Science.gov

Sample records for 1-hour intravenous infusion

  1. Acyclovir kinetics after intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, P; Whitley, R J; Blum, M R; Keeney, R E; Barton, N; Cocchetto, D M; Good, S; Hemstreet, G P; Kirk, L E; Page, D A; Elion, G B

    1979-12-01

    The disposition and safety of the antiviral drug acyclovir were studied in 14 subjects with advanced malignancies. Acyclovir was administered by a 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg. At the end of infusion, mean peak plasma levels (+/- SEM), determined by radioimmunoassay, were 6.4 +/- 0.7, 12.1 +/- 2.3, 14.9 +/- 2.7, and 33.7 +/- 7.1 microM. The plasma concentration-time profiles could be described by a biexponential equation. The half-life of acyclovir in the slow disposition phase ranged from 2.2 to 5 hr and the drug was detected in the plasma for at least 18 hr after infusion. The total body clearance ranged from 117 to 396 ml/min/1.73 m2. A proportionality between area under the curve and dose suggests that acyclovir exhibits dose-independent kinetics in the dose range studied. There was wide variation in cumulative urinary excretion of unchanged drug, ranging from 30 to 69% of the dose. From renal clearances of acyclovir, which were higher than creatinine clearances, it appears that both glomerular filtration and tubular secretion contribute to its renal excretion. Analysis of the urine by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of the metabolite 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine. There was no indication of toxicity either clinically or from laboratory findings in any of the study subjects. This study demonstrates that in addition to selectivity and low toxicity, the kinetic profile and metabolic disposition of acyclovir make it an attractive candidate for therapy in a variety of herpes infections.

  2. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  3. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  4. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  5. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  6. The Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion Protocol.

    PubMed

    Collard, Benjamin; Sturgeon, Jonathan; Patel, Natasha; Asharia, Shabbar

    2014-01-01

    Insulin use among inpatients is high and associated with severe and regular medication errors. An initial baseline audit showed a wide variation in the prescription of intravenous insulin within the trust. These included variation in the choice of fluid prescribed, electrolyte levels not consistently checked, handwritten illegible prescriptions, and varying parameters set for adjustment of the prescription. A Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion protocol (VRIII)) was introduced to standardize intravenous insulin prescription throughout the trust by all members of the clinical team. We looked at and measured uptake and effects of the VRIII protocol in improving standardization of insulin prescription for inpatients on insulin at St George's NHS trust. The protocol was uploaded to the intranet to allow access 24 hours a day and the staff educated about it. The VRIII protocol was routinely used successfully throughout the trust. Any initial problems were addressed through education of clinical staff. The protocol has shown decreased prescribing and administrative errors, whilst demonstrating good glucose and electrolyte control. Use of a standardized protocol helps reduce medication errors and demonstrates good glycaemic control. Regular and continued education of clinical staff is necessary to maintain its efficacy. PMID:26734228

  7. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  8. [The development of multifunction intravenous infusion quantitative packaging device].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shufang; Li, Ruihua; Shen, Lianhong

    2012-11-01

    Aimed at tackling the compatibility issues arising from the drug reaction in intravenous infusion tube, we developed a simple, suitable and multi-function intravenous infusion tube for the special use for rescuing critical patients, the elderly, children etc. Each drug in a transfusion process can be filtered to realize quantitative packet and packet delivery. Thus, the drugs in the infusion tube are prevented from meeting with each other. No overlap, no particle pollution occurred. Stable performance and accurate dosage are maintained. As a result safety is ensured during drug delivery. PMID:23461118

  9. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2a: Ontario Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mark; Koczmara, Christine; Masino, Caterina; Cassano-Piché, Andrea; Trbovich, Patricia; Easty, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Research conducted in earlier phases of this study prospectively identified a number of concerns related to the safe administration of multiple intravenous (IV) infusions in Ontario hospitals. Objective To investigate the potential prevalence of practices or policies that may contribute to the patient safety risks identified in Phase 1b of this study. Data Sources and Review Methods Sixty-four survey responses were analyzed from clinical units where multiple IV infusions may occur (e.g., adult intensive care units). Survey questions were organized according to the topics identified in Phase 1b as potential contributors to patient harm (e.g., labelling practices, patient transfer practices, secondary infusion policies). Results Survey results indicated suboptimal practices and policies in some clinical units, and variability in a number of infusion practices. Key areas of concern included the following: use of primary IV tubing without back check valves when administering secondary infusions administration of secondary infusions with/as high-alert continuous IV medications potential confusion about how IV tubing should be labelled to reflect replacement date and time interruptions to IV therapy due to IV pump and/or tubing changes when patients are transferred between clinical units coadministration of continuous or intermittent infusions on central venous pressure monitoring ports variability in respondents’ awareness of the infusion pump's bolus capabilities Limitations Due to the limited sample size, survey responses may not be representative of infusion practices across Ontario. Answers to some questions indicated that the intent of the questions might have been misunderstood. Due to a design error, 1 question about bolus administration methods was not shown to as many respondents as appropriate. Conclusions The Ontario survey revealed variability in IV infusion practice across the province and potential opportunities to improve safety. PMID

  10. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  11. Contamination of intravenous infusion fluid: effects of changing administration sets.

    PubMed

    Buxton, A E; Highsmith, A K; Garner, J S; West, C M; Stamm, W E; Dixon, R E; McGowan, J E

    1979-05-01

    Daily change of intravenous (i.v.) infusion administration sets has been recommended by the Center for Disease Control since 1973 to reduce the risk of infusion bacteremia. To evaluate this recommendation, we undertook a prospective, randomized, controlled trial that compared the rates of i.v.-associated bacteremia, in-use i.v. fluid contamination, and phlebitis in 300 patients whose administration sets were changed every 24 h with those in 300 patients whose administration sets were changed every 48 h. No i.v.-associated bacteremia occurred. Twelve of 600 infusions (2%) had positive infusion-fluid cultures: five in one group and seven in the other. Both groups had comparable rates of phlebitis. In this study population with low rates of fluid contamination, no benefit accrued from changing the administration sets every 24 h instead of every 48 h. In hospitals with low rates of fluid contamination, the routine changing of i.v. administration sets every 48 h will result in substantial financial savings.

  12. Venipuncture and intravenous infusion access during zero-gravity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger; Bechtle, Perry; Creager, Gerald J.; Boyce, Joey B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to establish the difficulty associated with securing an intravenous (IV) catheter in place in microgravity flight and the techniques applicable in training the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) for Space Station Freedom, as well as aiding in the selection of appropriate hardware and supplies for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). The objectives are the following: (1) to determine the difficulties associated with venipuncture in a microgravity environment; (2) to evaluate the various methods of securing an IV catheter and attached tubing for infusion with regard to the unique environment; (3) to evaluate the various materials available for securing an intravenous catheter in place; and (4) to evaluate the fluid therapy administration system when functioning in a complete system. The inflight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic flight test to simulate microgravity are presented.

  13. A new apparatus for chronic intravenous infusion in unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, H; Yura, J; Miyaike, H; Ishikawa, M; Mizuno, H; Taniguchi, M; Hanai, T; Mizuno, A; Shinagawa, N; Kato, F

    1988-01-01

    A new apparatus incorporating a unique type of swivel device was devised for chronic intravenous infusion in unrestrained rats. The swivel requires very little torque for rotation, ie, one-fourth that of the standard swivel, yet is 1/30 as expensive. A coil spring tube, located between the swivel and the catheter, allows the rat unhampered movement within the metabolic cage. Because the catheter follows the rats' movements freely, only two silk sutures are required to secure it to the animal. No statistically significant differences between experimental and control rats were observed in terms of body weight gain, food intake, nitrogen balance, or caloric efficiency. This apparatus should prove useful in many areas of research.

  14. The direct cost of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Scott, Anne; Rayman, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    The cost of intravenous insulin infusion to the NHS is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the direct cost of insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales in the first 24-hour period of infusion. Data from the National Inpatient Diabetes Audit 2013 in the UK were used to estimate the number of insulin infusions in use across England and Wales. Costs were calculated for six models for setting up and maintenance of insulin infusions, depending on the extent of involvement of different healthcare professionals in the UK. In this study, the direct costs of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales have been estimated to vary from £6.4-8.5 million in the first 24-hour period on infusion. More appropriate use of these infusions could result in substantial cost savings.

  15. Fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and maternal intravenous immunoglobulin infusion

    PubMed Central

    Giers, Günther; Wenzel, Folker; Stockschläder, Markus; Riethmacher, Regina; Lorenz, Horst; Tutschek, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background Different therapeutic approaches have been used in fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, but many centers administer immunoglobulin G infusions to the pregnant woman. We studied the effect of maternal antenatal immunoglobulin infusions on fetal platelet counts in pregnancies with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Design and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical courses of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia whose mothers were treated with immunoglobulin G infusions in a single center between 1999 and 2005. In a center-specific protocol, weekly maternal immunoglobulin G infusions were given to 25 pregnant women with previously affected neonates and four women with strong platelet antibodies, but no previous history of fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia; before each infusion diagnostic fetal blood sampling was performed to determine fetal platelet counts and immunoglobulin G levels. Results There were 30 fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, confirmed by initial fetal blood sampling showing fetal platelet counts between 4×109/L and 130×109/L and antibody-coated fetal platelets using a glycoprotein specific assay. Despite weekly antenatal maternal immunoglobulin G infusions fetal platelet counts did not change significantly. Maternal and fetal immunoglobulin G levels, measured before every infusion, increased significantly with the number of maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. Conclusions In this group of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia no consistent increase of fetal platelets was achieved as a result of regular maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. PMID:20534698

  16. Iatrogenic magnesium toxicity following intravenous infusion of magnesium sulfate: risks and strategies for prevention.

    PubMed

    Cavell, Gillian F; Bryant, Catherine; Jheeta, Seetal

    2015-07-31

    A 65-year-old man being treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy for recurrent colonic adenocarcinoma was admitted for management of hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia secondary to diarrhoea. He was treated with intravenous infusions of potassium chloride and magnesium sulfate. Following an infusion of magnesium sulfate, he experienced a sudden neurological deterioration. A CT of the head revealed no haemorrhage or evidence of acute ischaemic injury. Results of serum biochemistry later that day revealed an elevated magnesium level. Iatrogenic magnesium toxicity was suspected. Further discussions between the pharmacist and ward staff confirmed that a medication error had been made in the preparation of the infusion resulting in an overdose of intravenous magnesium.

  17. Effects of Intrarenal and Intravenous Infusion of the Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitor Milrinone on Renin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that administration of the phosphodiesterase III inhibitor milrinone increases renin secretion in conscious rabbits. The aim of the present study was to determine if the increase in renin secretion results from a direct renal action of milrinone, or from an indirect extrarenal effect of the drug. This was accomplished by comparing the effects of intrarenal and intravenous infusion of graded doses of milrinone on plasma renin activity in unilaterally nephrectomized conscious rabbits. Milrinone was infused into the renal artery in doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 micro-g/kg/min, and intravenously in the same rabbits in doses of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 micro-g/kg/min. Each dose was infused for 15 min. No intrarenal dose of milrinone altered plasma renin activity or arterial pressure, although at the highest dose, there was a small increase in heart rate. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1.0 micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 176 +/- 55% of the control value (P less than 0.05). Heart rate increased but arterial pressure did not change. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1O micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 386 +/- 193% of control in association with a decrease in arterial pressure and an increase in heart rate. These results confirm that milrinone increases renin secretion, and indicate that the stimulation is due to an extrarenal effect of the drug.

  18. Durability of Benefit From Repeated Intravenous Lidocaine Infusions in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Newhouse, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder with no curative treatments, and available medications typically provide partial relief of pain. Reported here is the effective use of serial intravenous lidocaine infusions for the chronic management of 3 patients with fibromyalgia. The details of the infusion procedure are described, and relevant literature is reviewed. Lidocaine infusions should be considered in fibromyalgia patients who are refractory to other treatments, and a positive response to 1 infusion may justify repeated infusions for chronic management. PMID:26835161

  19. Reversible lactic acidosis associated with repeated intravenous infusions of sorbitol and ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Batstone, G. F.; Alberti, K. G.; Dewar, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Infusions of fructose or sorbitol are used commonly in parenteral nutrition and may cause lactic acidosis. A case is reported in whom blood lactate concentration was monitored frequently over a 5-day period during intravenous feeding with a sorbitol-ethanol-amino acid mixture. During the first five infusions blood lactate rose only moderately, but with the final infusion lactate rose to 11-1 mmol/l and the patient had a severe metabolic acidosis. In retrospect the patient had shown deterioration in renal and hepatic function tests during the preceding 24 hr. On terminating the infusions the blood lactate concentration fell rapidly. It is suggested that great care should be exercised when using such infusions in ill patients and acid base status and renal and hepatic function should be monitored frequently. PMID:22069

  20. Intravenous medication safety and smart infusion systems: lessons learned and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Hayes, Judy; Saniuk, Catherine; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Bates, David W

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human: Building a Safe Health System greatly increased national awareness of the need to improve patient safety in general and medication safety in particular. Infusion-related errors are associated with the greatest risk of harm, and "smart" (computerized) infusion systems are currently available that can avert high-risk errors and provide previously unavailable data for continuous quality improvement (CQI) efforts. As healthcare organizations consider how to invest scarce dollars, infusion nurses have a key role to play in assessing need, evaluating technology, and selecting and implementing specific products. This article reviews the need to improve intravenous medication safety. It describes smart infusion systems and the results they have achieved. Finally, it details the lessons learned and the opportunities identified through the use of smart infusion technology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

  1. A quadruply-asymmetric sigmoid to describe the insulin-glucose relationship during intravenous insulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Daniel T; Umpierrez, Guillermo E; Braithwaite, Susan S

    2014-01-01

    For hospitalized patients requiring intravenous insulin therapy, an objective is to quantify the intravenous insulin infusion rate (IR) across the domain of blood glucose (BG) values at a single timepoint. The algorithm parameters include low BG (70 mg/dL), critical high BG, target range BG limits, and maintenance rate (MR) of insulin infusion, which, after initialization, depends on rate of change of blood glucose, previous IR, and other inputs. The restraining rate (RR) is a function of fractional completeness of ascent of BG (FCABG) from BG 70 mg/dL to target. The correction rate (CR) is a function of fractional elevation of BG (FEBG), in comparison to elevation of a critical high BG, above target. IR = RR + CR. The proposed mathematical model describing a sigmoidal relationship between IR and BG may offer a safety advantage over the linear relationship currently employed in some intravenous glucose management systems. PMID:24691385

  2. Renal excretion of intravenously infused amoxycillin and ampicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Sjövall, J; Westerlund, D; Alván, G

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether concentration-dependent renal clearance of ampicillin and amoxycillin occurs. The drugs were given as single 20 min i.v. infusions in doses ranging from 1.9 to 2.8 g to nine healthy volunteers using a cross-over design. Plasma and urinary concentrations were determined by a selective liquid chromatographic method using frequent sampling up to 10 and 30 h respectively after termination of the infusion. The renal clearance of the drugs was independent of the plasma concentration. The mean (s.d.) renal clearances of ampicillin and amoxycillin were 167 (24) and 157 (20) ml min-1 1.73 m-2 respectively. The net secretion was about 50% of the total renal clearance of both drugs. The plasma concentration and urinary excretion rate versus time curves indicated a polyexponential decline, which could be described by both a biexponential and a triexponential equation. The former proved to be more reliable, especially in the calculation of micro rate constants. There was a tendency to more sustained plasma concentrations after amoxycillin, also illustrated by a significantly lower mean (s.d.) plasma clearance of this drug, viz. 185 (30) ml min-1 1.73 m-2, as compared to ampicillin, 210 (24) ml min-1 1.73 m-2 (P less than 0.04). There were no major differences in the disposition rate constants and the distribution volumes of ampicillin and amoxycillin. The mean (s.d.) plasma half-life was 1.7 (0.3) h for both drugs. The urinary excretion rate indicated a slower terminal disposition rate however, with ampicillin and amoxycillin half-lives of 3.4 (2.0) and 3.9 (1.2) h respectively. The longer half-life in the terminal phase may be due to increased tubular reabsorption at low urinary concentrations. It was not possible to determine in this study whether the half-life was affected by changes in clearance or volume of distribution. The urinary solubility of the drugs was dependent on pH. This could explain the massive macroscopic

  3. Effects of intravenous infusion of glycerol on blood parameters and urinary glycerol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Dohi, Michiko; Kageyama, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    In sports, the oral intake and intravenous administration of glycerol as a potential masking agent have been prohibited. The effect of glycerol on blood parameters was investigated by comparing the intravenous administration of glycerol (20g/200mL) with that of an electrolyte (8g glucose/200mL) as a comparator (n=7, fixed-dose-rate i.v. infusion, 200mL in 1h). This study was also designed to evaluate whether the urinary concentrations reached the positivity threshold after the intravenous infusion of glycerol. Significant decreases of the haemoglobin (HGB, g/dL), haematocrit (HCT, %) and OFF-h Score (OFF-score) values were observed after the infusion of glycerol (P<0.05 at 1-6h). The differences in the HGB, HCT and OFF-score between pre- and post-administration were -0.49±0.23g/dL (2h), -1.54±0.73% (2h) and -3.89±3.66 (2h), respectively. Glycerol infusion significantly increased the plasma volume by 12.1% (1h), 6.3% (2h) and 5.7% (3h) compared with the initial values. The infusion of the comparator also increased the plasma volume by 9.6% (1h), 5.8% (2h) and 4.9% (3h) compared with the values before infusion. There were no significant differences in the change of the plasma volume between the intravenous infusions of glycerol and the glucose-based electrolyte (as the comparator) (P≥0.05). This finding might indicate that glycerol itself only exhibited limited effects on the expansion of plasma. After administration of glycerol, the urinary glycerol concentrations increased from 0.0013±0.0004mg/mL to 6.86±2.86mg/mL at 1h and 6.45±3.08mg/mL at 2h. The intravenous infusion of glycerol can most likely be detected using the current urine analysis; however, the dependence of the concentration of urinary glycerol on the urine volume should be considered. PMID:26986972

  4. An unusual case of chronic neuropathic pain responds to an optimum frequency of intravenous ketamine infusions.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A C

    2001-05-01

    The effective treatment of patients suffering from a variety of difficult pain syndromes, including phantom pain and other neuropathic pains, remains a clinical challenge. Neuropathic pain has been shown to respond to drugs that block the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, such as ketamine and amantidine. A 44-year-old woman with a previous right-sided forequarter amputation presented to the Palliative Medicine Team complaining of neuropathic pain in her left arm, which was neurologically intact. The pain was treated with repeated infusions of intravenous ketamine. Twenty-one infusions were given over a period of four months. The pain intensity experienced by the patient lessened as the frequency of the ketamine infusions increased. This finding has not been described previously and supports the theory that there may be an optimum frequency of ketamine infusions to achieve adequate pain control. PMID:11369165

  5. Multiorgan crystal deposition following intravenous oxalate infusion in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfrucht, M.J.; Cheeks, C.; Wedeen, R.P.

    1986-06-01

    Deposition of calcium oxalate is responsible for the pathologic manifestations of oxalosis and may contribute to multiorgan dysfunction in uremia and to the progression of renal damage after renal failure is established. We have developed a rat model of oxalosis using a single intravenous injection of sodium oxalate, 0.3 mmol./kg. body weight, in rats. Polarized light microscopy and section freeze-dry autoradiography were used to identify /sup 14/C-oxalate within the renal parenchyma and in extrarenal organs. /sup 14/C-oxalate crystals under three mu in length were identified within one min. of injection in proximal tubule lumens. Section freeze-dry autoradiography showed occasional minute crystals within glomeruli, heart, lung and liver at one hr. In contrast to concentrative cellular uptake demonstrated in rat renal cortical slices in vitro, intracellular accumulation of /sup 14/C-oxalate could not be detected in vivo. Within the first 24 hr., renal oxalate retention reached a maximum of 25 +/- 4 per cent of the injected dose/gm. kidney compared to a maximum of only 7 +/- 3 per cent/gm. kidney after intraperitoneal administration. Although less than one per cent dose/gm. kidney remained after one week, crystal fragments were scattered throughout the cortex and medulla, often surrounded by foci of interstitial nephritis. The retention of crystals in kidney and other body organs following i.v. oxalate provides a model of oxalosis which stimulates pathophysiologic events in a variety of clinical situations characterized by transiently or persistently elevated serum oxalate.

  6. Intraosseous infusion of the distal phalanx compared to systemic intravenous infusion for marimastat delivery to equine lamellar tissue.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Claire; Collins, Simon N; van Eps, Andrew W; Mills, Paul C; Allavena, Rachel E; Bailey, Simon R; Medina Torres, Carlos E; Meizler, Alon; Pollitt, Christopher C

    2015-09-01

    No validated laminitis drug therapy exists, yet pharmaceutical agents with potential for laminitis prevention have been identified. Many of these are impractical for systemic administration but may be effective if administered locally. This study compared intraosseous infusion of the distal phalanx (IOIDP) with systemic intravenous constant rate infusion (CRI) to determine which was more effective for lamellar marimastat delivery. Ultrafiltration probes were placed in both forefeet of five horses to collect lamellar interstitial fluid as lamellar ultrafiltrate (LUF). Marimastat solution (3.5 mg/mL) containing lidocaine (20 mg/mL) was infused by IOIDP at 0.15 mL/min for 12 h. After a 12 h wash-out, marimastat (3.5 mg/mL) and lidocaine were infused by constant rate infusion (CRI) at 0.15 mL/min for 12 h. LUF, plasma and lamellar tissue marimastat concentrations were quantified using UPLC-MS. Zymography was used to establish the inhibitory concentrations of marimastat for equine lamellar matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Data were analysed non-parametrically. There was no difference between the steady-state marimastat concentration in lamellar ultrafiltrate (LUF[M]) during IOIDP (139[88-497] ng/mL) and CRI (136[93-157] ng/mL). During IOIDP, there was no difference between marimastat concentrations in the treated foot (139[88-497] ng/mL), the untreated foot (91[63-154] ng/mL) and plasma (101[93-118] ng/mL). LUF[M] after IOIDP and CRI were >IC50 of lamellar MMP-2 and 9, but below the concentration considered necessary for in vivo laminitis prevention. Lamellar drug delivery during IOIDP was inconsistent and did not achieve higher lamellar marimastat concentrations than CRI. Modification or refinement of the IOIDP technique is necessary if it is to be consistently effective. PMID:26073286

  7. Increasing intravenous infusions of glucose improve body condition but not lactation performance in midlactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Al-Trad, B; Reisberg, K; Wittek, T; Penner, G B; Alkaassem, A; Gäbel, G; Fürll, M; Aschenbach, J R

    2009-11-01

    The present study was intended to test whether intravenously applied glucose would elicit dose effects on lactation performance similar to those observed after gastrointestinal glucose application. Six midlactation cows received intravenous glucose infusions (GI), increasing by 1.25% of the calculated net energy for lactation (NE(L)) requirement per day, whereas control cows received volume-equivalent saline infusions (SI). Measurements and samples were taken at surplus glucose dose levels of 0, 10, 20, and 30% of the NE(L) requirement, respectively. Body weight and backfat thickness increased linearly with increasing glucose dose for cows on GI compared with SI. No differences were observed in daily feed intake, milk energy output, and energy-corrected milk yield between treatments. However, milk protein percentage and yield increased linearly with the dose of glucose infused in the GI group. Although milk lactose was not affected by treatment during the infusion period, milk lactose percentage and yield decreased for GI, but not SI, once infusions ceased. Based on 5 diurnal blood samples, daily mean and maximum concentrations of plasma glucose and serum insulin showed linear increases with increasing GI, whereas their daily minimum concentrations were unaffected. At GI of 30% of the NE(L) requirement, marked hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were observed at 1600 h (i.e., 1 h postprandially), coinciding with glucosuria. The revised quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index indicated linear development of insulin resistance for the GI treatment but no such change in SI cows. Glucose infusion decreased daily mean and maximum serum beta-hydroxybutyrate and daily minimum nonesterified fatty acid concentrations relative to SI, whereas serum urea nitrogen was only numerically decreased by GI. No changes were observed in the serum activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase and aspartate transaminase and in the serum concentrations of bilirubin and macrominerals

  8. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  9. Brittle diabetes: long-term control with a portable, continuous, intravenous insulin infusion system.

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, J

    1981-01-01

    A young woman had severe brittle diabetes mellitus that was critically unmanageable with all conventional insulin treatment. Continuous subcutaneous and intramuscular infusions of insulin also failed to control her metabolic instability. Use of a continuous intravenous infusion, however, whereby a portable, variable-rate, battery-operated syringe pump delivered insulin through a subcutaneously tunnelled central venous catheter, resulted in good control. When she was receiving hourly intramuscular insulin injections (a mean of 778 IU daily) mean blood glucose concentrations had been 22.1 +/- 1.4 mmol/l (398 +/- 25 mg/100 microliters). After she had received the intravenous infusion for one month as an outpatient mean blood glucose concentration was 8.2 +/- 0.46 mmol/l (148 +/- 8 mg/100 microliters) and only 80 IU insulin daily was required. Follow-up after over five months of use showed that few complications had occurred. The system is simple to use and safe, and the diabetes had been stabilised such that she could enjoy a near-normal life style. PMID:6797511

  10. Effect of intravenous infusion of verapamil in patients of severe hypertension.

    PubMed

    Verma, S K; Dosi, R; Kaushik, S K; Bordia, A

    1990-01-01

    Thirty patients with diastolic blood pressure of 120 mm Hg or more were administered a bolus dose of verapamil (0.15 mg/kg) followed immediately by an intravenous infusion at a rate of 0.005 mg/kg/min for one hour. The patients were monitored during this period and three hours following the discontinuation of the infusion. The systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures before verapamil administration were 221.4 +/- 7.5, 134.3 +/- 2.7 and 163.4 +/- 4.1 mm Hg respectively, which decreased to 170.1 +/- 5.2, 99.1 +/- 3.7 and 122.8 +/- 3.6 mm Hg after intravenous bolus of verapamil. The fall in all the levels of blood pressure was significant (p less than 0.001) and was maintained at the lower levels throughout the infusion period and even three hours after discontinuation of the therapy. No untowards effects were observed and there was no significant change in heart rate and electrocardiogram. It, thus, proves to be an useful addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in the acute management of severe hypertension.

  11. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Ashraf F.; Armstrong, Josh S.; Smith, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:27462225

  12. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Ashraf F; Armstrong, Josh S; Smith, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:27462225

  13. Increased dietary sodium alters Fos expression in the lamina terminalis during intravenous angiotensin II infusion.

    PubMed

    Bealer, Steven L; Metcalf, Cameron S; Heyborne, Ryan

    2007-03-01

    These studies examined the effects of increased dietary sodium on expression of Fos, the protein product of c-fos, in forebrain structures in the rat following intravenous infusion with angiotensin II (AngII). Animals were provided with either tap water (Tap) or isotonic saline solution (Iso) as their sole drinking fluid for 3-5 weeks prior to testing. Rats were then implanted with catheters in a femoral artery and vein. The following day, the conscious, unrestrained animals received iv infusion of either isotonic saline (Veh), AngII, or phenylephrine (Phen) for 2 h. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously throughout the procedure. Brains were subsequently processed for evaluation of Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-Li IR) in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), the subfornical organ (SFO), and the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO). Fos-Li IR was significantly increased in the SFO and OVLT of animals consuming both Tap and Iso following AngII, but not Phen, compared to Veh infusions. Furthermore, Fos-Li IR in the MnPO was increased following AngII infusion in rats consuming a high sodium diet, but not in animals drinking Tap. These data suggest that increased dietary sodium sensitizes the MnPO neurons to excitatory input from brain areas responding to circulating AngII.

  14. Evaluation of a visual infusion phlebitis scale for determining appropriate discontinuation of peripheral intravenous catheters.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Paulette; Schultz, Alyce A

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 150 million peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters are inserted annually in the United States, with a 5% incidence rate of phlebitis as an acceptable benchmark. In 2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that PIV sites and administration sets be changed at least every 96 hours, yet clinical practice supported that at least 25% of PIV catheters showed no signs of phlebitis at 96 hours' dwell time. This study reports the assessment results of 850 PIV catheters over the indwelling life of the catheter, using the Visual Infusion Phlebitis scale as the measure determining when a PIV should be removed. PMID:17122689

  15. Heparin and related drugs for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: subcutaneous or intravenous continuous infusion?

    PubMed

    Izadpanah, Mandana; Khalili, Hossein; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Mohammadi, Mostafa

    2015-03-01

    In this article, the most evidenced approaches of unfractionated heparin administration for prevention of venous thromboembolism in medical and surgical hospitalized patients will be reviewed. Present data were collected by searching Scopus, PubMed, MEDLINE, Science direct, Clinical trials and Cochrane database systematic reviews. Subcutaneous low doses of unfractionated heparin (10000-15000 IU) in two or three divided doses per day are commonly administrated for venous thromboembolism prevention in different medical and surgical populations. In some populations such as obese surgical and critically ill patients, due to altered pharmacokinetics behavior of unfractionated heparin, continuous intravenous infusion of the low doses of unfractionated heparin has been proposed.

  16. Assessment of Injection Site Reactions for Peripheral Intravenous Oxaliplatin Infusion and Potential Remedies.

    PubMed

    Handa, Satoko; Kuroiwa, Ryohei; Miyano, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hisanori; Kamei, Daisuke; Takei, Hiromi; Sonou, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Murayama, JunIchiro; Sato, Atsushi; Kato, Yasuhisa

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the medical and nursing records of 19 patients with unresectable advanced recurrent colorectal cancers treated using oxaliplatin and capecitabine(CapeOX)with or without bevacizumab at the outpatient tumor center of Showa UniversityHospital between November 1, 2009 and November 30, 2011, to clarifydifferences in the incidence of injection site reactions according to the use or non-use of an intravenous infusion solution warming device. Vascular pain and other injection site reactions occurred in 13 patients(68.4%). Injection site reactions occurred in 33 of the total of 77 chemotherapytreatments (42.9%). No difference in incidence of injection site reactions was seen according to whether the intravenous infusion solution warmer was used. The most common time to onset of injection site reactions after commencing oxaliplatin administration was 60-90 min, and symptoms were seen to decrease when non-steroidal anti-inflammatorydrugs were coadministered. We intend to leverage these studyfindings to demonstrate the mechanism of onset for injection site reactions and to propose measures for handling adverse drug reactions. PMID:27539041

  17. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  18. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  19. Pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin: influence of rate of constant intravenous infusion in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Legg, B; Solomon, L R; Johnson, R W; Rowland, M

    1987-10-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin were studied in 12 renal transplant patients. Five patients received a constant rate (7 mg kg-1 day-1) intravenous infusion over 72 h and the remainder received rates of 7, 4 and 10 mg kg-1 day-1, consecutively each for at least 24 h. 2 Plasma, separated at 37 degrees C, was analysed by h.p.l.c. 3 The data were best described by a biexponential model. 4 Following the 72 h infusion, a plateau was reached by 24 h and clearance was 0.60 l h-1 kg-1. 5 Clearance associated with the 10 mg kg-1 day-1 infusion rate (0.43 l h-1 kg-1) was estimated to be lower than that following the 4 and 7 mg kg-1 day-1 rates (0.52 and 0.54 l h-1 kg-1 respectively) but the difference is unlikely to be of clinical significance. PMID:3318898

  20. Efficacy and safety of constant-rate intravenous cyclosporine infusion immediately after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, T J; Myre, S A; Melvin, D B; Van der Bel-Kahn, J; Stephens, G W; Collins, J A; Wolf, R K; Brown, L L; Pesce, A J; First, M R

    1989-01-01

    Oral cyclosporine therapy immediately after heart transplantation is erratic and difficult to predict. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficacy and safety of cyclosporine when administered by constant-rate infusion immediately after transplantation. Nineteen patients (17 men and two women) aged 50 years (range 25 to 61 years) who weighed 71 +/- 9 kg, participated in the study and received cyclosporine, 7 to 10 mg/hr (117 +/- 15 micrograms/kg/hr). The infusions were initially maintained for 26 +/- 5 hours (range 18 to 42 hours) without adjustments in dosage. Whole blood samples were obtained at hourly intervals for the first 8 to 12 hours and then daily throughout the 7-day study period and were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Constant-rate cyclosporine infusion resulted in therapeutic blood levels (350 to 450 ng/ml) at 6 hours. These levels remained relatively steady throughout the 7-day infusion, requiring only minimal dosage adjustments. Kidney function was not altered significantly after 7 days of intravenous cyclosporine therapy as evidenced by a mean serum creatinine level of 1.3 mg/dl before therapy and 1.4 mg/dl after therapy. There, however, was a transient rise in serum creatinine level in most patients on the second or third day after transplantation that resolved without a reduction in cyclosporine dosage. The mean endomyocardial biopsy score at 1 week after transplantation was 0.1, and only four of the patients required additional immunosuppressive therapy to treat rejection during the first 6 weeks after transplantation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2647932

  1. Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells promotes functional recovery in a model of chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomonori; Sasaki, Masanori; Kataoka-Sasaki, Yuko; Nakazaki, Masahito; Nagahama, Hiroshi; Oka, Shinichi; Oshigiri, Tsutomu; Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Kocsis, Jeffery D; Honmou, Osamu

    2016-10-29

    Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adult bone marrow improves behavioral function in rat models of spinal cord injury (SCI). However, most studies have focused on the acute or subacute phase of SCI. In the present study, MSCs derived from bone marrow of rats were intravenously infused 10weeks after the induction of a severe contusive SCI. Open field locomotor function was assessed weekly until 20weeks post-SCI. Motor recovery was greater in the MSC-treated group with rapid improvement beginning in earlier post-infusion times than in the vehicle-treated group. Blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) integrity was assessed by the intravenous infusion of Evans Blue (EvB) with spectrophotometric quantitation of its leakage into the parenchyma. In MSC-treated rats, BSCB leakage was reduced. Immunohistochemical staining for RECA-1 and PDGFR-β showed increased microvasculature/repair-neovascularization in MSC-treated rats. There was extensive remyelination around the lesion center and increased sprouting of the corticospinal tract and serotonergic fibers after MSC infusion. These results indicate that the systemic infusion of MSCs results in functional improvement that is associated with structural changes in the chronically injured spinal cord including stabilization of the BSCB, axonal sprouting/regeneration and remyelination. PMID:27586052

  2. Changes in urinary water and electrolyte excretion in sodium-loaded sheep in response to intravenous infusion of arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Scott, D; Morton, J J

    1976-01-01

    Mature sheep receiving supplements of sodium chloride into the rumen were given intravenous infusions of arginine vasopressin at rates varying from 4-6-23 pmol/min (2-10 mU/min). Infusion of the hormone led to an increase in urine flow and to increases in the amounts of sodium and chloride excreted, the effect on flow was, however, the greater so that the osmolality of the urine fell during the infusions. In sheep given intravenous infusions of a hypertonic sodium chloride solution addition of vasopressin to the infusate led to the formation of a larger volume of urine containing a higher proportion of the infused salt load compared to when the salt solution alone was given. As before the effect on flow was the greater and hence the osmolality of the urine was lower when the hormone was given. In other experiments intravenous infusion of a hypertonic sodium chloride solution at rates providing 2-8 mmol NaCl/min led to increases in urine flow and increases in sodium and chloride excretion, the size of these increases being proportional to infusion rate. Plasma vasopressin levels markedly increased during these infusions, the levels seen being similar to those seen in sheep given vasopressin in amounts which increased both urine flow and electrolyte excretion. This suggests that during hypertonic salt loading vasopressin probably contributes directly to the increases in urine flow and the increases in electrolyte excretion which are seen. Further evidence in support of this was obtained in experiments in which a greater natriuretic response was seen in sheep given a hypertonic sodium chloride solution into the carotid artery as opposed to the given a hypertonic sodium chloride solution into the carotid artery as opposed to the jugular vein and where it was shown that plasma vasopressin levels were indeed higher when the solution was given into the artery.

  3. Evaluation of intravenous medication errors with smart infusion pumps in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Bates, David W

    2013-01-01

    While some published research indicates a fairly high frequency of Intravenous (IV) medication errors associated with the use of smart infusion pumps, the generalizability of these results are uncertain. Additionally, the lack of a standardized methodology for measuring these errors is an issue. In this study we iteratively developed a web-based data collection tool to capture IV medication errors using a participatory design approach with interdisciplinary experts. Using the developed tool, a prevalence study was then conducted in an academic medical center. The results showed that the tool was easy to use and effectively captured all IV medication errors. Through the prevalence study, violation errors of hospital policy were found that could potentially place patients at risk, but no critical errors known to contribute to patient harm were noted.

  4. Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infraction after High Dose Intravenous Immunoglobulin Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi, Meir; Adar, Tomer; Orenbuch-Harroch, Efrat; Elitzur, Yair

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIgs) are used for several indications, including autoimmune conditions. IVIg treatment is associated with several possible adverse reactions including induction of a hypercoagulable state. We report a 76-year-old woman treated with IVIg for myasthenia gravis, which developed chest pain and weakness following IVIg infusion. The symptoms were associated with ST segment depression in V4–6 and elevated troponin levels. The patient was diagnosed with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). The patient had no significant risk factor besides age and a cardiac perfusion scan was interpreted as normal (the patient refused to undergo cardiac catheterization). This case is compatible with IVIg-induced hypercoagulability resulting in NSTEMI. Cardiac evaluation should therefore be considered prior to initiation of IVIg treatment especially in patients with multiple cardiovascular risks. PMID:20182639

  5. Increasing plasma [K+] by intravenous potassium infusion reduces NCC phosphorylation and drives kaliuresis and natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Srinivas; Lee, Donna H; Oh, Young Taek; Delpire, Eric; Youn, Jang H; McDonough, Alicia A

    2014-05-01

    Dietary potassium loading results in rapid kaliuresis, natriuresis, and diuresis associated with reduced phosphorylation (p) of the distal tubule Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). Decreased NCC-p inhibits NCC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption and shifts Na(+) downstream for reabsorption by epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC), which can drive K(+) secretion. Whether the signal is initiated by ingesting potassium or a rise in plasma K(+) concentration ([K(+)]) is not understood. We tested the hypothesis, in male rats, that an increase in plasma [K(+)] is sufficient to reduce NCC-p and drive kaliuresis. After an overnight fast, a single 3-h 2% potassium (2%K) containing meal increased plasma [K(+)] from 4.0 ± 0.1 to 5.2 ± 0.2 mM; increased urinary K(+), Na(+), and volume excretion; decreased NCC-p by 60%; and marginally reduced cortical Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) phosphorylation 25% (P = 0.055). When plasma [K(+)] was increased by tail vein infusion of KCl to 5.5 ± 0.1 mM over 3 h, significant kaliuresis and natriuresis ensued, NCC-p decreased by 60%, and STE20/SPS1-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) phosphorylation was marginally reduced 35% (P = 0.052). The following were unchanged at 3 h by either the potassium-rich meal or KCl infusion: Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), NHE3-p, NKCC, ENaC subunits, and renal outer medullary K(+) channel. In summary, raising plasma [K(+)] by intravenous infusion to a level equivalent to that observed after a single potassium-rich meal triggers renal kaliuretic and natriuretic responses, independent of K(+) ingestion, likely driven by decreased NCC-p and activity sufficient to shift sodium reabsorption downstream to where Na(+) reabsorption and flow drive K(+) secretion.

  6. Increasing plasma [K+] by intravenous potassium infusion reduces NCC phosphorylation and drives kaliuresis and natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Srinivas; Lee, Donna H; Oh, Young Taek; Delpire, Eric; Youn, Jang H; McDonough, Alicia A

    2014-05-01

    Dietary potassium loading results in rapid kaliuresis, natriuresis, and diuresis associated with reduced phosphorylation (p) of the distal tubule Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). Decreased NCC-p inhibits NCC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption and shifts Na(+) downstream for reabsorption by epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC), which can drive K(+) secretion. Whether the signal is initiated by ingesting potassium or a rise in plasma K(+) concentration ([K(+)]) is not understood. We tested the hypothesis, in male rats, that an increase in plasma [K(+)] is sufficient to reduce NCC-p and drive kaliuresis. After an overnight fast, a single 3-h 2% potassium (2%K) containing meal increased plasma [K(+)] from 4.0 ± 0.1 to 5.2 ± 0.2 mM; increased urinary K(+), Na(+), and volume excretion; decreased NCC-p by 60%; and marginally reduced cortical Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) phosphorylation 25% (P = 0.055). When plasma [K(+)] was increased by tail vein infusion of KCl to 5.5 ± 0.1 mM over 3 h, significant kaliuresis and natriuresis ensued, NCC-p decreased by 60%, and STE20/SPS1-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) phosphorylation was marginally reduced 35% (P = 0.052). The following were unchanged at 3 h by either the potassium-rich meal or KCl infusion: Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), NHE3-p, NKCC, ENaC subunits, and renal outer medullary K(+) channel. In summary, raising plasma [K(+)] by intravenous infusion to a level equivalent to that observed after a single potassium-rich meal triggers renal kaliuretic and natriuretic responses, independent of K(+) ingestion, likely driven by decreased NCC-p and activity sufficient to shift sodium reabsorption downstream to where Na(+) reabsorption and flow drive K(+) secretion. PMID:24598799

  7. [Postoperative analgesia with tramal in newborn children using the method of continuous intravenous infusion].

    PubMed

    Mikhel'son, V A; Zhirkova, Iu V; Beliaeva, I D; Stepanenko, S M; Manerova, A F; Butyleva, O Iu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of postoperative analgesia with tramal in the newborns. Analgesia with tramal (5% solution for injections, "Gruonental GmbH", Germany) was administered postoperatively in 20 newborn children. Thirteen children were operated for congenital malformations in the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, three children were operated for purulent-septic diseases and four children were operated for neoplasms. Hemodynamics indices, i.e. heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure, as well as SaO2, respiratory rate (RR), acid-base condition and behavioral reactions were assessed. Analgesia was implemented by the method of continuous intravenous infusion of tramal, 0.1-0.2 mg/kg.h combined with boluses, 1-2 mg/kg. The newborns were asleep for a major part of time during analgesia with tamal; the stable indices of hemodynamics, acid-base balance, glycemia and of the cortisol level were registered. Arterial hypertension, caused by several factors including the effect produced by tamal, was noted in 70% of children. Dose-dependent hypercapnia was registered in 80% of tests in children at unassisted respiration during the infusion of tamal, which is indicative of that tamal affects the respiratory center during the neonatal period and that it is necessary to monitor thoroughly the respiratory functions, i.e. RR, SatO2, pO2, pCO2, and to choose accurately a preparation dose. The continuous infusion of tamal ensures a sufficient analgesia after different operations and especially after medium-traumatic operations.

  8. Exploring the Current Landscape of Intravenous Infusion Practices and Errors (ECLIPSE): protocol for a mixed-methods observational study

    PubMed Central

    Blandford, Ann; Furniss, Dominic; Chumbley, Gill; Iacovides, Ioanna; Wei, Li; Cox, Anna; Mayer, Astrid; Schnock, Kumiko; Bates, David Westfall; Dykes, Patricia C; Bell, Helen; Dean Franklin, Bryony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intravenous medication is essential for many hospital inpatients. However, providing intravenous therapy is complex and errors are common. ‘Smart pumps’ incorporating dose error reduction software have been widely advocated to reduce error. However, little is known about their effect on patient safety, how they are used or their likely impact. This study will explore the landscape of intravenous medication infusion practices and errors in English hospitals and how smart pumps may relate to the prevalence of medication administration errors. Methods and analysis This is a mixed-methods study involving an observational quantitative point prevalence study to determine the frequency and types of errors that occur in the infusion of intravenous medication, and qualitative interviews with hospital staff to better understand infusion practices and the contexts in which errors occur. The study will involve 5 clinical areas (critical care, general medicine, general surgery, paediatrics and oncology), across 14 purposively sampled acute hospitals and 2 paediatric hospitals to cover a range of intravenous infusion practices. Data collectors will compare each infusion running at the time of data collection against the patient's medication orders to identify any discrepancies. The potential clinical importance of errors will be assessed. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively; interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from an NHS Research Ethics Committee (14/SC/0290); local approvals will be sought from each participating organisation. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences for academic and health professional audiences. Results will also be fed back to participating organisations to inform local policy, training and procurement. Aggregated findings will inform the debate on costs and benefits of the NHS investing in smart pump technology

  9. Multiple intravenous infusions of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reverse hyperglycemia in experimental type 2 diabetes rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haojie; Liu, Jiejie; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Yali; Liu, Huilin; Hou, Qian; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Dong, Liang; Cheng, Yu; Mu, Yiming; Liu, Jianping; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2013-07-01

    The worldwide rapid increase in diabetes poses a significant challenge to current therapeutic approaches. Single-dose mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) infusion ameliorates hyperglycemia but fails to restore normoglycemia in diabetic animals. We therefore hypothesized that multiple intravenous MSC infusions may reverse hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes (T2D) rats. We administered serial allogenous bone-marrow derived MSC infusions (1 × 10(6)cells/infusion) via the tail vein once every 2 weeks to T2D rats, induced by high-fat diet and streptozocin (STZ) administration. Hyperglycemia decreased only transiently after a single infusion in early-phase (1 week) T2D rats, but approximated normal levels after at least three-time infusions. This normal blood level was maintained for at least 9 weeks. Serum concentrations of both insulin and C-peptide were dramatically increased after serial MSC infusions. Oral glucose tolerance tests revealed that glucose metabolism was significantly ameliorated. Immunofluorescence analysis of insulin/glucagon staining revealed the restoration of islet structure and number after multiple MSC treatments. When multiple-MSC treatment was initiated in late-phase (5 week) T2D rats, the results were slightly different. The results of this study suggested that a multiple-MSC infusion strategy offers a viable clinical option for T2D patients.

