  4. Diurnal cycle of precipitation over Fujian Province during the pre-summer rainy season in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Anning; Zhou, Yang; Yang, Ben; Fang, Dexian; Zhang, Lujun; Wu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Precipitation diurnal cycle over Fujian in the pre-summer rainy season has been revealed based on the hourly rain gauge data during 2009-2013. The precipitation amount (PA) over northwestern Fujian and most southeast coasts shows relatively small diurnal variability. This is in contrast to large diurnal variations in the mountainous areas. Regional differences in precipitation diurnal cycles are obviously noted among the coastal, valley, hilly, and mountainous areas. The precipitation diurnal cycles are significantly affected by the terrain elevation and distance to coast, PA and precipitation frequency (PF) show much more pronounced double diurnal peaks with the terrain elevation and distance to coast increased. However, the precipitation intensity (PI) basically shows one distinct late afternoon diurnal peak for different elevations and distances to coast. Four typical patterns of precipitation diurnal cycle are further identified by cluster analysis. The four typical PF patterns show relatively apparent morning peaks over coasts, inland mountains, and hills in addition to distinct late afternoon maxima. Low PF with weak diurnal amplitude is mainly located over the coastal areas, while high PF with strong diurnal amplitude is found over the valley, hilly, and mountainous regions. The PA exhibits a weak early morning peak and a relatively strong late afternoon peak over coastal, hilly, or mountainous areas and windward slopes but only one distinct late afternoon peak over the valley regions and leeward slopes. The amplitude of PA diurnal cycle is the weakest over the coastal areas but the strongest over the valley regions or leeward slopes among the four PA patterns. The four PI diurnal cycle patterns consistently show distinct afternoon peaks.

  5. Transcriptome Phase Distribution Analysis Reveals Diurnal Regulated Biological Processes and Key Pathways in Rice Flag Leaves and Seedling Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meina; Xing, Zhuo; Yang, Wenqiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Han; Gong, Xiaojie; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Zhenhai; Hu, Xingming; Wang, Dong; Qian, Qian; Wang, Tai; Su, Zhen; Xue, Yongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Plant diurnal oscillation is a 24-hour period based variation. The correlation between diurnal genes and biological pathways was widely revealed by microarray analysis in different species. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the major food staple for about half of the world's population. The rice flag leaf is essential in providing photosynthates to the grain filling. However, there is still no comprehensive view about the diurnal transcriptome for rice leaves. In this study, we applied rice microarray to monitor the rhythmically expressed genes in rice seedling and flag leaves. We developed a new computational analysis approach and identified 6,266 (10.96%) diurnal probe sets in seedling leaves, 13,773 (24.08%) diurnal probe sets in flag leaves. About 65% of overall transcription factors were identified as flag leaf preferred. In seedling leaves, the peak of phase distribution was from 2:00am to 4:00am, whereas in flag leaves, the peak was from 8:00pm to 2:00am. The diurnal phase distribution analysis of gene ontology (GO) and cis-element enrichment indicated that, some important processes were waken by the light, such as photosynthesis and abiotic stimulus, while some genes related to the nuclear and ribosome involved processes were active mostly during the switch time of light to dark. The starch and sucrose metabolism pathway genes also showed diurnal phase. We conducted comparison analysis between Arabidopsis and rice leaf transcriptome throughout the diurnal cycle. In summary, our analysis approach is feasible for relatively unbiased identification of diurnal transcripts, efficiently detecting some special periodic patterns with non-sinusoidal periodic patterns. Compared to the rice flag leaves, the gene transcription levels of seedling leaves were relatively limited to the diurnal rhythm. Our comprehensive microarray analysis of seedling and flag leaves of rice provided an overview of the rice diurnal transcriptome and indicated some diurnal regulated biological

  6. On the Sensitivity of the Diurnal Cycle in the Amazon to Convective Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itterly, K. F.; Taylor, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    The sensitivity of the diurnal cycle to convective intensity is investigated for the wet season (DJF) and dry season (JJA) in the Amazon region. Model output reveals large water and energy budget errors in tropical rainforests, arising from a misrepresentation of the diurnal cycle of the complex processes inherent to diurnally forced moist convection. Daily, 3-hourly satellite observations of CERES Ed3a SYN1DEG TOA fluxes and 3-hourly TRMM 3B42 precipitation rate from 2002-2012 are split into regimes of convective intensity using percentile definitions for both daily minimum OLR and daily maximum precipitation rate to define regimes. These satellite-defined regimes are then co-located with convective parameters calculated from radiosonde observations. Diurnal statistics from satellite include: phase, amplitude, precipitation onset, precipitation duration and diurnal mean. The diurnal phase of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and longwave cloud forcing (LWCF) occurs several hours earlier on convective days compared to stable days, however, climatological precipitation phase is less sensitive to convective intensity, occurring between 1-4PM local time for all regimes and 1-2 hours later on very convective days, which is related to longer duration precipitation events from increased humidity. Diurnal convection in the Amazon is strongly related to 8AM values of both dynamic and thermodynamic variables, most of which are related to: the background moisture content of the troposphere, the stability of the lower troposphere, convective inhibition (CIN) and wind speed and direction in the column. Morning values of CIN, lifted condensation level (LCL), level of free convection (LFC) and equilibrium level (EL) are lower in DJF than JJA, and lower on very convective days than stable days for all stations. Higher background humidity is related to longer duration precipitation events (r-values between 0.4-0.6, depending on station and season), earlier phases and onset times

  7. Comparison of modeled diurnally varying sea surface temperatures to satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    A subset of modeled, global diurnally varying sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is created using a physically based, one-dimensional, upper ocean heating model, POSH or Profiles in Oceanic Surface Heating. The model is forced with a nighttime minimum temperature approximated by the Reynolds OI daily AVHRR-only and reanalysis data from NASA's MERRA dataset. To assess the model's ability to replicate the diurnal cycle of SSTs, the model output is compared to satellite-retrieved data for the entire cycle. SEVIRI hourly 5-km SST swath data are used for the comparison and regridded to the 25-km model grid. In the analysis of SST differences between the two products, difference plots at each time step are not sufficient to determine the quality of POSH's representation of the diurnal cycle. The differences in SST can be a combination of a nighttime offset and a shift in the onset of the heating cycle. Furthermore, the caveats associated with gap filling by the interpolation technique can deteriorate the quality of the comparison, especially when the satellite data are not continuous over time. To establish quality criteria, a 2D histogram is computed to determine the percent of coverage per 0.25-degree grid cell. This is a combined measure of the density (how many satellite grid points lie within the 0.25-degree cell) and the continuity (how often, in hours, the grid cell is sampled over the day). In a best-case scenario approach for the comparison, a total of 89 grid locations are selected at which time series of SSTs are extracted from the satellite and model data. The results in Figure 1 indicate that the Reynolds product estimates the nighttime minimum temperature reasonably well, while the model consistently overestimates the peak of the diurnal cycle compared to the satellite data. Moreover, the diurnal heating in the satellite data persists approximately 3 hours longer than the diurnal heating produced by the model. Since the difference averaged over all hours of

  8. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley M.; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish. PMID:23698009

  9. Cumulus Moistening, the Diurnal Cycle, and Initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, J. H.; Johnson, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric soundings, cloud radar, and air-sea flux measurements collected during DYNAMO (Dynamics of the MJO) are employed to study the initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) over the tropical Indian Ocean. Findings indicate that moistening of the troposphere during MJO initiation occurs in two stages: low-to-midlevel moistening in the suppressed phase (i.e., prior to the onset of deep convection), followed by deep-column moistening during the early active phase. The first stage of moistening occurs as the drying by large-scale subsidence and horizontal advection wane and convective clouds increase in areal coverage and deepen from shallow to congestus. Analysis of the suppressed phase reveals the striking degree to which the moistening characteristic of this period is accomplished by the diurnal cycle of cumulus clouds. This diurnal cycle is driven by the cycle in sea surface temperature and air-sea fluxes linked to shallow oceanic diurnal warm layers. This coupled diurnal cycle, and the associated afternoon peak in convective cloud depth, cloud areal coverage, and cumulus moistening, likely drives more vigorous overall moistening than would occur without this diurnal cycle. A conspicuous finding pertaining to the suppressed phase convection is the prominence of mesoscale cloud organization (i.e., open cells and horizontal convective rolls), which is hypothesized to enhance convective instability in localized patches, thereby promoting deeper, more vigorous cumulus moistening than would otherwise occur.

  10. Variability and reliability of diurnal cortisol in younger and older adults: implications for design decisions.

    PubMed

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Boggero, Ian A; Smith, Gregory T; Sephton, Sandra E

    2014-11-01

    The extant research is inconclusive regarding the best sampling methods to construct reliable measures of between-person differences in derived parameters of diurnal cortisol, and no study provides such recommendations for detecting within-person changes. These studies determined how many days of sampling are necessary to assess between-person differences and within-person changes over multiple occasions in diurnal mean, diurnal slope, and area under the curve (AUC). Generalizability and decision analyses were conducted on diurnal salivary cortisol data from two separate longitudinal studies, one with younger adults (N=124) and one with older adults (N=148). In both studies, results indicated that 3 days of data collection provided the minimal level of reliability in mean cortisol to detect between-person differences; 4-8 days were necessary to reliably assess AUC, and 10 days for cortisol slope. Similarly, in order to reliably characterize within-person changes across occasions, at least 3 days of data collection were needed for mean cortisol and AUC and 5-8 days for slope. Results also indicated that only two samples per day, taken morning and evening, could faithfully reproduce the diurnal slope calculated from 3 or 4 samples (r=.97-.99). Instead of having participants provide many samples per day over the course of a few days, we recommend collecting fewer samples per day over more days.

  11. Diurnal Variation in Gravity Wave Activity at Low and Middle Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrioli, V. F.; Fritts, D. C.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.; Janches, Diego

    2013-01-01

    We employ a modified composite day extension of the Hocking (2005) analysis method to study gravity wave (GW) activity in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using 4 meteor radars spanning latitudes from 7deg S to 53.6deg S. Diurnal and semidiurnal modulations were observed in GW variances over all sites. Semidiurnal modulation with downward phase propagation was observed at lower latitudes mainly near the equinoxes. Diurnal modulations occur mainly near solstice and, except for the zonal component at Cariri (7deg S), do not exhibit downward phase propagation. At a higher latitude (SAAMER, 53.6deg S) these modulations are only observed in the meridional component where we can observe diurnal variation from March to May, and semidiurnal, during January, February, October (above 88 km) and November. Some of these modulations with downward phase progression correlate well with wind shear. When the wind shear is well correlated with the maximum of the variances the diurnal tide has its largest amplitudes, i.e., near equinox. Correlations exhibiting variations with tidal phases suggest significant GW-tidal interactions that have different characters depending on the tidal components and possible mean wind shears. Modulations that do not exhibit phase variations could be indicative of diurnal variations in GW sources.

  12. [Effects of Reduced Water and Diurnal Warming on Winter-Wheat Biomass and Soil Respiration].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang-zhou; Chen, Jian; Hu, Zheng-hua; Xie, Yan; Chen, Shu-tao; Zhang, Xue-song; Shen, Shuang-he; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-15

    Field experiments were conducted in winter wheat-growing season to investigate the effect of reduced water and diurnal warming on wheat biomass and soil respiration. The experimental treatments included the control (CK), 30% reduced water (W), diurnal warming (T, enhanced 2 degrees C), and the combined treatment (TW, 30% reduced water plus diurnal warming 2 degrees C). Soil respiration rate was measured using a static chamber-gas chromatograph technique. The results showed that in the winter wheat-growing season, compared to CK, T and TW treatments significantly increased shoot biomass by 46.0% (P = 0.002) and 19.8% (P = 0.032) during the elongation-booting stage, respectively. T and TW treatments also significantly increased the harvested shoot biomass by 19.8% (P = 0.050) and 34.6% (P = 0.028), respectively. On the other hand, W treatment had no significant effect on shoot biomass, and W, T, and TW treatments didn't significantly change the root biomass. T and W treatments had no significant effect on the mean respiration rate (MRR) of soil (P > 0.05). TW treatment significantly decreased soil MRR by 22.4% (P = 0.049). We also found T treatment decreased the temperature sensitivity coefficients of soil respiration (Q10). The results of our study suggested that compared to the single treatment (reduced water or diurnal warming), the combined treatment (reduced water plus diurnal warming) may have different effects on agroecosystem.

  13. Long-term changes of the diurnal temperature cycle: implications about mechanisms of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.

    We use a global climate model to investigate the impact of a wide range of radiative forcing and feedback mechanisms on the diurnal cycle of surface air temperature. This allows us not only to rule out many potential explanations for observed diurnal changes, but to infer fundamental information concerning the nature and location of the principal global climate forcings of this century. We conclude that the observed changes of the diurnal cycle result neither from natural climate variability nor a globally-distributed forcing, but rather they require the combination of a (negative) radiative forcing located primarily over continental regions together with the known globally-distributed forcing due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Tropospheric aerosols can account for part of the continentally-located forcing, but alone they do not damp the diurnal cycle as observed. Only an increase of continental cloud cover, possibly a consequence of anthropogenic aerosols, can damp the diurnal cycle by an amount comparable to observations. A corollary of these results is quantitative confirmation of the widely held suspicion that anthropogenic greenhouse gas warming has been substantially counterbalanced by a forced cooling. Under the assumption that the cloud change is sulfate driven, a further implication is that the net rate of global warming is likely to increase substantially in coming years. We note that, on the long run, the daily maximum temperature will increase by an amount not much less than the increase of the mean temperature.

  14. Regimes of Diurnal Variation of Summer Rainfall over Subtropical East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan W.; Lin W.; Yu, R.; Zhang, M.; Chen, H.; Li, J.

    2012-05-01

    Using hourly rain gauge records and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 from 1998 to 2006, the authors present an analysis of the diurnal characteristics of summer rainfall over subtropical East Asia. The study shows that there are four different regimes of distinct diurnal variation of rainfall in both the rain gauge and the satellite data. They are located over the Tibetan Plateau with late-afternoon and midnight peaks, in the western China plain with midnight to early-morning peaks, in the eastern China plain with double peaks in late afternoon and early morning, and over the East China Sea with an early-morning peak. No propagation of diurnal phases is found from the land to the ocean across the coastlines. The different diurnal regimes are highly correlated with the inhomogeneous underlying surface, such as the plateau, plain, and ocean, with physical mechanisms consistent with the large-scale 'mountain-valley' and 'land-sea' breezes and convective instability. These diurnal characteristics over subtropical East Asia can be used as diagnostic metrics to evaluate the physical parameterization and hydrological cycle of climate models over East Asia.

  15. The contributions of sleep-related risk factors to diurnal car accidents.

    PubMed

    Lucidi, Fabio; Mallia, Luca; Violani, Cristiano; Giustiniani, Gabriele; Persia, Luca

    2013-03-01

    This study was intended to estimate the presence and number of individual sleep-related risk factors in a sample of diurnal car accidents and to analyze the extent to which these risk factors tended to be more represented in diurnal accidents involving only one vehicle, involving young drivers or occurring on non-urban roads. Two hundred fifty-three drivers involved in diurnal accidents were interviewed immediately after the accidents to assess their sleepiness-related personal conditions and the circumstances prior to the accident (i.e., individual sleep-related risk factors), such as poor sleep, changes in habitual sleeping patterns, prolonged wakefulness, self-reported acute sleepiness and daytime sleepiness, night-shift jobs and insomnia. A total of 12.3% of the drivers were classified as having at least one of the seven risk factors assessed in the study, supporting the general notion that drivers' sleepiness conditions are crucial, even in diurnal driving circumstances in which they are less likely to depend on chrono-biological processes. Furthermore, consistent with the guiding hypotheses, specific sleep-related risk factors were more evident in single (vs. multiple) car accidents, among young drivers and in car accidents occurring on non-urban roads. In summary, sleep-related risk factors seemed to have a negative impact on drivers' safety in circumstances of diurnal driving, especially when the accidents involved young individuals and occurred on non-urban roads. PMID:23246705

  16. Variability and reliability of diurnal cortisol in younger and older adults: Implications for design decisions

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Boggero, Ian A.; Smith, Gregory T.; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    The extant research is inconclusive regarding the best sampling methods to construct reliable measures of between-person differences in derived parameters of diurnal cortisol, and no study provides such recommendations for detecting within-person changes. These studies determined how many days of sampling are necessary to assess between-person differences and within-person changes over multiple occasions in diurnal mean, diurnal slope, and area under the curve (AUC). Generalizability and decision analyses were conducted on diurnal salivary cortisol data from two separate longitudinal studies, one with younger adults (N = 124) and one with older adults (N = 148). In both studies, results indicated that 3 days of data collection provided the minimal level of reliability in mean cortisol to detect between-person differences; 4–8 days were necessary to reliably assess AUC, and 10 days for cortisol slope. Similarly, in order to reliably characterize within-person changes across occasions, at least 3 days of data collection were needed for mean cortisol and AUC and 5–8 days for slope. Results also indicated that only two samples per day, taken morning and evening, could faithfully reproduce the diurnal slope calculated from 3 or 4 samples (r = .97–.99). Instead of having participants provide many samples per day over the course of a few days, we recommend collecting fewer samples per day over more days. PMID:25137484

  17. The Met Office's new operational analysis system for diurnally varying skin-SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    While, James; Mao, Chongyuan; Martin, Matthew; Good, Simon; Sykes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Diurnal variations in skin Sea Surface Temperature (skin SST), which can be as large as several degrees, play an important role in determining the heat flux between the ocean and atmosphere. As such, since February 2015 the Met Office, as part of the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS), has been producing an operational analysis of the diurnal cycle of skin SST. This product consists of three components: an underlying 'foundation' SST (based on the OSTIA analysis), a warm layer where solar heating is important, and a cool skin where cooling due to long wave radiation dominates. A major development in this system is the use of a 4D-Var data assimilation technique with multiple outer-loops to improve estimates of the warm layer. Observations assimilated come from the SEVIRI, GOES-W, MTSAT2, and NOAA-AVHRR infra-red satellite instruments. Through their assimilation, the observations act to update the applied heat and wind flux such that the diurnal cycle in the warm layer is improved. In this presentation we describe the analysis system and how it produces a skin SST product. Particular attention is paid to the data assimilation aspects and on the observation processing. We also present results from a three month validation period showing that the system is well able to reproduce a drifter based climatology of the diurnal cycle in SST. A direct validation of our diurnal SST output against near surface Argo data is also given.

  18. The contributions of sleep-related risk factors to diurnal car accidents.

    PubMed

    Lucidi, Fabio; Mallia, Luca; Violani, Cristiano; Giustiniani, Gabriele; Persia, Luca

    2013-03-01

    This study was intended to estimate the presence and number of individual sleep-related risk factors in a sample of diurnal car accidents and to analyze the extent to which these risk factors tended to be more represented in diurnal accidents involving only one vehicle, involving young drivers or occurring on non-urban roads. Two hundred fifty-three drivers involved in diurnal accidents were interviewed immediately after the accidents to assess their sleepiness-related personal conditions and the circumstances prior to the accident (i.e., individual sleep-related risk factors), such as poor sleep, changes in habitual sleeping patterns, prolonged wakefulness, self-reported acute sleepiness and daytime sleepiness, night-shift jobs and insomnia. A total of 12.3% of the drivers were classified as having at least one of the seven risk factors assessed in the study, supporting the general notion that drivers' sleepiness conditions are crucial, even in diurnal driving circumstances in which they are less likely to depend on chrono-biological processes. Furthermore, consistent with the guiding hypotheses, specific sleep-related risk factors were more evident in single (vs. multiple) car accidents, among young drivers and in car accidents occurring on non-urban roads. In summary, sleep-related risk factors seemed to have a negative impact on drivers' safety in circumstances of diurnal driving, especially when the accidents involved young individuals and occurred on non-urban roads.

  19. Diurnal and circadian variation of sleep and alertness in men vs. naturally cycling women.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Diane B; Shechter, Ari; Boudreau, Philippe; Begum, Esmot Ara; Ng Ying-Kin, Ng Mien Kwong

    2016-09-27

    This study quantifies sex differences in the diurnal and circadian variation of sleep and waking while controlling for menstrual cycle phase and hormonal contraceptive use. We compared the diurnal and circadian variation of sleep and alertness of 8 women studied during two phases of the menstrual cycle and 3 women studied during their midfollicular phase with that of 15 men. Participants underwent an ultradian sleep-wake cycle (USW) procedure consisting of 36 cycles of 60-min wake episodes alternating with 60-min nap opportunities. Core body temperature (CBT), salivary melatonin, subjective alertness, and polysomnographically recorded sleep were measured throughout this procedure. All analyzed measures showed a significant diurnal and circadian variation throughout the USW procedure. Compared with men, women demonstrated a significant phase advance of the CBT but not melatonin rhythms, as well as an advance in the diurnal and circadian variation of sleep measures and subjective alertness. Furthermore, women experienced an increased amplitude of the diurnal and circadian variation of alertness, mainly due to a larger decline in the nocturnal nadir. Our results indicate that women are likely initiating sleep at a later circadian phase than men, which may be one factor contributing to the increased susceptibility to sleep disturbances reported in women. Lower nighttime alertness is also observed, suggesting a physiological basis for a greater susceptibility to maladaptation to night shift work in women. PMID:27621470

  20. [Effects of Reduced Water and Diurnal Warming on Winter-Wheat Biomass and Soil Respiration].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang-zhou; Chen, Jian; Hu, Zheng-hua; Xie, Yan; Chen, Shu-tao; Zhang, Xue-song; Shen, Shuang-he; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-15

    Field experiments were conducted in winter wheat-growing season to investigate the effect of reduced water and diurnal warming on wheat biomass and soil respiration. The experimental treatments included the control (CK), 30% reduced water (W), diurnal warming (T, enhanced 2 degrees C), and the combined treatment (TW, 30% reduced water plus diurnal warming 2 degrees C). Soil respiration rate was measured using a static chamber-gas chromatograph technique. The results showed that in the winter wheat-growing season, compared to CK, T and TW treatments significantly increased shoot biomass by 46.0% (P = 0.002) and 19.8% (P = 0.032) during the elongation-booting stage, respectively. T and TW treatments also significantly increased the harvested shoot biomass by 19.8% (P = 0.050) and 34.6% (P = 0.028), respectively. On the other hand, W treatment had no significant effect on shoot biomass, and W, T, and TW treatments didn't significantly change the root biomass. T and W treatments had no significant effect on the mean respiration rate (MRR) of soil (P > 0.05). TW treatment significantly decreased soil MRR by 22.4% (P = 0.049). We also found T treatment decreased the temperature sensitivity coefficients of soil respiration (Q10). The results of our study suggested that compared to the single treatment (reduced water or diurnal warming), the combined treatment (reduced water plus diurnal warming) may have different effects on agroecosystem. PMID:27078968

  1. Hydraulic dispersion of diurnal reactive constituents in an open channel eutrophic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Chen, G. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Closely related to the solar photocycle, plankton growth in eutrophic waters displays a diurnal variation because of photosynthesis and respiration. Presented in this paper is an analytical study of the diurnal variation of mean concentration of plankton and nutrient in an open channel eutrophic flow initiated by an instantaneous emission. The evolution of the concentration is shown driven by the combination of hydraulic dispersion and diurnal reaction between plankton and nutrient. The analytical solution for longitudinal distribution of concentration is rigorously derived and illustrated, based on the time dependent hydraulic dispersivity. Numerical results are presented and characterized by the reaction rate, yield factor and period for the diurnal reaction and the P e ´ clet number of the flow. For typical applications such as ecological risk assessment and environmental impact assessment, the upper and lower limits of critical length and duration of five typical pollutant concentrations are concretely illustrated for given concentration criterions. Remarkable diurnal variations are revealed up to around one third in the critical length and duration for plankton, and about ten percent for nutrient.

  2. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ashley M; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C

    2013-07-22

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish.

  3. Climatological diurnal variation of negative CG lightning peak current over the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chronis, T.; Cummins, K.; Said, R.; Koshak, W.; McCaul, E.; Williams, E. R.; Stano, G. T.; Grant, M.

    2015-01-01

    study provides an 11 year climatology of the diurnal variability of the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning peak current. The local diurnal variation of peak current for negative polarity CG (-CG) flashes exhibits a highly consistent behavior, with increasing magnitudes between the late night to early morning hours and decreasing magnitudes during the afternoon. Over most regions, an inverse relationship exists between the -CG peak current and the corresponding -CG activity, although specific details can depend on region and time of day. Overall, the diurnal variation of the -CG peak current appears to reflect fundamental differences between morning and afternoon storms, but additional studies are required to clearly identify the primary cause(s).

  4. Long term diurnal variations in contaminant removal in high rate ponds treating urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    García, J; Green, B F; Lundquist, T; Mujeriego, R; Hernández-Mariné, M; Oswald, W J

    2006-09-01

    In this investigation, diurnal variations in contaminant removal in high rate ponds (HRP) treating urban wastewater were evaluated. Two experimental HRPs (surface area 1.54 m2 and depth 0.3 m), each with a clarifier in series (surface area 0.025 m2), were operated in parallel with different hydraulic retention times (3-10 days) but with the same environmental conditions over a period of one year. The operating strategies adopted only yielded a significant overall difference in removal between the two HRPs for nutrients. Effluent total suspended solids and chemical oxygen demand were slightly higher at midday than at dawn, while for total nitrogen and total phosphorous the concentrations were slightly higher at dawn. All these differences were related to the diurnal changes of DO and pH. The main conclusion of this work is that the diurnal variations of the contaminant concentrations in HRPs do not seriously affect their reliability in treating wastewater.

  5. Diurnal variation of marine stratocumulus over San Nicolas Island during the FIRE IFO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Blaskovic, M.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary analysis was made of data collected at San Nicolas Island during the Intensive Field Observation (IFO) phase of the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program's Regional Experiment (FIRE). Of particular interest was an examination of a distinct diurnal variation in the cloud properties, despite an apparent absence of diurnal forcing from the surface. Direct or indirect radiative modulation of such clouds, as proposed by Fravalo at el. (1981) and Turton and Nicholls (1987) indeed seems likely. Preliminary observational evidence for diurnal change in the marine stratocumulus adjacent to San Nicolas Island is presented. A comparison is then made between the observed behavior and predictions from theoretical models of the interactive effect of radiation on boundary layer clouds.

  6. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  7. Mixed Layer Dynamics and the Diurnal Cycle in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenegrat, J. O.; McPhaden, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    A unique 8-month data set of moored near-surface velocity observations is used to examine the diurnal cycle of near-surface shear and stratification at 0°N, 23°W in the central equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The ocean diurnal cycle is strongly modulated by seasonal variability in wind forcing, and during trade wind conditions descending diurnal shear layers are observed regularly in the late afternoon and evening. These descending shear layers are associated with reduced Richardson number, and marginal instability of the equatorial undercurrent below the mixed layer. The significance of these findings for deep-cycle turbulence in the central equatorial Atlantic will be discussed in relation to recent work from the Pacific.

  8. Wavy Lineaments on Europa: Fracture Propagation into Combined Nonsynchronous and Diurnal Stress Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Zane; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Barr, Amy C.; Gleeson, Damhnait; Mullen, McCall; Nimmo, Francis; Stempel, Michelle M.; Wahr, John

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the processes that have operated on Europa and the manner in which they may have changed through time is fundamental to understanding the satellite's geology and present-day habitability. Previous studies have shown that lineament patterns on Europa can be explained by accumulation of tensile stress from slow nonsynchronous rotation (NSR), while the cycloidal planforms of other Europan lineaments can be explained if fractures propagate through a diurnally changing tensile stress field. We find that fractures propagated into combined diurnal and NSR stress fields can be "wavy" in planform for NSR stress accumulated over 2 to 8 of ice shell rotation and average propagation speeds of approx. 1 to 3 m/s. The variety of Europa's observed lineament planforms from cycloidal, to wavy, to arcuate can be produced by accumulation of NSR stress relative to the diurnal stress field. Varying proportions of these stress mechanisms plausibly may be related to a time-variable (slowing) NSR rate.

  9. Diurnally driven scaling properties of Amazonian rainfall fields: Fourier spectra and order-q statistical moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, JuliáN. E.; Poveda, GermáN.

    2009-06-01

    The influence of the diurnal cycle on spatial scaling properties of Amazonian rainfall fields is investigated using data gathered during the January-February 1999 Wet Season Atmospheric Meso-scale Campaign in the state of Rondonia (Brazil, SW Amazonia). Most intense precipitation events with large spatial coverage occur during early afternoon. Amplitudes of average and maximum intensity diurnal cycles are higher during the easterly than during the westerly atmospheric regime. The diurnal cycle of average rainfall occupancy exhibits a significantly larger amplitude during the westerly regime. Storms exhibit power law Fourier spectra, E(k) = ck-β, with two scaling regimes characterized by different scaling exponents (β1 and β2), separated at a critical distance, which depends on the spatial extent of rainfall organization. Inversely correlated diurnal cycles for β1 and β2 reflect rainfall organization patterns at different spatial scales through the 24-h period. The break occurs at smaller (larger) spatial scales during the morning (afternoon-evening). Average values of c and β exhibit inversely related diurnal cycles, and different behavior during either atmospheric regime. Order-q statistical moments indicate multiscaling of rainfall fields. Departures from simple scaling are also driven by the diurnal cycle, reflecting differences in convective activity and the spatial organization of rainfall throughout the 24-h cycle. Departures from simple scaling are dependent on the moment order q. Clear-cut differences between the estimated order-q statistical moments appear during both atmospheric regimes. These results shed light toward linking physical processes with statistics in Amazonian storms.

  10. Influence of an Ultra Fast Kelvin Wave on the Migrating Diurnal Tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. C.; Palo, S. E.; Liu, H.

    2008-12-01

    The migrating diurnal tide is one of the dominant dynamical features of the Earth's Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region, particularly at low latitudes. While the long term evolution of the migrating diurnal tide is dependent primarily upon seasonal changes in the solar heating profile and the background atmosphere, short term fluctuations on the order of a few days have been observed, occurring at time scales too short to be explained by changes in solar heating. These short-term fluctuations are often manifested as a modulation of tidal amplitudes at frequencies corresponding to those of propagating planetary wave modes, suggesting that short term variability in the tide can be driven by nonlinear wave-wave interactions between the tide and various propagating planetary waves also present in the region. However, many questions still remain about the nature of such interactions. The conditions under which various planetary waves may or may not interact with the atmospheric tides, as well as the mechanisms and overall effects of a planetary wave / tidal interaction are still unclear. In this study, we explore the effect of ultra fast Kelvin waves (UFKWs) on the migrating diurnal tide. The UFKWs are eastward propagating disturbances that occur sporadically throughout the year in the low latitude MLT region where the migrating diurnal tide is large. The NCAR Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) is used to simulate a control case without a UFKW and cases in which a UFKW of various magnitudes is present. Use of a global circulation model in this way allows us to characterize the effects of UFKW on the migrating diurnal tide and to investigate the underlying physical processes responsible for the interactions. Initial studies have indicated the UFKW does clearly modulate the amplitude of the tidal parameters influencing the overall amplitude and spatial structure of the migrating diurnal tide.

  11. Diurnal variability in orthostatic tachycardia: implications for the postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Jordan A; Garland, Emily M; Biaggioni, Italo; Black, Bonnie K; Ling, John F; Shibao, Cyndya A; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with POTS (postural tachycardia syndrome) have excessive orthostatic tachycardia (>30 beats/min) when standing from a supine position. HR (heart rate) and BP (blood pressure) are known to exhibit diurnal variability, but the role of diurnal variability in orthostatic changes of HR and BP is not known. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that there is diurnal variation of orthostatic HR and BP in patients with POTS and healthy controls. Patients with POTS (n=54) and healthy volunteers (n=26) were admitted to the Clinical Research Center. Supine and standing (5 min) HR and BP were obtained in the evening on the day of admission and in the following morning. Overall, standing HR was significantly higher in the morning (102±3 beats/min) than in the evening (93±2 beats/min; P<0.001). Standing HR was higher in the morning in both POTS patients (108±4 beats/min in the morning compared with 100±3 beats/min in the evening; P=0.012) and controls (89±3 beats/min in the morning compared with 80±2 beats/min in the evening; P=0.005) when analysed separately. There was no diurnal variability in orthostatic BP in POTS. A greater number of subjects met the POTS HR criterion in the morning compared with the evening (P=0.008). There was significant diurnal variability in orthostatic tachycardia, with a great orthostatic tachycardia in the morning compared with the evening in both patients with POTS and healthy subjects. Given the importance of orthostatic tachycardia in diagnosing POTS, this diurnal variability should be considered in the clinic as it may affect the diagnosis of POTS.

  12. Research of the diurnal soil respiration dynamic in two typical vegetation communities in Tianjin estuarine wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Meng, W. Q.; Li, H. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the differences and diurnal variations of soil respiration in different vegetation communities in coastal wetland is to provide basic reliable scientific evidence for the carbon "source" function of wetland ecosystems in Tianjin.Measured soil respiration rate which changed during a day between two typical vegetation communities (Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa) in coastal wetland in October, 2015. Soil temperature and moisture were measured at the same time. Each of the diurnal curves of soil temperature in two communities had a single peak value, and the diurnal variations of soil moisture showed a "two peak-one valley" trend. The diurnal dynamic of soil respiration under the two communities had obvious volatility which showed a single peak form with its maximum between 12:00-14:00 and minimum during 18:00. The diurnal average of soil respiration rate in Phragmites australis communities was 3.37 times of that in Suaeda salsa communities. Significant relationships were found by regression analysis among soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration rate in Suaeda salsa communities. There could be well described by exponential models which was y = -0.245e0.105t between soil respiration rate and soil temperature, by quadratic models which was y = -0.276×2 + 15.277× - 209.566 between soil respiration rate and soil moisture. But the results of this study showed that there were no significant correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature and soil moisture in Phragmites australis communities (P > 0.05). Therefore, under the specific wetland environment conditions in Tianjin, soil temperature and moisture were not main factors influencing the diurnal variations of soil respiration rate in Phragmites australis communities.

  13. The diurnal and nocturnal effects of travoprost in normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the diurnal and nocturnal effects of travoprost with sofZia® (Travatan Z® [TZ]) on intraocular pressure (IOP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods Twenty-seven subjects with NTG were admitted to an inpatient sleep laboratory for three 24-hour sessions monitoring IOP, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate every 2 hours in the habitual position (diurnal period: upright; nocturnal period: supine). Baseline IOP and OPP levels were compared to those during active treatment with TZ and 3 days after stopping the medication. OPP was calculated as 2/3 [diastolic BP + 1/3 (systolic BP – diastolic BP)] – IOP. Results TZ significantly reduced the mean diurnal and nocturnal IOP levels compared to baseline at all time points. During treatment, mean IOP decreased from 17.1±3.4 to 14.7±3.0 mmHg during the diurnal period (P<0.01) and from 19.9±3.6 to 18.8±3.5 mmHg during the nocturnal period (P<0.01). Once treatment was discontinued, mean IOP remained at levels significantly less than baseline during both the diurnal (15.6±3.2 mmHg) and nocturnal (18.7±3.7 mmHg) periods. Mean OPP was not significantly changed with treatment during either period. Conclusion In this population of NTG patients, TZ significantly lowers IOP at all time points throughout the diurnal and nocturnal periods. The treatment effect on IOP endures for up to 3 days after the last dose. Treatment did not significantly improve OPP. PMID:25382969

  14. Effects of diurnally oscillating pCO2 on the calcification and survival of coral recruits.

    PubMed

    Dufault, Aaron M; Cumbo, Vivian R; Fan, Tung-Yung; Edmunds, Peter J

    2012-08-01

    Manipulative studies have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) is a threat to coral reefs, yet no experiments have employed diurnal variations in pCO(2) that are ecologically relevant to many shallow reefs. Two experiments were conducted to test the response of coral recruits (less than 6 days old) to diurnally oscillating pCO(2); one exposing recruits for 3 days to ambient (440 µatm), high (663 µatm) and diurnally oscillating pCO(2) on a natural phase (420-596 µatm), and another exposing recruits for 6 days to ambient (456 µatm), high (837 µatm) and diurnally oscillating pCO(2) on either a natural or a reverse phase (448-845 µatm). In experiment I, recruits exposed to natural-phased diurnally oscillating pCO(2) grew 6-19% larger than those in ambient or high pCO(2). In experiment II, recruits in both high and natural-phased diurnally oscillating pCO(2) grew 16 per cent larger than those at ambient pCO(2), and this was accompanied by 13-18% higher survivorship; the stimulatory effect on growth of oscillatory pCO(2) was diminished by administering high pCO(2) during the day (i.e. reverse-phased). These results demonstrate that coral recruits can benefit from ecologically relevant fluctuations in pCO(2) and we hypothesize that the mechanism underlying this response is highly pCO(2)-mediated, night-time storage of dissolved inorganic carbon that fuels daytime calcification.

  15. Diurnal and seasonal change in stem respiration of Larix principis-rupprechtii trees, northern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Zhao, Miao; Xu, Xiangtao; Sun, Zhenzhong; Yin, Guodong; Piao, Shilong

    2014-01-01

    Stem respiration is a critical and uncertain component of ecosystem carbon cycle. Few studies reported diurnal change in stem respiration as well as its linkage with climate. In this study, we investigated the diurnal and seasonal change in stem respiration and its linkage with environmental factors, in larch plantations of northern China from 2010 to 2012. The stem respiration per unit surface area (RS) showed clear diurnal cycles, ranging from 1.65±0.10 to 2.69±0.15 µmol m(-2) s(-1), increased after 6∶00, peaked at 15∶00 and then decreased. Both stem temperature and air temperature show similar diurnal pattern, while the diurnal pattern of air relative humidity is just the opposite to Rs. Similar to the diurnal cycles, seasonal change in RS followed the pattern of stem temperature. RS increased from May (1.28±0.07 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) when the stem temperature was relatively low and peaked in July (3.02±0.10 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) when the stem temperature was also the highest. Further regression analyses show that RS exponentially increases with increasing temperature, and the Q10 of Rs at mid daytime (1.97±0.17 at 12∶00 and 1.96±0.10 at 15∶00) is significantly lower than that of mid nighttime (2.60±0.14 at 00∶00 and 2.71±0.25 at 03∶00) Q10. This result not only implies that Rs is more sensitive to night than day warming, but also highlights that temperature responses of Rs estimated by only daytime measurement can lead to underestimated stem respiration increase under global warming, especially considering that temperature increase is faster during nighttime.