  10. Study on toxicity of danshensu in beagle dogs after 3-month continuous intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Guisheng; Gao, Yonglin; Li, Shenjun; Li, Chunmei; Zhu, Xiaoyin; Li, Min; Liu, Zhifeng

    2009-09-01

    Danshensu (3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) lactic acid), a natural phenolic acid, is isolated from root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, and is widely used as a traditional Chinese medicine for treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, toxicity of danshensu was evaluated in male and female dogs after 3-month continuous intravenous infusion. Beagle dogs were treated with danshensu at doses of 17, 50, and 150 mg/kg/day, and observed for 90 days followed by recovery periods. Measurements included clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, temperature, electro-cardiography (EGC), hematology, blood chemistry, urinalysis, gross necropsy, organ weight, and histopathology. No significant adverse effects on these parameters were observed. The only treatment-related finding was a hard knot at injection site observed in the 150 mg/kg group after 2-3 weeks continuous administration, and returned to normal after 3-4 days withdrawal. From these results, it might be concluded that danshensu did not produce any significant cumulative toxicity at the doses administered, as reflected by the various parameters investigated. PMID:19778246

  11. Organ distribution of histones after intravenous infusion of FITC histones or after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Fatemeh; Grailer, Jamison J; Jajou, Lawrence; Zetoune, Firas S; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Ward, Peter A

    2015-03-01

    Histones appear in plasma during infectious or non-infectious sepsis and are associated with multiorgan injury. In the current studies, intravenous infusion of histones resulted in their localization in major organs. In vitro exposure of mouse macrophages to histones caused a buildup of histones on cell membranes followed by localization into cytosol and into the nucleus. After polymicrobial sepsis (cecal ligation and puncture), histones appeared in plasma as well as in a multiorgan pattern, peaking at 8 h followed by decline. In lungs, histones and neutrophils appeared together, with evidence for formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which represent an innate immune response to trap and kill bacteria and other infectious agents. In liver, there was intense NET formation, featuring linear patterns containing histones and strands of DNA. When neutrophils were activated in vitro with C5a or phorbol myristate acetate, NET formation ensued. While formation of NETs represents entrapment and killing of infectious agents, the simultaneous release from neutrophils of histones often results in tissue/organ damage.

  12. Intravenous ATP infusions can be safely administered in the home setting: a study in pre-terminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Beijer, Sandra; Gielisse, Eric A R; Hupperets, Pierre S; van den Borne, Ben E E M; van den Beuken-van Everdingen, Marieke; Nijziel, Marten R; van Henten, Arjen M J; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the safety of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) administration at home in pre-terminal cancer patients. Included were patients with cancer for whom medical treatment options were restricted to supportive care, who had a life expectancy of less than 6 months, a World Health Organization performance status 1 or 2, and suffered from at least one of the following complaints: fatigue, anorexia or weight loss >5% over the previous 6 months. Side effects were registered systematically on a standard form according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Toxicity Criteria. Fifty-one patients received a total of 266 intravenous ATP infusions. Of these, 11 infusions (4%) were given at the lowest dose of 20 microg kg(-1) min(-1), 85 infusions (32%) at 25-40 microg kg(-1) min(-1), and 170 (64%) at the highest dose of 45-50 microg kg(-1) min(-1) ATP. The majority of ATP infusions (63%) were without side effects. Dyspnea was the most common side effect (14% of infusions), followed by chest discomfort (12%) and the urge to take a deep breath (11%). No symptoms of cardiac ischemia occurred in any of the infusions. All side effects were transient and resolved within minutes after lowering the ATP infusion rate. Side effects were most frequent in the presence of cardiac disorders. We conclude that ATP at a maximum dose of 50 microg kg(-1) min(-1) can be safely administered in the home setting in patients with pre-terminal cancer. PMID:17786387

  13. Intravenous labetolol in treating hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion for procedural sedation.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Moni, Amarnath; Mathews, Lailu; Balaji, Sudarshan

    2016-03-01

    Dexmedetomidine is widely used for procedural sedation because of its unique combination of sedation, analgesia, and anxiolysis with minimal respiratory depression. Transient hypertension has been reported during the use of dexmedetomidine which is usually benign and is taken over by the hypotensive response on continuing the infusion. We report a case of hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion used for procedural sedation, necessitating discontinuation of the infusion and treatment of hypertension. The dilemmas involved in treating hypertension caused by dexmedetomidine are discussed.

  14. Effect of peri-operative intravenous infusion of lignocaine on haemodynamic responses to intubation, extubation and post-operative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shruti; Khan, Rashid M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Lignocaine in intravenous (IV) bolus dose has been used for minimising haemodynamic changes associated with intubation and extubation. Furthermore, IV infusion has been used for post-operative analgesia. We investigated whether IV peri-operative lignocaine (bolus and infusion) would be able to produce both the effects simultaneously in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Methods: In this randomised prospective study, 60 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. In Group A, patients received 6 ml normal saline as bolus over 10 min followed by 6 ml/h infusion whereas in Group B, patients received preservative free 2% lignocaine 1.5 mg/kg IV bolus (made to a volume of 6 ml with normal saline) administered over a period of 10 min and thereafter an infusion at a rate of 1.5 mg/kg/h (pre-diluted in normal saline made to a volume of 6 ml/h. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The rise in pulse rate (PR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were less in Group B as compared to the Group A (P < 0.05) during intubation as well as during extubation. Furthermore, the Group B had significant longer mean pain-free post-operative period of 5½ h as compared to 54.43 min in the Group A (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Administration of lignocaine infusion attenuates the rise in PR as well as MAP during the peri-intubation and peri-extubation period. Furthermore, infusion of lignocaine significantly increases the mean pain-free period post-operatively. PMID:26195829

  15. Intravenous infusion of L-isomers of phenylalanine and tryptophan stimulate gastric acid secretion at physiologic plasma concentrations in normal subjects and after parietal cell vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, K E; Isenberg, J I; Hogan, D L; Dreier, S J

    1983-01-01

    To determine whether intravenous infusion of individual amino acids stimulated gastric acid secretion in man, graded doses of phenylalanine, tryptophan, glycine, alanine, histidine, and NaCl control were infused on separate days in nine healthy subjects. Intravenous infusion of phenylalanine and tryptophan significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion to 50 and 52%, respectively, of the acid secretory response to intragastric peptone. Intravenous alanine and histidine were without effect, whereas glycine produced a slight response. Serum gastrin concentrations did not significantly change during intravenous amino acid infusion, except in response to 0.1 M phenylalanine. However, the increase in serum gastrin occurred 2 h after acid secretion had significantly increased in response to the 0.025 M phenylalanine infusion. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured during intravenous amino acid infusion and in response to a steak meal in five of the subjects. At a time when acid secretion was significantly increased during intravenous infusion of phenylalanine and tryptophan, plasma amino acids were similar to, or less than, that observed after the steak meal, suggesting that circulating levels of these three amino acids have a physiologic effect on gastric secretion in man. Intravenous infusion of a combination of graded doses of phenylalanine plus a continuous infusion of 0.01 M tryptophan shifted the dose-response curve to the left and resulted in a significantly greater response than to either amino acid alone. In five subjects with parietal cell vagotomy, intravenous phenylalanine and tryptophan stimulated acid secretion, whereas histidine was without effect, similar to normal subjects. These studies indicate that intravenous infusion of small amounts of phenylalanine (0.025 M, 3.1 mmol/h) and tryptophan (0.01 M, 1.25 mmol/h) stimulated gastric acid secretion at plasma concentrations similar to those observed after a steak meal, suggesting a physiologic role

  16. Pharmacokinetic profile of cefbuperazone in healthy Chinese volunteers after single and multiple drip intravenous infusion by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongbo; Geng, Taohua; Wang, Yiya; Ding, Li

    2016-09-10

    A selective and reproducible HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and fully validated for the determination of cefbuperazone in human plasma and urine. Samples were prepared using protein precipitation and separated on a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18 column (2.1×50mm, 3.5μm). The API-4000 mass spectrometer was operated under multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM) using the electrospray ionization technique. Linearity was achieved from 0.250 to 250μg/mL in plasma and 20.0-5000μg/mL in urine. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of cefbuperazone in healthy Chinese volunteers after drip intravenous infusion of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0g cefbuperazone sodium injection. Cefbuperazone reached a maximum concentration (Cmax) of 44.7±8.1μg/mL, 86.7±12.7μg/mL and 168±14μg/mL in 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0g dose groups respectively, at 60min after the start of infusion. The half-life (t1/2) was between 1.8-1.9h, and the elimination constant (kel) was between 0.36-0.39h(-1). The results proved that cefbuperazone showed linear pharmacokinetic profile in the dose range of 0.5-2.0g without gender difference. Drug accumulation was not observed. Cefbuperazone reached the maximum excretion rate in urine 2h after the start of infusion. About 60.0% of the administered drug was excreted via urine as unchanged form within 12h. The cumulative excretion of cefbuperazone after single drip intravenous infusion was proportional to the administered dose within the range from 0.5g to 2.0g. PMID:27394175

  17. Glycemic increase induced by intravenous glucose infusion fails to affect hunger, appetite, or satiety following breakfast in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schultes, Bernd; Panknin, Ann-Kristin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Wilms, Britta; de Courbière, Felix; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schmid, Sebastian M

    2016-10-01

    Meal-dependent fluctuations of blood glucose and corresponding endocrine signals such as insulin are thought to provide important regulatory input for central nervous processing of hunger and satiety. Since food intake also triggers the release of numerous gastrointestinal signals, the specific contribution of changes in blood glucose to appetite regulation in humans has remained unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that inducing glycemic fluctuations by intravenous glucose infusion is associated with concurrent changes in hunger, appetite, and satiety. In a single blind, counter-balanced crossover study 15 healthy young men participated in two experimental conditions on two separate days. 500 ml of a solution containing 50 g glucose or 0.9% saline, respectively, was intravenously infused over a 1-h period followed by a 1-h observation period. One hour before start of the respective infusion subjects had a light breakfast (284 kcal). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations as well as self-rated feelings of hunger, appetite, satiety, and fullness were assessed during the entire experiment. Glucose as compared to saline infusion markedly increased glucose and insulin concentrations (peak glucose level: 9.7 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 0.3 mmol/l; t(14) = -5.159, p < 0.001; peak insulin level: 370.4 ± 66.5 vs. 109.6 ± 21.5 pmol/l; t(14) = 4.563, p < 0.001) followed by a sharp decline in glycaemia to a nadir of 3.0 ± 0.2 mmol/l (vs. 3.9 ± 0.1 mmol/l at the corresponding time in the control condition; t(14) = -3.972, p = 0.001) after stopping the infusion. Despite this wide glycemic fluctuation in the glucose infusion condition subjective feelings of hunger, appetite satiety, and fullness did not differ from the control condition throughout the experiment. These findings clearly speak against the notion that fluctuations in glycemia and also insulinemia represent major signals in the short-term regulation of hunger and satiety.

  18. Glycemic increase induced by intravenous glucose infusion fails to affect hunger, appetite, or satiety following breakfast in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schultes, Bernd; Panknin, Ann-Kristin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Wilms, Britta; de Courbière, Felix; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schmid, Sebastian M

    2016-10-01

    Meal-dependent fluctuations of blood glucose and corresponding endocrine signals such as insulin are thought to provide important regulatory input for central nervous processing of hunger and satiety. Since food intake also triggers the release of numerous gastrointestinal signals, the specific contribution of changes in blood glucose to appetite regulation in humans has remained unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that inducing glycemic fluctuations by intravenous glucose infusion is associated with concurrent changes in hunger, appetite, and satiety. In a single blind, counter-balanced crossover study 15 healthy young men participated in two experimental conditions on two separate days. 500 ml of a solution containing 50 g glucose or 0.9% saline, respectively, was intravenously infused over a 1-h period followed by a 1-h observation period. One hour before start of the respective infusion subjects had a light breakfast (284 kcal). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations as well as self-rated feelings of hunger, appetite, satiety, and fullness were assessed during the entire experiment. Glucose as compared to saline infusion markedly increased glucose and insulin concentrations (peak glucose level: 9.7 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 0.3 mmol/l; t(14) = -5.159, p < 0.001; peak insulin level: 370.4 ± 66.5 vs. 109.6 ± 21.5 pmol/l; t(14) = 4.563, p < 0.001) followed by a sharp decline in glycaemia to a nadir of 3.0 ± 0.2 mmol/l (vs. 3.9 ± 0.1 mmol/l at the corresponding time in the control condition; t(14) = -3.972, p = 0.001) after stopping the infusion. Despite this wide glycemic fluctuation in the glucose infusion condition subjective feelings of hunger, appetite satiety, and fullness did not differ from the control condition throughout the experiment. These findings clearly speak against the notion that fluctuations in glycemia and also insulinemia represent major signals in the short-term regulation of hunger and satiety. PMID

  19. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of infusion to achieve a body temperature of 33 degrees C, the F(i)O(2) could be further reduced with unchanged PEEP. The infusion of large volume, ice-cold fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  20. A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Andrew R; Strassman, Rick J

    2016-01-01

    The state of consciousness induced by N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is one of the most extraordinary of any naturally-occurring psychedelic substance. Users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel "alternate universe," often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient "beings." The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry. The extremely short duration of DMT effects-less than 20 min-militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modeling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses. This model would also be valuable in performing functional neuroimaging, where subjects are required to remain under the influence of the drug for extended periods. Finally, target-controlled intravenous infusion of DMT may aid the development of unique psychotherapeutic applications of this psychedelic agent.

  1. A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gallimore, Andrew R.; Strassman, Rick J.

    2016-01-01

    The state of consciousness induced by N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is one of the most extraordinary of any naturally-occurring psychedelic substance. Users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel “alternate universe,” often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient “beings.” The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry. The extremely short duration of DMT effects—less than 20 min—militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modeling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses. This model would also be valuable in performing functional neuroimaging, where subjects are required to remain under the influence of the drug for extended periods. Finally, target-controlled intravenous infusion of DMT may aid the development of unique psychotherapeutic applications of this psychedelic agent. PMID:27471468

  2. A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Andrew R; Strassman, Rick J

    2016-01-01

    The state of consciousness induced by N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is one of the most extraordinary of any naturally-occurring psychedelic substance. Users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel "alternate universe," often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient "beings." The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry. The extremely short duration of DMT effects-less than 20 min-militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modeling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses. This model would also be valuable in performing functional neuroimaging, where subjects are required to remain under the influence of the drug for extended periods. Finally, target-controlled intravenous infusion of DMT may aid the development of unique psychotherapeutic applications of this psychedelic agent. PMID:27471468

  3. Stability of morphine sulfate in infusion devices and containers for intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Duafala, M E; Kleinberg, M L; Nacov, C; Flora, K P; Hines, J; Davis, K; McDaniel, A; Scott, D

    1990-01-01

    The stability of morphine sulfate in one brand of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) container, one brand of glass syringe, and two brands of disposable infusion devices was determined. Solutions of morphine sulfate 2 and 15 mg/mL were used to fill the PVC containers and drug administration devices. Stability was determined for both concentrations of morphine sulfate at room temperature (23-25 degrees C) and 4 degrees C in the PVC containers, glass syringes, and disposable infusion devices; stability was also determined at 31 degrees C in the disposable infusion devices. At 0, 1, 2, 4, 7, 12, and 15 days, portions of the solutions were removed and assayed in triplicate by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method. At each time point the drug-infusion fluid combinations were inspected visually for color changes and the presence of particulate matter, and pH was measured. Morphine sulfate 2 and 15 mg/mL remained stable for at least 12 days in all the containers and devices at each temperature tested. No substantial changes in the pH or physical appearance of the solutions were observed. Morphine sulfate can be repackaged in the disposable glass syringe, PVC container, and both disposable infusion devices for routine clinical use. PMID:2301422

  4. A guideline for the use of variable rate intravenous insulin infusion in medical inpatients.

    PubMed

    George, S; Dale, J; Stanisstreet, D

    2015-06-01

    The present paper summarizes the key recommendations in a recent publication produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care on the use of variable rate i.v. insulin infusion in 'medical' inpatients. The full guideline is available at http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS/JBDS_IP_VRIII.pdf and is designed to be a practical guide that can used by any healthcare professional who manages medical inpatients with hyperglycaemia. Its main aim is to allow variable rate i.v. insulin infusion to be used safely, effectively and efficiently for this specific group of inpatients.

  5. Nonstationary disposition of valproic acid during prolonged intravenous infusion: contributions of unbound clearance and protein binding.

    PubMed

    Arens, T L; Pollack, G M

    2001-09-01

    Circadian variations in disposition have been observed for a variety of agents, including anticonvulsants. Valproic acid (VPA), an anticonvulsant used to control generalized and partial seizures, has exhibited diurnal oscillations in steady-state concentrations during long-term administration to humans and non-human primates. The present study was conducted to assess potential diurnal changes in the disposition of VPA during prolonged i.v. infusion in rats. Animals, maintained on a strict 12-h per day light cycle, were equipped with venous cannulae and an arterial microdialysis probe. VPA was administered as a 50-mg/kg loading dose followed by a 42 mg/kg/h infusion for 70 h. Blood and microdialysate samples were obtained at timed intervals after establishment of steady-state throughout two complete light/dark cycles; and total (serum) and unbound (microdialysate) VPA was determined by gas chromatography. Modest oscillations (6-7 h period) in total and unbound VPA were observed; clearance and binding parameters were not different between light and dark periods. However, unbound clearance increased, and unbound fraction decreased, with time over the course of the infusion. These results suggest that time-dependent changes in VPA disposition occur in rats, although oscillations in steady-state concentrations do not appear to be diurnal in nature. PMID:11754040

  6. Optimal intravenous infusion to decrease the haematocrit level in patient of DHF infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, D.; Nuraini, N.; Saragih, R.; Wijaya, K. P.; Naiborhu, J.

    2014-02-01

    The optimal control of infusion model for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) infection is formulated here. The infusion model will be presented in form of haematocrit level. The input control aim to normalize the haematocrit level and is expressed as infusion volume on mL/day. The stability near the equilibrium points will be analyzed. Numerical simulation shows the dynamic of each infection compartments which gives a description of within-host dynamic of dengue virus. These results show particularly that infected compartments tend to be vanished in ±15days after the onset of the virus. In fact, without any control added, the haematocrit level will decrease but not up to the normal level. Therefore the effective haematocrit normalization should be done with the treatment control. Control treatment for a fixed time using a control input can bring haematocrit level to normal range 42-47%. The optimal control in this paper is divided into three cases, i.e. fixed end point, constrained input, and tracking haematocrit state. Each case shows different infection condition in human body. However, all cases require that the haematocrit level to be in normal range in fixed final time.

  7. Retrospective evaluation of continuous rate infusion of regular insulin intravenously for the management of feline diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Pamela N; Moore, Lisa E

    2015-01-01

    The use and efficacy of continuous rate infusion (CRI) of regular insulin intravenously for the treatment of feline diabetic ketoacidosis was retrospectively evaluated. The study focused on the rate of glucose decline, time to resolution of inappetence, time to long-term injectable insulin, and length of hospital stay. Review of medical records from 2009 to 2011 identified 10 cases that met the inclusion criteria. Six cats were existing diabetics, 3 of whom had recent insulin changes. Five cats had concurrent diseases. The mean time to long-term injectable insulin was 55 hours. The mean length of hospitalization was 3.8 days. Five cats survived to discharge. In 5 patients, an insulin CRI permitted a short hospital stay and transition to long-term injectable insulin. Many cats with diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis are prior diabetics with concurrent disease and/or a history of recent insulin changes.

  8. Control of acute pain after major abdominal surgery in 585 patients given tramadol and ketorolac by intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Pieri, M; Meacci, L; Santini, L; Santini, G; Dollorenzo, R; Sansevero, A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of postoperative pain relief using tramadol and ketorolac in continuous intravenous infusion. The 585 patients included in the study underwent major surgery according to a protocol involving the parenteral administration of 100 mg tramadol approximately 40 min before the end of surgery. This was followed by the continuous intravenous infusion of 600 mg tramadol and 180 mg ketorolac diluted with physiological solution to a total volume of 96 ml. Delivery was carried out using an elastomeric pump or a syringe pump and administered over a 48-hour period at a constant rate of 2 ml/h. Any further doses consisted of 100 mg tramadol up to a maximum of 300 mg over a 24-h period. Pain was assessed on a verbal numeric scale (VNS). For each patient the intensity of pain was assessed both at rest and on movement (coughing, deep breathing, movement of lower limbs). At the scheduled times (T0-T72, every 6 h), the following parameters were evaluated: hemodynamic stability; respiratory function; the appearance of any side effects; the level of sedation; and the need for any further doses of analgesic. The analysis of the data obtained showed the good quality of postoperative pain relief achieved: pain intensity at rest was, on average, always below VNS level 3, while during movement it always had an average VNS level of 3-4. The only side effects found with any frequency were nausea (22.6%) and vomiting (8.5%); hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable. The method adopted was of limited cost and was well accepted by both patients and staff. On the basis of the data obtained, it is possible to affirm that the post-operative pain protocol proposed is effective, safe, without significant side effects, and of limited cost. Therefore, it is the first choice protocol for our operating unit after major abdominal surgery. PMID:12224377

  9. Intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride improves epicenter blood flow during the acute stage of contusive spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Muradov, Johongir M; Hagg, Theo

    2013-05-15

    Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels at the site of contusive or compressive spinal cord injury lead to infarction and initiate secondary degeneration. Here, we used intravenous injection of endothelial-binding lectin followed by histology to show that the number of perfused microvessels at the injury site is decreased by 80-90% as early as 20 min following a moderate T9 contusion in adult female rats. Hemorrhage within the spinal cord also was maximal at 20 min, consistent with its vasoconstrictive actions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microvascular blood flow recovered to up to 50% of normal volume in the injury penumbra by 6 h, but not at the epicenter. A comparison with an endothelial cell marker suggested that many microvessels fail to be reperfused up to 48 h post-injury. The ischemia was probably caused by vasospasm of vessels penetrating the parenchyma, because repeated Doppler measurements over the spinal cord showed a doubling of total blood flow over the first 12 h. Moreover, intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride, used clinically to treat CNS vasospasm, greatly improved the number of perfused microvessels at 24 and 48 h. The magnesium treatment seemed safe as it did not increase hemorrhage, despite the improved parenchymal blood flow. However, the treatment did not reduce acute microvessel, motor neuron or oligodendrocyte loss, and when infused for 7 days did not affect functional recovery or spared epicenter white matter over a 4 week period. These data suggest that microvascular blood flow can be restored with a clinically relevant treatment following spinal cord injury.

  10. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h. PMID:24071567

  11. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h.

  12. Improvement of the microcirculation in the acute ischemic rat limb during intravenous infusion of drag-reducing polymers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feng; Zha, Daogang; Du, Rongsheng; Chen, Xianghui; Zhou, Bingjie; Xiu, Jiancheng; Bin, Jianping; Liu, Yili

    2011-01-01

    Drag-reducing polymers (DRPs) are blood-soluble macromolecules that can increase blood flow and reduce vascular resistance. The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of DRPs on microcirculation in rat hind limb during acute femoral artery occlusion. Two groups of 20 male Wistar rats were subjected to either hemodynamic measurement or contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEU) imaging during peripheral ischemia. Both groups were further subdivided into a DRP-treated group or a saline-treated group. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) was chosen as the test DRP, and rats were injected with either 10 ppm PEO solution or saline through the caudal vein at a constant rate of 5 ml/h for 20 min. Abdominal aortic flow, iliac artery pressure, iliac vein pressure, heart rate, carotid artery pressure and central venous pressure (CVP) were monitored, and vascular resistance was calculated by (iliac artery pressure-iliac vein pressure)/abdominal aortic blood flow. Flow perfusion and capillary volume of skeletal muscle were measured by CEU. During PEO infusion, abdominal aortic blood flow increased (p<0.001) and vascular resistance decreased (p<0.001) compared to rats that received saline during peripheral ischemia. There was no significant change in ischemic skeletal capillary volume (A) with DRP treatment (p>0.05), but red blood cell velocity (β) and capillary blood flow (A×β) increased significantly (p<0.05) during PEO infusion. In addition, A, β and A×β all increased (p<0.05) in the contralateral hind limb muscle. In contrast, PEO had no significant influence on heart rate, mean carotid artery blood pressure or CVP. Intravenous infusion of drag reducing polymers may offer a novel hydrodynamic approach for improving microcirculation during acute peripheral ischemia.

  13. A phase I trial of bryostatin 1 in patients with advanced malignancy using a 24 hour intravenous infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Jayson, G. C.; Crowther, D.; Prendiville, J.; McGown, A. T.; Scheid, C.; Stern, P.; Young, R.; Brenchley, P.; Chang, J.; Owens, S.

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is a macrocyclic lactone derived from the marine invertebrate Bugula neritina. In vitro, bryostatin 1 activates protein kinase C (PKC), induces the differentiation of a number of cancer cell lineages, exhibits anti-tumour activity and augments the response of haemopoietic cells to certain growth factors. In vivo, bryostatin 1 is also immunomodulatory, but the range of tumours which respond to bryostatin 1 in xenograft tumour models is mostly the same as the in vitro tumour types, suggesting a direct mode of action. Nineteen patients with advanced malignancy were entered into a phase I study in which bryostatin 1 was given as a 24 h intravenous infusion, weekly, for 8 weeks. Myalgia was the dose-limiting toxicity and the maximum tolerated dose was 25 micrograms m-2 per week. The myalgia was cumulative and dose related, and chiefly affected the thighs, calves and muscles of extraocular movement. The mechanism of the myalgia is unknown. CTC grade 1 phlebitis affected every patient for at least one cycle and was caused by the diluent, PET, which contains polyethylene glycol, ethanol and Tween 80. Most patients experienced a 1 g dl-1 decrease in haemoglobin within 1 h of commencing the infusion which was associated with a decrease in haematocrit. Radiolabelled red cell studies were performed in one patient to investigate the anaemia. The survival of radiolabelled red cells during the week following treatment was the same as that seen in the week before treatment. However, there was a temporary accumulation of radiolabelled red cells in the liver during the first hour of treatment, suggesting that pooling of erythrocytes in the liver might account for the decrease in haematocrit. Total or activated PKC concentrations were measured in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of three patients for the first 4 h of treatment and during the last hour of the infusion. This showed that PKC activity was significantly modulated during the infusion. Bryostatin

  14. First Clinical Experience with a High-Capacity Implantable Infusion Pump for Continuous Intravenous Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Damascelli, Bruno; Patelli, Gianluigi; Frigerio, Laura F.; Lanocita, Rodolfo; Di Tolla, Giuseppe; Marchiano, Alfonso; Spreafico, Carlo; Garbagnati, Francesco; Bonalumi, Maria G.; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Ticha, Vladimira; Prino, Aurelio

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of a new high-capacity pump for systemic venous chemotherapy and to verify the quality of implantation by interventional radiology staff. Methods: A total of 47 infusion pumps with a 60-ml reservoir and variable flow rates (2, 6, 8, or 12 ml/24 hr) were implanted by radiologists in 46 patients with solid tumor metastases requiring treatment with a single, continuously infused cytostatic agent. The reservoir was refilled transcutaneously, usually once weekly. The flow accuracy of the pump was assessed from actual drug delivery recorded on 34 patients over a minimum observation period of 180 days. Results: No early complications occurred in any of the 47 implants in 46 patients. A total of 12 (25.53%) complications occurred between 3 and 24 months after implantation. Seven (14.90%) of these were due to the external design of the pump, while five (10.63%) were related to the central venous catheter. In the 34 patients available for pump evaluation (follow-up of at least 180 days), the system was used for a total of 14,191 days (range 180-911 days, mean 417.38 days), giving an overall complication rate of 0.84 per 1000 days of operation. The mean flow rate accuracy was 90.26%. Conclusion: The new implantable pump showed good flow rate accuracy and reliable operation. The pump-related complications were related to its external design and have now been corrected by appropriate modifications. From a radiologic and surgical viewpoint, the venous implantation procedure is identical to that of conventional vascular access devices and can be performed by radiologists familiar with these techniques. The current limitations lie in the high cost of the pump and, for certain drugs, the short time between refills.

  15. Stability studies of lincomycin hydrochloride in aqueous solution and intravenous infusion fluids

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Boddy, Michael; Sunderland, Bruce; Hughes, Jeff D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical stability of Lincocin® (lincomycin hydrochloride) in commonly used intravenous fluids at room temperature (25°C), at accelerated-degradation temperatures and in selected buffer solutions. Materials and methods The stability of Lincocin® injection (containing lincomycin 600 mg/2 mL as the hydrochloride) stored at 25°C±0.1°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s), 0.9% sodium chloride, 5% glucose, and 10% glucose solutions was investigated over 31 days. Forced degradation of Lincocin® in hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide was performed at 60°C. The effect of pH on the degradation rate of lincomycin hydrochloride stored at 80°C was determined. Results Lincomycin hydrochloride w as found to maintain its shelf life at 25°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution, with less than 5% lincomycin degradation occurring in all intravenous solutions over a 31-day period. Lincomycin hydrochloride showed less rapid degradation at 60°C in acid than in basic solution, but degraded rapidly in hydrogen peroxide. At all pH values tested, lincomycin followed first-order kinetics. It had the greatest stability near pH 4 when stored at 80°C (calculated shelf life of 4.59 days), and was least stable at pH 2 (calculated shelf life of 0.38 days). Conclusion Lincocin® injection was chemically found to have a shelf life of at least 31 days at 25°C when added to sodium lactate (Hartmann’s) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution. Solutions prepared at approximately pH 4 are likely to have optimum stability. PMID:27022242

  16. Acute hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of Ajuga iva L. Schreber whole plant in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Hilaly, Jaouad; Tahraoui, Adil; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2007-10-01

    The hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of the whole plant Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (Labiatae) (AI-extract) was investigated in anesthetized normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The AI-extract was administered to a group of rats by continuous intravenous infusion for 4 h at a dose of 4.2 microg/min/100 g body weight; another group was infused with taurine, the reference compound, at the same dose. In normal rats, AI-extract infusion had no effect on plasma glucose or triglycerides, but plasma cholesterol levels were significantly decreased (22%; P<0.05). However, taurine infusion produced significant hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects (all changes, P<0.05). In STZ-diabetic rats, AI-extract infusion reduced plasma levels of glucose by 24 % (P<0.05), cholesterol by 35% (P<0.01) and triglycerides by 13% (P<0.05). Infusion with taurine produced a greater fall in plasma glucose (72%, P<0.01), cholesterol (54%; P<0.001) and triglyceride (24%; P<0.001) levels. Our results indicate that intravenously administered AI-extract exerts hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic rats by mechanism(s) which appear to be similar to that of taurine, which involve insulin sensitization or an insulin-like effect. The identity and the exact mechanism(s) of action of the active component(s) of the AI-extract are not known. Ajuga iva appears to be a useful plant in the therapy of diabetes, a condition in which hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia coexist quite often.

  17. Postoperative analgesia in children: a prospective study in intermittent intramuscular injection versus continuous intravenous infusion of morphine.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, M; Myre, L; Johnson, D G; Matlak, M E; Black, R E; Sullivan, J J

    1990-02-01

    Few advancements in postoperative pain control in children have been made despite longstanding inadequacies in conventional intramuscular analgesic regimens. While overestimating narcotic complication rates, physicians often underestimate efficacious doses, nurses are reluctant to give injections, and many children in pain shy away from shots. This study prospectively focuses on the safety, efficacy, and complication rate of intermittent intramuscular (IM) versus continuous intravenous infusion (IV) of morphine sulfate (MS) in 46 nonventilated children following major chest, abdominal, or orthopedic surgical procedures. Twenty patients assigned to the IM group had a mean age of 6.17 years and a mean weight of 23.0 kg. Twenty-six patients assigned to the IV group had a mean age of 8.74 years and a mean weight of 27.4 kg. The mean IM MS dose was 12.3 micrograms/kg/h while the mean IV dose was 19.8 micrograms/kg/h (P less than .001). Postoperative pain was assessed with a linear analogue scale from 1 to 10 (1, "doesn't hurt"; 10, "worst hurt possible") for 3 days following operation. Using the analysis of covariance (ANACOVA), nurse, parent, and patient mean pain scores in the IV group were significantly lower than those of the IM group when controlled for age, MS dose, and complications (P less than .007). Nurse assessment of pain correlated well with the patient and parent assessments (Pearson correlation coefficients greater than 0.6). Not only did IV infusion give better pain relief than IM injections, but there were no major complications such as respiratory depression. Minor complications in this study (nausea, urinary retention, drowsiness, vomiting, hallucinations, lightheadedness, and prolonged ileus) were not significantly different between IM and IV groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2303987

  18. Effects of intravenous magnesium infusion on in vivo release of acetylcholine and catecholamine in rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Fumiaki; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Toji; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Nosaka, Syuichi; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2013-10-01

    We applied microdialysis technique to the left adrenal medulla of anesthetized rats and examined the effects of intravenous Mg(2+) infusion on presynaptic acetylcholine (ACh) release and postsynaptic catecholamine release induced by electrical stimulation of splanchnic nerves. The dialysis probes were perfused with Ringer's solution containing neostigmine. Low-dose MgSO4 (25 μmol/kg/min for 30 min i.v.) increased mean plasma Mg(2+) concentration to 2.5mM; the administration suppressed norepinephrine (NE) release by approximately 30% and epinephrine (Epi) release by approximately 20%, but did not affect ACh release. High-dose MgSO4 (50 μmol/kg/min for 30 min i.v.) increased mean plasma Mg(2+) concentration to 3.8mM; the administration suppressed ACh release by approximately 25%, NE release by approximately 60% and Epi release by approximately 45%. Administration of Na2SO4 (50 μmol/kg/min for 30 min i.v.) did not change the release of ACh, NE or Epi. Local administration of nifedipine (200 μM) suppressed NE release by approximately 40% and Epi release by approximately 30%, but did not affect ACh release. In the presence of nifedipine, low-dose MgSO4 did not suppress the release of ACh, or further suppress NE or Epi compared to nifedipine alone, but high-dose MgSO4 suppressed ACh release by approximately 25% and further suppressed NE release by approximately 60% and Epi release by approximately 50% compared to nifedipine alone. In conclusion, intravenous administration of Mg(2+) inhibits both presynaptic ACh release and postsynaptic catecholamine release in the adrenal medulla, but L-type Ca(2+) channel-controlled catecholamine release may be more sensitive to Mg(2+) than non-L-type Ca(2+) channel-controlled ACh release.

  19. Diffuse and persistent blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after contusive spinal cord injury rapidly recovers following intravenous infusion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takashi; Lankford, Karen L; Arroyo, Edgardo J; Sasaki, Masanori; Neyazi, Milad; Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery D

    2015-05-01

    Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to reduce the severity of experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), but mechanisms are not fully understood. One important consequence of SCI is damage to the microvasculature and disruption of the blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB). In the present study we induced a contusive SCI at T9 in the rat and studied the effects of intravenous MSC infusion on BSCB permeability, microvascular architecture and locomotor recovery over a 10week period. Intravenously delivered MSCs could not be identified in the spinal cord, but distributed primarily to the lungs where they survived for a couple of days. Spatial and temporal changes in BSCB integrity were assessed by intravenous infusions of Evans blue (EvB) with in vivo and ex vivo optical imaging and spectrophotometric quantitation of EvB leakage into the parenchyma. SCI resulted in prolonged BSCB leakage that was most severe at the impact site but disseminated extensively rostral and caudal to the lesion over 6weeks. Contused spinal cords also showed an increase in vessel size, reduced vessel number, dissociation of pericytes from microvessels and decreases in von Willebrand factor (vWF) and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) expression. In MSC-treated rats, BSCB leakage was reduced, vWF expression was increased and locomotor function improved beginning 1 week post-MSC infusion, i.e., 2weeks post-SCI. These results suggest that intravenously delivered MSCs have important effects on reducing BSCB leakage which could contribute to their therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Expirograms of O2, CO2 and intravenously infused C2H2 and Freon-22 during panting in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sipinková, I; Hahn, G; Hillebrecht, A; Meyer, M; Piiper, J

    1990-01-01

    To study pulmonary gas transport in panting, expirograms of several inert and respiratory gases were simultaneously measured in panting dogs. The experiments were performed on 5 conscious dogs (mean body weight 34.4 kg) provided with a chronic tracheostomy. Panting at a mean frequency of 312/min (5.2 Hz) was induced by elevated room temperature (mean 28.1 degrees C). Isotonic saline equilibrated with 50% acetylene and 50% Freon-22 was infused intravenously at a constant rate (4 ml/min). Fractional concentrations in the tracheostomy tube were measured by a respiratory mass spectrometer, using a special sampling system designed for quasi-continuous analysis of rapidly changing gas concentrations. Air flow was monitored by an ultrasonic transit-time flowmeter. A tracing of expired gas concentrations versus expired volume showed no alveolar plateau, displaying a steep increase of Freon-22, acetylene and CO2 (decrease of O2) up to the onset of inspiration. The small but statistically highly significant differences between the expirograms of CO2 and O2, and of Freon-22 and acetylene, could be qualitatively explained by ventilation-perfusion inequalities with sequential emptying, by Taylor dispersion and by reversible solution in airway mucosa in the course of the respiratory cycle.

  1. A Holstein cow-calf model for the transfer of ciprofloxacin through milk after a long-term intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, O A; Idowu, O R; Heller, D; Smith, M; Nochetto, C; Chamberlain, P L; Gehring, R; von Bredow, J

    2013-10-01

    This study is part of an ongoing effort to develop animal models that provide milk and sufficient infant (offspring) plasma samples to fully describe a drug's pharmacokinetics to quantitate the risk to the nursing infant. Ciprofloxacin was administered to six healthy Holstein cows as a constant rate intravenous infusion (flow rate was weight adjusted) to achieve a steady-state concentration of approximately 300 ng/mL for 7 days. Plasma and milk samples were collected from the cow at regular intervals over the course of the 7 days. The plasma and milk samples were analyzed for ciprofloxacin by high-performance liquid chromatography. The milk was fed to calves, and calf plasma samples were analyzed to study the lactational transfer of ciprofloxacin from dam to nursing neonate. Remarkably, concentrations of ciprofloxacin in milk were 45 times higher than plasma drug concentrations in the dam. Approximately 6% of the administered dose was transferred to the milk, resulting in an average oral dose of 0.5 mg/kg to the calves with every feeding. The drug did not accumulate in the calves, and plasma concentrations were between one-tenth and one-fifth the plasma concentrations of the dam.

  2. Time Savings with Rituximab Subcutaneous Injection versus Rituximab Intravenous Infusion: A Time and Motion Study in Eight Countries

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Erwin; Kritikou, Persefoni; Sandoval, Mariana; Tao, Sunning; Wiesner, Christof; Carella, Angelo Michele; Ngoh, Charles; Waterboer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Rituximab is a standard treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The SABRINA trial (NCT01200758) showed that a subcutaneous (SC) rituximab formulation did not compromise efficacy or safety compared with intravenous (IV) infusion. We aimed to quantify active healthcare professional (HCP) time and patient chair time for rituximab SC and IV, including potential time savings. Methods This non-interventional time and motion study was run in eight countries and 30 day oncology units. Rituximab SC data were collected alongside the MabCute trial (NCT01461928); IV data were collected per routine real-world practice. Trained observers recorded active HCP time for pre-specified tasks (stopwatch) and chair time (time of day). A random intercept model was used to analyze active HCP time (by task and for all tasks combined) in the treatment room and drug preparation area, drug administration duration, chair time and patient treatment room time by country and/or across countries. Active HCP and chair time were extrapolated to a patient’s first year of treatment (11 rituximab sessions). Results Mean active HCP time was 35.0 and 23.7 minutes for IV and SC process, respectively (-32%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction in time was 27–58%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated active HCP time (first year of treatment) was 1.1–5.2 hours. Mean chair time was 262.1 minutes for IV, including 180.9 minutes infusion duration, vs. 67.3 minutes for SC, including 8.3 minutes SC injection administration (-74%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction was 53–91%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated chair time for the first year of treatment was 3.1–5.5 eight-hour days. Conclusions Compared with rituximab IV, rituximab SC was associated with reduced chair time and active HCP time. The latter could be invested in other activities, whereas the former may lead to more available appointments, reducing waiting lists and increasing the efficiency of day oncology units. Trial

  3. Effects of Rate of Infusion and Probenecid on Serum Levels, Renal Excretion, and Tolerance of Intravenous Doses of Cefoxitin in Humans: Comparison with Cephalothin

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Stewart; Raftery, E. B.; Goldberg, A. D.; Skeggs, H.; Till, A. E.; Martin, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Using a randomized crossover design, 1-g intravenous doses of cephalothin and cefoxitin, a cephalosporinase-resistant cephamycin, were infused into 12 normal adult males over periods of 120, 30, and 3 min, the last with and without prior intravenous infusions of probenecid (1 g). Mean peak serum concentrations of antibiotic activity after cephalothin infusions were 23, 56, 103, and 102 μg/ml, respectively, and after cefoxitin infusions they were 27, 74, 115, and 125 μg/ml, respectively. Probenecid treatment prolonged the terminal serum half-life of cephalothin-like activity from 0.52 to 1.0 h, and of cefoxitin from 0.68 to 1.4 h. In contrast to cephalothin, which was found to be metabolized about 25% to the less active desacetyl form, cefoxitin was metabolized less than 2% to the virtually inactive descarbamyl form, as judged from urinary recoveries. Neither antibiotic displayed detectable organ toxicity. Of 300 recent clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli other than Pseudomonas spp., 83% were susceptible to cephalothin but 95% were susceptible to cefoxitin. Organisms resistant to cephalothin but susceptible to cefoxitin included strains of Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella spp., Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter spp., and Bacteroides spp. PMID:15830485

  4. A rapid infusion pump driven by micro electromagnetic linear actuation for pre-hospital intravenous fluid administration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Chong, Yinbao; Zhao, An; Lang, Lang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Jiuling

    2015-02-01

    A rapid infusion pump with a maximum flow rate of 6 L/h was designed experimentally using a micro electromagnetic linear actuator, and its effectiveness was evaluated by comparing with that of a commercial Power Infuser under preset flow rates of 0.2, 2, and 6 L/h. The flow rate, air detection sensitivity, occlusion response time, quantitative determination of hemolysis, and power consumption of the infusion devices were extensively investigated using statistical analysis methods (p < 0.05). The experimental results revealed that the flow rate of the designed infusion pump was more stable and accurate, and the hemolysis was significantly less than that of the Power Infuser. The air detection sensitivity and the power consumption could be comparable to that of the Power Infuser except the occlusion response time. The favorable performance made the designed infusion pump a potential candidate for applications in pre-hospital fluid administration.

  5. [Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy after intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium: a preliminary study in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, S; Yamashita, S; Suzuki, T; Muramatsu, T; Ide, M; Dohi, Y; Nishimura, K; Miyamae, T

    1991-12-01

    The feasibility and safety of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy after the intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium (ATP) (Adetphos, Kowa) were studied in eight patients with angina pectoris and/or old myocardial infarction. Coronary arteriography (CAG) was performed by the conventional method in all patients. ATP was infused for 5 min and thallium was injected at 3 min after the start of ATP infusion. ATP was given at 0.12 mg/min/kg in two patients (group A), 0.16 mg/min/kg in three patients (group B), 0.20 mg/min/kg in one patient (group C) and 0.28 mg/min/kg in two patients (group D). SPECT images were obtained at 10 min and 180 min after thallium injection. No significant hemodynamic changes were observed in group A and B. Severe hypotension was observed in group C and one member of group D. Chest pain was experienced by one patient in group A, two in group B, one in group C, and both of the two in group D. ST depression on the electrocardiogram (ECG) was documented in one patient each of groups B and C. In one group D patient, the study was discontinued because of complete atrioventricular block persistent for 5 beats. The correlation between thallium imaging and CAG was unclear in group A, reasonable in groups B and C, and obscure in group D because of side effects. None of the patients who developed side effects of ATP were administered sublingual nitroglycerin or intravenous aminophylline. Their symptoms or ECG changes improved spontaneously within 2 min and disappeared within 5 min after termination of infusion. In conclusion, the optimal ATP regimen for this purpose was considered to be a 5 min infusion at 0.16 mg/kg/min and this method was found to be feasible and safe. PMID:1784093

  6. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus: its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Jan G; Kirberger, Robert M; Steyl, Johan C A; Soley, John T; Booyse, Dirk G; Huchzermeyer, Fritz W; Lowers, Russel H; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-05

    The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2) by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions.

  7. Changes in the linear attenuation coefficient of canine appendicular bone following intravenous infusion of strontium lactate, measured using gamma-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Overton, T R; Snyder, R E; Hangartner, T N; Girgis, S; Audette, R J; Secord, D C

    1992-04-01

    Changes in the average linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) within a fixed measurement volume in the proximal end of the dog tibia, which contains trabecular bone and associated soft tissues (the trabecular bone "space"), were monitored continuously using gamma-ray computed tomography (gamma-CT) prior to, during, and following intravenous infusion of strontium (Sr) lactate. An infusion of 1.3-4.7 g of Sr over a period of 110-160 minutes into 20-kg dogs resulted, within 6-8 hours, in an increase of 0.019-0.045 cm-1 (P less than 0.002) in the LAC. Calibration of the gamma-CT system showed that 0.44 mg/cm3 of Sr produced a change of 0.01 cm-1 in the LAC. Using this conversion factor, the Sr concentration in the trabecular bone space resulting from infusion, as measured by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, agreed with that predicted by the change observed in the LAC. Sr present in the serum and urine was consistent with the changes observed in the LAC over the study period. Control dogs infused with mineral-free solutions showed no change in LAC. Calcium equivalents required to give the changes observed in the LAC using Sr indicate that variations in skeletal turnover in man can be monitored in the peripheral skeleton using gamma-CT. PMID:1571847

  8. Intravenous infusion of erythromycin inhibits CXC chemokine production, but augments neutrophil degranulation in whole blood stimulated with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Schultz, M J; Speelman, P; Hack, C E; Buurman, W A; van Deventer, S J; van Der Poll, T

    2000-08-01

    Macrolides may influence the inflammatory response to an infection by mechanisms that are unrelated to their antimicrobial effect. Indeed, erythromycin and other macrolides inhibit cytokine production and induce degranulation of neutrophils in vitro. CXC chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that specifically influence neutrophil functions. To determine the effect of a clinically relevant dose of erythromycin on the production of CXC chemokines and neutrophil degranulation, six healthy humans received a 30 min iv infusion of erythromycin (1000 mg). Whole blood obtained before and at various times after the infusion was stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae. Ex vivo production of the CXC chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8) and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant 78 (ENA-78), in whole blood obtained after erythromycin infusion, was lower than that in blood drawn before erythromycin infusion (maximum inhibition post-infusion: 32.9 +/- 6.5% and 35.2 +/- 12.6% decrease in production, respectively, expressed as percentage change relative to production before infusion of erythromycin, both P < 0.05). In contrast, infusion of erythromycin was associated with an enhanced capacity of whole blood to release the neutrophil degranulation products bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI), human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and human lactoferrin (HLF) upon stimulation with S. pneumoniae. Effects of erythromycin were greatest 4 h after infusion was stopped, when BPI, HNE and HLF concentrations were increased by +107.6 +/- 33.5%, +134.7 +/- 34.8% and +205.9 +/- 55.9 %, respectively (expressed as percentage change relative to production before infusion of erythromycin) (all P < 0. 05). These results indicate the ability of erythromycin to reduce CXC chemokine production and to enhance neutrophil degranulation in human blood.

  9. Cisplatin Concentrations in Long and Short Duration Infusion: Implications for the Optimal Time of Radiation Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu Susan; Das, Saikat; Isaiah, Rajesh; John, Subashini; Prabha, Ratna; Fleming, Denise Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cisplatin has radiosensitizing properties and the best sensitization to radiotherapy occurs with a higher plasma concentration of cisplatin. To our knowledge the optimal time sequence between chemotherapy and administration of radiation therapy, to obtain maximum effect from concurrent chemoradiation is unclear. Aim The aim of this study was to measure the two cisplatin infusion regimens in order to determine the total and free cisplatin post infusion concentration changes over time. These changes may have clinical implications on the optimum time of administration of post infusion radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Two cohorts of patients were recruited and both, total and free plasma concentration of cisplatin following long and short durations of intravenous infusion was determined. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 5 hours from the start of the infusion in the 1hour infusion group and at 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 6 and 24 hours from the start of the infusion, in the 3 hour infusion group. Total and free cisplatin concentrations were measured using a validated HPLC-UV method. Results The highest concentration of total and free cisplatin was achieved at the end of the infusion in both regimens. Total cisplatin concentration declined 30 minutes after the end of infusion in both the groups. After 1hour of discontinuing cisplatin, the free cisplatin concentration also declined significantly. Conclusion We conclude that radiation should be administered within 30 minutes of completion of the infusion irrespective of the duration of infusion. PMID:27630935

  10. Evaluation of Meropenem Regimens Suppressing Emergence of Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii with Human Simulated Exposure in an In Vitro Intravenous-Infusion Hollow-Fiber Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Xian-Jia; Yang, Yang; Gong, Wei-Tao; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Ying-Qun

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to carbapenems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be suppressed by optimizing the administration of meropenem. However, whether the same is true for Acinetobacter baumannii is not fully understood. We assessed the bactericidal activity of meropenem and its potency to suppress the emergence of resistance in A. baumannii with human simulated exposure in an in vitro intravenous-infusion hollow-fiber infection model (HFIM). Two clinical strains of carbapenem-susceptible multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (CS-MDRAB), CSRA24 and CSRA91, were used, and their MICs and mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) were determined. Six meropenem dosage regimens (0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g given every 8 h [q8h] with a 0.5-h or 3-h infusion for seven consecutive days) were simulated and then evaluated in the HFIM. Both the total population and resistant subpopulations of the two strains were quantified. Drug concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. All dosage regimens, except for the lowest dosage (0.5 g for both the 0.5-h and 3-h infusions), showed 3-log CFU/ml bacterial killing. Dosage regimens of 2.0 g with 0.5-h and 3-h infusions exhibited an obvious bactericidal effect and suppressed resistance. Selective amplification of subpopulations with reduced susceptibility to meropenem was suppressed with a percentage of the dosage interval in which meropenem concentrations exceeded the MPC (T>MPC) of ≥20% or with a ratio of T>MPC to the percentage of the dosage interval in which drug concentrations are within the mutant selection window of ≥0.25. Our in vitro data support the use of a high dosage of meropenem (2.0 g q8h) for the treatment of severe infection caused by CS-MDRAB. PMID:25182633

  11. Effect of dietary nitrogen content and intravenous urea infusion on ruminal and portal-drained visceral extraction of arterial urea in lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, N B; Storm, A C; Larsen, M

    2010-06-01

    Urea extraction across ruminal and portal-drained visceral (PDV) tissues were investigated using 9 rumen-cannulated and multi-catheterized lactating dairy cows adapted to low-N (12.9% crude protein) and high-N (17.1% crude protein) diets in a crossover design. The interaction between adaptation to dietary treatments and blood plasma concentrations of urea was studied by dividing samplings into a 2.5-h period without urea infusion followed by a 2.5-h period with primed continuous intravenous infusion of urea (0.493+/-0.012 mmol/kg of BW per h). Cows were sampled at 66+/-14 and 68+/-12 d in milk and produced 42+/-1 and 36+/-1 kg of milk/d with the high-N and low-N diets, respectively. The arterial blood urea concentration before urea infusion was 1.37 and 4.09+/-0.18 mmol/L with low-N and high-N, respectively. Dietary treatment did not affect the urea infusion-induced increase in arterial urea concentration (1.91+/-0.13 mmol/L). Arterial urea extraction across the PDV and rumen increased from 2.7 to 5.4+/-0.5% and from 7.1 to 23.8+/-2.1% when cows were changed from high-N to low-N, respectively. Urea infusion did not decrease urea extractions, implying that urea transport rates were proportional to arterial urea concentrations. Urea extraction increased more across the rumen wall than across the total PDV for low-N compared with high-N, which implies that a larger proportion of total PDV uptake of arterial urea is directed toward the rumen with decreasing N intake. The ruminal vein - arterial (RA) concentration difference for ammonia increased instantly (first sampling 15 min after initiation of infusion) to the primed intravenous infusion when cows were adapted to the low-N diet. The RA difference for ammonia correlated poorly to the ventral ruminal concentration of ammonia (r=0.55). Relating the RA difference for ammonia to a function of both ruminal ammonia concentration and the RA difference for urea markedly improved the fit (r=0.85), indicating that a large

  12. Effect of Intra-Medullar and Intra-Venous Infusions of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cell Engraftment by In-Vivo Cell Tracking and Osteoinductivity in Rabbit Long Bones: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Ohmine, Ken; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stem cell therapy can be an efficacious treatment option for bone fragility disorders (eg, osteogenesis imperfecta, disuse osteopenia, and osteoporosis), and successful cell therapy application may be dependent on optimal cell engraftment in target bones. The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency of intra-medullar and intra-venous delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to improve cell engraftment rate, bone mineral density, and micro-architecture. Methods By using six healthy juvenile New Zealand White rabbits, MSC were isolated from cancellous bone harvests and confirmed to have osteogenic capacity by inducing ectopic bone formation. The MSC were cultured, transduced by foamy viral vectors with marker genes for in vivo cell tracking, and expanded. All rabbits had one randomly selected limb receive intra-medullar infusion of 3×107 to 1×108 autologous MSC in the distal femur or the distal femur and proximal tibia. Two of six rabbits also received an intra-venous MSC infusion. At 28 days, MSC bone engraftment was assessed by PCR and the bone density and microstructure assessed by computed tomography and histomorphometry. Results The intra-medullar-infused MSC were detected in epiphysis or diaphysis of the distal femurs and/or proximal tibiae. Infused MSC comprised 0.01 to 0.3% of all cells in the bone tissues. The intra-venous-infused MSC were not detected in any location. Neither intra-medullar nor intra-venous MSC infusion altered bone volume, bone mineral density, or cortical bone porosity/thickness. Systemic biodistribution of intra-medullar-infused MSC was not evident. Conclusions Our results indicated that intra-medullar infusion can be an effective cell delivery route for stem cell therapy potentially for orthopedic disorders, in preference to systemic administration. Further research is warranted to demonstrate an efficacy of intra-medullar MSC infusion on bone density and micro-architecture using animal models of bone disorders

  13. Intravenous ethanol increases dopamine release in the ventral striatum in humans: PET study using bolus-plus-infusion administration of [11C]raclopride

    PubMed Central

    Aalto, Sargo; Ingman, Kimmo; Alakurtti, Kati; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Virkkala, Jussi; Någren, Kjell; Rinne, Juha O; Scheinin, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol increases the interstitial dopamine (DA) concentration in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of experimental animals, but positron emission tomography (PET) studies using the single-bolus protocol of the [11C]-raclopride competition paradigm have yielded conflicting results in humans. To resolve disparate previous findings, we utilized the bolus-plus-infusion (B/I) method, allowing both baseline and intervention quantification of [11C]raclopride binding during a single 105-minute PET scan, to investigate possible ethanol-induced DA release in nine healthy male subjects. A 25-minute intravenous ethanol (7.6%) infusion, resulting in a 1.3 g/L mean blood ethanol concentration, was administered using masked timing during the PET scan. Automated region-of-interest analysis testing the difference between baseline (40–50 minutes) and intervention (60–85 minutes) revealed an average 12.6% decrease in [11C]raclopride binding in the ventral striatum (VST, P=0.003) including the NAcc. In addition, a shorter time interval from the start of ethanol infusion to the first subjective effect was associated with a greater binding potential decrease bilaterally in the VST (r=0.92, P=0.004), and the feeling of pleasure was associated with a decrease in binding potential values in both the caudate nucleus (r=−0.87, P=0.003) and putamen (r=−0.74; P=0.02). These results confirm that ethanol induces rapid DA release in the limbic striatum, which can be reliably estimated using the B/I method in one imaging session. PMID:25492110

  14. Oligodeoxynucleotide CpG 7909 delivered as intravenous infusion demonstrates immunologic modulation in patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Link, Brian K; Ballas, Zuhair K; Weisdorf, Daniel; Wooldridge, James E; Bossler, Aaron D; Shannon, Mary; Rasmussen, Wendy L; Krieg, Arthur M; Weiner, George J

    2006-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN) can alter various immune cell subsets important in antibody therapy of malignancy. We undertook a phase I trial of CPG 7909 (also known as PF-3512676) in patients with previously treated lymphoma with the primary objective of evaluating safety across a range of doses, and secondary objectives of evaluating immunomodulatory effects and clinical effects. Twenty-three patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma received up to 3 weekly 2-hour intravenous (IV) infusions of CPG ODN 7909 at dose levels 0.01 to 0.64 mg/kg. Evaluation of immunologic parameters and clinical endpoints occurred for 6 weeks. Infusion-related toxicity included grade 1 nausea, hypotension, and IV catheter discomfort. Serious adverse hematologic events observed more than once included anemia (2=Gr3, 2=Gr4), thrombocytopenia (4=Gr3), and neutropenia (2=Gr3), and were largely judged owing to progressive disease. Immunologic observations included: (1) The mean ratio of NK-cell concentrations compared with pretreatment at day 2 was 1.44 (95% CI=0.94-1.94) and at day 42 was 1.53 (95% CI=1.14-1.91); (2) NK activity generally increased in subjects; and (3) Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity increased in select cohorts. No clinical responses were documented radiographically at day 42. Two subjects demonstrated late response. We conclude CpG 7909 can be safely given as a 2-hour IV infusion to patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma at doses that have immunomodulatory effects. PMID:16971811

  15. Pharmacokinetics of R 82913 in AIDS patients: a phase I dose-finding study of oral administration compared with intravenous infusion.

    PubMed Central

    De Wit, S; Hermans, P; Sommereijns, B; O'Doherty, E; Westenborghs, R; van de Velde, V; Cauwenbergh, G F; Clumeck, N

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oral administration of R 82913, or tetrahydroimidazol [4,5,1-jk]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one or -thione (TIBO), was compared with those of intravenous administration in five AIDS patients. TIBO was administered as a single daily 1-h infusion of 100 mg for 29 days and orally as a single daily dose for 14 days with three consecutive regimens of 100, 200, and 100 mg with probenecid (1 g) daily. Each cycle was followed by a wash-out period. Oral bioavailability of TIBO appears to be low and is not improved by the adjunction of probenecid. Trough levels obtained with oral administration systematically remained far below the 90% inhibitory concentration of TIBO against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Tolerance of TIBO was excellent. No clinical efficacy could be demonstrated. p24 antigenemia decreased significantly in one patient under intravenous therapy. TIBO derivatives are promising anti-HIV-1 agents in vitro, but improvement of oral bioavailability is needed before implementation of long-term efficacy and tolerability studies. Moreover, rapid emergence of resistance, which has been recently documented, constitutes a major problem with most nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. PMID:1482134

  16. A Comparison of Oxycodone and Alfentanil in Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia with a Time-Scheduled Decremental Infusion after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji Su; Kim, Seong Su; Kim, Young Ki; Hwang, Byeong Mun; Kang, Seong Sik; Son, Hee Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oxycodone, a semisynthetic opioid, has been widely used for acute and chronic pain. Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil on postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. A total of 82 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to receive either oxycodone or alfentanil using intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). PCA was administered as a time-scheduled decremental continuous infusion based on lean body mass for 48 hours postoperatively. Patients were assessed for pain with a visual analogue scale (VAS), the cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Results. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) between the two groups in VAS score, cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Conclusions. Our data showed that the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil were similar. Therefore, oxycodone may be a good alternative to alfentanil for pain management using intravenous PCA after laparoscopic cholecystectomy when used at a conversion ratio of 10 : 1. This trial is registered with KCT0001962. PMID:27725791

  17. A case of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation with a non-pulmonary vein trigger identified by intravenous adenosine triphosphate infusion

    PubMed Central

    Esato, Masahiro; Nishina, Naoto; Kida, Yoshitomi; Chun, YeongHwa

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our institution with frequent chest discomfort and was diagnosed with drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) was performed using a three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping system. After completion of left and right circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI), an intravenous bolus of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, 20 mg) was administered to evaluate the electric reconduction between the pulmonary vein (PV) and left atrium (LA). Although no PV–LA reconduction was observed, atrial fibrillation (AF) was reproducibly induced. As the duration of AF was very short (<20 s), no further RFCA to the LA was performed. One month later, the patient presented with frequent atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATs), and RFCA was repeated. Although no electric reconduction was observed in the left- or right-sided PVs, incessant ATs and AF were induced after an intravenous bolus administration of ATP. The earliest atrial activation site initiating ATs was consistently identified from electrodes positioned in the superior vena cava (SVC), and both ATs and AF were no longer inducible after electric isolation of the SVC. ATP-induced PV/non-PV ectopy may be a marker of increased susceptibility to autonomic triggers of AF and could potentially predict recurrent AF after CPVI. PMID:26550091

  18. [99mTc-MIBI myocardial tomography with intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Kumano, S

    1996-02-01

    To evaluate its feasibility, safety and diagnostic accuracy, 99mTc-MIBI myocardial tomography with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion (0.16 mg/kg/min for 5 min) was performed 100 consecutive patients using the stress/rest one day protocol. None of the patients required treatment with aminophylline during the study. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting patients with coronary artery disease were 97% and 71%, respectively. Those for detecting individual coronary lesion (> or = 75% stenosis) were 92% and 89%, respectively. The high hepatic uptake of 99mTc-MIBI causes artifactual perfusion defects in the inferior myocardial wall, particularly on ATP stress images. In order to reduce this artifactual phenomenon, the interval time between injection and stress imaging must be increased. PMID:8721103

  19. Intravenous infusion of ketamine-propofol can be an alternative to intravenous infusion of fentanyl-propofol for deep sedation and analgesia in paediatric patients undergoing emergency short surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Khutia, Samit Kumar; Mandal, Mohan C; Das, Sabyasachi; Basu, SR

    2012-01-01

    Background: Paediatric patients often present with different painful conditions that require immediate surgical interventions. Despite a plethora of articles on the ketamine–propofol combination, comprehensive evidence regarding the suitable sedoanalgesia regime is lacking due to heterogeneity in study designs. Methods: This prospective, randomized, double-blind, active–controlled trial was conducted in 100 children, of age 3–14 years, American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status IE-IIE, posted for emergency short surgical procedures. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either 2 mL of normal saline (pre-induction) plus calculated volume of drug from the 11 mL of ketamine–propofol solution for induction (group PK, n=50) or fentanyl 1.5 μg/kg diluted to 2 mL with normal saline (pre-induction) plus calculated volume of drug from the 11 mL of propofol solution for induction (group PF, n=50). In both the groups, the initial bolus propofol 1 mg/kg i.v. (assuming the syringes contained only propofol, for simplicity) was followed by adjusted infusion to achieve a Ramsay Sedation Scale score of six. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was the primary outcome measurement. Results: Data from 48 patients in group PK and 44 patients in group PF were available for analysis. Hypotension was found in seven patients (14.6%) in group PK compared with 17 (38.6%) patients in group PF (P=0.009). Intraoperative MAP was significantly lower in group PF than group PK when compared with baseline. Conclusion: The combination of low-dose ketamine and propofol is more effective and a safer sedoanalgesia regimen than the propofol–fentanyl combination in paediatric emergency short surgical procedures in terms of haemodynamic stability and lesser incidence of apnoea. PMID:22701205

  20. Effects of continuous rate intravenous infusion of butorphanol on physiologic and outcome variables in horses after celiotomy.

    PubMed

    Sellon, Debra C; Roberts, Malcolm C; Blikslager, Anthony T; Ulibarri, Catherine; Papich, Mark G

    2004-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial was performed to determine whether butorphanol administered by continuous rate infusion (CRI) for 24 hours after abdominal surgery would decrease pain and surgical stress responses and improve recovery in horses. Thirty-one horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy for abdominal pain were randomly assigned to receive butorphanol CRI (13 microg/kg/h for 24 hours after surgery; treatment) or isotonic saline (control). All horses received flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg IV q12h). There were no significant differences between treatment and control horses in preoperative or operative variables. Treatment horses had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentration compared with control horses at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after surgery. Mean weight loss while hospitalized was significantly less for treatment horses than control horses, whether expressed as total decrease in body weight (13.9+/-3.4 and 27.9+/-4.5 kg, respectively) or as a percentage decrease in body weight (2.6+/-0.7 and 6.3+/-1.1%, respectively). Treatment horses were significantly delayed in time to first passage of feces (median times of 15 and 4 hours, respectively). Treatment horses had significantly improved behavior scores during the first 24 hours after surgery, consistent with the conclusion that they experienced less pain during that time. Butorphanol CRI during the immediate postoperative period significantly decreased plasma cortisol concentrations and improved recovery characteristics in horses undergoing abdominal surgery. PMID:15320598

  1. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  2. Phase I trial of systemic intravenous infusion of interleukin-13-Pseudomonas exotoxin in patients with metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Kumar, Parag; Patel, Dhaval; Aufforth, Rachel; Neychev, Vladimir; Sadowski, Samira; Gara, Sudheer K; Joshi, Bharat H; Cottle-Delisle, Candice; Merkel, Roxanne; Yang, Lily; Miettinen, Markku; Puri, Raj K; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but lethal malignancy without effective current therapy for metastatic disease. IL-13-PE is a recombinant cytotoxin consisting of human interleukin-13 (IL-13) and a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). The main objectives of this Phase I dose-escalation trial were to assess the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of IL-13-PE in patients with metastatic ACC. Eligible patients had confirmed IL-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2) expressions in their tumors. IL-13-PE at dose of 1–2 μg/kg was administered intravenously (IV) on day 1, 3, and 5 in a 4-week cycle. Six patients received 1 μg/kg and two patients received 2 μg/kg of IL-13-PE. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed at 2 μg/kg, at which patients exhibited thrombocytopenia and renal insufficiency without requiring dialysis. PK analysis demonstrated that at MTD, the mean maximum serum concentration (Cmax) of IL-13-PE was 21.0 ng/mL, and the terminal half-life of IL-13-PE was 30–39 min. Two (25%) of the eight patients had baseline neutralizing antibodies against PE. Three (75%) of the remaining four tested patients developed neutralizing antibodies against IL-13-PE within 14–28 days of initial treatment. Of the five patients treated at MTD and assessed for response, one patient had stable disease for 5.5 months before disease progression; the others progressed within 1–2 months. In conclusion, systemic IV administration of IL-13-PE is safe at 1 μg/kg. All tested patients developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies during IL-13-PE treatment. Use of strategies for immunodepletion before IL-13-PE treatment should be considered in future trials. PMID:25767039

  3. Propofol as sole agent for paediatric day-case dental surgery. A randomised study comparing an intravenous propofol infusion with 100% inspired oxygen versus a nitrous oxide/oxygen/halothane maintenance technique.

    PubMed

    Moore, W J; Underwood, S

    1994-09-01

    After intravenous induction of anaesthesia with propofol (4 mg.kg-1) 80 unpremedicated children admitted for day-case dental extractions were randomly allocated to receive either an intravenous propofol infusion whilst breathing 100% oxygen, or inhalational nitrous oxide, oxygen and halothane for maintenance of anaesthesia. In both groups, the quality of anaesthesia was acceptable to both anaesthetist and surgeon. Recovery times and postoperative analgesia requirements did not differ significantly between the two groups. No child vomited. Propofol appears to be suitable for use as a sole agent in paediatric day case dental surgery.

  4. Propofol as sole agent for paediatric day-case dental surgery. A randomised study comparing an intravenous propofol infusion with 100% inspired oxygen versus a nitrous oxide/oxygen/halothane maintenance technique.

    PubMed

    Moore, W J; Underwood, S

    1994-09-01

    After intravenous induction of anaesthesia with propofol (4 mg.kg-1) 80 unpremedicated children admitted for day-case dental extractions were randomly allocated to receive either an intravenous propofol infusion whilst breathing 100% oxygen, or inhalational nitrous oxide, oxygen and halothane for maintenance of anaesthesia. In both groups, the quality of anaesthesia was acceptable to both anaesthetist and surgeon. Recovery times and postoperative analgesia requirements did not differ significantly between the two groups. No child vomited. Propofol appears to be suitable for use as a sole agent in paediatric day case dental surgery. PMID:7978143

  5. Intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, Brian G; Wang, Henry E

    2003-01-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital in the resuscitation of critically-ill children and adults. Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is a viable route for providing vascular access when traditional intravenous methods cannot be accomplished. IOI is relatively easy to perform and is a standard recommended intervention for the resuscitation of both adults and children. The authors review the history, anatomy, technique, and clinical application of IOI. They also highlight the use of IOI in the prehospital setting. PMID:12710793

  6. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  7. Bioequivalence and population pharmacokinetic modeling of two forms of antibiotic, cefuroxime lysine and cefuroxime sodium, after intravenous infusion in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Longshan; Li, Qing; Li, Xingang; Yin, Ran; Chen, Xiaohui; Geng, Lulu; Bi, Kaishun

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bioequivalence and the population pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime lysine and cefuroxime sodium in healthy beagle dogs. A randomized 2-period crossover design in 18 healthy beagle dogs after receiving 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg of cefuroxime lysine or cefuroxime sodium was conducted. A 3-compartment open model was used as the basic model for the population pharmacokinetic study. Both of the antibiotics exhibited dose-proportional pharmacokinetics over the dose range of 20-80 mg/kg. The mean relative bioavailability of cefuroxime lysine versus cefuroxime sodium was 1.05 (range, 0.71 to 1.42), with a significant difference between males and females. The estimates of population pharmacokinetic of CL, V(1), Q(2), V(2), Q(3), V(3) were 3.74 mL/h, 1.70 mL, 29.5 mL/min, 3.58 mL, 0.31 mL/min, and 158 mL for cefuroxime lysine and 4.10 mL/h, 1.00 mL, 38.5 mL/min, 4.19 mL, 0.06 mL/min, and 13.6 mL for cefuroxime sodium, respectively. The inter-individual variability was determined to be less than 29.1%. A linear pharmacokinetic was revealed for cefuroxime lysine and cefuroxime sodium in dogs after intravenous infusion, and the bioequivalence of these forms of the antibiotic was observed with the significant gender-related differences in mean relative bioavailability of cefuroxime lysine versus cefuroxime sodium.

  8. XG-102 administered to healthy male volunteers as a single intravenous infusion: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study

    PubMed Central

    Deloche, Catherine; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Mouz, Sébastien; Perino, Julien; Abadie, Claire; Combette, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the JNK inhibitor XG-102 in a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, sequential ascending dose parallel group Phase 1 Study. Three groups of male subjects received as randomly assigned ascending single XG-102 doses (10, 40, and 80 μg/kg; 6 subjects per dose) or placebo (2 subjects per dose) as an intravenous (IV) infusion over 60 min. Safety and tolerability were assessed by physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiography, eye examination, clinical laboratory tests and adverse events (AEs). PK was analyzed using noncompartmental methods. All reported AEs were mild to moderate and neither their number nor their distribution by System Organ Class suggest a dose relationship. Only headache and fatigue were considered probably or possibly study drug related. Headache frequency was similar for active and placebo, consequently this was not considered to be drug related but probably to study conditions. The other examinations did not show clinically relevant deviations or trends suggesting a XG-102 relationship. Geometric mean half-life was similar among doses, ranging from 0.36 to 0.65 h. Geometric mean XG-102 AUC0–last increased more than linearly with dose, 90% confidence intervals (CIs) did not overlap for the two highest doses. Geometric mean dose normalized Cmax values suggest a more than linear increase with dose but 90% CIs overlap. It may be concluded that XG-102 single IV doses of 10–80 μg/kg administered over 1 h to healthy male subjects were safe and well tolerated. PMID:25505576

  9. Intravenous Infusion of Phage-displayed Antibody Library in Human Cancer Patients: Enrichment and Cancer-Specificity of Tumor-Homing Phage-Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Girja S.; Krag, David N.; Peletskaya, Elena N.; Pero, Stephanie C.; Sun, Yu-Jing; Carman, Chelsea L.; McCahill, Laurence E.; Roland, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful method for target discovery and selection of ligands for cancer treatment and diagnosis. Our goal was to select tumor-binding antibodies in cancer patients. Eligibility criteria included absence of preexisting anti-phage antibodies and a Stage IV cancer status. All patients were intravenously administered 1×1011 TUs/kg of an scFv library 1 to 4 hours before surgical resection of their tumors. No significant adverse events related to the phage library infusion were observed. Phage were successfully recovered from all tumors. Individual clones from each patient were assessed for binding to the tumor from which clones were recovered. Multiple tumor-binding phage-antibodies were identified. Soluble scFv antibodies were produced from the phage clones showing higher tumor binding. The tumor-homing phage-antibodies and derived soluble scFvs were found to bind varying numbers (0 to 5) of 8 tested normal human tissues (breast, cervix, colon, kidney, liver, spleen, skin, and uterus). The clones that showed high tumor specificity were found to bind corresponding tumors from other patients also. Clone enrichment was observed based on tumor binding and DNA sequence data. Clone sequences of multiple variable regions showed significant matches to certain cancer-related antibodies. One of the clones (07-2355) that was found to share a 12-amino acid long motif with a reported IL-17A antibody was further studied for competitive binding for possible antigen target identification. We conclude that these outcomes support the safety and utility of phage display library panning in cancer patients for ligand selection and target discovery for cancer treatment and diagnosis. PMID:23736951

  10. Role of capsaicin-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons in anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of cholecystokinin, peptide YY-(3-36), and glucagon-like peptide-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Anders, Krista; Apenteng, Bettye

    2014-10-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced suppression of feeding is mediated by vagal sensory neurons that are destroyed by the neurotoxin capsaicin (CAP). Here we determined whether CAP-sensitive neurons mediate anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of gut hormones peptide YY-(3-36) [PYY-(3-36)] and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Rats received three intraperitoneal injections of CAP or vehicle (VEH) in 24 h. After recovery, non-food-deprived rats received at dark onset a 3-h intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (5, 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), PYY-(3-36) (5, 17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), or GLP-1 (17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). CCK-8 was much less effective in reducing food intake in CAP vs. VEH rats. CCK-8 at 5 and 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 39 and 71% in VEH rats and 7 and 18% in CAP rats. In contrast, PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 were similarly effective in reducing food intake in VEH and CAP rats. PYY-(3-36) at 5, 17, and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 15, 33, and 70% in VEH rats and 13, 30, and 33% in CAP rats. GLP-1 at 17 and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 48 and 60% in VEH rats and 30 and 52% in CAP rats. These results suggest that anorexic responses to PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 are not primarily mediated by the CAP-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons (presumably vagal) that mediate CCK-8-induced anorexia.

  11. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  12. Sloping alveolar plateaus of CO2, O2, and intravenously infused C2H2 and CHClF2 in the dog.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Mohr, M; Schulz, H; Piiper, J

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the role of the various mechanisms assumed to contribute to the slope of the alveolar plateau, two test gases exhibiting identical solubility but two-fold differing diffusivity, acetylene (C2H2) and chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22, CHClF2), dissolved in saline were intravenously infused in 10 anesthetized, paralyzed, artificially ventilated dogs (mean body mass, 18 kg). The partial pressures of C2H2, CHClF2, CO2 and O2 during a constant-flow single-breath washout maneuver were recorded by mass spectrometry and analyzed in terms of slope of the alveolar plateau (phase III) and series (Fowler) dead space. The slope of the alveolar plateau (S) was determined as the relative alveolar slope normalized to mixed-expired partial pressure and referred to expired volume (VE), S(V) = delta PE/(PE - PI)/delta VE or expiration time (tE), S(t) = delta PE/(PE - PI)/delta tE (subscripts I, E, and E refer to inspired, instantaneous expired and mixed-expired gas, respectively). The effects of expiratory flow rate (VE), and time of breath-hold (BH) were studied with reference to control conditions (VI = 0.5 L.sec-1, VE = 0.1 L.sec-1, VI = 50% and VE = 75% of volume at FRC, BH = 0 sec). In control conditions, the following significantly different S(V) values (units: L-1), grouped in ascending order, were obtained (means +/- SD): CO2, 0.83 +/- 0.26; C2H2, 0.93 +/- 0.18; CHClF2, 1.00 +/- 0.20; O2, 1.07 +/- 0.29. The mean C2H2/CHClF2 ratio for S(V), 0.94 (SD +/- 0.03), was statistically different from unity. In line with model calculations, the experimental findings suggest that three mechanisms contribute to the sloping alveolar plateaus: 1, continuing gas exchange during expiration; 2, ventilation-perfusion inequality combined with sequential emptying; 3, intrapulmonary diffusion limitation.

  13. The conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine in man. Direct measurement by continuous intravenous tracer infusions of L-(ring-/sup 2/H5)phenylalanine and L-(1-/sup 13/C) tyrosine in the postabsorptive state

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.T.; Bier, D.M.

    1982-10-01

    Steady state phenylalanine and tyrosine turnover and the rate of conversion of phenylalanine of tyrosine in vivo were determined in 6 healthy postabsorptive adult volunteers. Continuous infusions of tracer amounts of L-(ring-/sup 2/H5)phenylalanine were determined intravenously for 13-14 hr. After 9-10 hr, a priming dose followed by a continuous infusion of L-(1-/sup 13/C)tyrosine was added and maintained, along with the (/sup 2/H5)phenylalanine infusion, for 4 hr. Venous plasma samples were obtained before the initiation of each infusion and every 30 min during the course of the combined (/sup 2/H5)phenylalanine and (/sup 13/C)tyrosine infusion for determination of isotopic enrichments of (/sup 2/H5)phenylalanine, (/sup 13/C)tyrosine, and (/sup 2/H4)tyrosine by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometric analysis of the N-trifluoroacetyl-, methyl ester derivatives of the amino acids. Calculated from the observed enrichments, free phenylalanine and tyrosine turnover rates were 36.1 +/- 5.1 mumole . kg-1 . h-1 and 39.8 +/- 3.5 mumole . kg-1 . h-1, respectively. Phenylalanine was converted to tyrosine at the rate of 5.83 +/- 0.59 mumole . kg-1 . h-1, accounting for approximately 16% of either the phenylalanine or the tyrosine flux. The results indicate that the normal basal steady state phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in vivo in man is lower than that obtained from phenylalanine loading studies. This supports the existence of some type of substance activation of the enzyme as reflected in the previously reported exponential relationship between phenylalanine concentration and phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in vitro. The use of continuous simultaneous infusions of tracer amounts of stable isotope-labeled phenylalanine and tyrosine provides a direct means for studying physiological regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in vivo.

  14. Plasminogen activation in vivo upon intravenous infusion of DDAVP. Quantitative assessment of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complex with a novel monoclonal antibody based radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; de Boer, J P; Roem, D; ten Cate, J W; Hack, C E

    1992-01-23

    Infusion of desamino-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) results in an increase in plasma plasminogen activator activity. Whether this increase results in the generation of plasmin in vivo has never been established. A novel sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of the complex between plasmin and its main inhibitor alpha 2-antiplasmin (PAP complex) was developed using monoclonal antibodies preferentially reacting with complexed and inactivated alpha 2-antiplasmin and monoclonal antibodies against plasmin. The assay was validated in healthy volunteers and in patients with an activated fibrinolytic system. Infusion of DDAVP in a randomized placebo controlled crossover study resulted in all volunteers in a 6.6-fold increase in PAP complex, which was maximal between 15 and 30 min after the start of the infusion. Hereafter, plasma levels of PAP complex decreased with an apparent half-life of disappearance of about 120 min. Infusion of DDAVP did not induce generation of thrombin, as measured by plasma levels of prothrombin fragment F1+2 and thrombin-antithrombin III (TAT) complex. We conclude that the increase in plasminogen activator activity upon the infusion of DDAVP results in the in vivo generation of plasmin, in the absence of coagulation activation. Studying the DDAVP induced increase in PAP complex of patients with thromboembolic disease and a defective plasminogen activator response upon DDAVP may provide more insight into the role of the fibrinolytic system in the pathogenesis of thrombosis.

  15. Effects of an overnight intravenous lipid infusion on intramyocellular lipid content and insulin sensitivity in African-American versus Caucasian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SoJung; Boesch, Chris; Kuk, Jennifer L.; Arslanian, Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explain the predisposition for insulin resistance among African American (AA) adolescents, this study aimed to: 1) examine changes in intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL), and insulin sensitivity with intralipid (IL) infusion; and 2) determine whether the increase in IMCL is comparable between AA and Caucasian adolescents. Materials and Methods Thirteen AA and 15 Caucasian normal-weight adolescents (BMI <85th) underwent a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, on two occasions in random order, after an overnight 12-hr infusion of: 1) 20% IL and 2) normal saline (NS). IMCL was quantified by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in tibialis anterior muscle before and after IL infusion. Results During IL infusion, plasma TG, glycerol, FFA and fat oxidation increased significantly, with no race differences. Hepatic insulin sensitivity decreased with IL infusion with no difference between the groups. IL infusion was associated with a significant increase in IMCL, which was comparable between AA (Δ 105%; NS: 1.9 ± 0.8 vs. IL: 3.9 ± 1.6 mmol/kg wet weight) and Caucasian (Δ 86%; NS: 2.8 ± 2.1 vs. IL: 5.2 ± 2.4 mmol/kg wet weight), with similar reductions (P<0.01) in insulin sensitivity between the groups (Δ −44%: NS: 9.1 ± 3.3 vs. IL: 5.1 ± 1.8 mg/kg/min per µU/ml in AA) and (Δ−39%: NS: 12.9 ± 6.0 vs. IL: 7.9 ± 3.8 mg/kg/min per µU/ml in Caucasian) adolescents. Conclusions In healthy adolescents, an acute elevation in plasma FFA with IL infusion is accompanied by significant increases in IMCL and reductions in insulin sensitivity with no race differential. Our findings suggest that AA normal-weight adolescents are not more susceptible than Caucasians to FFA-induced IMCL accumulation and insulin resistance. PMID:23122836

  16. Evaluation of the internal thoracic arterial graft patency by the transthoracic Doppler method under continuous intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium.

    PubMed

    Fukata, Y; Horike, K; Fujimoto, E; Shimoe, Y; Kanbara, T

    1999-10-01

    Usefulness of the Doppler method under continuous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium (ATP) for improvement of accuracy in the diagnosis of the left internal thoracic arterial graft (LITA) patency was examined using transthoracic ultrasonic echocardiography. 1) Influence of ATP on the Doppler velocity in a graft was examined in 7 patients with good LITA grafts using physiological saline as the control. In the ATP group, 80 mg of ATP was dissolved in 20 ml physiological saline and continuously infused at 0.14 mg/kg/min. In the saline group, an equal volume of physiological saline was administered and the blood flow velocity in the LITA was recorded continuously by the transthoracic Doppler method from the supraclavicular fossa approach. Results; ATP administration increased the blood flow velocity in the LITA and the rate of increase was 48.3% for systolic peak velocity, 111% for diastolic peak velocity, 64.4% for systolic time velocity integral and 99% for diastolic time velocity integral indicating particularly high rates of increase in diastolic components. The diastolic/systolic peak velocity ratio or diastolic fraction did not increase significantly. In the saline group, none of the parameters showed a change. 2) Angiographic findings of the LITA were compared with the measurement values of the diastolic components by the Doppler method to examine usefulness of diastolic component measurement with ATP infusion for diagnosis of LITA patency. Subjects were 19 patients with good LITA (group A) and 8 patients with bad LITA (group B). Results; while there were significant differences in the mean baseline diastolic peak velocity, mean diastolic time velocity integral and mean diastolic fraction between the groups, overlapping was seen in individual cases. However, the inter-group differences were more distinct by ATP infusion and the borderline values were 30 cm/sec for diastolic peak velocity and 10 for diastolic time velocity integral. 3) Reliability of the

  17. Optimization of health-care organization and perceived improvement of patient comfort by switching from intra-venous BU four-times-daily infusions to a once-daily administration scheme in adult hematopoietic stem cell recipients.

    PubMed

    Xhaard, A; Rzepecki, P; Valcarcel, D; Santarone, S; Fürst, S; Serrano, D; De Angelis, G; Krüger, W; Scheid, C

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown an equivalent pharmacokinetic profile between four-times-daily (4QD) and once-daily (QD) administration of intra-venous (IV) BU, without increased toxicity. We assess the impact of a switch in IV BU from a 4QD to a QD schedule, in terms of health-care organization, staff working conditions, quality of care dispensed and perceived patient comfort. Clinicians, nurses and pharmacists from nine allogeneic transplantation units in five European countries were interviewed face to face. Overall perception of QD versus 4QD BU was very positive. Both administration schemes were evaluated to be equally efficaciousZ. QD BU was perceived to be safer and more convenient. Clinicians and nurses perceived that patient comfort was improved, due to fewer complications associated with repeated infusions, and avoiding night infusions associated with stress, anxiety and decreased quality of sleep. Switching from 4QD to QD BU had a significant impact on health-care organization, with a better integration in the overall management and usual timelines in the pharmacies and transplantation units. Time spent to prepare and administer BU was significantly reduced, leading to potential financial savings that merit further assessment and would be of particular interest in the current economic climate.

  18. A phase I trial of c-Raf kinase antisense oligonucleotide ISIS 5132 administered as a continuous intravenous infusion in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C C; Holmlund, J T; Schiller, J H; Geary, R S; Kwoh, T J; Dorr, A; Nemunaitis, J

    2000-05-01

    Raf proteins play a central role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and hence are involved in oncogenic transformation and tumor cell proliferation. ISIS 5132 is a 20-base antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxyribonucleotide that specifically down-regulates c-raf expression. We report here an initial study of the safety and tolerability of an i.v. infusion of ISIS 5132 in patients with advanced cancer. A continuous i.v. infusion of ISIS 5132 was administered for 21 days every 4 weeks to 34 patients with a variety of solid tumors refractory to standard therapy. The dose of ISIS 5132 was increased in sequential cohorts of patients, as toxicity allowed, until a final dose of 5.0 mg/kg body weight was reached. Toxicity was scored by common toxicity criteria, and tumor response was monitored. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed for 30 patients treated at doses of < or =4.0 mg/kg/day. The initial dose of ISIS 5132 was 0.5 mg/kg body weight and was successfully increased incrementally to 5.0 mg/kg body weight. Toxicities through the 4.0 mg/kg dose level were not dose limiting. Side effects were minimal and could not be specifically related to ISIS 5132. Two patients had prolonged stabilization of their disease, and one patient with ovarian carcinoma had a significant response with a 97% reduction in CA-125 levels. ISIS 5132, an antisense oligonucleotide against c-raf, was well tolerated at doses up to and including 4.0 mg/kg/day by 21-day continuous i.v. infusion and demonstrated antitumor activity at the doses tested.

  19. Biodistribution of boron after intravenous 4-dihydroxyborylphenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) infusion in meningioma and schwannoma patients: A feasibility study for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kulvik, Martti; Kallio, Merja; Laakso, Juha; Vähätalo, Jyrki; Hermans, Raine; Järviluoma, Eija; Paetau, Anders; Rasilainen, Merja; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Seppälä, Matti; Jääskeläinen, Juha

    2015-12-01

    We studied the uptake of boron after 100 mg/kg BPA infusion in three meningioma and five schwannoma patients as a pre-BNCT feasibility study. With average tumour-to-whole blood boron concentrations of 2.5, we discuss why BNCT could, and probably should, be developed to treat severe forms of the studied tumours. However, analysing 72 tumour and 250 blood samples yielded another finding: the plasma-to-whole blood boron concentrations varied with time, suggesting that the assumed constant boron ratio of 1:1 between normal brain tissue and whole blood deserves re-assessment.

  20. Effect of intraoperative magnesium intravenous infusion on the hemodynamic changes associated with right lobe living donor hepatotomy under transesophageal Doppler monitoring-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, G; Sayed, E; Eskander, A; ElSheikh, M; Lotfy, M; Yassen, K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liver donors are subjected to specific postresection hemodynamic changes. The aim was to monitor these changes and to evaluate the effect of magnesium sulfate infusion (MgSO4) on these changes together with total anesthetic agents consumption. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 donors scheduled for right hepatotomy were divided into two equal groups. Controls (C) received saline and magnesium group (Mg) received MgSO4 10% (30 mg/kg over 20 min) administered immediately after induction of anesthesia, followed by infusion (10 mg/kg/h) till the end of surgery. Hemodynamics, transesophageal Doppler (TED) data and anesthetic depth guided by Entropy were recorded. Results: Postresection both groups demonstrated an increase in heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (COP) in association with lowering of systemic vascular resistance (SVR). The increase in HR with Mg was lower when compared with C, P = 0.00. Increase in COP was lower with Mg compared to (C) (6.1 ± 1.3 vs. 7.5 ± 1.6 L/min, P = 0.00) and with less reduction in SVR compared to C (1145 ± 251 vs. 849.2 ± 215 dynes.s/cm5, P < 0.01), respectively. Sevoflurane consumption was lower with Mg compared to C (157.1 ± 35.1 vs. 187.6 ± 25.6 ml, respectively, P = 0.001). Reduced fentanyl and rocuronium consumption in Mg group are compared to C (P = 0.00). Extubation time, postoperative patient-controlled fentanyl were lower in Mg than C (P = 0.001). Conclusion: TED was able to detect significant hemodynamic changes associated with major hepatotomy. Prophylactic magnesium helped to reduce these changes with lower anesthetic and analgesics consumption and an improvement in postoperative pain relief. PMID:27051361

  1. Effect of Subchronic Intravenous Morphine Infusion and Naloxone-Precipitated Morphine Withdrawal on P-gp and Bcrp at the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Catarina; Gómez-Zepeda, David; Auvity, Sylvain; Menet, Marie-Claude; Crété, Dominique; Labat, Laurence; Remião, Fernando; Cisternino, Salvatore; Declèves, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic morphine regimen increases P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer-resistance protein (Bcrp) expressions at the rat blood–brain barrier (BBB) but what drives this effect is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to assess subchronic continuous morphine infusion and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal effects on P-gp/Bcrp contents and activities at the rat BBB. Rats were treated either with (i) a continuous i.v. morphine for 120 h, (ii) escalating morphine dosing (10-40 mg/kg, i.p., 5 days), (iii) a chronic morphine regimen (10 mg/kg s.c., 5 days) followed by a withdrawal period (2 days) and treatment for 3 additional days. Animal behavior was assessed after naloxone-precipitated withdrawal (1 mg/kg, s.c.). P-gp/Bcrp expressions and activities were determined in brain microvessels by qRT-PCR, Western blot, UHPLC–MS/MS, and in situ brain perfusion of P-gp or Bcrp substrates. Results show continuous i.v. morphine did not change P-gp/Bcrp protein levels in rat brain microvessels, whereas naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after escalating or chronic morphine dose regimen increased Mdr1a and Bcrp mRNA levels by 1.4-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively. Conversely, P-gp/Bcrp protein expressions remained unchanged after naloxone administration, and brain uptake of [3H]-verapamil (P-gp) and [3H]-mitoxantrone (Bcrp) was not altered. The study concludes subchronic morphine infusion and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal have poor effect on P-gp/Bcrp levels at the rat BBB.