  16. Simulation of the Universal-Time Diurnal Variation of the Global Electric Circuit Charging Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackerras, David; Darveniza, Mat; Orville, Richard E.; Williams, Earle R.; Goodman, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    A global lightning model that includes diurnal and annual lightning variation, and total flash density versus latitude for each major land and ocean, has been used as the basis for simulating the global electric circuit charging rate. A particular objective has been to reconcile the difference in amplitude ratios [AR=(max-min)/mean] between global lightning diurnal variation (AR approximately equals 0.8) and the diurnal variation of typical atmospheric potential gradient curves (AR approximately equals 0.35). A constraint on the simulation is that the annual mean charging current should be about 1000 A. The global lightning model shows that negative ground flashes can contribute, at most, about 10-15% of the required current. For the purpose of the charging rate simulation, it was assumed that each ground flash contributes 5 C to the charging process. It was necessary to assume that all electrified clouds contribute to charging by means other than lightning, that the total flash rate can serve as an indirect indicator of the rate of charge transfer, and that oceanic electrified clouds contribute to charging even though they are relatively inefficient in producing lightning. It was also found necessary to add a diurnally invariant charging current component. By trial and error it was found that charging rate diurnal variation curves could be produced with amplitude ratios and general shapes similar to those of the potential gradient diurnal variation curves measured over ocean and arctic regions during voyages of the Carnegie Institute research vessels. The comparisons were made for the northern winter (Nov.-Feb.), the equinox (Mar., Apr., Sept., Oct.), the northern summer (May-Aug.), and the whole year.

  17. Diurnal and Nocturnal Pollination of Marginatocereus marginatus (Pachycereeae: Cactaceae) in Central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    DAR, SALEEM; ARIZMENDI, Ma. del CORO; VALIENTE-BANUET, ALFONSO

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Chiropterophillous and ornithophillous characteristics can form part of a single reproductive strategy in plants that have flowers with diurnal and nocturnal anthesis. This broader pollination strategy can ensure seed set when pollinators are scarce or unpredictable. This appears to be true of hummingbirds, which presumably pollinate Marginatocereus marginatus, a columnar cactus with red nocturnal and diurnal flowers growing as part of dense bat-pollinated columnar cacti forests in arid regions of central Mexico. The aim of this study was to study the floral biology of M. marginatus, and evaluate the effectiveness of nocturnal vs. diurnal pollinators and the contribution of each pollinator group to overall plant fitness. • Methods Individual flower buds were marked and followed to evaluate flower phenology and anthesis time. Flowers and nectar production were measured. An exclusion experiment was conducted to measure the relative contribution of nocturnal and diurnal pollinators to seed set. • Key Results Marginatocereus marginatus has red hermaphroditic flowers with nocturnal and diurnal anthesis. The plant cannot produce seeds by selfing and was pollinated during the day by hummingbirds and during the night by bats, demonstrating that both pollinator groups were important for plant reproduction. Strong pollen limitation was found in the absence of one of the pollinator guilds. • Conclusions Marginatocereus marginatus has an open pollination system in which both diurnal and nocturnal pollinators are needed to set seeds. This represents a fail-safe pollination system that can ensure both pollination, in a situation of low abundance of one of the pollinator groups (hummingbirds), and high competition for nocturnal pollinators with other columnar cacti that bloom synchronously with M. marginatus in the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico. PMID:16394025

  18. Sleep loss reduces diurnal rhythm amplitude of leptin in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Mullington, J M; Chan, J L; Van Dongen, H P A; Szuba, M P; Samaras, J; Price, N J; Meier-Ewert, H K; Dinges, D F; Mantzoros, C S

    2003-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of sleep loss on the diurnal rhythm of circulating leptin levels. An indwelling forearm catheter was used to sample blood at 90-min intervals for a total of 120 h, which included 88 h of sustained sleeplessness, in 10 healthy men. The diurnal amplitude of leptin was reduced during total sleep deprivation and returned toward normal during the period of recovery sleep. This finding provides evidence that sleep influences the nocturnal leptin profile, and may have implications for the understanding of the role of sleep in metabolic regulation and the aetiologies of obesity and the night eating syndrome.

  19. A diurnal study of the electrical structure of the equatorial middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croskey, C. L.; Hale, L. C.; Mitchell, J. D.; Muha, D.; Maynard, N. C.

    1985-01-01

    Electrical parameters measured from 115 km down to below 20 km during the Project Condor campaign at the Punta Lobos Rocket Range near Lima, Peru, are presented. Ten rocket-launched payloads measured electrical conductivity. A strong diurnal influence due to solar ultraviolet radiation is shown. Nine of the payloads also measured electric fields. No large mesospheric vertical electric fields are found in the data. A calculation of the dc global conduction current density at 18 km is smaller than previously measured at low latitudes and does not show the conventional diurnal variation.

  20. A two component model of the diurnal variations in the thermospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Volland, H.

    1972-01-01

    A self-consistent, two-dimensional, two-component diffusion model is presented to describe the diurnal component of thermosphere dynamics. In the regions where oxygen and helium are the minor constituents, diffusion is shown to increase the amplitudes of these constituents and to advance the times of their diurnal maxima by several hours with respect to the gas temperature and the major species. Both effects are in basic agreement with satellite observations. The diffusion process is relatively insignificant for temperature, total mass density, and wind fields. The magnitude of the temperature-density phase delay is discussed with respect to its dependence on the electron density distribution.

  1. Imaging of ultraweak spontaneous photon emission from human body displaying diurnal rhythm.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2009-07-16

    The human body literally glimmers. The intensity of the light emitted by the body is 1000 times lower than the sensitivity of our naked eyes. Ultraweak photon emission is known as the energy released as light through the changes in energy metabolism. We successfully imaged the diurnal change of this ultraweak photon emission with an improved highly sensitive imaging system using cryogenic charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We found that the human body directly and rhythmically emits light. The diurnal changes in photon emission might be linked to changes in energy metabolism.

  2. [Diurnal variation of Quercus variabilis trunk diameter in response to environmental factors at south aspect of Taihang Mountains].

    PubMed

    Sun, Shou-Jia; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jin-Song; Jia, Chang-Rong; Ren, Ying-Feng

    2012-08-01

    By using Circumference Dendrometer 2 (DC2), this paper studied the diurnal variation of trunk diameter in Quercus variabilis plantation at the south aspect of Taihang Mountains. During seasonal drought, the diurnal variation of Q. variabilis trunk diameter was quite evident. The time of the diameter shrinkage followed the start-up time of sap flow, but the appearance of the minimum trunk diameter lagged behind the maximum sap flow flux about 3-4 h. The maximum daily shrinkage (MDS) value of the trunk diameter presented a trend low-high-low, being significantly correlated with the diurnal differences of cumulative sap flow flux and leaf water potential and having a significant quadratic relationship with soil moisture content. The MDS value was affected by the variations of meteorological factors, being significantly correlated with the diurnal variations of air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, and relative humidity, but less correlated with the diurnal variation of solar radiation. After successive precipitation, soil moisture content was no longer the limiting factor of the diurnal variation of Q. variabilis trunk diameter. The MDS value had less correlations with the diurnal differences of cumulative sap flow flux, leaf water potential, soil moisture content, and other meteorological factors. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that the soil moisture content and air temperature in seasonal drought and rain seasons were the key factors affecting the diurnal variation of Q. variabilis trunk diameter. PMID:23189691

  3. 40 CFR 1045.625 - What requirements apply under the Diurnal Transition Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...(d) and 40 CFR 1060.105. The provisions of this section do not apply for portable marine fuel tanks... are exempt from the prohibitions in 40 CFR 1068.101(a)(1) with respect to diurnal emissions, subject... under this section: (1) Percent-of-production allowances. You may produce up to 50 percent of...

  4. 40 CFR 1045.625 - What requirements apply under the Diurnal Transition Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...(d) and 40 CFR 1060.105. The provisions of this section do not apply for portable marine fuel tanks... are exempt from the prohibitions in 40 CFR 1068.101(a)(1) with respect to diurnal emissions, subject... under this section: (1) Percent-of-production allowances. You may produce up to 50 percent of...

  5. Entrainment of the diurnal rhythm of plasma leptin to meal timing.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, D A; Cella, L K; Sinha, M K; Caro, J F

    1997-10-01

    To identify the physiologic factor(s) that entrain the diurnal rhythm of plasma leptin, leptin levels were measured hourly after changes in light/dark cycle, sleep/wake cycle, and meal timing. Four young male subjects were studied during each of two protocols, those being a simulated 12-h time zone shift and a 6.5-h meal shift. During the baseline day, plasma leptin demonstrated a strong diurnal rhythm with an amplitude of 21%, zenith at 2400 h, and nadir between 0900 and 1200 h. Acute sleep deprivation did not alter plasma leptin, but day/night reversal (time zone shift) caused a 12+/-2 h shift (P < 0.01) in the timing of the zenith and nadir. When meals were shifted 6.5 h without changing the light or sleep cycles, the plasma leptin rhythm was shifted by 5-7 h (P < 0.01). The phase change occurred rapidly when compared with changes in the diurnal rhythm of cortisol, suggesting that leptin levels are not acutely entrained to the circadian clock. The leptin rhythm was altered by meal timing in a manner very similar to the rhythm of de novo cholesterol synthesis. We conclude that the diurnal rhythm of plasma leptin in young males is entrained to meal timing.

  6. Diurnal variation of surface ozone in mountainous areas: Case study of Mt. Huang, East China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jin, Lianji; Zhao, Tianliang; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Bin; Shan, Yunpeng; Guo, Xiaomei; Tan, Chenghao; Gao, Jinhui; Wang, Haoliang

    2015-12-15

    To explore the variations in atmospheric environment over mountainous areas, measurements were made from an intensive field observation at the summit of Mt. Huang (30.13°N, 118.15°E, 1841m above sea level), a rural site located in East China, from June to August 2011. The measurements revealed a diurnal change of surface O3 with low concentrations during the daytime and high concentrations during the nighttime. The causes of diurnal O3 variations over the mountain peak in East China were investigated by using a fairly comprehensive WRF-Chem and HYSPLIT4 modeling approach with observational analysis. By varying model inputs and comparing the results to a baseline modeling and actual air quality observations, it is found that nearby ozone urban/anthropogenic emission sources were contributing to a nighttime increase in mountaintop ozone levels due to a regional transport lag and residual layer effects. Positive correlation of measured O3 and CO concentrations suggested that O3 was associated with anthropogenic emissions. Sensitivity modeling experiments indicated that local anthropogenic emissions had little impact on the diurnal pattern of O3. The diurnal pattern of O3 was mainly influenced by regional O3 transport from the surrounding urban areas located 100-150km away from the summit, with a lag time of 10h for transport. PMID:26318811

  7. Diurnal changes in stable isotopes of leaf water on the southern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wusheng

    2015-04-01

    Leaf water in plants playing a significant role in the hydrological cycle, will change the existing stable isotope hydrological cycle pattern. Based on stable isotopic analysis and corresponding meteorological measurement, a better understanding of water transport, storage, and usage can be achieved in stable isotope hydrological cycle on the Tibetan Plateau. This study focuses on the diurnal variations of leaf water stable isotopes at the Lhasa station, southern Tibetan Plateau. The results of our data show that, the diurnal variations of stable isotopic compositions (δ18O and δD) of leaf water fluctuate obviously, with high value in the daytime and low value at night. The diurnal fluctuations of deuterium excess (d) of leaf water are also clear, with low value in the daytime and high value at night. At diurnal time scale, both air temperature and relative humidity control the variations of δ18O and δD in leaf water. Relative humidity correlates negatively with δ18O, and positively with d, in contrast to air temperature. The results reveal that deuterium excess may be an indicator of plant transpiration.

  8. Gross ecosystem photosynthesis causes a diurnal pattern in methane emission from rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatala, Jaclyn A.; Detto, Matteo; Baldocchi, Dennis D.

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the relative contribution of environmental and substrate controls on rice paddy methanogenesis is critical for developing mechanistic models of landscape-scale methane (CH4) flux. A diurnal pattern in observed rice paddy CH4 flux has been attributed to fluctuations in soil temperature physically driving diffusive CH4 transport from the soil to atmosphere. Here we make direct landscape-scale measurements of carbon dioxide and CH4 fluxes and show that gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) is the dominant cause of the diurnal pattern in CH4 flux, even after accounting for the effects of soil temperature. The time series of GEP and CH4 flux show strong spectral coherency throughout the rice growing season at the diurnal timescale, where the peak in GEP leads that of CH4 flux by 1.3 ± 0.08 hours. By applying the method of conditional Granger causality in the spectral domain, we demonstrated that the diurnal pattern in CH4 flux is primarily caused by GEP.

  9. Diurnal Regulation of the Brassinosteroid-Biosynthetic CPD Gene in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bancos, Simona; Szatmári, Anna-Mária; Castle, Julie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Bishop, Gerard J.; Nagy, Ferenc; Szekeres, Miklós

    2006-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), are essential for normal photomorphogenesis. However, the mechanism by which light controls physiological functions via BRs is not well understood. Using transgenic plants carrying promoter-luciferase reporter gene fusions, we show that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the BR-biosynthetic CPD and CYP85A2 genes are under diurnal regulation. The complex diurnal expression profile of CPD is determined by dual, light-dependent, and circadian control. The severely decreased expression level of CPD in phytochrome-deficient background and the red light-specific induction in wild-type plants suggest that light regulation of CPD is primarily mediated by phytochrome signaling. The diurnal rhythmicity of CPD expression is maintained in brassinosteroid insensitive 1 transgenic seedlings, indicating that its transcriptional control is independent of hormonal feedback regulation. Diurnal changes in the expression of CPD and CYP85A2 are accompanied by changes of the endogenous BR content during the day, leading to brassinolide accumulation at the middle of the light phase. We also show that CPD expression is repressed in extended darkness in a BR feedback-dependent manner. In the dark the level of the bioactive hormone did not increase; therefore, our data strongly suggest that light also influences the sensitivity of plants to BRs. PMID:16531479

  10. Diurnal regulation of the brassinosteroid-biosynthetic CPD gene in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bancos, Simona; Szatmári, Anna-Mária; Castle, Julie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Bishop, Gerard J; Nagy, Ferenc; Szekeres, Miklós

    2006-05-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), are essential for normal photomorphogenesis. However, the mechanism by which light controls physiological functions via BRs is not well understood. Using transgenic plants carrying promoter-luciferase reporter gene fusions, we show that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the BR-biosynthetic CPD and CYP85A2 genes are under diurnal regulation. The complex diurnal expression profile of CPD is determined by dual, light-dependent, and circadian control. The severely decreased expression level of CPD in phytochrome-deficient background and the red light-specific induction in wild-type plants suggest that light regulation of CPD is primarily mediated by phytochrome signaling. The diurnal rhythmicity of CPD expression is maintained in brassinosteroid insensitive 1 transgenic seedlings, indicating that its transcriptional control is independent of hormonal feedback regulation. Diurnal changes in the expression of CPD and CYP85A2 are accompanied by changes of the endogenous BR content during the day, leading to brassinolide accumulation at the middle of the light phase. We also show that CPD expression is repressed in extended darkness in a BR feedback-dependent manner. In the dark the level of the bioactive hormone did not increase; therefore, our data strongly suggest that light also influences the sensitivity of plants to BRs.

  11. Entrainment of the diurnal rhythm of plasma leptin to meal timing.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeller, D A; Cella, L K; Sinha, M K; Caro, J F

    1997-01-01

    To identify the physiologic factor(s) that entrain the diurnal rhythm of plasma leptin, leptin levels were measured hourly after changes in light/dark cycle, sleep/wake cycle, and meal timing. Four young male subjects were studied during each of two protocols, those being a simulated 12-h time zone shift and a 6.5-h meal shift. During the baseline day, plasma leptin demonstrated a strong diurnal rhythm with an amplitude of 21%, zenith at 2400 h, and nadir between 0900 and 1200 h. Acute sleep deprivation did not alter plasma leptin, but day/night reversal (time zone shift) caused a 12+/-2 h shift (P < 0.01) in the timing of the zenith and nadir. When meals were shifted 6.5 h without changing the light or sleep cycles, the plasma leptin rhythm was shifted by 5-7 h (P < 0.01). The phase change occurred rapidly when compared with changes in the diurnal rhythm of cortisol, suggesting that leptin levels are not acutely entrained to the circadian clock. The leptin rhythm was altered by meal timing in a manner very similar to the rhythm of de novo cholesterol synthesis. We conclude that the diurnal rhythm of plasma leptin in young males is entrained to meal timing. PMID:9312190

  12. [Features of diurnal profile of blood pressure in workers having serum aromatic hydrocarbons level].

    PubMed

    Baĭdina, A S; Safonova, M A; Alekseev, V B

    2012-01-01

    Features of diurnal profile of blood pressure in workers having serum level of benzol and ethylbenzene are high systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure during the day, index of systolic arterial pressure time and index diastolic arterial pressure time was also high. These features should be considered in anti-hypertensives prescription.

  13. Obliquity Tides have an Impact in Diurnal Tidal Stresses on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüsthoff, M.; Sohl, F.

    2016-08-01

    We examine consequences of the lunar spin axis tilt relative to the pole of the orbital plane for diurnal tidal stresses. If obliquity tides are accounted for, maximum stresses at the surface are up to 30% larger than for eccentricity tides alone.

  14. Diurnality and cone photopigment polymorphism in strepsirrhines: examination of linkage in Lemur catta.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H; Deegan, Jess F

    2003-09-01

    Trichromatic color vision is routine among catarrhine primates, but occurs only as a variant form of color vision in some individuals in most platyrrhine genera. This arises from a fundamental difference in the organization of X-chromosome cone opsin genes in these two lineages: catarrhines have two opsin genes specifying middle- and long-wavelength-sensitive cone pigments, while platyrrhines have only a single gene. Some female platyrrhine monkeys achieve trichromacy because of a species polymorphism that allows the possibility of different opsin gene alleles on the two X-chromosomes. Recently, a similar opsin gene polymorphism was detected in some diurnal strepsirrhines, while at the same time appearing to be absent in any nocturnal genera. The aim of this study was to assess whether cone pigment polymorphism is inevitably linked to diurnality in strepsirrhines. Cone photopigments were measured in a species usually classified as diurnal, the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), using electroretinogram flicker photometry, a noninvasive electrophysiological procedure. Each of 12 animals studied was found to have the same middle-wavelength cone pigment, with peak sensitivity at about 547 nm. In conjunction with earlier results, this implies that cone pigment polymorphism is unlikely to exist in this species and that, accordingly, such variation is not a consistently predictable feature of vision in diurnal strepsirrhines. PMID:12923905

  15. Diurnal variation of surface ozone in mountainous areas: Case study of Mt. Huang, East China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jin, Lianji; Zhao, Tianliang; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Bin; Shan, Yunpeng; Guo, Xiaomei; Tan, Chenghao; Gao, Jinhui; Wang, Haoliang

    2015-12-15

    To explore the variations in atmospheric environment over mountainous areas, measurements were made from an intensive field observation at the summit of Mt. Huang (30.13°N, 118.15°E, 1841m above sea level), a rural site located in East China, from June to August 2011. The measurements revealed a diurnal change of surface O3 with low concentrations during the daytime and high concentrations during the nighttime. The causes of diurnal O3 variations over the mountain peak in East China were investigated by using a fairly comprehensive WRF-Chem and HYSPLIT4 modeling approach with observational analysis. By varying model inputs and comparing the results to a baseline modeling and actual air quality observations, it is found that nearby ozone urban/anthropogenic emission sources were contributing to a nighttime increase in mountaintop ozone levels due to a regional transport lag and residual layer effects. Positive correlation of measured O3 and CO concentrations suggested that O3 was associated with anthropogenic emissions. Sensitivity modeling experiments indicated that local anthropogenic emissions had little impact on the diurnal pattern of O3. The diurnal pattern of O3 was mainly influenced by regional O3 transport from the surrounding urban areas located 100-150km away from the summit, with a lag time of 10h for transport.

  16. Long-Term Effectiveness of the Response Restriction Method for Establishing Diurnal Bladder Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Duker, P. C.; Melein, L.; Averink, M.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effectiveness of the response restriction method for establishing diurnal bladder control was assessed with 48 participants with intellectual disabilities. Intervals of assessment ranged from 28 to 66 months across the individuals following initial baseline. Difference scores in terms of the mean number of toileting accidents per…

  17. Diurnal profiles of testosterone and pituitary hormones suggest different mechanisms for menstrual disturbances in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Rickenlund, Anette; Thorén, Marja; Carlström, Kjell; von Schoultz, Bo; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diurnal pattern of testosterone and pituitary hormones in endurance female athletes with different types of menstrual disorder. Age- and body mass index-matched groups of endurance athletes with amenorrhea (n = 10) and oligomenorrhea (n = 6), regularly cycling athletes (n = 8), and sedentary controls (n = 8) were compared with respect to 24-h hormonal profiles of testosterone, LH, prolactin (PRL), GH, insulin, IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), and cortisol. The 24-h hormone profiles in amenorrheic athletes were characterized by decreased LH pulsatility and peak amplitude of PRL and increased baseline levels of GH and cortisol. However, oligomenorrheic athletes displayed a significantly different pattern with higher diurnal testosterone secretion than all other groups. Furthermore, LH, PRL, GH, and cortisol secretions were comparable with regularly menstruating subjects. In the combined group of athletes with menstrual disturbances, diurnal secretions of testosterone, LH, and PRL were positively, whereas cortisol was negatively correlated with the number of menstruations the last year. Although this could be explained by a gradual inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, our results indicate that the symptoms of amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea may reflect two hormonally distinct conditions. Thus, amenorrheic athletes displayed a hormonal pattern in agreement with hypothalamic inhibition due to energy deficiency, whereas oligomenorrheic athletes demonstrated increased diurnal secretion of testosterone, suggesting a different mechanism, e.g. essential hyperandrogenism.

  18. Global evaluation of ammonia bidirectional exchange and livestock diurnal variation schemes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bidirectional air–surface exchange of ammonia (NH3) has been neglected in many air quality models. In this study, we implement the bidirectional exchange of NH3 in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. We also introduce an updated diurnal variability scheme for NH3...

  19. Salivary Biomarker Levels and Diurnal Variation: Associations with Medications Prescribed to Control Children's Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibel, Leah C.; Granger, Douglas A.; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred

    2007-01-01

    This study examined associations between medications prescribed to control children's problem behaviors and levels of, and diurnal variation in, salivary cortisol (C), testosterone (T), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Saliva was collected in the morning, midday, and afternoon from 432 children ages 6-13 years. Relative to a no-medication…

  20. The impact of the diurnal insolation cycle on the tropical cyclone heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Morgan E.; Perez-Betancourt, Diamilet; Wing, Allison A.

    A hurricane, or tropical cyclone, is understood as a heat engine that moves heat from the warm sea surface to the cold tropopause. The efficiency of this engine depends in part on the strength and duration of solar heating. Over land, peak rainfall associated with individual thunderstorms occurs in the late afternoon. Over ocean, with its markedly higher surface heat capacity, deep convection responds more to radiational cooling than daytime surface heating. However, the role of daily varying solar forcing on the dynamics of tropical cyclones is poorly understood. Recently, Dunion et al. (2014) reported significant, repeating diurnal behavior propagating outward from tropical cyclone centers, using infrared imagery from nine years of North Atlantic tropical cyclones. We study the impact of the diurnal cycle on tropical cyclones using a high resolution 3D numerical model, the System for Atmospheric Modeling (Khairoutdinov and Randall 2003). Simulations are run with and without variable sunlight. We are able to reproduce the observational finding of Dunion et al. (2014), and further identify a diurnally-varying residual circulation in the tropical cyclone at midlevels. The impact of the diurnal cycle on the equilibrium dynamics of tropical cyclones is also discussed.

  1. Approximate analytical solution to diurnal atmospheric boundary-layer growth under well-watered conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The system of governing equations of a simplified slab model of the uniformly-mixed, purely convective, diurnal atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is shown to allow immediate solutions for the potential temperature and specific humidity as functions of the ABL height and net radiation when expressed i...

  2. A diurnal reflectance model using grass: Surface-substrate interaction and inverse solution - October 16, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report an analysis of canopy reflectance (ρ) experiment, using hand-held radiometer to measure distribution of biomass in a grass field. The analysis: 1) separates the green-fraction from thatch and soil background, 2) accounts for the changing diurnal ρ with the sun elevation...

  3. Diurnal temperature range compression hastens berry development and modifies flavonoid partitioning in grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperatures during the day and night are known to influence grape berry metabolism and resulting composition. In this study, the flavonoid composition of field-grown Vitis vinifera L. cv. Merlot berries was investigated as a function of diurnal temperature range (DTR). The DTR was compressed by c...

  4. Diurnal Variability of Organic Carbon Distributions and Phytoplankton in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meo, O.; Mannino, A.

    2009-12-01

    The full effects of fossil fuel combustion on the carbon cycle are not well understood. To address rising environmental concerns, NASA is studying a new satellite mission concept called Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE), which will take more frequent images than the two current ocean color satellite sensors, SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua. GEO-CAPE will be able to study the diurnal variation associated with natural processes, climate change, and other human impacts on the coastal ocean. The purpose of this study was to collect preliminary data for organic carbon distributions and phytoplankton in Chesapeake Bay through high frequency sampling. Local water samples showed greater regional and daily differences in colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), which may be explained by river discharge. Small diurnal variation likely due to the tidal cycle was also observed. Mean particulate organic carbon (POC) showed more substantial diurnal variation, which coincided with diurnal variability in chlorophyll from algal biomass. This variability supports the need for the GEO-CAPE satellite mission to further our understanding of the ocean’s role in the carbon cycle.

  5. Global characteristics in the diurnal variations of the thermospheric temperature and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Hedin, A. E.; Reber, C. A.; Carignan, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Global characteristics in the diurnal components of OGO-6 neutral mass spectrometer measurements near 450 km are discussed qualitatively as well as quantitatively on the basis of a theoretical model. Observations and conclusion are summarized: (1) During equinox the temperature maximum occurs after 1600 LT at the equator and shifts toward 1500 LT at the poles, while the oxygen concentration at 450 km peaks about one hour earlier. (2) There is general agreement between the magnitudes and phases of the diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiuranal temperature components at 450 km from theory as well as OGO-6 and radar backscatter measurements. (3) The maximum in the diurnal variation of He is observed near 1030 LT consistent with theoretical results which further emphasize the importance of dynamics and diffusion. (4) During solstice conditions the diurnal temperature maximum shifts toward later local times, in substantial agreement with radar temperature measurements. (5) the temperature-oxygen density phase difference at 450 km is observed to decrease with latitude from the winter toward the summer hemisphere, where oxygen may even peak after the temperature at high latitudes.

  6. Regional climate simulations of summer diurnal rainfall variations over East Asia and Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Chan, Johnny C. L.; Au-Yeung, Andie Y. M.

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluates the performance of RegCM3 (Regional Climate Model Version 3) in simulating the East Asian rainfall, with emphasis on the diurnal variations of rainfall over Southeast China during the 1998-2002 summer (June-August) seasons. The evaluation focuses on the sensitivity of the choice of cumulus parameterizations and model domain. With the right setup, the spatial and temporal evolution of diurnal rainfall over Southeast China, which has not been well simulated by past studies, can be accurately simulated by RegCM3. Results show that the Emanuel cumulus scheme has a more realistic simulation of summer mean rainfall in East Asia, while the GFC (Grell scheme with the Frisch-Chappell convective closure assumption) scheme is better in simulating the diurnal variations of rainfall over Southeast China. The better performance of these two schemes [relative to the other two schemes in RegCM3: the Kuo scheme and the GAS (Grell scheme with the Arakawa-Schubert closure assumption) scheme] can be attributed to the reasonable reproduction of the major formation mechanism of rainfall—the moisture flux convergence—over Southeast China. Furthermore, when the simulation domain covers the entire Tibetan Plateau, the diurnal variations of rainfall over Southeast China are found to exhibit a noticeable improvement without changes in the physics schemes.

  7. Thermoregulatory Behavior in Diurnal Lizards as a Vehicle for Teaching Scientific Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platz, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Field experiments offer the opportunity for hands on experience with the scientific process. While this is true of a wide variety of activities, many have pitfalls both experimental and logistical that reduce the overall rate of success, in turn, influencing student learning outcomes. Relying on small, territorial, diurnal lizards and an array of…

  8. Differential arousal regulation by prokineticin 2 signaling in the nocturnal mouse and the diurnal monkey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qun-Yong; Burton, Katherine J; Neal, Matthew L; Qiao, Yu; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Sun, Yanjun; Xu, Xiangmin; Ma, Yuanye; Li, Xiaohan

    2016-01-01

    The temporal organization of activity/rest or sleep/wake rhythms for mammals is regulated by the interaction of light/dark cycle and circadian clocks. The neural and molecular mechanisms that confine the active phase to either day or night period for the diurnal and the nocturnal mammals are unclear. Here we report that prokineticin 2, previously shown as a circadian clock output molecule, is expressed in the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, and the expression of prokineticin 2 in the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells is oscillatory in a clock-dependent manner. We further show that the prokineticin 2 signaling is required for the activity and arousal suppression by light in the mouse. Between the nocturnal mouse and the diurnal monkey, a signaling receptor for prokineticin 2 is differentially expressed in the retinorecipient suprachiasmatic nucleus and the superior colliculus, brain projection targets of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Blockade with a selective antagonist reveals the respectively inhibitory and stimulatory effect of prokineticin 2 signaling on the arousal levels for the nocturnal mouse and the diurnal monkey. Thus, the mammalian diurnality or nocturnality is likely determined by the differential signaling of prokineticin 2 from the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells onto their retinorecipient brain targets. PMID:27535380

  9. Diurnal change in trees as observed by optical and microwave sensors - The EOS Synergism Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Jobea; Mcdonald, Kyle; Paris, Jack; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Weber, James A.; Ustin, Susan L.; Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Kasischke, Eric S.

    1991-01-01

    The EOS (Earth Observing System) Synergism Study examined the temporal variability of the optical and microwave backscatter due to diurnal change in canopy properties of interest to ecosystem modelers. The experiment was designed to address diurnal changes in canopy water status that relate to transpiration. Multispectral optical and multifrequency, multipolarization microwave measurements were acquired using boom-truck-based systems over a two-week period. Sensor and canopy properties were collected around the clock. The canopy studied was a walnut orchard in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The results demonstrate a large diurnal variation in the dielectric properties of the tree that in turn produces significant diurnal changes in the microwave backscatter. The results suggest that permanently orbiting spaceborne sensors such as those on EOS should be placed in orbits that are optimized for the individual sensor and need not be tied together by a tight simultaneity requirement on the order of minutes to hours for the purpose of monitoring ecosystem properties.

  10. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter of maize during water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Judge, Jasmeet; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Microwave emission and backscatter of vegetated surfaces are influenced by vegetation water content (VWC), which varies in response to availability of soil moisture in the root zone. Understanding the influence of diurnal VWC dynamics on radar backscatter will improve soil moisture retrievals using microwave remote sensing, and will provide insight into the potential use for radar to directly monitor vegetation water status. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of diurnal variation in VWC of an agricultural canopy on backscatter for different radar configurations. Water stress was induced in a corn (Zea mays) canopy near Citra, Florida, between September 1 and October 20, 2013. Diurnal destructive samples from the canopy were collected to determine leaf, stalk and total VWC. Water stress was quantified by calculating the evaporation deficit and measuring the soil water tension. The water-cloud model was used to model the influence of VWC and soil moisture variations on backscatter for a range of frequencies, polarizations and incidence angles. Furthermore, radar backscatter time series was simulated to show the effect of water stress on the diurnal variation in backscatter due to VWC. Results of this study show the very significant effects that VWC dynamics have on radar backscatter. We also highlight the potential for vegetation and soil water status monitoring using microwave remote sensing.

  11. A DIURNAL REFLECTANCE MODEL USING GRASS: SURFACE-SUBSTRATE INTERACTION AND INVERSE SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of using remote sensing data from earth orbiting radiometers can be improved by using a model that helps to separate the green-fraction in a canopy reflectance () from thatch and soil background, accounts for their diurnal changes, and inverts to a solution of a biop...

  12. Diurnal-period currents trapped above Fieberling Guyot: observed characteristics and model comparisons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.A.; Brink, K.H.; Eriksen, C.C.

    1994-01-01

    Current measurements at depths of 19, 115, 264 and 464 m above the summit of Fieberling Guyot (32??28???N, 127??47???W) for 13 months in 1989 show that the diurnal tides are strongly amplified. The measured variances for K1, P1 and O1 at the 115 m depth were 810, 140 and 80 times larger than the variances of the respective estimated barotropic tides. The diurnal currents closer to the summit were also strongly amplified, through the variance ratios were 40-50% of the ratios observed at 115 m. The diurnal band currents were only amplified at the precise tidal frequencies; the bandwidth of the response was less than 0.0002 cph. The discrete character of the response suggests that only currents with large spatial scales will be amplified. The characteristics of the amplified diurnal currents are compared to those predicted by a model for Fieberling Guyot of seamount-trapped waves driven by the barotropic tide. The amplitudes of the responses at this one site on the seamount compare favourably to the predicted. ?? 1994.

  13. Absence of diurnal variation of C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier-Ewert, H. K.; Ridker, P. M.; Rifai, N.; Price, N.; Dinges, D. F.; Mullington, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in otherwise healthy subjects has been shown to predict future risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. CRP is synthesized by the liver in response to interleukin-6, the serum concentration of which is subject to diurnal variation. METHODS: To examine the existence of a time-of-day effect for baseline CRP values, we determined CRP concentrations in hourly blood samples drawn from healthy subjects (10 males, 3 females; age range, 21-35 years) during a baseline day in a controlled environment (8 h of nighttime sleep). RESULTS: Overall CRP concentrations were low, with only three subjects having CRP concentrations >2 mg/L. Comparison of raw data showed stability of CRP concentrations throughout the 24 h studied. When compared with cutoff values of CRP quintile derived from population-based studies, misclassification of greater than one quintile did not occur as a result of diurnal variation in any of the subjects studied. Nonparametric ANOVA comparing different time points showed no significant differences for both raw and z-transformed data. Analysis for rhythmic diurnal variation using a method fitting a cosine curve to the group data was negative. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that baseline CRP concentrations are not subject to time-of-day variation and thus help to explain why CRP concentrations are a better predictor of vascular risk than interleukin-6. Determination of CRP for cardiovascular risk prediction may be performed without concern for diurnal variation.

  14. 40 CFR 1045.625 - What requirements apply under the Diurnal Transition Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...(d) and 40 CFR 1060.105. The provisions of this section do not apply for portable marine fuel tanks... are exempt from the prohibitions in 40 CFR 1068.101(a)(1) with respect to diurnal emissions, subject... this section. You may combine this with the label required under 40 CFR 1060.135. This label...

  15. 40 CFR 1045.625 - What requirements apply under the Diurnal Transition Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...(d) and 40 CFR 1060.105. The provisions of this section do not apply for portable marine fuel tanks... are exempt from the prohibitions in 40 CFR 1068.101(a)(1) with respect to diurnal emissions, subject... this section. You may combine this with the label required under 40 CFR 1060.135. This label...

  16. Diurnal and stress-reactive dehydroepiandrosterone levels and telomere length in youth.

    PubMed

    Dismukes, Andrew R; Meyer, Vanessa J; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Theall, Katherine P; Esteves, Kyle C; Drury, Stacy S

    2016-05-01

    The current investigation examined the association between the aging-related biomarkers dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and telomere length (TL) in community-recruited African-American youth. The examination of DHEA included stress reactive, basal and diurnal sampling, in order to elucidate the underlying physiological process that may overlap with TL. One hundred and two participants completed the Trier Social Stressor Test for children (TSST-C). TL was obtained from all youth from buccal swabs on the same day as the TSST-C. Saliva samples from 83 participants were obtained over the course of two additional days to measure waking and diurnal levels of DHEA. DHEA diurnal slope was a robust predictor of TL (B=0.516, P<0.05), while other DHEA values were not significantly associated with TL. This study is one of the first studies to examine basal, diurnal and reactivity measurements of DHEA in youth. Furthermore, this is the first study, to our knowledge, to demonstrate a positive association between DHEA, a putative anti-aging hormone, and TL, an indicator of cellular aging. PMID:27221260

  17. SIMULATION OF SUMMER-TIME DIURNAL BACTERIAL DYNAMICS IN THE ATMOSPHERIC SURFACE LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model was prepared to simulate the observed concentration dynamics of culturable bacteria in the diurnal summer atmosphere at a Willamette River Valley, Oregon location. The meteorological and bacterial mechanisms included in a dynamic null-dimensional model with one-second tim...

  18. Diurnal Albedo Variations of the Martian North Polar Water Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troy, R. F.; Bass, D.

    2002-01-01

    Presentation of findings regarding diurnal variations in the north polar water ice cap of Mars as part of a larger study of the interannual and seasonal variations of the Martian north polar water ice cap. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Diurnal and stress-reactive dehydroepiandrosterone levels and telomere length in youth

    PubMed Central

    Dismukes, Andrew R; Meyer, Vanessa J; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Theall, Katherine P; Esteves, Kyle C

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation examined the association between the aging-related biomarkers dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and telomere length (TL) in community-recruited African-American youth. The examination of DHEA included stress reactive, basal and diurnal sampling, in order to elucidate the underlying physiological process that may overlap with TL. One hundred and two participants completed the Trier Social Stressor Test for children (TSST-C). TL was obtained from all youth from buccal swabs on the same day as the TSST-C. Saliva samples from 83 participants were obtained over the course of two additional days to measure waking and diurnal levels of DHEA. DHEA diurnal slope was a robust predictor of TL (B=0.516, P<0.05), while other DHEA values were not significantly associated with TL. This study is one of the first studies to examine basal, diurnal and reactivity measurements of DHEA in youth. Furthermore, this is the first study, to our knowledge, to demonstrate a positive association between DHEA, a putative anti-aging hormone, and TL, an indicator of cellular aging. PMID:27221260

  20. 40 CFR 1045.625 - What requirements apply under the Diurnal Transition Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...(d) and 40 CFR 1060.105. The provisions of this section do not apply for portable marine fuel tanks... are exempt from the prohibitions in 40 CFR 1068.101(a)(1) with respect to diurnal emissions, subject... this section. You may combine this with the label required under 40 CFR 1060.135. This label...

  1. What are the determinants of the diurnal cycle of cloud properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julia; Cermak, Jan

    2015-04-01

    This study aims at untangling the influence of aerosols and meteorological factors on the diurnal cycle of cloud parameters based on a regional analysis of polar orbiting, geostationary satellite and reanalysis data. Aerosols affect the life time of clouds by changing their microphysical properties and dynamics dependent on the meteorological regime. In these systems, cloud properties change over time periods of hours and are highly variable spatially. Contributing to uncertainties of the Earth's radiation budget, the investigation of the aerosol-cloud-meteorology system from a regional perspective and on a daily basis is an important aspect of climate system research. In order to clarify to what extent cloud properties and their diurnal cycles are a result of cloud feedbacks to aerosols or meteorological conditions, multivariate statistics, in particular artificial neural networks, are used. Daily aerosol property data (MODIS) and meteorological parameters (ERA-Interim reanalysis) are used as input parameters and are related through a model to the observed output, i.e. diurnal cycles of cloud parameters (SEVIRI). Once the network is trained, the relevance of influencing factors for the diurnal cycle of cloud parameters is determined by sensitivity analysis.

  2. Diurnal activities of the brown stink bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in and near tasseling corn fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The demand for effective management of the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus, in corn and other crops has been increasing in recent years. To identify when and where the stink bugs are most likely to occur for targeted insecticide application, diurnal activities of stink bugs in and near the field...

  3. Diurnal Cortisol Profile in Williams Syndrome in Novel and Familiar Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lense, Miriam Diane; Tomarken, Andrew J.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder associated with high rates of anxiety and social issues. We examined diurnal cortisol, a biomarker of the stress response, in adults with WS in novel and familiar settings, and compared these profiles to typically developing (TD) adults. WS and TD participants had similar profiles in…

  4. Temporal patterns, heterogeneity, and stability of diurnal cortisol rhythms in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Tomarken, Andrew J; Han, Gloria T; Corbett, Blythe A

    2015-12-01

    The current study used a multifaceted approach to assess whether children with ASD have a distinctive diurnal rhythm of cortisol that differentiates them from typically developing (TD) peers and whether sub-groups of ASD children can be identified with unique diurnal profiles. Salivary cortisol was sampled at four time points during the day (waking, 30-min post-waking, afternoon, and evening) across three days in a sample of 36 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 27 typically developing (TD) peers. Between-group comparisons on both mean levels and featural components of diurnal cortisol indicated elevated evening cortisol and a dampened linear decline across the day in the ASD group. No differences were evident on the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Group-based trajectory modeling indicated that a subgroup (25%) of ASD children demonstrated an attenuated linear decline while the cortisol trajectory of the second subgroup was indistinguishable from that of the TD group. Intraclass correlations indicated that, when aggregated across days, cortisol measures were generally stable over the interval assessed. There were few significant relations between cortisol measures or sub-groups and measures of stress, temperament, and symptoms. Results encourage follow-up studies to investigate the functional significance, heterogeneity and longer-term stability of diurnal cortisol profiles in children with ASD.

  5. Diurnal Radiation Cycle Impact in Different Stages of Hurricane Edouard (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Tang, X.

    2015-12-01

    This work examines the impact of diurnally varying radiation cycle on the intensity, structure and track of Hurricane Edouard (2014) at different stages of its life cycle through convection-permitting simulations.During the formation stage, nighttime destabilization through radiative cooling may promote deep moist convection that eventually leads to the genesis of the storm while a tropical cyclone fails to develop in the absence of the night phase despite a strong incipient vortex under favorable environmental conditions. The nighttime radiative cooling further enhances the primary vortex before the storm undergoes rapid intensification (RI). Thereafter, the nighttime radiative cooling mainly increases convective activities outside of the primary eyewall that leads to stronger/broader outer rainbands and larger storm size during the mature stage of the hurricane but there is little impact on the hurricane intensity in terms of maximum surface wind speed. There is no apparent eyewall replacement cycle (ERC) simulated in both sensitivity experiments without the diurnal cycle (daytime only and nighttime only) while the control forecast undergoes secondary eyewall formation during the mature stage of Edourad (as observed), suggesting the potential role of the diurnally varying radiative impact. Through changing the strength of the initial vortex during the formation stage, the diurnal cycle may also alter the track of the storm.

  6. Perceived stress, common health complaints and diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion in young, otherwise healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Brian; Moss, Mark; Wetherell, Mark A

    2011-08-01

    Research has frequently linked perceived stress with changes in subjective and objective measures of ill health; however, additional assessment should consider the physiological mechanisms mediating these effects. This study investigated whether differential patterns of cortisol secretion might partially mediate perceived stress related disparities in common health complaints in young, otherwise healthy individuals. To capture the kinds of health complaints commonly reported in this population, the Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (PILL) was selected. To capture important parameters of the diurnal profile, cortisol was sampled at waking, 30 minutes post waking, 1200 h and 2200 h on three consecutive weekdays. Results revealed flatter diurnal cortisol slopes and elevated mean diurnal output (characterised by HPA hyperactivity in the evening) for participants in the higher stress group. Participants that reported higher perceived levels of stress also reported experiencing common health complaints with markedly greater frequency; however, these disparities were abolished when mean diurnal output of cortisol was statistically controlled. While dysregulation of basal HPA activity has been implicated in the aetiologies of chronic illness, findings reported here implicated hypersecretion of cortisol as one physiological pathway, partially mediating perceived stress related disparities in the kinds of common health complaints that typically affect young, otherwise healthy individuals.

  7. A Combined Infrared and Microwave Technique for Studying the Diurnal Variation of Rainfall Over Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Xu, L.; Adler, R. F.; Anagnostou, E.; Rickenbach, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present results from the application of a satellite infrared (IR) technique for estimating rainfall over northern South America. Our main objectives are to examine the diurnal variability of rainfall and to investigate the relative contributions from the convective and stratiform components. Additional information is contained in the original.

  8. Diurnal sampling reveals significant variation in CO2 emission from a tropical productive lake.

    PubMed

    Reis, P C J; Barbosa, F A R

    2014-08-01

    It is well accepted in the literature that lakes are generally net heterotrophic and supersaturated with CO2 because they receive allochthonous carbon inputs. However, autotrophy and CO2 undersaturation may happen for at least part of the time, especially in productive lakes. Since diurnal scale is particularly important to tropical lakes dynamics, we evaluated diurnal changes in pCO2 and CO2 flux across the air-water interface in a tropical productive lake in southeastern Brazil (Lake Carioca) over two consecutive days. Both pCO2 and CO2 flux were significantly different between day (9:00 to 17:00) and night (21:00 to 5:00) confirming the importance of this scale for CO2 dynamics in tropical lakes. Net heterotrophy and CO2 outgassing from the lake were registered only at night, while significant CO2 emission did not happen during the day. Dissolved oxygen concentration and temperature trends over the diurnal cycle indicated the dependence of CO2 dynamics on lake metabolism (respiration and photosynthesis). This study indicates the importance of considering the diurnal scale when examining CO2 emissions from tropical lakes.

  9. Diurnal Human Activity and Introduced Species Affect Occurrence of Carnivores in a Human-Dominated Landscape.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Arce, Dario; Vergara, Pablo M; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal human activity and domestic dogs in agro-forestry mosaics should theoretically modify the diurnal habitat use patterns of native carnivores, with these effects being scale-dependent. We combined intensive camera trapping data with Bayesian occurrence probability models to evaluate both diurnal and nocturnal patterns of space use by carnivores in a mosaic of land-use types in southern Chile. A total of eight carnivores species were recorded, including human-introduced dogs. During the day the most frequently detected species were the culpeo fox and the cougar. Conversely, during the night, the kodkod and chilla fox were the most detected species. The best supported models showed that native carnivores responded differently to landscape attributes and dogs depending on both the time of day as well as the spatial scale of landscape attributes. The positive effect of native forest cover at 250 m and 500 m radius buffers was stronger during the night for the Darwin's fox and cougar. Road density at 250 m scale negatively affected the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s fox, whereas at 500 m scale roads had a stronger negative effect on the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s foxes and cougars. A positive effect of road density on dog occurrence was evidenced during both night and day. Patch size had a positive effect on cougar occurrence during night whereas it affected negatively the occurrence of culpeo foxes and skunks during day. Dog occurrence had a negative effect on Darwin's fox occurrence during day-time and night-time, whereas its negative effect on the occurrence of cougar was evidenced only during day-time. Carnivore occurrences were not influenced by the proximity to a conservation area. Our results provided support for the hypothesis that diurnal changes to carnivore occurrence were associated with human and dog activity. Landscape planning in our study area should be focused in reducing both the levels of diurnal human activity in native forest remnants

  10. Areal differences in diurnal variations in summer precipitation over Beijing metropolitan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Renhe; Wang, Yingchun

    2012-12-01

    Using hourly rain-gauge measurements for the period 2004-2007, differences in diurnal variation in summer (June-August) precipitation are investigated in four distinct areas of Beijing: the urban area (UA), suburban area (SA), north mountainous area (NMA), and south mountainous area (SMA), which are distinguished empirically based on underlying surface conditions and verified with a statistical rotated empirical orthogonal function. The diurnal cycles and spatial patterns in seasonal mean precipitation amount, intensity, and frequency in the four areas are compared. Results show that the four areas have distinct diurnal variation patterns in precipitation amounts, with a single peak observed in UA and NMA in the late afternoon, which are 80 % and 121 % higher than their daily average, respectively, and two peaks in SA during the late afternoon and early morning with magnitudes exceeding the daily mean by 76 % and 29 %, respectively. There are also two peaks in SMA: a weaker nocturnal diurnal peak and an afternoon peak. The minimum amounts of rainfall observed in the forenoon in UA, SA, and SMA are 53 %, 47 %, and 57 % lower than the daily mean in each area, respectively, and that observed in the early morning in NMA is 50 % lower than the daily mean. The diurnal variations in precipitation intensities resemble those for precipitation amount in all four areas, but more intense precipitation is observed in SA (2.4 mm/h) than in UA (2.2 mm/h). The lowest frequency for the whole day is observed in UA, whereas the highest frequency occurs in the mountainous areas in the daytime, especially in the late afternoon in SMA. Diurnal variations in surface air temperature and divergence fields in the four areas are further investigated to interpret the physical mechanisms that underlie the spatial and temporal differences in summer diurnal precipitation, and the results indicate the possible dominance of the local circulation arising from mountain-valley wind and the

  11. Diurnal variation in leaf extension of Salix viminalis at two nitrogen supply rates.

    PubMed

    Stadenberg, I; McDonald, A J; Palmer, S

    1994-10-01

    To investigate how nitrogen supply might affect the biophysical factors controlling diurnal variation in leaf extension, pot-grown Salix viminalis L. were supplied with nitrogen at a low relative addition rate of 0.05 g N g(-1) N day(-1) (low N) or were given free access to all nutrients (high N). Leaf extension, turgor pressure, turgor after stress relaxation and the plastic extensibility of leaf tissue were determined for growing leaves every 4 h during two days of clear skies in August. Plants in the high-N treatment had a significantly higher relative growth rate, dry weight, shoot/root ratio, leaf nitrogen concentration, total leaf area, final area of single leaves and epidermal cell size than plants in the low-N treatment. The periodicity of leaf extension was similar in both treatments with high values during the afternoon and early evening, and negligible values during the night and in the early morning. The maximum rate of leaf extension was higher in high-N than in low-N plants. Leaf water potential and leaf osmotic potential decreased in the morning and increased in the afternoon with highest values during the night. Calculated values of turgor pressure showed no consistent diurnal trend and did not correlate with the rate of leaf extension. There was no consistent difference in turgor between treatments. Turgor after stress relaxation varied diurnally. The difference between turgors before and after stress relaxation also varied diurnally and was largely in phase with the diurnal pattern of leaf extension. These data are consistent with either a causal role for growth turgor (difference between turgors before and after stress relaxation) in the regulation of cell expansion, or a diurnal variation in turgors after relaxation, attributable to different capacities for cell wall loosening at different times of day. Plastic extensibility of leaf tissue showed no diurnal pattern but consistently higher values were found in high-N than in low-N plants. We

  12. Diurnal Human Activity and Introduced Species Affect Occurrence of Carnivores in a Human-Dominated Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Arce, Dario; Vergara, Pablo M.; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal human activity and domestic dogs in agro-forestry mosaics should theoretically modify the diurnal habitat use patterns of native carnivores, with these effects being scale-dependent. We combined intensive camera trapping data with Bayesian occurrence probability models to evaluate both diurnal and nocturnal patterns of space use by carnivores in a mosaic of land-use types in southern Chile. A total of eight carnivores species were recorded, including human-introduced dogs. During the day the most frequently detected species were the culpeo fox and the cougar. Conversely, during the night, the kodkod and chilla fox were the most detected species. The best supported models showed that native carnivores responded differently to landscape attributes and dogs depending on both the time of day as well as the spatial scale of landscape attributes. The positive effect of native forest cover at 250m and 500 m radius buffers was stronger during the night for the Darwin's fox and cougar. Road density at 250m scale negatively affected the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s fox, whereas at 500m scale roads had a stronger negative effect on the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s foxes and cougars. A positive effect of road density on dog occurrence was evidenced during both night and day. Patch size had a positive effect on cougar occurrence during night whereas it affected negatively the occurrence of culpeo foxes and skunks during day. Dog occurrence had a negative effect on Darwin's fox occurrence during day-time and night-time, whereas its negative effect on the occurrence of cougar was evidenced only during day-time. Carnivore occurrences were not influenced by the proximity to a conservation area. Our results provided support for the hypothesis that diurnal changes to carnivore occurrence were associated with human and dog activity. Landscape planning in our study area should be focused in reducing both the levels of diurnal human activity in native forest remnants and

  13. Diurnal Human Activity and Introduced Species Affect Occurrence of Carnivores in a Human-Dominated Landscape.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Arce, Dario; Vergara, Pablo M; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal human activity and domestic dogs in agro-forestry mosaics should theoretically modify the diurnal habitat use patterns of native carnivores, with these effects being scale-dependent. We combined intensive camera trapping data with Bayesian occurrence probability models to evaluate both diurnal and nocturnal patterns of space use by carnivores in a mosaic of land-use types in southern Chile. A total of eight carnivores species were recorded, including human-introduced dogs. During the day the most frequently detected species were the culpeo fox and the cougar. Conversely, during the night, the kodkod and chilla fox were the most detected species. The best supported models showed that native carnivores responded differently to landscape attributes and dogs depending on both the time of day as well as the spatial scale of landscape attributes. The positive effect of native forest cover at 250 m and 500 m radius buffers was stronger during the night for the Darwin's fox and cougar. Road density at 250 m scale negatively affected the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s fox, whereas at 500 m scale roads had a stronger negative effect on the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s foxes and cougars. A positive effect of road density on dog occurrence was evidenced during both night and day. Patch size had a positive effect on cougar occurrence during night whereas it affected negatively the occurrence of culpeo foxes and skunks during day. Dog occurrence had a negative effect on Darwin's fox occurrence during day-time and night-time, whereas its negative effect on the occurrence of cougar was evidenced only during day-time. Carnivore occurrences were not influenced by the proximity to a conservation area. Our results provided support for the hypothesis that diurnal changes to carnivore occurrence were associated with human and dog activity. Landscape planning in our study area should be focused in reducing both the levels of diurnal human activity in native forest remnants

  14. Diurnal and spatial variation of remotely sensed precipitation over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, D.; Iyengar, G. R.; Mitra, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    The climate of India is dominated by monsoon systems. The remotely sensed estimates obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) are used to examine the most of the Indian monsoon systems. This study deals with the diurnal and spatial variation of precipitation over the Indian region. The precipitation data from TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), blended from a variety of sources (including rain gauges over land) and having both daily and 3- hourly output are being used for evaluation of the Numerical Weather Prediction models Basu (2007) of National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. The precipitation obtained from TRMM 3B42 for this study period has a spatial resolution of 0.25º X 0.25º latitude-longitude. The 3-hourly averaged values are centered at the middle of each 3 hr period. South Asian regions are dominated by seasonal climatic fluctuations and the major rainy season is the southwest monsoon season. In addition to the seasonal fluctuations, Indian summer monsoon is modulated by diurnal fluctuations; nature of diurnal variation of rainfall varies from place to place and depends upon the locations, topography of the region. Diurnal variation of rain-rate, frequency of rain, conditional rain rate, and maximum and minimum rain occurrence is studied. Over Indian tropical region, maximum rainfall over land and Bay of Bengal regions is observed during the late-afternoon and early-morning period, respectively. Drizzle or less rainfall occur frequently in the morning over most land areas, whereas convective activity occurs during the afternoon. The model predicted diurnal cycle of precipitation peaks too early (by ~3h) and the amplitude is too strong over Indian land region and tropical ocean region.

  15. Diurnal-inertial motions and diapycnal mixing on the Portuguese shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; Cisneros-Aguirre, Jesús; Martínez-Marrero, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    This work presents observations of diurnal-inertial motions forced by a sea-land breeze regime near critical latitudes ( 30∘±10∘N/S) for resonance on the Portuguese shelf. Wind conditions were determined with an Aanderaa meteorological buoy placed in the Bay of Setúbal during the Maritime Rapid Environmental Assessment 2004 (MREA04) sea trial. Currents data for this period were recorded from two Barny ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler) deployments located on the north and south sides of the bay, respectively. Both ADCPs covered almost the full depth of water ( ˜112m) with 24 bins of 4 m size at both sites. Dominant motions exhibited a two-layer configuration in response to energetic out-of-phase oscillations driven by diurnal-inertial currents. Hence, simultaneous CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) data were considered to assess the strength of observed motions in promoting diapycnal mixing. With this aim, ADCP and CTD data were used to analyse the vertical shear ( S2), squared buoyancy frequency ( N2) and gradient Richardson number ( Ri) of the water column in terms of two main layers with highly stratified and vertically sheared flows during diurnal-inertial events. Observations show a strong variation in the vertical density field near both ADCP deployments that involved high vertical shears distributed into two layers associated with diurnal-inertial currents. The results of our analysis highlight the role of wind-forced diurnal-inertial motions in shelf areas near the critical latitudes, where they can greatly contribute to triggering diapycnal mixing at the scale of a few days, owing to sea-land breeze forcing.

  16. Dysregulation of the cortisol diurnal rhythm following prenatal alcohol exposure and early life adversity.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Kaitlyn; Rasmussen, Carmen; Oberlander, Tim F; Loock, Christine; Pei, Jacqueline; Andrew, Gail; Reynolds, James; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is impacted by a multitude of pre- and postnatal factors. Developmental programming of HPA axis function by prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) has been demonstrated in animal models and in human infants, but remains understudied in older children and adolescents. Moreover, early life adversity (ELA), which occurs at higher rates in children with PAE than in non-exposed children, may also play a role in programming the stress response system. In a cohort of children and adolescents with PAE and ELA (PAE + ELA), we evaluated HPA function through assessment of diurnal cortisol activity compared to that in typically developing controls, as well as the associations among specific ELAs, adverse outcomes, protective factors, and diurnal cortisol. Morning and evening saliva samples were taken under basal conditions from 42 children and adolescents (5-18 years) with PAE + ELA and 43 typically developing controls. High rates of ELA were shown among children with PAE, and significantly higher evening cortisol levels and a flatter diurnal slope were observed in children with PAE + ELA, compared to controls. Medication use in the PAE + ELA group was associated with lower morning cortisol levels, which were comparable to controls. Complex associations were found among diurnal cortisol patterns in the PAE + ELA group and a number of ELAs and later adverse outcomes, whereas protective factors were associated with more typical diurnal rhythms. These results complement findings from research on human infants and animal models showing dysregulated HPA function following PAE, lending weight to the suggestion that PAE and ELA may interact to sensitize the developing HPA axis. The presence of protective factors may buffer altered cortisol regulation, underscoring the importance of early assessment and interventions for children with FASD, and in particular, for the many children with FASD who also have ELA.

  17. Removing Diurnal Cycle Contamination in Satellite-Derived Tropospheric Temperatures: Understanding Tropical Tropospheric Trend Discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po-Chedley, S.; Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical mid-tropospheric temperature (TMT) time series have been constructed by several independent research teams using satellite microwave sounding unit (MSU) measurements beginning in 1978 and advanced MSU (AMSU) measurements since 1998. Despite careful efforts to homogenize the MSU/AMSU measurements, tropical TMT trends disagree by a factor of three even though each analysis uses the same basic data. Previous studies suggest that the discrepancy in tropical TMT temperature trends is largely caused by differences in both the NOAA-9 warm target factor and diurnal drift corrections used by various teams to homogenize the MSU/AMSU measurements. This work introduces a new observationally-based method for removing biases related to satellite diurnal drift. The method relies on minimizing inter-satellite and inter-node drifts by subtracting out a common diurnal cycle determined via linear regression. It is demonstrated that this method is effective at removing intersatellite biases and biases between the ascending (PM) and descending (AM) node of individual satellites in the TMT time series. After TMT bias correction, the ratio of tropical tropospheric temperature trends relative to surface temperature trends is in accord with the ratio from global climate models. It is shown that bias corrections for diurnal drift based on a climate model produce tropical trends very similar to those from the observationally-based correction, with a trend differences smaller than 0.02 K decade-1. Differences among various TMT datasets are explored further. Tropical trends from this work are comparable to those from the Remote Sensing System (RSS) and NOAA datasets despite small differences. Larger differences between this work and UAH are attributed to differences in the treatment of the NOAA-9 target factor and the UAH diurnal cycle correction.

  18. The Effects of the Diurnal Atmospheric Variability on Entry, Descent and Landing on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marceta, D.

    2014-12-01

    Landing on Mars is extremely challenging task due to the fact that the Martian atmosphere is the most hostile environment in the Solar system to perform the entry, descent and landing (EDL) process, because it is thick enough to create substantial heating of the entry vehicle but not thick enough to reduce its velocity to the one necessary for safe landing. Beside this, the atmosphere is very dynamic mainly due to high eccentricity of the Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital to the equatorial plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion. Although seasonal variations of atmospheric parameters are significantly larger than the diurnal, it is very important to analyze diurnal cycles as they can significantly change vertical and horizontal atmospheric profiles in very short time intervals. This can present a serious threat to missions which have very precise timings and specific requirements such as the requirement for the daytime landing to enable ground images acquisition during the descent and landing phase. A 3-degrees-of-freedom trajectory integration routine was combined with the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) to identify the dependence of the EDL profiles on the diurnal cycles of atmospheric parameters throughout the Martian year. The obtained results show that the influence of the diurnal cycles is the largest at the equator and decreases relatively symmetrically towards the poles with a slightly stronger influence in the northern hemisphere. Also, there is a significant influence of the orbital position of Mars on the effect of diurnal atmospheric variations which causes that, around the orbital perihelion and winter solstice, there is some kind of inversion of the dependance of optimal entry timing on latitude of the landing site comparing to the rest of the Martian year.

  19. Epigenome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis of Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Diurnal Preference.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chloe C Y; Parsons, Michael J; Lester, Kathryn J; Burrage, Joe; Eley, Thalia C; Mill, Jonathan; Dempster, Emma L; Gregory, Alice M

    2015-12-01

    Diurnal preference is an individual's preference for daily activities and sleep timing and is strongly correlated with the underlying circadian clock and the sleep-wake cycle validating its use as an indirect circadian measure in humans. Recent research has implicated DNA methylation as a mechanism involved in the regulation of the circadian clock system in humans and other mammals. In order to evaluate the extent of epigenetic differences associated with diurnal preference, we examined genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation in DNA from monozygotic (MZ) twin-pairs discordant for diurnal preference. MZ twins were selected from a longitudinal twin study designed to investigate the interplay of genetic and environmental factors in the development of emotional and behavioral difficulties. Fifteen pairs of MZ twins were identified in which one member scored considerably higher on the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) than the other. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were assessed in twins' buccal cell DNA using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. Quality control and data pre-processing was undertaken using the wateRmelon package. Differentially methylated probes (DMPs) were identified using an analysis strategy taking into account both the significance and the magnitude of DNA methylation differences. Our data indicate that DNA methylation differences are detectable in MZ twins discordant for diurnal preference. Moreover, downstream gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis on the top-ranked diurnal preference associated DMPs revealed significant enrichment of pathways that have been previously associated with circadian rhythm regulation, including cell adhesion processes and calcium ion binding.

  20. Dysregulation of the cortisol diurnal rhythm following prenatal alcohol exposure and early life adversity.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Kaitlyn; Rasmussen, Carmen; Oberlander, Tim F; Loock, Christine; Pei, Jacqueline; Andrew, Gail; Reynolds, James; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is impacted by a multitude of pre- and postnatal factors. Developmental programming of HPA axis function by prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) has been demonstrated in animal models and in human infants, but remains understudied in older children and adolescents. Moreover, early life adversity (ELA), which occurs at higher rates in children with PAE than in non-exposed children, may also play a role in programming the stress response system. In a cohort of children and adolescents with PAE and ELA (PAE + ELA), we evaluated HPA function through assessment of diurnal cortisol activity compared to that in typically developing controls, as well as the associations among specific ELAs, adverse outcomes, protective factors, and diurnal cortisol. Morning and evening saliva samples were taken under basal conditions from 42 children and adolescents (5-18 years) with PAE + ELA and 43 typically developing controls. High rates of ELA were shown among children with PAE, and significantly higher evening cortisol levels and a flatter diurnal slope were observed in children with PAE + ELA, compared to controls. Medication use in the PAE + ELA group was associated with lower morning cortisol levels, which were comparable to controls. Complex associations were found among diurnal cortisol patterns in the PAE + ELA group and a number of ELAs and later adverse outcomes, whereas protective factors were associated with more typical diurnal rhythms. These results complement findings from research on human infants and animal models showing dysregulated HPA function following PAE, lending weight to the suggestion that PAE and ELA may interact to sensitize the developing HPA axis. The presence of protective factors may buffer altered cortisol regulation, underscoring the importance of early assessment and interventions for children with FASD, and in particular, for the many children with FASD who also have ELA. PMID:27286932

  1. Diurnal Evolution of Three-Dimensional Wind and Temperature Structure in California's Central Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shiyuan; Whiteman, Charles D.; Bian, Xindi

    2004-11-01

    The diurnal evolution of the three-dimensional summer season mean wind and temperature structure in California’s Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys (collectively called the Central Valley) are investigated using data from 22 radar wind profiler/Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASS) operated as part of the Central California Ozone Study in 2000. The profiler network revealed, for the first time, that the persistent summer season flow pattern documented by surface observations extends 800-1000 m above the surface. At most locations, up-valley winds persist both day and night except at the upper ends of the valleys and close to the valley sidewalls where diurnal wind reversals occur. Wind speeds exhibit pronounced diurnal oscillations, with amplitudes decreasing with height. A low-level wind maximum occurs in the lowest 300 m, with a sharp decrease in speed above the maximum. Especially well-defined nocturnal low-level jets occur at sites in the southern San Joaquin Valley, where maximum speeds of 10 m s-1 or more occur 1-2 h before midnight at heights near 300 m. The afternoon mixed layer, generally deeper than 1000 m, increases in depth with up-valley distance in both valleys. At night, temperature inversions develop in the lowest several hundred meters with near-isothermal layers above. Mean temperatures in the lowest 500 m of the valleys are always warmer than at the same altitude over the coast, and temperature increases from the lower to upper valleys. The diurnal oscillation of the coast-valley and along-valley temperature and pressure difference reach a maximum in late afternoon and a minimum in early morning. These oscillations are in phase with the diurnal variation of westerly onshore flows. The along-valley wind maxima, however, occur 1-2 h before midnight while the pressure gradient maxima are usually found just before sunset.

  2. Evaluating Diurnal Variations of Summer Precipitation over the Asian Monsoon Region based on TRMM Satellite Data and Coupled model outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Wu, G.

    2013-12-01

    Climatological characteristics of diurnal variations in summer precipitation over the entire Asian monsoon region are comprehensively investigated based on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite data during 1998-2008. The amplitude and phase of diurnal precipitation show a distinct geographical pattern. Significant diurnal variations occur over most of continental and coastal areas including the Maritime Continent, with the relative amplitude exceeding 40%, indicating that the precipitation peak is 1.4 times the 24-h mean. Although the diurnal variations of summer precipitation over the continental areas are characterized by an afternoon peak (1500-1800 Local Solar Time (LST)), over the central Indochina Peninsula and central and southern Indian Peninsula the diurnal phase is delayed to after 2100 LST, suggesting the diurnal behaviors over these areas different from the general continental areas. The weak diurnal variations with relative amplitudes less than 40% exist mainly over oceanic areas in the western Pacific and most of Indian Ocean, with the rainfall peak mainly occurring from midnight to early morning (0000-0600 LST), indicating a typical oceanic regime characterized by an early morning peak. However, apparent exceptions occur over the South China Sea (SCS), Bay of Bengal (BOB), and eastern Arabian Sea, with the rainfall peak occurring in daytime (0900-1500 LST). Prominent meridional propagations of the diurnal phase exist in South Asia and East Asia. The diurnal precipitation variations are also evaluated using the simulated outputs from several coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) participating in CMIP3 (such as CNRM-CM3 and MRI-GCGM2.3.2) and CMIP5 (FGOALS-g2). As compared with those from TRMM data, current state-of-the-art CGCMs still have significant problems in simulating the diurnal variability of the Asian summer monsoon. Although most models can capture the amplitude and phase of the diurnal rainfall cycle over continental

  3. Disentangling sources of individual differences in diurnal salivary α-amylase: reliability, stability and sensitivity to context.

    PubMed

    Out, Dorothée; Granger, Douglas A; Sephton, Sandra E; Segerstrom, Suzanne C

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, we employ a longitudinal design and a generalizability framework to examine the sources of variance in the diurnal rhythm of salivary α-amylase (sAA). The sample consisted of 122 first-year law students (55% male, mean age=23.9 years), who collected five saliva samples on each of three consecutive days at each of five data collection waves. In total, over 6900 saliva samples were collected, which allowed us to examine the properties of diurnal variation in sAA in great detail. Systematic individual differences accounted for 15-29% of the variability in the awakening response and diurnal slope, and for 61-65% of the variation in overall daily levels (i.e., diurnal mean, area under the curve with respect to ground [AUCg]). Although less than 1% of the variation was due to differences between waves and between days, the generalizability analyses revealed that between 16% and 17% of the variance in the diurnal mean, slope and AUCg is due to person by wave interactions, indicating that individuals vary in their biological sensitivity to environmental influences. In sum, this study documents sufficient stability and variation in diurnal sAA to warrant future studies on the origins and consequences of alterations in the diurnal rhythm of sAA worthwhile, and proposes guidelines on obtaining reliable measures.

  4. Spatial differences in thermal structure and variability within a small bay: Interplay of diurnal winds and tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicelli, Jessica; Moffat, Carlos; Navarrete, Sergio A.; Largier, John L.; Tapia, Fabian J.

    2014-10-01

    We characterize diurnal and semidiurnal temporal variability of the spring and summer near-shore hydrographic structure and circulation in Cartagena Bay, a small open bay in central Chile, and assess the relative role of diurnal wind and semidiurnal tide as forcing mechanisms of that variability. Our results highlight that the relative importance of these forcing mechanisms and the thermal structure can vary over small spatial scales within the bay. The water column at the southern and most wind-sheltered study site within the Bay (CTGN) was stratified all day despite the sea breeze. Throughout the water column, temperature variability at CTGN was strongly associated with the semidiurnal tide. At the northern site (ECIM), which was relatively more exposed to wind forcing, surface layer temperature fluctuations were principally diurnal and tightly associated with diurnal wind variability. The wind effect weakened near the bottom, where temperature variability was also correlated with the semidiurnal tide. At ECIM, we observed a vertically sheared cross-shore current structure, with onshore surface flow and offshore flow at mid-depth during strong winds. The diurnal variability in cross-shore flows matched diurnal variability in winds, suggesting that this vertical circulation could be directly forced by the wind. The diurnal circulation and the spatial differences in thermal structure across the bay are likely to be important for larval dispersal and material transport in and out of the Bay, as well as between near-shore waters and the shoreline.

  5. Climatology of diurnal tide and its long-term variability in the lower middle atmosphere over a tropical station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P. Vinay; Dutta, Gopa; Mohammad, Salauddin; Rao, B. Venkateswara

    2016-07-01

    ECMWF reanalysis (ERA-interim) data of winds for two solar cycles (1991-2012) are harmonically analyzed to delineate the characteristics and variability of diurnal tide over a tropical site (13.5° N, 79.5° E). The diurnal cycle horizontal winds measured by Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar between May 2005 and April 2006 have been used to compute 24 h tidal amplitudes and phases and compared with the corresponding results obtained from ERA winds. The climatological diurnal tidal amplitudes and phases have been estimated from surface to ˜33 km using ERA interim data. The amplitudes and phases obtained in the present study are found to compare reasonably well with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM-09). Diurnal tides show larger amplitudes in the lower troposphere below 5 km during summer and in the mid-stratosphere mainly during equinoctial months and early winter. Water vapor and convection in the lower troposphere are observed to play major roles in exciting 24-h tide. Correlations between diurnal amplitude and integrated water vapor and between diurnal amplitude and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are 0.59 and -0.34, respectively. Ozone mixing ratio correlates (ρ = 0.66) well with diurnal amplitude and shows annual variation in the troposphere whereas semi-annual variation is observed at stratospheric heights with stronger peaks in equinoctial months. A clear annual variation of diurnal amplitude is displayed in the troposphere and interannual variability becomes prominent in the stratosphere which could be partly due to the influence of equatorial stratospheric QBO. The influence of solar activity on diurnal oscillations is found to be insignificant.

  6. Scale interaction between the MJO and the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peatman, Simon; Matthews, Adrian; Stevens, David

    2013-04-01

    The Maritime Continent is a highly-populated region of many islands and shallow oceans, located in the oceanic warm pool, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. A strong diurnal cycle of precipitation exists due to onshore breezes causing strong convergence of moist air - enhanced by topographic effects - over the land during the day time, peaking during afternoon-evening. The respective diurnal cycle over the ocean is far weaker and does not peak until early in the morning. On intra-seasonal time-scales the greatest source of variability in the tropics is the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The convectively active part of the MJO propagates slowly (~5 ms-1) eastward through the warm pool from the Indian Ocean to the western Pacific, followed by the convectively suppressed part. The complex topography of the Maritime Continent means the exact nature of the propagation through this region is unclear. Model simulations of the MJO are often poor over the region, leading to errors in latent heat release and, subsequently, global errors in medium-range weather prediction and climate simulation. Using 14 northern hemisphere winters of high-resolution satellite data it is shown that, over regions where the diurnal cycle is strong, more than 80% of the variance in precipitation during an MJO cycle is accounted for by changes in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle. A canonical view of the MJO is of smooth eastward progression of a large-scale precipitation envelope over the warm pool. However, by computing "MJO harmonics" it is shown that the leading edge of the precipitation envelope advances over the islands of the Maritime Continent approximately 6 days or 2000 km ahead of the main body. This behaviour can be accommodated within existing theories of MJO propagation. When the active convective MJO envelope is over the eastern Indian Ocean, frictional moisture convergence and topographic blocking in the easterlies of the equatorial Kelvin wave response supply moisture to

  7. Effects of diurnal variation and prolonged refractoriness on repeated measurements of airways responsiveness to methacholine.

    PubMed Central

    Beach, J. R.; Stenton, S. C.; Connolly, M. J.; Walters, E. H.; Hendrick, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A number of studies have suggested that diurnal variation in airways responsiveness underlies the circadian rhythm of ventilatory function in asthma. Measurements of airways responsiveness are therefore often performed at standardised times in order to avoid this possible effect, but this is not practical for epidemiological studies. Refractoriness to methacholine has also been reported and this, too, could confound the results of methacholine tests repeated over short intervals. This investigation was carried out to evaluate the possible magnitude of diurnal variation and refractoriness in repeated measures of airways responsiveness to methacholine. METHODS--To investigate diurnal variation in airways responsiveness, 24 asthmatic subjects aged 18-45 underwent five methacholine tests over three days which were not necessarily consecutive: day 1 at 08:00 hours; day 2 at 08:00 hours, 14:00 hours, 20:00 hours; day 3 at 20:00 hours. To investigate refractoriness a retrospective analysis was undertaken of all paired methacholine tests performed in individuals within our unit between 1984 and 1990 where there had been no intervention likely to affect the results. RESULTS--The first investigation revealed no diurnal change in airways responsiveness although there was a change in FEV1. Mean PD20 did, however, increase 1.57 fold from 08:00 hours on day 1 to 08:00 hours on day 2 for subjects studied on consecutive days. The second investigation confirmed that a test interval of up to 24 hours (but not of 48 or more hours) was associated with a refractory index (PD20 test 2/PD20 test 1) of > 1. CONCLUSIONS--No diurnal variation in airways responsiveness was detected for measurements made between 08:00 hours and 20:00 hours, but an interval between successive tests of up to 24 hours was associated with refractoriness. Diurnal variation is not likely to exert an important confounding effect on methacholine tests carried out between 08:00 hours and 20:00 hours, but

  8. A diurnal animation of thermal images from a day-night pair

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    2000-01-01

    Interpretation of thermal images is often complicated because the physical property information is contained in both the spatial and temporal variations of the data and thermal models are necessary to extract and display this information. A linearized radiative transfer solution to the surface flux has been used to derive a function that is invariant with respect to thermal inertia. This relationship makes it possible to predict the temperature variation at any time in the diurnal cycle using only two distinct measurements (e.g., noon and midnight). An animation can then be constructed from a pair of day-night images to view both the spatial and temporal temperature changes throughout the diurnal cycle. A more complete solution for the invariant function, using the method of Laplace transforms and based on the linearized solution, was introduced. These results indicate that the linear model does not provide a sufficiently accurate estimate. Using standard conditions (latitude 30??, solar declination 0??, acquisition times at noon and midnight), this new relationship was used to predict temperature throughout the diurnal cycle to an rms error of 0.2??C, which is close to the system noise of most thermal scanners. The method was further extended to include the primary effects of topographic slope with similar accuracy. The temperature was computed at 48 equally spaced times in the diurnal cycle with this algorithm using a co-registered day and night TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) data pair (330 pixels, 450 lilies) acquired of the Carlin, Nevada, area and a co-registered DEM (Digital Elevation Model). (Any reader can view the results by downloading the animation file from an identified tip site). The results illustrate the power of animation to display subtle temporal and spatial temperature changes, which can provide clues to structural controls and material property differences. This 'visual change' approach could significantly increase the use of

  9. Photoperiod affects the diurnal rhythm of hippocampal neuronal morphology of Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    Individuals of many species can regulate their physiology, morphology, and behavior in response to annual changes of day length (photoperiod). In mammals, the photoperiodic signal is mediated by a change in the duration of melatonin, leading to alterations in gene expressions, neuronal circuits, and hormonal secretion. The hippocampus is one of the most plastic structures in the adult brain and hippocampal neuronal morphology displays photoperiod-induced differences. Because the hippocampus is important for emotional and cognitive behaviors, photoperiod-driven remodeling of hippocampal neurons is implicated in seasonal differences of affect, including seasonal affective disorder (SAD) in humans. Because neuronal architecture is also affected by the day-night cycle in several brain areas, we hypothesized that hippocampal neuronal morphology would display a diurnal rhythm and that day length would influence that rhythm. In the present study, we examined diurnal and seasonal differences in hippocampal neuronal morphology, as well as mRNA expression of the neurotrophic factors (i.e., brain-derived neurotrophic factor [Bdnf], tropomyosin receptor kinase B [trkB; a receptor for BDNF], and vascular endothelial growth factor [Vegf]) and a circadian clock gene, Bmal1, in the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters. Diurnal rhythms in total length of dendrites, the number of primary dendrites, dendritic complexity, and distance of the furthest intersection from the cell body were observed only in long-day animals; however, diurnal rhythms in the number of branch points and mean length of segments were observed only in short-day animals. Spine density of dendrites displayed diurnal rhythmicity with different peak times between the CA1 and DG subregions and between long and short days. These results indicate that photoperiod affects daily morphological changes of hippocampal neurons and the daily rhythm of spine density, suggesting the possibility that photoperiod-induced adjustments

  10. Sexual orientation and diurnal cortisol patterns in a cohort of U.S. young adults.

    PubMed

    Austin, S Bryn; Rosario, Margaret; McLaughlin, Katie A; Roberts, Andrea L; Gordon, Allegra R; Sarda, Vishnudas; Missmer, Stacey; Anatale-Tardiff, Laura; Scherer, Emily A

    2016-07-01

    Sexual minorities in the United States are at elevated risk of bullying, discrimination, and violence victimization, all stressors that have been linked to psychological and behavioral stress responses including depressive and anxious symptoms and substance use. Acute and chronic stressors may also elicit physiologic stress responses, including changes in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between minority sexual orientation and diurnal cortisol patterns. The present study included 1670 young adults ages 18-32 years (69% female, 31% male) from the Growing Up Today Study, a prospective cohort of U.S. youth. Participants provided five saliva samples over one day to estimate diurnal cortisol patterns. Sexual orientation groups included: completely heterosexual with no same-sex partners (referent), completely heterosexual with same-sex partners/mostly heterosexual, and gay/lesbian/bisexual. Covariates included perceived stress and stressful life events in the past month. Sex-stratified multilevel models of log-transformed cortisol values were used to model diurnal cortisol patterns, and generalized estimating equations were used to model area under the curve (AUC), both with respect to ground (AUCg) and increase (AUCi). Among females, sexual minorities reported significantly more stressful life events in the past month than their heterosexual counterparts. In adjusted multilevel models, sexual orientation was not significantly associated with diurnal cortisol patterns or with AUCg or AUCi in either females or males. There were no significant interactions between sexual orientation and stressful life events. Time-varying negative mood was significantly associated with higher cortisol levels across the day for both female and male participants, after adjusting for all covariates. This study from a large cohort of U.S. young adults did not detect a relationship between sexual

  11. Diurnal warming in shallow coastal seas: Observations from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Minnett, P. J.; Berkelmans, R.; Hendee, J.; Manfrino, C.