  2. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  3. The effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on reduction of pain after abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jarahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Harati, Sina Taghizadeh; Babaeizadeh, Hamideh; Yasaei, Elahe; Bashar, Farshid Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-surgical pain is a physiological response to tissue trauma that produces unpleasant physiological effects with manifestations on various organic systems. Objective According to the effect of magnesium sulfate on the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, this study examined the effect of magnesium sulfate on the reduction of pain and the mean amount of narcotics consumed by patients after abdominal hysterectomies. Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was performed on 60 patients who had undergone abdominal hysterectomies in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd, Iran, from 2013 to 2015. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 30 members each. All of the patients received 2 mg of Midazolam and 2 mcg/kg of Fentanyl as the induction of anesthesia with propofol (2–2.5 mg/kg) and Atracurium 0.5 mg/kg was conducted. All of the patients received 5 mg of intravenous morphine 30 min after induction of anesthesia. Afterwards, the study group received 50 mg/kg of magnesium sulfate in 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum during the 20 minutes, and 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum was administered to the members of the placebo group. Visual analogue scale VAS scores were evaluated to reach the minimum difference of 0.8 in mean pain score Results The results of this study indicated that the mean pain scores immediately after surgery and at 1, 2, 6, and 12 hr after surgery were lower in the study group than in the placebo group. The mean value of narcotic consumption at all measured time points was higher in the placebo group. No significant differences were found between two groups concerning drug complications. Conclusion The results of this study indicated that the intravenous injection of magnesium sulfate can reduce pain, reduce morphine consumption, and reduce the side effects of morphine in patients after surgery. Funding This study was funded by Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Clinical trial registration The trial was

  4. The effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on reduction of pain after abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jarahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Harati, Sina Taghizadeh; Babaeizadeh, Hamideh; Yasaei, Elahe; Bashar, Farshid Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-surgical pain is a physiological response to tissue trauma that produces unpleasant physiological effects with manifestations on various organic systems. Objective According to the effect of magnesium sulfate on the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, this study examined the effect of magnesium sulfate on the reduction of pain and the mean amount of narcotics consumed by patients after abdominal hysterectomies. Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was performed on 60 patients who had undergone abdominal hysterectomies in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd, Iran, from 2013 to 2015. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 30 members each. All of the patients received 2 mg of Midazolam and 2 mcg/kg of Fentanyl as the induction of anesthesia with propofol (2–2.5 mg/kg) and Atracurium 0.5 mg/kg was conducted. All of the patients received 5 mg of intravenous morphine 30 min after induction of anesthesia. Afterwards, the study group received 50 mg/kg of magnesium sulfate in 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum during the 20 minutes, and 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum was administered to the members of the placebo group. Visual analogue scale VAS scores were evaluated to reach the minimum difference of 0.8 in mean pain score Results The results of this study indicated that the mean pain scores immediately after surgery and at 1, 2, 6, and 12 hr after surgery were lower in the study group than in the placebo group. The mean value of narcotic consumption at all measured time points was higher in the placebo group. No significant differences were found between two groups concerning drug complications. Conclusion The results of this study indicated that the intravenous injection of magnesium sulfate can reduce pain, reduce morphine consumption, and reduce the side effects of morphine in patients after surgery. Funding This study was funded by Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Clinical trial registration The trial was

  5. Plasma and interstitial fluid pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin, its metabolite ciprofloxacin, and marbofloxacin after oral administration and a constant rate intravenous infusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, T L; Papich, M G

    2005-08-01

    Enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin were administered to six healthy dogs in separate crossover experiments as a single oral dose (5 mg/kg) and as a constant rate IV infusion (1.24 and 0.12 mg/h.kg, respectively) following a loading dose (4.47 and 2 mg/kg, respectively) to achieve a steady-state concentration of approximately 1 microg/mL for 8 h. Interstitial fluid (ISF) was collected with an in vivo ultrafiltration device at the same time period as plasma to measure protein unbound drug concentrations at the tissue site and assess the dynamics of drug distribution. Plasma and ISF were analyzed for enrofloxacin, its active metabolite ciprofloxacin, and for marbofloxacin by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lipophilicity and protein binding of enrofloxacin were higher than for marbofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Compared to enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin had a longer half-life, higher Cmax, and larger AUC(0-infinity) in plasma and ISF after oral administration. Establishing steady state allowed an assessment of the dynamics of drug concentrations between plasma and ISF. The ISF and plasma-unbound concentrations were similar during the steady-state period despite differences in lipophilicity and pharmacokinetic parameters of the drugs.

  6. 76 FR 61098 - Guidance for 1-Hour SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...Notice is hereby given that the EPA has posted its draft non- binding guidance titled, ``Guidance for 1-Hour SO2 NAAQS SIP Submissions'' on its Web site. The EPA invites public comments on this guidance document during the comment period specified below, and plans to issue an updated version of the guidance after reviewing timely submitted...

  7. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-01

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  8. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-01

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  9. Intravenous fenoldopam versus sodium nitroprusside in patients with severe hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reisin, E; Huth, M M; Nguyen, B P; Weed, S G; Gonzalez, F M

    1990-02-01

    In an open-label study, we compared the efficacy and safety of intravenous infusion of fenoldopam mesylate with that of sodium nitroprusside in patients with severe hypertension or in hypertensive crisis. Both antihypertensive medications were infused at a maximal dose increment of 0.2 microgram/kg/min (fenoldopam) and 1 microgram/kg/min (nitroprusside), with a maximal infusion rate of 1.5 micrograms/kg/min fenoldopam mesylate or 8 micrograms/kg/min sodium nitroprusside. Once the desired reduction in diastolic blood pressure was achieved (less than 110 mm Hg if initial diastolic blood pressure was 120-149 mm Hg, or by at least 40 mm Hg if initial diastolic blood pressure was 150-190 mm Hg), the maximal infusion rate used was maintained for at least 1 hour, and then, the infusion was slowed gradually over 2 hours. After the infusion treatment, patients remained in the hospital for 2 days of follow-up. Both antihypertensive agents successfully controlled the blood pressure in all the patients by the end of the maintenance periods. Between the baseline and the end of the maintenance period, analysis of variance showed that the changes in the variables induced by fenoldopam mesylate did not differ significantly from those induced by sodium nitroprusside. The incidence of side effects listed were similar in both groups of patients. The detection of toxic levels of thiocyanate in two patients treated with nitroprusside, however, shows that fenoldopam might be preferable for the control of a hypertensive crisis or severe hypertension in patients with decreased renal function. PMID:1967592

  10. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, and ginkgolide K after intravenous infusion of ginkgo diterpene lactones in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyao; Ouyang, Bingchen; Aa, Jiye; Geng, Jianliang; Fei, Fei; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jiankun; Peng, Ying; Geng, Ting; Li, Yanjing; Huang, Wenzhe; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Guangji

    2016-07-15

    Ginkgo diterpene lactones are compounds that are extracted from the Ginkgo biloba leaf and possess pharmacologic activities with neuroprotective effects. To address the poor bioavailability of ginkgo diterpene lactones, ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection (GDLI) was formulated and is commercially available. In this study, a simple, sensitive and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for assessing the total amount and the amount of the prototype forms of ginkgolides A (GA), B (GB) and K (GK) in rat plasma and tissues. This method was used to calculate the concentrations of the hydrolysed carboxylic forms and assess the pharmacokinetics of the ginkgolides after intravenous (i.v.) GDLI administration in rats. Generally, all three ginkgolide forms showed dose-dependent plasma concentrations, and no obvious differences in pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of plasma concentration versus time and half-life, were observed after GDLI administration on 7 consecutive days. These ginkgolides primarily existed in the carboxylic form in the plasma, and the systemic concentrations of the carboxylic forms of GA and GB were 11- to 17- and 3- to 4-fold higher than those of their prototype forms, respectively. In contrast, dramatically increased levels of the GA and GB prototype lactones were detected in the liver and heart. GA, GB, and GK were extensively distributed in various organs/tissues; the highest levels were found in the kidneys, liver, and intestine, and the lowest levels were found in the brain. These data suggest that ginkgolides have difficulty crossing the blood-brain barrier and that their targets for protecting against cerebral ischaemia are located outside the central system.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, and ginkgolide K after intravenous infusion of ginkgo diterpene lactones in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyao; Ouyang, Bingchen; Aa, Jiye; Geng, Jianliang; Fei, Fei; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jiankun; Peng, Ying; Geng, Ting; Li, Yanjing; Huang, Wenzhe; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Guangji

    2016-07-15

    Ginkgo diterpene lactones are compounds that are extracted from the Ginkgo biloba leaf and possess pharmacologic activities with neuroprotective effects. To address the poor bioavailability of ginkgo diterpene lactones, ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection (GDLI) was formulated and is commercially available. In this study, a simple, sensitive and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for assessing the total amount and the amount of the prototype forms of ginkgolides A (GA), B (GB) and K (GK) in rat plasma and tissues. This method was used to calculate the concentrations of the hydrolysed carboxylic forms and assess the pharmacokinetics of the ginkgolides after intravenous (i.v.) GDLI administration in rats. Generally, all three ginkgolide forms showed dose-dependent plasma concentrations, and no obvious differences in pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of plasma concentration versus time and half-life, were observed after GDLI administration on 7 consecutive days. These ginkgolides primarily existed in the carboxylic form in the plasma, and the systemic concentrations of the carboxylic forms of GA and GB were 11- to 17- and 3- to 4-fold higher than those of their prototype forms, respectively. In contrast, dramatically increased levels of the GA and GB prototype lactones were detected in the liver and heart. GA, GB, and GK were extensively distributed in various organs/tissues; the highest levels were found in the kidneys, liver, and intestine, and the lowest levels were found in the brain. These data suggest that ginkgolides have difficulty crossing the blood-brain barrier and that their targets for protecting against cerebral ischaemia are located outside the central system. PMID:27182682

  12. A Case Report of Long-Term Survival following Hepatic Arterial Infusion of L-Folinic Acid Modulated 5-Fluorouracil Combined with Intravenous Irinotecan and Cetuximab Followed by Hepatectomy in a Patient with Initially Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Van Bael, Kobe; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Engels, Benedikt; Delvaux, Georges

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old women admitted to our hospital for weight loss, anorexia, and abdominal pain was diagnosed with sigmoid neoplasm and multiple bilobar liver metastases. This patient received six cycles of systemic FOLFOX prior to a laparoscopically assisted anterior resection of the rectosigmoid for a poorly differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma T2N2M1, K-RAS negative (wild type). Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of L-folinic acid modulated 5-fluorouracil (LV/5-FU) with intravenous (iv) irinotecan (FOLFIRI) and cetuximab as adjuvant therapy resulted in a complete metabolic response (CR) with CEA normalization. A right hepatectomy extended to segment IV was performed resulting in (FDG-)PET negative remission for 7 months. Solitary intrahepatic recurrence was effectively managed by local radiofrequent ablation following 6c FOLFIRI plus cetuximab iv. Multiple lung lesions and recurrence of pulmonary and local lymph node metastases were successfully treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (50 Gy) and iv LV/5-FU/oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) plus cetuximab finally switched to panitumumab with CR as a result. At present the patient is in persistent complete remission of her stage IV colorectal cancer, more than 5 years after initial diagnosis of the advanced disease. Multidisciplinary treatment with HAI of chemotherapy (LV/5-FU + CPT-11) plus EGFR-inhibitor can achieve CR of complex unresectable LM and can even result in hepatectomy with possible long-term survival. PMID:26064730

  13. Determination of hydromorphone in human plasma by a sensitive RP-HPLC-ESI-MS method and its application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study in postoperative patients after low dose intravenous administration with infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luning; Pan, Yinbin; Ding, Li; Luo, Xuemei; Yan, Zhengyu; Liu, Cunming; Qian, Yanning; Chu, Yan

    2012-03-01

    A sensitive reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-ESI-MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of hydromorphone in human plasma using naloxone as the internal standard (IS). After alkalization with saturated sodium bicarbonate, the plasma samples were extracted with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column with the column temperature of 50 °C and a mobile phase of 5mM ammonium acetate buffer containing 1% formic acid-methanol (88:12, v/v). Hydromorphone and the IS were detected by selected ion monitoring using the protonated molecules at m/z 286.2 for hydromorphone and m/z 328.2 for the IS. Calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.01-50 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification was 0.01 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study in postoperative patients after intravenous infusion of 1.5mg hydromorphone hydrochloride. The obtained main pharmacokinetic parameters of hydromorphone in postoperative patients were as follows: the maximum hydromorphone plasma concentration (C(max)) was (24.15 ± 12.51)ng/mL, the time to the C(max) was (10.0 ± 0.0)min, and the elimination half-life was (2.7 ± 0.8)h. PMID:22169470

  14. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  15. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  16. Efficacy of intravenous infusion of doripenem.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I

    2009-08-15

    Initial treatment of nosocomial pneumonia (NP), including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), is usually empirical. The use of a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen to treat NP-VAP that is active against suspected multidrug-resistant pathogens maximizes the likelihood of a favorable outcome. In a post hoc analysis of pooled data from 2 prospective, randomized, open-label, phase 3 NP-VAP trials, doripenem, a new broad-spectrum carbapenem with antipseudomonal activity, demonstrated noninferiority to standard comparator regimens (imipenem and piperacillin-tazobactam) with regard to clinical and microbiological outcomes. In subgroup analyses, doripenem continued to show noninferiority to the comparator drugs in achieving clinical and microbiological cures in populations at high risk of multidrug-resistant infection, such as patients with late-onset VAP (defined as patients who develop VAP >5 days after intubation) or those with NP-VAP caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or complicated by bacteremia. Overall, the clinical data indicate that doripenem has the potential to be an important option in the treatment of NP, including VAP.

  17. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  18. Partial intravenous anesthesia in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Duke, Tanya

    2013-03-01

    The partial intravenous anesthesia technique (PIVA) is used to lower the inspired concentration of an inhalational anesthetic by concurrent use of injectable drugs. This technique reduces the incidence of undesirable side-effects and provides superior quality of anesthesia and analgesia. Drugs commonly used for PIVA include opioids, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, injectable anesthetic agents, and lidocaine. Most are administered by intravenous infusion.

  19. [Portable elastomeric infusion system applied to patients with knee prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Soler, Gemma; Quiles, Olga; Nicolau, Agnes; Faura, Teresa; Moreno, Cristina

    2007-03-01

    An LV infuser consists of an infusion pump which can administer medicines via various methods: intravenous, epidural, subdural, o subcutaneous. Its usefulness is based on the administration of medicines such as oncological drugs and/or analgesic by means of a continuous infusion. PMID:17474369

  20. Glucose Infusion into Exercising Dogs after Confinement: Rectal and Active Muscle Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kruk, B.; Nazar, K.; Falecka-Wieczorek, I.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous glucose infusion into ambulatory dogs results in attenuation of exercise-induced increase of both rectal and thigh muscle temperatures. That glucose (Glu) infusion attenuates excessive increase in body temperature from restricted activity during confinement deconditioning. Intravenous glucose infusion attenuates the rise in exercise core temperature in deconditioned dogs by a yet undefined mechanism.

  1. A randomized, open, multicenter clinical study on the short course of intravenous infusion of 750 mg of levofloxacin and the sequential standard course of intravenous infusion/oral administration of 500 mg of levofloxacin for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tiemei; Chen, Liang-An; Wang, Ping; Tian, Guizhen; Ye, Feng; Zhu, Huili; He, Bei; Zhang, Baiying; Shao, Changzhou; Jie, Zhijun; Gao, Xiwen; Wang, Dongxia; Song, Weidong; Pan, Zhijie; Chen, Jin; Zhang, Xingyi; Gao, Zhancheng; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare 5-day regimen of levofloxacin 750 mg IV daily with 7–14-day conventional regimen of levofloxacin 500 mg intravenous to oral (IV/PO) daily for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Chinese population. Methods This was a non-inferiority study to assess the difference of clinical efficacy at the end of treatment (EOT) between two regimens. Adult CAP patients with CURB-65 score 0–2 were enrolled from 17 hospitals in China from November 2012 to July 2014. The subjects were randomized into levofloxacin 750 or 500 mg group and the clinical data were collected. Sputum and blood specimens were sent for bacterial culture. The urinary antigen of Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) was detected as well. At EOT, the clinical efficacy (primary endpoint), microbiological efficacy and safety were evaluated. Results A total of 457 patients were enrolled. Intent-to-treat (ITT) for primary endpoint analysis and per-protocol set (PPS) populations were 448 and 427 patients respectively. The therapeutic durations were 4.86 and 10.35 days and the mean drug exposure was 3,641.4 and 5,169.6 mg in 750 and 500 mg groups respectively. The clinical efficacy rate was 91.40% (202/221) in 750 mg group and 94.27% (214/227) in 500 mg group (ITT, P=0.2449). The difference in clinical efficacy rate was −2.87 (95% CI: −7.64, 1.90) between the two groups. The non-inferiority hypothesis of two groups was tenable (Δ=10%). The bacterial eradication rate was 100.00% in both groups. The most common drug-related clinical adverse events were injection site and gastrointestinal reactions. The most common drug-related laboratory abnormalities were WBC decrease and ALT/AST elevation. No statistical difference was found between two groups (P>0.05). Conclusions The 5-day regimen of levofloxacin 750 mg daily is non-inferior to 7–14-day conventional regimen of 500 mg daily in clinical efficacy for treatment of mild to moderate Chinese CAP population. The short

  2. Intraosseous infusion in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Neal, C J; McKinley, D F

    1994-01-01

    In traumatically injured or medically unstable pediatric patients requiring resuscitation, gaining intravenous access often is frustrating for the physician and agonizing for the patient. Even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by trained professionals, cardiac arrests in children in the prehospital setting have a mortality of 79% to 100%. Immediate vascular access such as that obtained by intraosseous infusion improves survival. The intraosseous infusion technique uses the medullary cavity in the tibia as a "noncollapsible vein" for parenteral infusion. It is indicated in a child in shock or cardiac arrest when two attempts to access peripheral vasculature have failed or when more than 2 minutes have elapsed in the attempt to gain access. Epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, lidocaine, and volume expanders can be infused via the intraosseous route. Complications rarely occur. The technique described here is gaining acceptance in both prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:8169160

  3. Intravenous therapy

    PubMed Central

    Waitt, C; Waitt, P; Pirmohamed, M

    2004-01-01

    Intravenous administration of fluids, drugs, and nutrition is very common in hospitals. Although insertion of peripheral and central cannulae and subsequent intravenous therapy are usually well tolerated, complications that prolong hospitalisation, and in some cases cause death, can arise on occasions. Additionally, many cannulae are inserted unnecessarily. This article seeks to review this area and to outline good medical practice. PMID:14760169

  4. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  5. [Intraosseous infusion for adults].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kirchhoff, C

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion methods have been common for emergency treatment in infants and children for years. The role of IO access in adults is however much less clear, but its importance in this patient group is increasing, and different devices are available today. Each device has strengths and weaknesses, but all achieve rapid vascular access even in challenging situations. The potential of IO access regarding both therapeutic and diagnostic options has been shown in several operational studies in and out of hospital. Insertion times require between 1 and 2 min in most cases, while insertion and handling of the IO access devices seem to be easy and reliable. The flow rates of IO access devices for adults are lower than those of large-bore peripheral intravenous catheters, but fluid resuscitation is possible in most cases at least with pressure bag infusion systems. Most drugs administered intravenously can be given intraosseously in equivalent dosages and with the same effects. Nevertheless the limitations and risks of IO access routes need to be considered for each application. Rapid IO access is now possible in all age groups, and the 2005 AHA Guidelines favor it over drug administration via the endotracheal tube. PMID:18250995

  6. [Leg ischemia complicating the intraosseous infusion of epinephrine for a Djiboutian child].

    PubMed

    Maurin, O; de Régoix, S; Legonidec, E; Tourtier, J P; Kaiser, E

    2014-01-01

    Intraosseous infusion is increasingly used as an alternative to intravenous infusion. It is recommended for the cardiac arrest of a child in the first instance and after two failed attempts of intravenous infusion in the cardiac arrest of adults. Its rapid use and its low failure rate justify its use in all life-threatening emergencies. It can be used to administer the same treatments as intravenous infusion. It does, nonetheless, present some rare complications, such as acute leg ischemia by extravasation of epinephrine, as we report here. Awareness of these complications is necessary to ensure compliance with the rules of placing this type of infusion. PMID:24854187

  7. Compartment syndrome following intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    Moen, Todd C; Sarwark, John F

    2008-08-01

    Intraosseous infusion is a valuable technique in the resuscitation of critically ill pediatric patients in whom vascular access has proved otherwise impossible. Although it is well established as a safe and reliable means of emergent access, intraosseous infusion is not without danger, nor complication. One of the rare yet most grave complications of intraosseous access is compartment syndrome. We report a case of compartment syndrome as a result of intraosseous infusion that serves to remind of the potential pitfalls of this technique. An otherwise healthy 6-year-old girl presented to our institution's pediatric intensive care unit following emergent resuscitation for a prolonged cardiac arrest. Approximately 1 hour following an uneventful soccer practice, without any antecedent cardiopulmonary symptoms or complaints, the patient collapsed and was unresponsive, not breathing, and pulseless. In the course of resuscitation, right and left tibial intraosseous lines were started. After 30 minutes of resuscitation, with multiple rounds of lidocaine and epinephrine infused through the intraosseous lines, a sustained perfusing rhythm was established. Acute compartment syndrome was diagnosed, and through anterolateral and posteromedial incisions, all 4 fascial compartments were released. While the condition of the patient's extremity improved, the overall clinical condition of the patient did not. This case highlights the fundamental principles regarding the use of intraosseous infusion and the diagnosis and management of compartment syndrome in critically ill patients. PMID:19292404

  8. Partial intravenous anesthesia in cats and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The partial intravenous anesthesia technique (PIVA) is used to lower the inspired concentration of an inhalational anesthetic by concurrent use of injectable drugs. This technique reduces the incidence of undesirable side-effects and provides superior quality of anesthesia and analgesia. Drugs commonly used for PIVA include opioids, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, injectable anesthetic agents, and lidocaine. Most are administered by intravenous infusion. PMID:23997266

  9. Effects of the Infusion of 4% or 20% Human Serum Albumin on the Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation in Endotoxemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisa; Ince, Can; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea; Mocchegiani, Federico; Pelaia, Paolo; Provinciali, Mauro; Donati, Abele

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis-induced microcirculatory alterations contribute to tissue hypoxia and organ dysfunction. In addition to its plasma volume expanding activity, human serum albumin (HSA) has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and may have a protective role in the microcirculation during sepsis. The concentration of HSA infused may influence these effects. We compared the microcirculatory effects of the infusion of 4% and 20% HSA in an experimental model of sepsis. Methods Adult male Wistar rats were equipped with arterial and venous catheters and received an intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, serotype O127:B8, 10 mg/kg over 30 minutes) or vehicle (SHAM, n = 6). Two hours later, endotoxemic animals were randomized to receive 10 mL/kg of either 4% HSA (LPS+4%HSA, n = 6), 20% HSA (LPS+20%HSA, n = 6) or 0.9% NaCl (LPS+0.9%NaCl, n = 6). No fluids were given to an additional 6 animals (LPS). Vessel density and perfusion were assessed in the skeletal muscle microcirculation with sidestream dark field videomicroscopy at baseline (t0), 2 hours after LPS injection (t1), after HSA infusion (t2) and 1 hour later (t3). The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were recorded. Serum endothelin-1 was measured at t2. Results MAP was stable over time in all groups. The microcirculatory parameters were significantly altered in endotoxemic animals at t1. The infusion of both 4% and 20% HSA similarly increased the perfused vessel density and blood flow velocity and decreased the flow heterogeneity to control values. Microvascular perfusion was preserved in the LPS+20%HSA group at t3, whereas alterations reappeared in the LPS+4%HSA group. Conclusions In a rat model of normotensive endotoxemia, the infusion of 4% or 20% HSA produced a similar acute improvement in the microvascular perfusion in otherwise unresuscitated animals. PMID:26942605

  10. Rationale and design of the allogeneiC human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in patients with aging fRAilTy via intravenoUS delivery (CRATUS) study: A phase I/II, randomized, blinded and placebo controlled trial to evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cell infusion in patients with aging frailty

    PubMed Central

    Golpanian, Samuel; DiFede, Darcy L.; Pujol, Marietsy V.; Lowery, Maureen H.; Levis-Dusseau, Silvina; Goldstein, Bradley J.; Schulman, Ivonne H.; Longsomboon, Bangon; Wolf, Ariel; Khan, Aisha; Heldman, Alan W.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a syndrome associated with reduced physiological reserves that increases an individual's vulnerability for developing increased morbidity and/or mortality. While most clinical trials have focused on exercise, nutrition, pharmacologic agents, or a multifactorial approach for the prevention and attenuation of frailty, none have studied the use of cell-based therapies. We hypothesize that the application of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (allo-hMSCs) as a therapeutic agent for individuals with frailty is safe and efficacious. The CRATUS trial comprises an initial non-blinded phase I study, followed by a blinded, randomized phase I/II study (with an optional follow-up phase) that will address the safety and pre-specified beneficial effects in patients with the aging frailty syndrome. In the initial phase I protocol, allo-hMSCs will be administered in escalating doses via peripheral intravenous infusion (n=15) to patients allocated to three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=5, 20 million allo-hMSCs), Group 2 (n=5, 100 million allo-hMSCs), and Group 3 (n=5, 200 million allo-hMSCs). Subsequently, in the randomized phase, allo-hMSCs or matched placebo will be administered to patients (n=30) randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of two doses of MSCs versus placebo: Group A (n=10, 100 million allo-hMSCs), Group B (n=10, 200 million allo-hMSCs), and Group C (n=10, placebo). Primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCs administered in frail older individuals. This study will determine the safety of intravenous infusion of stem cells and compare phenotypic outcomes in patients with aging frailty. PMID:26933813

  11. Phase I study of high-dose continuous intravenous infusion of VP-16 in combination with high-dose melphalan followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation in children with stage IV neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Valteau-Couanet, D; Vassal, G; Pondarré, C; Bonnay, M; Benhamou, E; Couanet, D; Plantaz, D; Hartmann, O

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of continuous infusion of high-dose VP-16 in combination with high-dose melphalan (HDM) for conditioning before autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Thirteen children (median age 27 months) with stage IV neuroblastoma were treated with high-dose VP-16 and HDM followed by ABMT as consolidation treatment. All had previously received conventional chemotherapy with a mean number of six drugs. Surgery of the primary tumor had been performed in 12/13. We performed a dose-escalating study of VP-16 from 1800 mg/m2/72 h with 300 mg/m2/72 h dose increments according to toxicity. VP-16 was administered as a 72-h i.v. infusion. Melphalan (140 mg/m2/day) was administered once as an i.v. push. VP-16 pharmacokinetics were analyzed in 12 patients. Five children received 1800 mg/m2/72 h of VP-16, five received 2100 mg/m2/72 h and three, 2400 mg/m2/72 h. The mean duration of granulocytopenia (< 0.5 x 10(9)/1) was 24 days and thrombocytopenia (< 50 x 10(9)/1) was 36 days. No major infectious complications occurred. Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was the dose-limiting toxicity. Five severe manifestations of GI toxicity in three patients led us to consider 2400 mg/m2/72 h as the MTD. The mean VP-16 clearance rate was 17.3 ml/min/m2 with continuous infusion. A mean steady-state plasma concentration of 24.2 micrograms/ml (s.d. = 2) and 28.3 micrograms/ml (s.d. = 1.9) was achieved at the 1800 mg/ml and 2100 mg/m2 dose levels, respectively, GI toxicity is dose limiting when VP-16 at 2400 mg/m2/72 h, is associated with HDM. When given as a continuous i.v. infusion, at 2100 mg/m2/72 h, VP-16 associated with HDM is well tolerated before ABMT in young heavily pre-treated children.

  12. Pharmacodynamics and safety of a new calcium sensitizer, levosimendan, and its metabolites during an extended infusion in patients with severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kivikko, Matti; Antila, Saila; Eha, Jaan; Lehtonen, Lasse; Pentikäinen, Pertti J

    2002-01-01

    Levosimendan is a new calcium sensitizer developed for the short-term intravenous treatment of congestive heart failure. The aims of the present open-label, nonrandomized study were to determine the tolerability, hemodynamic effects, and the basic pharmacokinetics of levosimendan and its metabolites during an extended continuous infusion of levosimendan. Twenty-four patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) III-IV heart failure in two groups of 12 patients were exposed to either 0.05 microg/kg/min or 0.1 microg/kg/min of levosimendan for 7 days. Heart rate and blood pressure were measured, and blood samples for the determination of plasma concentrations of the parent drug and its metabolites were drawn daily during the infusion and the 10 to 15 days' follow-up. The 7-day infusion was well tolerated and no premature discontinuations occurred. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased maximally by 6 mmHg in the lower and by 11 mmHg in the higher levosimendan dose groups during the infusion period (p < 0.05 for both groups). The mean heart rate values increased maximally by 18 and 26 beats/min in the lower and higher levosimendan dose groups, respectively (p < 0.001 for both groups). The hemodynamic effects peaked at the end of the infusion period and thereafter slowly declined during the follow-up. After the recommended infusion period of 24 hours, the mean heart rate increase was only 2 and 6 beats/min in the lower and higher levosimendan dose groups, respectively. The elimination half-life of levosimendan was approximately 1 hour and of the metabolites 70 to 80 hours. It can be concluded that levosimendan, even administered considerably longer than the recommended 24 hours, was well tolerated. The 7-day infusion induced a prolonged increase in heart rate and a minor decrease in blood pressure. The long-lasting effects are probably explained by the active metabolite.

  13. Effects of COX inhibition on experimental pain and hyperalgesia during and after remifentanil infusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Harald; Raeder, Johan; Draegni, Tomas; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Schmelz, Martin; Stubhaug, Audun

    2011-06-01

    Opioids may enhance pain sensitivity resulting in opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Activation of spinal cyclooxygenase may play a role in the development of OIH. The aim of this study was to demonstrate remifentanil-induced postinfusion hyperalgesia in an electrical pain and a cold pain model, and to investigate whether COX-2 (parecoxib) or COX-1 (ketorolac) inhibition could prevent hyperalgesia after remifentanil infusion. Sixteen healthy males were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Each subject went through 4 sessions: control, remifentanil, parecoxib+remifentanil, and ketorolac+remifentanil. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation induced acute pain and areas of pinprick hyperalgesia. The areas of pinprick hyperalgesia were assessed before, during, and after a 30-minute infusion of either remifentanil or saline. The cold-pressor test (CPT) was performed before, at the end of, and 1 hour after the infusions. The subjects received a bolus of either saline, 40 mg parecoxib, or 30 mg ketorolac intravenously after the first CPT. The areas of pinprick hyperalgesia and CPT pain after the end of remifentanil infusion increased significantly compared to control (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively). Pretreatment with parecoxib or ketorolac reduced the postinfusion area of pinprick hyperalgesia (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively), compared to the remifentanil group. Parecoxib reduced the area significantly more than ketorolac (P = 0.009). In the CPT, pretreatment with parecoxib or ketorolac did not prevent postinfusion hyperalgesia. These results demonstrated OIH in both models, and may suggest that COX-2 inhibition is more important than COX-1 inhibition in reducing hyperalgesia. Remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia was demonstrated for both electrically induced pain and cold-pressor pain. Both parecoxib and ketorolac prevented hyperalgesia in the electrical model, parecoxib to a larger extent.

  14. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public... Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to... complication of Immune Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis include...

  15. Intravenous angiotensin and salt appetite in rats.

    PubMed

    Fitts, Douglas A; Zierath, Dannielle K; Savos, Anna V; Ho, Jacqueline M; Bassett, John E

    2007-01-01

    Circulating angiotensin II is crucial for the activation of salt appetite after sodium depletion. We tested if angiotensin (ANG) II infused intravenously at 50 ng/kg/min overnight (chronic) can mimic the rapid salt appetite similar to furosemide and overnight sodium depletion. In experiment 1, rats received chronic ANG II or vehicle infusions all night with access to water and chow but no saline solution. In the morning, the infusions continued, but half of the vehicle-infused group was switched to ANG II (acute). Thirty minutes after the switch, all rats received 10 mg/kg furosemide SC. One hour later they were provided water and 0.3 M NaCl to drink. Rats infused with vehicle or acute ANG drank little, but the chronic ANG group drank 11+/-1 ml of saline in 90 min. In experiment 2, the furosemide was omitted, and a group receiving a chronic infusion of phenylephrine at 6.25 microg/kg/min was included. The chronic ANG group drank 10+/-1 ml saline in 90 min, but the phenylephrine group, which also incurred a significant negative sodium balance overnight, drank little. Thus, an overnight infusion of ANG II is sufficient to mimic the robust expression of salt appetite as observed after furosemide and overnight sodium depletion.

  16. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions. PMID:26055373

  17. Development of individual insulin infusion profiles for open loop infusion systems.

    PubMed

    Strack, T; Krause, U; Schulz, G; Beyer, J; Beutelspacher, F; Nagel, J

    1984-04-01

    A computer controlled syringe-type insulin infusion pump storing up to 254 different infusion rates, eight different meal programs and two different basal rates automatically changeable during 24 h in EPROM was used for insulin infusion applying a wavy step profile. This profile approaching the physiological postprandial insulin secretion of the B-cell was calculated by an algorithm following the biphasic insulin secretion model proposed by E. Cerasi . The computer program for the open loop infusion device simulated the feed-back structure of a closed loop insulin secretion control by an algorithm based upon a theoretical postprandial blood sugar profile. Fifteen unstable juvenile onset insulin requiring diabetics could be well controlled after two to three days of an intravenous open loop insulin infusion program. The programs consisted of two constant basal rates and superimposed wavy step profile programs activated at the beginning of each meal. The preabsorptive bolus or cephalic phase was an additional tool both for improved postprandial blood sugar control and further reduction of insulin consumption. The programmable insulin infusion device proved as a valuable tool for the study of a sophisticated insulin infusion profile suitable as well for open loop as for closed loop insulin infusion systems.

  18. Intravenous lidocaine for fibromyalgia syndrome: an open trial.

    PubMed

    Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; Malucelli, Tiago; Machado, Fabíola; Takeshi, Hélcio; Kaiber, Flávia; Schmidt, Carolina; Harth, Fabielle

    2009-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of intravenous infusions of lidocaine in pain and quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia. Twenty-three consecutive patients were included in the study, which consisted on five sequential intravenous 2% lidocaine infusions with rising dosages (2-5 mg/kg, days 1-5). Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain were applied before the first lidocaine infusion, immediately after the fifth infusion and 30 days after the fifth infusion. A significant improvement was observed in the FIQ scores after the fifth infusion (73.52 +/- 16.56 vs 63.29 +/- 21.21, p = 0.02), which was maintained after 30 days (73.52 +/- 16.56 vs 63.85 +/- 24.59, p = 0.04). Similar results were seen concerning the VAS: 8.19 +/- 1.76 vs 6.84 +/- 2.44, p = 0.01 and 8.19 +/- 1.76 vs 7.17 +/- 2.35, p = 0.05, respectively. Intravenous lidocaine infusions are safe and effective in the management of fibromyalgia.

  19. Pulmonary vascular resistance during lipid infusion in neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Prasertsom, W.; Phillipos, E. Z.; Van Aerde, J. E.; Robertson, M.

    1996-01-01

    Using two-dimensional echocardiography, pulmonary vascular resistance was estimated from right ventricular pre-ejection period to ejection time (RVPEP/ET) in 11 preterm infants with respiratory distress, to test the effect of different doses of continuous lipid infusion. Echocardiography was performed at baseline with no lipid infusing 2 and 24 hours after 1.5 and 3 g/kg/day of intravenous lipid, 24 hours after discontinuing intravenous lipid emulsion, and 2 hours after restarting intravenous lipid. After 24 hours of intravenous lipid at 1.5 g/kg/day the RVPEP/ET rose to mean (SD) 0.287 (0.03) from a baseline value of 0.225 (0.02) and to 0.326 (0.05) after 24 hours of intravenous lipid at 3 g/kg/day. Pulmonary arterial pressure returned to baseline 24 hours after the intravenous lipid had been discontinued. Continuous 24 hour infusion of lipid caused significant dose and time-dependent increases in pulmonary vascular resistance. Intravenous lipid may aggravate pulmonary hypertension. PMID:8777674

  20. [How to control postoperative pain: intravenous route].

    PubMed

    Occella, P; Vivaldi, F

    2003-12-01

    Intravenous administration of analgesic drugs is one of the most common ways to control post-operative pain. It can be used in almost all kinds of surgical interventions and particularly those of medium and high complexity. Besides, when other techniques are contraindicated because of clinical and/or managing problems, intravenous way finds its best application. Among analgesic drugs NSAID (ketorolac) and opioids (tramadol, morphine, buprenorphine) are most frequently used. As to administration techniques, elastomeric pump is, according to personal experience, a simple-to-manage, practical and precise device with lower cost respect to other administration set. Elastomeric pump is a single use reservoir that allows continuous administration of drugs with a uniform pre-set infusion speed. Finally, guide-lines, showing pre-load and infusion doses of analgesic drugs, based on pain intensity, are presented. PMID:14663417

  1. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  2. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols.

  3. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols. PMID:21499552

  4. Fat emulsion infusion potentiates coagulation activation during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Coyle, S M; Levi, M; Boermeester, M A; Braxton, C C; Jansen, P M; Hack, C E; Lowry, S F

    1996-01-01

    Intravenous fat emulsions are frequently given to malnourished patients who are prone to suffer from infectious complications. As injection of low dose endotoxin represents a model to study the human response to acute infection, we sought to determine the effect of lipid emulsion infusion on endotoxin-induced activation of the hemostatic mechanism in man. Ten healthy men received a bolus intravenous injection of endotoxin (lot EC-5; 20 U/kg) midway through a 4-h infusion (125 ml/h) of either dextrose 5% (n = 5) or Intralipid 20% (n = 5). Lipid infusion potentiated endotoxin-induced coagulation activation, as indicated by higher plasma levels of the prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 and of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes (both p < 0.05 for the difference between groups). However, lipid infusion did not influence the fibrinolytic response to intravenous endotoxin, as reflected by similar increases in the levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes in both groups. Endotoxin-induced appearance of plasminogen activator inhibitor type I was enhanced by lipid infusion (p < 0.05). These data suggest that fat emulsion infusion may enhance the tendency towards thrombotic complications in patients with infections.

  5. Peripheral intravenous line (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peripheral intravenous line is a small, short plastic catheter that is placed through the skin into a vein, ... or foot, but occasionally in the head. A peripheral intravenous line is used to give fluids and ...

  6. Infusion Rate Dependent Pharmacokinetics of Bendamustine with Altered Formation of γ-hydroxybendamustine (M3) Metabolite Following 30- and 60-min Infusion of Bendamustine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, N R; Richter, W; Devaraj, V C; Suresh, P S; Bhamdipati, R K; Mullangi, R

    2016-07-01

    Bendamustine is an alkylating agent administered as 1 h intravenous infusion in the clinic for the treatment of malignant haematological cancers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of bendamustine and its key cytochrome P 450 (CYP) 1A2 mediated γ-hydroxybendamustine (M3) metabolite after 30- and 60-min intravenous infusion of bendamustine in rats. 2 groups were assigned to receive bendamustine either as 30- or 60-min infusion and doses were normalized to 15 mg/kg for the sake of statistical evaluation. Serial pharmacokinetic samples were collected and were analysed for the circulatory levels of bendamustine and its M3 metabolite. Standard pharmacokinetic parameters were generated for bendamustine and its M3 metabolite. Regardless of the intravenous regimens, Cmax coincided with end of infusion for both bendamustine and its M3 metabolite. Immediately after stoppage of infusion, a rapid decline in the plasma levels occurred for both bendamustine and M3 metabolite. The Cmax and AUC0-∞ parameters for bendamustine after 60-min infusion were 1.90 and 1.34-fold higher; while CL was lower by 1.32-fold as compared to the 30-min infusion. In contrast, the Cmax and AUC0-∞ after 30-min infusion for the M3 metabolite was 2.15- and 2.78-fold greater; while CL was 2.32-fold lower when compared to the 60-min infusion. However, T1/2 and Vz values were similar between the 2 intravenous treatments for bendamustine or the M3 metabolite. The data unequivocally confirmed the existence of differential pharmacokinetics of bendamustine and its M3 metabolite as the function of the duration of intravenous infusion.

  7. Acid-Base Homeostasis: Overview for Infusion Nurses.

    PubMed

    Masco, Natalie A

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential to normal function of the human body. Even slight alterations can significantly alter physiologic processes at the tissue and cellular levels. To optimally care for patients, nurses must be able to recognize signs and symptoms that indicate deviations from normal. Nurses who provide infusions to patients-whether in acute care, home care, or infusion center settings-have a responsibility to be able to recognize the laboratory value changes that occur with the imbalance and appreciate the treatment options, including intravenous infusions. PMID:27598068

  8. Multi-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere and auroral emissions (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, Benjamin; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini; Krupp, Norbert; Grodent, Denis; Kurth, William S.; Yates, Japheth N.

    2016-04-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes which differ from the rotation period. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emission brightness. We made a 10-year survey of the quasi-periodic 1-hour energetic electron injections observed in the Saturn's outer magnetosphere by the Low-Energy Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini. The signature of these injections is pulsations in the electron fluxes at energies between a hundred keV up to several MeV. We investigated the topology and the morphology of these pulsations, as well as the signatures of the electron injections in the radio emissions and the magnetic field, respectively, measured by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) on board Cassini. The morphology of the pulsations (interpulse period, number of pulsations per event, growth and decay time) shows a weak local time dependence, which suggests a high-latitude source for the pulsed energetic electrons. This suggestion is reinforced by the observation of strong radio bursts in the auroral hiss coincident with the electron pulsations and by the higher growth rate and decay rate magnitudes at high latitudes. Moreover, since the morphological properties of the pulsations are similar at the various locations where the electron injections are observed, the acceleration mechanism of the electrons is likely common for all the events and may be directly or indirectly involving magnetic reconnection. The auroral emissions, which display the ionospheric response to magnetospheric dynamics, exhibit some quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations as well. Some pulsed auroral brightenings are observed while Cassini detects several electron

  9. How to Keep an Infusion Log: Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tions relating to the donor pool and the manufacturing process may arise and knowing which brand and ... thousands of donors is pooled together during the manufacturing process and each pool is given a “lot” ...

  10. Impact of smart infusion technology on administration of anticoagulants (unfractionated Heparin, Argatroban, Lepirudin, and Bivalirudin).

    PubMed

    Fanikos, John; Fiumara, Karen; Baroletti, Steve; Luppi, Carol; Saniuk, Catherine; Mehta, Amar; Silverman, Jon; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2007-04-01

    This study reviewed 863 alerts generated from the infusion of anticoagulants in 355 patients from October 2003 to January 2005. Alerts were generated by smart infusion technology pumps and recorded in the devices' memory. The most common alerts were underdose alerts (59.8%), followed by overdose alerts (31.3%) and duplicate drug therapy alerts (8.9%). In response to the alerts, users' most frequent action was to cancel (46.5%) or reprogram (43.1%) the infusions. The highest percentage of alerts occurred from 2 to 4 p.m. During the study, there were 4 infusion rate errors, compared with 15 in the immediately preceding 16-month period. In conclusion, smart infusion technology intercepted keypad entry errors, thereby reducing the likelihood of intravenous anticoagulant overdose or underdose. Dose or infusion rate programming during intravenous anticoagulation is an important targets for medication safety interventions.

  11. Optical detection of intravenous infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    Infiltration of medications during infusion therapy results in complications ranging from erythema and pain to tissue necrosis requiring amputation. Infiltration occurs from improper insertion of the cannula, separation of the cannula from the vein, penetration of the vein by the cannula during movement, and response of the vein to the medication. At present, visual inspection by the clinical staff is the primary means for detecting intravenous (IV) infiltration. An optical sensor was developed to monitor the needle insertion site for signs of IV infiltration. Initial studies on simulated and induced infiltrations on a swine model validated the feasibility of the methodology. The presence of IV infiltration was confirmed by visual inspection of the infusion site and/or absence of blood return in the IV line. Potential sources of error due to illumination changes, motion artifacts, and edema were also investigated. A comparison of the performance of the optical device and blinded expert observers showed that the optical sensor has higher sensitivity and specificity, and shorter detection time than the expert observers. An improved model of the infiltration monitoring device was developed and evaluated in a clinical study on induced infiltrations of healthy adult volunteers. The performance of the device was compared with the observation of a blinded expert observer. The results show that the rates of detection of infiltrations are 98% and 82% for the optical sensor and the observer, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the optical sensor are 0.97 and 0.98, respectively.

  12. Intravenous iron therapy: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; Muñoz, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) because of its effectiveness and low cost. But unfortunately in many iron deficient conditions, oral iron is a less than the ideal treatment mainly because of adverse events related to the gastrointestinal tract as well as the long course required to treat anemia and replenish body iron stores. The first iron product for intravenous use was high-molecular-weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to prescribe intravenous iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia for many years. In 1999 and 2001, two new intravenous iron preparations (ferric gluconate and iron sucrose) were introduced into the market as safer alternatives to iron dextran. Over the last five years, three new intravenous iron dextran-free preparations have been developed and have better safety profiles than the more traditional intravenous compounds, as none require test doses and all these products are promising in respect to a more rapid replacement of body iron stores (15-60 minutes/infusion) as they can be given at higher doses (from 500 mg to more than 1000 mg/infusion). The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, safety profile and toxicity of intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. PMID:23049364

  13. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic... convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units? (a) Use the equation...

  14. Intravenous lipids for preterm infants: a review.

    PubMed

    Salama, Ghassan Sa; Kaabneh, Mahmmoud Af; Almasaeed, Mai N; Alquran, Mohammad Ia

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW) are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science. PMID:25698888

  15. Intravenous human immunoglobulin for treatment of folliculitis decalvans.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nuriah; Ralph, Nicola; Murphy, Gillian

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of folliculitis decalvans (FD) successfully treated with intravenous human immunoglobulin (HIG). Many conventional treatments with topical agents and oral antibiotics had failed to achieve disease remission, treatment with HIG at a dose of 2 g/kg for the first month, reduced to 1 g/kg for second to fourth months was therefore started, which resulted in rapid improvement and ultimately complete resolution of FD. Clinical improvement was noted after the first infusion of HIG and remission of inflammation was achieved after the fourth infusion. Disease remission was sustained for six months following the last HIG infusion. The exact mechanism of action of HIG is poorly understood. However, it is thought to act as an immunomodulatory agent by altering different components of immune functions. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of FD successfully treated with intravenous HIG.

  16. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  17. Wireless Application in Intravenous Infiltration Detection System

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Matthew S.; Naramore, William J.; Chou, Nee-Yin; Winchester, Leonard W.

    2008-01-01

    The IrDA wireless protocol has been applied to a fiber optics based point-of-care system for the detection of intravenous infiltration. The system is used for monitoring patients under infusion therapy. It is optimized for portability by incorporating a battery source and wireless communication. The IrDA protocol provides secure data communication between the electronic module of the system and the PDAs carried by the nurses. The PDA is used for initiating the actions of the electronic module and for data transfer. Security is provided by specially designed software and hardware. PMID:19162821

  18. Wireless application in intravenous infiltration detection system.

    PubMed

    Alley, Matthew S; Naramore, William J; Chou, Nee-Yin; Winchester, Leonard W

    2008-01-01

    The IrDA wireless protocol has been applied to a fiber optics based point-of-care system for the detection of intravenous infiltration. The system is used for monitoring patients under infusion therapy. It is optimized for portability by incorporating a battery source and wireless communication. The IrDA protocol provides secure data communication between the electronic module of the system and the PDAs carried by the nurses. The PDA is used for initiating the actions of the electronic module and for data transfer. Security is provided by specially designed software and hardware.