    2014-07-01

    A good understanding of diurnal warming in the upper ocean is important for the validation of satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) against in-situ buoy data and for merging satellite SSTs taken at different times of the same day. For shallow coastal regions, better understanding of diurnal heating could also help improve monitoring and prediction of ecosystem health, such as coral reef bleaching. Compared to its open ocean counterpart which has been studied extensively and modeled with good success, coastal diurnal warming has complicating localized characteristics, including coastline geometry, bathymetry, water types, tidal and wave mixing. Our goal is to characterize coastal diurnal warming using two extensive in-situ temperature and weather datasets from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Results showed clear daily warming patterns in most stations from both datasets. For the three Caribbean stations where solar radiation is the main cause of daily warming, the mean diurnal warming amplitudes were about 0.4 K at depths of 4-7 m and 0.6-0.7 K at shallower depths of 1-2 m; the largest warming value was 2.1 K. For coral top temperatures of the GBR, 20% of days had warming amplitudes >1 K, with the largest >4 K. The bottom warming at shallower sites has higher daily maximum temperatures and lower daily minimum temperatures than deeper sites nearby. The averaged daily warming amplitudes were shown to be closely related to daily average wind speed and maximum insolation, as found in the open ocean. Diurnal heating also depends on local features including water depth, location on different sections of the reef (reef flat vs. reef slope), the relative distance from the barrier reef chain (coast vs. lagoon stations vs. inner barrier reef sites vs. outer rim sites); and the proximity to the tidal inlets. In addition, the influence of tides on daily temperature changes and its relative importance compared to solar radiation was quantified by

  12. Acute behavioral responses to light and darkness in nocturnal Mus musculus and diurnal Arvicanthis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Shuboni, D D; Cramm, S; Yan, L; Nunez, A A; Smale, Laura

    2012-08-01

    The term masking refers to immediate responses to stimuli that override the influence of the circadian timekeeping system on behavior and physiology. Masking by light and darkness plays an important role in shaping an organism's daily pattern of activity. Nocturnal animals generally become more active in response to darkness (positive masking) and less active in response to light (negative masking), and diurnal animals generally have opposite patterns of response. These responses can vary as a function of light intensity as well as time of day. Few studies have directly compared masking in diurnal and nocturnal species, and none have compared rhythms in masking behavior of diurnal and nocturnal species. Here, we assessed masking in nocturnal mice (Mus musculus) and diurnal grass rats (Arvicanthis niloticus). In the first experiment, animals were housed in a 12:12 light-dark (LD) cycle, with dark or light pulses presented at 6 Zeitgeber times (ZTs; with ZT0 = lights on). Light pulses during the dark phase produced negative masking in nocturnal mice but only at ZT14, whereas light pulses resulted in positive masking in diurnal grass rats across the dark phase. In both species, dark pulses had no effect on behavior. In the 2nd experiment, animals were kept in constant darkness or constant light and were presented with light or dark pulses, respectively, at 6 circadian times (CTs). CT0 corresponded to ZT0 of the preceding LD cycle. Rhythms in masking responses to light differed between species; responses were evident at all CTs in grass rats but only at CT14 in mice. Responses to darkness were observed only in mice, in which there was a significant increase in activity at CT 22. In the 3rd experiment, animals were kept on a 3.5:3.5-h LD cycle. Surprisingly, masking was evident only in grass rats. In mice, levels of activity during the light and dark phases of the 7-h cycle did not differ, even though the same animals had responded to discrete photic stimuli in the

  13. Sexual orientation and diurnal cortisol patterns in a cohort of U.S. young adults

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S. Bryn; Rosario, Margaret; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Roberts, Andrea L.; Gordon, Allegra R.; Sarda, Vishnudas; Missmer, Stacey; Anatale-Tardiff, Laura; Scherer, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual minorities in the United States are at elevated risk of bullying, discrimination, and violence victimization, all stressors that have been linked to psychological and behavioral stress responses including depressive and anxious symptoms and substance use. Acute and chronic stressors may also elicit physiologic stress responses, including changes in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between minority sexual orientation and diurnal cortisol patterns. The present study included 1670 young adults ages 18–32 years (69% female, 31% male) from the Growing Up Today Study, a prospective cohort of U.S. youth. Participants provided five saliva samples over one day to estimate diurnal cortisol patterns. Sexual orientation groups included: completely heterosexual with no same-sex partners (referent), completely heterosexual with same-sex partners/mostly heterosexual, and gay/lesbian/bisexual. Covariates included perceived stress and stressful life events in the past month. Sex-stratified multilevel models of log-transformed cortisol values were used to model diurnal cortisol patterns, and generalized estimating equations were used to model area under the curve (AUC), both with respect to ground (AUCg) and increase (AUCi). Among females, sexual minorities reported significantly more stressful life events in the past month than their heterosexual counterparts. In adjusted multilevel models, sexual orientation was not significantly associated with diurnal cortisol patterns or with AUCg or AUCi in either females or males. There were no significant interactions between sexual orientation and stressful life events. Time-varying negative mood was significantly associated with higher cortisol levels across the day for both female and male participants, after adjusting for all covariates. This study from a large cohort of U.S. young adults did not detect a relationship between sexual

  14. Human Diurnal Preference and Circadian Rhythmicity are Not Associated with the CLOCK 3111C/T Gene Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Buch, Alison M.; Bradstreet, Dayna S.; Klements, David J.; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic association studies of the CLOCK 3111C/T polymorphism and diurnal preference have yielded conflicting results since the first report that the 3111C allele was associated with eveningness. The goal of the present study was to investigate the association of this polymorphism with diurnal preference and circadian physiology in a group of 179 individuals, by comparing the frequency of the 3111C allele to diurnal preference, habitual sleep timing, circadian phase markers, and circadian period. We did not find a significant association between this allele and morningness/eveningness or any circadian marker. PMID:21628555

  15. Diurnal changes in the synthesis of the neurosteroid 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone stimulating locomotor activity in newts.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Teppei; Haraguchi, Shogo; Vaudry, Hubert; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    We recently identified 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone as a novel amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity in newts. Because male newts show marked diurnal changes in locomotor activity, we hypothesized that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone may be a key factor for the induction of diurnal changes in locomotor activity in male newts. In this study, we found diurnal changes in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain of male newts, which paralleled locomotor activity. Interestingly, the production of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone in the male newt brain increased during the dark phase when locomotor activity of males was high.

  16. The cosmic ray differential diurnal variation dependences on the zenith angle and the geomagnetic disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavlakov, S.; Georgiev, L.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous and continuous muon measurements in two opposite azimuthal directions under equal zenith angles demonstrated the importance of this method for cosmic ray diurnal variation investigations. Lately these measurements were extended by means of improved telescopes. The obtained cosmic ray diurnal variations were presented as intensity differential curves. Theoretical investigations connected the properties of these curves with some interplanetary spece parameters. The harmonics of these curves were interpreted physically. Some order difference curves were introduced. In earlier works some dependences between the parameters characterizing the first and the second harmonics of the differential intensity curves and the geomagnetic activity were found. Then all measurements were carried out under only one zenith angle. The results of investigations of similar dependences using data of simultaneous measurements under three different zenith angles are presented.

  17. Dependence of upper atmosphere photochemistry on the shape of the diurnal cycle of the photolysis rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecinos, S.; Barrientos, P.

    2006-03-01

    A photochemical model of the atmosphere constitutes a non-linear, non-autonomous dynamical system, enforced by the Earth's rotation. Some studies have shown that the region of the mesopause tends towards non-linear responses such as period-doubling cascades and chaos. In these studies, simple go approximations for the diurnal variations of the photolysis rates are assumed. The goal of this article is to investigate what happens if the more realistic, calculated photolysis rates are introduced. It is found that, if the usual approximations-sinusoidal and step functions-are assumed, the responses of the system are similar: it converges to a 2-day periodic solution. If the more realistic, calculated diurnal cycle is introduced, a new 4-day subharmonic appear.

  18. The diurnal interaction between convection and peninsular-scale forcing over South Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, H. J.; Simpson, J.; Garstang, M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in modern meterology is that of describing in detail the manner in which larger scales of motion interact with, influence and are influenced by successively smaller scales of motion. The present investigation is concerned with a study of the diurnal evolution of convection, the interaction between the peninsular-scale convergence and convection, and the role of the feedback produced by the cloud-scale downdrafts in the maintenance of the convection. Attention is given to the analysis, the diurnal cycle of the network area-averaged divergence, convective-scale divergence, convective mass transports, and the peninsular scale divergence. The links established in the investigation between the large scale (peninsular), the mesoscale (network), and the convective scale (cloud) are found to be of fundamental importance to the understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and decay of deep precipitating convection and to its theoretical parameterization.

  19. Diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in coral reef waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kayanne, Hajime; Suzuki, Atsushi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1995-07-14

    Coral reefs are considered to be a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of their high calcium carbonate production and low net primary production. This was tested by direct measurement of diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (P{sub CO2}) in reef waters during two 3-day periods, one in March 1993 and one in March 1994, on Shiraho reef of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Although the P{sub CO2} values in reef waters exhibited large diurnal changes ranging from 160 to 520 microatmospheres, they indicate that the reef flat area is a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This suggests that the net organic production rate of the reef community exceeded its calcium carbonate production rate during the observation periods. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Elevated repetitive behaviors are associated with lower diurnal salivary cortisol levels in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Gabriels, Robin L; Agnew, John A; Pan, Zhaoxing; Holt, Katherine D; Reynolds, Ann; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2013-05-01

    Previously, we reported a subgroup of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) had consistently high rates of repetitive behaviors (RBs) with abnormal sensory sensitivity. Given evidence of lower cortisol levels in response to stress and associated sensory sensitivity in the ASD population, this pilot study evaluates whether the presence of RBs reflects an underlying pathophysiology related to cortisol regulation. Diurnal salivary cortisol from 21 children with ASD and high versus low occurrence RBs were collected at four time points over three consecutive days. Although a typical decline in salivary cortisol was observed, participants in the high RB group showed 36% lower diurnal salivary cortisol than the low RB group. Age, IQ, RB type, and sleep quality were unrelated to observed differences. These findings suggest that RBs may serve to mitigate distress or that the glucocorticoid system has been down regulated in association with prolonged distress in this sample population.

  1. Pea Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Have Diurnal Rhythms When Raised Independently of a Host Plant.

    PubMed

    Joschinski, Jens; Beer, Katharina; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Krauss, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal timing is assumed to involve the circadian clock, an endogenous mechanism to track time and measure day length. Some debate persists, however, and aphids were among the first organisms for which circadian clock involvement was questioned. Inferences about links to phenology are problematic, as the clock itself is little investigated in aphids. For instance, it is unknown whether aphids possess diurnal rhythms at all. Possibly, the close interaction with host plants prevents independent measurements of rhythmicity. We reared the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum(Harris) on an artificial diet, and recorded survival, moulting, and honeydew excretion. Despite their plant-dependent life style, aphids were independently rhythmic under light-dark conditions. This first demonstration of diurnal aphid rhythms shows that aphids do not simply track the host plant's rhythmicity.

  2. Diurnal Cycle of Convection in the East Pacific ITCZ during EPIC-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Cifelli, Robert; Rutledge, Steven A.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the last three weeks of September 2001, the EPIC-2001 intensive field campaign focused on studies of deep convection in the ITCZ over the Mexican warm pool region (10N, 95W) of the East Pacific. This study focuses on the pronounced observed diurnal cycle of environmental and convective parameters within the experiment domain. Data from three primary sources are examined: the R/V Ronald H. Brown C-band weather radar, 4-hourly soundings from the Brown and the Global Atmospherics, Inc. National Lightning Detection Network (long range product). Satellite data from TRMM, GOES and OV-1 are also used. The domain boundary layer shows a robust daily evolution of moist enthalpy (as reflect by equivalent potential temperature, theta-e, or wet bulb potential temperature, theta-w), with contributions from changes in both dry and moist entropy. Peak theta-w is found after local nightfall; the average diurnal range of theta-w is approximately 1 deg C. A composite diurnal cycle of convective properties was derived from the C-band volume scans, sampled continuously through the experiment at 10 minute updates. Products derived from the volumetric data include a surface PPI, 15 and 30 dBZ echo top height, vertically integrated liquid, and 6 km (mixed phase region) reflectivity CAPPIs. For almost all products, the parameter means showed virtually no diurnal cycle. However, for the upper-level products, the parameter spectra showed a clear peak in the occurrence of deep/vigorous convection (the "tail end of the distribution") between 7-9 UTC (1-3 AM local), while overall frequency of occurrence peaked later, from 12-15 UTC (6-9 AM local). This represents a daily "outbreak" of isolated deep cells a couple of hours after sunset and subsequent growth, organization and decay through the nighttime hours. The coherence of the diurnal cycle of the convective spectrum is impressive given the wide variety of convective organization observed during the experiment, and given the modulation

  3. The complexity of diagnosing postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: influence of the diurnal variability.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Han Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Shin, Jung-Won; Lim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Tae-Joon; Shin, Yong-Won; Lee, Keon-Joo; Jeon, Daejong; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-03-01

    We investigated how the diagnosis of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) would be changed due to diurnal variability in orthostatic tachycardia. The orthostatic vital sign test was administered to each patient twice, in the afternoon of the day of admission and the next morning (n = 113). Forty-six patients were diagnosed with POTS, and the remaining 67 patients were assigned to non-POTS group. Heart rate increments after standing were larger in the morning than in the afternoon in every group (all P < .001). Among the POTS patients, 82.6% fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for POTS in the morning and 52.2% in the afternoon. Most POTS group (65.2%) displayed normal result on single orthostatic vital sign test. Orthostatic intolerance symptoms were provoked in only 45.7% of the POTS patients, more frequently in the morning. In conclusion, diurnal variability in hemodynamic parameters and provoked symptoms significantly challenged the diagnosis of POTS.

  4. Ten-Year Climatology of Summertime Diurnal Rainfall Rate Over the Conterminous U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Mocko, David; Lee, Myong-In; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Suarez, Max J.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.

    2010-01-01

    Diurnal cycles of summertime rainfall rates are examined over the conterminous United States, using radar-gauge assimilated hourly rainfall data. As in earlier studies, rainfall diurnal composites show a well-defined region of rainfall propagation over the Great Plains and an afternoon maximum area over the south and eastern portion of the United States. Zonal phase speeds of rainfall in three different small domains are estimated, and rainfall propagation speeds are compared with background zonal wind speeds. Unique rainfall propagation speeds in three different regions can be explained by the evolution of latent-heat theory linked to the convective available potential energy, than by gust-front induced or gravity wave propagation mechanisms.

  5. Variability of radiatively forced diurnal cycle of intense convection in the tropical west pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.M.; Sheaffer, J.D.; Thorson, W.B.

    1996-04-01

    Strong differences occur in daytime versus nighttime (DVN) net radiative cooling in clear versus cloudy areas of the tropical atmosphere. Daytime average cooling is approximately -0.7{degrees}C/day, whereas nighttime net tropospheric cooling rates are about -1.5{degrees}C/day, an approximately two-to-one difference. The comparatively strong nocturnal cooling in clear areas gives rise to a diurnally varying vertical circulation and horizontal convergence cycle. Various manifestations of this cyclic process include the observed early morning heavy rainfall maxima over the tropical oceans. The radiatively driven DVN circulation appears to strongly modulate the resulting diurnal cycle of intense convection which creates the highest, coldest cloudiness over maritime tropical areas and is likely a fundamental mechanism governing both small and large scale dynamics over much of the tropical environment.

  6. Diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in coral reef water.

    PubMed

    Kayanne, H; Suzuki, A; Saito, H

    1995-07-14

    Coral reefs are considered to be a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of their high calcium carbonate production and low net primary production. This was tested by direct measurement of diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco(co2)) in reef waters during two 3-day periods, one in March 1993 and one in March 1994, on Shiraho reef of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Although the Pco(co2) values in reef waters exhibited large diurnal changes ranging from 160 to 520 microatmospheres, they indicate that the reef flat area is a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This suggests that the net organic production rate of the reef community exceeded its calcium carbonate production rate during the observation periods.

  7. Long-term effectiveness of the response restriction method for establishing diurnal bladder control.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Duker, P C; Melein, L; Averink, M

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effectiveness of the response restriction method for establishing diurnal bladder control was assessed with 48 participants with intellectual disabilities. Intervals of assessment ranged from 28 to 66 months across the individuals following initial baseline. Difference scores in terms of the mean number of toileting accidents per hour were related to participants' stereotypic behaviour and their housing conditions, as these were hypothesized to differentially influence the maintenance of diurnal bladder control. It was found that (a) across all participants there was a statistically significant decrease of the mean number of toileting accidents during follow-up as compared to initial baseline (b) stereotypic behaviour failed to be related to maintenance of bladder control, and (c) housing condition was significantly related to the above dependent variable, in that those living in a residential facility were more likely to wear a diaper again as compared to those living with their family. Implications for the clinical practice are discussed. PMID:19643573

  8. Diurnal/Inertial Oscillations on the West Florida Shelf in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, E. V.; Weisberg, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillations of diurnal/inertial frequency on the West Florida Shelf in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico are thought to be seasonally important for mixing the shelf waters because of their tendency to have large vertical shear and to be quite energetic. Such oscillations are also thought to seasonally affect the ecology of the region through daily vertical thermocline migration. The presentation will focus on some novel findings about the diurnal/inertial coastal current fluctuations based on unique observational and modeled data sets on the West Florida Shelf. The properties of the oscillations, including spatial and temporal characteristics, and mechanisms of generation and propagation will be discussed. This presentation is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Ocean Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship under Grant OCE-1421180 (E. V. Maksimova).

  9. Ozone Diurnal Variation in the PBL at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory During Summer 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newchurch, M.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brewer, A.; Brown, S. S.; Carrion, W.; Delgado, R.; De Young, R.; Huang, G.; Johnson, B.; Kuang, S.; Langford, A. O.; Lundquist, J. K.; McGee, T. J.; Pliutau, D.; Senff, C. J.; Sullivan, J. T.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the diurnal variation of PBL ozone at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in July 2014 using multiple observations, including three ozone DIALs, several wind Doppler lidars, free-launched and tethered ozonesondes, and in-situ measurements on the BAO tower. Three mobile lidars from the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar NETwork (TOLNET) provide high spatial and temporal ozone profiles from near surface to the top of the troposphere. The combination of multiple observations will provide detailed structure of the diurnal variation of ozone. This ozone information will help the satellite and modeling communities to study the character of lower tropospheric ozone for the improvements of satellite retrieval and air-quality models. In addition, a Large-Eddy Simulation model will calculate ozone in the mixed layer to explain the processes responsible for the observations.

  10. Mechanisms of diurnal precipitation over the US Great Plains: a cloud resolving model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myong-In; Choi, Ildae; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Kang, In-Sik

    2010-02-01

    The mechanisms of summertime diurnal precipitation in the US Great Plains were examined with the two-dimensional (2D) Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud-resolving model (CRM). The model was constrained by the observed large-scale background state and surface flux derived from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Intensive Observing Period (IOP) data at the Southern Great Plains (SGP). The model, when continuously-forced by realistic surface flux and large-scale advection, simulates reasonably well the temporal evolution of the observed rainfall episodes, particularly for the strongly forced precipitation events. However, the model exhibits a deficiency for the weakly forced events driven by diurnal convection. Additional tests were run with the GCE model in order to discriminate between the mechanisms that determine daytime and nighttime convection. In these tests, the model was constrained with the same repeating diurnal variation in the large-scale advection and/or surface flux. The results indicate that it is primarily the surface heat and moisture flux that is responsible for the development of deep convection in the afternoon, whereas the large-scale upward motion and associated moisture advection play an important role in preconditioning nocturnal convection. In the nighttime, high clouds are continuously built up through their interaction and feedback with long-wave radiation, eventually initiating deep convection from the boundary layer. Without these upper-level destabilization processes, the model tends to produce only daytime convection in response to boundary layer heating. This study suggests that the correct simulation of the diurnal variation in precipitation requires that the free-atmospheric destabilization mechanisms resolved in the CRM simulation must be adequately parameterized in current general circulation models (GCMs) many of which are overly sensitive to the parameterized boundary layer

  11. Sleep, diurnal preference, health, and psychological well-being: a prospective single-allelic-variation study.

    PubMed

    Lázár, Alpár S; Slak, Ana; Lo, June Chi-Yan; Santhi, Nayantara; von Schantz, Malcolm; Archer, Simon N; Groeger, John A; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2012-03-01

    Individual differences in sleep and diurnal preference associate with physical and mental health characteristics, but few genetic determinants of these differences have been identified. A variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the PERIOD3 (PER3) gene (rs57875989) has been reported to associate with diurnal preference, i.e., preferred timing of waking and sleep. Here, the authors investigate in a prospective single-candidate genetic variant study whether allelic variation for this polymorphism associates also with reported actual sleep timing and sleep duration, as well as psychological and health measures. Six hundred and seventy-five subjects, aged 20 to 35 yrs, completed questionnaires to assess sleep and psychological and health characteristics and were genotyped for the PER3 VNTR. Homozygosity for the longer allele (PER3(5/5)) of the VNTR was associated with increased morning preference, earlier wake time and bedtime, and reduced daytime sleepiness. Separate analyses of work and rest days demonstrated that the increase in time in bed during rest days was greatest in PER3(5/5) homozygotes. PER3 genotype modified the effects of sleep timing and duration on fluid intelligence and body mass index. Genotype was not associated with physical or psychological characteristics as assessed by the SF-36 Health Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire, the Big Five Inventory, the Behavioral Inhibition System-Behavioral Activation System scales, and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, even though these measures varied significantly with diurnal preference as assessed by the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire. Whereas diurnal preference also predicts mental health and psychological characteristics, as well as sleep timing, the PER3 VNTR specifically affects measures of sleep timing and may also modify the effects of sleep on health outcome measures. PMID:22324552

  12. Diurnal rainfall pattern over and around the Indochina Peninsula observed by TRMM-PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H. G.

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed a diurnal rainfall pattern during summer monsoon season (May to September; e.g., Takahashi and Yasunari 2006) over and around the Indochina Peninsula focusing on its relationship to terrain, using 10-year (1998-2007) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM-PR) observation. First, we compared TRMM-PR rainfall to 30-year mean rain-gauge rainfall over land, which indicated that TRMM-PR can capture the spatial distribution of summer-mean rainfall amount. We investigated a 3-hour mean diurnal pattern of rainfall. Previous studies of diurnal cycle of rainfall over the whole Asian monsoon region (e.g., Hirose and Nakamura 2005) showed the evening peak in rainfall over land and morning peak over the sea near land. Focusing attention on the regional-scale diurnal pattern in rainfall over the Indochina Peninsula, a daytime maximum of rainfall occurs along the Indochina mountain ranges, and evening rainfall was observed over a windward foot of mountain range, a valley, and basin-shaped plain, for example, around Bangkok, Thailand and plains in Cambodia. In addition, heavy rainfall in early morning was found around the coasts over the eastern Gulf of Thailand and the Bay of Bengal, as well as eastern Khorat Plateau. Note that the evening rainfall did not continue until the middle of the night. Hence, the early-morning rainfall was likely to be newly-developed, although the mechanism of triggering of the early-morning rainfall has not been clarified. Rainfall intensity and rainfall occurrence rate were also investigated to understand characteristics of rainfall. The examination of rainfall occurrence rate and rainfall intensity showed that both factors contributed to the heavy rainfall in early evening. In addition, we found that the spatial distribution of total rainfall was very similar to that of rainfall amount during early-morning. Therefore, the early-morning rainfall probably contributes to forming of the climatological spatial

  13. Dim nighttime light impairs cognition and provokes depressive-like responses in a diurnal rodent.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Kitsmiller, Emily; Smale, Laura; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-08-01

    Circadian disruption is a common by-product of modern life. Although jet lag and shift work are well-documented challenges to circadian organization, many more subtle environmental changes cause circadian disruption. For example, frequent fluctuations in the timing of the sleep/wake schedule, as well as exposure to nighttime lighting, likely affect the circadian system. Most studies of these effects have focused on nocturnal rodents, which are very different from diurnal species with respect to their patterns of light exposure and the effects that light can have on their activity. Thus, the authors investigated the effect of nighttime light on behavior and the brain of a diurnal rodent, the Nile grass rat. Following 3 weeks of exposure to standard light/dark (LD; 14:10 light [~150 lux] /dark [0 lux]) or dim light at night (dLAN; 14:10 light [~150 lux] /dim [5 lux]), rats underwent behavioral testing, and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus (DG) were examined. Three behavioral effects of dLAN were observed: (1) decreased preference for a sucrose solution, (2) increased latency to float in a forced swim test, and (3) impaired learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Light at night also reduced dendritic length in DG and basilar CA1 dendrites. Dendritic length in the DG positively correlated with sucrose consumption in the sucrose anhedonia task. Nighttime light exposure did not disrupt the pattern of circadian locomotor activity, and all grass rats maintained a diurnal activity pattern. Together, these data suggest that exposure to dLAN can alter affective responses and impair cognition in a diurnal animal.

  14. Diurnal anisotropy during solar activity cycle twenty and diffusion-convection model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Riker, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Underground muon telescope data obtained at Embudo and Neutron monitor data obtained at Deep River are divided into two sets; one covers the ascending phase of the cycle (1965-70) and the other covers the descending phase (1971-76). The amplitude of diurnal anisotropy calculated from the data does not agree with the value predicted by the simplified version of the Diffusion-Convection Model (DCM); the discrepancy is worse for neutron data.

  15. Diurnal Corticosterone Presence and Phase Modulate Clock Gene Expression in the Male Rat Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Chun, Lauren E; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2016-04-01

    Mood disorders are associated with dysregulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) function, circadian rhythms, and diurnal glucocorticoid (corticosterone [CORT]) circulation. Entrainment of clock gene expression in some peripheral tissues depends on CORT. In this study, we characterized over the course of the day the mRNA expression pattern of the core clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the male rat PFC and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) under different diurnal CORT conditions. In experiment 1, rats were left adrenal-intact (sham) or were adrenalectomized (ADX) followed by 10 daily antiphasic (opposite time of day of the endogenous CORT peak) ip injections of either vehicle or 2.5 mg/kg CORT. In experiment 2, all rats received ADX surgery followed by 13 daily injections of vehicle or CORT either antiphasic or in-phase with the endogenous CORT peak. In sham rats clock gene mRNA levels displayed a diurnal pattern of expression in the PFC and the SCN, but the phase differed between the 2 structures. ADX substantially altered clock gene expression patterns in the PFC. This alteration was normalized by in-phase CORT treatment, whereas antiphasic CORT treatment appears to have eliminated a diurnal pattern (Per1 and Bmal1) or dampened/inverted its phase (Per2). There was very little effect of CORT condition on clock gene expression in the SCN. These experiments suggest that an important component of glucocorticoid circadian physiology entails CORT regulation of the molecular clock in the PFC. Consequently, they also point to a possible mechanism that contributes to PFC disrupted function in disorders associated with abnormal CORT circulation. PMID:26901093

  16. The poro-elastic behaviour of the intervertebral disc: A new perspective on diurnal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; van der Veen, Albert J; Emanuel, Kaj S; van Dieën, Jaap H; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-04-11

    Diurnal disc height changes, due to fluid in- and outflow, are in equilibrium while daytime spinal loading is twice as long as night time rest. A direction-dependent permeability of the endplates, favouring inflow over outflow, reportedly explains this; however, fluid flow through the annulus fibrosus should be considered. This study investigates the fluid flow of entire intervertebral discs. Caprine discs were preloaded in saline for 24h under four levels of static load. Under sustained load, we modulated the disc׳s swelling pressure by exchanging saline for demineralised water (inflow) and back to saline (outflow), both for 24h. We measured disc height creep and used stretched exponential models to determine time-constants. During inflow disc height increased in relation to applied load, and during outflow disc height decreased to preload levels. When comparing in- and outflow phases, there was no difference in creep, and time-constants were similar indicating no direction-dependent resistance to fluid flow in the entire intervertebral disc. Results provoked a new hypothesis for diurnal fluid flow: in vitro time-constants for loading are shorter than for unloading and in vivo daytime loading is twice as long as night time unloading, i.e. in diurnal loading the intervertebral disc is closer to loading equilibrium than to unloading equilibrium. Per definition, fluid flow is slower close to equilibrium than far from equilibrium; therefore, as diurnal loading occurs closer to loading equilibrium, fluid inflow during night time unloading can balance fluid outflow during daytime loading, despite a longer time-constant. PMID:26684430

  17. Diurnal and seasonal variation of coastal carbonate system parameters in South Florida and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, K.; Smiley, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    Assessing the impact of climate change and ocean acidification on coastal and marine ecosystems requires accurate characterization of its chemical and physical effects on the carbonate system in seawater. Very few data exist that characterize natural variations in coastal carbonate chemistry, limiting the development and validation of coastal climate change and ocean acidification models. We measured carbonate system parameters over diurnal cycles in shallow, coastal ecosystems of Florida Bay, Tampa Bay, Biscayne National Park, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Tobago, and the Bahamas. Salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured continuously, and seawater samples were collected every 4 hours throughout multiple 24-hour time periods. Total alkalinity and pH were measured using spectrophotometric techniques, dissolved inorganic carbon was measured via carbon coulometry, and remaining carbonate system parameters were calculated using CO2SYS. Seasonal variability was either determined from existing data sets, or modeled using salinity and temperature data collected from CTDs deployed at study locations or long-term monitoring sites. Results indicate that all carbonate system parameters showed distinct variation over diurnal timescales primarily due to productivity, respiration, and precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate. The average range of diurnal variation was up to 102% of the seasonal range of variability in carbonate chemistry. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability (or vice versa) may impart significant error in calculation of annual carbon budgets and modeling carbon cycling in coastal ecosystems. Implications for modeling long-term impacts of ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems will be discussed.

  18. Dim nighttime light impairs cognition and provokes depressive-like responses in a diurnal rodent.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Kitsmiller, Emily; Smale, Laura; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-08-01

    Circadian disruption is a common by-product of modern life. Although jet lag and shift work are well-documented challenges to circadian organization, many more subtle environmental changes cause circadian disruption. For example, frequent fluctuations in the timing of the sleep/wake schedule, as well as exposure to nighttime lighting, likely affect the circadian system. Most studies of these effects have focused on nocturnal rodents, which are very different from diurnal species with respect to their patterns of light exposure and the effects that light can have on their activity. Thus, the authors investigated the effect of nighttime light on behavior and the brain of a diurnal rodent, the Nile grass rat. Following 3 weeks of exposure to standard light/dark (LD; 14:10 light [~150 lux] /dark [0 lux]) or dim light at night (dLAN; 14:10 light [~150 lux] /dim [5 lux]), rats underwent behavioral testing, and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus (DG) were examined. Three behavioral effects of dLAN were observed: (1) decreased preference for a sucrose solution, (2) increased latency to float in a forced swim test, and (3) impaired learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Light at night also reduced dendritic length in DG and basilar CA1 dendrites. Dendritic length in the DG positively correlated with sucrose consumption in the sucrose anhedonia task. Nighttime light exposure did not disrupt the pattern of circadian locomotor activity, and all grass rats maintained a diurnal activity pattern. Together, these data suggest that exposure to dLAN can alter affective responses and impair cognition in a diurnal animal. PMID:22855576

  19. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms of hepatic glycogen metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Swain, Telisha M.; Filiano, Ashley N.; Gamble, Karen L.; Young, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption has been shown to significantly decrease hepatic glycogen content; however, the mechanisms responsible for this adverse metabolic effect are unknown. In this study, we examined the impact chronic ethanol consumption has on time-of-day-dependent oscillations (rhythms) in glycogen metabolism processes in the liver. For this, male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or ethanol-containing liquid diet for 5 wk, and livers were collected every 4 h for 24 h and analyzed for changes in various genes and proteins involved in hepatic glycogen metabolism. Glycogen displayed a robust diurnal rhythm in the livers of mice fed the control diet, with the peak occurring during the active (dark) period of the day. The diurnal glycogen rhythm was significantly altered in livers of ethanol-fed mice, with the glycogen peak shifted into the inactive (light) period and the overall content of glycogen decreased compared with controls. Chronic ethanol consumption further disrupted diurnal rhythms in gene expression (glycogen synthase 1 and 2, glycogenin, glucokinase, protein targeting to glycogen, and pyruvate kinase), total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase protein, and enzyme activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of glycogen metabolism. In summary, these results show for the first time that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms in hepatic glycogen metabolism at the gene and protein level. Chronic ethanol-induced disruption in these daily rhythms likely contributes to glycogen depletion and disruption of hepatic energy homeostasis, a recognized risk factor in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25857999

  20. Investigating the Diurnal Phase of Tropical Precipitation Using a Hierarchy of Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbengue, Cheikh; Schneider, Tapio; Pressel, Kyle; Kaul, Colleen; Zhihong, Tan; Teixeira, Joao

    2014-05-01

    Global climate models generally do not capture the diurnal cycle of convection: their peak precipitation over both land and oceans in the tropics occurs before the peak seen in observational data. Models also err in predicting the diurnal amplitude of precipitation. These errors have significant consequences for the models' energy budgets, hydrological cycle, and overall forecast skill. Given the present availability of computational resources, moist convection remains a sub-grid scale phenomenon in global climate models, and thus the parameterization of convection in these models is likely the major source of the precipitation bias. Previous work on this bias suggests that an inadequate evolution of the convective boundary layer in some models (penetrative downdrafts from the first precipitation events do not delay after-sunrise deep convection by stabilizing the convective boundary layer and allowing its growth; in other words, there is a lack of effective coupling between deep convection and the boundary layer) and poor communication between shallow and deep convection schemes in the models may be responsible for the precipitation bias. Large eddy simulation (LES), as part of a hierarchy of models (models of varying complexity), provides a unique opportunity to investigate the precipitation bias because it not only resolves the convective scale, but also allows for numerical experiments over a broad parameter space. Our results show that LES can faithfully reproduce the late afternoon precipitation peak associated with tropical land convection, and the nighttime or early morning peak associated with tropical maritime convection. We use the LES and a hierarchy of models to investigate the diurnal phase of precipitation and to develop a simple model to help understand and improve the bias in the precipitation diurnal cycle seen in global climate models.

  1. Influence of dynamical equatorial flattening and orientation of a triaxial core on prograde diurnal polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rong; Shen, WenBin

    2016-04-01

    The noise floor of empirical models of diurnal Earth Rotation could reach as low as 1μas as shown by several recent studies. In another aspect, the differences between these empirical models with the theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) for certain diurnal frequencies are more than 10 μas (e.g. K1). The traxiality of the core is ignored in the theoretical model given by IERS Convention (2010) because it is highly uncertain. To explain the difference between the empirical model and theoretical model, we consider the possible influence of a triaxial core. We use the difference between empirical models and theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) as input to invert the traxiality parameter of the core. In the inversion, we assume the ocean tide response obeys the admittance theory. So extra six admittance parameters are introduced to model the difference between smooth responses inferred from empirical models and that given by theoretical model predictions from IERS Convention (2010). The results show that adding core triaxiality into the theoretical model could narrow the difference between empirical model and theoretical model at diurnal frequencies. The residual of amplitude becomes smaller. For a set of tide components consisting of seven diurnal frequencies (Q1, O1, M1, P1, K1, J1, Oo1), the root mean square of the residual of this set have decreased from more than 10μas to 2˜3μas for most of the empirical models. As for the dynamical equatorial flattening of the core, estimates inverted based on different empirical models are consistent within standard deviation. The results also suggest that the principal axes of the triaxial core does not coincidence with the principal axes of the whole Earth. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41504019).