  19. [Intravenous monoanesthesia and antianesthetics in emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    D'iachenko, P K; Kostiuchenko, A L

    1984-04-01

    Profiles of using the intravenous mononarcosis (sodium hydroxybutyrate, viadryl , ketamin , sombrevin, seduxen) in urgent surgery and traumatology are analyzed. Choice of certain narcotics is motivated for patients with blood loss and shock, intoxication, insufficiency of kidneys, adrenals and liver, cardio-vascular and respiratory disorders. The problem of antinarcotics is considered with reference to the efficiency of specific (bemegride, gutimine , amtizol , cytochrome "C") and nonspecific ( osmodiuretics , infusion media containing thawing water) antinarcotics . A preliminary assessment of the efficiency of different drugs of antinarcotic action is given.

  20. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text]. PMID:19192939

  1. Impact of priming the infusion system on the performance of target-controlled infusion of remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Moon, Bong-Ki; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Jo, Youn Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background The start-up behavior of syringe and syringe pump is known to be one of the causes of inaccurate intravenous infusion. This study evaluated the method of priming the infusion system (PRIMING), and its impact on the target-controlled infusion (TCI) of two remifentanil diluents. Methods PRIMING was performed using an evacuation of 2.0 ml to the atmosphere prior to TCI. Forty-eight TCI, using 50 µg/ml (Remi50) or 20 µg/ml (Remi20) of diluents, were performed targeting 4.0 ng/ml of effect-site concentration (Ceff), with PRIMING or not. The gravimetrical measurements of the delivered infusates reproduced actual Ceff. The bolus amount and time to reach 95% target were compared. Results Without PRIMING, Remi50 infused less bolus (43 ± 23 %) than Remi20 (19 ± 9 %) (P = 0.003), and showed more delayed increase of Ceff (11.2 ± 4.0 min) than Remi20 (7.4 ± 0.4 min) (P = 0.028). However, PRIMING significantly decreased the deficit of the bolus (2 ± 1%), as well as the delay of the increase of Ceff in Remi50 (1.2 ± 0.2 min) (both P < 0.001). In addition, with PRIMING, the start-up bolus showed minimal difference to the nominal bolus (1 and 2%), and Ceff were increased to 4.0 ± 0.1 ng/ml at the expected time of peak effect, irrespective of the diluents. Conclusions Proper operation of the syringe pump used in the priming of the syringe may be helpful in reduction of the inaccuracy of TCI, particularly during the early phase of infusion, or the infusion of a more concentrated diluent. PMID:23741562

  2. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  3. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  4. Daytime melatonin infusions induce sleep in pigeons without altering subsequent amounts of nocturnal sleep.

    PubMed

    Mintz, E M; Phillips, N H; Berger, R J

    1998-12-18

    Daily infusions of melatonin restore sleep suppressed by continuous bright light in pigeons. To test whether melatonin could also induce sleep in pigeons on a 12:12 h light-dark cycle (LD), pigeons received 12-h intravenous melatonin infusions during the day. Melatonin induced sleep during the day, increased EEG slow wave activity, and decreased body temperature and locomotor activity. None of these variables were altered during the night following infusions. The induction of extended daytime sleep by melatonin infusions indicates that melatonin is a principal factor in the regulation of sleep in pigeons.

  5. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  6. Chronic postthoracotomy pain and perioperative ketamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Liao, Qin; Zhang, Fan; Tong, Jianbin; Ouyang, Wen

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate whether continuous intravenous ketamine during the first 72 hours after thoracotomy could reduce the incidence and intensity of chronic postthoracotomy pain (CPTP) and to define the incidence and risk factors of CPTP. Seventy-eight patients receiving thoracotomy for lung tumor (benign or malignant) were randomly divided into two groups: ketamine group (n = 31) and control groups (n = 47). Patients in the ketamine group received intravenous ketamine 1 mg/kg before incision, followed by 2 μg/kg/minute infusion for 72 hours plus sufentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia after thoracotomy. Patients in the control group received intravenous a 0.9% normal saline and infusion plus sufentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia. The solutions patients received were blinded. The numerical rating scale (NRS) pain scores and the incidence and risk factors of CPTP were recorded during the first 6 months after surgery. Compared with control group, the incidence of chronic pain in the ketamine group did not decrease at 2 months (χ(2) = 1.599, P = .206) and 6 months (χ(2) = 0.368, P = .544) after surgery. Postoperative pain scores in the ketamine group were not significantly different from those of the control group patients at 2 months (U = 677.5, P = .593) and 6 months (U = 690.5, P = .680). The incidence of CPTP was 78.2% (61/78) at 2 months and 53.8% (42/78) at 6 months after surgery. Retractor used time (OR = 5.811, P = .002), inadequate acute pain control (NRS ≥ 5) (OR = 5.425, P = .048), and chemotherapy (OR = 3.784, P = .056) were independent risk factors for chronic postthoracotomy pain. The authors conclude that continuous intravenous ketamine (2 μg/kg/min) during the first 72 hours after thoracotomy was not beneficial to prevent chronic postthoracotomy pain. The independent risk factors for chronic postthoracotomy pain were retractor used time, inadequate acute pain control, and chemotherapy.

  7. Pharmacogenomics: Overview of Applications and Relation to Infusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kisor, David F; Bright, David R; Manion, Chelsea R; Smith, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) describes the relationship between an individual's genes and his or her response to drug therapy. Data are accumulating that indicate that PGx has application in the clinical setting for drugs across therapeutic categories, including drugs that are administered intravenously and are of greater familiarity to infusion nurses. This article provides an overview of the science and presents common examples of PGx as it relates to drug and/or drug dose selection. Additionally, there are brief summaries of the role infusion nurses can play relative to toxicity monitoring, patient education, and other aspects of PGx. PMID:27074990

  8. Peripheral intravenous line - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PIV - infants; Peripheral IV - infants; Peripheral line - infants; Peripheral line - neonatal ... A peripheral intravenous line (PIV) is a small, short, plastic tube, called a catheter. A health care provider puts ...

  9. Intravenous cannula site management.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Nicola

    2016-08-24

    Intravenous cannulation is becoming one of the most common procedures in healthcare as increasing numbers of patients are treated for acute and chronic illnesses. The use of an intravenous cannula is not without risk, so it is essential that the healthcare practitioner can justify why the patient requires cannulation, as well as being able to safely manage and provide ongoing care for patients with the device. This article provides an overview of intravenous cannulation, including the selection of appropriate cannulation sites, identification of the different types and sizes of cannula used, and cannula maintenance. Specific complications related to intravenous cannulation are discussed and guidance is given on how to recognise and avoid potential complications to ensure that practice is safe and effective. PMID:27641593

  10. Pharmacokinetics as applied to total intravenous anaesthesia. Practical implications.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, J; Schwilden, H; Stoekel, H

    1983-07-01

    In six patients undergoing gynaecological surgery computer assisted total intravenous anaesthesia (CATIA) was performed using etomidate and alfentanil. Constant plasma levels of etomidate (0.3 microgram/ml) from the very beginning onwards were achieved using the so called B.E.T. infusion scheme. Alfentanil plasma concentrations of 0.45 microgram/ml were maintained by the same infusion scheme beginning with skin incision until 20 minutes prior to the end of surgery. The proposed concept of CATIA provided an adequate analgesic and hypnotic effect during anaesthesia for abdominal surgery with a recovery period of short duration.

  11. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  12. Disposition of intravenous radioactive acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda, P.; Good, S.S.; Laskin, O.L.; Krasny, H.C.; Connor, J.D.; Lietman, P.S.

    1981-11-01

    The kinetic and metabolic disposition of (8-14C)acyclovir (ACV) was investigated in five subjects with advanced malignancy. The drug was administered by 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma and blood radioactivity-time, and plasma concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open kinetic model. There was nearly equivalent distribution of radioactivity in blood and plasma. The overall mean plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD of ACV were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hr and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of ACV to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4%. Most of the radioactive dose excreted was recovered in the urine (71% to 99%) with less than 2% excretion in the feces and only trace amounts in the expired Co2. Analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of ACV, accounting for 8.5% to 14.1% of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2% of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-((2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary ACV ranged from 62% to 91% of the dose. There was no indication of ACV cleavage to guanine. Renal clearance of ACV was approximately three times the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  13. Intravenous Rh immune globulin for treating immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G

    2001-11-01

    Intravenous Rh [corrected] immune globulin was licensed by the U. S. Food and Drug administration in 1995 for the treatment of acute and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in adults. In 1996, the American Society of Hematology published a practice guideline for immune thrombocytopenic purpura, but treatment recommendations of necessity were formulated using only results of early clinical trials with intravenous Rh immune globulin. To date, there are no published results of large-scale clinical trials comparing conventional doses of intravenous immune globulin with the most promising dose range for intravenous Rh immune globulin (50-75 microg/kg). However, clinical experience is accumulating to indicate that intravenous Rh immune globulin is as effective, probably safer, and easier to administer than intravenous immune globulin. Acute intravascular hemolysis after infusions of intravenous Rh immune globulin for immune thrombocytopenic purpura has been reported with an estimated incidence of 1 in 1,115 patients. The risk factors for this adverse event have not been defined.

  14. [Transition from intravenous to subcutaneous prostacyclin in pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Escribano Subías, Pilar; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Tello de Menesses, Rocío; Gómez Sánchez, Miguel A; Delgado Jiménez, Juan F; Sáenz de la Calzada, Carlos

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of arterial pulmonary hypertension with epoprostenol (intravenous prostacyclin) improves survival and quality of life, but the need for an implanted central venous catheter is associated with frequent complications, that often (as in the case of infection or dislodgment) are serious and require catheter replacement. Treprostinil is a prostacyclin analogue suitable for continuous subcutaneous administration. We report the successful transition from intravenous epoprostenol to subcutaneuos treprostinil in four patients with severe pulmonary hypertension who suffered from serious complications associated with the epoprostenol infusion system.

  15. Female Patients Require a Higher Propofol Infusion Rate for Sedation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shigeru; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Honda, Yuka; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Sedation may minimize physiologic and behavioral stress responses. In our facility, the infusion rate of propofol is adjusted according to the bispectral index (BIS) in all cases of implant-related surgery; multivariate analysis of retrospective data enabled us to extract independent factors that affect the dose of propofol in sedation that are considered useful indicators for achieving adequate sedation. The study population comprised all patients undergoing implant-related surgery under intravenous sedation in Okayama University Hospital from April 2009 to March 2013. The infusion rate of propofol was adjusted to maintain the BIS value at 70-80. The outcome was the average infusion rate of propofol, and potential predictor variables were age, sex, body weight, treatment time, and amount of midazolam. Independent variables that affected the average infusion rate of propofol were extracted with multiple regression analysis. One hundred twenty-five subjects were enrolled. In the multiple regression analysis, female sex was shown to be significantly associated with a higher average infusion rate of propofol. Females may require a higher infusion rate of propofol than males to achieve adequate sedation while undergoing implant-related surgery. PMID:27269663

  16. Female Patients Require a Higher Propofol Infusion Rate for Sedation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shigeru; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Honda, Yuka; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Sedation may minimize physiologic and behavioral stress responses. In our facility, the infusion rate of propofol is adjusted according to the bispectral index (BIS) in all cases of implant-related surgery; multivariate analysis of retrospective data enabled us to extract independent factors that affect the dose of propofol in sedation that are considered useful indicators for achieving adequate sedation. The study population comprised all patients undergoing implant-related surgery under intravenous sedation in Okayama University Hospital from April 2009 to March 2013. The infusion rate of propofol was adjusted to maintain the BIS value at 70-80. The outcome was the average infusion rate of propofol, and potential predictor variables were age, sex, body weight, treatment time, and amount of midazolam. Independent variables that affected the average infusion rate of propofol were extracted with multiple regression analysis. One hundred twenty-five subjects were enrolled. In the multiple regression analysis, female sex was shown to be significantly associated with a higher average infusion rate of propofol. Females may require a higher infusion rate of propofol than males to achieve adequate sedation while undergoing implant-related surgery.

  17. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. (c) EPA's authority under paragraph (b) of this section... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  18. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  19. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  20. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. (c) EPA's authority under paragraph (b) of this section... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  1. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units? 60.1755 Section 60.1755 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1755 How do I convert my...

  3. 77 FR 4940 - Determination of Failure To Attain by 2005 and Determination of Current Attainment of the 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Air pollution control, National parks, Wilderness Areas. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. Dated... Attainment of the 1-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the Baltimore Nonattainment Area in... National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) by the applicable attainment date of November 15,...

  4. 76 FR 28195 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... attainment of the 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) through the year 2014. The... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed...

  5. Simplified intravenous nutrition using Intralipid-based mixtures in patients with serious gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, W. R.; Knott, C. E.; Cook, J. A.; Langman, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An Intralipid-based intravenous feeding mixture has been given to 20 patients with serious gastrointestinal disease who required parenteral nutritional support (mean duration 13.75 days). In half of the patients, only peripheral veins were used for infusion (mean duration 12 days), the infusion site being changed every 24-48 hr. Positive nitrogen balance was maintained in all but one individual and other parameters of nutrition improved. No serious complications due to intravenous feeding were encountered, although some patients did develop abnormal liver function tests and mild phlebitis at the peripheral vein infusion site. No abnormalities of pulmonary gas exchange attributable to the infusion were noted. We conclude that this mixture is safe, relatively simple to use and effective. Consequently, it may be especially appropriate for patients in general medical and surgical wards as well as those in specialist units. PMID:6415636

  6. The Effect of Intravenous Citalopram on the Neural Substrates of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Bhikram, Tracy P; Farb, Norman A S; Ravindran, Lakshmi N; Papadopoulos, Yousef G; Conn, David K; Pollock, Bruce G; Ravindran, Arun V

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of an intravenous serotonin reuptake inhibitor on the neural substrates of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), as intravenous agents may be more effective in treating OCD than conventional oral pharmacotherapy. Eight OCD subjects and eight control subjects received alternate infusions of citalopram and placebo during functional magnetic resonance imaging, in a randomized, symptom-provocation, crossover design. Compared with baseline, OCD subjects displayed significant changes in prefrontal neural activity after the citalopram infusion relative to placebo, and these changes correlated with reductions in subjective anxiety. PMID:27019066

  7. Effect of intravenous lipid emulsion on bupivacaine plasma concentration in humans.

    PubMed

    Litonius, E; Tarkkila, P; Neuvonen, P J; Rosenberg, P H

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion is the recommended treatment for severe local anaesthetic intoxication. Lipid emulsion may entrap lipid soluble drugs by functioning as a 'lipid sink', but its effect on bupivacaine pharmacokinetics remains unknown. In this randomised, double-blind, crossover study, eight healthy male volunteers were infused bupivacaine 0.5mg.kg(-1) intravenously over 20 min, followed by an infusion of either intravenous lipid emulsion or Hartmann's solution for 30 min. At 20 and 30 min after the start of the infusion, the total plasma bupivacaine concentration was lower while receiving lipid emulsion than Hartmann's solution (mean difference 111 (95% CI 55-167) μg.l(-1) and 75 (95% CI 26-124 μg.l(-1) at 20 and 30 min, respectively; p<0.02). However, there were no differences in un-entrapped (non-lipid bound) or free (non-protein bound) bupivacaine plasma concentrations during the infusion. Intravenous lipid emulsion infusion reduced the context-sensitive half-life of total plasma bupivacaine from 45 (95% CI 32-76)min to 25 (95% CI 20-33)min; p=0.01. We observed no significant adverse effects of lipid emulsion. In conclusion, lipid emulsion may slightly increase the rate of bupivacaine tissue distribution. No 'lipid sink' effect was observed with the non-toxic dose of bupivacaine used.

  8. Update on intravenous dipyridamole cardiac imaging in the assessment of ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Younis, L.T.; Chaitman, B.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Intravenous dipyridamole is a relative selective coronary vasodilator which, when combined with thallium-201, provides a useful technique to assess myocardial perfusion. The intravenous dipyridamole is administered as an infusion at a rate of 0.14 mg/kg/min for 4 minutes. In the presence of significant coronary artery disease the increase of coronary blood flow is disproportionate between vessels with and without significant coronary lesions, providing the basis for detecting regional differences in flow using thallium-201. The test can be used alone or combined with low level exercise to increase test sensitivity. The test is safe when performed under medical supervision and when patient selection is done appropriately. Most of the side effects induced by dipyridamole infusion are well tolerated by patients and readily reversed with intravenous aminophylline and sublingual nitroglycerin. The average sensitivity and specificity of the dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy test from the major studies are 76% and 70%, respectively. The test is very useful in providing prognostic information in patients who are unable to exercise. A reversible thallium defect after dipyridamole infusion has been shown to be associated with significant mortality and morbidity in patients with documented or suspected coronary artery disease. The use of intravenous dipyridamole has been extended into other modalities of imaging, including 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, to study functional changes in the left ventricular induced by the infusion of intravenous dipyridamole. 52 references.

  9. Optimization of induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia with cold saline infusion: A laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Fluher, Jure; Markota, Andrej; Stožer, Andraž; Sinkovič, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    Cold fluid infusions can be used to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Fluid temperature higher than 4°C can increase the volume of fluid needed, prolong the induction phase of hypothermia and thus contribute to complications. We performed a laboratory experiment with two objectives. The first objective was to analyze the effect of wrapping fluid bags in ice packs on the increase of fluid temperature with time in bags exposed to ambient conditions. The second objective was to quantify the effect of insulating venous tubing and adjusting flow rate on fluid temperature increase from bag to the level of an intravenous cannula during a simulated infusion. The temperature of fluid in bags wrapped in ice packs was significantly lower compared to controls at all time points during the 120 minutes observation. The temperature increase from the bag to the level of intravenous cannula was significantly lower for insulated tubing at all infusion rates (median temperature differences between bag and intravenous cannula were: 8.9, 4.8, 4.0, and 3.1°C, for non-insulated and 5.9, 3.05, 1.1, and 0.3°C, for insulated tubing, at infusion rates 10, 30, 60, and 100 mL/minute, respectively). The results from this study could potentially be used to decrease the volume of fluid infused when inducing mild hypothermia with an infusion of cold fluids. PMID:26614854

  10. Electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons for 1 hour improves axon regeneration and the number of reinnervated muscles that function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Grumbles, Robert M; Thomas, Christine K

    2013-07-01

    Motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or disease results in muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. We have previously transplanted embryonic ventral spinal cord cells into the peripheral nerve to reinnervate denervated muscles and to reduce muscle atrophy, but reinnervation was incomplete. Here, our aim was to determine whether brief electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons in the peripheralnerve changes motoneuron survival, axon regeneration, and muscle reinnervation and function because neural depolarization is crucial for embryonic neuron survival and may promote activity-dependent axon growth. At 1 week after denervation by sciatic nerve section, embryonic day 14 to 15 cells were purified for motoneurons, injected into the tibial nerve of adult Fischer rats, and stimulated immediatelyfor up to 1 hour. More myelinated axons were present in tibial nerves 10 weeks after transplantation when transplants had been stimulated acutely at 1 Hz for 1 hour. More muscles were reinnervated if the stimulation treatment lasted for 1 hour. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy, with or without the stimulation treatment. These data suggest that brief stimulation of embryonic neurons promotes axon growth, which has a long-term impact on muscle reinnervation and function. Muscle reinnervation is important because it may enable the use of functional electrical stimulation to restore limb movements. PMID:23771218

  11. An intravenous medication safety system: preventing high-risk medication errors at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Irene; Sullivan, Mark; Hutchinson, James; Thurman, Susan; Gaffney, F Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Improving medication safety at the point of care--particularly for high-risk drugs--is a major concern of nursing administrators. The medication errors most likely to cause harm are administration errors related to infusion of high-risk medications. An intravenous medication safety system is designed to prevent high-risk infusion medication errors and to capture continuous quality improvement data for best practice improvement. Initial testing with 50 systems in 2 units at Vanderbilt University Medical Center revealed that, even in the presence of a fully mature computerized prescriber order-entry system, the new safety system averted 99 potential infusion errors in 8 months.

  12. Effects of intracoronary infusions of acetylcholine and nicotine on the dog heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ross, G

    1973-08-01

    1. In anaesthetized dogs intracoronary infusions of high doses of nicotine and acetylcholine increased myocardial contractile force and this could be prevented by pre-treatment with desmethylimipramine or phenoxybenzamine.2. The inotropic effect of nicotine was brief and subsided during the continuing infusion of the drug. The infusion of nicotine did not reduce the inotropic effects of cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation.3. The motropic effect of intracoronary acetylcholine often fluctuated during prolonged infusions and was not altered by pretreatment with atropine. Acetylcholine infusions reduced the inotropic responses produced by cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation and led to a substantial transient reduction in the associated pressor responses. Intracoronary acetylcholine also reduced the pressor and inotropic effect of intravenous noradrenaline. The attenuation of these adrenergic cardiovascular responses by acetylcholine was prevented by atropine.

  13. Analgesic efficacy of ropivacaine wound infusion after laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Bo Young; Park, Yoon Ah; Koo, Hye Young; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Cho, Juhee; Sim, Woo Seog

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local anesthetic wound infusion has been previously investigated in postoperative pain management. However, a limited number of studies have evaluated its use in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. This study aims to evaluate whether ropivacaine wound infusion is effective for postoperative pain management after laparoscopic surgery in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods This prospective study included 184 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer between July 2012 and June 2013. The patients were grouped as the combined group (intravenous patient-controlled analgesia [IV-PCA] plus continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine, n = 92) and the PCA group (IV-PCA only, n = 92). Efficacy and safety were assessed in terms of numeric rating scale (NRS) pain score, opioid consumption, postoperative recovery, and complications. Results The total quantity of PCA fentanyl was significantly less in the combined group than in the PCA group (P < 0.001). The NRS score of the combined group was not higher than in the PCA group, despite less opioid consumption. There were no differences between groups for postoperative recovery and most complications, including wound complications. However, the rate of nausea and vomiting was significantly lower in the combined group (P = 0.022). Conclusion Ropivacaine wound infusion significantly reduced postoperative opioid requirements and the rate of nausea/vomiting. This study showed clinical efficacy of ropivacaine wound infusion for postoperative pain control in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27757398

  14. High-technology i.v. infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1989-02-01

    Some of the newer high-technology infusion devices commercially available or under development are described. The range of infusion devices includes both controllers and pumps; pumps can be classified by mechanism of operation (peristaltic, syringe, cassette, elastomeric reservoir), frequency or type of drug delivery (continuous or intermittent infusion, bolus dosing, single- or multiple-solution delivery), or therapeutic application (such as the patient-controlled analgesia, or PCA, pump). Advances in infusion technology and computer technology have led to the development of devices with extremely sophisticated drug-delivery capabilities (multiple-rate or multiple-solution programming, operation as pump or controller, or both, and interchangeable applications and settings). Current research in infusion-device technology is focusing on implantable pumps, pumps with chronobiological applications, osmotic-pressure devices, and open- and closed-loop systems. Pharmacists need to keep abreast of the rapidly changing intravenous device marketplace to provide clinical expertise and leadership in the review and evaluation of high-technology drug delivery systems. PMID:2653027

  15. High-technology i.v. infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1991-10-01

    Some of the newer high-technology infusion devices commercially available or under development are described. The range of infusion devices includes both controllers and pumps; pumps can be classified by mechanism of operation (peristaltic, syringe, cassette, elastomeric reservoir), frequency or type of drug delivery (continuous or intermittent infusion, bolus dosing, single- or multiple-solution delivery), or therapeutic application (such as the patient-controlled analgesia, or PCA, pump). Advances in infusion technology and computer technology have led to the development of devices with extremely sophisticated drug-delivery capabilities (multiple-rate or multiple-solution programming, operation as pump or controller, or both, and interchangeable applications and settings). Current research in infusion-device technology is focusing on implantable pumps, pumps with chronobiological applications, osmotic-pressure devices, and open- and closed-loop systems. Pharmacists need to keep abreast of the rapidly changing intravenous device marketplace to provide clinical expertise and leadership in the review and evaluation of high-technology drug delivery systems. PMID:1772112

  16. Theophylline: constant-rate infusion predictions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, C A; Sahebjami, H; Imhoff, T; Thomas, J P; Myre, S A

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a method of prospectively estimating appropriate aminophylline infusion rates in acutely ill, hospitalized patients with bronchospasm. Steady-state serum theophylline concentrations (Css), clearances (Cl), and half-lives (t1/2) were estimated by the Chiou method using serum concetrantions obtained 1 and 6 h after the start of a constant-rate intravenous aminophylline infusion in 10 male patients averaging 57 years of age. Using an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay (EMIT) system for theophylline analysis, pharmacokinetic estimations were excellent for Css (r = 0.9103, p less than 0.01) and Cl (r = 0.9750, p less than 0.01). The mean estimation errors were 9.4% (range 0.8-21.5) for Css and 12.3% (range 1.3-28.0) for Cl. There was no correlation between patient age and Cl. This method is useful for rapidly individualizing aminophylline therapy in patients with acute bronchospasm. PMID:6740734

  17. Controlled release infusion kinetics of tobramycin.

    PubMed

    Lane, J R; Murray, W E; Willenborg, N L; Wilcox, C L; Connor, J D; Adler, D S

    1989-01-01

    Ten healthy male volunteers received two doses of tobramycin (2 mg/kg) in a crossover fashion, first by intravenous piggyback (IVPB), then by the CRIS infusion system after a washout period. Serum samples were drawn both during and after the infusions. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were assayed for tobramycin. Residual fluid from the lines of both delivery systems was measured and assayed for tobramycin concentration. All samples were run in duplicate, using an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique assay. The results indicate that there was a statistically higher amount of drug delivered via the CRIS system (98.3 +/- 0.3% versus 90.4 +/- 2.3%). No significant difference was found in urinary recovery between the two groups. Peak serum levels were significantly higher with the CRIS system, with 8/10 subjects having at least one serum level greater than 10 micrograms/ml, as compared to 0/10 when given by IVPB. Peak serum levels occurred at 30 min in all subjects given tobramycin through the CRIS system, compared to 50-60 min when delivered by IVPB. This difference in peak serum levels is primarily related to the rate of drug delivery and to the difference in the dose delivered to each subject. The significance of the serum concentration profiles is discussed.

  18. Intravenous thrombolysis on early recurrent cardioembolic stroke: 'Dr Jekyll' or 'Mr Hyde'?

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Manuel; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Carletti, Monica; Bovi, Paolo; Moretto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Early recurrent cardioembolic stroke on the previously unaffected side has very rarely been reported during or after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke. For these cases, thrombolysis guidelines lack any clear recommendation. We report two cases of thrombolysed stroke patients, with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation but normal sinus rhythm on admission, who respectively developed recurrent ischemic stroke within few hours after complete improvement and during intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator infusion. Intravenous thrombolysis was successfully repeated after echocardiographic evidence of left appendage thrombus in the first case and discontinued before complete administration in the second. PMID:22089941

  19. Plasma Calcium, Inorganic Phosphate and Magnesium During Hypocalcaemia Induced by a Standardized EDTA Infusion in Cows

    PubMed Central

    Mellau, LSB; Jørgensen, RJ; Enemark, JMD

    2001-01-01

    The intravenous Na2EDTA infusion technique allows effective specific chelation of circulating Ca2+ leading to a progressive hypocalcaemia. Methods previously used were not described in detail and results obtained by monitoring total and free ionic calcium were not comparable due to differences in sampling and analysis. This paper describes a standardized EDTA infusion technique that allowed comparison of the response of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium between 2 groups of experimental cows. The concentration of the Na2EDTA solution was 0.134 mol/l and the flow rate was standardized at 1.2 ml/kg per hour. Involuntary recumbency occurred when ionised calcium dropped to 0.39 – 0.52 mmol/l due to chelation. An initial fast drop of ionized calcium was observed during the first 20 min of infusion followed by a fluctuation leading to a further drop until recumbency. Pre-infusion [Ca2+] between tests does not correlate with the amount of EDTA required to induce involuntary recumbence. Total calcium concentration measured by atomic absorption remained almost constant during the first 100 min of infusion but declined gradually when the infusion was prolonged. The concentration of inorganic phosphate declined gradually in a fluctuating manner until recumbency. Magnesium concentration remained constant during infusion. Such electrolyte responses during infusion were comparable to those in spontaneous milk fever. The standardized infusion technique might be useful in future experimental studies. PMID:11503370

  20. Efficacy of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Jan D; Quast, Isaak; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    Owing to its anti-inflammatory efficacy in various autoimmune disease conditions, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-pooled IgG obtained from the plasma of several thousands individuals-has been used for nearly three decades and is proving to be efficient in a growing number of neurological diseases. IVIG therapy has been firmly established for the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, either as first-line therapy or adjunctive treatment. IVIG is also recommended as rescue therapy in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis and is beneficial as a second-line therapy for dermatomyositis and stiff-person syndrome. Subcutaneous rather than intravenous administration of IgG is gaining momentum because of its effectiveness in patients with primary immunodeficiency and the ease with which it can be administered independently from hospital-based infusions. The demand for IVIG therapy is growing, resulting in rising costs and supply shortages. Strategies to replace IVIG with recombinant products have been developed based on proposed mechanisms that confer the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG, but their efficacy has not been tested in clinical trials. This review covers new developments in the immunobiology and clinical applications of IVIG in neurological diseases.

  1. Extended Infusion of Dexmedetomidine to an Infant at Sixty Times the Intended Rate

    PubMed Central

    Max, Bryan A.; Mason, Keira P.

    2010-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2 adrenergic agonist which has recently been approved in the United States for procedural sedation in adults. This report describes an infant who inadvertently received an intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine at a rate which was 60 times greater than intended. We describe the hemodynamic, respiratory, and sedative effects of this overdose. PMID:20885920

  2. [Inhalational or intravenous anesthesia?].

    PubMed

    Dahan, A; Aarts, L P H J

    2016-01-01

    The debate continues whether there is a difference in patient outcome following inhalational versus intravenous anesthesia. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome following inhalational anesthesia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery but not in patients undergoing non-cardiac procedures. In this article we discuss the meta-analysis and its caveats, taking into account additional comparative studies. Our overall conclusion is that it is too early to definitively claim that one anesthesia technique results in a better outcome than the other. PMID:27650024

  3. Improvement in depression scores after 1 hour of light therapy treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gloria M; Nijjar, Gagan Virk; Langenberg, Patricia; Johnson, Mary A; Khabazghazvini, Baharak; Sleemi, Aamar; Vaswani, Dipika; Lapidus, Manana; Manalai, Partam; Tariq, Muhammad; Acharya, Monika; Cabassa, Johanna; Snitker, Soren; Postolache, Teodor T

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible rapid effects of light therapy on depressed mood in patients with seasonal affective disorder. Participants received 1 hour of bright light therapy and 1 hour of placebo dim red light in a randomized order crossover design. Depressed mood was measured at baseline and after each hour of light treatment using two self-report depression scales (Profile of Mood States-Depression-Dejection [POMS-D] subscale and the Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II]). When light effects were grouped for the two sessions, there was significantly greater reduction in self-report depression scores by -1.3 (p = 0.02) on the BDI-II and -1.2 (p = 0.02) on the POMS-D. A significant but modest improvement was detected after a single active light session. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to document an immediate improvement with light treatment using a placebo-controlled design with a clinical sample of depressed individuals.

  4. [Continuous-infusion ketamine].

    PubMed

    Mancini, P G; Caggese, G; Di Fabio, A; Di Nino, G F; Cocchi, V

    1980-08-01

    An investigation was made of the employment of ketamin as the sole anaesthetic in general surgery, using continuous infusion of a 1% solution for both induction and maintenance in 118 cases. ECG was monitored and arterial pressure was measured invasively. Central venous pressure was also determined in 10 cases. Changes in serum enzyme values during and after surgery were examined in 35 patients. Blood samples were withdrawn before induction, after the return to consciousness, and 24 hr after the operation. Side-effects were common, but slight. Five patients suffered from nightmares, but these were persons with marked imaginative activity and a melancholic nature. Cardiocirculatory function was satisfactory. In particular, peripheral perfusion was excellent in all cases.

  5. Removing the confusion about infusion.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C G

    1997-02-01

    There is more to infusion technology than simply connecting the "pump-du-jour" to the central line. The purpose of infusion technology, its safety products and four categories of devices-elastomeric, mechanical, gas and membrane-are discussed. PMID:9287736

  6. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units? 60.1265 Section 60.1265 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1265 How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2943 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units? 60.2943 Section 60.2943 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Operator Training and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2943 How do I convert my 1-hour...

  8. A functional test for the detection of infusion lines extravasation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Arnaldo; Zholkover, Adi; Keidan, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Extravasation during intravenous (IV) infusion is a common secondary effect with potentially serious clinical consequences. The correct positioning of the needle in the vein may be difficult to confirm when no blood return is observed. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the detection of extravasation during infusion therapy. A small volume of a sodium bicarbonate solution is administrated IV and, following its consecutive dissociation, an excess of carbon dioxide (CO2) is rapidly exhaled by the lungs. The analysis of the exhaled CO2 signal by a pattern recognition algorithm enables the robust detection of the CO2 excess release, thereby confirming the absence of extravasation. Initial results are presented for the application of the method on a group of 89 oncology patients. PMID:25570913

  9. [Methods of preventing phlebitis induced by infusion of fosaprepitant].

    PubMed

    Kohno, Emiko; Kanematsu, Sayaka; Okazaki, Satoshi; Ogata, Makoto; Kanemitsu, Meiko; Yamashita, Hiromi; Syuntou, Kaori; Sekita, Masako; Nishioka, Ryoko; Yoshida, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    At our hospital, we use aprepitant for nausea and vomiting when administering highly emetic anticancer agents, according to "Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Antiemetic Agents" given by the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology. We initiated the intravenous administration of fosaprepitant for better compliance compared with aprepitant; however, we observed phlebitis after the infusion of fosaprepitant. Therefore, we investigated measures to reduce phlebitis associated with the infusion of fosaprepitant. For the first premedication, fosaprepitant (150 mg) was dissolved in 100 mL of saline and administered for 30 minutes; 1 of 2 patients showed grade 4 phlebitis. For the modified premedication, fosaprepitant, dexamethasone, and 5- HT(3) antagonist were dissolved in 100 mL of saline and administered for 30 minutes. The modified premedication was administered to a total of 27 patients; 5 patients developed mild phlebitis (grade 1), but infusion could be continued by treating their phlebitis with a hot pack. We used a combination of dexamethasone and 5-HT(3) antagonist with fosaprepitant as a modified premedication in order to avoid drug-induced vascular damage, which resulted in the pH decreasing to 6.20-7.55 (close to neutral) and a shorter infusion time.

  10. Intravenous Fluid Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; McKay, Terri; Brown, Daniel; Zoldak, John

    2013-01-01

    The ability to stabilize and treat patients on exploration missions will depend on access to needed consumables. Intravenous (IV) fluids have been identified as required consumables. A review of the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) lists over 400 medical conditions that could present and require treatment during ISS missions. The Intravenous Fluid Generation System (IVGEN) technology provides the scalable capability to generate IV fluids from indigenous water supplies. It meets USP (U.S. Pharmacopeia) standards. This capability was performed using potable water from the ISS; water from more extreme environments would need preconditioning. The key advantage is the ability to filter mass and volume, providing the equivalent amount of IV fluid: this is critical for remote operations or resource- poor environments. The IVGEN technology purifies drinking water, mixes it with salt, and transfers it to a suitable bag to deliver a sterile normal saline solution. Operational constraints such as mass limitations and lack of refrigeration may limit the type and volume of such fluids that can be carried onboard the spacecraft. In addition, most medical fluids have a shelf life that is shorter than some mission durations. Consequently, the objective of the IVGEN experiment was to develop, design, and validate the necessary methodology to purify spacecraft potable water into a normal saline solution, thus reducing the amount of IV fluids that are included in the launch manifest. As currently conceived, an IVGEN system for a space exploration mission would consist of an accumulator, a purifier, a mixing assembly, a salt bag, and a sterile bag. The accumulator is used to transfer a measured amount of drinking water from the spacecraft to the purifier. The purifier uses filters to separate any air bubbles that may have gotten trapped during the drinking water transfer from flowing through a high-quality deionizing cartridge that removes the impurities in

  11. [Experiences with intravenous sulprostone administration in massive postpartal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Schönegg, W; Wessel, J; Schmidt-Gollwitzer, K

    1987-11-01

    Forty-three patients at the University Gynecology Clinic in Charlottenburg were given the prostaglandin E2 derivative sulprostone for severe postpartal hemorrhage. It was administered intravenously in a dose of 1.7 mcg/min (100 mcg/100 ml/h), with short-term increases to three times this amount in isolated cases. The drug proved highly efficacious (rapid onset and lasting effect). In 80% of the cases there were no side effects. Rises in body temperature occurred in six patients and in one patient a venous irritation developed in the arm into which the drug was infused. An RDS occurred, though it was considered that there was not necessarily a causal connection between this and the sulprostone infusion. In the authors' experience this drug has an established place in the treatment of atonic postpartal hemorrhage emergencies.

  12. Intravenous self-administration of cocaine and norcocaine by dogs.

    PubMed

    Risner, M E; Jones, B E

    1980-01-01

    The potency of cocaine, relative to d-amphetamine, to initiate and maintain intravenous self-administration behavior by dogs (n = 5) was determined. Response-contingent infusions of cocaine (at unit doses of 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60 mg/kg/infusion) and d-amphetamine (at unit doses of 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg/infusion) were available during daily 4-h sessions on a FR1 reinforcement schedule. By comparing the dose-response curves of the two drugs, it was found that 1 mg of amphetamine is equivalent to 5.3 mg of cocaine (95% confidence limits = 3.8--9.1 mg). In a second experiment, pretreatment with the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine (in doses ranging from 0.125--2.0 mg/kg, IV) did not produce any appreciable changes in responding for cocaine (0.2 mg/kg/infusion) by dogs (n = 9). In contrast, when the same animals were pretreated with the dopaminergic antagonist pimozide (in doses ranging from 5--40 mg/kg, IV), subsequent responding for cocaine was increased in a dose-dependent manner. In a third experiment it was determined that norcocaine, the N-demethylated metabolite of cocaine, would maintain self-administration behavior by dogs (n = 4) when it was substituted for cocaine. As expected, when saline was substituted for cocaine, responding was not maintained.

  13. Successful treatment of refractory Trichomonas vaginalis infection using intravenous metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Isobel; Carne, Christopher; Sonnex, Christopher; Carmichael, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted protozoan infection resulting in a vulvo-vaginitis and altered vaginal discharge in symptomatic women. Since its introduction in the 1960 s, metronidazole has been the first-line drug for trichomonal infection. Other nitroimidazoles, such as tinidazole, are used as alternative regimens with similar activity but at a greater expense. Treatment failure usually represents patient non-compliance or reinfection, although metronidazole resistance has previously been documented. Sensitivity testing is currently not available in the UK. Patients with disease unresponsive to first-line treatments pose a major challenge, as therapeutic options are limited. This case looks at a patient with refractory disease over an 18-month period, where intravenous infusion of metronidazole resulted in cure after multiple previous therapy failures. There is limited evidence to endorse the use of intravenous metronidazole, and this case report provides further support for its efficacy.

  14. Successful treatment of refractory Trichomonas vaginalis infection using intravenous metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Isobel; Carne, Christopher; Sonnex, Christopher; Carmichael, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted protozoan infection resulting in a vulvo-vaginitis and altered vaginal discharge in symptomatic women. Since its introduction in the 1960 s, metronidazole has been the first-line drug for trichomonal infection. Other nitroimidazoles, such as tinidazole, are used as alternative regimens with similar activity but at a greater expense. Treatment failure usually represents patient non-compliance or reinfection, although metronidazole resistance has previously been documented. Sensitivity testing is currently not available in the UK. Patients with disease unresponsive to first-line treatments pose a major challenge, as therapeutic options are limited. This case looks at a patient with refractory disease over an 18-month period, where intravenous infusion of metronidazole resulted in cure after multiple previous therapy failures. There is limited evidence to endorse the use of intravenous metronidazole, and this case report provides further support for its efficacy. PMID:25161176

  15. Intravenous acetaminophen use in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Nirav

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used pediatric medication that has recently been approved for intravenous use in the United States. The purpose of this article was to review the pharmacodynamics, indications, contraindications, and precautions for the use of intravenous acetaminophen in pediatrics.

  16. [Consideration of preventive free-flowing IV infusion method for vinorelbine].

    PubMed

    Suga, Yukio; Hara, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Hideko; Nishigami, Jun; Shimizu, Michie; Akasaka, Hiroko; Hayashi, Kyoko; Yonejima, Miharu; Nakamura, Makiko; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Kasahara, Kazuo; Nishimura, Gen-ichi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2007-08-01

    Vinorelbine is administered to treat solid tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer, and good treatment results have been reported. Although this agent is known to cause phlebitis, some studies indicated that its administration over 5 minutes or less decreased the incidence of this adverse effect to approximately 5%. However,most studies employed bolus injection, and no study has reported completing drip infusion within 5 minutes. In the present study,we investigated the preventive effects on phlebitis of administering this agent over 5 minutes or less by drip infusion,which is simpler and more useful than intravenous injection. We administered vinorelbine 35 times to 6 patients with breast cancer or non-small cell lung cancer. The mean administration period was 3 minutes and 59 seconds +/-22 seconds, and the incidence of phlebitis was 5.7%. Our administration method involving drip infusion prevented phlebitis as markedly as by intravenous injection. In addition,there were no marked differences in the incidences of adverse effects other than phlebitis. The administration method employed in this study (drip infusion within five minutes) prevented vinorelbine-induced phlebitis, and was simpler than intravenous injection.

  17. Cardiovascular effects in man of intravenous prizidilol hydrochloride (SK&F 92657); a new antihypertensive agent.

    PubMed Central

    Edmonstone, W M; Manghani, K K; Bell, A J; McLeod, M; Milton-Thompson, G J; Burland, W L

    1981-01-01

    1 Cardiovascular responses to intravenous prizidilol hydrochloride (SK&F 92657) 0.86 mg/kg were studied in eight supine resting healthy volunteers. Five subjects were slow and the remaining three were fast acetylators of sulphamethazine. Compared with pre-infusion values, mean resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly reduced, while mean resting pulse rate was significantly increased at 30 min after the start of the twenty minute infusion. 2 During the 6 h study period the lowest mean +/- s.e. mean systolic blood pressure (108.8 +/- 1.7) was recorded 30 min after the start of the infusion. This represented a mean reduction of 5.2 mmHg. Reductions in mean diastolic blood pressure were greater and of longer duration, the lowest mean value (44.8 +/- 2.0 mmHg) being recorded 3.5 h after the start of the infusion and representing a reduction of 18.5 mmHg from the pre-dosing value. At 6 h after the start of the infusion mean diastolic blood pressure was still significantly reduced (by 15.3 mmHg). 3 The maximum mean +/- s.e. mean resting pulse rate (79.3 +/- 4.4 beats/min) occurred 3 h after the start of the infusion, an increase of 23.0 beats/min over the pre-infusion value. At the end of the study the pulse rate was still significantly raised (by 17.7 beats/min). 4 The left ventricular ejection fraction, evaluated in five subjects, 45 min after the start of the infusion, was not altered by prizidilol hydrochloride, but the left ventricular area decreased significantly. 5 Intravenous prizidilol hydrochloride decreases resting blood pressure and left ventricular area, increases pulse rate and has virtually no effect on left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:7295490

  18. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  19. Forebrain circumventricular organs mediate salt appetite induced by intravenous angiotensin II in rats.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Wilson, Wendy L; Starbuck, Elizabeth M; Fitts, Douglas A

    2002-09-13

    Two circumventricular organs, the subfornical organ (SFO) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT), may mediate salt appetite in response to acute intravenous infusions of angiotensin (ANG) II. Fluid intakes and mean arterial pressures were measured in rats with sham lesions or electrolytic lesions of the SFO or OVLT during an intravenous infusion of 30 ng/min ANG II. Beginning 21 h before the 90-min infusion, the rats were depleted of sodium with furosemide and given a total of 300 mg/kg captopril in 75 ml/kg water in three spaced gavages to block the usual salt appetite and to hydrate the rats. No other food or fluids were available for ingestion. Sham-lesioned rats drank 9.3+/-1.2 ml if 0.3 M NaCl alone was available and drank 8.9+/-1.6 ml of saline and 3.7+/-1.6 ml of water if both were available. Either SFO or OVLT lesions reduced the intakes of saline to <5 ml in both conditions and of water to <1 ml. Mean arterial pressure did not differ among the groups and was maintained above 100 mmHg after the depletion and captopril treatments because of the large doses of water. Thus, a full expression of salt appetite in response to an acute intravenous infusion of ANG II requires the integrity of both the SFO and OVLT. PMID:12213298

  20. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low- Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections, using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. During this period, we identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of these pulsed events to investigate their properties. This analysis reveals that the mean interpulse period is 68 ± 10 minutes and that the events are made up of less than 9 pulses in general, but they can include up to 19 pulses. The most common shape of these pulses is a fast rise followed by a slow decay. Moreover, the ratio between the rise rate and the decay rate increases with the energy. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG). Correlated pulsed signatures are observed in the plasma wave emissions, especially in the auroral hiss, for 12% of the

  1. Safety, local tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline fosamil administered in a reduced infusion volume

    PubMed Central

    Edeki, Timi; Kujacic, Mirjana; Broadhurst, Helen; Li, Jianguo; Sunzel, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Aims The standard dose of ceftaroline fosamil for patients with normal renal function is 600 mg diluted in 250 ml by 60 min intravenous infusion every 12 h. This two part phase I trial (NCT01577589) assessed safety and local tolerability of multiple ceftaroline fosamil 50 ml and 250 ml infusions, and pharmacokinetics following single administrations of each infusion volume. Methods Part A was a placebo-controlled, double-blind, multiple dose crossover study. Twenty-four healthy subjects were randomized to simultaneous, bilateral ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg and placebo infusions in each arm (50 ml then 250 ml or vice versa) every 12 h for 72 h, with a ≥ 4.5 day washout. Local tolerability was evaluated by the Visual Infusion Phlebitis scale, with scores ≥2 considered infusion site reactions (ISRs). Part B was an open label crossover study. Ten subjects were randomized to single 50 ml and 250 ml ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg infusions on days 1 and 3 (washout on day 2). Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were taken over 24 h. Results In part A, four subjects (16.7%) experienced ISRs, all of which were associated with placebo infusions. No ISRs were reported for either ceftaroline fosamil 50 ml or 250 ml. Plasma pharmacokinetics (ceftaroline fosamil, active ceftaroline and an inactive metabolite) were similar following single 50 ml and 250 ml infusions in part B. Conclusions No new safety concerns were identified for ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg 50 ml compared with 250 ml. These findings suggest infusion volumes down to 50 ml may be used in patients with fluid intake restrictions. PMID:25041494

  2. 5-HTTLPR and Gender Moderate Changes in Negative Affect Responses to Tryptophan Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Brummett, Beverly H.; Muller, Christopher L.; Collins, Ann L.; Boyle, Stephen H.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Siegler, Ilene C.; Williams, Redford B.; Ashley-Koch, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Expression of the serotonin transporter is affected by the genotype of the 5-HTTLPR (short and long forms) as well as the genotype of the SNP rs25531 within this region. Based on the combined genotypes for these polymorphisms, we designated each allele as a high or low expressing allele according to established expression levels—resulting in HiHi, HiLo, & LoLo genotype groups for analysis. We evaluated effects of gender and the promoter genotype on induction of negative affect by intravenous infusion of l-tryptophan (TRP). The protocol consisted of a day-1 sham saline infusion and a day-2 active TRP infusion. Models assessed 5-HTTLPR composite genotype and gender as predictors of change in ratings of negative emotion during TRP infusion. During sham infusion there were no significant changes from baseline in mood ratings. During TRP infusion all negative affect ratings increased significantly from baseline (P's < .02). The genotype × gender interaction was a significant predictor of depression-dejection (P = .013), and trended towards predicting anger–hostility (P = .084). Males in the HiHi group had greater increases in negative affect during infusion, compared to all groups except LoLo females, who also showed increased negative affect. PMID:18661222

  3. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey; Chronis, Themis

    2015-01-01

    Using satellite-based methods that provide accurate 0-1 hour convective initiation (CI) nowcasts, and rely on proven success coupling satellite and radar fields in the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS; operated and developed at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory), to subsequently monitor for first-flash lightning initiation (LI) and later period lightning trends as storms evolve. Enhance IR-based methods within the GOES-R CI Algorithm (that must meet specific thresholds for a given cumulus cloud before the cloud is considered to have an increased likelihood of producing lightning next 90 min) that forecast LI. Integrate GOES-R CI and LI fields with radar thresholds (e.g., first greater than or equal to 40 dBZ echo at the -10 C altitude) and NWP model data within the WDSS-II system for LI-events from new convective storms. Track ongoing lightning using Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data to assess per-storm lightning trends (e.g., as tied to lightning jumps) and outline threat regions. Evaluate the ability to produce LI nowcasts through a "lightning threat" product, and obtain feedback from National Weather Service forecasters on its value as a decision support tool.