  2. Practical limitations on the use of diurnal temperature signals to quantify groundwater upwelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin; Lautz, Laura K.; Buckley, Sean F.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater upwelling to streams creates unique habitat by influencing stream water quality and temperature; upwelling zones also serve as vectors for contamination when groundwater is degraded. Temperature time series data acquired along vertical profiles in the streambed have been applied to simple analytical models to determine rates of vertical fluid flux. These models are based on the downward propagation characteristics (amplitude attenuation and phase-lag) of the surface diurnal signal. Despite the popularity of these models, there are few published characterizations of moderate-to-strong upwelling. We attribute this limitation to the thermodynamics of upwelling, under which the downward conductive signal transport from the streambed interface occurs opposite the upward advective fluid flux. Governing equations describing the advection–diffusion of heat within the streambed predict that under upwelling conditions, signal amplitude attenuation will increase, but, counterintuitively, phase-lag will decrease. Therefore the extinction (measurable) depth of the diurnal signal is very shallow, but phase lag is also short, yielding low signal to noise ratio and poor model sensitivity. Conversely, amplitude attenuation over similar sensor spacing is strong, yielding greater potential model sensitivity. Here we present streambed thermal time series over a range of moderate to strong upwelling sites in the Quashnet River, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The predicted inverse relationship between phase-lag and rate of upwelling was observed in the field data over a range of conditions, but the observed phase-lags were consistently shorter than predicted. Analytical solutions for fluid flux based on signal amplitude attenuation return results consistent with numerical models and physical seepage meters, but the phase-lag analytical model results are generally unreasonable. Through numerical modeling we explore reasons why phase-lag may have been over-predicted by the

  3. Changing patterns of daily rhythmicity across reproductive states in diurnal female Nile grass rats (Arvicanthis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Schradera, Jessica A.; Walaszczykb, Erin J.; Smalea, Laura

    2009-01-01

    SCHRADER, J.A., E. J. WALASZCZYK, AND L. SMALE. Changing patterns of daily rhythmicity across reproductive states in diurnal female Nile grass rats (Arvicanthis niloticus). PHYSIOL BEHAV XX(X) XXX-XXX, XXXX. -- A suite of changes in circadian rhythms have been described in nocturnal rodents as females go through pregnancy and lactation, but there is no information on such patterns in diurnal species. As the challenges faced by these two groups of animals are somewhat different, we characterized changes in activity and core body temperature (Tb) in female diurnal Nile grass rats (Arvicanthis niloticus) as they went through a series of reproductive states: virgin, pregnant, pregnant and lactating, lactating only, and post-weaning. The phase of neither rhythm varied, but the amplitude did. Females increased their overall levels of daily activity from early to late pregnancy, regardless of whether they were also lactating. The pattern of activity was less rhythmic during early than mid-lactation, in both non-pregnant and pregnant females, as a consequence of a decrease in daytime relative to nighttime activity. The Tb rhythm amplitude dropped from mid-pregnancy through mid-lactation, and there were rises in Tb troughs during the mid-light and mid-dark phases of the day, though pregnancy and lactation affected Tb at these times in somewhat different ways. This study demonstrates that rhythms in diurnal grass rats change during pregnancy and lactation in different ways than those of nocturnal species that have been studied to date and that the effects of pregnancy and lactation are not additive in any simple way. PMID:19744504

  4. Mechanisms of Diurnal Precipitation over the United States Great Plains: A Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M.-I.; Choi, I.; Tao, W.-K.; Schubert, S. D.; Kang, I.-K.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of summertime diurnal precipitation in the US Great Plains were examined with the two-dimensional (2D) Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud-resolving model (CRM). The model was constrained by the observed large-scale background state and surface flux derived from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program s Intensive Observing Period (IOP) data at the Southern Great Plains (SGP). The model, when continuously-forced by realistic surface flux and large-scale advection, simulates reasonably well the temporal evolution of the observed rainfall episodes, particularly for the strongly forced precipitation events. However, the model exhibits a deficiency for the weakly forced events driven by diurnal convection. Additional tests were run with the GCE model in order to discriminate between the mechanisms that determine daytime and nighttime convection. In these tests, the model was constrained with the same repeating diurnal variation in the large-scale advection and/or surface flux. The results indicate that it is primarily the surface heat and moisture flux that is responsible for the development of deep convection in the afternoon, whereas the large-scale upward motion and associated moisture advection play an important role in preconditioning nocturnal convection. In the nighttime, high clouds are continuously built up through their interaction and feedback with long-wave radiation, eventually initiating deep convection from the boundary layer. Without these upper-level destabilization processes, the model tends to produce only daytime convection in response to boundary layer heating. This study suggests that the correct simulation of the diurnal variation in precipitation requires that the free-atmospheric destabilization mechanisms resolved in the CRM simulation must be adequately parameterized in current general circulation models (GCMs) many of which are overly sensitive to the parameterized boundary layer heating.

  5. Sex hormones adjust "sex-specific" reactive and diurnal cortisol profiles.

    PubMed

    Juster, Robert-Paul; Raymond, Catherine; Desrochers, Alexandra Bisson; Bourdon, Olivier; Durand, Nadia; Wan, Nathalie; Pruessner, Jens C; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in stress hormone functions are presumed to depend on sex hormones. And yet, surprisingly few psychoneuroendocrine studies actually assess within-sex variations of testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone when investigating sex-specific activities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In this methodological study of 204 healthy adults (60 men), we assessed whether cortisol profiles would differ between the sexes when unadjusted or adjusted for basal sex hormones among both sexes. Reactive cortisol was sampled using 6 saliva samples measured every 10-min as part of the Trier Social Stress Test that generally activates cortisol among men more than women. Diurnal cortisol was sampled over two days at (1) awakening, (2) 30-min thereafter, (3) 1400 h, (4) 1600 h, and (5) bedtime. Sex hormones were collected at baseline before the psychosocial stressor and on two occasions during diurnal cortisol assessment. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance controlled for key covariates in analyses unadjusted or adjusted for sex hormones. Results revealed that men had higher reactive cortisol than women in unadjusted analysis, but this sex difference was attenuated when adjusting for sex hormones. While diurnal cortisol showed no sex differences in unadjusted models, adjusting for sex hormones revealed that women have higher morning cortisol. Correlations using area under the curve formulae revealed intriguing sex-specific associations with progesterone in men and testosterone in women that we propose have implications for social and affective neuroscience. In summary, our results reveal that adjusting for sex hormones alters "sex-specific" reactive and diurnal cortisol profiles.

  6. Associations Between Coping and Diurnal Cortisol Among Children Affected by Parental HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Slatcher, Richard B.; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang; Ren, Xuequn; Zhu, Jianfeng; Stanton, Bonita

    2014-01-01

    Objective Prior research has shown that early-life adversity is associated with physical health problems, but little is known about the health-related effects of coping in the context of having a parent with HIV/AIDS. The goal of this study was to investigate the associations between positive and negative coping strategies and diurnal cortisol among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS. Method Six hundred and forty-five children aged 8-15 affected by parental HIV/AIDS provided 4 saliva samples per day over three days (two weekdays and one weekend day) to assess diurnal cortisol. Positive and negative coping strategies were measured via self-report prior to saliva collection. Possible confounds of the associations between coping and diurnal cortisol also were assessed, including age, gender, socioeconomic status, parenting quality, parental death, other stressful life events, sleep quality, and perceived health status. Results Greater positive coping (e.g., problem-solving, cognitive reframing) was associated with children's higher morning cortisol (p = .028), whereas greater negative coping (e.g., fighting, breaking things) was independently associated with lower morning cortisol (p = .032) and a flatter diurnal cortisol slope (p = .005). These associations remained significant after controlling for potential confounds. Neither positive coping nor negative coping interacted with stressful life circumstances—assessed via both stressful life events and parental death from HIV/AIDS—to predict cortisol (all p's > .27). Conclusion These findings indicate the extent to which a child's coping strategy is associated with indicators of stress biology in the context of having a parent with HIV/AIDS. PMID:25581701

  7. Shifting Nicotiana attenuata's diurnal rhythm does not alter its resistance to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Herden, Jasmin; Meldau, Stefan; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kunert, Grit; Joo, Youngsung; Baldwin, Ian T; Schuman, Meredith C

    2016-07-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants are less resistant to attack by the generalist lepidopteran herbivore Trichoplusia ni when plants and herbivores are entrained to opposite, versus identical diurnal cycles and tested under constant conditions. This effect is associated with circadian fluctuations in levels of jasmonic acid, the transcription factor MYC2, and glucosinolate contents in leaves. We tested whether a similar effect could be observed in a different plant-herbivore system: the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata and its co-evolved specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. We measured larval growth on plants under both constant and diurnal conditions following identical or opposite entrainment, profiled the metabolome of attacked leaf tissue, quantified specific metabolites known to reduce M. sexta growth, and monitored M. sexta feeding activity under all experimental conditions. Entrainment did not consistently affect M. sexta growth or plant defense induction. However, both were reduced under constant dark conditions, as was M. sexta feeding activity. Our data indicate that the response induced by M. sexta in N. attenuata is robust to diurnal cues and independent of plant or herbivore entrainment. We propose that while the patterns of constitutive or general damage-induced defense may undergo circadian fluctuation, the orchestration of specific induced responses is more complex. PMID:26699809

  8. Diel Variation in Flower Scent Reveals Poor Consistency of Diurnal and Nocturnal Pollination Syndromes in Sileneae.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Benítez, Samuel; Dötterl, Stefan; Giménez-Benavides, Luis

    2015-12-01

    The composition of flower scent and the timing of emission are crucial for chemical communication between plants and their pollinators; hence, they are key traits for the characterization of pollination syndromes. In many plants, however, plants are assigned to a syndrome based on inexpensive to measure flower traits, such as color, time of flower opening, and shape. We compared day and night scents from 31 Sileneae species and tested for quantitative and semi-quantitative differences in scent among species classified a priori as diurnal or nocturnal. As most Sileneae species are not only visited by either diurnal or nocturnal animals as predicted by their syndrome, we hypothesized that, even if flower scent were preferentially emitted during the day or at night, most species also would emit some scents during the opposing periods of the day. This phenomenon would contribute to the generalized assemblage of flower visitors usually observed in Sileneae species. We found that diel variations of scent often were not congruent with the syndrome definition, but could partially be explained by taxonomy and sampling times. Most species emitted compounds with attractive potential to insects during both the night and day. Our results highlight the current opinion that syndromes are not watertight compartments evolved to exclude some flower visitors. Thus, important information may be lost when scents are collected either during day- or night-time, depending on the a priori classification of the species as diurnal or nocturnal.

  9. Effect of diurnal temperature difference on lipid accumulation and development in Calanus sinicus (Copepoda: Calanoida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Konglin; Sun, Song

    2016-08-01

    Calanus sinicus, the dominant copepod in the Yellow Sea, develops a large oil sac in late spring to prepare for over-summering in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). The lipid accumulation mechanism for the initiation of over-summering is unknown. Here, we cultured C3 copepodites at four constant temperatures (10, 13, 16, and 19°C) and at three temperature regimes that mimicked the temperature variations experienced during diurnal vertical migration (10-13°C, 10-16°C, and 10-19°C) for 18 days to explore the effects of temperature differences on copepod development and lipid accumulation. C. sinicus stored more lipid at low than at high temperatures. A diurnal temperature difference (10-16°C and 10-19°C) promoted greater lipid accumulation (1.9-2.1 times) than a constant temperature of either 16°C or 19°C, by reducing the energy cost at colder temperatures and lengthening copepodite development. Thereafter, the lipid reserve supported gonad development after final molting. Only one male developed in these experiments. This highly female-skewed sex ratio may have been the result of the monotonous microalgae diet fed to the copepodites. This study provides the first evidence that diurnal temperature differences may promote lipid accumulation in C. sinicus, and provides a foundation for future investigations into the mechanisms involved in over-summering in the YSCWM.

  10. Analysis of the bimodal diurnal rainfall pattern during the summer monsoon over the Hong Kong Archipelago

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, P.T.; Wai, M.M.K.

    1994-12-31

    A complete year`s record of hourly surface measurements was used to examine the atmospheric diurnal secondary circulations over the Hong Kong Archipelago in conjunction with spatial and temporal variations of surface temperature, wind speed and rainfall. The two objectives in this study are to identify both the spatial and temporal variations of diurnal temperature, wind speed and rainfall over the entire Hong Kong area, and to link these variations to the forcing mechanisms and their scales of action. In this way, the authors can establish some useful understanding of the forcing and response, leading toward a systematic method to identify inappropriate parameterization schemes in otherwise potentially useful numerical models. This study focuses on the occurrence of a summer biomodal rainfall maximum which results from the interaction of summer monsoon flow and local mesoscale secondary circulations. The result is a dominant morning rainfall maximum and a secondary afternoon peak. Evidence of atmospheric diurnal secondary circulations are found at 10 local data stations. Though system strength and timing vary, these secondary circulation systems behave like a classic sea breeze circulation, complicated by superimposed slope effects, but dominated by the summer monsoon flow.

  11. Observed diurnal variation changes of Jakarta precipitation from 144 available meteorological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswanto, Siswanto; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; van den Hurk, Bart; Jilderda, Rudmer

    2013-04-01

    Using a long available meteorological observation for almost 114 years hourly and daily record from Jakarta Observatory, the temporal heterogeneity of climate trends and its variability over Jakarta, Indonesia has been studied. The analyses showed that the number of wet days has decreased between 1880 and 2010, while the precipitation exceeding 50 mm is observed to be slightly increased. An increased trend of heavy rainfall in the 80% and 95% percentile between April and September was detected. Diurnal variation of Jakarta precipitation and temperature changed markedly. In the wet season (DJF), the morning rainfall has increased in intensity, while in other seasons; delayed amplitude of late afternoon rainfall peak is observed. The diurnal variation of night time temperature considerably increased while daytime temperature remains similar. Changes in temporal characteristics of light and heavy precipitation, as well as the diurnal variation of precipitation and temperature lead to hypotheses concerning anthropogenic influence. Some theoretical arguments on Urban Heat Island and aerosol effect precipitation could be linked to our results. Jakarta is a metropolitan city where its development is characterized by mixing of many different land uses and economic activities, including large-scale housing projects, industrial estates, and agricultural activities. In the future, the separation of local response to large scale and local changes will be investigated.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of the Diurnal Cycle in Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, P; Bretherton, C

    2008-03-03

    This paper describes a series of 6 day large eddy simulations of a deep, sometimes drizzling stratocumulus-topped boundary layer based on forcings from the East Pacific Investigation of Climate (EPIC) 2001 field campaign. The base simulation was found to reproduce the observed mean boundary layer properties quite well. The diurnal cycle of liquid water path was also well captured, although good agreement appears to result partially from compensating errors in the diurnal cycles of cloud base and cloud top due to overentrainment around midday. At other times of the day, entrainment is found to be proportional to the vertically-integrated buoyancy flux. Model stratification matches observations well; turbulence profiles suggest that the boundary layer is always at least somewhat decoupled. Model drizzle appears to be too sensitive to liquid water path and subcloud evaporation appears to be too weak. Removing the diurnal cycle of subsidence had little effect on simulated cloud albedo. Simulations with changed droplet concentration and drizzle susceptibility showed large liquid water path differences at night, but differences were quite small at midday. Droplet concentration also had a significant impact on entrainment, primarily through droplet sedimentation feedback rather than through drizzle processes.

  13. QBO Generated Inter-annual Variations of the Diurnal Tide in the Mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, John G.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a study with the Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which produces in the mesosphere significant inter-annual variations in the diurnal tide. Applying Hines Doppler Spread Parameterization (DPS), small-scale gravity waves (GW) drive the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO) and Semi-annual Oscillation (SAO). With a GW source that peaks at the equator and is taken to be isotropic and independent of season, the NSM generates near the equator a QBO with variable periods around 27 months and zonal wind amplitudes close to 20 m / s at 30 Ism. As reported earlier, the NSM reproduces the observed equinoctial maxima in the diurnal tide at altitudes around 95 km. In the present paper it is shown that the QBO modulates the tide such that the seasonal amplitude maxima can vary from one year to another by as much as 30%. Since the period of the QBO is variable, its phase relative to the seasonal cycle changes. The magnitude of the QBO modulation of the tide thus varies considerably as our long-term model simulation shows. To shed light on the underlying mechanism, the relative importance of the linearized advection terms are discussed that involve the meridional and vertical winds of the diurnal tide.

  14. Global Electric Circuit Diurnal Variation Derived from Storm Overflight and Satellite Optical Lightning Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bateman, M. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We have combined analyses of over 1000 high altitude aircraft observations of electrified clouds with diurnal lightning statistics from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) to produce an estimate of the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit. Using basic assumptions about the mean storm currents as a function of flash rate and location, and the global electric circuit, our estimate of the current in the global electric circuit matches the Carnegie curve diurnal variation to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Mean contributions to the global electric circuit from land and ocean thunderstorms are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean). Contributions to the global electric circuit from ESCs are 0.22 kA for ocean storms and 0.04 kA for land storms. Using our analysis, the mean total conduction current for the global electric circuit is 2.0 kA.

  15. Potential effects of diurnal temperature oscillations on potato late blight with special reference to climate change.

    PubMed

    Shakya, S K; Goss, E M; Dufault, N S; van Bruggen, A H C

    2015-02-01

    Global climate change will have effects on diurnal temperature oscillations as well as on average temperatures. Studies on potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans) development have not considered daily temperature oscillations. We hypothesize that growth and development rates of P. infestans would be less influenced by change in average temperature as the magnitude of fluctuations in daily temperatures increases. We investigated the effects of seven constant (10, 12, 15, 17, 20, 23, and 27°C) and diurnally oscillating (±5 and ±10°C) temperatures around the same means on number of lesions, incubation period, latent period, radial lesion growth rate, and sporulation intensity on detached potato leaves inoculated with two P. infestans isolates from clonal lineages US-8 and US-23. A four-parameter thermodynamic model was used to describe relationships between temperature and disease development measurements. Incubation and latency progression accelerated with increasing oscillations at low mean temperatures but slowed down with increasing oscillations at high mean temperatures (P < 0.005), as hypothesized. Infection efficiency, lesion growth rate, and sporulation increased under small temperature oscillations compared with constant temperatures but decreased when temperature oscillations were large. Thus, diurnal amplitude in temperature should be considered in models of potato late blight, particularly when predicting effects of global climate change on disease development.

  16. Mathematical modelling of the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Isoprenoid molecules are essential elements of plant metabolism. Many important plant isoprenoids, such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols, prenylated quinones and hormones are synthesised in chloroplasts via the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we develop a mathematical model of diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to integrate mechanisms potentially involved in the diurnal control of the pathway. Our data show that flux through the MEP pathway is accelerated in light due to the photosynthesis-dependent supply of metabolic substrates of the pathway and the transcriptional regulation of key biosynthetic genes by the circadian clock. We also demonstrate that feedback regulation of both the activity and the abundance of the first enzyme of the MEP pathway (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, DXS) by pathway products stabilizes the flux against changes in substrate supply and adjusts the flux according to product demand under normal growth conditions. These data illustrate the central relevance of photosynthesis, the circadian clock and feedback control of DXS for the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway.

  17. Diurnal variations of outgoing longwave radiation and albedo from ERBE scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.; Kowalewsky, Karen J.; Michelsen, Marc L.

    1991-01-01

    The scanning instruments of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment provide measurements of instantaneous broadband albedo and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) with a spatial resolution of about 50 km. Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), which is in an orbit that precesses through local time at the rate of one hour every three days, can be used to describe the mean, hourly diurnal variations in the distribution of OLR and albedo on this scale. Much of this variation is caused by cloud type and amount changes. Two-dimensional histograms show the coevolution of OLR and albedo with the diurnal cycle, and the distribution of albedo-OLR pairings associated with the cloud distribution in a particular region and season. The albedo-OLR pairing characterizes a cloud type and determines its net effect on the energy balance at the top of the atmosphere. Diurnal variations in cloud type and amount in many regions are sufficient to cause substantial errors in radiation budget quantities and cloud properties estimated from observations taken from a single sun-synchronous orbit. Errors in estimated net radiation can be as large as 50 W/sq m for oceanic stratus regions and for land regions during summer.

  18. Diurnal Temperature Variations Affect Development of a Herbivorous Arthropod Pest and its Predators

    PubMed Central

    Vangansbeke, Dominiek; Audenaert, Joachim; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Verhoeven, Ruth; Gobin, Bruno; Tirry, Luc; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The impact of daily temperature variations on arthropod life history remains woefully understudied compared to the large body of research that has been carried out on the effects of constant temperatures. However, diurnal varying temperature regimes more commonly represent the environment in which most organisms thrive. Such varying temperature regimes have been demonstrated to substantially affect development and reproduction of ectothermic organisms, generally in accordance with Jensen’s inequality. In the present study we evaluated the impact of temperature alternations at 4 amplitudes (DTR0, +5, +10 and +15°C) on the developmental rate of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and their natural prey, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). We have modelled their developmental rates as a function of temperature using both linear and nonlinear models. Diurnally alternating temperatures resulted in a faster development in the lower temperature range as compared to their corresponding mean constant temperatures, whereas the opposite was observed in the higher temperature range. Our results indicate that Jensen’s inequality does not suffice to fully explain the differences in developmental rates at constant and alternating temperatures, suggesting additional physiological responses play a role. It is concluded that diurnal temperature range should not be ignored and should be incorporated in predictive models on the phenology of arthropod pests and their natural enemies and their performance in biological control programmes. PMID:25874697

  19. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations and subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.

  20. From dusk till dawn: nocturnal and diurnal pollination in the epiphyte Tillandsia heterophylla (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, P A; Krömer, T; García-Franco, J G; MacSwiney G, M C

    2016-01-01

    In order to compare the effectiveness of diurnal and nocturnal pollinators, we studied the reproductive biology and pollinators of Tillandsia heterophylla E. Morren, an epiphytic tank bromeliad endemic to southeastern Mexico. Since anthesis in T. heterophylla is predominantly nocturnal but lasts until the following day, we hypothesised that this bromeliad would receive visits from both diurnal and nocturnal visitors, but that nocturnal visitors would be the most effective pollinators, since they arrive first to the receptive flower, and that bats would be the most frequent nocturnal visitors, given the characteristics of the nectar. Flowering of T. heterophylla began in May and lasted until July. The species is fully self-compatible, with an anthesis that lasts for ca. 15-16 h. Mean volume of nectar produced per flower was 82.21 μl, with a mean sugar concentration of 6.33%. The highest volume and concentration of nectar were found at 20:00 h, with a subsequent decline in both to almost zero over the following 12-h period. T. heterophylla has a generalist pollination system, since at least four different morphospecies of visitors pollinate its flowers: bats, moths, hummingbirds and bees. Most of the pollinating visits corresponded to bats and took place in the early evening, when stigma receptivity had already begun; making bats the probable pollinator on most occasions. However, diurnal pollinators may be important as a 'fail-safe' system by which to guarantee the pollination of T. heterophylla.

  1. Regional and Latitude Variability in Diurnally Modulated Neutron Flux Measured by LRO/LEND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Bodnarik, J.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Harshman, K.; Litvak, M. L.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sagdeev, R.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R. D.; SU, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Diurnal variability of epithermal neutron leakage flux from the Moon has been demonstrated at near-equatorial latitudes, combining neutron flux measurements at 30°S to 30°N from the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND), on the polar-orbiting Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft. The measured signal demonstrates a minimum at dawn and a maximum in the mid to late afternoon. The pattern is consistent with neutron flux suppression at dawn due to a maximum water concentration in the upper one meter of regolith. The present work expands on this earlier low-latitude effort by investigating specific regions of interest: the nearside Maria, the farside lunar highlands, and the farside South Pole-Aitken Basin region, as well as investigating how latitude affects the measurable diurnal variability. Investigating the possibility of regional variability tied to geologic properties of the surface may help to discriminate between interpretations for the source mechanism driving diurnal variability, temperature or variable hydrogenation/hydration of the surface.

  2. Diurnal temperature variations affect development of a herbivorous arthropod pest and its predators.

    PubMed

    Vangansbeke, Dominiek; Audenaert, Joachim; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Verhoeven, Ruth; Gobin, Bruno; Tirry, Luc; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The impact of daily temperature variations on arthropod life history remains woefully understudied compared to the large body of research that has been carried out on the effects of constant temperatures. However, diurnal varying temperature regimes more commonly represent the environment in which most organisms thrive. Such varying temperature regimes have been demonstrated to substantially affect development and reproduction of ectothermic organisms, generally in accordance with Jensen's inequality. In the present study we evaluated the impact of temperature alternations at 4 amplitudes (DTR0, +5, +10 and +15°C) on the developmental rate of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and their natural prey, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). We have modelled their developmental rates as a function of temperature using both linear and nonlinear models. Diurnally alternating temperatures resulted in a faster development in the lower temperature range as compared to their corresponding mean constant temperatures, whereas the opposite was observed in the higher temperature range. Our results indicate that Jensen's inequality does not suffice to fully explain the differences in developmental rates at constant and alternating temperatures, suggesting additional physiological responses play a role. It is concluded that diurnal temperature range should not be ignored and should be incorporated in predictive models on the phenology of arthropod pests and their natural enemies and their performance in biological control programmes. PMID:25874697

  3. Nocturnal to Diurnal Switches with Spontaneous Suppression of Wheel-Running Behavior in a Subterranean Rodent

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Tøien, Øivind; Valentinuzzi, Veronica S.; Buck, C. Loren; Oda, Gisele A.

    2015-01-01

    Several rodent species that are diurnal in the field become nocturnal in the lab. It has been suggested that the use of running-wheels in the lab might contribute to this timing switch. This proposition is based on studies that indicate feed-back of vigorous wheel-running on the period and phase of circadian clocks that time daily activity rhythms. Tuco-tucos (Ctenomys aff. knighti) are subterranean rodents that are diurnal in the field but are robustly nocturnal in laboratory, with or without access to running wheels. We assessed their energy metabolism by continuously and simultaneously monitoring rates of oxygen consumption, body temperature, general motor and wheel running activity for several days in the presence and absence of wheels. Surprisingly, some individuals spontaneously suppressed running-wheel activity and switched to diurnality in the respirometry chamber, whereas the remaining animals continued to be nocturnal even after wheel removal. This is the first report of timing switches that occur with spontaneous wheel-running suppression and which are not replicated by removal of the wheel. PMID:26460828

  4. Nocturnal to Diurnal Switches with Spontaneous Suppression of Wheel-Running Behavior in a Subterranean Rodent.

    PubMed

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Tøien, Øivind; Valentinuzzi, Veronica S; Buck, C Loren; Oda, Gisele A

    2015-01-01

    Several rodent species that are diurnal in the field become nocturnal in the lab. It has been suggested that the use of running-wheels in the lab might contribute to this timing switch. This proposition is based on studies that indicate feed-back of vigorous wheel-running on the period and phase of circadian clocks that time daily activity rhythms. Tuco-tucos (Ctenomys aff. knighti) are subterranean rodents that are diurnal in the field but are robustly nocturnal in laboratory, with or without access to running wheels. We assessed their energy metabolism by continuously and simultaneously monitoring rates of oxygen consumption, body temperature, general motor and wheel running activity for several days in the presence and absence of wheels. Surprisingly, some individuals spontaneously suppressed running-wheel activity and switched to diurnality in the respirometry chamber, whereas the remaining animals continued to be nocturnal even after wheel removal. This is the first report of timing switches that occur with spontaneous wheel-running suppression and which are not replicated by removal of the wheel.

  5. Diurnal anisotropy of cosmic rays during intensive solar activity for the period 2001-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezari, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    2016-07-01

    The diurnal variation of cosmic ray intensity, based on the records of two neutron monitor stations at Athens (Greece) and Oulu (Finland) for the time period 2001 to 2014, is studied. This period covers the maximum and the descending phase of the solar cycle 23, the minimum of the solar cycles 23/24 and the ascending phase of the solar cycle 24.These two stations differ in their geographic latitude and magnetic threshold rigidity. The amplitude and phase of the diurnal anisotropy vectors have been calculated on annual and monthly basis. From our analysis it is resulted that there is a different behaviour in the characteristics of the diurnal anisotropy during the different phases of the solar cycle, depended on the solar magnetic field polarity, but also during extreme events of solar activity, such as Ground Level Enhancements and cosmic ray events, such as Forbush decreases and magnetospheric events. These results may be useful to Space Weather forecasting and especially to Biomagnetic studies.

  6. Diurnal Rhythms Result in Significant Changes in the Cellular Protein Complement in the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Stockel, Jana; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Welsh, Eric A.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-02-22

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ,30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for,5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  7. Diurnal variations and effects of fasting on blood constituents in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, H; Monnai, Y; Ishii, H; Tanioka, Y; Tanigawa, M

    1999-10-01

    We examined the diurnal variations and the effects of 48-hour fasting on hematological and serum biochemical values to obtain basic physiological data on ten male and seven female Göttingen minipigs 6 to 16 months of age. For all hematological parameters examined (RBC, HCT, HGB, WBC and PLT), there was no diurnal variation in either sex, but red blood cell parameters were affected by fasting, with an increase in males and a decrease in females. Three serum biochemical parameters (GOT, UN and i.p.) for males and four (GOT, UN, Ca and i.p.) for females exhibited diurnal variation. These variations were eliminated by fasting. The BIL level in males was increased by fasting, and the color of serum was yellowish. Fe concentration in both sexes and CRE and Mg levels in males were decreased by fasting. These findings are basic data for various experiments on minipigs, and indicate that great care is required in establishing feeding times and fasting intervals and in the analysis of results of experiments on minipigs.

  8. Diurnal Variability of the Hydrologic Cycle and Radiative Fluxes: Comparisons Between Observation and a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Randall, David A.; Fowler, Laura D.

    2000-01-01

    The simulated diurnal cycle is in many ways an ideal test bed for new physical parameterizations. The purpose of this paper is to compare observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission, the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Experiment, and the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observation Study with the diurnal variability of the Amazonian hydrologic cycle and radiative energy budget as simulated by the Colorado State University general circulation model, and to evaluate improvements and deficiencies of the model physics. The model uses a prognostic cumulus kinetic energy (CKE) to relax the quasi-equilibrium closure of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization. A parameter, alpha, is used to relate the CKE to the cumulus mass flux. This parameter is expected to vary with cloud depth, mean shear, and the level of convective activity, but up to now a single constant value for all cloud types has been used. The results of the present study show clearly that this approach cannot yield realistic simulations of both the diurnal cycle and the monthly mean climate state. Improved results are obtained using a version of the model in which alpha is permitted to vary with cloud depth.

  9. [Diurnal dynamics of photosynthetic and transpiration rates of alfalfa under dry farming and their relationships with environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhua; Shi, Ji'an; Jia, Zhikuan; Han, Qingfang

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, the diurnal dynamics of photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration rate ( Tr) of four years planted alfalfa under dry farming, as well as those of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) , CO2 concentration in field ( Ca ) , relative humidity (RH) and air temperature ( Ta) were measured, and the relationships between the diurnal dynamics of Pn, Tr and climatic factors were analyzed by correlation coefficient, path coefficient, and decision coefficient analyses. The results showed that T. had the greatest effect on the diurnal dynamics of Pn , while RH, PAR and C, affected P,, mainly through their acting on Ta PAR had the greatest effect on the diurnal changes of Tr, and RH, Ta and Ca affected Tr indirectly by acting on PAR. For the characteristics of photosynthesis and transpiration, PAR was the primary determining factor, and Ta was the main limiting factor. PMID:17209375

  10. Are rainforest owl monkeys cathemeral? Diurnal activity of black-headed owl monkeys, Aotus nigriceps, at Manu Biosphere Reserve, Peru.

    PubMed

    Khimji, Shenaz N; Donati, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Aotus are traditionally considered strictly nocturnal, however, in recent years cathemeral habits have been described in a single species of owl monkey, Aotus azarai, which occur in the highly seasonal habitat of the Argentinean Chaco. This finding raises the question as to whether other species of Aotus exhibit cathemeral activity in less seasonal habitats. In this study, we observed the diurnal activity of one group of A. nigriceps living in the Manu Biosphere Reserve, Peru over 65 days. The data collected indicate that A. nigriceps has only sporadic diurnal bouts of activity. In addition, nocturnal luminosity of the previous night, rainfall, and temperature did not correlate with the minor diurnal activity exhibited. This suggests that for A. nigriceps the potential costs of shifting to diurnality may outweigh its prospective advantages in this rainforest environment.

  11. Diurnal and Seasonal Trends in Canopy Transpiration and Conductance of Pristine Forest Types in Belize, Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Oren, R.; Billings, S.; Muller-Ezards, C.; Schaaff, C.; Strohmeier, P.; Obermaier, E.

    1994-01-01

    Five semi-deciduous broadleaf forest types growing over tropical karst in Belize, Central America, were monitored for three years to study diurnal and seasonal changes of transpiration and micro-meteorologic conditions.

  12. Interpolation of surface radiative temperature measured from polar orbiting satellites to a diurnal cycle: 1. Without clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Menglin; Dickinson, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    The land surface skin temperature diurnal cycle (LSTD) is an important element of the climate system. This variable, however, cannot be directly obtained globally from polar orbiting satellites because such satellites only pass a given area twice per day and because their infrared channels cannot observe the surface when the sky is cloudy. To obtain the skin temperature diurnal cycle and fully utilize satellite measurements, we have designed an efficient algorithm that combines model results with satellite and surface-based observations and interpolates satellite twice-daily observations into the diurnal cycle. Climatological information from a climate model, CCM3/BATS, is used to determine a normalized shape (typical pattern) of the diurnal temperature for different latitudes, seasons, and vegetation types. The satellite observations, which are by themselves inadequate, are combined with the normalized modeled diurnal typical patterns to obtain the skin temperature diurnal cycle. The normalized typical patterns depend on the parameters of the diurnal insolation, such as sunrise, sunset, and peak times, and are also affected by the type of vegetation cover and soil moisture. The underlying physical foundation of this algorithm is that the diurnal cycle of temperature can be viewed as a composite of a daily average, diurnal periodic component, and random aperiodic component (noise). With the assumption that the noise can be ignored, the daily average can be inferred from satellite twice-per-day measurements and the periodic part can be obtained from modeled climatologies, providing a reasonable approach for estimation of the diurnal cycle of skin temperature. The general framework of the algorithm and its application for the clear-sky (cloud free) conditions are presented. This cloud-free version of algorithm is evaluated using FIFE and BOREAS field experiment surface observations. Regional tests over the Mississippi River basin have also been conducted using GOES-8

  13. Developmental histories of perceived racial discrimination and diurnal cortisol profiles in adulthood: A 20-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Adam, Emma K; Heissel, Jennifer A; Zeiders, Katharine H; Richeson, Jennifer A; Ross, Emily C; Ehrlich, Katherine B; Levy, Dorainne J; Kemeny, Margaret; Brodish, Amanda B; Malanchuk, Oksana; Peck, Stephen C; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E; Eccles, Jacquelynne S

    2015-12-01

    Perceived racial discrimination (PRD) has been associated with altered diurnal cortisol rhythms in past cross-sectional research. We investigate whether developmental histories of PRD, assessed prospectively, are associated with adult diurnal cortisol profiles. One-hundred and twelve (N=50 Black, N=62 White) adults from the Maryland Adolescent Development in Context Study provided saliva samples in adulthood (at approximately age 32 years) at waking, 30min after waking, and at bedtime for 7 days. Diurnal cortisol measures were calculated, including waking cortisol levels, diurnal cortisol slopes, the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and average daily cortisol (AUC). These cortisol outcomes were predicted from measures of PRD obtained over a 20-year period beginning when individuals were in 7th grade (approximately age 12). Greater average PRD measured across the 20-year period predicted flatter adult diurnal cortisol slopes for both Black and White adults, and a lower CAR. Greater average PRD also predicted lower waking cortisol for Black, but not White adults. PRD experiences in adolescence accounted for many of these effects. When adolescent and young adult PRD are entered together predicting cortisol outcomes, PRD experiences in adolescence (but not young adulthood) significantly predicted flatter diurnal cortisol slopes for both Black and White adults. Adolescent, but not young adult PRD, also significantly predicted lower waking and lower average cortisol for Black adults. Young adult PRD was, however, a stronger predictor of the CAR, predicting a marginally lower CAR for Whites, and a significantly larger CAR for Blacks. Effects were robust to controlling for covariates including health behaviors, depression, income and parent education levels. PRD experiences interacted with parent education and income to predict aspects of the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Although these results suggest PRD influences on cortisol for both Blacks and Whites, the key findings

  14. Climatology of the diurnal tides from eCMAM30 (1979 to 2010) and its comparison with SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Quan; Du, Jian; Ward, William E.; Beagley, Stephen R.; Fomichev, Victor I.; Zhang, Shaodong

    2014-12-01

    The extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (eCMAM) was recently run in a nudged mode using reanalysis data from the ground to 1 hPa for the period of January 1979 to June 2010 (hence the name eCMAM30). In this paper, eCMAM30 temperature is used to examine the background mean temperature, the spectrum of the diurnal tides, and the climatology of the migrating diurnal tide Dw1 and three nonmigrating diurnal tides De3, Dw2, and Ds0 in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. The model results are then compared to the diurnal tidal climatology derived from Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) observations between 40 to 110 km and 50° S to 50° N from January 2002 to December 2013. The model reproduces the latitudinal background mean temperature gradients well except that the cold mesopause temperature in eCMAM30 is 10 to 20 K colder than SABER. The diurnal tidal spectra and their relative strengths compare very well between eCMAM30 and SABER. The altitude-latitude structures for the four diurnal tidal components (Dw1, De3, Dw2, and Ds0) from the two datasets are also in very good agreement even for structures in the stratosphere with a weaker amplitude. The largest discrepancy between the model and SABER is associated with the seasonal variation of De3. In addition to the Northern Hemisphere (NH) summer maximum, a secondary maximum occurs during NH winter (December-February) in the model but is absent in SABER. The seasonal variations of the other three diurnal tidal components are in good agreement. Interannual time series of Dw1 and De3 from both eCMAM30 and SABER reveal variability with a period of 25 to 26 months, which indicates the modulation of the diurnal tides by the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO).