  4. [First pass effect by infusing 99mTc-human serum albumin into the hepatic artery].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Kimura, K; Koyanagi, Y; Aoki, T; Kusama, M; Takagi, S; Kakuta, T; Yoshimatsu, A; Ishikawa, M; Yasuda, D

    1988-08-01

    The fundamental principles of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy are thought to be increased local drug concentration and the "first-pass" effect. The concentration in the rest of the body can only be decreased if there is local elimination of the infused drug before reaching the systemic circulation. This is referred to as the "first-pass" effect. In the evaluation of "first-pass" effect, the uptake of liver after infusing 99mTc-human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) in the hepatic artery by injecting the subcutaneously implanted silicon reservoir was compared with that obtained after intravenous administration of 99mTc-HSA. In order to remove the factor of portal infusion, each count of liver up take had been continued for only 24 seconds after starting the liver uptake. The results are as follows: for 24 cases excepting 6 cases with catheter obstruction, the mean i.a./i.v. ratio was 7.92 +/- 3.34 (range 3.25 to 17.25). Although the elimination rate of drugs in the liver varies with each drug, the infusion of intraarterial chemotherapy should be about 8 times more concentrative than intravenous administration on the "first-pass" effect.

  5. Hepatic glycogen in humans. II. Gluconeogenetic formation after oral and intravenous glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Radziuk, J. )

    1989-08-01

    The amount of glycogen that is formed by gluconeogenetic pathways during glucose loading was quantitated in human subjects. Oral glucose loading was compared with its intravenous administration. Overnight-fasted subjects received a constant infusion or (3-{sup 3}H)glucose and a marker for gluconeogenesis, (U-{sup 14}C)lactate or sodium ({sup 14}C)bicarbonate ({sup 14}C)bicarbonate. An unlabeled glucose load was then administered. Postabsorptively, or after glucose infusion was terminated, a third tracer ((6-{sup 3}H)glucose) infusion was initiated along with a three-step glucagon infusion. Without correcting for background stimulation of ({sup 14}C)glucose production or for dilution of {sup 14}C with citric acid cycle carbon in the oxaloacetate pool, the amount of glycogen mobilized by the glucagon infusion that was produced by gluconeogenesis during oral glucose loading was 2.9 +/- 0.7 g calculated from (U-{sup 14}C)-lactate incorporation and 7.4 +/- 1.3 g calculated using ({sup 14}C)bicarbonate as a gluconeogenetic marker. During intravenous glucose administration the latter measurement also yielded 7.2 +/- 1.1 g. When the two corrections above are applied, the respective quantities became 5.3 +/- 1.7 g for (U-{sup 14}C)lactate as tracer and 14.7 +/- 4.3 and 13.9 +/- 3.6 g for oral and intravenous glucose with ({sup 14}C)bicarbonate as tracer (P less than 0.05, vs. ({sup 14}C)-lactate as tracer). When (2-{sup 14}C)acetate was infused, the same amount of label was incorporated into mobilized glycogen regardless of which route of glucose administration was used. Comparison with previous data also suggests that {sup 14}CO{sub 2} is a potentially useful marker for the gluconeogenetic process in vivo.

  6. Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron: guidance for risk minimization and management

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, David; Folkersen, Joergen; Fishbane, Steven; Hedenus, Michael; Howaldt, Stefanie; Locatelli, Francesco; Patni, Shalini; Szebeni, Janos; Weiss, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia when oral iron is inappropriate, ineffective or poorly tolerated. Acute hypersensitivity reactions during iron infusions are very rare but can be life-threatening. This paper reviews their frequency, pathogenesis and risk factors, and provides recommendations about their management and prevention. Complement activation-related pseudo-allergy triggered by iron nanoparticles is probably a more frequent pathogenetic mechanism in acute reactions to current formulations of intravenous iron than is an immunological IgE-mediated response. Major risk factors for hypersensitivity reactions include a previous reaction to an iron infusion, a fast iron infusion rate, multiple drug allergies, severe atopy, and possibly systemic inflammatory diseases. Early pregnancy is a contraindication to iron infusions, while old age and serious co-morbidity may worsen the impact of acute reactions if they occur. Management of iron infusions requires meticulous observation, and, in the event of an adverse reaction, prompt recognition and severity-related interventions by well-trained medical and nursing staff. PMID:25420283

  7. Feedback to the field: an assessment of sternal intraosseous (IO) infusion.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Crawley, Geoffrey; Mazuchowski, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Intraosseous vascular infusion (IO) is a recognized alternative to peripheral intravenous infusion when access is inadequate. The sternum and proximal tibia are the preferred sites. A review of 98 cases at autopsy revealed successful sternal IO placement in 78 cases (80%). Assuming a worst case scenario for placement (pin mark and no tip in bone [17 cases] and tip present and not in the sternum [3 cases]), attempts were unsuccessful in 20 cases (20%). We draw no specific conclusions regarding sternal IO use, but hope that personnel placing these devices and those providing medical training can use the information.

  8. Intramuscular versus Intravenous Therapy for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Silbergleit, Robert; Durkalski, Valerie; Lowenstein, Daniel; Conwit, Robin; Pancioli, Arthur; Palesch, Yuko; Barsan, William

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early termination of prolonged seizures with intravenous administration of benzodiazepines improves outcomes. For faster and more reliable administration, paramedics increasingly use an intramuscular route. METHODS This double-blind, randomized, noninferiority trial compared the efficacy of intramuscular midazolam with that of intravenous lorazepam for children and adults in status epilepticus treated by paramedics. Subjects whose convulsions had persisted for more than 5 minutes and who were still convulsing after paramedics arrived were given the study medication by either intramuscular autoinjector or intravenous infusion. The primary outcome was absence of seizures at the time of arrival in the emergency department without the need for rescue therapy. Secondary outcomes included endotracheal intubation, recurrent seizures, and timing of treatment relative to the cessation of convulsive seizures. This trial tested the hypothesis that intramuscular midazolam was noninferior to intravenous lorazepam by a margin of 10 percentage points. RESULTS At the time of arrival in the emergency department, seizures were absent without rescue therapy in 329 of 448 subjects (73.4%) in the intramuscular-midazolam group and in 282 of 445 (63.4%) in the intravenous-lorazepam group (absolute difference, 10 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 4.0 to 16.1; P<0.001 for both noninferiority and superiority). The two treatment groups were similar with respect to need for endotracheal intubation (14.1% of subjects with intramuscular midazolam and 14.4% with intravenous lorazepam) and recurrence of seizures (11.4% and 10.6%, respectively). Among subjects whose seizures ceased before arrival in the emergency department, the median times to active treatment were 1.2 minutes in the intramuscular-midazolam group and 4.8 minutes in the intravenous-lorazepam group, with corresponding median times from active treatment to cessation of convulsions of 3.3 minutes and 1.6 minutes

  9. Glossitis and tongue trauma subsequent to administration of an oral medication, using an udder infusion cannula, in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Mark C.; Abutarbush, Sameeh M.

    2007-01-01

    A 10-year-old gelding was presented with a tongue that had swelled immediately after oral administration of oxfendazole, using an udder infusion cannula. The tongue appeared to have been punctured inadvertently. The horse recovered after treatment with intravenous fluid, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory drugs. Administering oral medication by this method should be discouraged. PMID:17824329

  10. [Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and delayed puberty: differential diagnosis using the LH-RH-infusion test].

    PubMed

    Vierhapper, H

    1983-08-26

    Serum concentrations of LH and FSH were determined during an intravenous infusion of LH-RH (200 micrograms, t = 4 hours) in 8 patients (age: 15 to 20 years) with delayed sexual maturation and retarded bone age. Four patients who by clinical criteria were later recognized as suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) presented during the infusion of LH-RH with only a small response of LH (and, in three cases, of FSH). In 3 patients with HH a deficiency of endogenous LH-RH due to a hypothalamic defect was suggested by an enhanced secretion of LH and FSH during a second LH-RH infusion test performed after priming of the pituitary by pulsatile, subcutaneous infusions of LH-RH (50 micrograms/night for 9 consecutive nights). The fourth patient with HH, who suffered from a pituitary adenoma, failed to display this enhanced secretion of gonadotropins following pituitary priming by intermittent administration of LH-RH. As compared with the patients with HH, 4 patients in whom puberty, although delayed, later occurred spontaneously (pubertas tarda, PT), presented with a considerably more pronounced secretion of LH and FSH during the infusion of LH-RH, and priming by intermittent subcutaneous LH-RH failed to achieve further enhancement of the secretion of LH and FSH during a second infusion test in these patients. The intravenous infusion of LH-RH in combination with a protocol of pituitary priming offers a possibility of distinguishing patients with delayed puberty from those with various forms of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:6417915

  11. Effect of intravenous or oral sodium chlorate administration on the fecal shedding of Escherichia coli in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of gavage or intravenous (i.v.) administration of sodium chlorate salts on the fecal shedding of generic Escherichia coli in wether lambs was studied. To this end, 9 lambs (27 +/- 2.5 kg) were administered 150 mg NaClO3 per kg BW by gavage or i.v. infusion in a cross-over design with sal...

  12. The Effect of an Amino Acid Infusion on Central Thermoregulatory Control in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yasufumi; Takamata, Akira; Matsukawa, Takashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Mizobe, Toshiki

    2005-01-01

    Background Administration of protein or amino acids enhances thermogenesis, presumably by stimulating oxidative metabolism. However, hyperthermia results even when thermoregulatory responses are intact, suggesting that amino acids also alter central thermoregulatory control. We thus tested the hypothesis that amino acid infusion increases the thermoregulatory setpoint. Methods Nine male volunteers each participated on four study days in randomized order: 1) intravenous amino acids infused at 4 kJ·kg−1·hr−1 for 2.5 h combined with skin-surface warming; 2) amino acid infusion combined with cutaneous cooling; 3) a saline infusion combined with skin-surface warming; and, 4) saline infusion combined with cutaneous cooling. Results Amino acid infusion increased resting core temperature by 0.3 ± 0.1°C (mean ± SD) and oxygen consumption by 18 ± 12%. Furthermore, amino acid infusion increased the calculated core temperature threshold (triggering core temperature at a designated mean-skin temperature of 34°C) for active cutaneous vasodilation by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, for sweating by 0.2 ± 0.2°C, for thermoregulatory vasoconstriction by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, and for thermogenesis by 0.4 ± 0.5°C. Amino acid infusion did not alter the incremental response intensity (i.e., gain) of thermoregulatory defenses. Conclusions Amino acid infusion increased the metabolic rate and resting core temperature. However, amino acids also produced a synchronous increase in all major autonomic thermoregulatory defense thresholds; the increase in core temperature was identical to the setpoint increase — even in a cold environment with amble potential to dissipate heat. In subjects with intact thermoregulatory defenses, amino acid-induced hyperthermia appears to result from an elevated setpoint increase rather than increased metabolic rate per se. PMID:15108979

  13. Closed-loop Continuous Infusions of Etomidate and Etomidate Analogs in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, Joseph F.; Le Ge, Ri; Banacos, Natalie; Pejo, Ervin; Husain, S. Shaukat; Williams, James H.; Raines, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a sedative–hypnotic that is often given as a single intravenous bolus but rarely as an infusion because it suppresses adrenocortical function. Methoxycarbonyl etomidate and (R)-ethyl 1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (carboetomidate) are etomidate analogs that do not produce significant adrenocortical suppression when given as a single bolus. However, the effects of continuous infusions on adrenocortical function are unknown. In this study, we compared the effects of continuous infusions of etomidate, methoxycarbonyl etomidate, and carboetomidate on adrenocortical function in a rat model. Methods A closed-loop system using the electroencephalographic burst suppression ratio as the feedback was used to administer continuous infusions of etomidate, methoxycarbonyl etomidate, or carboetomidate to Sprague–Dawley rats. Adrenocortical function was assessed during and after infusion by repetitively administering adrenocorticotropic hormone 1–24 and measuring serum corticosterone concentrations every 30 min. Results The sedative–hypnotic doses required to maintain a 40% burst suppression ratio in the presence of isoflurane, 1%, and the rate of burst suppression ratio recovery on infusion terminationvaried(methoxycarbonyletomidate>carboetomidate > etomidate). Serum corticosterone concentrations were reduced by 85% and 56% during 30-min infusions of etomidate and methoxycarbonyl etomidate, respectively. On infusion termination, serum corticosterone concentrations recovered within 30 min with methoxycarbonyl etomidate but persisted beyond an hour with etomidate. Carboetomidate had no effect on serum corticosterone concentrations during or after continuous infusion. Conclusions Our results suggest that methoxycarbonyl etomidate and carboetomidate may have clinical utility as sedative–hypnotic maintenance agents when hemodynamic stability is desirable. PMID:21572317

  14. GOES Infrared and Reflectance 0-1 hour Lightning Initiation Indicators: Development and Initial Testing within a Convective Nowcasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Harris, R.; MacKenzie, W.; Durkee, P. A.; Iskenderian, H.; Bickmeier, L.; Nielsen, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Within cumulus cloud fields that develop in conditionally unstable air masses, only a fraction of the cumuli may eventually develop into deep convection. Identifying which of these convective clouds most likely to generate lightning often starts with little more than a qualitative visual satellite analysis. The goal of this study is to identify the observed satellite infrared (IR) signatures associated with growing cumulus clouds prior to the first lightning strike, so-called lightning initiation (LI). This study quantifies the behavior of ten Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) IR interest fields in the 1-hour in advance of LI. A total of 172 lightning-producing storms that occurred during the 2009 convective season are manually tracked and studied over four regions: Northern Alabama, Central Oklahoma, the Kennedy Space Center and Washington D.C. Four-dimensional and cloud-to-ground lightning array data provide a total cloud lightning picture (in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, cloud-to-air, cloud-to-ground) and thus precise LI points for each storm in both time and space. Statistical significance tests are conducted on observed trends for each of the ten LI fields to determine the unique information each field provides in terms of behavior prior to LI. Eight out of ten LI fields exhibited useful information at least 15 min in advance of LI, with 35 min being the average. Statistical tests on these eight fields are compared for separate large geographical areas. IR temperature thresholds are then determined as an outcome, which may be valuable when implementing a LI prediction algorithm into real-time satellite-based systems. The key LI indicators from GOES IR data (as well as 3.9 μm reflectance) will be presented. Beginning in 2010, the feasibility of using the satellite-based LI indicators found in the above analysis to forecast first lightning will be assessed within the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) CoSPA nowcasting system. The goal

  15. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Yates, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 h in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low-Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. The one-year extension of the data and a different method of detection of the injections do not lead to a discrepancy with the results of the previous survey, indicating an absence of a long-term temporal evolution of this phenomenon. We identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of the pulsed events properties. The morphology of the pulsations shows a weak local time dependence which could imply a high-latitude acceleration source. We provide some clues that the electron population associated with this pulsed phenomenon is distinct from the field-aligned electron beams previously observed in Saturn's magnetosphere, but both populations can be mixed. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio

  16. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Lightning one of the most dangerous weather-related phenomena, especially as many jobs and activities occur outdoors, presenting risk from a lightning strike. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning represents a considerable safety threat to people at airfields, marinas, and outdoor facilities-from airfield personnel, to people attending outdoor stadium events, on beaches and golf courses, to mariners, as well as emergency personnel. Holle et al. (2005) show that 90% of lightning deaths occurred outdoors, while 10% occurred indoors despite the perception of safety when inside buildings. Curran et al. (2000) found that nearly half of fatalities due to weather were related to convective weather in the 1992-1994 timeframe, with lightning causing a large component of the fatalities, in addition to tornadoes and flash flooding. Related to the aviation industry, CG lightning represents a considerable hazard to baggage-handlers, aircraft refuelers, food caterers, and emergency personnel, who all become exposed to the risk of being struck within short time periods while convective storm clouds develop. Airport safety protocols require that ramp operations be modified or discontinued when lightning is in the vicinity (typically 16 km), which becomes very costly and disruptive to flight operations. Therefore, much focus has been paid to nowcasting the first-time initiation and extent of lightning, both of CG and of any lightning (e.g, in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud). For this project three lightning nowcasting methodologies will be combined: (1) a GOESbased 0-1 hour lightning initiation (LI) product (Harris et al. 2010; Iskenderian et al. 2012), (2) a High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) lightning probability and forecasted lightning flash density product, such that a quantitative amount of lightning (QL) can be assigned to a location of expected LI, and (3) an algorithm that relates Pseudo-GLM data (Stano et al. 2012, 2014) to the so-called "lightning jump" (LJ) methodology (Shultz et al

  17. Low-dose insulin infusions in diabetic patients with high insulin requirements.

    PubMed

    Dandona, P; Foster, M; Healey, F; Greenbury, E; Beckett, A G

    1978-08-01

    Six patients with high insulin requirements (range 120-3000 units daily) have been infused with much smaller doses (range 50-63 units daily) of insulin intravenously. All six maintained adequate glucose homoestasis on this regimen. It is suggested that subcutaneous tissue at the site of injection may alter insulin or impair its absorption. Insulin resistance in some patients may be due to these mechanisms.

  18. Renal excretory responses of taurine-depleted rats to hypotonic and hypertonic saline infusion.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, M S; Warren, B K; Azuma, J; Schaffer, S W

    1998-01-01

    Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were given either tap water (control) or 3% beta-alanine (taurine-depleted) for three weeks. To prepare for the kidney function studies, the animals were then implanted with femoral vessels and bladder catheters. Two days after surgery, each rat was given an intravenous infusion of saline at the rate of 50 microliter/min and urine samples were collected at specific time intervals. An isotonic saline solution (0.9% NaCl) was infused for determination of baseline parameters and was followed by the infusion of a hypotonic saline solution (0.45% NaCl). Two days later, the infusion protocol was repeated in the same animals; however, a hypertonic saline solution (1.8% NaCl) was substituted for the hypotonic saline solution. Renal excretion of fluid and sodium increased in the control, but not taurine-depleted, rats during the hypotonic saline infusion. Interestingly, diuretic and natriuretic responses were similar between the groups during hypertonic saline infusion. The results suggest that taurine-depletion in rats affects renal excretory responses to a hypotonic, but not a hypertonic, saline solution.

  19. Microcomputer Infusion Project: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossberg, Stephen A.; Bitter, Gary G.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Microcomputer Infusion Project (MIP), which was developed at Arizona State University to provide faculty with the necessary hardware, software, and training to become models of computer use in both lesson development and presentation for preservice teacher education students. Topics discussed include word processing; database…

  20. Enhancing Instruction through Software Infusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sia, Archie P.

    The presence of the computer in the classroom is no longer considered an oddity; it has become an ordinary resource for teachers to use for the enhancement of instruction. This paper presents an examination of software infusion, i.e., the use of computer software to enrich instruction in an academic curriculum. The process occurs when a chosen…

  1. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  2. Intravascular streaming and variable delivery to brain following carotid artery infusions in the Sprague-Dawley rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saris, S.C.; Wright, D.C.; Oldfield, E.H.; Blasberg, R.G.

    1988-02-01

    Intracarotid artery infusions in animals are commonly performed in studies of the blood-brain barrier and in chemotherapy trials. Implicit in the analysis of these experiments is that the infusate will be distributed to the territory of the internal carotid artery in a manner that is proportional to blood flow. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to determine if poor infusate mixing with blood due to intravascular streaming occurred during intracarotid artery drug infusions and if it could be eliminated with fast retrograde infusion. In three experimental groups, a radiolabeled flow tracer--/sup 14/C-iodoantipyrine (IAP)--was infused retrograde through the external carotid artery into the common carotid artery at slow, medium, and fast rates (0.45, 1.5, and 5.0 ml/min). In a control group, IAP was injected intravenously (i.v.). Local isotope concentrations in the brain were determined by quantitative autoradiography, and the variability of isotope delivery was assessed in the frontoparietal cortex, temporal cortex, and caudate putamen of all animals. Streaming phenomena were manifest in all selected anatomic areas after the slow and medium rates of intraarterial infusion. After fast intracarotid infusion or i.v. injection, there was uniform distribution of isotope in the same brain regions.

  3. Orthostatic stability with intravenous levodopa.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Shan H; Creech, Mary L; Black, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous levodopa has been used in a multitude of research studies due to its more predictable pharmacokinetics compared to the oral form, which is used frequently as a treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Levodopa is the precursor for dopamine, and intravenous dopamine would strongly affect vascular tone, but peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors are intended to block such effects. Pulse and blood pressure, with orthostatic changes, were recorded before and after intravenous levodopa or placebo-after oral carbidopa-in 13 adults with a chronic tic disorder and 16 tic-free adult control subjects. Levodopa caused no statistically or clinically significant changes in blood pressure or pulse. These data add to previous data that support the safety of i.v. levodopa when given with adequate peripheral inhibition of DOPA decarboxylase. PMID:26336641

  4. Prospective audit of adverse reactions occurring in 459 primary antibody-deficient patients receiving intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    BRENNAN, V M; SALOMÉ-BENTLEY, N J; CHAPEL, H M

    2003-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used as the standard replacement therapy for patients with primary antibody deficiencies. A previous study of adverse reactions in patients self-infusing at home over 1 year showed an overall reaction rate of 0·7%. A larger prospective study is reported here, involving a greater number of immunology centres and including children and adults who received infusions from medical or nursing staff as well as those self-infusing. Four hundred and fifty-nine patients were entered into this study and 13 508 infusions were given. The study showed that no severe reactions occurred and the reaction rate was low at 0·8%. This figure could have been lower, 0·5%, if predisposing factors responsible for some reactions had been considered before infusion. In conclusion, the study shows the importance of ongoing training for patients and staff to recognize the predisposing factors to prevent avoidable reactions. Because none of these reactions were graded as severe, the present guidance to prescribe self-injectable adrenaline for patients infusing outside hospital should be reviewed. PMID:12869031

  5. Detergent inhibits 70-90% of responses to intravenous endotoxin in awake sheep.

    PubMed

    Staub, N C; Longworth, K E; Serikov, V; Jerome, E H; Elsasser, T

    2001-05-01

    Sheep have reactive pulmonary intravascular macrophages, which are essential for the marked pulmonary vascular response to infusions of small quantities of endotoxin. In another species with reactive pulmonary intravascular macrophages, horses, our laboratory found that an intravenous biosafe detergent, tyloxapol, inhibited some systemic and pulmonary responses to endotoxin (Longworth KE, Smith BL, Staub NC, Steffey EP, and Serikov V. Am J Vet Res 57: 1063-1066, 1996). We determined whether the same detergent would inhibit endotoxin responses in awake sheep. In 10 awake, instrumented sheep with chronic lung lymph fistulas, we did a control experiment by intravenously infusing 1 microg/kg Escherichia coli endotoxin. One week later, we gave 40 micromol/kg tyloxapol intravenously 1-4 h before infusing the same dose of endotoxin. In these paired studies, we compared pulmonary hemodynamics, lung lymph dynamics, body temperature, circulating leukocyte concentrations, and circulating tumor necrosis factor for 6 h. In all 10 sheep, tyloxapol blocked 80-90% of the pulmonary responses and 70-90% of the systemic responses. Tyloxapol is safe, inexpensive, easy to use, and effective immediately. It may be a clinically useful approach to contravening many of the effects of endotoxemia, in humans as well as animals.

  6. Improved pain relief after thoracotomy: use of cryoprobe and morphine infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, I A; Keenan, D J; Dundee, J W

    1981-01-01

    In a randomised controlled trial carried out during the first to days after thoracotomy patients who had had intercostal nerves frozen with a cryoprobe or were given morphine by continuous intravenous infusion had significant less pain at rest than patients given intramuscular morphine. Differences between the groups with respect to pain on movement and during physiotherapy were not significant. Pain was estimated using visual analogue scales, and an arc sine transformation was carried out on values obtained from these scales before comparison using an analysis of variance. The trial did not distinguish between the cryoprobe and infusion treatment. The simplicity of the cryoprobe had much to commend it, but in units without access to this equipment a small infusion pump offers a satisfactory alternative. PMID:6793183

  7. Propofol infusion for sedation in the intensive care unit: preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, R M; Lalor, J M; Lumley, J; Royston, D; Morgan, M

    1987-01-01

    Propofol (2,6,di-isopropylphenol) was given by continuous intravenous infusion to provide sedation after cardiac surgery in 30 patients and its effects compared with those of midazolam given to a further 30 patients. Propofol infusion allowed rapid and accurate control of the level of sedation, which was satisfactory for longer than with midazolam. Patients given propofol recovered significantly more rapidly from their sedation once they had fulfilled the criteria for weaning from artificial ventilation and as a result spent a significantly shorter time attached to a ventilator. There were no serious complications in either group. Both medical and nursing staff considered the propofol infusion to be superior to midazolam in these patients. These findings suggest that propofol is a suitable replacement for etomidate and alphaxalone-alphadolone for sedating patients receiving intensive care. PMID:3101895

  8. Effect of medium- and long-chain triglyceride infusion on lipoprotein and hepatic lipase in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Nordenström, J; Neeser, G; Olivecrona, T; Wahren, J

    1991-12-01

    Plasma lipolytic activity and hydrolysis of intravenous fat were studied in six healthy subjects during infusion of a long-chain triglyceride (LCT) fat emulsion (Intralipid 20%) or of a medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)/LCT emulsion (Lipofundin MCT 20%). The fat emulsions were infused continuously at a rate of 0.17 g triglyceride kg-1 body weight (BW)h-1 for 6 h in random order at 7-day intervals. A continuous infusion of glucose (0.18 g kg-1 BW h-1) was administered for a period of 7 h and was started 1 h before the lipid infusion. Infusions of both types of fat increased plasma triglyceride (TG), free fatty acid (FFA) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) levels and steady-state values were present during the 3rd to 5th h of infusion. MCT/LCT infusion resulted in higher plasma levels at steady-state of TG (3.63 +/- 0.45 [SEM] vs 2.73 +/- 0.45 mmol l-1; P less than 0.05), FFA (1.05 +/- 0.08 vs 0.54 +/- 0.04 mmol l-1; P less than 0.01) and LPL (4.6 +/- 0.6 vs 2.6 +/- 0.5 mU ml-1; P less than 0.05) in comparison with LCT administration. There was a positive correlation between plasma LPL activity and TG concentration (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) when data for the two infusions were combined. Although the same amount of fat was infused on a weight basis, the molar infusion rate was 40% higher with MCT/LCT than with LCT infusion, due to differences in molecular weights (634 vs 885 Da).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1778219

  9. [Effective made of octreotide intravenous administration for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction in terminal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Kiyoko; Onda, Seiji; Mitsunobu, Masao

    2010-10-01

    Continuous subcutaneous administration of octreotide acetate (SMS201-995: SMS) has not been done in Meiwa Hospital for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction in terminal patients for the following reasons: First, patients and families refuse an indwelling needle on the abdominal wall; second, an additional route limits daily activity; third, the needle site becomes inflamed or sclerosed; and fourth, an infusion pump is required. Hence, the effectiveness of three types of intravenous administration was investigated retrospectively in 15 patients in our hospital: 7 cases received intermittent IV drip infusion; 4 continuous IV drip infusion; and 4 bolus IV injection. As a result, 6 cases (86%), 2 cases (50%), and 1 case (25%), respectively, were successfully treated. These results suggested that intermittent IV administration of SMS is efficient, safe, and very convenient, while continuous IV administration is also efficient as long as the SMS potency is not reduced by mixed drugs.

  10. Intravenous contrast medium aggravates the impairment of pancreatic microcirculation in necrotizing pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Hotz, H G; Foitzik, T; Ryschich, E; Buhr, H J; Warshaw, A L; Herfarth, C; Klar, E

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous reports demonstrated that radiographic contrast medium, as used in contrast-enhanced computed tomography, increases acinar necrosis and mortality in experimental pancreatitis. The authors studied the possibility that these changes may be related to an additional impairment of pancreatic microcirculation. METHODS: Fifty Wistar rats had acute pancreatitis induced by intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (10 mmol/L for 10 min) and intravenous cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/hr for 6 hrs). After rehydration (16 mL/kg), pancreatic capillary perfusion was quantified by means of intravital microscopy at baseline before intravenous infusion of contrast medium (n = 25) or saline (n = 25), and 30 and 60 minutes thereafter. In addition to total capillary flow, capillaries were categorized as high- or low-flow (> or < 1.6 nL/min). RESULTS: Pancreatic capillary flow did not change in either high- or low-flow capillaries after saline infusion. However, contrast medium infusion induced a significant decrease of total capillary flow (p < 0.001). Analysis according to the relative flow rate revealed that this was primarily because of a significant additional reduction of perfusion in low-flow capillaries (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, complete capillary stasis was observed in 15.9 +/- 3.4% after contrast medium as compared with 3.2 +/- 1.2% after saline infusion (p < 0.006). CONCLUSION: Radiographic contrast medium aggravates the impairment of pancreatic microcirculation in experimental necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:7717779

  11. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  13. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Intravenous Anesthetics: A New Critical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Zlotnik, Alexander; Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Rosa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative cerebral damage can result in various clinical sequela ranging from minor neurocognitive deficits to catastrophic neurological morbidity with permanent impairment and death. The goal of neuroprotective treatments is to reduce the clinical effects of cerebral damage through two major mechanisms: increased tolerance of neurological tissue to ischemia and changes in intra-cellular responses to energy supply deprivation. In this review, we present the clinical evidence of intravenous anesthetics on perioperative neuroprotection, and we also provide a critical perspective for future studies. The neuroprotective efficacy of the intravenous anesthetics thiopental, propofol and etomidate is unproven. Lidocaine may be neuroprotective in non-diabetic patients who have undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP) or with a 48-hour infusion, but conclusive data are lacking. There are several limitations of clinical studies that evaluate postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), including difficulties in identifying patients at high-risk and a lack of consensus for defining the “gold-standard” neuropsychological testing. Although a battery of neurocognitive tests remains the primary method for diagnosing POCD, recent evidence suggests a role for novel biomarkers and neuroimaging to preemptively identify patients more susceptible to cognitive decline in the perioperative period. Current evidence, while inconclusive, suggest that intravenous anesthetics may be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic in the perioperative period. A critical analysis on data recorded from randomized control trials (RCTs) is essential in identifying patients who may benefit or be harmed by a particular anesthetic. RCTs will also contribute to defining methodologies for future studies on the neuroprotective effects of intravenous anesthetics. PMID:24669972

  15. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters.

  16. 40 CFR 60.3042 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units? 60.3042 Section 60.3042 Protection of Environment... Construction On or Before December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3042 How do I convert my...

  17. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... NAAQS maintenance area, the State may request that obligations under the applicable requirements of § 51.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  18. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  19. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  20. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... requirement to submit a maintenance plan for purposes of paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  1. Symptomatic intravenous antipyretic therapy: efficacy of metamizol, diclofenac, and propacetamol.

    PubMed

    Oborilová, Andrea; Mayer, Jirí; Pospísil, Zdenek; Korístek, Zdenek

    2002-12-01

    Fever is a common symptom in cancer patients. The most frequent causes of fever are infections, malignancy itself, various medications, transfusions, and allergy. Although it is necessary to treat the cause of fever, if possible, symptomatic fever management is also important. Surprisingly, little attention is paid to this topic in the medical literature, despite the fact that it is a very frequent problem. In order to support symptomatic fever therapy, we wanted to study the patients' discomfort accompanying fever and the beneficial effects of the symptomatic fever management. To the best of our knowledge, there is an absence of studies in this area, despite the fever discomfort can be an important reason for the antipyretic treatment, mainly in cancer patients. In this non-randomized open label pilot study, three intravenous antipyretics were tested in five groups of patients: diclofenac (75 mg, brief intravenous [IV] infusion) vs. metamizol (2500 mg or 1000 mg, brief IV infusion) vs. propacetamol (2000 mg or 1000 mg, slow IV injection or brief IV infusion). The study included 254 febrile episodes mainly in hemato-oncological patients with axillary temperature at least 38 degrees C. The main study endpoints were: changes in axillary temperature, improvement in patient comfort, and number and nature of adverse events. To support justification for symptomatic fever management in febrile patients, we asked the first 45 study subjects to fill in a questionnaire concerning their opinions about fever, fever-associated discomfort, and relief upon antipyretic therapy. All study medications had a significant antipyretic effect. However, metamizol at the dose 2500 mg was considered as the most effective, while propacetamol at the dose 1000 mg showed the lowest antipyretic efficacy. Concerning tolerability and adverse events, there were significant differences among the treatment groups. Diclofenac and metamizol (both 2500 mg and 1000 mg) were tolerated at best. All tested

  2. Tissue distribution of (Lipocurc™) liposomal curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin following two- and eight-hour infusions in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Matabudul, Dharmendr; Pucaj, Kresimir; Bolger, Gordon; Vcelar, Brigitta; Majeed, Muhammed; Helson, Lawrence

    2012-10-01

    This study interrogated whether different durations of intravenous infusions of lipocurc™ would alter curcumin metabolism, tissue distribution and whether treating necropsied tissues of Beagle dogs with phosphoric acid prior to measuring curcumin and its metabolite, tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), would stabilize the compounds allowing for accurate analytic measurements. Two cohorts comprising two male and two female dogs were infused each intravenously with 10 mg/kg lipocurc™, either over two hours or over eight hours. Tissue data from each cohort was averaged from four dogs. Curcumin and THC distributed among all 13 tissues were examined at necropsy. The highest curcumin level was observed in the lungs followed by the liver. Tissue levels of curcumin in the lung, spleen and liver increased substantially following the eight-hour infusion compared to the two-hour infusion. The pancreas, kidney and urinary bladder also contained relatively high curcumin levels. Tissue partition coefficients for curcumin and THC were also higher for the eight-hour infusion than the two-hour infusion. The tissue THC/curcumin ratio varied in a tissue-specific manner and was lower for the eight-hour compared to the two-hour infusion. In conclusion, this raised the possibility that prolonged infusion of curcumin may facilitate distribution into tissues via a transporter-dependent mechanism and elevated tissue concentrations of curcumin may inhibit or saturate a putative reductase enzyme converting curcumin to THC. The addition of phosphoric acid stabilized the levels of curcumin and THC in some but not all the examined tissues, raising issues of tissue-specific curcumin and THC stability.

  3. Efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose in treating adults with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; de Figueiredo, Pedro Otavio Novis; Olivato, Maria Cristina Albe; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is the most common disorder in the world, affecting approximately 25% of the world`s population and the most common cause of anemia. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose (IS) in the treatment of adults with iron deficiency anemia Methods Eighty-six adult patients with iron deficiency anemia, who had intolerance or showed no effect with oral iron therapy, received a weekly dose of 200 mg of intravenous iron sucrose until the hemoglobin level was corrected or until receiving the total dose of intravenous iron calculated for each patient Results The mean hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 8.54 g/dL and 7.63 ng/mL (pre-treatment) and 12.1 g/dL and 99.0 ng/mL (post-treatment) (p-value < 0.0001), respectively. The average increases in hemoglobin levels were 3.29 g/dL for women and 4.58 g/dL for men; 94% of male and 84% of female patients responded (hemoglobin increased by at least 2 g/dL) to intravenous iron therapy. Correction of anemia was obtained in 47 of 69 (68.1%) female patients and in 12 of 17 male (70.6%) patients. A total of 515 intravenous infusions of iron sucrose were administered and iron sucrose was generally well tolerated with no moderate or serious adverse drug reactions recorded by the investigators. Conclusions Our data confirm that the use of intravenous iron sucrose is a safe and effective option in the treatment of adult patients with iron deficiency anemia who lack satisfactory response to oral iron therapy. Intravenous iron sucrose is well tolerated and with a clinically manageable safety profile when using appropriate dosing and monitoring. The availability of intravenous iron sucrose would potentially improve compliance and thereby reduce morbidities from iron deficiency. PMID:23049360

  4. Intravenous ampicillin pharmacokinetics in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kubacka, R T; Johnstone, H E; Tan, H S; Reeme, P D; Myre, S A

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single dose of intravenous ampicillin were studied in nine patients during their third trimester of pregnancy. Each volunteer was given either 500 mg (5.7-8.8 mg/kg) or 1 g (15.4-21.4 mg/kg) of sodium ampicillin by rapid infusion. Postinfusion plasma concentration-time curves followed biexponential decay in all subjects. Calculated parameters included a mean plasma distribution volume of 177.1 +/- 97.5 ml/kg, tissue or peripheral distribution volume of 246.2 +/- 143.9 ml/kg, elimination half-life of 1.60 +/- 0.51 h, and total body clearance of 4.59 +/- 1.48 ml/min/kg. Dose-dependent disposition was not observed. Gestation-specific drug therapy research during pregnancy is discussed. PMID:6845399

  5. Renal electrolyte excretion and renin release during calcium and parathormone infusions in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, W S; Roddis, S A; Unwin, R J

    1986-01-01

    Following a random block experimental design in each case, three repeated measurement studies were carried out in three different groups of conscious rabbits, to investigate the renal effects of increasing doses of intravenous calcium chloride (CaCl2) and bovine parathyroid hormone (PTH). In the first study, each rabbit received either CaCl2 (0.15, 0.3, 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1) or vehicle alone (control) for 160 min. In the second study, rabbits were given either PTH (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1), CaCl2 (1.0 mg kg-1 min-1), PTH plus CaCl2 (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1 and 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1, respectively) or vehicle alone; PTH was infused for just over 60 min. In the third study, a much smaller dose (0.05 mg kg-1 min-1) of CaCl2 was infused for 100 min. CaCl2 infusion produced a striking fall in fractional excretion of sodium of at least 50% (P less than 0.01), but this was not dose related, being almost maximal at the smaller doses infused. Although this effect was evident in the absence of any changes in total plasma calcium concentration at the lower doses of CaCl2, renal calcium excretion was increased between 2- and 20-fold (P less than 0.01) at all doses infused. Fractional excretion of chloride doubled at the two higher doses of CaCl2 (P less than 0.01), but potassium excretion was unchanged. There were no consistent alterations in mean arterial blood pressure, effective renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate or plasma renin activity (PRA); total plasma calcium concentration was consistently elevated only during infusion of the high dose by just under 1 mmol l-1. PTH infusion had no measured effect on fractional excretion of sodium or renal calcium excretion, but doubled fractional potassium excretion (P less than 0.05). Heart rate and PRA increased (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.05, respectively), the latter by 50%, but systemic pressure and renal haemodynamics were not significantly affected. By contrast, PTH infused with CaCl2 produced a 4-fold rise

  6. Intravenous magnetic nanoparticle cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui S; Hainfeld, James F

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles heated by an alternating magnetic field could be used to treat cancers, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. However, direct intratumoral injections suffer from tumor incongruence and invasiveness, typically leaving undertreated regions, which lead to cancer regrowth. Intravenous injection more faithfully loads tumors, but, so far, it has been difficult achieving the necessary concentration in tumors before systemic toxicity occurs. Here, we describe use of a magnetic nanoparticle that, with a well-tolerated intravenous dose, achieved a tumor concentration of 1.9 mg Fe/g tumor in a subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma mouse model, with a tumor to non-tumor ratio > 16. With an applied field of 38 kA/m at 980 kHz, tumors could be heated to 60°C in 2 minutes, durably ablating them with millimeter (mm) precision, leaving surrounding tissue intact. PMID:23901270

  7. Intravenous bisphosphonates for postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Peyman

    2010-01-01

    Numerous clinical studies have shown bisphoshonates (BPs) to be useful and cost-effective options for the fractures prevention and postmenopausal bone loss. The use of oral bisphoshonates is an established option for managment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, but many of them complaint from gastrointestinal side effect or frequently dosed oral regimens. To improve upon the suboptimal therapeutic compliance in postmenopausal women, newer, longer-acting intravenous formulations of BPs has been approved for intermittent administration in postmenopausal women. These preparations would become an option for patients who can not tolerate oral BPs or it was ineffective in increasing their bone density. This article proposed to review effectiveness and tolerability of intravenous BPs in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. PMID:21526078

  8. Low flow measurement for infusion pumps: implementation and uncertainty determination of the normalized method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebeiro, J.; Musacchio, A.; Fernández Sardá, E.

    2011-12-01

    Intravenous drug delivery is a standard practice in hospitalized patients. As the blood concentration reached depends directly on infusion rate, it is important to use safe devices that guarantee output accuracy. In pediatric intensive care units, low infusion rates (i.e. lower than 10.0 ml/h) are frequently used. Thus, it would be necessary to use control programs to search for deviations at this flow range. We describe the implementation of a gravimetric method to test infusion pumps in low flow delivery. The procedure recommended by the ISO/IEC 60601-2-24 standard was used being a reasonable option among the methods frequently used in hospitals, such as infusion pumps analyzers and volumetric cylinders. The main uncertainty sources affecting this method are revised and a numeric and graphic uncertainty analysis is presented in order to show its dependence on flow. Additionally, the obtained uncertainties are compared to those presented by an automatic flow analyzer. Finally, the results of a series of tests performed on a syringe infusion pump operating at low rates are shown.

  9. Modification of the diuretic and natriuretic effects of a dopamine infusion by fluid loading in preoperative cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Bryan, A G; Bolsin, S N; Vianna, P T; Haloush, H

    1995-04-01

    An intravenous infusion of dopamine at 2.5 microgram/kg/min was administered for 40 minutes to anesthetized cardiac surgical patients, and their renal function was measured. Five patients had the usual preoperative regimen of reduced fluid intake for the night and morning before surgery (nonhydrated), and five patients received normal saline, 2 mL/kg/hr intravenously, for 6 hours before anesthesia (hydrated). Renal function (measured by urine output, sodium excretion, free water clearance, and fractional excretion of sodium) was similar immediately before starting the dopamine infusion. All four variables were significantly higher in the hydrated group after 10 minutes; this difference becoming maximal after 40 minutes. Twenty minutes after stopping the dopamine infusion, renal function was similar in the two groups. This study indicates that preoperatively fluid-restricted patients demonstrate powerful salt and water conservation with reduced natriuretic and diuretic responses to a low-dose dopamine infusion when compared with hydrated patients. Patients with adequate fluid loading and intravascular volume will demonstrate a marked natriuresis and diuresis in response to low-dose dopamine infusion.

  10. Intravenous Solutions for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Niederhaus, Charles; Barlow, Karen; Griffin, DeVon

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the intravenous (IV) fluids requirements being developed for medical care during NASA s future exploration class missions. Previous research on IV solution generation and mixing in space is summarized. The current exploration baseline mission profiles are introduced, potential medical conditions described and evaluated for fluidic needs, and operational issues assessed. We briefly introduce potential methods for generating IV fluids in microgravity. Conclusions on the recommended fluid volume requirements are presented.