  15. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  16. What the diurnal cycle of precipitation tells us about land-atmosphere coupling strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Craig; Song, Hyojong; Roundy, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    The key attributes of a coupled forecast model are the coupling strengths between the land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere schemes. If a model cannot skillfully capture the diurnal cycle of clouds and precipitation, then it likely cannot be expected to yield accurate long-term climate projections. The seasonal drought forecast skill shortfalls of the U.S. NCEP Coupled Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2) have been directly linked to its unrealistically strong land-atmosphere coupling strength. Most models can be similarly categorized, which is to say, sensitivity to the land physics (i.e., soil moisture constraints on evapotranspiration) is too strong. In nature, the land signal: noise ratio appears to be at a much lower value. Diagnosing land-atmosphere coupling strength requires at a minimum: surface soil moisture state, surface turbulent heat fluxes, and atmospheric moisture and instability. Full-on diagnosis would entail hacking into the code and inserting a number of tracers. This study addresses the question: What if, given the soil wetness anomaly, model biases in coupling sign and/or strength could be diagnosed from phase shifts in the diurnal precipitation frequency cycle? We use 34-years of output from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) to investigate the variation in diurnal precipitation frequency cycle between so-called "wet-advantage" and "dry-advantage" coupling regimes over the U.S. southern Great Plains. Wet-advantage occurs when the atmospheric state is closer to the wet adiabatic rate and convection is triggered by a strong increase in the moist static energy from the surface. In contrast, dry-advantage occurs when the atmosphere is drier and the temperature profile is close to the dry adiabatic lapse rate, which favors convection over areas of large boundary layer growth due to high sensible heat fluxes at the surface. We find that there is a significant difference in the

  17. The simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land in a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, P.; Chaboureau, J. P.; Beljaars, A.; Betts, A. K.; Köhler, M.; Miller, M.; Redelsperger, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    In the context of the European Cloud Systems project, the problem of the simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land is addressed with the aid of cloud-resolving (CRM) and single-column (SCM) model simulations of an idealized midlatitude case for which observations of large-scale and surface forcing are available. The CRM results are compared to different versions of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) convection schemes using different convective trigger procedures and convective closures. In the CRM, maximum rainfall intensity occurs at 15 h (local time). In this idealized midlatitude case, most schemes do not reproduce the afternoon precipitation peak, as (i) they cannot reproduce the gradual growth (typically over 3 hours) of the deep convective cloud layer and (ii) they produce a diurnal cycle of precipitation that is in phase with the diurnal cycle of the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective inhibition (CIN), consistent with the parcel theory and CAPE closure used in the bulk mass-flux scheme. The scheme that links the triggering to the large-scale vertical velocity gets the maximum precipitation at the right time, but this may be artificial as the vertical velocity is enforced in the single-column context. The study is then extended to the global scale using ensembles of 72-hour global forecasts at resolution T511 (40 km), and long-range single 40-day forecasts at resolution T159 (125 km) with the ECMWF general-circulation model. The focus is on tropical South America and Africa where the diurnal cycle is most pronounced. The forecasts are evaluated against analyses and observed radiosonde data, as well as observed surface and satellite-derived rainfall rates. The ECMWF model version with improved convective trigger produces the smallest biases overall. It also shifts the rainfall maximum to 12 h compared to 9.5 h in the original version. In contrast to the SCM, the vertical

  18. Technical Note: Glacial influence in tropical mountain hydrosystems evidenced by the diurnal cycle in water levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauvy-Fraunié, S.; Condom, T.; Rabatel, A.; Villacis, M.; Jacobsen, D.; Dangles, O.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, the rapid shrinking of glaciers in response to ongoing climate change is modifying the glacial meltwater contribution to hydrosystems in glacierized catchments. Determining the influence of glacial runoff to streams is therefore of critical importance to evaluate potential impact of glacier retreat on water quality and aquatic biota. This task has challenged both glacier hydrologists and ecologists over the last 20 yr due to both structural and functional complexity of the glacier-stream system interface. Here we propose quantifying the diurnal cycle amplitude of the streamflow to determine the glacial influence in glacierized catchments. We performed water-level measurements using water pressure loggers over 10 months at 30 min time steps in 15 stream sites in 2 glacier-fed catchments in the Ecuadorian Andes (> 4000 m a.s.l.) where no perennial snow cover is observed outside the glaciers. For each stream site, we performed wavelet analyses on water-level time series, determined the scale-averaged wavelet power spectrum at 24 h scale and defined three metrics, namely the power, frequency and temporal clustering of the diurnal flow variation. The three metrics were then compared to the percentage of the glacier cover in the catchments, a metric of glacial influence widely used in the literature. As expected, we found that the diurnal variation power of glacier-fed streams decreased downstream with the addition of non-glacial tributaries. We also found that the diurnal variation power and the percentage of the glacier cover in the catchment were significantly positively correlated. Furthermore, we found that our method permits the detection of glacial signal in supposedly non-glacial sites, thereby revealing glacial meltwater resurgence. While we specifically focused on the tropical Andes in this paper, our approach to determine glacial influence may have potential applications in temperate and arctic glacierized catchments. The measure of diurnal water

  19. Diurnal cycle in convergence patterns in the boundary layer east of the Andes and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Matilde; Skabar, Yanina García

    2011-06-01

    The South American Low-Level Jet Experiment (SALLJEX) provided a unique dataset to investigate the existence of a mesoscale low-level circulation and of a diurnal cycle in its related convergence pattern over the Southeastern South American region east of the Andes, as well as its relationship with deep convection during the warm season. The present paper builds upon high-resolution analyses produced, assimilating the data collected during the SALLJEX field campaign using BRAMS, and explores their capability to reproduce mesoscale circulations not resolved by the low density observational network available in this region. Results of the analyses show a diurnal oscillation signal in the mean boundary layer convergence pattern over the plains with a nocturnal (daytime) convergence (divergence) maximum. These results are coherent with previous findings of a nocturnal phase in the mature stage of organized deep convection and related precipitation in subtropical latitudes east of the Andes during the warm season. The diurnal cycle of convergence/divergence in the boundary layer is described over a 15-day period, during which different synoptic conditions occurred. During weakly forced environments a regime characterized by nocturnal eastward anomaly flow and convergence and daytime westward anomaly flow and divergence related to a mesoscale northwestern mountain-central plain flow regime dominates over the plains between the Andes Mountains, the Parana River Valley, and the southern Brazil mountain range. In contrast, during synoptic conditions dominated by the presence of a deep thermal low over northwestern Argentina and a related low-level jet, convergence at night is mainly accomplished by the predominantly meridional low-level jet, which exhibits an anomalous weak wind speed diurnal cycle with respect to its summer climatological mean. On the other hand daytime divergence is completely produced by the zonal wind component as in the previous synoptic situation

  20. Diurnal variation in rates of calcification and carbonate sediment dissolution in Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Water quality and circulation in Florida Bay (a shallow, subtropical estuary in south Florida) are highly dependent upon the development and evolution of carbonate mud banks distributed throughout the Bay. Predicting the effect of natural and anthropogenic perturbations on carbonate sedimentation requires an understanding of annual, seasonal, and daily variations in the biogenic and inorganic processes affecting carbonate sediment precipitation and dissolution. In this study, net calcification rates were measured over diurnal cycles on 27 d during summer and winter from 1999 to 2003 on mud banks and four representative substrate types located within basins between mud banks. Substrate types that were measured in basins include seagrass beds of sparse and intermediate density Thalassia sp., mud bottom, and hard bottom communities. Changes in total alkalinity were used as a proxy for calcification and dissolution. On 22 d (81%), diurnal variation in rates of net calcification was observed. The highest rates of net carbonate sediment production (or lowest rates of net dissolution) generally occurred during daylight hours and ranged from 2.900 to -0.410 g CaCO3 m-2 d-1. The lowest rates of carbonate sediment production (or net sediment dissolution) occurred at night and ranged from 0.210 to -1.900 g CaCO3 m -2 night-1. During typical diurnal cycles, dissolution during the night consumed an average of 29% of sediment produced during the day on banks and 68% of sediment produced during the day in basins. Net sediment dissolution also occurred during daylight, but only when there was total cloud cover, high turbidity, or hypersalinity. Diurnal variation in calcification and dissolution in surface waters and surface sediments of Florida Bay is linked to cycling of carbon dioxide through photosynthesis and respiration. Estimation of long-term sediment accumulation rates from diurnal rates of carbonate sediment production measured in this study indicates an overall average

  1. Diurnal resting in brown lemurs in a dry deciduous forest, northwestern Madagascar: implications for seasonal thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroki

    2012-07-01

    Decreased activity has been reported in both nocturnal and diurnal primates during the prolonged dry season in western Madagascar, and this has been interpreted as a reaction to the severe environment, with its food scarcity and/or thermal stress. Several day-active lemurs rest more as trees defoliate, although the reason for this is unclear. To understand the mechanism underpinning the diurnal resting of lemurs in seasonal deciduous forests, I observed common brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus fulvus) for one year in Ankarafantsika National Park, northwestern Madagascar. In Ankarafantsika, despite high fruit availability during the dry season, brown lemurs are known to engage in diurnal resting. To examine the effects of thermal factors and defoliation on lemur inactivity, I recorded the activity of a troop at 1 min intervals, hourly ambient temperature, daily rainfall, and weather during observations (06:00-18:00). I quantified the amount of leaves biweekly for 680 trees. I tested correlations between percentages of resting time and each factor across hours during the day and across seasons. During the rainy season, resting time did not differ between sunny and cloudy days, and lemurs were active throughout the daytime. At the hourly level during the dry season, lemurs rested exclusively at midday, apparently at peak sunlight intensity rather than at peak ambient temperature. At seasonal level, percentages of total resting time from 08:00 to 16:00 were greater during dry season (81.9%) than during rainy season (62.6%), and percentages increased as ambient temperatures increased. Defoliation was related to seasonal decrease in weekly rainfall, which served as an index of water retained in the forest. Defoliation probably reflected aridification as well as the penetration of sunlight into the forest. Diurnal resting increased as both the amount of leaves and weekly rainfall decreased seasonally. These results suggest that heat stress under dry conditions may promote

  2. Diurnal Lightning Distributions as Observed by the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Jeff C.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Christian, Hugh J.

    2007-01-01

    Data obtained from the Optical Transient Detector (April 1995 to March 2000) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (December 1997 to December 2005) satellites (70 and 35 inclination low earth orbits, respectively) are used to statistically determine the number of flashes in the annual and seasonal diurnal cycle as a function of local and universal time. The data are further subdivided by season, land versus ocean, northern versus southern hemisphere, and other spatial (e.g., continents) and temporal (e.g., time of peak diurnal amplitude) categories. The data include corrections for detection efficiency and instrument view time. Continental results display strong diurnal variation, with a lightning peak in the late afternoon and a minimum in late morning. In regions of the world dominated by large mesoscale convective systems the peak in the diurnal curve shifts toward late evening or early morning hours. The maximum diurnal flash rate occurs in June-August, corresponding to the Northern Hemisphere summer, while the minimum occurs in December-February. Summer lightning dominates over winter activity and springtime lightning dominates over autumn activity at most continental locations. This latter behavior occurs especially strongly over the Amazon region in South America in September-November. Oceanic lightning activity in winter and autumn tends to exceed that in summer and spring. Global lightning is well correlated in phase but not in amplitude with the Carnegie curve. The diurnal flash rate varies about 4-35 percent about the mean, while the Carnegie curve varies around 4-15 percent.

  3. Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats: effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Bodosi, B; Gardi, J; Hajdu, I; Szentirmai, E; Obal, F; Krueger, J M

    2004-11-01

    To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat. PMID:15475503

  4. Viscosity changes of riparian water controls diurnal fluctuations of stream-flow and DOC concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Michael; Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent; Weiler, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Diurnal fluctuations in stream-flow are commonly explained as being triggered by the daily evapotranspiration cycle in the riparian zone, leading to stream flow minima in the afternoon. While this trigger effect must necessarily be constrained by the extent of the growing season of vegetation, we here show evidence of daily stream flow maxima in the afternoon in a small headwater stream during the dormant season. We hypothesize that the afternoon maxima in stream flow are induced by viscosity changes of riparian water that is caused by diurnal temperature variations of the near surface groundwater in the riparian zone. The patterns were observed in the Weierbach headwater catchment in Luxembourg. The catchment is covering an area of 0.45 km2, is entirely covered by forest and is dominated by a schistous substratum. DOC concentration at the outlet of the catchment was measured with the field deployable UV-Vis spectrometer spectro::lyser (scan Messtechnik GmbH) with a high frequency of 15 minutes over several months. Discharge was measured with an ISCO 4120 Flow Logger. During the growing season, stream flow shows a frequently observed diurnal pattern with discharge minima in the afternoon. During the dormant season, a long dry period with daily air temperature amplitudes of around 10 ° C occurred in March and April 2014, with discharge maxima in the afternoon. The daily air temperature amplitude led to diurnal variations in the water temperature of the upper 10 cm of the riparian zone. Higher riparian water temperatures cause a decrease in water viscosity and according to the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, the volumetric flow rate is inversely proportional to viscosity. Based on the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the viscosity changes of water, we calculated higher flow rates of near surface groundwater through the riparian zone into the stream in the afternoon which explains the stream flow maxima in the afternoon. With the start of the growing season, the viscosity

  5. Chronotype, sleep loss, and diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol in a simulated daylong driving.

    PubMed

    Oginska, Halszka; Fafrowicz, Magdalena; Golonka, Krystyna; Marek, Tadeusz; Mojsa-Kaja, Justyna; Tucholska, Kinga

    2010-07-01

    The study focused on chronotype-related differences in subjective load assessment, sleepiness, and salivary cortisol pattern in subjects performing daylong simulated driving. Individual differences in work stress appraisal and psychobiological cost of prolonged load seem to be of importance in view of expanding compressed working time schedules. Twenty-one healthy, male volunteers (mean +/- SD: 27.9 +/- 4.9 yrs) were required to stay in semiconstant routine conditions. They performed four sessions (each lasting approximately 2.5 h) of simulated driving, i.e., completed chosen tasks from computer driving games. Saliva samples were collected after each driving session, i.e., at 10:00-11:00, 14:00-15:00, 18:00-19:00, and 22:00-23:00 h as well as 10-30 min after waking (between 05:00 and 06:00 h) and at bedtime (after 00:00 h). Two subgroups of subjects were distinguished on the basis of the Chronotype Questionnaire: morning (M)- and evening (E)-oriented types. Subjective data on sleep need, sleeping time preferences, sleeping problems, and the details of the preceding night were investigated by questionnaire. Subjective measures of task load (NASA Task Load Index [NASA-TLX]), activation (Thayer's Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List [AD ACL]), and sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale [KSS]) were applied at times of saliva samples collection. M- and E-oriented types differed significantly as to their ideal sleep length (6 h 54 min +/- 44 versus 8 h 13 min +/- 50 min), preferred sleep timing (midpoint at 03:19 versus 04:26), and sleep index, i.e., 'real-to-ideal' sleep ratio, before the experimental day (0.88 versus 0.67). Sleep deficit proved to be integrated with eveningness. M and E types exhibited similar diurnal profiles of energy, tiredness, tension, and calmness assessed by AD ACL, but E types estimated higher their workload (NASA-TLX) and sleepiness (KSS). M types exhibited a trend of higher mean cortisol levels than E types (F = 4.192, p < .056) and

  6. New fire diurnal cycle characterizations to improve fire radiative energy assessments made from low-Earth orbit satellites sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andela, N.; Kaiser, J. W.; van der Werf, G. R.; Wooster, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate near real time fire emissions estimates are required for air quality forecasts. To date, most approaches are based on satellite-derived estimates of fire radiative power (FRP), which can be converted to fire radiative energy (FRE) which is directly related to fire emissions. Uncertainties in these FRE estimations are often substantial. This is for a large part because the most often used low-Earth orbit satellite-based instruments like the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have a relatively poor sampling of the usually pronounced fire diurnal cycle. In this paper we explore the spatial variation of this fire diurnal cycle and its drivers. Specifically, we assess how representing the fire diurnal cycle affects FRP and FRE estimations when using data collected at MODIS overpasses. Using data assimilation we explored three different methods to estimate hourly FRE, based on an incremental sophistication of parameterizing the fire diurnal cycle. We sampled data from the geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) at MODIS detection opportunities to drive the three approaches. The full SEVIRI time-series, providing full coverage of the diurnal cycle, were used to evaluate the results. Our study period comprised three years (2010-2012), and we focussed on Africa and the Mediterranean basin to avoid the use of potentially lower quality SEVIRI data obtained at very far off-nadir view angles. We found that the fire diurnal cycle varies substantially over the study region, and depends on both fuel and weather conditions. For example, more "intense" fires characterized by a fire diurnal cycle with high peak fire activity, long duration over the day, and with nighttime fire activity are most common in areas of large fire size (i.e., large burned area per fire event). These areas are most prevalent in relatively arid regions. Ignoring the fire diurnal cycle as done currently in some approaches caused structural

  7. Resolving the diurnal cycle in satellite derived sea surface temperatures and its significance on surface heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Marine surface heat fluxes across the globe need to be resolved on a smaller time scale in order to determine how changes in their diurnal cycle contribute to surface turbulent fluxes. In order to do this, the sea surface temperatures used to calculate the fluxes also need to accurately represent diurnal changes. Since most satellite derived sea surface temperature products are time-averaged and smoothed so that intradiurnal variations are neglected, and insitu measurements are scarce in global spatial coverage, modeling of the diurnal cycle of SSTs becomes necessary. A bulk flux model, POSH (Gentemann et al. 2009), will be used to calculate a global field of diurnally varying sea surface temperatures (dSSTs) over the course of 2 months in two different annual seasons, winter and summer. As the model produces a dSST field, surface turbulent heat fluxes are calculated using the Bourassa (2006) flux model. In order to compute fluxes, bulk atmospheric variables are taken from the MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications) reanalysis dataset. Sea surface temperatures are obtained from the AVHRR-only Reynolds Daily OI Sea Surface Temperature product (Reynolds et al. 2007). The Reynolds SST is bias-corrected relative to a 7-day in-situ SST so therefore it does not resolve the diurnal cycle itself. The Reynolds SST product will serve as a foundation temperature, or the temperature that is independent from the effects of diurnal heating (Donolan et al. 2007), of which the amplitude of the diurnal heating will be added to. Finally, 2-monthly average differences in dSSTs versus Daily OI SSTs and uncertainties in the biases will be compared. From these statistics, climactic and modeling significance of the inclusion of diurnal heating can be evaluated. We find that latent heat fluxes in the tropics are increased by roughly 10 Wm-2 when the diurnal variability is considered (Fig. 1). This change in flux decreases poleward. The tropical changes are

  8. Diurnal odor, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide emission profiles of confined swine grower/finisher rooms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gang; Guo, Huiqing; Peterson, Jonathan; Predicala, Bernardo; Laguë, Claude

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain diurnal variation profiles of odor and gas (ammonia [NH3], hydrogen sulfide [H2S], carbon dioxide [CO2]) concentrations and emission rate (OGCER) from confined swine grower/ finisher rooms under three typical weather conditions (warm, mild, and cold weather) in a year. Two grower/ finisher rooms, one with a fully slatted floor and the other with partially slatted floors, were measured for 2 consecutive days under each weather condition. The results revealed that the diurnal OGCER in the room with a fully slatted floor was 9.2-39.4% higher than that with a partially slatted floor; however, no significant differences in the diurnal OGCER were found between these two rooms, except for the NH3 concentrations in August, the NH3 and H2S concentrations and emissions in October, and odor concentrations and emissions in February (p > 0.05). The OGCER variations presented different diurnal patterns as affected by time of day, season, type of floor, ventilation rate, animal growth cycles, in-house manure storage, and weather conditions. Significant diurnal fluctuations in the OGCER (except for the odor concentrations and H2S emissions) were observed in August (p < 0.05); all of the gas emissions in October and the CO2 concentrations and emissions in February also showed significant diurnal variations (p < 0.05). These significant diurnal variations indicated that the OGCER during different periods of a day should be monitored when quantifying OGCER concentrations and emissions; for example, source emission data used in air dispersion modeling to decrease the great incertitude of setback determination using randomly measured data.

  9. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise. PMID:27124542

  10. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise.

  11. Nocturnal ranging by a diurnal primate: are ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) cathemeral?

    PubMed

    Parga, Joyce A

    2011-07-01

    Cathemerality, an activity pattern comprised of distinct periods of diurnal and nocturnal activity, is a trait found among several of the Malagasy strepsirhines and one species of Aotus. Because occasional anecdotal reports suggest that some diurnal primates can be active at night, I investigated the possibility of nocturnal ranging behavior in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) by using global positioning system (GPS) collars programmed to collect data across a 24-h period. Five individuals in a provisioned, free-ranging L. catta colony on St. Catherines Island, Georgia, USA, wore GPS collars across 1 week of the mating season. Results revealed that night ranging behavior occurred between the h of 1900 and 0530. An evaluation of the effect of moonlight on nocturnal activity showed that a greater rate of travel occurred during moonlit periods as opposed to periods when the moon had not yet risen. Distance travelled at night decreased across the deployment period, likely because of a decrease in available moonlight over time, as the lemurs were collared during a waning moon. Fewer mating opportunities over time may have also been responsible for the decrease in night ranging, because the number of females in estrus declined across the deployment period. Future research is needed to separate the effects of moonlight and mating activity on night ranging in this species, as well as to evaluate whether L. catta in Madagascar show night ranging similar to L. catta on SCI. These data raise the possibility that L. catta may be cathemeral, with an activity pattern fluctuating between diurnality and cathemerality in accordance with shifts in environmental conditions.

  12. Patterns in diurnal airspace use by migratory landbirds along an ecological barrier.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Anna C; Niemi, Gerald J; Johnson, Douglas H

    2015-04-01

    Migratory bird populations and survival are affected by conditions experienced during migration. While many studies and conservation and management efforts focus on terrestrial stoppage and staging areas, the aerial environment through which migrants move also is subjected to anthropogenic impacts with potential consequences to migratory movement and survival. During autumn migration, the northern coastline of Lake Superior acts as an ecological barrier for many landbirds migrating out of the boreal forests of North America. From 24 observation points, we assessed the diurnal movements of birds throughout autumn migration, 2008-2010, within a 210 × 10 km coastal region along the northern coast of Lake Superior. Several raptor species showed patterns in airspace associated with topographic features such as proximity to the coastline and presence of ridgelines. Funneling movement, commonly used to describe the concentration of raptors along a migratory diversion line that either prevents or enhances migration progress, occurred only for Bald and Golden Eagles. This suggests a "leaky" migration funnel for most migratory raptors (e.g., migrating birds exiting the purported migration corridor). Passerines migrating during the late season showed more spatial and temporal structure in airspace distribution than raptors did, including funneling and an association with airspace near the coast. We conclude that (1) the diurnal use of airspace by many migratory landbirds is patterned in space and time, (2) autumn count sites situated along ecological barriers substantially underestimate the number of raptors due to "leakage" out of these concentration areas, and (3) the magnitude and structure of diurnal passerine movements in airspace have been overlooked. The heavy and structured use of airspace by migratory landbirds, especially the airspace associated with anthropogenic development (e.g., buildings, towers, turbines) necessitates a shift in focus to airspace management

  13. Global transcriptomic analysis of Cyanothece 51142 reveals robust diurnal oscillation of central metabolic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh V.; Aurora, Rajeev; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-04-22

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, and the only prokaryotes known to have a circadian cycle. Unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Cyanothece 51142 can fix atmospheric nitrogen, a process exquisitely sensitive to oxygen. Thus, the intracellular environment of Cyanothece oscillates between aerobic and anaerobic conditions during a day-night cycle. This is accomplished by temporal separation of two processes: photosynthesis during the day, and nitrogen fixation at night. While previous studies have examined periodic changes transcript levels for a limited number of genes in Cyanothece and other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, a comprehensive study of transcriptional activity in a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium is necessary to understand the impact of the temporal separation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation on global gene regulation and cellular metabolism. We have examined the expression patterns of nearly 5000 genes in Cyanothece 51142 during two consecutive diurnal periods. We found that ~30% of these genes exhibited robust oscillating expression profiles. Interestingly, this set included genes for almost all central metabolic processes in Cyanothece. A transcriptional network of all genes with significantly oscillating transcript levels revealed that the majority of genes in numerous individual pathways, such as glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and glycogen metabolism, were co-regulated and maximally expressed at distinct phases during the diurnal cycle. Our analyses suggest that the demands of nitrogen fixation greatly influence major metabolic activities inside Cyanothece cells and thus drive various cellular activities. These studies provide a comprehensive picture of how a physiologically relevant diurnal light-dark cycle influences the metabolism in a photosynthetic bacterium

  14. Feeding and diurnal related activity of lateral hypothalamic neurons in freely behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Sasaki, K; Nishino, H; Fukuda, M; Shibata, R

    1986-05-14

    Activity of 64 single neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) was recorded for 1-8 days in freely behaving rats. The activity of 26 (40.6%) neurons varied with circadian rhythm and in relation to feeding. Activity of 23 of these neurons decreased during consumption of each pellet, and that of one increased. The activity of two other neurons increased intermittently, at night, prior to and during eating and drinking episodes. All changed activity with sleep-wake changes; increasing in the dark or upon arousal, and decreasing in the light or during slow wave sleep, but the activity was independent of individual movement, except feeding. The activity of 29 (45.3%) neurons varied only diurnally. Of these, 26 neurons also had sleep-wake responses and activity changes that corresponded to behavior. The firing rate of the other 3 neurons was independent of sleep-wake condition or individual feeding activity, but gradually increased in the dark to a maximum in the early morning, then subsided rapidly in 1-2 h. Four (6.3%) neurons were related only to feeding and not to diurnal rhythm, and 5 (7.8%) neurons were not related to either. Of the 5 neurons that were unrelated to either diurnal rhythm or feeding acts, 3 increased activity at light on and decreased it at light off for 4-13 min. These data suggest LHA neuronal involvement in control of short term feeding or individual feeding episodes, and long term feeding or circadian feeding rhythm.

  15. The circadian oscillator in Synechococcus elongatus controls metabolite partitioning during diurnal growth

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Spencer; Jun, Darae; Rubin, Benjamin E.; Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a genetically tractable model cyanobacterium that has been engineered to produce industrially relevant biomolecules and is the best-studied model for a prokaryotic circadian clock. However, the organism is commonly grown in continuous light in the laboratory, and data on metabolic processes under diurnal conditions are lacking. Moreover, the influence of the circadian clock on diurnal metabolism has been investigated only briefly. Here, we demonstrate that the circadian oscillator influences rhythms of metabolism during diurnal growth, even though light–dark cycles can drive metabolic rhythms independently. Moreover, the phenotype associated with loss of the core oscillator protein, KaiC, is distinct from that caused by absence of the circadian output transcriptional regulator, RpaA (regulator of phycobilisome-associated A). Although RpaA activity is important for carbon degradation at night, KaiC is dispensable for those processes. Untargeted metabolomics analysis and glycogen kinetics suggest that functional KaiC is important for metabolite partitioning in the morning. Additionally, output from the oscillator functions to inhibit RpaA activity in the morning, and kaiC-null strains expressing a mutant KaiC phosphomimetic, KaiC-pST, in which the oscillator is locked in the most active output state, phenocopies a ΔrpaA strain. Inhibition of RpaA by the oscillator in the morning suppresses metabolic processes that normally are active at night, and kaiC-null strains show indications of oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activation as well as increased abundance of primary metabolites. Inhibitory clock output may serve to allow secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the morning, and some metabolites resulting from these processes may feed back to reinforce clock timing. PMID:25825710

  16. Effects of altered calcium intake on diurnal and calcium-stimulated plasma calcitonin in normal women.

    PubMed

    Tiegs, R D; Heath, H

    1989-06-01

    We sought to determine if any protective effect of dietary calcium (Ca) or Ca supplements on bone could be at least partially mediated by increased calcitonin (CT) secretion. First we studied 10 healthy premenopausal women (median age, 35.5 years) who were randomized to high or low dietary Ca intake (1752 versus 391 mg elemental Ca per day) for 2 weeks and then crossed over. At the end of each dietary period, blood was drawn on 1 day at 0800, 1200, 1700, and 2000 h to assess diurnal variation of plasma CT levels. CT secretory reserve was assessed on the next day by Ca infusion (2 mg Ca per kg body weight over 5 minutes). Next, we studied 10 healthy premenopausal women who took a low-Ca diet (approximately 400 mg Ca per day) for a 2 week control period. The women were then randomized to high- or low-Ca intake [400 mg dietary Ca +/- 1500 mg Ca per day (as supplemental CaCO3)] and then crossed over. At the end of each study period, the diurnal variation in CT was tested on day 1; the CT secretory reserve was assessed on day 3 by an oral Ca load (500 mg as CaCO3)] and on day 5 by Ca infusion. Plasma immunoreactive CT was measured in whole plasma (iCT) and after silica extraction (exCT), predominantly monomeric CT. Neither increased dietary Ca nor Ca supplements affected the diurnal levels of iCT or exCT or augmented plasma CT responses to an oral Ca load.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Nocturnal ranging by a diurnal primate: are ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) cathemeral?

    PubMed

    Parga, Joyce A

    2011-07-01

    Cathemerality, an activity pattern comprised of distinct periods of diurnal and nocturnal activity, is a trait found among several of the Malagasy strepsirhines and one species of Aotus. Because occasional anecdotal reports suggest that some diurnal primates can be active at night, I investigated the possibility of nocturnal ranging behavior in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) by using global positioning system (GPS) collars programmed to collect data across a 24-h period. Five individuals in a provisioned, free-ranging L. catta colony on St. Catherines Island, Georgia, USA, wore GPS collars across 1 week of the mating season. Results revealed that night ranging behavior occurred between the h of 1900 and 0530. An evaluation of the effect of moonlight on nocturnal activity showed that a greater rate of travel occurred during moonlit periods as opposed to periods when the moon had not yet risen. Distance travelled at night decreased across the deployment period, likely because of a decrease in available moonlight over time, as the lemurs were collared during a waning moon. Fewer mating opportunities over time may have also been responsible for the decrease in night ranging, because the number of females in estrus declined across the deployment period. Future research is needed to separate the effects of moonlight and mating activity on night ranging in this species, as well as to evaluate whether L. catta in Madagascar show night ranging similar to L. catta on SCI. These data raise the possibility that L. catta may be cathemeral, with an activity pattern fluctuating between diurnality and cathemerality in accordance with shifts in environmental conditions. PMID:21717291

  18. The circadian oscillator in Synechococcus elongatus controls metabolite partitioning during diurnal growth.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Spencer; Jun, Darae; Rubin, Benjamin E; Golden, Susan S

    2015-04-14

    Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a genetically tractable model cyanobacterium that has been engineered to produce industrially relevant biomolecules and is the best-studied model for a prokaryotic circadian clock. However, the organism is commonly grown in continuous light in the laboratory, and data on metabolic processes under diurnal conditions are lacking. Moreover, the influence of the circadian clock on diurnal metabolism has been investigated only briefly. Here, we demonstrate that the circadian oscillator influences rhythms of metabolism during diurnal growth, even though light-dark cycles can drive metabolic rhythms independently. Moreover, the phenotype associated with loss of the core oscillator protein, KaiC, is distinct from that caused by absence of the circadian output transcriptional regulator, RpaA (regulator of phycobilisome-associated A). Although RpaA activity is important for carbon degradation at night, KaiC is dispensable for those processes. Untargeted metabolomics analysis and glycogen kinetics suggest that functional KaiC is important for metabolite partitioning in the morning. Additionally, output from the oscillator functions to inhibit RpaA activity in the morning, and kaiC-null strains expressing a mutant KaiC phosphomimetic, KaiC-pST, in which the oscillator is locked in the most active output state, phenocopies a ΔrpaA strain. Inhibition of RpaA by the oscillator in the morning suppresses metabolic processes that normally are active at night, and kaiC-null strains show indications of oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activation as well as increased abundance of primary metabolites. Inhibitory clock output may serve to allow secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the morning, and some metabolites resulting from these processes may feed back to reinforce clock timing.

  19. OSCILLATOR: A system for analysis of diurnal leaf growth using infrared photography combined with wavelet transformation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantification of leaf movement is an important tool for characterising the effects of environmental signals and the circadian clock on plant development. Analysis of leaf movement is currently restricted by the attachment of sensors to the plant or dependent upon visible light for time-lapse photography. The study of leaf growth movement rhythms in mature plants under biological relevant conditions, e.g. diurnal light and dark conditions, is therefore problematic. Results Here we present OSCILLATOR, an affordable system for the analysis of rhythmic leaf growth movement in mature plants. The system contains three modules: (1) Infrared time-lapse imaging of growing mature plants (2) measurement of projected distances between leaf tip and plant apex (leaf tip tracking growth-curves) and (3) extraction of phase, period and amplitude of leaf growth oscillations using wavelet analysis. A proof-of-principle is provided by characterising parameters of rhythmic leaf growth movement of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions as well as of Petunia hybrida and Solanum lycopersicum plants under diurnal conditions. The amplitude of leaf oscillations correlated to published data on leaf angles, while amplitude and leaf length did not correlate, suggesting a distinct leaf growth profile for each accession. Arabidopsis mutant accession Landsberg erecta displayed a late phase (timing of peak oscillation) compared to other accessions and this trait appears unrelated to the ERECTA locus. Conclusions OSCILLATOR is a low cost and easy to implement system that can accurately and reproducibly quantify rhythmic growth of mature plants for different species under diurnal light/dark cycling. PMID:22867627

  20. Physiological, Diurnal and Stress-Related Variability of Cadmium-Metallothionein Gene Expression in Land Snails

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini-Martha, Veronika; Niederwanger, Michael; Kopp, Renate; Schnegg, Raimund; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial Roman snail Helix pomatia has successfully adapted to strongly fluctuating conditions in its natural soil habitat. Part of the snail’s stress defense strategy is its ability to express Metallothioneins (MTs). These are multifunctional, cysteine-rich proteins that bind and inactivate transition metal ions (Cd2+, Zn2+, Cu+) with high affinity. In Helix pomatia a Cadmium (Cd)-selective, inducible Metallothionein Isoform (CdMT) is mainly involved in detoxification of this harmful metal. In addition, the snail CdMT has been shown to also respond to certain physiological stressors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological and diurnal variability of CdMT gene expression in snails exposed to Cd and non-metallic stressors such as desiccation and oxygen depletion. CdMT gene expression was upregulated by Cd exposure and desiccation, whereas no significant impact on the expression of CdMT was measured due to oxygen depletion. Overall, Cd was clearly more effective as an inducer of the CdMT gene expression compared to the applied non-metallic stressors. In unexposed snails, diurnal rhythmicity of CdMT gene expression was observed with higher mRNA concentrations at night compared to daytime. This rhythmicity was severely disrupted in Cd-exposed snails which exhibited highest CdMT gene transcription rates in the morning. Apart from diurnal rhythmicity, feeding activity also had a strong impact on CdMT gene expression. Although underlying mechanisms are not completely understood, it is clear that factors increasing MT expression variability have to be considered when using MT mRNA quantification as a biomarker for environmental stressors. PMID:26935042

  1. Patterns in diurnal airspace use by migratory landbirds along an ecological barrier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Anna C.; Niemi, Gerald J.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    Migratory bird populations and survival are affected by conditions experienced during migration. While many studies and conservation and management efforts focus on terrestrial stoppage and staging areas, the aerial environment through which migrants move also is subjected to anthropogenic impacts with potential consequences to migratory movement and survival. During autumn migration, the northern coastline of Lake Superior acts as an ecological barrier for many landbirds migrating out of the boreal forests of North America. From 24 observation points, we assessed the diurnal movements of birds throughout autumn migration, 2008-2010, within a 210 km by 10 km coastal region along the northern coast of Lake Superior. Several raptor species showed patterns in airspace associated with topographic features such as proximity to the coastline and presence of ridgelines. Funneling movement, commonly used to describe the concentration of raptors along a migratory diversion line that either prevents or enhances migration progress, occurred only for Bald and Golden Eagles. This suggests a "leaky" migration funnel for most migratory raptors (e.g., migrating birds exiting the purported migration corridor). Passerines migrating during the late season showed more spatial and temporal structure in airspace distribution than raptors, including funneling and an association with airspace near the coast. We conclude that a) the diurnal use of airspace by many migratory landbirds is patterned in space and time, b) autumn count sites situated along ecological barriers substantially underestimate the number of raptors due to 'leakage' out of these concentration areas, and c) the magnitude and structure of diurnal passerine movements in airspace have been overlooked. The heavy and structured use of airspace by migratory landbirds, especially the airspace associated with anthropogenic development (e.g., buildings, towers, turbines) necessitates a shift in focus to airspace management and

  2. Diurnal variation in hepatic expression of the rat S14 gene is synchronized by the photoperiod

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlaw, W.B.; Fish, L.H.; Schwartz, H.L.; Oppenheimer, J.H.

    1987-04-01

    We have analyzed the factors responsible for the circadian variation in rat hepatic mRNA-S14. Regulation of this sequence, which is found in lipogenic tissues and encodes a protein (S14) believed to be associated with fatty acid synthesis, is an excellent model of the interaction of thyroid hormone and dietary factors at the hepatocellular level. The mRNA exhibits a 3-fold diurnal variation (peak, approximately 2000 h; nadir, 0800 h) in ad libitum feeding rats on a 12-h light, 12-h dark photoschedule. We studied the effects of the photoschedule, periodic food intake, hypophysectomy, and induction by thyroid hormone (T3) on the mRNA-S14 rhythm. Adaptation to feeding restricted to either light or dark periods for 15 days did not greatly affect the diurnal rhythm. Photoreversal resulted in a 180 degrees phase shift, whereas the rhythm persisted in the presence of constant light. Oscillation continued around a higher baseline after a receptor-saturating dose of T3 in both normal and hypophysectomized rats. Our results indicate primary entrainment of the mRNA-S14 diurnal rhythm to the photoperiod, rather than to periodic food intake. Moreover, the circadian regulatory signal, which probably originates in the central nervous system, appears capable of antagonizing a maximal T3-inductive stimulus and does not originate in the pituitary gland. Persistence of the oscillation in constant light rules out circulating melatonin as the mediator. Synchronization of the rhythm by the photoschedule suggests that neuroendocrine factors are important determinants of rhythmic changes in hepatic gene expression.

  3. Diurnal Cycles of Sulfate Reduction under Oxic Conditions in Cyanobacterial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Fründ, Claudia; Cohen, Yehuda

    1992-01-01

    Diurnal cycles of sulfate reduction were examined in a well-developed cyanobacterial mat which grew in an outdoor experimental hypersaline pond system at a constant salinity of 75 ± 5% for 3 years. Vertical profiles of sulfate reduction were determined for the upper 12 mm of the microbial mat. Sulfate reduction activities were compared with diurnal variations of oxygen and sulfide concentrations measured by microelectrodes. Significant activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected under aerobic conditions during the daytime, with maximal activity at 2 p.m. When comparing sulfate reduction activities in sediment cores taken at 6 a.m. and 12 a.m. and incubated at a constant temperature in the light and in the dark, a distinct stimulation of the activity in the vertical profile of sulfate reduction by light was evident. It is therefore concluded that the maximal in situ activities, measured at 2 p.m. in the chemocline of the cyanobacterial mat, cannot be attributed to diurnal changes of temperature alone. The response of sulfate-reducing bacteria to the addition of specific carbon sources was significantly different in the cyanobacterial layer, the anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial layer, and the permanently reduced layer of the microbial mat. Sulfate reduction in the mat layer exposed to high oxygen concentrations as a result of cyanobacterial oxygenic photosynthesis was enhanced only by glycolate; in the microzone where the chemocline is found during the daytime, ethanol was the only carbon source to enhance sulfate reduction, while both ethanol and lactate enhanced this activity in the permanently reduced zone. PMID:16348641

  4. Monitoring seasonal and diurnal changes in photosynthetic pigments with automated PRI and NDVI sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.; Kovalchuck, O.; Wong, C. Y. S.; Harris, A.; Garrity, S. R.

    2015-07-01

    The vegetation indices normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and photochemical reflectance index (PRI) provide indicators of pigmentation and photosynthetic activity that can be used to model photosynthesis from remote sensing with the light-use-efficiency model. To help develop and validate this approach, reliable proximal NDVI and PRI sensors have been needed. We tested new NDVI and PRI sensors, "spectral reflectance sensors" (SRS sensors; recently developed by Decagon Devices, during spring activation of photosynthetic activity in evergreen and deciduous stands. We also evaluated two methods of sensor cross-calibration - one that considered sky conditions (cloud cover) at midday only, and another that also considered diurnal sun angle effects. Cross-calibration clearly affected sensor agreement with independent measurements, with the best method dependent upon the study aim and time frame (seasonal vs. diurnal). The seasonal patterns of NDVI and PRI differed for evergreen and deciduous species, demonstrating the complementary nature of these two indices. Over the spring season, PRI was most strongly influenced by changing chlorophyll : carotenoid pool sizes, while over the diurnal timescale, PRI was most affected by the xanthophyll cycle epoxidation state. This finding demonstrates that the SRS PRI sensors can resolve different processes affecting PRI over different timescales. The advent of small, inexpensive, automated PRI and NDVI sensors offers new ways to explore environmental and physiological constraints on photosynthesis, and may be particularly well suited for use at flux tower sites. Wider application of automated sensors could lead to improved integration of flux and remote sensing approaches for studying photosynthetic carbon uptake, and could help define the concept of contrasting vegetation optical types.

  5. Monitoring seasonal and diurnal changes in photosynthetic pigments with automated PRI and NDVI sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.; Kovalchuk, O.; Wong, C. Y. S.; Harris, A.; Garrity, S. R.

    2015-02-01

    The vegetation indices normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and photochemical reflectance index (PRI) provide indicators of pigmentation and photosynthetic activity that can be used to model photosynthesis from remote sensing with the light-use efficiency model. To help develop and validate this approach, reliable proximal NDVI and PRI sensors have been needed. We tested new NDVI and PRI sensors, "SRS" sensors recently developed by Decagon Devices, during spring activation of photosynthetic activity in evergreen and deciduous stands. We also evaluated two methods of sensor cross-calibration, one that considered sky conditions (cloud cover) at midday only, and the other that also considered diurnal sun angle effects. Cross-calibration clearly affected sensor agreement with independent measurements, with the best method dependent upon the study aim and time frame (seasonal vs. diurnal). The seasonal patterns of NDVI and PRI differed for evergreen and deciduous species, demonstrating the complementary nature of these two indices. Over the spring season, PRI was most strongly influenced by changing chlorophyll : carotenoid pool sizes, while over the diurnal time scale PRI was most affected by the xanthophyll cycle epoxidation state. This finding demonstrates that the SRS PRI sensors can resolve different processes affecting PRI over different time scales. The advent of small, inexpensive, automated PRI and NDVI sensors offers new ways to explore environmental and physiological constraints on photosynthesis, and may be particularly well-suited for use at flux tower sites. Wider application of automated sensors could lead to improved integration of flux and remote sensing approaches to studying photosynthetic carbon uptake, and could help define the concept of contrasting vegetation optical types.

  6. A diurnal serum lipid integrates hepatic lipogenesis and peripheral fatty acid utilization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sihao; Brown, Jonathan D.; Stanya, Kristopher J.; Homan, Edwin; Leidl, Mathias; Inouye, Karen; Bhargava, Prerna; Gangl, Matthew R.; Dai, Lingling; Hatano, Ben; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Saghatelian, Alan; Plutzky, Jorge; Lee, Chih-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Food intake increases the activity of hepatic de novo lipogenesis, which mediates the conversion of glucose to fats for storage or utilization. In mice, this program follows a circadian rhythm that peaks with nocturnal feeding1,2 and is repressed by Rev-erbα/β and an HDAC3-containing complex3–5 during the day. The transcriptional activators controlling rhythmic lipid synthesis in the dark cycle remain poorly defined. Disturbances in hepatic lipogenesis are also associated with systemic metabolic phenotypes6–8, suggesting that lipogenesis in the liver communicates with peripheral tissues to control energy substrate homeostasis. Here we identify a PPARδ-dependent de novo lipogenic pathway in the liver that modulates fat utilization by muscle via a circulating lipid. The nuclear receptor PPARδ controls diurnal expression of lipogenic genes in the dark/feeding cycle. Liver-specific PPARδ activation increases, while hepatocyte-Ppard deletion reduces, muscle fatty acid (FA) uptake. Unbiased metabolite profiling identifies PC(18:0/18:1), or 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC), as a serum lipid regulated by diurnal hepatic PPARδ activity. PC(18:0/18:1) reduces postprandial lipid levels and increases FA utilization through muscle PPARα. High fat feeding diminishes rhythmic production of PC(18:0/18:1), whereas PC(18:0/18:1) administration in db/db mice improves metabolic homeostasis. These findings reveal an integrated regulatory circuit coupling lipid synthesis in the liver to energy utilization in muscle by coordinating the activity of two closely related nuclear receptors. These data implicate alterations in diurnal hepatic PPARδ-PC(18:0/18:1) signaling in metabolic disorders including obesity. PMID:24153306

  7. Evolutionary transformation of rod photoreceptors in the all-cone retina of a diurnal garter snake.

    PubMed

    Schott, Ryan K; Müller, Johannes; Yang, Clement G Y; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Chan, Natalie; Xu, Mengshu; Morrow, James M; Ghenu, Ana-Hermina; Loew, Ellis R; Tropepe, Vincent; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-01-12

    Vertebrate retinas are generally composed of rod (dim-light) and cone (bright-light) photoreceptors with distinct morphologies that evolved as adaptations to nocturnal/crepuscular and diurnal light environments. Over 70 years ago, the "transmutation" theory was proposed to explain some of the rare exceptions in which a photoreceptor type is missing, suggesting that photoreceptors could evolutionarily transition between cell types. Although studies have shown support for this theory in nocturnal geckos, the origins of all-cone retinas, such as those found in diurnal colubrid snakes, remain a mystery. Here we investigate the evolutionary fate of the rods in a diurnal garter snake and test two competing hypotheses: (i) that the rods, and their corresponding molecular machinery, were lost or (ii) that the rods were evolutionarily modified to resemble, and function, as cones. Using multiple approaches, we find evidence for a functional and unusually blue-shifted rhodopsin that is expressed in small single "cones." Moreover, these cones express rod transducin and have rod ultrastructural features, providing strong support for the hypothesis that they are not true cones, as previously thought, but rather are modified rods. Several intriguing features of garter snake rhodopsin are suggestive of a more cone-like function. We propose that these cone-like rods may have evolved to regain spectral sensitivity and chromatic discrimination as a result of ancestral losses of middle-wavelength cone opsins in early snake evolution. This study illustrates how sensory evolution can be shaped not only by environmental constraints but also by historical contingency in forming new cell types with convergent functionality. PMID:26715746

  8. Patterns in diurnal airspace use by migratory landbirds along an ecological barrier.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Anna C; Niemi, Gerald J; Johnson, Douglas H

    2015-04-01

    Migratory bird populations and survival are affected by conditions experienced during migration. While many studies and conservation and management efforts focus on terrestrial stoppage and staging areas, the aerial environment through which migrants move also is subjected to anthropogenic impacts with potential consequences to migratory movement and survival. During autumn migration, the northern coastline of Lake Superior acts as an ecological barrier for many landbirds migrating out of the boreal forests of North America. From 24 observation points, we assessed the diurnal movements of birds throughout autumn migration, 2008-2010, within a 210 × 10 km coastal region along the northern coast of Lake Superior. Several raptor species showed patterns in airspace associated with topographic features such as proximity to the coastline and presence of ridgelines. Funneling movement, commonly used to describe the concentration of raptors along a migratory diversion line that either prevents or enhances migration progress, occurred only for Bald and Golden Eagles. This suggests a "leaky" migration funnel for most migratory raptors (e.g., migrating birds exiting the purported migration corridor). Passerines migrating during the late season showed more spatial and temporal structure in airspace distribution than raptors did, including funneling and an association with airspace near the coast. We conclude that (1) the diurnal use of airspace by many migratory landbirds is patterned in space and time, (2) autumn count sites situated along ecological barriers substantially underestimate the number of raptors due to "leakage" out of these concentration areas, and (3) the magnitude and structure of diurnal passerine movements in airspace have been overlooked. The heavy and structured use of airspace by migratory landbirds, especially the airspace associated with anthropogenic development (e.g., buildings, towers, turbines) necessitates a shift in focus to airspace management

  9. Covariability in the Monthly Mean Convective and Radiative Diurnal Cycles in the Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, Jason B.; Taylor, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    The diurnal cycle of convective clouds greatly influences the radiative energy balance in convectively active regions of Earth, through both direct presence, and the production of anvil and stratiform clouds. Previous studies show that the frequency and properties of convective clouds can vary on monthly timescales as a result of variability in the monthly mean atmospheric state. Furthermore, the radiative budget in convectively active regions also varies by up to 7 Wm-2 in convectively active regions. These facts suggest that convective clouds connect atmospheric state variability and radiation variability beyond clear sky effects alone. Previous research has identified monthly covariability between the diurnal cycle of CERES-observed top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes and multiple atmospheric state variables from reanalysis over the Amazon region. ASVs that enhance (reduce) deep convection, such as CAPE (LTS), tend to shift the daily OLR and cloud albedo maxima earlier (later) in the day by 2-3 hr. We first test the analysis method using multiple reanalysis products for both the dry and wet seasons to further investigate the robustness of the preliminary results. We then use CloudSat data as an independent cloud observing system to further evaluate the relationships of cloud properties to variability in radiation and atmospheric states. While CERES can decompose OLR variability into clear sky and cloud effects, it cannot determine what variability in cloud properties lead to variability in the radiative cloud effects. Cloud frequency, cloud top height, and cloud microphysics all contribute to the cloud radiative effect, all of which are observable by CloudSat. In addition, CloudSat can also observe the presence and variability of deep convective cores responsible for the production of anvil clouds. We use these capabilities to determine the covariability of convective cloud properties and the radiative diurnal cycle.

  10. Diurnal Variations of Circulating Extracellular Vesicles Measured by Nano Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Camacho, Virginia; Felton, Edward J.; Khoory, Joseph; Kreimer, Simion; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Mantel, Pierre-Yves; Jones, Jennifer; Akuthota, Praveen; Das, Saumya; Ghiran, Ionita

    2016-01-01

    The identification of extracellular vesicles (EVs) as intercellular conveyors of biological information has recently emerged as a novel paradigm in signaling, leading to the exploitation of EVs and their contents as biomarkers of various diseases. However, whether there are diurnal variations in the size, number, and tissue of origin of blood EVs is currently not known, and could have significant implications when using EVs as biomarkers for disease progression. Currently available technologies for the measurement of EV size and number are either time consuming, require specialized equipment, or lack sufficient accuracy across a range of EV sizes. Flow cytometry represents an attractive alternative to these methods; however, traditional flow cytometers are only capable of measuring particles down to 500 nm, which is significantly larger than the average and median sizes of plasma EVs. Utilizing a Beckman Coulter MoFlo XDP flow cytometer with NanoView module, we employed nanoscale flow cytometry (termed nanoFCM) to examine the relative number and scatter distribution of plasma EVs at three different time points during the day in 6 healthy adults. Analysis of liposomes and plasma EVs proved that nanoFCM is capable of detecting biologically-relevant vesicles down to 100 nm in size. With this high resolution configuration, we observed variations in the relative size (FSC/SSC distributions) and concentration (proportions) of EVs in healthy adult plasma across the course of a day, suggesting that there are diurnal variations in the number and size distribution of circulating EV populations. The use of nanoFCM provides a valuable tool for the study of EVs in both health and disease; however, additional refinement of nanoscale flow cytometric methods is needed for use of these instruments for quantitative particle counting and sizing. Furthermore, larger scale studies are necessary to more clearly define the diurnal variations in circulating EVs, and thus further inform

  11. Evolutionary transformation of rod photoreceptors in the all-cone retina of a diurnal garter snake

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Ryan K.; Müller, Johannes; Yang, Clement G. Y.; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Chan, Natalie; Xu, Mengshu; Morrow, James M.; Ghenu, Ana-Hermina; Loew, Ellis R.; Tropepe, Vincent; Chang, Belinda S. W.

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate retinas are generally composed of rod (dim-light) and cone (bright-light) photoreceptors with distinct morphologies that evolved as adaptations to nocturnal/crepuscular and diurnal light environments. Over 70 years ago, the “transmutation” theory was proposed to explain some of the rare exceptions in which a photoreceptor type is missing, suggesting that photoreceptors could evolutionarily transition between cell types. Although studies have shown support for this theory in nocturnal geckos, the origins of all-cone retinas, such as those found in diurnal colubrid snakes, remain a mystery. Here we investigate the evolutionary fate of the rods in a diurnal garter snake and test two competing hypotheses: (i) that the rods, and their corresponding molecular machinery, were lost or (ii) that the rods were evolutionarily modified to resemble, and function, as cones. Using multiple approaches, we find evidence for a functional and unusually blue-shifted rhodopsin that is expressed in small single “cones.” Moreover, these cones express rod transducin and have rod ultrastructural features, providing strong support for the hypothesis that they are not true cones, as previously thought, but rather are modified rods. Several intriguing features of garter snake rhodopsin are suggestive of a more cone-like function. We propose that these cone-like rods may have evolved to regain spectral sensitivity and chromatic discrimination as a result of ancestral losses of middle-wavelength cone opsins in early snake evolution. This study illustrates how sensory evolution can be shaped not only by environmental constraints but also by historical contingency in forming new cell types with convergent functionality. PMID:26715746

  12. Tracking the diurnal signal of plant water uptake through the hydrologic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; Hassler, Sibylle; Heidbüchel, Ingo; Weiler, Markus; Simard, Sonia; Güntner, Andreas; Heinrich, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Plant water uptake during summer is characterized by strong diurnal fluctuations. As a result a diurnal sink term is imposed on catchment storage, affecting the unsaturated zone, sometimes the saturated zone and even streamflow. Detecting this signal and understanding its propagation through the hydrological system may help to better quantify eco-hydrological connectivity. The extent and strength of the propagation of this signal from plant to soil to ground- and stream water was investigated with a unique setup of 46 field sites in Luxemburg and 15 field sites in Germany. These sites cover a range of geologies, soils, topographies and types of vegetation. Vegetation types include grassland, pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 3-5 soil moisture profiles, matrix potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors (as proxy for plant water uptake) as well as standard climate data. At sites with access to a stream, discharge or water level is also recorded. Signal strength (amplitude of diurnal fluctuations) can thus be traced through the system and gives an indication of the physical sphere of influence of plant water uptake i.e. the "eco-hydro-connectivity". Temporal dynamics of signal strength furthermore suggest a shifting spatial distribution of root water uptake with time. The analysis of time lags (or phase shifts) between daily fluctuations in temperature, radiation, sapflow, soil water, groundwater and streamflow gives further insights into the processes driving and propagating these signals and inter-site comparison allows for the investigation of local controls.

  13. Diurnal Cortisol Patterns, Future Diabetes, and Impaired Glucose Metabolism in the Whitehall II Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kivimäki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Context: The hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal axis is thought to play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, evidence for an association between cortisol and future glucose disturbance is sparse. Objective: The aim was to examine the association of diurnal cortisol secretion with future T2D and impaired glucose metabolism in a community-dwelling population. Design: This is a prospective cohort study of salivary cortisol measured at the 2002–2004 clinical examination of the Whitehall II study, United Kingdom. We measured cortisol (nmol/l) from six saliva samples obtained over the course of a day: at waking, +30 minutes, +2.5 hours, +8 hours, +12 hours, and bedtime. Participants who were normoglycemic in 2002–2004 (phase 7) were reexamined in 2012–2013 (phase 11). Setting: The occupational cohort was originally recruited in 1985–1988. Participants: A total of 3270 men and women with an average age of 60.85 years at phase 7 (2002–2004). Outcome Measures: Incident T2D and impaired fasting glucose in 2012–2013 were measured. Results: Raised evening cortisol at phase 7 was predictive of new-onset T2D at phase 11 (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–1.37) with a trend for a flatter slope in participants with incident T2D (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.99–1.33). When expanding this analysis to a broader category of glucose disturbance we found that a flattened diurnal cortisol slope at phase 7 was predictive of future impaired fasting glucose or T2D at phase 11 (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.02–1.22), as was high bedtime cortisol (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01–1.20). Conclusions: In this nonclinical population, alterations in diurnal cortisol patterns were predictive of future glucose disturbance. PMID:26647151

  14. Seasonal Change of the Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation over Japan and Malaysia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, Taikan; Musiake, Katumi

    1994-12-01

    The diurnal cycle of precipitation is investigated using ground-based hourly observations for more than 10 years both in Japan and Malaysia. The diurnal cycle of precipitation in Japan is classified into three clusters. The first one has a peak in the morning, and the stations categorized into this cluster are located in coastal regions. The second cluster has two peaks in the morning and in the evening. These stations are located in an inland region. The morning peak in the above two clusters is dominant in June, when it is `baiu' in Japan. Baiu is the rainy season related to the southwest Asian monsoon. The third cluster is an exceptional case. No morning peak is observed in the stations of the third cluster and they have a comparatively strong evening peak.In the case of the Malay Peninsula, the inland region has a pronounced peak of rainfall at 1600 LST; the magnitude exceeds the mean of each month by 200%. This evening peak is too sharp to be represented by a 24-h-cycle sine wave decomposed by Fourier transform. The intensity also becomes higher at the peak time (1500 LST). The magnitude of the diurnal cycle of mean intensity is larger than the annual cycle of monthly mean intensity. The morning peak of precipitation is observed during the southwest monsoon season on the west coast, and during the northeast monsoon season on the east coast. The intensity of precipitation is not significantly high during this period; namely, the increase of the probability or the duration of precipitation forms this morning peak. These evidences indicate the mechanism of the convective rainfall by the thermodynamic forcing in the evening, and the low-level convergence between the local land sea breeze and the predominant monsoon wind in the morning.

  15. The influence of diurnal winds on phytoplankton dynamics in a coastal upwelling system off southwestern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Andrew J.; Pitcher, Grant C.; Probyn, Trevor A.; Kudela, Raphael M.

    2014-03-01

    At a coastal upwelling zone near 30°S latitude, diurnal wind variability forced energetic inertial current oscillations (>0.5ms-1) that materially influenced phytoplankton distribution and productivity. The diurnal-inertial band resonance found at this latitude in the Benguela upwelling system allowed rapid, efficient transfer of energy from counterclockwise rotating winds into anticyclonic currents upon the onset of the transition from relaxation to upwelling conditions. These inertial band oscillations caused regular pycnocline outcropping at the surface and the vertical advection of nutrient-rich waters in the coastal zone. Vertical pycnocline outcropping was coincident with the vertical redistribution of chlorophyll a fluorescence from a subsurface maximum to entrainment into the surface mixed layer, in effect turning vertical phytoplankton gradients into horizontal ones. The shear caused by the vertical structure of the inertial oscillations during (and after) the onset of wind forcing was intense enough to erode the strong stratification established during a prior relaxation period, according to Richardson number and strain analyses. This diapycnal mixing also had the consequence of mixing heat and chlorophyll downwards and nutrient-rich water upwards, such that the surface nitrate concentration became non-zero. Chlorophyll concentrations thereafter increased in what qualitatively appeared to be a phytoplankton bloom. This diurnal-inertial resonance-driven mechanism for mixing-driven nutrient flux, embedded within the low-frequency advective vertical flux forced by Ekman dynamics, enhanced the efficiency of wind forcing to produce high phytoplankton productivity, and is likely to be of first-order importance in bloom dynamics in the study area (including harmful algal blooms). Our results argue that, in general, high-frequency physical dynamics should be considered when studying the bottom-up forcing of algal blooms and red tide events.

  16. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Farmer, D. K.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-08-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment) must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA) concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  17. Diurnal and circadian regulation of a melatonin receptor, MT1, in the golden rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Ju; Park, Ji-Gweon; Hiyakawa, Nanae; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Se-Jae; Takemura, Akihiro

    2007-01-15

    The golden rabbitfish Siganus guttatus is a reef fish with a restricted lunar-synchronized spawning rhythmicity and releases gametes simultaneously around the first quarter moon period during the spawning season. In order to understand the molecular aspects of the "circa" rhythms in this species, the full-length melatonin receptor (MT1) cDNA was cloned, and its diurnal/circadian regulation was examined. The full-length MT1 cDNA (1257 bp) contained an open reading frame that encodes a protein of 350 amino acids; this protein is highly homologous to MT1 of nonmammalian species. A high expression of MT1 mRNA with a day-night difference was observed in the whole brain, retina, liver, and kidney. When diurnal variations in MT1 mRNA expression in the retina and whole brain were examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, an increase in the mRNA expression was observed during nighttime in both tissues under conditions of light/dark, constant darkness, and constant light. This suggests that MT1 mRNA expression is under circadian regulation. The expression of MT1 mRNA in the cultured pineal gland also showed diurnal variations with high expression levels during nighttime; this suggests that the increased expression level observed in the whole brain is partially of pineal origin. Alternation of light conditions in the pineal gland cultures resulted in the changes in melatonin release into the culture medium as well as MT1 mRNA expression in the pineal gland. The present results suggest that melatonin and its receptors play an important role in the exertion of daily and circadian variations in the neural tissues.

  18. Satellite-based investigation of the boundary layer diurnal cycle over the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painemal, D.; Minnis, P.

    2012-12-01

    Retrievals from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GOES-10, produced at NASA Langley Research Center, are used to investigate the diurnal and semidiurnal cycle in the Southeast Pacific boundary layer during October-November of 2008. The GOES-10 cloud top height (Ht) is estimated by applying a linear regression to the difference between GOES-10 cloud top temperature and TRMM microwave Imager (TMI) sea surface temperature. A high linear correlation (0.86) and a negligible bias (5 m) between GOES-10 Ht and its in situ counterpart during VOCALS Regional Experiment, give confidence on the linear method used to retrieve Ht. Moreover, the good quality of GOES retrievals is further confirmed with independent measurements from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer MODIS on board NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites. Daily mean GOES Ht shows a typical zonal gradient, with values between 600-1200 m along the coast and heights near 1700 m 15 degrees offshore. In terms of the diurnal cycle, we find amplitudes that fluctuate between 40-160 m, with the largest magnitudes far offshore. A 12 hour cycle is also evident in coastal regions, with a maximum magnitude of 80 m at 20S. The semidiurnal cycle is consistent with a NE-SW propagating wave pattern in Ht with a phase speed of 23-25 m/s, in agreement with modeling studies that show a subsidence wave that propagates away from the South American coast. The evolution of the boundary layer depth is closely linked to the liquid water path (LWP) cycle derived from a satellite microwave dataset. Both Ht and LWP yield their diurnal maxima near 2-5 LST, whereas the afternoon semidiurnal harmonic is a maximum at 16-19 LST and midnight over coastal and offshore regions respectively. The modulation of the subsidence wave over the cloud cover cycle is also apparent, and its consequences are further discussed in this presentation.

  19. Diurnal temperature effect on nitrate removal and production efficiency in bedform-induced hyporheic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers and aquifers are connected through the hyporheic zone (HZ). Pore water in the subsurface sediments is continuously exchanged with the overlying surface water. The exchange of water, mass and energy occurring along the surface-subsurface interface or within the HZ exerts a strong influence on the quality of both surface and subsurface waters, and fluvial ecology. Moreover, the HZ is rich in biologically active sediment, creating a favorable condition for microbially-facilitated reactions to occur, including organic carbon oxidation (aerobic respiration), nitrification, and denitrification. Inorganic N, especially NO3-, is of concern as a drinking water pollutant and as a cause for eutrophication that threatens ecosystems. The biogeochemical reactions in the HZ could produce or consume NO3- and thus the HZ could serve a nitrate source or sink role in the fluvial system. In addition, hyporheic exchange across the sediment-water interface (SWI) leads to penetration of diel temperature cycles from the river, leading to dynamic HZ temperature pattern. This in turn affects biogeochemical reactions in the HZ. The main objective of this study is to integrate all the processes that occur along the SWI to understand how diurnal temperature variations affect the biogeochemical function of the HZ. We conducted numerical simulations of coupled turbulent open-channel fluid flow, porous fluid flow, porous heat transport and reactive solute transport to study feedbacks and coupling between these processes. We assumed sinusoidally varying diurnal temperature variations. We studied the effects of different mean temperatures and different amplitudes of the diurnal temperature variations on nitrate removal or production efficiency in the HZ. The simulation results show that the average temperature effect on the HZ nitrate source-sink functionality and its associated efficiency has strong dependence on the [NO3-]/[NH4+ ] ratio in the river. However, the effects of the

  20. Diurnal variation in the concentration of air ions of different mobility classes in a rural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, Urmas; Salm, Jaan; Tammet, Hannes

    2003-10-01

    Analyzed data consist of 8900 hourly average mobility distributions measured in the mobility range of 0.00041-3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 (diameter range 0.36-79 nm) at Tahkuse Observatory, Estonia, in 1993-1994. The average diurnal variation in the concentration of cluster ions is typical for continental stations: the maximum in the early morning hours and the minimum in the afternoon. This is explained by variations in radon concentration. The diurnal variation for big cluster ions (0.5-1.3 cm2 V-1 s-1) differs from that for small cluster ions (1.3-3.14 cm2 V-1 s-1). The size distribution of intermediate and light large ions in the range of 1.6-22 nm is strongly affected by nucleation bursts of nanometer particles. On the burst days, the maximum concentration of intermediate ions (1.6-7.4 nm) is about the noontime and that of light large ions (7.4-22 nm) about 2 hours later. The concentration of heavy large ions (charged Aitken particles of diameters of 22-79 nm) is enhanced in the afternoon and this is explained by the bursts of nanometer particles and the subsequent growth of particles by condensation and coagulation. If the burst days are excluded, then in the warm season the concentration of Aitken particles increases during night. In the cold season, the diurnal variation is different and all the classes of aerosol ions (2.1-79 nm) show similar variation with the minimum at 0600 LT and the maximum in the afternoon; exceptions are the rare nucleation burst days.

  1. Diurnal adjustment in ultraviolet sunscreen protection is widespread among higher plants.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Tobler, Mark A; Ryel, Ronald J

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) in the epidermis of higher plants reduces the penetration of solar UV radiation to underlying tissues and is a primary mechanism of acclimation to changing UV conditions resulting from ozone depletion and climate change. Previously we reported that several herbaceous plant species were capable of rapid, diurnal adjustments in epidermal UV transmittance (T UV), but how widespread this phenomenon is among plants has been unknown. In the present study, we tested the generality of this response by screening 37 species of various cultivated and wild plants growing in four locations spanning a gradient of ambient solar UV and climate (Hawaii, Utah, Idaho and Louisiana). Non-destructive measurements of adaxial T UV indicated that statistically significant midday decreases in T UV occurred in 49 % of the species tested, including both herbaceous and woody growth forms, and there was substantial interspecific variation in the magnitude of these changes. In general, plants in Louisiana exhibited larger diurnal changes in T UV than those in the other locations. Moreover, across all taxa, the magnitude of these changes was positively correlated with minimum daily air temperatures but not daily UV irradiances. Results indicate that diurnal changes in UV shielding are widespread among higher plants, vary both within and among species and tend to be greatest in herbaceous plants growing in warm environments. These findings suggest that plant species differ in their UV protection "strategies" though the functional and ecological significance of this variation in UV sunscreen protection remains unclear at present. PMID:26809621

  2. Diurnal and seasonal carbon balance of four tropical tree species differing in successional status.

    PubMed

    Souza, G M; Ribeiro, R V; Sato, A M; Oliveira, M S

    2008-11-01

    This study addressed some questions about how a suitable leaf carbon balance can be attained for different functional groups of tropical tree species under contrasting forest light environments. The study was carried out in a fragment of semi-deciduous seasonal forest in Narandiba county, São Paulo Estate, Brazil. 10-month-old seedlings of four tropical tree species, Bauhinia forficata Link (Caesalpinioideae) and Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Sterculiaceae) as light-demanding pioneer species, and Hymenaea courbaril L. (Caesalpinioideae) and Esenbeckia leiocarpa Engl. (Rutaceae) as late successional species, were grown under gap and understorey conditions. Diurnal courses of net photosynthesis (Pn) and transpiration were recorded with an open system portable infrared gas analyzer in two different seasons. Dark respiration and photorespiration were also evaluated in the same leaves used for Pn measurements after dark adaptation. Our results showed that diurnal-integrated dark respiration (Rdi) of late successional species were similar to pioneer species. On the other hand, photorespiration rates were often higher in pioneer than in late successional species in the gap. However, the relative contribution of these parameters to leaf carbon balance was similar in all species in both environmental conditions. Considering diurnal-integrated values, gross photosynthesis (Pgi) was dramatically higher in gap than in understorey, regardless of species. In both evaluated months, there were no differences among species of different functional groups under shade conditions. The same was observed in May (dry season) under gap conditions. In such light environment, pioneers were distinguished from late successional species in November (wet season), showing that ecophysiological performance can have a straightforward relation to seasonality.

  3. Unique Regulation of the Melatonin Synthetic Pathway in the Retina of Diurnal Female Arvicanthis ansorgei (Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Gianesini, Coralie; Clesse, Daniel; Tosini, Gianluca; Hicks, David; Laurent, Virginie

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge about melatonin synthesis and its potential roles within the retina remains fragmented, especially in mammals where studies have focused on the penultimate enzyme of melatonin synthesis arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT), whereas the final enzyme necessary for melatonin production is hydroxyindole-O-methytransferase (HIOMT). We explored multiple parameters of the melatonin synthetic pathway in the cone-rich retina of a diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis ansorgei, cones being previously implicated as probable reservoirs of melatonin production. We analyzed the temporal and spatial expression of Aa-nat mRNA and AA-NAT protein and enzymatic activity of AA-NAT, HIOMT, as well as the melatonin receptor type 1 and melatonin itself. We report that Aa-nat mRNA was localized principally to cones and ganglion cells (retinal ganglion cell [RGC]) with opposing cyclic expression, being maximal in cones during the night, and maximal in RGC in the daytime. AA-NAT protein was also immunolocalized to these same populations, and was present and active throughout the 24-hour period. HIOMT immunolocalization mirrored that of AA-NAT, but expression levels and activity were extremely low and remained uniform throughout the 24-hour period. MT1 showed a complementary expression pattern to the synthetic enzymes, present in rod photoreceptors, some inner retinal neurons and RGC. Surprisingly, melatonin levels were consistently low throughout the day/night cycle, in accordance with the low activity levels of HIOMT. These data demonstrate that the melatonin synthetic pathway in a diurnal rodent differs from that described for other tissues and species (nocturnal and diurnal), the contrasting phase expression in photoreceptors and RGC, suggesting distinct roles in these populations.

  4. Individual-Based Ant-Plant Networks: Diurnal-Nocturnal Structure and Species-Area Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Fagundes, Roberth; Gurka, Carlos A. Q.; Silva, Mara S. A.; Vieira, Marisa C. L.; Izzo, Thiago J.; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecília; Del-Claro, Kleber; Rico-Gray, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance and increasing knowledge of ecological networks, sampling effort and intrapopulation variation has been widely overlooked. Using continuous daily sampling of ants visiting three plant species in the Brazilian Neotropical savanna, we evaluated for the first time the topological structure over 24 h and species-area relationships (based on the number of extrafloral nectaries available) in individual-based ant-plant networks. We observed that diurnal and nocturnal ant-plant networks exhibited the same pattern of interactions: a nested and non-modular pattern and an average level of network specialization. Despite the high similarity in the ants’ composition between the two collection periods, ant species found in the central core of highly interacting species totally changed between diurnal and nocturnal sampling for all plant species. In other words, this “night-turnover” suggests that the ecological dynamics of these ant-plant interactions can be temporally partitioned (day and night) at a small spatial scale. Thus, it is possible that in some cases processes shaping mutualistic networks formed by protective ants and plants may be underestimated by diurnal sampling alone. Moreover, we did not observe any effect of the number of extrafloral nectaries on ant richness and their foraging on such plants in any of the studied ant-plant networks. We hypothesize that competitively superior ants could monopolize individual plants and allow the coexistence of only a few other ant species, however, other alternative hypotheses are also discussed. Thus, sampling period and species-area relationship produces basic information that increases our confidence in how individual-based ant-plant networks are structured, and the need to consider nocturnal records in ant-plant network sampling design so as to decrease inappropriate inferences. PMID:24918750

  5. Chronic non-invasive corticosterone administration abolishes the diurnal pattern of tph2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Montoya, Christian D.; Lukkes, Jodi L.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Both hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and serotonergic systems are commonly dysregulated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. We describe here a non-invasive rat model for hypercortisolism, as observed in major depression, and its effects on physiology, behavior, and the expression of tph2, the gene encoding tryptophan hydroxylase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) synthesis. We delivered corticosterone (40 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml or 400 µg/ml) or vehicle to adrenal-intact adult, male rats via the drinking water for three weeks. On days 15, 16, 17 and 18, respectively, the rats’ emotionality was assessed in the open-field (OF), social interaction (SI), elevated plus-maze (EPM), and forced swim tests (FST). On day 21, half of the rats in each group were killed 2 h into the dark phase of a 12/12 h reversed light/dark cycle; the other half were killed 2 h into the light phase. We then measured indices of HPA axis activity, plasma glucose and interleukin-6 (IL-6) availability, and neuronal tph2 expression at each time point. Chronic corticosterone intake was sufficient to cause increased anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in a dose-dependent manner. It also disrupted the diurnal pattern of plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), corticosterone, and glucose concentrations, caused adrenal atrophy, and prevented regular weight gain. No diurnal or treatment-dependent changes were found for plasma levels of IL-6. Remarkably, all doses of corticosterone treatment abolished the diurnal variation of tph2 mRNA expression in the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) by elevating the gene’s expression during the animals’ inactive (light) phase. Our data demonstrate that chronic elevation of corticosterone creates a vulnerability to a depression-like syndrome that is associated with increased tph2 expression, similar to that observed in depressed patients. PMID:21924839

  6. Diurnal variations in response of rat liver tyrosine aminotransferase activity to food intake.

    PubMed

    Kato, H; Saito, M

    1980-01-01

    Effects of fasting and refeeding on the hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase activity were examined in rats that had been fed during the night. The tyrosine aminotransferase activity showed clear diurnal variations, with a maximal activity after the feeding time. The tyrosine aminotransferase rhythm persisted even under starvation, though the amplitude decreased remarkably. When the starved rats were refed at night, the tyrosine aminotransferase activity increased rapidly to a high level, but it increased slowly to a rather lower level when they were refed in daytime.

  7. Analysis of trends in maximum and minimum temperature, diurnal temperature range, and cloud cover over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shouraseni Sen; Balling, Robert C.

    2005-06-01

    We assembled data at a 1° latitude by 1° longitude resolution for 285 cells across India and analyzed the seasonal trends in the maximum and minimum temperature, diurnal temperature range (DTR), and cloud cover for the time period 1931-2002. Significant increases in maximum and minimum temperature have occurred over the Deccan plateau, but in general, trends in DTR were not significant except for a decrease in northwest Kashmir in summer. The effect of cloud cover on the DTR was expectedly negative for most of the country for winter and summer seasons with significant increase in summer cloud cover in Kashmir.

  8. Observing Seasonal and Diurnal Hydrometeorological Variability Within a Tropical Alpine Valley: Implications for Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellstrom, R. A.; Mark, B. G.

    2007-12-01

    Conditions of glacier recession in the seasonally dry tropical Peruvian Andes motivate research to better constrain the hydrological balance in alpine valleys. There is an outstanding need to better understand the impact of the pronounced tropical hygric seasonality on energy and water budgets within pro-glacial valleys that channel glacier runoff to stream flow. This paper presents a novel embedded network installed in the glacierized Llanganuco valley of the Cordillera Blanca (9°S) comprising eight low-cost, discrete temperature and humidity microloggers ranging from 3470 to 4740 masl and an automatic weather station at 3850 masl. Data are aggregated into distinct dry and wet periods sampled from two full annual cycles (2004-2006) to explore patterns of diurnal and seasonal variability. The magnitude of diurnal solar radiation varies little within the valley between the dry and wet periods, while wet season near-surface air temperatures are cooler. Seasonally characteristic diurnal fluctuations in lapse rate partially regulate convection and humidity. Steep lapse rates during the wet season afternoon promote up-slope convection of warm, moist air and nocturnal rainfall events. Standardized grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) was estimated using the FAO-56 algorithm of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and compared with estimates of actual ET from the process-based BROOK90 model that incorporates more realistic vegetation parameters. Comparisons of composite diurnal cycles of ET for the wet and dry periods suggest about twice the daily ET0 during the dry period, attributed primarily to the 500% higher vapor pressure deficit and 20% higher daily total solar irradiance. Conversely, the near absence of rainfall during the dry season diminishes actual ET below that of the wet season by two orders of magnitude. Nearly cloud-free daylight conditions are critical for ET during the wet season. We found significant variability of ET with elevation

  9. Simulations of polarization dependent contrast during the diurnal heating cycle for passive millimeter-wave imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John P.; Murakowski, Maciej; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2013-09-01

    Passive millimeter-wave (mmW) sensors are especially suited to persistent surveillance applications due to their ability to operate during day/night conditions and through transient atmospheric obscurants such as clouds, rain and fog. The contrast of targets will change throughout a diurnal heating cycle and this change will be polarization dependent. Simulations are presented from a ray tracing program developed for the mmW regime that has been modified to account for polarization information. Results are shown demonstrating periods during the day when the contrast of certain targets drop to zero for a linear polarization state while the orthogonal state still maintains a high contrast.

  10. Diurnal Cycle of Convection and Interaction with the Large-Scale Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salby, Murry

    2002-01-01

    The science in this effort was scheduled in the project's 3rd and 4th years, after a long record of high-resolution Global Cloud Imagery (GCI) had been produced. Unfortunately, political disruptions that interfered with this project led to its funding being terminated after only two years of support. Nevertheless, the availability of intermediate data opened the door to a number of important scientific studies. Beyond considerations of the diurnal cycle addressed in this grant, the GCI wakes possible a wide range of studies surrounding convection, cloud and precipitation. Several are already underway with colleagues in the US and abroad, who have requested the GCI.

  11. The diurnal cycle of rainfall over New Guinea in convection-permitting WRF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassim, M. E. E.; Lane, T. P.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine the diurnal cycle of rainfall over New Guinea using a series of convection-permitting numerical simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We focus our simulations on a period of suppressed regional-scale conditions (February 2010) during which local diurnal forcings are maximised. Additionally, we focus our study on the occurrence and dynamics of offshore-propagating convective systems that contribute to the observed early-morning rainfall maximum north-east of New Guinea.

    In general, modelled diurnal precipitation shows good agreement with satellite-observed rainfall, albeit with some timing and intensity differences. The simulations also reproduce the occurrence and variability of overnight convection that propagate offshore as organised squall lines north-east of New Guinea. The occurrence of these offshore systems is largely controlled by background conditions. Days with offshore-propagating convection have more middle tropospheric moisture, larger convective available potential energy, and greater low-level moisture convergence. Convection has similar characteristics over the terrain on days with and without offshore propagation.