  11. The Safety of Target-Controlled Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schnider, Thomas W; Minto, Charles F; Struys, Michel M R F; Absalom, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) technology has been available in most countries worldwide for clinical use in anesthesia for approximately 2 decades. This infusion mode uses pharmacokinetic models to calculate infusion rates necessary to reach and maintain the desired drug concentration. TCI is computationally more complex than traditional modes of drug administration. The primary difference between TCI and conventional infusions is that TCI decreases the infusion rate at regular intervals to account for the uptake of drug into saturable compartments. Although the calculated infusion rates are consistent with manually controlled infusion rates, there are concerns that TCI administration of IV anesthetics could introduce unique safety concerns. After approximately 2 decades of clinical use, it is appropriate to assess the safety of TCI. Our aim in this article was to describe safety-relevant issues related to TCI, which should have emerged after its use in millions of patients. We collected information from published medical literature, TCI manufacturers, and publicly available governmental Web sites to find evidence of safety issues with the clinical use of TCI. Although many case reports emphasize that IV anesthesia is technically more demanding than inhaled anesthesia, including human errors associated with setting up IV infusions, no data suggest that a TCI mode of drug delivery introduces unique safety issues other than selecting the wrong pharmacokinetic model. This is analogous to the risk of selecting the wrong drug with current infusion pumps. We found no evidence that TCI is not at least as safe as anesthetic administration using constant rate infusions. PMID:26516801

  12. [Formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin injection diluted with infusion solutions].

    PubMed

    Eto, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kie; Shimazu, Kounosuke; Sugiura, Toshimune; Baba, Kaori; Sato, Ayaka; Goromaru, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Hara, Keiko; Shinohara, Yoshitake; Takahashi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin use can cause acute peripheral neuropathy characterized by sensory paresthesias, which are markedly exacerbated by exposure to cold temperatures, and is a dose-limiting factor in the treatment of colorectal cancer.Oxalate is eliminated in a series of nonenzymatic conversions of oxaliplatin in infusion solutions or biological fluids.Elimination of oxalate from oxaliplatin has been suggested as one of the reasons for the development of acute neuropathy.In this study, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)-based method to detect oxalate formation, and investigated the time dependent formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin diluted with infusion solutions.The results obtained showed that the amount of oxalate in the solution corresponded to 1.6% of oxaliplatin 8 h after oxaliplatin dilution with a 5% glucose solution. On the other hand, oxalate formation from oxaliplatin diluted with a saline solution was ten-fold higher than that from oxaliplatin diluted with the 5% glucose solution.Most patients who were intravenously injected with oxaliplatin experienced venous pain.As a preventive measure against venous pain, dexamethasone was added to the oxaliplatin injection.We measured the amount of oxalate formed in the dexamethasone-containing oxaliplatin injection diluted with a 5% glucose solution.The amount of oxalate formed when dexamethasone was added did not differ significantly from that formed when dexamethasone was not added.Thus, there are no clinical problems associated with the stability of oxaliplatin solutions.

  13. Bolus injection v drip infusion contrast administration for ureteral stone targeting during shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Pearle, M S; McClennan, B L; Roehrborn, C G; Clayman, R V

    1997-06-01

    Intraoperative excretory urography may be used to facilitate stone targeting during in situ SWL for ureteral stones, precluding the need for ureteral catheter placement. We compared bolus injection with drip infusion urography for efficacy in stone localization. Twenty-seven patients with normal renal function and a solitary, difficult to visualize, radiopaque ureteral calculus were randomized to receive intravenous contrast by either bolus injection (N = 13) or drip infusion (N = 14). The bolus injection patients received an average of 74 mL of Conray 400 contrast over 1 minute; the drip infusion patients received an average of 92 mL of contrast over 15 minutes. After bolus injection, it took an average of 12 minutes to opacify the ureter compared with 14 minutes after drip infusion (P = 0.62). It took longer to initiate (5 minutes) and complete (6 minutes) treatment after drip infusion than after bolus injection (P = 0.28 and P = 0.16, respectively). Imaging time was significantly longer in the infusion group than in the bolus group (12 v 7 minutes; P = 0.04). Stone-free rates were similar in the two groups: 100% for the bolus group and 91% for the infusion group. No patient in either group experienced an adverse reaction to the contrast. Overall, the two methods of contrast administration were equally efficacious for stone targeting during SWL. However, bolus injection required lesser amounts of contrast, provided more rapid opacification of the ureter, and resulted in an overall shorter procedural time, although the only statistically significant differences were in imaging time and contrast volume.

  14. Infusion-related air embolism.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lynda S

    2013-01-01

    Vascular air embolism as a medically induced complication may be associated with numerous treatments and therapies. In infusion therapy, the risk is associated with venous and arterial catheterization as well as various other invasive procedures and much of the equipment used for them. The manner of air entry and the presentation of symptoms may vary greatly. Appropriate treatment options are dependent on air entry routes. Nurses need to be aware of the common and seldom-considered causes of air embolism to be able to guard against this complication, yet adequately support the patient if it occurs.

  15. Incorrect Prescription of Intravenous Paracetamol in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Örün, E; Polat, A; Andan, H; Çizmeci, N; Tufan, N

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous (IV) paracetamol is widely used for the treatment of pain and fever, when there is a clinical indication for an IV route. A 16-month-old girl weighing 12 kg had undergone anterior open reduction for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Twenty-four hours after the operation, IV paracetamol (Perfalgan® 10 mg/ml) infusion was started for the postoperative pain management. After 12 hours’ infusion, she has developed nausea, vomiting and agitation. The liver function tests were found to be more than 10-fold elevated on the laboratory results. When the medication order was checked, it was shown that she had been administered paracetamol 5 times at a dose of 42 mg/kg (total: 2.5 g/30 hours or 168 mg/kg/24 hours). The patient was started on N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) therapy immediately. She was asymptomatic at the 36th hour of the NAC treatment and the liver function tests completely recovered over 15 days. Since the errors in the calculation of the dosage of IV paracetamol may lead to serious complications or even death, physicians should be careful not to miscalculate when preferring the IV form of the drug. PMID:23935350

  16. Incorrect prescription of intravenous paracetamol in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Orün, E; Polat, A; Andan, H; Cizmeci, N; Tufan, N

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous (IV) paracetamol is widely used for the treatment of pain and fever, when there is a clinical indication for an IV route. A 16-month-old girl weighing 12 kg had undergone anterior open reduction for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Twenty-four hours after the operation, IV paracetamol (Perfalgan® 10 mg/ml) infusion was started for the postoperative pain management. After 12 hours' infusion, she has developed nausea, vomiting and agitation. The liver function tests were found to be more than 10-fold elevated on the laboratory results. When the medication order was checked, it was shown that she had been administered paracetamol 5 times at a dose of 42 mg/kg (total: 2.5 g/30 hours or 168 mg/kg/24 hours). The patient was started on N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) therapy immediately. She was asymptomatic at the 36th hour of the NAC treatment and the liver function tests completely recovered over 15 days. Since the errors in the calculation of the dosage of IV paracetamol may lead to serious complications or even death, physicians should be careful not to miscalculate when preferring the IV form of the drug. PMID:23935350

  17. Safety of intravenous iron use in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Philip A.; Bhandari, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is common and associated with fatigue, reduced quality of life and poorer clinical outcomes. Treatment with oral iron is often inadequate and international guidelines recommend intravenous (i.v.) iron as the preferred option for the treatment of IDA in certain clinical situations. In this review, we assess the safety of using i.v. iron with a particular focus on patients with chronic kidney disease. Recent findings Recent publications have raised safety concerns regarding the incidence of serious reactions accompanying i.v. infusion, as well as the subsequent risk of infections and cardiovascular events. Methodological flaws influence the interpretation of these data that lack evidence from the use of modern irons. The latter have been investigated in several randomized control trials. Summary There is a need for better understanding and definition of the nature of i.v. iron reactions, as many are nonserious infusion reactions rather than true anaphylaxis. Retrospective identification of anaphylaxis is difficult and we suggest the importance of reanalysing data using fatalities or standardized terms as outcome measures. With the exception of high molecular weight iron dextran, serious or life-threatening reactions are rare with the use of i.v. irons, and they can be used safely for the treatment of IDA. PMID:27557350

  18. Effects of arterial and venous volume infusion on coronary perfusion pressures during canine CPR.

    PubMed

    Gentile, N T; Martin, G B; Appleton, T J; Moeggenberg, J; Paradis, N A; Nowak, R M

    1991-08-01

    Intraarterial (IA) volume infusion has been reported to be more effective than intravenous (IV) infusion in treating cardiac arrest due to exsanguination. A rapid IA infusion was felt to raise intraaortic pressure and improve coronary perfusion pressure (CPP). The purpose of this study was to determine if IA or IV volume infusion could augment the effect of epinephrine on CPP during CPR in the canine model. Nineteen mongrel dogs with a mean weight of 26.3 +/- 4.2 kg were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Thoracic aortic (Ao), right atrial (RA) and pulmonary artery catheters were placed for hemodynamic monitoring. Additional Ao and central venous catheters were placed for volume infusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and Thumper CPR was begun after 5 min (t = 5). At t = 10, all dogs received 45 micrograms/kg IV epinephrine. Six animals received epinephrine alone (EPI). Five dogs received EPI plus a 500 cc bolus of normal saline over 3 min intravenously (EPI/IV). Another group (n = 8) received EPI plus the same fluid bolus through the aortic catheter (EPI/IA). Resuscitation was attempted at t = 18 using a standard protocol. There was a significant increase in CPP over baseline in all groups. The changes in CPP from baseline induced by EPI, EPI/IV and EPI/IA were 20.6 +/- 3.7, 22.8 +/- 4.2 and 22.2 +/- 2.4 mmHg, respectively. Volume loading did not augment the effect of therapeutic EPI dosing. By increasing both preload and afterload, volume administration may in fact be detrimental during CPR. PMID:1658894

  19. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P < 0.01). The emulsion was stable with the Z-average intensity-weighted mean droplet diameter remaining at 60 nm over 23 months. The zeta potential (a measure of negative surface charge protecting from aggregation) was unchanged at -36.2. Rapid cholesterol pool size was 25.3 ± 1.3 g. Intravenous cholesterol tracer was stable at 4°C for 9 months postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies.

  20. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P < 0.01). The emulsion was stable with the Z-average intensity-weighted mean droplet diameter remaining at 60 nm over 23 months. The zeta potential (a measure of negative surface charge protecting from aggregation) was unchanged at -36.2. Rapid cholesterol pool size was 25.3 ± 1.3 g. Intravenous cholesterol tracer was stable at 4°C for 9 months postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies. PMID:26416797

  1. Radip induction of ether anaesthesia and controlled maintenacne by a combination of intravenous and inhalation administration without the risk of explosion.

    PubMed

    Zwart, A; De Leeuw, L; Van Dieren, A; Vree, T B; Saleh, S; Garcia-Martinez, R; Trimbos, H

    1976-06-01

    The induction and maintenance of anaesthesia with ether using a combined intravenous infusion and a constant low inspired concentration are discribed. Predictions from a mathematical model were checked against animal experiments. Anaesthesia occurred within 5 min. The mehtod obviates the need for explosive mixtures.

  2. Design of low cost smart infusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Yohanes David; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2015-01-01

    We propose design of a smart infusion device suitable for public hospitals in Indonesia. The device comprised of LED, photodiode and DC motor to measure and control the infusion rate, using the principle of LED beam absorption. The infusion rate was identified by using microcontroller and displayed through computer unit. Experiment results for different flow rate level and concentration of Dextrose showed that the device is able to detect, measure, and control the infusion droplets flow rate by the average error rate of 1.0081%.

  3. Technical hazards of using nutritive mixtures in bags for cyclical intravenous nutrition: comparison with standard intravenous nutrition in 48 gastroenterological patients.

    PubMed Central

    Messing, B; Beliah, M; Girard-Pipau, F; Leleve, D; Bernier, J J

    1982-01-01

    Three methods for dispensing nutritional solutions are compared in 48 patients with gastrointestinal diseases on intravenous nutrition during 3582 days. The protocol for intravenous nutrition applied by the nursing team and the solutions used were the same in the three groups. In group A standard bottles were used, while in group B, 31PVC-disposable bags were used--with fat emulsion included (group B1) or with fat excluded (group B2). When fat was excluded from the bags it was infused separately from a bottle. The mixtures were made under laminar flow by the nursing team who applied a strict protocol which included bacteriological testing. The infection rate observed in the bags was 0.046%. The rate of septic complications was not significantly reduced in group B2 or B1 compared with group A; the type of container used was therefore unimportant and the key was the aseptic handling of the intravenous solutions. The rate of mechanical complications, mainly due to catheter obstruction, was higher (p less than 0.001) when fat was included in the bags--that is, in group B1--than in groups B2 and A. For 26 patients a cyclical regime of intermittent feeding was easier to manage when bags were used. In group B, this system replaced the continuous method n 75% of all therapeutic days without adverse effect; it improved compliance and allowed ambulatory treatment. The use of cyclical feeding with separate fat infusions has further reduced the hazards of intravenous nutrition and allowed the development of a programme that can be implemented at home. PMID:6804310

  4. Intravenous magnesium sulfate does not increase ventricular CSF ionized magnesium concentration of patients with intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Brewer, R P; Parra, A; Borel, C O; Hopkins, M B; Reynolds, J D

    2001-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate has attracted interest as a potential neuroprotectant but passage of magnesium ion into the central nervous system has not been well documented. For this study, we quantified plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ionized magnesium concentration after systemic magnesium sulfate infusion in patients with intracranial hypertension. Patients ( N = 9) received an intravenous infusion of 5 g/20 mmol magnesium sulfate (125 mL of a 4% wt/vol solution) over 30 minutes. Before and after dosing, CSF (from an indwelling ventricular catheter) and blood samples were collected at hourly intervals. Ionized magnesium concentration in all samples was determined using an electrolyte analyzer. Baseline plasma and CSF ionized magnesium concentrations were 0.58 +/- 0.05 and 0.82 +/- 0.06 mmol/L, respectively. Intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion significantly increased plasma ionized magnesium concentration (peak, 0.89 +/- 0.11 mmol/L), but CSF magnesium levels did not change during the 4-hour study. Systemic administration of magnesium sulfate failed to increase CSF ionized magnesium concentration in patients with intracranial hypertension despite increasing plasma magnesium levels by >50%.

  5. Effects of Intravenous Nicotine on Prepulse Inhibition in Smokers and Nonsmokers: Relationship with Familial Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Drobes, David J.; MacQueen, David A.; Blank, Melissa D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Malcolm, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing properties of nicotine may be, in part, derived from its ability to enhance certain forms of cognitive processing. Several animal and human studies have shown that nicotine increases prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex. However, it remains unclear whether these effects are related to smoking susceptibility. Objectives The current study examined the effects of intravenously delivered nicotine on PPI in smokers and nonsmokers, as well as its association with a quantitative index of familial smoking. Methods The sample consisted of 30 non-smokers and 16 smokers, who completed an initial assessment, followed on a separate day by a laboratory assessment of PPI prior to and following each of two intravenous nicotine infusions. Separate doses were used in smoker and non-smoker samples. Results Analyses indicated that both nicotine infusions acutely enhanced PPI among non-smokers, and this enhancement was positively related to the degree of smoking among first and second-degree relatives. Smokers also displayed PPI enhancement after receiving the first infusion, but this effect was unrelated to familial smoking. Conclusions These data suggest that the PPI paradigm may have utility as an endophenotype for cognitive processes which contribute to smoking risk. PMID:23624809

  6. A Convenient Method for Measuring Blood Ascorbate Concentrations in Patients Receiving High-Dose Intravenous Ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Sullivan, Garrett G; Schrick, Elizabeth; Choi, In-Young; He, Zhuoya; Lierman, JoAnn; Lee, Phil; Drisko, Jeanne A; Chen, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Objective A simple method of using fingerstick blood glucose monitors (FSBG) to estimate blood ascorbate values after high-dose intravenous (IV) ascorbate infusion is evaluated as a substitution for HPLC measurement. Methods In 33 participants, readings from FSBG were taken before and after IV ascorbate infusions at various time points, with the post-infusion FSBG readings subtracted by the baseline glucose readings. The results of the subtractions (AAFSBG) were correlated with ascorbate concentrations detected by HPLC (AAHPLC). Results A linear regression was found between ascorbate concentrations detected by the fingersitck method (AAFSBG) and by HPLC (AAHPLC). The linear correlations were identical in healthy subjects, diabetic subjects and cancer patients. ANOVA analysis obtained an AAFSBG/AAHPLC ratio of 0.90, with 90% confidence interval of (0.69, 1.20). The corrections of AAFSBG improved similarity to AAHPLC, but did not significantly differ from the un-corrected values. Conclusion The FSBG method can be used as an approximate estimation of high blood ascorbate concentration after IV ascorbate (>50 mg/dL, or 2.8 mM) without correction. However this measurement is not accurate in detecting lower or baseline blood ascorbate. It is also important to highlight that in regard to glucose monitoring, FSBG readings will be erroneously elevated following intravenous ascorbate use and insulin should not be administered to patients based on these readings. PMID:23885992

  7. [Effects of dehydration and infusion of blood substitutes on the hemostasis system in an experiment with 21-hour bed rest].

    PubMed

    Kuzichkin, D S; Baranov, M V; Kovalev, A S; Repenkova, L G; Morukov, B V; Markin, A A

    2009-01-01

    Eight volunteered male test-subjects (20-40 y.o.) took part in an experiment with 21-hr bed rest aimed to investigate trends in the hemostasis parameters (activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, plasminogen, D-dimers, soluble fibrin-monomer complexes (SFMC), as well as antithrombin III (ATIII) and protein C (antiplasmin) activities) after diuretics-induced dehydration followed by intravenous infusion of colloid and crystalloid solutions. It was shown that noncompensible dehydration during bed rest does not lead to noteworthy alterations in the procoagulating component of hemostasis. Intravenous infusion of blood substituting sterofundin (crystalloid) and venofundin (colloid) to the bedrested human subjects accelerated coagulation within the physiological norm. In all series of the experiment ATIII was suppressed and plasminogen content went down causing growth in SFMC. Fibrinogen concentration remained essentially unchanged pointing to the absence of acute reaction of organism to the experimental conditions.

  8. Intravenous Dexmedetomidine Promotes Spinal Bupivacaine Anesthesia and Postoperative Analgesia in Lower Limb Surgery: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical CONSORT Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Ming; Zhang, Sai-Yu; Fu, Min; Zhang, Si-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dexmedetomidine (DEX) has been reported to have synergistic action with local anesthetics. This prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical study was designed to observe the efficacy of intravenous DEX without loading dose on spinal blockade duration, postoperative sedation, patient-controlled analgesia and its morphine-sparing effect in lower limb surgeries. Seventy-five patients, scheduled for lower limb surgery under spinal anesthesia, were randomly allocated into 2 groups: group BS (received 15 mg of 0.5% of bupivacaine for subarachnoid anesthesia and continuous intravenous infusion of saline in Ringer solution) and BD group (received 15 mg of 0.5% of bupivacaine for subarachnoid anesthesia and continuous intravenous infusion of DEX in Ringer solution at a rate of 0.25 μg/kg/h). Intravenous infusion started 15 minutes before spinal anesthesia. The onset time of sensory and motor blockade was shorten, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was significantly prolonged in BD patients when compared to BS patients. The Ramsay sedation score measured immediately after surgery was greater in BD group than BS group. BD patients also shown increased time to the first request of postoperative morphine and decreased total morphine consumption as compared with BS patients. Collectively, intravenous administration of DEX without loading dose promoted the efficacy of spinal bupivacaine anesthesia and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing lower limb surgery. PMID:26937924

  9. Intravenous regional analgesia using bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Ware, R J

    1975-11-01

    Intravenous regional analgesia using bupivacaine (Marcain) was employed as the anaesthetic technique in a series of 50 cases undergoing a variety of surgical procedures on the upper limb. A short pilot study was undertaken to determine the optimal dosage and concentration of bupivacaine. This was found to be 1-5 mg/kg in 0-2% concentration and proved suitable for all patients regardless of age or physical condition. The use of bupivacaine produced highly successful results in 98% of cases. Onset of analgesia was very rapid (3-5 minutes) and profound muscular relaxation occurred in approximately half of the cases. The degree of muscle relaxation was, however, always adequate for the successful reduction of fractures. Only one patient exhibited an adverse reaction to the dose of bupivacaine used and this was limited to a brief period of slight drowsiness. The results of this series suggest that bupivacaine may provide advantages over previously used local analgesic agents for intravenous regional analgesia and that it may be the agent of choice for this useful technique.

  10. Infusing Systems Thinking into Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; Tomlin, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of career counselors in infusing systems thinking into occupational advising. The authors conducted a qualitative review and analysis of selected literature on systems thinking and analyzed trends for adaptation to career counseling practice. This analysis suggests that career counselors need to infuse systems…

  11. Changes in distribution of hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II in human hepatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Y.; Imaoka, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Nakano, S.; Ishikawa, O.; Ohigashi, H.; Taniguchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Iwanaga, T.; Terasawa, T.

    1985-01-15

    Changes in the distribution of the hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II (AT-II) were studied in human hepatic cancers using extremely short-lived radioisotope (RI) (krypton 81 m (/sup 81m/Kr); half-life, 13 seconds). After the start of continuous infusion of AT-II, the radioactivity of the tumor showed about a two-fold increase, whereas that of the nontumor region decreased to about one half as much as the level before the infusion. Consequently, the mean ratio of the arterial blood flow in the tumor region to that in the nontumor region (T/N ratio) increased to 3.30 (P less than 0.001). The T/N ratio showed a peak before the peripheral blood pressure reached the maximum, and thereafter tended to decrease. Intra-arterial infusion of AT-II raised the T/N ratio more obviously than did intravenous infusion of the drug, with less rise in the peripheral blood pressure. It is believed that intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with local use of AT-II enables better accessibility of chemotherapeutic drugs to tumors.

  12. Prospective validation of a 1-hour algorithm to rule-out and rule-in acute myocardial infarction using a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay

    PubMed Central

    Reichlin, Tobias; Twerenbold, Raphael; Wildi, Karin; Gimenez, Maria Rubini; Bergsma, Nathalie; Haaf, Philip; Druey, Sophie; Puelacher, Christian; Moehring, Berit; Freese, Michael; Stelzig, Claudia; Krivoshei, Lian; Hillinger, Petra; Jäger, Cedric; Herrmann, Thomas; Kreutzinger, Philip; Radosavac, Milos; Weidmann, Zoraida Moreno; Pershyna, Kateryna; Honegger, Ursina; Wagener, Max; Vuillomenet, Thierry; Campodarve, Isabel; Bingisser, Roland; Miró, Òscar; Rentsch, Katharina; Bassetti, Stefano; Osswald, Stefan; Mueller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to prospectively validate a novel 1-hour algorithm using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement for early rule-out and rule-in of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: In a multicentre study, we enrolled 1320 patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected acute MI. The high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, incorporating baseline values as well as absolute changes within the first hour, was validated against the final diagnosis. The final diagnosis was then adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists using all available information, including coronary angiography, echocardiography, follow-up data and serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels. Results: Acute MI was the final diagnosis in 17.3% of patients. With application of the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, 786 (59.5%) patients were classified as “rule-out,” 216 (16.4%) were classified as “rule-in” and 318 (24.1%) were classified to the “observational zone.” The sensitivity and the negative predictive value for acute MI in the rule-out zone were 99.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 97.6%–99.9%) and 99.9% (95% CI 99.3%–100%), respectively. The specificity and the positive predictive value for acute MI in the rule-in zone were 95.7% (95% CI 94.3%–96.8%) and 78.2% (95% CI 72.1%–83.6%), respectively. The 1-hour algorithm provided higher negative and positive predictive values than the standard interpretation of highsensitivity cardiac troponin T using a single cut-off level (both p < 0.05). Cumulative 30-day mortality was 0.0%, 1.6% and 1.9% in patients classified in the rule-out, observational and rule-in groups, respectively (p = 0.001). Interpretation: This rapid strategy incorporating high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T baseline values and absolute changes within the first hour substantially accelerated the management of suspected acute MI by allowing safe rule-out as well as accurate

  13. The rate of intravenous cocaine or amphetamine delivery: influence on drug-taking and drug-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Crombag, Hans S.; Ferrario, Carrie R.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the influence of rate of intravenous infusion of cocaine or amphetamine on drug-taking and seeking behavior. First, drug-naive rats were tested for acquisition of self-administration of increasing doses of amphetamine or cocaine infused over 5 or 100s. Second, self-administration of cocaine or amphetamine infused over 5–100 sec was assessed on fixed or progressive-ratio (PR) reinforcement schedules. Finally, the ability of a single 5 or 100 sec amphetamine or cocaine infusion to reinstate extinguished drug seeking was assessed. Although slower infusion rates produced a small effect on drug taking under continuous-reinforcement conditions, infusion rate did not alter drug taking on intermittent or PR reinforcement schedules, or the ability of cocaine or amphetamine to reinstate drug seeking. Taken together, our results suggest that variation in drug delivery rate over a range that we previously found alters the induction of behavioral sensitization, gene-expression and striatal dopamine activity, does not markedly alter drug-taking or seeking behavior. PMID:18586051

  14. External quantification of myocardial perfusion by exponential infusion of positron-emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Hack, S N; Eichling, J O; Bergmann, S R; Welch, M J; Sobel, B E

    1980-11-01

    A technique was developed and evaluated using the exponential infusion of positron-emitting diffusible tracers to quantitate myocardial perfusion. The approach employs a parameter that rapidly reaches a constant value as a function of tracer delivery rate, isotope decay constant, and the monotonically increasing tissue radioactivity. Isolated rabbit hearts with controlled flow were used to evaluate the approach, because tracer kinetics in such preparations mimic those in vivo. Accordingly, exponential infusions of H2 15O and [11C]butanol were administered to 25 isolated rabbit hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution (KH) alone or KH enriched with erythrocytes (KH-RBC, hematocrit = 40). With flow varied from 1.2 to 5 ml/g per min in eight KH hearts infused with H2 15O, actual and estimated flow correlated closely (r = 0.95, n = 52 determinations). For the KH-RBC hearts, flow was varied from 0.3 to 1.5 ml/g per min. Actual and estimated flow correlated significantly for both the 14 KH-RBC hearts infused with H2 15O (r = 0.90, n = 89 determinations) and the 3 KH-RBC hearts infused with [11C]butanol (r = 0.93, n = 13 determinations). In addition, the required exponentially increasing arterial tracer concentrations were shown to be attainable in vivo in dogs and rhesus monkeys after intravenous exponential administrations of tracer. The results suggest that the approach developed employing exponential tracer infusion permits accurate measurement of myocardial perfusion and that it should prove useful in the noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial perfusion in vivo by positron emission tomography.

  15. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions.

  16. A bolus infusion of xylitol solution in the treatment of cow ketosis does not cause a surge in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Yoji; Sako, Toshinori; Mizutani, Hisashi; Sugiyama, Mieko; Hayakawa, Noriyuki; Hasegawa, Hiroya; Hirose, Hisashi

    2008-10-01

    When a solution of xylitol was rapidly administered intravenously (bolus infusion) to healthy cattle or those with ketosis, different results were obtained. In healthy cattle, a temporary surge in insulin secretion was observed, whereas in ketotic cattle no such surge was found, but instead a moderate level of secretion continued for a lengthy period. No significant difference in the areas under the insulin curve (AUC) was found between healthy cattle and ketotic cattle up to 120 min after xylitol infusion. These results clearly demonstrated that a bolus infusion of xylitol solution in ketotic cattle does not cause a temporary surge in insulin secretion unlike in healthy animals, but rather results in a continuous, gradual rise in secretion.

  17. Effects of glycerol infusion on cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with intracranial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yonekura, Y.; Tanada, S.; Senda, M.; Saji, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Taki, W.; Ishikawa, M.; Handa, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-05-01

    Glycerol is one of the most popular drugs frequently used to improve brain edema, which is associated with intracranial tumors. To evaluate the effects of glycerol infusion, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism were studied in 8 patients with positron emission computed tomography (PET) before and after glycerol infusion. Regional CBF, oxygen utilization (CMRO2), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were measured with continuous inhalation of 0-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen, and bolus inhalation of 0-15 labeled carbon monoxide. Following the control measurements, 250 to 300 ml of 10% glycerol was infused intravenously within 20 min, and the repeat measurements were performed. In the control study, 6/8 cases showed decreased CBF and CMRO2 in the cerebral cortices, while the other two had normal CMRO2 with high OEF. After glycerol infusion, an increase in CBF was observed in all cases, whereas CMRO2 increased only in the cases with low CMRO2 at the control state, and didn't change in the two cases with normal CMRO2, in which OEF decreased to the normal level. These results indicated the important role of auto-regulation mechanism for oxygen metabolism to maintain neuronal activities against the changes in CBF. However, CMRO2 also decreased in the cases with severely diminished CBF, and glycerol improved both CBF and CMRO2 in these cases.

  18. Infusion of glucose and lipids at physiological rates causes acute endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Boden, Guenther; Song, Weiwei; Duan, Xunbao; Cheung, Peter; Kresge, Karen; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim

    2011-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has recently been implicated as a cause for obesity-related insulin resistance; however, what causes ER stress in obesity has remained uncertain. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that macronutrients can cause acute (ER) stress in rat liver. Examined were the effects of intravenously infused glucose and/or lipids on proximal ER stress sensor activation (PERK, eIF2-α, ATF4, Xbox protein 1 (XBP1s)), unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins (GRP78, calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), stress kinases (JNK, p38 MAPK) and insulin signaling (insulin/receptor substrate (IRS) 1/2 associated phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)) in rat liver. Glucose and/or lipid infusions, ranging from 23.8 to 69.5 kJ/4 h (equivalent to between ~17% and ~50% of normal daily energy intake), activated the proximal ER stress sensor PERK and ATF6 increased the protein abundance of calnexin, calreticulin and PDI and increased two GRP78 isoforms. Glucose and glucose plus lipid infusions induced comparable degrees of ER stress, but only infusions containing lipid activated stress kinases (JNK and p38 MAPK) and inhibited insulin signaling (PI3K). In summary, physiologic amounts of both glucose and lipids acutely increased ER stress in livers 12-h fasted rats and dependent on the presence of fat, caused insulin resistance. We conclude that this type of acute ER stress is likely to occur during normal daily nutrient intake.

  19. Complete resolution of recurrent calciphylaxis with long-term intravenous sodium thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Kavitha; Wallace, Hilary; Sinniah, Rajalingam; Saker, Barry

    2008-02-01

    A 35-year-old morbidly obese woman on home haemodialysis presented with painful indurated subcutaneous nodules histologically characteristic of calciphylaxis. After failing to respond to conventional treatment, she was commenced on an intravenous infusion of 25 g of sodium thiosulfate three times per week. Two weeks after commencing sodium thiosulfate, the pain resolved completely. By 12 weeks, the lesions had healed and the infusions were ceased. Two months later, skin lesions recurred, but resolved again within 3 months of recommencement of sodium thiosulfate treatment, which was continued for 8 months. The treatment was well tolerated. There has been no recurrence of lesions in the 18 months since the cessation of sodium thiosulfate. Clinical trials to determine the optimum dose and duration of therapy for sodium thiosulfate treatment of calciphylaxis should be given priority because of its high rate of success in treating what is otherwise a severe and mostly lethal condition.

  20. Reinforcer interactions under concurrent schedules of food, water, and intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, S.I.; Mirkis, S.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Rats housed in three-lever, operant-conditioning chambers were trained under a concurrent, chained fixed-ratio 1, fixed-ratio 9 schedule (conc chain FR1 FR9) of food and water deliveries. After stable patterns of food and water intake were observed, the rats were prepared with intravenous catheters and a drug self-administration option was added to the schedule. Cocaine infusions (0.33 mg/infusion) were available for only 6 h (09.00 h-15.00 h), while access to food and water was available for 24 h. Addition of the cocaine option produced a minimal decrease in food and water intake and a considerable disruption ruption of food and water intake patterns. Changes in the cocaine dose (0.08-0.84 mg/infusion) did not alter responding on the levers resulting in either food or water deliveries. Cocaine self-administration, however, showed an inverted "U" shaped function as the dose of cocaine was increased. Drug extinction probes resulted in a significant increase in responding on the levers resulting in food and water deliveries and substantial decreases on the lever previously resulting in cocaine infusions. Twenty-four hour food extinction probes decreased responding on the levers resulting in food and water deliveries and produced a modest decrease in the self-administration of cocaine.

  1. Special considerations with the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in older persons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, M Jennifer; Christmas, Colleen

    2011-09-01

    There are currently six labelled indications in the US for intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and over 150 unlabelled uses, ranging from some of the most studied indications through to those mentioned only in anecdotal reports. A downstream effect of the varied uses of IVIG is its increased utilization for disease processes that significantly affect the older population. In general, IVIG is considered a safe therapy, and the common adverse events (AEs) associated with IVIG administration are mild and transient. Serious AEs are fortunately uncommon with IVIG infusion. However, most safety data are collated from case reports and case series, with a modest amount of data from well controlled clinical studies that have limited power to detect uncommon AEs. Among the reported serious AEs, older patients appear to be particularly at risk of acute renal failure and arterial and venous thrombosis. The incidence of AEs appears to vary with the IVIG product composition, rate of infusion, the study population's disease process and underlying co-morbidities. Approaches to minimizing AEs, particularly in the older patient population, include ensuring sufficient hydration prior to infusion of IVIG, using the minimal effective dose possible during infusion, considering use of preparations with lower concentrations of sucrose, and monitoring renal function. Research is expanding to inform possible uses of a subcutaneous formulation of IVIG that, if proven to be effective, offers a potential reduction in AEs and lower cost of administration.

  2. Arginine infusion in patients with septic shock increases nitric oxide production without haemodynamic instability.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Poeze, Martijn; Deutz, Nicolaas E

    2015-01-01

    Arginine deficiency in sepsis may impair nitric oxide (NO) production for local perfusion and add to the catabolic state. In contrast, excessive NO production has been related to global haemodynamic instability. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the dose-response effect of intravenous arginine supplementation in post-absorptive patients with septic shock on arginine-NO and protein metabolism and on global and regional haemodynamics. Eight critically ill patients with a diagnosis of septic shock participated in this short-term (8 h) dose-response study. L-Arginine-HCl was continuously infused [intravenously (IV)] in three stepwise-increasing doses (33, 66 and 99 μmol·kg-1·h-1). Whole-body arginine-NO and protein metabolism were measured using stable isotope techniques, and baseline values were compared with healthy controls. Global and regional haemodynamic parameters were continuously recorded during the study. Upon infusion, plasma arginine increased from 48±7 to 189±23 μmol·l-1 (means±S.D.; P<0.0001). This coincided with increased de novo arginine (P<0.0001) and increased NO production (P<0.05). Sepsis patients demonstrated elevated protein breakdown at baseline (P<0.001 compared with healthy controls), whereas protein breakdown and synthesis both decreased during arginine infusion (P<0.0001). Mean arterial and pulmonary pressure and gastric mucosal-arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide difference (Pr-aCO2) gap did not alter during arginine infusion (P>0.05), whereas stroke volume (SV) increased (P<0.05) and arterial lactate decreased (P<0.05). In conclusion, a 4-fold increase in plasma arginine with intravenous arginine infusion in sepsis stimulates de novo arginine and NO production and reduces whole-body protein breakdown. These potential beneficial metabolic effects occurred without negative alterations in haemodynamic parameters, although improvement in regional perfusion could not be demonstrated in the eight

  3. Comparison of Intravenous Anesthetic Agents for the Treatment of Refractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Michael E.; Berger, Karen; Claassen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus that cannot be controlled with first- and second-line agents is called refractory status epilepticus (RSE), a condition that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most experts agree that treatment of RSE necessitates the use of continuous infusion intravenous anesthetic drugs such as midazolam, propofol, pentobarbital, thiopental, and ketamine, each of which has its own unique characteristics. This review compares the various anesthetic agents while providing an approach to their use in adult patients, along with possible associated complications. PMID:27213459

  4. Comparison of Intravenous Anesthetic Agents for the Treatment of Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Michael E; Berger, Karen; Claassen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus that cannot be controlled with first- and second-line agents is called refractory status epilepticus (RSE), a condition that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most experts agree that treatment of RSE necessitates the use of continuous infusion intravenous anesthetic drugs such as midazolam, propofol, pentobarbital, thiopental, and ketamine, each of which has its own unique characteristics. This review compares the various anesthetic agents while providing an approach to their use in adult patients, along with possible associated complications. PMID:27213459

  5. Dissecting Cellulitis of the Scalp Responding to Intravenous Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Gemmeke, Astrid; Koch, André

    2012-04-01

    The authors present the case of a 30-year-old male patient with a severe and long-standing dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. The disease did not respond to conventional treatment, including oral antibiotics, isotretinoin, and prednisolone. Quality of life was significantly impaired. After introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment (infliximab), the malodorous discharge stopped, inflammation was reduced significantly, nodules became flat, and pain decreased. The treatment was well tolerated although he developed a temporary psoriasiform rash after the second intravenous infusion. In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment is a new therapeutic option in this severe and recalcitrant disorder. PMID:22708007

  6. Dissecting Cellulitis of the Scalp Responding to Intravenous Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Gemmeke, Astrid; Koch, André

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 30-year-old male patient with a severe and long-standing dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. The disease did not respond to conventional treatment, including oral antibiotics, isotretinoin, and prednisolone. Quality of life was significantly impaired. After introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment (infliximab), the malodorous discharge stopped, inflammation was reduced significantly, nodules became flat, and pain decreased. The treatment was well tolerated although he developed a temporary psoriasiform rash after the second intravenous infusion. In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment is a new therapeutic option in this severe and recalcitrant disorder. PMID:22708007

  7. A prototype space flight intravenous injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    Medical emergencies, especially those resulting from accidents, frequently require the administration of intravenous fluids to replace lost body liquids. The development of a prototype space flight intravenous injection system is presented. The definition of requirements, injectable concentrates development, water polisher, reconstitution hardware development, administration hardware development, and prototype fabrication and testing are discussed.

  8. A consortium approach to intravenous certification.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D; Ziemba, S; Shumlas, D; Files, B

    1998-01-01

    Providing education for intravenous therapy without offering redundant courses is a concern for staff development educators. The consortium approach maximizes resources, provides a standard and consistent level of intravenous training, and provides a cost-effective remedy. Problems, solutions, and benefits to students, educators, and hospitals are described in this article. Emergent issues are also discussed.

  9. Intraosseous and intravenous administration of antibiotics yields comparable plasma concentrations during experimental septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, G; Larsson, A; Lipcsey, M; Michalek, J; Eriksson, M

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate whether comparable antibiotic concentrations could be reached with intraosseous and intravenous administration during septic shock. Methods In this randomized, prospective experimental study conducted at an animal research laboratory at the University Hospital of Uppsala, eight anesthetized pigs, weighing 21.2 to 29.1 kg (mean: 25.2 ± 2.3 kg), received endotoxin infusion at 4 μg/kg/h for 6 h. At the onset of clinical shock, alternatively after 3 h of endotoxemia, they received 75 mg/kg of cefotaxime and 7 mg/kg of gentamicin either in a proximal tibial intraosseous catheter or in a peripheral intravenous catheter. Mixed venous samples were taken after 5, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min and analyzed for antibiotic concentrations. Results For both antibiotics, plasma concentrations after intraosseous and intravenous administration followed similar curves throughout the observation period, and peak concentrations were comparable. Mean concentration area under the curve (AUC mg × h/l) for cefotaxime was 108.1 ± 19.5 after intraosseous and 116.5 ± 11.1 after intravenous administration; ratio 0.93, (95% CI 0.71–1.19). Mean AUC for gentamicin was 28.1 ± 6.8 for intraosseous and 32.2 ± 3.5 for intravenous administration; ratio 0.87 (95% CI 0.62–1.19). Conclusions In this porcine septic shock model, intraosseous and intravenous administration of gentamicin and cefotaxime yielded comparable concentrations. In an emergency, intraosseous administration of these antibiotics may be considered in severe infections when venous access is difficult. PMID:25557933

  10. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance. PMID:20841984

  11. Visualizing enzyme infusion into apple tissue.

    PubMed

    Culver, C A; Bjurlin, M A; Fulcher, R G

    2000-12-01

    Enzymes traditionally used in food processing are applied to ground or macerated tissue with little or no retention of cellular structure. More recently developed applications use enzymes to selectively alter tissue properties while retaining some structure. Process development has been hindered by the lack of conclusive evidence showing that enzyme infusion into plant tissue pieces is possible. This study provides direct evidence that such infusion is possible by using fluorescence microscopy to monitor vacuum infusion of fluorescein-labeled alpha-amylase into apple cubes. This method is generally applicable to any plant or animal tissue and to any macromolecule capable of derivatization. PMID:11141264

  12. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  13. [Medication errors with concentrated potassium intravenous solutions: Data of the literature, context and prevention].

    PubMed

    Charpiat, B; Magdinier, C; Leboucher, G; Aubrun, F

    2016-01-01

    Accidental direct intravenous injection of a concentrated solution of potassium often leads to patient death. In France, recommendations of healthcare agencies to prevent such accidents cover only preparation and intravenous infusion conditions. Accidents continue to occur in French hospitals. These facts demonstrate that these recommendations are insufficient and ineffective to prevent such deaths, especially those occurring during a catheter flushing. This article reviews the measures able to reduce the number of accidents. Countries which removed concentrated ampoules from ward stocks observed a decrease of the number of accidental deaths. This withdrawal, recommended by the World Health Organization, is now part of standards in studies aimed at determining the safety of care in hospitals. However, removal alone is insufficient to eliminate the risk. The combination with other measures should be considered. These measures are the provision of a combination of diluted intravenous ready to use solutions, the promotion of the oral route with tablets and oral solutions for potassium replenishment and to make available products with safeguards to prevent single shot intravenous injection. Studies aimed at determining the consequences on preventing concentrated potassium accidents of a widespread distribution of isotonic sodium chloride pre-filled ready-to-use syringes for catheter flushing should be performed. PMID:26298848

  14. Enhanced expressions and histological characteristics of intravenously administered plasmid DNA in rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Rha, S. J.; Wang, Y. P.

    2001-01-01

    Cationic liposome-mediated gene transfection is a promising method for gene therapy. In this study, the transfection efficiency and histological patterns were evaluated in rat lung after intravenous administration via femoral vein of naked plasmid DNA, naked plasmid DNA with pretreatment of DOTAP, and DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex. Plasmid DNA encoding bacterial LacZ gene was used. For quantification of LacZ gene expression, beta-galactosidase assay was performed. For histologic examination, X-gal staining and immunohistochemical staining for transfected gene products were performed. Pretreatment of DOTAP prior to the infusion of naked plasmid DNA increased transfection efficiency up to a level comparable to DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex injection. Transfected genes were mainly expressed in type II pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages in all animals. We conclude that the high transfection efficiency is achievable by intravenous administration of naked plasmid DNA with pretreatment of DOTAP, to a level comparable to DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex. In this regard, naked plasmid DNA administration with pretreatment of DOTAP could be a more feasible option for intravenous gene transfer than DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex, in that the former is technically easier and more cost-effective than the latter with a comparable efficacy, in terms of intravenous gene delivery to the lung. PMID:11641524

  15. Increased lung vascular permeability after pancreatitis and trypsin infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Tahamont, M. V.; Barie, P. S.; Blumenstock, F. A.; Hussain, M. H.; Malik, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the role of proteases in mediating lung vascular injury after acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Studies were made in sheep in which pulmonary lymph was collected for assessment of the changes in transvascular fluid and protein exchange. The induction of pancreatitis by injection of trypsin and sodium taurocholate into the pancreas resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance (lymph flow x lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio). The pulmonary vascular pressures did not change significantly after pancreatitis, indicating that the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and protein clearance were due to increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. The response to pancreatitis was also characterized by decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was a common morphologic feature in this group. In another group, an intravenous infusion of trypsin, which produced decreases in antiprotease activity comparable to those observed after pancreatitis, also resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance. These increases in lymph fluxes were comparable to those observed after pancreatitis and were also associated with decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was evident in this group upon histologic examination. In a third group, pretreatment with Trasylol prevented the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance after pancreatitis, suggesting that the pancreatitis-induced pulmonary vascular injury is the result of the release of proteases. The results indicate a common pulmonary vascular response to acute pancreatitis and trypsin infusion. The release of proteases into the circulation after acute pancreatitis may be the initiating event mediating the pulmonary vascular injury. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 11 and 12 PMID:6181692

  16. Differences in quality between privately and publicly banked umbilical cord blood units: a pilot study of autologous cord blood infusion in children with acquired neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jessica; Allison, June; McLaughlin, Colleen; Sledge, Linda; Waters-Pick, Barbara; Wease, Stephen; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A pilot study was conducted to determine the safety and feasibility of intravenous administration of autologous umbilical cord blood (CB) in young children with acquired neurologic disorders. Most CB units (CBUs) were electively stored in private CB banks. Unlike public banks, which utilize specific criteria and thresholds for banking, private banks generally store all collected CBUs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS CBUs of eligible patients containing more than 1 × 107 cells/kg were shipped to Duke from the banks of origin after confirming identity by HLA typing. On the day of infusion, CBUs were thawed and washed in dextran-albumin and infused intravenously. Patients were medicated with acetaminophen, diphenhydramine, and methylprednisolone before transfusion. Data regarding patients, infusions, and CBUs were collected retrospectively. Characteristics of CBUs were compared to existing data from CBUs publicly banked at the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank. RESULTS From March 2004 to December 2009, 184 children received 198 CB infusions. Three patients had infusion reactions, all responsive to medical therapy and stopping the infusion. Median precryopreservation volume (60 mL vs. 89 mL, p < 0.0001), total nucleated cell count (4.7 × 108 vs. 10.8 × 108, p < 0.0001), and CD34 count (1.8 × 106 vs. 3.0 × 106, p < 0.0001) were significantly lower than publicly stored CBUs. Postthaw sterility cultures were positive in 7.6% of infused CBUs. CONCLUSION IV infusion of autologous CB is safe and feasible in young children with neurologic injuries. Quality parameters of privately banked CBUs are inferior to those stored in public banks. If efficacy of autologous CB is established clinically, the quality of autologous units should be held to the same standards as those stored in public banks. PMID:20546200

  17. The History of Target-Controlled Infusion.

    PubMed

    Struys, Michel M R F; De Smet, Tom; Glen, John Iain B; Vereecke, Hugo E M; Absalom, Anthony R; Schnider, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) is a technique of infusing IV drugs to achieve a user-defined predicted ("target") drug concentration in a specific body compartment or tissue of interest. In this review, we describe the pharmacokinetic principles of TCI, the development of TCI systems, and technical and regulatory issues addressed in prototype development. We also describe the launch of the current clinically available systems.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of acyclovir after intravenous and oral administration.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, P; Blum, M R

    1983-09-01

    Acyclovir pharmacokinetics has been extensively investigated during the various phases of clinical development. Most of the administered drug is eliminated from the body unchanged, via the kidneys by glomerular filtration and tubular secretion. After intravenous dosing of patients with normal renal function, 8 to 14% of the dose is recovered in the urine as the metabolite 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine. Adequate distribution of acyclovir has been demonstrated in the cerebrospinal fluid, vesicular fluid, vaginal secretions and tissues. The low plasma protein binding of acyclovir precludes drug interactions involving binding displacement. When intravenous doses in the range of 2.5 to 15 mg/kg were given every 8 h to adult patients, dose-independent kinetics was observed. Continuous infusions of acyclovir over an equivalent daily dose range have achieved predictable plasma levels. Acyclovir half-life (T1/2 beta) and total body clearance (Cltot) are influenced significantly by renal function, and dosage adjustments should be made for patients with impaired renal function. For patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance (Clcr) greater than 80 ml/min/1.73m2) mean T1/2 beta and Cltot were 2.5 h and 327 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively. In children 1-year-old or older, Cltot normalized by body surface area was essentially the same as in adults with normal renal function, whereas Cltot for neonates was approximately one-third the adult value. In the adult population, age-related decreases in acyclovir Cltot reflect age-related changes in renal function; therefore dosage adjustments based on Clcr will compensate for age effects on acyclovir pharmacokinetics. After oral administration, the bioavailability of acyclovir was approximately 20%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Renal toxicity mediated by continuous infusion of recombinant interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Ponce, P; Cruz, J; Travassos, J; Moreira, P; Oliveira, J; Melo-Gomes, E; Gouveia, J

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2), a potent lymphokine with antitumoral activity, was used in continuous intravenous infusion for 5 days (18,000,000 IU/m2/day) in 9 treatment cycles in 5 patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. During the infusion, patients received aggressive fluid replacement titrated by invasive hemodynamic monitoring, aiming at a stable central volemia. Body weight went up an average of 4.5 kg in 5 days, mean arterial blood pressure dropped slightly from day 1 to day 5 (105.4 +/- 11.6 to 86.1 +/- 12.5 mm Hg, p < 0.05), systemic vascular resistance decreased from 1304.7 +/- 242.1 to 871.7 +/- 237.2 dyn/s/cm-5 (p < 0.05), with stable pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiac output and central venous pressure. The urinary output significantly dropped from 1.9 +/- 1.2 to 0.2 +/- 0.1 ml/min (p < 0.05) with very significant rises in serum creatinine from 76.0 +/- 28.3 to 242.2 +/- 144.9 mumol/l (0.86 +/- 0.32 to 2.47 +/- 1.64 mg/dl) and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase urinary activity from 4.97 +/- 5.0 to 23.0 +/- 12.1 U/l, and significant decrement of creatinine clearance (1.86 +/- 0.65 to 0.29 +/- 0.27 ml/s or 111.5 +/- 38.9 to 17.1 +/- 16.6 ml/min) and urinary sodium (113.8 +/- 78.3 to 9.0 +/- 6.7 mmol/l). Urine sediment evolved from normal at day 1 to 9.0 +/- 3.7 epithelial cells/mm3 and 6.9 +/- 3.6 brown casts/mm3 (p = 0.001). We concluded that cancer treatment with IL-2 in continuous infusion, even with stable hemodynamics, induces an acute renal failure in most patients treated.