    The offshore-propagating convection manifests via a multi-stage evolutionary process. First, scattered convection over land, which is remnant of the daytime maximum, moves towards the coast and becomes reorganised near the region of coastal convergence associated with the land breeze. The convection then moves offshore in the form of a squall line at ˜ 5 ms-1. In addition, cool anomalies associated with gravity waves generated by precipitating land convection propagate offshore at a dry hydrostatic gravity wave speed (of ˜ 15 ms-1) and act to destabilise the coastal/offshore environment prior to the arrival of the squall line. Although the gravity

  12. Semi-diurnal seiching in a shallow, micro-tidal lagoonal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettich, Richard A.; Carr, Sarah D.; Reynolds-Fleming, Janelle V.; Fulcher, Crystal W.; McNinch, Jesse E.

    2002-07-01

    Analysis of current meter data in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE) associates over half of the along channel velocity variance with roughly the semi-diurnal frequency band. Velocity in this frequency range is episodic, has a typical magnitude of 10 cm s-1 and often reaches twice this speed. The NRE is a sub-estuary of the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System (APES), which is the second largest estuarine complex and the largest lagoonal estuary in the United States. The astronomical tide in the NRE is negligible, owing to the APES's virtual isolation from the coastal ocean by the North Carolina Outer Banks barrier island chain. The episodic nature of the velocity signal together with the lack of an astronomical tide suggest that the semi-diurnal signal in the NRE is generated within the APES/NRE, presumably due to meteorological forcing. In the absence of a tidal current, this motion plays a significant role in determining the position and strength of the salt wedge, the thickness of the diffusive bottom boundary layer and the overall dispersion characteristics of the system. The episodic nature of the semi-diurnal signal encouraged us to pursue the use of nonstationary timeseries analysis techniques in the present study. We found wavelet analysis to be a highly effective technique for discriminating times when the semi-diurnal motion was strong and for identifying a predominant 13.2 h period in the along channel component of both 10-week wintertime and 10-week summertime current meter records. Model runs using idealized wind forcing to excite the vertically integrated version of the ADCIRC finite element circulation model indicated that the APES has a natural mode oscillation period of 13.2 h, an average "seiche depth" of 3.5 m and a "seiche length" of 139 km. This length is close to that of the long axis of Pamlico Sound, although the depth is approximately 25 percent less than the sound's 4.5 m mean bathymetric depth. Model runs using observed winds from Cape Hatteras

  13. Diurnal variations of ELF transients and background noise in the Schumann resonance band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Eran; Price, Colin

    2007-02-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are resonant electromagnetic waves in the Earth-ionosphere cavity, induced primarily by lightning discharges, with a fundamental frequency of about 8 Hz and higher-order modes separated by approximately 6 Hz. The SR are made up of the background signal resulting from global lightning activity and extremely low frequency (ELF) transients resulting from particularly intense lightning discharges somewhere on the planet. Since transients within the Earth-ionosphere cavity due to lightning propagate globally in the ELF range, we can monitor and study global ELF transients from a single station. Data from our Negev Desert (Israel) ELF site are collected using two horizontal magnetic induction coils and a vertical electric field ball antenna, monitored in the 5-40 Hz range with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. In this paper we present statistics related to the probability distribution of ELF transients and background noise in the time domain and its temporal variations during the day. Our results show that the ELF signal in the time domain follows the normal distribution very well. The σ parameter exhibits three peaks at 0800, 1400, and 2000 UT, which are related to the three main global lightning activity centers in Asia, Africa, and America, respectively. Furthermore, the occurrence of intense ELF events obeys the Poisson distribution, with such intense events occurring every ~10 s, depending on the time of the day. We found that the diurnal changes of the σ parameter are several percent of the mean, while for the number of intense events per minute, the diurnal changes are tens of percent about the mean. We also present the diurnal changes of the SR intensities in the frequency domain as observed at our station. To better understand the diurnal variability of the observations, we simulated the measured ELF background noise using space observations as input, as detected by the Optical Transient Detector (OTD). The most active center which is

  14. Diurnal and seasonal mood vary with work, sleep, and daylength across diverse cultures.

    PubMed

    Golder, Scott A; Macy, Michael W

    2011-09-30

    We identified individual-level diurnal and seasonal mood rhythms in cultures across the globe, using data from millions of public Twitter messages. We found that individuals awaken in a good mood that deteriorates as the day progresses--which is consistent with the effects of sleep and circadian rhythm--and that seasonal change in baseline positive affect varies with change in daylength. People are happier on weekends, but the morning peak in positive affect is delayed by 2 hours, which suggests that people awaken later on weekends.

  15. Diurnal raptors in the fragmented rain forest of the Sierra Imataca, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, E.; Ellis, D.H.; Smith, D.G.; LaRue, C.T.; Bird, David M.; Varland, Daniel E.; Negro, Juan Jose

    1996-01-01

    The rain forest of the Sierra Imataca in eastern Venezuela has been subjected to extensive deforestation for pastures and agricultural settlements. In the last decade the opening of access roads combined with intensified logging and mining activities have fragmented a significant portion of the remaining forest. We noted local distribution and habitat use for 42 species of diurnal raptors observed in affected areas in this region. We observed some raptors considered as forest interior species and other open country species foraging and roosting in man-made openings inside the forest.

  16. Diurnal raptors in the fragmented rain forest of the Sierra Imataca, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, E.; Ellis, D.H.; Smith, D.G.; LaRue, C.T.

    1994-01-01

    The rain forest of the Sierra Imataca in eastern Venezuela has been subjected to extensive deforestation for pastures and agricultural settlements. In the last decade the opening of access roads combined with intensified logging and mining activities have fragmented a significant portion of the remaining forest. We noted local distribution and habitat use for 40 species of diurnal raptors observed in ten affected areas, including raptors considered as forest interior species and some open country species utilizing the man-made openings inside the forest for roosting and foraging.

  17. Driver Drowsiness Warning System Using Visual Information for Both Diurnal and Nocturnal Illumination Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, MarcoJavier; Armingol, JoséMaría; de la Escalera, Arturo

    2010-12-01

    Every year, traffic accidents due to human errors cause increasing amounts of deaths and injuries globally. To help reduce the amount of fatalities, in the paper presented here, a new module for Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) which deals with automatic driver drowsiness detection based on visual information and Artificial Intelligence is presented. The aim of this system is to locate, track, and analyze both the drivers face and eyes to compute a drowsiness index, where this real-time system works under varying light conditions (diurnal and nocturnal driving). Examples of different images of drivers taken in a real vehicle are shown to validate the algorithms used.

  18. Measurement of diurnal and semidiurnal rotational variations and tidal parameters of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the determination of diurnal and semidiurnal variations in the rotation rate and the direction of rotation axis of Earth from the analysis of 8 years of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data. This analysis clearly show that these variations are largely periodic and tidally driven; that is, the periods of the variations correspond to the periods of the largest lunar and solar tides. For rotation rate variations, expressed in terms of changes in universal time (UT), the tidal lines with the largest observed signals are O1 (amplitude 23.5 microseconds in time (microseconds), period 25.82 solar hours); KL (18.9 microseconds, 23.93 hours); M2 (17.9 microseconds, 12.54 hours); and S2 (8.6 microseconds, 12.00 hours). For variations in the direction of the rotation axis (polar motion), significant signals exist in the retrograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and S2 tides (amplitudes 265 and 119 microarc seconds (microarc seconds, respectively); the prograde diurnal band at the O1, K1, and P1 tides (amplitudes 199, 152, and 60 microarc seconds, respectively); and the prograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and K2 tides (amplitudes 58 and 39 microarc seconds, respectively). Variations in the retrograde diurnal band are represented by corrections with previous estimates except that a previously noted discrepancy in the 13.66-day nutation (corresponding to the O1 tide) is largely removed in this new analysis. We estimate that the standard deviations of these estimates are 1.0 microseconds for the UT1 variations and 14-16 microarc seconds for the polar motion terms. These uncertainties correspond to surface displacements of approximately 0.5 mm. From the analysis of atmospheric angular momentum data we conclude that variations in UT1 excited by the atmosphere with subdaily periods are small (approximately 1 microsecond). We find that the average radial tidal displacements of the VLBI sites in the diurnal band are largely consistent with known deficiencies in current

  19. Diurnal habitat use of American woodcock wintering along the Atlantic coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term decline of the American woodcock (Scolopax minor) population led us to investigate diurnal habitat use with radiotelemetry on the wintering grounds. Sites included the coastal plain of Georgia (1989-1991), South Carolina (1988-1989), and Virginia (1991-1992). Habitat use was not explained by age, sex, or date during the winter, but individuals used habitat differently (P < 0.05). Only shrubland was preferred at all sites in all years. Pine plantations of various ages were used according to availability, but usually less often than expected, while bottomland hardwoods and pine - hardwoods were used more often than expected.

  20. A framework for global diurnally-resolved observations of Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, Darren; Remedios, John

    2014-05-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Being a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within Global models, the requirement for global diurnal observations of LST is well founded. Earth Observation satellites offer an opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST, with the appropriate exploitation of data from multiple instruments providing a capacity to resolve the diurnal cycle on a global scale. Here we present a framework for the production of global, diurnally resolved, data sets for LST which is a key request from users of LST data. We will show how the sampling of both geostationary and low earth orbit data sets could conceptually be employed to build combined, multi-sensor, pole-to-pole data sets. Although global averages already exist for individual instruments and merging of geostationary based LST is already being addressed operationally (Freitas, et al., 2013), there are still a number of important challenges to overcome. In this presentation, we will consider three of the issues still open in LST remote sensing: 1) the consistency amongst retrievals; 2) the clear-sky bias and its quantification; and 3) merging methods and the propagation of uncertainties. For example, the combined use of both geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data, and both infra-red and microwave data are relatively unexplored but are necessary to make the most progress. Hence this study will suggest what is state-of-the-art and how considerable advances can be made, accounting also for recent improvements in techniques and data quality. The GlobTemperature initiative under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013

  1. A framework for global diurnally-resolved observations of Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, D.; Remedios, J.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Being a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within Global models, the requirement for global diurnal observations of LST is well founded. Earth Observation satellites offer an opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST, with the appropriate exploitation of data from multiple instruments providing a capacity to resolve the diurnal cycle on a global scale. Here we present a framework for the production of global, diurnally resolved, data sets for LST which is a key request from users of LST data. We will show how the sampling of both geostationary and low earth orbit data sets could conceptually be employed to build combined, multi-sensor, pole-to-pole data sets. Although global averages already exist for individual instruments and merging of geostationary based LST is already being addressed operationally (Freitas, et al., 2013), there are still a number of important challenges to overcome. In this presentation, we will consider three of the issues still open in LST remote sensing: 1) the consistency amongst retrievals; 2) the clear-sky bias and its quantification; and 3) merging methods and the propagation of uncertainties. For example, the combined use of both geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data, and both infra-red and microwave data are relatively unexplored but are necessary to make the most progress. Hence this study will suggest what is state-of-the-art and how considerable advances can be made, accounting also for recent improvements in techniques and data quality. The GlobTemperature initiative under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013

  2. Convective Cloud and Rainfall Processes Over the Maritime Continent: Simulation and Analysis of the Diurnal Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, Rebecca L.

    The Maritime Continent experiences strong moist convection, which produces significant rainfall and drives large fluxes of heat and moisture to the upper troposphere. Despite the importance of these processes to global circulations, current predictions of climate change over this region are still highly uncertain, largely due to inadequate representation of the diurnally-varying processes related to convection. In this work, a coupled numerical model of the land-atmosphere system (RegCM3-IBIS) is used to investigate how more physically-realistic representations of these processes can be incorporated into large-scale climate models. In particular, this work improves simulations of convective-radiative feedbacks and the role of cumulus clouds in mediating the diurnal cycle of rainfall. Three key contributions are made to the development of RegCM3-IBIS. Two pieces of work relate directly to the formation and dissipation of convective clouds: a new representation of convective cloud cover, and a new parameterization of convective rainfall production. These formulations only contain parameters that can be directly quantified from observational data, are independent of model user choices such as domain size or resolution, and explicitly account for subgrid variability in cloud water content and nonlinearities in rainfall production. The third key piece of work introduces a new method for representation of cloud formation within the boundary layer. A comprehensive evaluation of the improved model was undertaken using a range of satellite-derived and ground-based datasets, including a new dataset from Singapore's Changi airport that documents diurnal variation of the local boundary layer height. The performance of RegCM3-IBIS with the new formulations is greatly improved across all evaluation metrics, including cloud cover, cloud liquid water, radiative fluxes and rainfall, indicating consistent improvement in physical realism throughout the simulation. This work

  3. Diurnal variation of stratospheric chlorine monoxide - A critical test of chlorine chemistry in the ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R.; Parrish, A.; Barrett, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based observations of a mm-wave spectral line at 278 GHz have yielded stratospheric chlorine monoxide column density diurnal variation records which indicate that the mixing ratio and column density of this compound above 30 km are about 20 percent lower than model predictions based on 2.1 parts/billion of total stratospheric chlorine. The observed day-to-night variation is, however, in good agreement with recent model predictions, both confirming the existence of a nighttime reservoir for chlorine and verifying the predicted general rate of its storage and retrieval.

  4. Strato-mesospheric ClO observations by SMILES: error analysis and diurnal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T. O.; Sagawa, H.; Kreyling, D.; Manabe, T.; Ochiai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Baron, P.; Mendrok, J.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D.; Yasui, M.; Kasai, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Chlorine monoxide (ClO) is the key species for anthropogenic ozone loss in the middle atmosphere. We observed the ClO diurnal variation using the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the International Space Station which has a non sun-synchronous orbit. This is the first global observation of the ClO diurnal variation from the stratosphere up to the mesosphere. The SMILES observation reproduced the diurnal variation of stratospheric ClO, an enhancement during a daytime, as observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS/MLS). Mesospheric ClO has shown a different diurnal behavior with an enhancement during nighttime. The ClO enhancement was found at a pressure of 0.02 hPa (about 70 km) with an amplitude of about 100 pptv and reached up to 0.01 hPa (80 km) in the zonal mean of 50° N-65° N in January-February 2010. The observation of mesospheric ClO was possible due to the 10-20 times better signal-to-noise ratio of the spectra than those of past microwave/submillimeter-wave limb-emission sounders. We performed a quantitative error analysis for the strato- and mesospheric ClO of the Level-2 research (L2r) product version 2.1.5 taking into account all possible error contributions; i.e. errors due to spectrum noise, smoothing and uncertainties in the radiative transfer model and instrument function. The SMILES L2r v2.1.5 ClO data are useful over the range 0.01 and 100 hPa with a total error of 10-30 pptv (about 10%) with averaging of 100 profiles. The vertical resolution is 3-5 km and 5-8 km for the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. The performance of the SMILES observation opens the new opportunity to investigate ClO up to the mesopause.

  5. Strato-mesospheric ClO observations by SMILES: error analysis and diurnal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T. O.; Sagawa, H.; Kreyling, D.; Manabe, T.; Ochiai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Baron, P.; Mendrok, J.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D.; Yasui, M.; Kasai, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Chlorine monoxide (ClO) is the key species for anthropogenic ozone losses in the middle atmosphere. We observed ClO diurnal variations using the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the International Space Station, which has a non-sun-synchronous orbit. This includes the first global observations of the ClO diurnal variation from the stratosphere up to the mesosphere. The observation of mesospheric ClO was possible due to 10-20 times better signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of the spectra than those of past or ongoing microwave/submillimeter-wave limb-emission sounders. We performed a quantitative error analysis for the strato- and mesospheric ClO from the Level-2 research (L2r) product version 2.1.5 taking into account all possible contributions of errors, i.e. errors due to spectrum noise, smoothing, and uncertainties in radiative transfer model and instrument functions. The SMILES L2r v2.1.5 ClO data are useful over the range from 0.01 and 100 hPa with a total error estimate of 10-30 pptv (about 10%) with averaging 100 profiles. The SMILES ClO vertical resolution is 3-5 km and 5-8 km for the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. The SMILES observations reproduced the diurnal variation of stratospheric ClO, with peak values at midday, observed previously by the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS/MLS). Mesospheric ClO demonstrated an opposite diurnal behavior, with nighttime values being larger than daytime values. A ClO enhancement of about 100 pptv was observed at 0.02 to 0.01 hPa (about 70-80 km) for 50° N-65° N from January-February 2010. The performance of SMILES ClO observations opens up new opportunities to investigate ClO up to the mesopause.

  6. Diurnal and seasonal effects in E region low-latitude nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, A. I.; Cravens, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of nitric oxide in the lower E region made by the ultraviolet nitric oxide experiment on Atmosphere Explorer C during 1974 are used to demonstrate diurnal and seasonal effects at low latitudes. At the equator, NO increases by about a factor of 2 between sunrise and the early afternoon: this is followed by a small decline toward sunset. Seasonally, NO shows an asymmetry about the equator with more NO on the summer side than on the winter side; at equinox the asymmetry vanishes. These effects are in qualitative accord with the current theoretical understanding of thermospheric nitric oxide.

  7. Soil moisture sensing with aircraft observations of the diurnal range of surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Blanchard, B.; Anderson, A.; Wang, V.

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft observations of the surface temperature were made by measurements of the thermal emission in the 8-14 micrometers band over agricultural fields around Phoenix, Arizona. The diurnal range of these surface temperature measurements were well correlated with the ground measurement of soil moisture in the 0-2 cm layer. The surface temperature observations for vegetated fields were found to be within 1 or 2 C of the ambient air temperature indicating no moisture stress. These results indicate that for clear atmospheric conditions remotely sensed surface temperatures are a reliable indicator of soil moisture conditions and crop status.

  8. Diurnal variation of phytoplankton community in a high frequency area of HABs: Daya Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaxue; Song, Xingyu; Huang, Liangmin; Zhong, Yu; Shen, Pingping; Qin, Geng

    2011-07-01

    Phytoplankton community was investigated in the cage culture area of Daya Bay during a diurnal cycle. Two rainfalls occurred during the course of the experiment and decreased the surface seawater salinity in the aquaculture area. A total of 38 species were identified, of which the dominant species included Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and Skeletonema costatum. Water stratification obstructed the vertical migration of dinoflagellates. Statistical analysis indicated that Synechococcus showed negative relationship with silicate and ammonia, which indicated that Synechococcus adapted to grow at oligotrophic environment. Phytoplankton community structure implied the risk of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. blooms in the aquaculture area of Daya Bay.

  9. Assessing Diurnal Variability in Riverine Dissolved Organic Carbon and Nitrate with Discrete and High Frequency In Situ Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, B. A.; Kraus, T.; Downing, B. D.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding diurnal variability of nitrate (NO3) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface water is important for characterizing water quality and quantifying constituent loads. However, measuring NO3 and DOC at sufficiently high frequencies to detect diurnal patterns has historically been a challenge. Here we present results from a study examining high frequency variations of DOC and NO3 in the San Joaquin River in California during a period without rainfall (July 2005). In situ optical instrumentation was used to quantify NO3 concentrations and the intensity of chromophoric DOM at 30-minute intervals for a 5-day period. Discrete samples were also collected every 2 hours for 2 days of the study for lab analysis of bulk DOC and NO3 concentrations, as well as spectral absorbance and fluorescence. Ancillary in situ data (electrical conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence, and flow) were also measured. In situ and lab NO3 concentrations were strongly correlated (r2=0.97) and varied diurnally by up to 25 % (0.6 mg/L). The general temporal pattern shows a daily minimum at night (ca. 2000 hr) and a daily maxima near noon. A second daily NO3 peak occurred but was less predictable and may reflect changes in external sources such as agricultural return flow. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, and chlorophyll fluorescence exhibited clear diurnal signals with late afternoon maxima and early morning minima but were not correlated with NO3 concentrations. Lab DOC concentrations ranged from 3.1-3.6 mg/L and showed no clear diurnal pattern during the 2-day sampling period. In contrast, high frequency CDOM values did show a clear diurnal variability with maxima at noon and minima at night. Differences between CDOM and lab DOC patterns may indicate diurnal changes in components of the bulk DOC pool (such as chromophoric material) or may reflect insufficient analytical precision of lab DOC analyses to detect small diurnal changes. Along with C and N isotopic

  10. Diurnal patterns of gas-exchange and metabolic pools in tundra plants during three phases of the arctic growing season

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Rajit; Mortazavi, Behzad; Oberbauer, Steven F; Starr, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Arctic tundra plant communities are subject to a short growing season that is the primary period in which carbon is sequestered for growth and survival. This period is often characterized by 24-h photoperiods for several months a year. To compensate for the short growing season tundra plants may extend their carbon uptake capacity on a diurnal basis, but whether this is true remains unknown. Here, we examined in situ diurnal patterns of physiological activity and foliar metabolites during the early, mid, and late growing season in seven arctic species under light-saturated conditions. We found clear diurnal patterns in photosynthesis and respiration, with midday peaks and midnight lulls indicative of circadian regulation. Diurnal patterns in foliar metabolite concentrations were less distinct between the species and across seasons, suggesting that metabolic pools are likely governed by proximate external factors. This understanding of diurnal physiology will also enhance the parameterization of process-based models, which will aid in better predicting future carbon dynamics for the tundra. This becomes even more critical considering the rapid changes that are occurring circumpolarly that are altering plant community structure, function, and ultimately regional and global carbon budgets. PMID:23467719

  11. The contribution of the pineal gland on daily rhythms and masking in diurnal grass rats, Arvicanthis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Shuboni, Dorela D; Agha, Amna A; Groves, Thomas K H; Gall, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Melatonin is a hormone rhythmically secreted at night by the pineal gland in vertebrates. In diurnal mammals, melatonin is present during the inactive phase of the rest/activity cycle, and in primates it directly facilitates sleep and decreases body temperature. However, the role of the pineal gland for the promotion of sleep at night has not yet been studied in non-primate diurnal mammalian species. Here, the authors directly examined the hypothesis that the pineal gland contributes to diurnality in Nile grass rats by decreasing activity and increasing sleep at night, and that this could occur via effects on circadian mechanisms or masking, or both. Removing the pineal gland had no effect on the hourly distribution of activity across a 12:12 light-dark (LD) cycle or on the patterns of sleep-like behavior at night. Masking effects of light at night on activity were also not significantly different in pinealectomized and control grass rats, as 1h pulses of light stimulated increases in activity of sham and pinealectomized animals to a similar extent. In addition, the circadian regulation of activity was unaffected by the surgical condition of the animals. Our results suggest that the pineal gland does not contribute to diurnality in the grass rat, thus highlighting the complexity of temporal niche transitions. The current data raise interesting questions about how and why genetic and neural mechanisms linking melatonin to sleep regulatory systems might vary among mammals that reached a diurnal niche via parallel and independent pathways.

  12. Diurnal patterns of gas-exchange and metabolic pools in tundra plants during three phases of the arctic growing season.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Rajit; Mortazavi, Behzad; Oberbauer, Steven F; Starr, Gregory

    2013-02-01

    Arctic tundra plant communities are subject to a short growing season that is the primary period in which carbon is sequestered for growth and survival. This period is often characterized by 24-h photoperiods for several months a year. To compensate for the short growing season tundra plants may extend their carbon uptake capacity on a diurnal basis, but whether this is true remains unknown. Here, we examined in situ diurnal patterns of physiological activity and foliar metabolites during the early, mid, and late growing season in seven arctic species under light-saturated conditions. We found clear diurnal patterns in photosynthesis and respiration, with midday peaks and midnight lulls indicative of circadian regulation. Diurnal patterns in foliar metabolite concentrations were less distinct between the species and across seasons, suggesting that metabolic pools are likely governed by proximate external factors. This understanding of diurnal physiology will also enhance the parameterization of process-based models, which will aid in better predicting future carbon dynamics for the tundra. This becomes even more critical considering the rapid changes that are occurring circumpolarly that are altering plant community structure, function, and ultimately regional and global carbon budgets.

  13. Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Barrera, S.; Rodriguez-Puebla, C.; Challinor, A. J.

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to provide new insight on the wheat yield historical response to climate processes throughout Spain by using statistical methods. Our data includes observed wheat yield, pseudo-observations E-OBS for the period 1979 to 2014, and outputs of general circulation models in phase 5 of the Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) for the period 1901 to 2099. In investigating the relationship between climate and wheat variability, we have applied the approach known as the partial least-square regression, which captures the relevant climate drivers accounting for variations in wheat yield. We found that drought occurring in autumn and spring and the diurnal range of temperature experienced during the winter are major processes to characterize the wheat yield variability in Spain. These observable climate processes are used for an empirical model that is utilized in assessing the wheat yield trends in Spain under different climate conditions. To isolate the trend within the wheat time series, we implemented the adaptive approach known as Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition. Wheat yields in the twenty-first century are experiencing a downward trend that we claim is a consequence of widespread drought over the Iberian Peninsula and an increase in the diurnal range of temperature. These results are important to inform about the wheat vulnerability in this region to coming changes and to develop adaptation strategies.

  14. Diurnal changes in seawater carbonate chemistry speciation at increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Schulz, K G; Riebesell, U

    2013-01-01

    Natural variability in seawater pH and associated carbonate chemistry parameters is in part driven by biological activities such as photosynthesis and respiration. The amplitude of these variations is expected to increase with increasing seawater carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the future, because of simultaneously decreasing buffer capacity. Here, we address this experimentally during a diurnal cycle in a mesocosm CO2 perturbation study. We show that for about the same amount of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) utilized in net community production diel variability in proton (H(+)) and CO2 concentrations was almost three times higher at CO2 levels of about 675 ± 65 in comparison with levels of 310 ± 30 μatm. With a simple model, adequately simulating our measurements, we visualize carbonate chemistry variability expected for different oceanic regions with relatively low or high net community production. Since enhanced diurnal variability in CO2 and proton concentration may require stronger cellular regulation in phytoplankton to maintain respective gradients, the ability to adjust may differ between communities adapted to low in comparison with high natural variability.

  15. A Combined Infrared and Microwave Technique for Studying the Diurnal Variation of Rainfall over Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil; Adler, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    Over 10 years of continuous data from the Special Sensor microwave Imager (SSM/I) aboard a series of Defense Department satellites has made it possible to construct regional rainfall climatologies at high spatial resolution. Using the Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF), monthly estimates of precipitation were made over the region of northern Brazil, including the Amazon Basin, for 1987 to 1998. GPROF is a physical approach to passive microwave precipitation retrieval, which uses the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (cloud) model to establish prior probability densities of precipitation structures. Precipitation fields from GPROF were stratified into morning and evening satellite overpasses, and accumulated at monthly intervals at 0.5 degree spatial resolution. Important diurnal effects were noted in the analysis, the most pronounced being a land/sea breeze circulation along the northern coast of Brazil and a mountain/valley circulation along the Andes. There were also indications of morning rainfall maxima along the major rivers, and evening maxima between the rivers. The addition of simultaneous geosynchronous infrared (IR) data leads to the current technique, which takes advantage of the 30 minute sampling and 4 km spatial resolution of the infrared channel and the better physics of the microwave retrieval. The resultant IR method is subsequently used to derive the diurnal variability of rainfall over the Amazon basin, and further, to investigate the relative contribution from its convective and stratiform components.

  16. Diurnal variations in CO2 flux from peatland floodplains: Implications for models of ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulsbra, Claire; Rickards, Nathan; Brown, Sarah; Evans, Martin; Boult, Stephen; Alderson, Danielle

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are important terrestrial carbon stores, and within these environments, floodplains have been identified as hotspots of carbon processing, potentially releasing substantial amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere. Previous monitoring campaigns have shown that such CO2 release from ecosystem respiration is linked not only to soil temperature and water table depth, but also to CO2 sequestration via primary productivity, thought to be because the root exudates produced during photosynthesis stimulate microbial activity. This suggests that extrapolation models that are parameterised on data collected during day light hours, when vegetation is photosynthesising, may overestimate ecosystem respiration rates at night, which has important implications for estimates of annual CO2 flux and carbon budgeting. To investigate this hypothesis, monitoring data is collected on the CO2 flux from UK peatland floodplains over the full diurnal cycle. This is done via ex-situ manual data collection from mesocosms using an infra-red gas analyser, and the in-situ automated collection of CO2 concentration data from boreholes within the peat using GasClams®. Preliminary data collected during the summer months suggest that night time respiration is suppressed compared to that during the day, and that the significant predictors of respiration are different when examining day and night time data. This highlights the importance of incorporating diurnal variations into models of ecosystem respiration.

  17. Analysis of water-soluble ions and their precursor gases over diurnal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Zang-Ho; Ghosh, Samik; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Song, Sang-Keun; Jung, Kweon; Kim, Nam-Jin

    2013-10-01

    A detailed description of an interactive relationship is made between water-soluble ionic components in PM2.5 and their precursor gases using the hourly resolution data measured at an urban monitoring site in Seoul during the year of 2010. Their diurnal variability was found to be correlated with their precursor gases (HNO3 and NH3). In the case of NO3- and NH4+, a close similarity was seen in their diurnal trends, especially during spring. There were no noticeable differences in the formation pathway of NO3-, SO42- , and NH4+ aerosols between day and night. For NO3- formation, heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 might play a significant role in the nighttime enhancement of the oxidation rate. In addition, the concentrations of major anions (e.g. NO3-, SO42- , and Cl-) exhibited highly diverse seasonal patterns with their maximum values occurring in spring, summer, and winter, respectively. The overall results of this study suggest that the formation pathway of NO3- and SO42- aerosols should be regulated by a competing relationship between the NH3-lean (spring and winter) and NH3-rich conditions (summer and fall).

  18. Opposite patterns of diurnal activity in the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora and Copula sivickisi.

    PubMed

    Garm, A; Bielecki, J; Petie, R; Nilsson, D-E

    2012-02-01

    Cubozoan medusae have a stereotypic set of 24 eyes, some of which are structurally similar to vertebrate and cephalopod eyes. Across the approximately 25 described species, this set of eyes varies surprisingly little, suggesting that they are involved in an equally stereotypic set of visual tasks. During the day Tripedalia cystophora is found at the edge of mangrove lagoons where it accumulates close to the surface in sun-lit patches between the prop roots. Copula sivickisi (formerly named Carybdea sivickisi) is associated with coral reefs and has been observed to be active at night. At least superficially, the eyes of the two species are close to identical. We studied the diurnal activity pattern of these two species both in the wild and under controlled conditions in laboratory experiments. Despite the very similar visual systems, we found that they display opposite patterns of diurnal activity. T. cystophora is active exclusively during the day, whereas C. sivickisi is actively swimming at night, when it forages and mates. At night T. cystophora is found on the muddy bottom of the mangrove lagoon. C. sivickisi spends the day attached to structures such as the underside of stones and coral skeletons. This species difference seems to have evolved to optimize foraging, since the patterns of activity follow those of the available prey items in their respective habitats. PMID:22426630

  19. Time to pay attention: attentional performance time-stamped prefrontal cholinergic activation, diurnality and performance

    PubMed Central

    Paolone, Giovanna; Lee, Theresa M.; Sarter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although the impairments in cognitive performance that result from shifting or disrupting daily rhythms have been demonstrated, the neuronal mechanisms that optimize fixed time daily performance are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that daily practice of a sustained attention task (SAT) evokes a diurnal activity pattern in rats. Here we report that SAT practice at a fixed time produced practice time-stamped increases in prefrontal cholinergic neurotransmission that persisted after SAT practice was terminated and in a different environment. SAT time-stamped cholinergic activation occurred irrespective of whether the SAT was practiced during the light or dark phase or in constant light conditions. In contrast, prior daily practice of an operant schedule of reinforcement, albeit generating more rewards and lever presses per session than the SAT, neither activated the cholinergic system nor affected the animals' nocturnal activity pattern. Likewise, food-restricted animals exhibited strong food anticipatory activity (FAA) and attenuated activity during the dark period but FAA was not associated with increases in prefrontal cholinergic activity. Removal of cholinergic neurons impaired SAT performance and facilitated the reemergence of nocturnality. Shifting SAT practice away from a fixed time resulted in significantly lower performance. In conclusion, these experiments demonstrated that fixed time, daily practice of a task assessing attention generates a precisely practice time-stamped activation of the cortical cholinergic input system. Time-stamped cholinergic activation benefits fixed time performance and, if practiced during the light phase, contributes to a diurnal activity pattern. PMID:22933795

  20. Enhanced circadian photoresponsiveness after prolonged dark adaptation in seven species of diurnal and nocturnal rodents

    PubMed Central

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in mice and Syrian hamsters have described an enhancement of circadian photoresponsiveness after exposure to darkness for several weeks. The present study investigated the generality of the phenomenon in 3 diurnal and 4 nocturnal rodent species. In four of the species tested, phase delays of the running-wheel activity rhythm evoked by 1-h light pulses were several-fold larger after 3 to 4 weeks of exposure to darkness than after a single day. This drastic change in photoresponsiveness has important implications for the understanding of the process of photic entrainment. Differences between species that showed a significant effect of dark adaptation and species that showed no effect were not accounted for by temporal niche (diurnal versus nocturnal) or photic sensitivity (albino versus pigmented). Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for inter-species differences in the occurrence of enhanced photoresponsiveness after dark adaptation and to identify the neural substrates of this phenomenon in species that exhibit it. PMID:17116312

  1. Using Diurnal Temperature Range to Examine the Climatology of Solar Energy Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zercher, C. N.; Hanrahan, J.; Murphy, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The potential for annual solar energy production largely depends on the amount of incoming shortwave radiation which is dependent on cloud cover. Due to natural large-scale climate variability, long-term cloud cover can vary substantially, therefore modifying the total energy that can be produced by solar cells in individual locations. Under anthropogenic climate change, future precipitation is expected to significantly deviate from observed values, therefore suggesting that cloud cover, and thus solar energy potential, will also change. The expected changes are both positive and negative depending on geographic region and can be highly spatially variable, particularly in regions of complex terrain. Because of the short-term availability of observed radiation and cloud cover data, it is difficult to study the historical climatology of solar energy potential, thus making future projections uncertain. Research has shown that another readily available climate variable, the diurnal temperature range, correlates well with daily averaged shortwave radiation values during months of minimal/no snow cover, and can thus serve as a proxy for shortwave radiation during the warm season throughout the period of record. In the present study, the diurnal temperature range is shown to be an excellent predictor of shortwave radiation around the state of Vermont, independent of latitude and elevation. Monte Carlo significance testing is also used to examine recent trends in this region.

  2. Diurnal variation of apoplastic ascorbate in winter wheat leaves in relation to ozone detoxification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Pang, Jing; Feng, Zhaozhong; Zhu, Jianguo; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Besides stomatal closure, biological detoxification is an important protection mechanism for plants against ozone (O3). This study investigated the diurnal changes of ascorbate (a major detoxification agent) in the apoplast and leaf tissues of winter wheat grown under ambient air field conditions. Results showed the reduced ascorbate in the apoplast (ASCapo) exhibited a peak in late morning or midday, mismatching with either the maximum external O3 concentrations in mid-afternoon or the maximum stomatal O3 uptake between late morning and mid-afternoon. In contrast, the ASC in leaf tissues remained stable throughout the day. The investigations conducted in a Free-Air Concentration Elevation of O3 system confirmed that the diurnal variations of the ASCapo were induced more by the daily variations of O3 concentrations rather than the cumulative O3 effects. In conclusion, the O3-stress detoxification should be a dynamic variable rather than a fixed threshold as assumed in the stomatal flux-based O3 dose metrics.

  3. Spring leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in a temperate maple forest.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Jonathan M

    2014-03-01

    Spring leaf phenology in temperate climates is intricately related to numerous aspects of the lower atmosphere [e.g., surface energy balance, carbon flux, humidity, the diurnal temperature range (DTR)]. To further develop and improve the accuracy of ecosystem and climate models, additional investigations of the specific nature of the relationships between spring leaf phenology and various ecosystem and climate processes are required in different environments. This study used visual observations of maple leaf phenology, below-canopy light intensities, and micrometeorological data collected during the spring seasons of 2008, 2009, and 2010 to examine the potential influence of leaf phenology on a seasonal transition in the trend of the DTR. The timing of a reversal in the DTR trend occurred near the time when the leaves were unfolding and expanding. The results suggest that the spring decline in the DTR can be attributed primarily to the effect of canopy closure on daily maximum temperature. These findings improve our understanding of the relationship between leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in temperate maple forests during the spring. They also demonstrate the necessity of incorporating accurate phenological data into ecosystem and climate models and warrant a careful examination of the extent to which canopy phenology is currently incorporated into existing models.

  4. Dating base flow in streams using dissolved gases and diurnal temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Casile, Gerolamo; Haase, Karl B.

    2015-12-01

    A method is presented for using dissolved CFCs or SF6 to estimate the apparent age of stream base flow by indirectly estimating the mean concentration of the tracer in the inflowing groundwater. The mean value is estimated simultaneously with the mean residence times of the gas and water in the stream by sampling the stream for one or both age tracers, along with dissolved nitrogen and argon at a single location over a period of approximately 12-14 h. The data are fitted to an equation representing the temporal in-stream gas exchange as it responds to the diurnal temperature fluctuation. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by collecting and analyzing samples at six different stream locations across parts of northern Virginia, USA. The studied streams drain watersheds with areas of between 2 and 122 km2 during periods when the diurnal stream temperature ranged between 2 and 5°C. The method has the advantage of estimating the mean groundwater residence time of discharge from the watershed to the stream without the need for the collection of groundwater infiltrating to streambeds or local groundwater sampled from shallow observation wells near the stream.

  5. On the modeling of atmospheric pollutant dispersion during a diurnal cycle: A finite element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, Roseane A. S.; Duda, Fernando P.; Pimentel, Luiz Cláudio G.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical model to study pollutant dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The model accounts for the mechanisms of advection by the mean wind in the horizontal direction, turbulent diffusion in the vertical direction to ground surface, dry deposition, and radioactive decay. More importantly, the model is capable of accounting for the evolution of the ABL structure over a diurnal cycle by considering parameterizations for the wind-speed and eddy-diffusivity profiles that depend on the atmospheric stability condition, which in turn undergoes dramatic changes throughout the day. To solve the resulting advection-diffusion equation, we propose a numerical method based on a stabilized finite element formulation. After validating the numerical model by simulating classical experiments and comparing its predictions with those available in literature, we study the dispersion of a pollutant during a full diurnal ABL cycle with the meteorological parameters generated by AERMET for a 24-h period on a 1-h basis.

  6. Diurnal cycle of greenhouse gases and biogenic hydrocarbons during summer near Cool, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, B. A.; Floerchinger, C.; Knighton, W. B.; Dubey, M. K.; Herndon, S. C.; Kelley, P.; Luke, W. T.; Shaw, W. J.; Barnard, J.; Laulainen, N.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthesis by forests is a large sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and also a large source of biogenic volatile organics (VOCs) that produce aerosols, nucleate clouds, and interact with nitrogen oxides (NOx) to produce ozone. To elucidate these complex biogeochemical mechanisms, we performed continuous high temporal resolution measurements of CO2, VOC, trace gases, and aerosol in June 2010 at the T1 site, 70 km from Sacramento, CA, during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in June 2010. Throughout the month we find that diurnal profiles exhibit minima in CO2 and maxima in isoprene during daytime. Both their amplitudes are modulated strongly by cloud cover consistent with a common photosynthetic mechanism. In cont