  20. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima e

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg−1·h−1 (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913. PMID:26949390

  1. Isotonic saline in elderly men: an open-labelled controlled infusion study of electrolyte balance, urine flow and kidney function.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R G; Isacson, M Nyberg; Fagerström, T; Rosvall, J; Nyman, C R

    2016-02-01

    Isotonic saline is a widely-used infusion fluid, although the associated chloride load may cause metabolic acidosis and impair kidney function in young, healthy volunteers. We wished to examine whether these effects also occurred in the elderly, and conducted a crossover study in 13 men with a mean age of 73 years (range 66-84), who each received intravenous infusions of 1.5 l of Ringer's acetate and of isotonic saline. Isotonic saline induced mild changes in plasma sodium (mean +1.5 mmol.l(-1) ), plasma chloride (+3 mmol.l(-1) ) and standard bicarbonate (-2 mmol.l(-1) ). Three hours after starting the infusions, 68% of the Ringer's acetate and 30% of the infused saline had been excreted (p < 0.01). The glomerular filtration rate increased in response to both fluids, but more after the Ringer's acetate (p < 0.03). Pre-infusion fluid retention, as evidenced by high urinary osmolality (> 700 mOsmol.kg(-1) ) and/or creatinine (> 7 mmol.l(-1) ), was a strong factor governing the responses to both fluid loads.

  2. Differential Postoperative Effects of Volatile Anesthesia and Intraoperative Remifentanil Infusion in 7511 Thyroidectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Jun-Young; Choi, Seong-Soo; Yi, Jung Min; Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Se Ung; Sim, Ji-Hoon; Karm, Myong-Hwan; Ku, Seungwoo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although remifentanil is used widely by many clinicians during general anesthesia, there are recent evidences of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as an adverse effect. This study aimed to determine if intraoperative remifentanil infusion caused increased pain during the postoperative period in patients who underwent a thyroidectomy. A total of 7511 patients aged ≥ 20 years, who underwent thyroidectomy between January 2009 and December 2013 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. Enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups: group N (no intraoperative remifentanil and only volatile maintenance anesthesia) and group R (intraoperative remifentanil infusion including total intravenous anesthesia and balanced anesthesia). Following propensity score matching analysis, 2582 patients were included in each group. Pain scores based on numeric rating scales (NRS) were compared between the 2 groups at the postoperative anesthetic care unit and at the ward until 3 days postoperation. Incidences of postoperative complications, such as nausea, itching, and shivering were also compared. The estimated NRS pain score on the day of surgery was 5.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.97–5.19) in group N patients and 6.73 (95% CI 6.65–6.80) in group R patients (P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in NRS scores on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3 between the 2 groups. Postoperative nausea was less frequent in group R (31.4%) than in group N (53.5%) (P < 0.001). However, the incidence of itching was higher in group R (4.3%) than in group N (0.7%) (P < 0.001). Continuous infusion of remifentanil during general anesthesia can cause higher intensity of postoperative pain and more frequent itching than general anesthesia without remifentanil infusion immediately after thyroidectomy. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of continuous remifentanil infusion, volatile anesthesia without opioid may be a good choice for minor

  3. Repeat infusion of autologous bone marrow cells in multiple sclerosis: protocol for a phase I extension study (SIAMMS-II)

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Claire M; Marks, David I; Walsh, Peter; Kane, Nick M; Guttridge, Martin G; Redondo, Juliana; Sarkar, Pamela; Owen, Denise; Wilkins, Alastair; Scolding, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ‘Study of Intravenous Autologous Marrow in Multiple Sclerosis (SIAMMS)’ trial was a safety and feasibility study which examined the effect of intravenous infusion of autologous bone marrow without myeloablative therapy. This trial was well tolerated and improvement was noted in the global evoked potential (GEP)—a neurophysiological secondary outcome measure recording speed of conduction in central nervous system pathways. The efficacy of intravenous delivery of autologous marrow in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) will be examined in the phase II study the ‘Assessment of Bone Marrow-Derived Cellular Therapy in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (ACTiMuS; NCT01815632)’. In parallel with the ‘ACTiMuS’ study, the current study ‘SIAMMS-II’ will explore the feasibility of repeated, non-myeloablative autologous bone marrow-derived cell therapy in progressive MS. Furthermore, information will be obtained regarding the persistence or otherwise of improvements in conduction in central nervous system pathways observed in the original ‘SIAMMS’ study and whether these can be reproduced or augmented by a second infusion of autologous bone marrow-derived cells. Methods and analysis An open, prospective, single-centre phase I extension study. The six patients with progressive MS who participated in the ‘SIAMMS’ study will be invited to undergo repeat bone marrow harvest and receive an intravenous infusion of autologous, unfractionated bone marrow as a day-case procedure. The primary outcome measure is the number of adverse events, and secondary outcome measures will include change in clinical rating scales of disability, GEP and cranial MRI. Ethics and dissemination The study has UK National Research Ethics Committee approval (13/SW/0255). Study results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT01932593. PMID:26363342

  4. A remote drip infusion monitoring system employing Bluetooth.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hikaru; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Maki, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Sosuke; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Caldwell, W Morton

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a remote drip infusion monitoring system for use in hospitals. The system consists of several infusion monitoring devices and a central monitor. The infusion monitoring device employing a Bluetooth module can detect the drip infusion rate and an empty infusion solution bag, and then these data are sent to the central monitor placed at the nurses' station via the Bluetooth. The central monitor receives the data from several infusion monitoring devices and then displays graphically them. Therefore, the developed system can monitor intensively the drip infusion situation of the several patients at the nurses' station.

  5. A short course of infusion of a hydrogen sulfide-donor attenuates endotoxemia induced organ injury via stimulation of anti-inflammatory pathways, with no additional protection from prolonged infusion.

    PubMed

    Aslami, Hamid; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; de Beer, Friso M; Kuipers, Maria T; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hegeman, Maria A; Van der Sluijs, Koen F; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2013-02-01

    Organ failure is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Previously, we showed that a short course of infusion of a hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) donor reduced metabolism with concurrent reduction of lung injury. Here, we hypothesize that prolonged H(2)S infusion is more protective than a short course in endotoxemia with organ failure. Also, as H(2)S has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects, we explored the effect of H(2)S on interleukin production. Endotoxemia was induced by an intravenous bolus injection of LPS (7.5mg/kg) in mechanically ventilated rats. H(2)S donor NaHS (2mg/kg) or vehicle (saline) was infused and organ injury was determined after either 4 or 8h. A short course of H(2)S infusion was associated with reduction of lung and kidney injury. Prolonged infusion did not enhance protection. Systemically, infusion of H(2)S increased both the pro-inflammatory response during endotoxemia, as demonstrated by increased TNF-α levels, as well as the anti-inflammatory response, as demonstrated by increased IL-10 levels. In LPS-stimulated whole blood of healthy volunteers, co-incubation with H(2)S had solely anti-inflammatory effects, resulting in decreased TNF-α levels and increased IL-10 levels. Co-incubation with a neutralizing IL-10 antibody partly abrogated the decrease in TNF-α levels. In conclusion, a short course of H(2)S infusion reduced organ injury during endotoxemia, at least in part via upregulation of IL-10. PMID:23267760

  6. Management of severely brittle diabetes by continuous subcutaneous and intramuscular insulin infusions: evidence for a defect in subcutaneous insulin absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, J C; Home, P D; Bilous, R W; Keen, H; Alberti, K G

    1981-01-01

    Severely brittle diabetes is defined as a rare subtype of insulin-dependent diabetes with wide, fast, unpredictable, and inexplicable swings in blood glucose concentration, often culminating in ketoacidosis or hypoglycaemic coma. To assess the role of inappropriate type, amount, or timing of insulin treatment and the route of administration as a cause of severe brittleness six patients with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, which provides a high degree of optimisation of dosage with exogenous insulin in stable diabetics. The glycaemic control achieved during continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion was compared with that during continuous intramuscular insulin infusion. Six patients with non-brittle diabetes were also treated by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. These patients achieved the expected improvement in glycaemic control (mean +/- SD plasma glucose concentration 5.1 +/- 2.3 mmol/l (92 +/- 41 mg/100 ml)), but not the patients with brittle diabetes remained uncontrolled with continuous subcutaneous infusion (13.6 +/- 5.8 mmol/1 (245 +/- 105 mg/100 ml) compared with 10.3 +/- 4.1 mmol/l (186 +/- 74 mg/100 ml) during treatment with optimised conventional subcutaneous injections). During continuous intramuscular infusion, however, glycaemic control in five of the patients with brittle diabetes was significantly improved (7.7 +/- 2.6 mmol/l (139 +/- 47 mg/100 ml). The remaining patient with brittle diabetes, previously safely controlled only with continuous intravenous insulin, did not respond to continuous intramuscular infusion. It is concluded that in five of the six patients with brittle diabetes studied here impaired or irregular absorption of insulin from the subcutaneous site played a more important part in their hyperlability than inappropriate injection strategies. This absorption defect was presumably bypassed by the intramuscular route. PMID:6780019

  7. Changes in regional plasma extravasation in rats following endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    van Lambalgen, A.A.; van den Bos, G.C.; Thijs, L.G.

    1987-07-01

    Regional differences in plasma extravasation during endotoxin shock in rats and a possible relationship with changes in regional blood flow were studied with radioactive isotopes (/sup 125/I-HSA, 51Cr-labeled red blood cells, microspheres) in anesthetized rats (pentobarbital). Shock was induced by intravenous infusion of endotoxin (Eschericia coli; 10 mg X kg-1) for 60 min (starting at t = 0); at t = 120 min, the experiments were terminated. These rats (n = 8) were compared with time-matched control rats (n = 8). A third group (rats killed 7.5 min after injection of /sup 125/I-HSA, i.e., no extravasation; n = 8) served as baseline. The amount of plasma extravasated in 2 hr of endotoxin shock was significantly increased over control values in skin (by 67%), colon (88%), skeletal muscle (105%), stomach (230%), pancreas (300%), and diaphragm (1300%). Losses of /sup 125/I-HSA into intestinal lumen and peritoneal cavity had also increased over control values by 146 and 380%, respectively. Blood flow was compromised in most organs except heart and diaphragm. Extravasation when normalized for total plasma supply was correlated with total blood supply; the more the blood supply decreased, the higher the normalized extravasation. In the diaphragm, however, blood supply and plasma leakage increased together. Decreased blood supply and plasma extravasation may be related but they could also be simultaneously occurring independent phenomena with a common origin.

  8. [Hemodynamic study of intravenous milrinone in 26 patients with NYHA class III or IV cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Boesch, C; Dubois-Rande, J L; Pochmalicki, G; Lellouche, D; Teiger, E; Saal, J P; Cachin, J C; Mallo, C; Castaigne, A; Jan, F

    1992-11-01

    The hemodynamic effects of milrinone (WIN 47203) were studied in 26 NYHA Class III or IV patients. The compound was administered intravenously using a protocol including an initial push dose of 50 micrograms/kg in 10 min, followed by a 24 hour infusion at the dose of 0.5 microgram/kg/min. Maximal response was obtained after 15 min and persisted during the infusion: cardiac index increased from 2.08 +/- 0.36 l/min/m2 to 3.09 +/- 0.68 l/min/m2, while capillary pressure fell from 25 mmHg to 16-17 mmHg. These variations were significant (p = 0.01). Heart rate was stable. Mean peripheral blood pressure fell modestly (6%). Systemic vascular resistance fell by 30% and pulmonary vascular resistance by 20%. All these results confirmed the beneficial effect of this inotropic agent administered intravenously. The increase in ventricular premature contractions noted by many justifies the careful surveillance of these patients by monitoring.

  9. Cocaine self-administration punished by intravenous histamine in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Nathan A.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a transitional phase marked by a heightened vulnerability to substances of abuse. It has been hypothesized that both increased sensitivity to reward and decreased sensitivity to aversive events may drive drug-use liability during this phase. To investigate possible age-related differences in sensitivity to the aversive consequences of drug use, adolescent and adult rats were compared on self-administration of cocaine before, during, and after a 10-day period in which an aversive agent, histamine, was added to the cocaine solution. Adult and adolescent female rats were trained to self-administer intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) over 10 sessions (2 h/session; 2 sessions/day). Histamine (4 mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution for the next 10 sessions. Finally, the cocaine/histamine solution was replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and rats continued to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) for 20 sessions. Compared with adolescent rats, adult rats showed a greater decrease in cocaine self-administration when it was punished with intravenous histamine compared with their baseline cocaine self-administration rates. These results suggest that differences in the sensitivity to negative consequences of drug use may partially explain developmental differences in drug use vulnerability. PMID:25769092

  10. Treatment of acute intravascular thrombi with diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Lof, John; Everbach, Carr; He, Anming; Bennett, Richard M; Matsunaga, Terry; Johanning, Jason; Porter, Thomas R

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether high mechanical index (MI) impulses from diagnostic ultrasound (DUS) could dissolve intravascular thrombi using intravenous microbubbles. Using a canine model, DUS was applied during a continuous intravenous infusion of microbubbles. Completely thrombosed grafts were assigned to 2 treatment regimens: low-MI (<0.5-MI) ultrasound alone; or intermittent high-MI impulses (1.9-MI) guided by low-MI ultrasound (contrast pulse sequencing). A 20-MHz cavitation detector was placed confocal to the ultrasound transducer to make intravascular cavitation measurements in 1 dog. Intravascular cavitational activity was detected when an MI of >0.5 was applied. In grafts treated with intermittent high-MI ultrasound, angiographic success was 71% at 30 min and 79% at 45 min, compared with 20% and 30% at these times in the low-MI ultrasound alone group (p < 0.05). We conclude that a commercially available DUS transducer can successfully recanalize acute intravascular thrombi during a continuous microbubble infusion. PMID:19580735

  11. Acute arsenic poisoning treated by intravenous dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and combined extrarenal epuration techniques.

    PubMed

    Hantson, Philippe; Haufroid, Vincent; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Mahieu, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic poisoning was diagnosed in a 26-year-old man who had been criminally intoxicated over the last two weeks preceding admission by the surreptitious oral administration of probably 10 g of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The patient developed severe manifestations of toxic hepatitis and pancreatitis, and thereafter neurological disorders, respiratory distress, acute renal failure, and cardiovascular disturbances. In addition to supportive therapy, extrarenal elimination techniques and chelating agents were used. Dimercaprol (BAL) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA or succimer) were used simultaneously as arsenic chelating agents for two days, and thereafter DMSA was used alone. DMSA was administered by intravenous (20 mg/kg/d for five days, then 10 mg/kg/d for six days) and intraperitoneal route. Intravenous DMSA infusion was well tolerated and resulted in an increase in arsenic blood concentration immediately after the infusion. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration combined with hemodialysis, and peritoneal dialysis were proposed to enhance arsenic elimination. It was calculated that over an 11-day period 14.5 mg arsenic were eliminated by the urine, 26.7 mg by hemodialysis, 17.8 mg by peritoneal dialysis, and 7.8 mg by continuous venovenous hemofiltration. These amounts appeared negligible with regard to the probable ingested dose. The patient died on day 26 from the consequences of multiple organ failure, with subarachnoid hemorrhage and generalized infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus.

  12. Cocaine self-administration punished by intravenous histamine in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2015-06-01

    Adolescence is a transitional phase marked by a heightened vulnerability to substances of abuse. It has been hypothesized that both increased sensitivity to reward and decreased sensitivity to aversive events may drive drug-use liability during this phase. To investigate possible age-related differences in sensitivity to the aversive consequences of drug use, adolescent and adult rats were compared on self-administration of cocaine before, during, and after a 10-day period in which an aversive agent, histamine, was added to the cocaine solution. Adult and adolescent female rats were trained to self-administer intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) over 10 sessions (2 h/session; 2 sessions/day). Histamine (4 mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution for the next 10 sessions. Finally, the cocaine/histamine solution was replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and rats continued to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) for 20 sessions. Compared with adolescent rats, adult rats showed a greater decrease in cocaine self-administration when it was punished with intravenous histamine compared with their baseline cocaine self-administration rates. These results suggest that differences in the sensitivity to negative consequences of drug use may partially explain developmental differences in drug use vulnerability.

  13. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose. PMID:25162093

  14. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose.

  15. The effect of intravenous magnesium hypophosphite in calcium borogluconate solution on the serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus in healthy cows.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Jehle, W

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of intravenous (IV) administration of phosphite on the serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus in cows. Twelve clinically healthy cows were divided into four groups of three. All cows received 600 mL of a 40% calcium borogluconate solution; three cows each received this as a rapid (20 min) IV infusion with and without 6% magnesium hypophosphite, and three other cows each received this as a slow IV infusion (8 h) with and without 6% magnesium hypophosphite. Samples of blood were collected for the determination of serum concentrations of calcium, inorganic phosphorus and magnesium before and 10, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min and 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h after the start of treatment. The concentration of calcium increased after treatment in all cows but the increase was most rapid in cows that received the rapid infusion. In cows that received the rapid IV infusion containing magnesium hypophosphite, the mean concentration of inorganic phosphorus decreased significantly 3-4 h after treatment compared with initial serum levels. The serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus did not change significantly in cows that received the rapid IV solution without magnesium hypophosphite or the slow IV infusion with or without magnesium hypophosphite. The serum concentration of magnesium increased after treatment in all cows receiving magnesium hypophosphite but remained unchanged in the others. The rapid infusion of calcium borogluconate without magnesium hypophosphite made all three cows anorexic and hypercalcaemic and the slow infusion made 1/3 anorexic. It is concluded that the IV administration of a calcium solution containing magnesium hypophosphite does not increase the serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus.

  16. Maji: A New Tool to Prevent Overhydration of Children Receiving Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kamal; Skerrett, Erica; Nojoomi, Matthew; Walker, Thor; Maynard, Kelley; Pan, Michael; Flynn, Bailey; Yuan, Melissa; Horton, Paige; Vaughn, Taylor; Miros, Robert; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Saterbak, Ann; Oden, Z Maria; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    We designed and evaluated the accuracy and usability of a device to regulate the volume of fluid dispensed during intravenous drip therapy. The mechanical system was developed in response to a pressing need articulated by clinicians in pediatric wards throughout sub-Saharan Africa, who require a tool to prevent overhydration in children receiving intravenous fluid in settings that lack burettes or electronic infusion pumps. The device is compatible with most intravenous bags and limits the volume dispensed to a preset amount that can be adjusted in 50 mL increments. Laboratory accuracy over a range of clinically-relevant flow rates, initial bag volumes, and target volumes was within 12.0 mL of the target volume. The ease of use is “excellent,” with a mean system usability score of 84.4 out of 100. Use of the device limits the volume of fluid dispensed during intravenous therapy and could potentially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with overhydration in children receiving intravenous therapy. PMID:25732685

  17. Haemodynamic interactions of medetomidine and the peripheral alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 during step infusions in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Johanna; del Castillo, Jérôme R E; Salla, Kati; Troncy, Eric; Raekallio, Marja R; Vainio, Outi M

    2014-11-01

    The haemodynamic interactions of a step infusion with medetomidine (MED) and the peripherally acting alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 (MK) were compared with MED infused alone in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs. Eight purposely-bred Beagles were used in a randomised crossover study. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol intravenously (IV) and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Dogs received 1.25 µg/kg MED as a 1 min loading dose IV, along with a step-down MED infusion at rates of 8.0 µg/kg/h (step 1: 0-20 min), 5.5 µg/kg/h (step 2: 20-40 min) and 4.0 µg/kg/h (step 3: 40-95 min). Five minutes after starting the MED infusion, the dogs received MK-467 in a step-up infusion at rates of 100 µg/kg/h (step 1: 5-35 min), 200 µg/kg/h (step 2: 35-65 min) and 500 µg/kg/h (step 3: 65-95 min). Heart rate (HR), systolic (SAP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressures and arteriovenous oxygen content differences (a-vO2 diff) were calculated. Plasma drug concentrations were analysed. Repeated-measures general linear mixed models with Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analyses. MED infusion alone increased SAP maximally by 24.9%, MAP by 34.7% and a-vO2 diff by 222.5%, and reduced HR by 32.3%, but these changes were significantly attenuated by MK-467. Most MED effects returned to baseline during step 2 of MK-467 infusion and step 3 of MED infusion (MED/MK-467 ratio 1:18 to 1:50). Plasma concentrations of MED tended to be lower with the addition of MK-467. The use of step infusions helped to narrow down the therapeutic range for the MED/MK-467 infusion dose ratio during isoflurane anaesthesia in dogs.

  18. Recovery of fibrinogen concentrate after intraosseous application is equivalent to the intravenous route in a porcine model of hemodilution

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Solomon, Cristina; Keibl, Claudia; Zipperle, Johannes; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Öhlinger, Wolfgang; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly considered as a hemostatic agent for trauma patients experiencing bleeding. Placing a venous access is sometimes challenging during severe hemorrhage. Intraosseous access may be considered instead. Studies of intraosseous infusion of coagulation factor concentrates are limited. We investigated in vivo recovery following intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate and compared the results with intravenous administration. METHODS This study was performed on 12 pigs (mean [SD] body weight, 34.1 [2.8] kg). Following controlled blood loss (35 mL/kg) and fluid replacement with balanced crystalloid solution, intraosseous (n = 6) administration of fibrinogen concentrate (80 mg per kilogram of bodyweight) in the proximal tibia was compared with intravenous (n = 6) administration of the same dose (fibrinogen infusion time approximately 5 minutes in both groups). The following laboratory parameters were assessed: blood cell count, prothrombin time index, activated partial thromboplastin time, and plasma fibrinogen concentration (Clauss assay). Coagulation status was also assessed by thromboelastometry. RESULTS All tested laboratory parameters were comparable between the intraosseous and intravenous groups at baseline, hemodilution, and 30 minutes after fibrinogen concentrate administration. In vivo recovery of fibrinogen was also similar in the two groups (89% [23%] and 91% [22%], respectively). There were no significant between-group differences in any of the thromboelastometric parameters. Histologic examination indicated no adverse effects on the tissue surrounding the intraosseous administration site. CONCLUSION This study suggests that intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate results in a recovery of fibrinogen similar to that of intravenous administration. The intraosseous route of fibrinogen concentrate could be a valuable alternative in situations where intravenous access is not feasible or would

  19. Computer-assisted continuous infusions of fentanyl during cardiac anesthesia: comparison with a manual method.

    PubMed

    Alvis, J M; Reves, J G; Govier, A V; Menkhaus, P G; Henling, C E; Spain, J A; Bradley, E

    1985-07-01

    The design and implementation of a computer-assisted continuous infusion (CACI) system to rapidly attain and maintain a constant plasma fentanyl concentration (PFC), as well as a CACI system that allowed the anesthesiologist to change the plasma level of fentanyl during cardiac anesthesia, were developed. In 30 patients (three groups of 10 patients each) these two automated methods of fentanyl infusion were compared with a manual fentanyl administration method. There was excellent agreement in the measured/predicted PFC ratios with the CACI stable fentanyl level system (ratio = 0.99, n = 91) and in the CACI variable fentanyl level system (ratio = 1.08, n = 79). The stable fentanyl level group of patients received significantly more (P less than 0.05) fentanyl than did the other groups. The CACI variable fentanyl level group of patients had greater hemodynamic stability, required significantly (P less than 0.05) fewer adjuvant drug interventions and experienced significantly (P less than 0.05) fewer hypotensive and hypertensive episodes than the manual, bolus fentanyl (control) group. These data show that a computer-assisted automated infusion of fentanyl is safe and as good as manual methods. CACI has greater potential as a new method of intravenous anesthesia administration. PMID:3874568

  20. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases microvascular blood flow and macromolecular escape during renin infusion in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Boric, M.P.; Albertini, R. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) on microvascular hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity were studied in the hamster cheek pouch under resting conditions and during intravenous renin infusion. Fluorescent intravital microscopy was used to observe arteriolar diameters and to detect escape of fluorescent dextran of 150 K-Daltons (FITC-Dx-150). Microvascular plasma flow was estimated by clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and net macromolecular transport by clearance of FITC-Dx-150. At rest, topical ANP (2-250 ng/ml) had no effect on arteriolar diameter, 51Cr-EDTA clearance, relative vascular conductance (RVC) or FITC-Dx-150 clearance. Infusion of renin (10 mU/Kg/Hr, iv) elevated systemic arterial pressure by 30% and reduced cheek pouch RVC by 26%. During renin infusion, topical ANP (50 ng/ml) produced transient arteriolar vasodilation, and increased 51Cr-EDTA clearance (+35%), RVC (+58%) and FITC-Dx-150 clearance (+54%), without affecting systemic pressure. ANP did not induce venular leakage sites under any condition, but changes in FITC-Dx-150 clearance were highly correlated with changes in 51Cr-EDTA clearance, suggesting that the larger macromolecular escape was due to increases in microvascular blood flow and capillary/post-capillary hydrostatic pressure.

  1. Continuous versus intermittent infusion of vancomycin in adult patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jing-Jing; Chen, Han; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Continuous infusion of vancomycin (CIV) and intermittent infusion of vancomycin (IIV) are two major administration strategies in clinical settings. However, previous articles comparing the efficacy and safety of CIV versus IIV showed inconsistent results. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of CIV and IIV. PubMed, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science up to June 2015 were searched using the keywords 'vancomycin', 'intravenous', 'parenteral', 'continuous', 'intermittent', 'discontinuous', 'infusion', 'administration' and 'dosing'. Eleven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Neither heterogeneity nor publication bias were observed. Patients treated with CIV had a significantly lower incidence of nephrotoxicity compared with patients receiving IIV [risk ratio (RR)=0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47-0.80; P<0.001]. No significant difference in treatment failure between the two groups was detected. Mortality between patients receiving CIV and patients receiving IIV was similar (RR=1.15, 95% CI 0.85-1.54; P=0.365). This meta-analysis showed that CIV had superior safety compared with IIV, whilst the clinical efficacy was not significantly different. A further multicentre, randomised controlled trial is required to confirm these results.

  2. Case Reports Showing a Long-Term Effect of Subanesthetic Ketamine Infusion in Reducing l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Scott J; Estevez, Miguel; Magill, Ari B; Falk, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is an FDA-approved drug with a known safety profile. Low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment has led to long-term reduction of treatment-resistant depression and of chronic pain states. We report on low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients by 5 case studies and show a long-lasting therapeutic benefit to reduce l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), improve on time, and reduce depression. Based on the literature we hypothesize that low-dose ketamine may act as a 'chemical deep brain stimulation', by desynchronizing hypersynchronous oscillatory brain activity, including in the basal ganglia and the motor cortex. The presented PD case reports indicate tolerability, safety and long-term beneficial effects of low-dose ketamine infusion that should be further investigated in a properly controlled prospective clinical trial for treatment of LID, as well as the prevalent nonmotor features pain and depression in PD patients. PMID:27293405

  3. Selective dopamine-1 agonist therapy in severe hypertension: effects of intravenous fenoldopam.

    PubMed

    White, W B; Radford, M J; Gonzalez, F M; Weed, S G; McCabe, E J; Katz, A M

    1988-05-01

    To determine the effects of dopamine-1 agonist therapy in severe hypertension, blood pressure, heart rate, catecholamines and left ventricular function were studied in 18 patients (10 with renal disease) with diastolic blood pressure greater than 120 mm Hg (range 124 to 160) after intravenous fenoldopam therapy. Constant infusions of fenoldopam were titrated upward every 10 to 20 min from an initial dose of 0.1 microgram/kg per min to a maximal dose of 0.9 microgram/kg per min. The therapeutic goal of a supine diastolic blood pressure of less than 110 mm Hg was achieved in every patient within 1 h at an average dose of 0.34 +/- 0.22 microgram/kg per min. Blood pressure decreased from 214/134 +/- 33/10 mm Hg at baseline to 170/96 +/- 29/7 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001) at 3 h, whereas heart rate increased from 77 +/- 23 to 88 +/- 21 beats/min (p less than 0.01). Plasma norepinephrine increased during the fenoldopam infusion; epinephrine and dopamine levels did not change. Two indexes of left ventricular function (end-systolic dimension and isovolumic relaxation time) improved during the fenoldopam infusion, but mitral flow velocities during ventricular filling were unchanged. Side effects of intravenous fenoldopam were mild, transient and associated with the marked vasodilatory properties of the drug. Thus, fenoldopam is safe and effective as a parenteral monotherapy in patients with severe essential and renovascular hypertension. Preliminary data suggest that blood pressure reduction with selective dopamine-1 agonist therapy is accompanied by improved left ventricular function. PMID:2895780

  4. Acquired appetitive responding to intravenous nicotine reflects a Pavlovian conditioned association

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Bevins, Rick A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research examining Pavlovian appetitive conditioning has extended the associative properties of nicotine from the unconditioned stimulus or reward to include the role of a conditional stimulus (CS), capable of acquiring the ability to evoke a conditioned response. To date, published research has used pre-session extravascular injections to examine nicotine as a contextual CS in that appetitive Pavlovian drug discrimination task. Two studies in the current research examined whether a nicotine CS can function discretely, multiple times within a session using passive intravenous infusions. In Experiment 1, rats readily acquired a discrimination in conditioned responding between nicotine and saline infusions when nicotine was selectively paired with sucrose presentations. In Experiment 2, rats were either trained with nicotine paired with sucrose or explicitly unpaired with sucrose. The results showed that rats trained with explicitly unpaired nicotine and sucrose did not increase dipper entries after the infusions. Nicotine was required to be reliably paired with sucrose for control of conditioned responding to develop. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to tobacco addiction, learning theory, and pharmacology. PMID:19170434

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin preparations induce mild activation of neutrophils in vivo via triggering of macrophages--studies in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; Bleeker, W K; Rigter, G M; van Rooijen, N; Kuijpers, T W; Hack, C E

    2001-03-01

    Despite widespread use in various immune disorders, the in vivo mechanisms of action of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations are not well known. We previously reported that human neutrophils degranulate after incubation with IVIG in vitro as a result of interaction with FcgammaRII. The purpose of this study was to determine whether IVIG might stimulate neutrophils in vivo. Anaesthetized rats received a bolus intravenous injection of IVIG preparations, containing either high (aged IVIG) or low (fresh IVIG) amounts or IgG dimers at a dose of 250 mg/kg. Administration of aged IVIG induced neutrophil activation in vivo, whereas no effect was observed after infusion of fresh IVIG. Histological examination of lung tissue demonstrated mild influx of neutrophils into the pulmonary tissue after aged IVIG administration, though gross damage did not occur. Macrophage-depleted rats no longer showed activation of neutrophils after infusion of aged IVIG, suggesting that neutrophils become activated via an indirect macrophage dependent way. We conclude that IVIG induces a mild activation of neutrophils in vivo via triggering of macrophages depending on the amount of IgG dimers. For this reason, IVIG preparations with a high content of dimers may not always be as harmless as generally believed and may be responsible for some of the side-effects observed during IVIG infusions.

  6. Adenosine triphosphate infusion increases liver energy status in advanced lung cancer patients: an in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Leij-Halfwerk, Susanne; Agteresch, Hendrik J; Sijens, Paul E; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2002-02-01

    We recently observed inhibition of weight loss in patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer after intravenous infusion of ATP. Because liver ATP levels were found to be decreased in lung cancer patients with weight loss, the present 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study was aimed at investigating whether ATP infusion restores liver energy status in these patients. Nine patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (stage IIIB/IV) were studied 1 week before (baseline) and at 22 to 24 hours of continuous ATP infusion (37-75 microg/kg/min). Localized hepatic 31P MR spectra (repetition time 15 seconds), obtained in the overnight-fasted state, were analyzed for ATP and P(i) content. Ten healthy subjects (without ATP infusion) served as control. Liver ATP levels in lung cancer patients increased from 8.8 +/- 0.7% (relative to total MR-detectable phosphate; mean +/- SE) at baseline to 12.2 +/- 0.9% during ATP infusion (P <.05), i.e., a level similar to that in healthy subjects (11.9 +/- 0.9%). The increase in ATP level during ATP infusion was most prominent in patients with > or = 5% weight loss (baseline: 7.9 +/- 0.7%, during ATP infusion: 12.8 +/- 1.0%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, ATP infusion restores hepatic energy levels in patients with advanced lung cancer, especially in weight-losing patients. These changes may contribute to the previously reported beneficial effects of ATP infusion on the nutritional status of lung cancer patients. PMID:11826418

  7. The effect of preoperative intravenous paracetamol administration on postoperative fever in pediatrics cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Mohammad-Hasan; Foruzan-nia, Khalil; Behjati, Mostafa; Bagheri, Babak; Khanbabayi-Gol, Mehdi; Dareshiri, Shahla; Pishgahi, Alireza; Zarezadeh, Rafie; Lotfi-Naghsh, Nazgol; Lotfi-Naghsh, Ainaz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-operative fever is a common complication of cardiac operations, which is known to be correlated with a greater degree of cognitive dysfunction 6 weeks after cardiac surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine efficacy and safety of single dose intravenous Paracetamol in treatment of post-operative fever in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 80 children, aged 1-12 years, presenting for open heart surgery were entered in the trial and randomly allocated into two groups: Placebo and Paracetamol. After induction of anaesthesia, 15 mg/kg intravenous Paracetamol solution was infused during 1 h in the Paracetamol group. Patients in placebo group received 15 mg/kg normal saline infusion during the same time. Since the end of operation until next 24 h in intensive care unit, axillary temperature of the two group patients was recorded in 4-h intervals. Any fever that occurred during this period had been treated with Paracetamol suppository (125 mg) and the amount of antipyretic drug consumption for each patient had been recorded. In order to examine the safety of Paracetamol, patients were evaluated for drug complication at the same time. Results: Mean axillary temperature during first 24 h after operation was significantly lower in Paracetamol group compared with placebo group (P = 0.001). Overall fever incidence during 24 h after operation was higher in placebo group compared with Paracetamol group (P = 0.012). Of Paracetamol group patients, 42.5% compared with 15% of placebo group participants had no consumption of antipyretic agent (Paracetamol suppository) during 24 h after operation (P = 0.001). Conclusion: This study suggests that single dose administration of intravenous Paracetamol before paediatric cardiac surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass; reduce mean body temperature in the first 24 h after operation. PMID:25298601

  8. Changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion assessed by quantitative intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, S; Muro, T; Hozumi, T; Watanabe, H; Shimada, K; Yoshiyama, M; Takeuchi, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clarify whether changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion under significant coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by quantitative intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in humans. Methods: 31 patients underwent dipyridamole stress MCE and quantitative coronary angiography. Intravenous MCE was performed by continuous infusion of Levovist. Images were obtained from the apical four chamber view with alternating pulsing intervals both at rest and after dipyridamole infusion. Images were analysed offline by placing regions of interest over both endocardial and epicardial sides of the mid-septum. The background subtracted intensity versus pulsing interval plots were fitted to an exponential function, y = A (1 − e−βt), where A is plateau level and β is rate of rise. Results: Of the 31 patients, 16 had significant stenosis (> 70%) in the left anterior descending artery (group A) and 15 did not (group B). At rest, there were no differences in the A endocardial to epicardial ratio (A-EER) and β-EER between the two groups (mean (SD) 1.2 (0.6) v 1.2 (0.8) and 1.2 (0.7) v 1.1 (0.6), respectively, NS). During hyperaemia, β-EER in group A was significantly lower than that in group B (1.0 (0.5) v 1.4 (0.5), p < 0.05) and A-EER did not differ between the two groups (1.0 (0.5) v 1.2 (0.4), NS). Conclusions: Changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion under significant coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by quantitative intravenous MCE in humans. PMID:12231594

  9. Plasma disposition of enrofloxacin following intravenous and intramuscular administration in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Sekkin, S; Gokbulut, C; Kum, C; Karademir, U

    2012-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the plasma disposition and systemic availability of enrofloxacin (ENR) following intramuscular and intravenous administrations. Six donkeys (Equus asinus) were used in this study. The animals were allocated into two groups (intramuscular and intravenous groups). After a 2-week washout period, the experiment was repeated with the groups reversed according to a two-phase crossover design. In phase I, group I received intravenously the commercially available injectable solution of ENR at the dose of 5 mg/kg and group II received intramuscularly the same ENR formulation at the same dose rate. Blood samples were collected 1 hour prior to drug administration and various times between 5 minutes and 48 hours post-treatments. The samples were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector. The half-life and mean residence time of ENR (12.08 hours and 17.85 hours) after intramuscular route were significantly longer compared with intravenous administration (9.54 hours and 7.46 hours, respectively) and these were associated with a flip-flop phenomenon. A marked proportion of ENR (20-21 per cent) was metabolised to ciprofloxacin (CPR) following both administration routes and the half-life of CPR paralleled that of the parent drug after intramuscular administration. Mean absorption time was relatively long (10.39 hours), and the bioavailability of ENR was 76.56 per cent after intramuscular route in the donkeys. The plasma concentration is lower after intramuscular administration at a dose rate of 5 mg/kg, and may need a higher dose to provide sufficient plasma concentration in donkeys compared with horses.

  10. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  11. Efficacy of Intravenous Lidocaine During Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Choi, Jong Bum; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Jeong, Hae Won; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, So Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced therapy for early gastric neoplasm and requires sedation with adequate analgesia. Lidocaine is a short-acting local anesthetic, and intravenous lidocaine has been shown to have analgesic efficacy in surgical settings. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of intravenous lidocaine on analgesic and sedative requirements for ESD and pain after ESD. Sixty-six patients scheduled for ESD randomly received either intravenous lidocaine as a bolus of 1.5 mg/kg before sedation, followed by continuous infusion at a rate of 2 mg/kg/h during sedation (lidocaine group; n = 33) or the same bolus and infusion volumes of normal saline (control group; n = 33). Sedation was achieved with propofol and fentanyl. The primary outcome was fentanyl requirement during ESD. We recorded hemodynamics and any events during ESD and evaluated post-ESD epigastric and throat pain. Fentanyl requirement during ESD reduced by 24% in the lidocaine group compared with the control group (105 ± 28 vs. 138 ± 37 μg, mean ± SD; P < 0.001). The lidocaine group reached sedation faster [40 (20–100) vs. 55 (30–120) s, median (range); P = 0.001], and incidence of patient movement during ESD decreased in the lidocaine group (3% vs. 26%, P = 0.026). Numerical rating scale for epigastric pain was significantly lower at 6 hours after ESD [2 (0–6) vs. 3 (0–8), median (range); P = 0.023] and incidence of throat pain was significantly lower in the lidocaine group (27% vs. 65%, P = 0.003). No adverse events associated with lidocaine were discovered. Administration of intravenous lidocaine reduced fentanyl requirement and decreased patient movement during ESD. Moreover, it alleviated epigastric and throat pain after ESD. Thus, we conclude that the use of intravenous adjuvant lidocaine is a new and safe sedative method during ESD. PMID:27149489

  12. Intravenous Oxycodone, Hydrocodone and Morphine in Recreational Opioid Users: Abuse Potential and Relative Potencies

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Hatton, Kevin W.; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Nonmedical use and abuse of prescription opioids is an increasing public health problem. Intravenous (IV) administration of opioid analgesics intended for oral use is not uncommon, yet little is known about the relative abuse potential of these drugs when administered intravenously to recreational opioid abusers without physical dependence. Methods This inpatient study employed a double-blind, randomized, within-subject, placebo-controlled design to examine the relative abuse potential of IV doses of oxycodone, hydrocodone and morphine. Nine healthy adult participants reporting recreational opioid use and histories of IV opioid use completed 11 experimental sessions, including one active-dose practice session. IV doses were infused over 5-min and included three identical doses of each opioid (5, 10 and 20 mg/10 ml) and saline placebo. Physiological, subjective and performance effects were collected before and for 6 h after drug administration. Results All three opioids produced prototypical mu agonist effects (e.g., miosis; increased ratings of liking) that were generally dose-related. Pharmacodynamic effects were observed within 5 min of IV administration. Physiological effects were more prolonged than subjective effects for all three drugs. While the magnitude of effects was generally comparable across drugs and qualitatively similar, valid potency assays indicated the following potency relationship: oxycodone > morphine > hydrocodone. Conclusions There were modest potency differences between oxycodone, hydrocodone and morphine, but their overall profile of effects was similar, indicating significant abuse potential when administered intravenously. PMID:20665209

  13. Chemical and physical compatibility of an intravenous solution of epinephrine with calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Phillip A; Teng, Yang; Wu, Lei; Sun, Mary; Yang, Zhen; Chow, Diana S-L

    2014-01-01

    An infusion of epinephrine combined with calcium chloride has been used historically as an intravenous inotropic solution to support critically ill heart failure patients with severe cardiogenic shock. There is no reliable data on the stability of this solution beyond three hours. This study was conducted to evaluate the chemical and physical compatibility of epinephrine (0.032 mg/mL) combined with calcium chloride (4 mg/mL) in a solution for intravenous administration up to 26 hours at room temperature. The chemical stability of epinephrine was monitored by measuring epinephrine concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. The physical compatibility of the mixture was determined by measuring spectrophotometric absorbance between 400 to 700 nm. Absorbance greater than 0.010 AU was considered an indicator of the presence of precipitation. The results showed epinephrine with calcium chloride was stable together in normal saline up to 26 hours at room temperature, irrespective of exposure to light. The absorbance of epinephrine throughout the study was less than 0.010 AU, indicating no significant precipitation. Conclusions indicate that epinephrine (0.032 mg/mL) combined with calcium chloride (4 mg/mL) in normal saline at room temperature is acceptably stable up to 26 hours for intravenous administration.

  14. Intravenous injections of cobalt reduce fatty acid desaturation products in milk and blood of lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Taugbøl, O; Karlengen, I J; Salbu, B; Aastveit, A H; Harstad, O M

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether intravenous infusion of Co affects levels of fatty acid desaturation products in bovine milk. Six cows were assigned to two replicated 3 × 3 Latin squares with 14-day periods. Treatment occurred on days 1 to 5 and depuration occurred on days 6-14. Two treatments were tested, the first consisting of per os supplementation of 3.5 g Co daily in the form of Co acetate and the second consisting of intravenous injection of 175 mg Co daily in the form of Co acetate diluted in saline solution. The third treatment was a control. Both Co treatments decreased cis-9 18:1 levels from approximately 18 to 14 g/100 g fatty acids, and increased 18:0 levels from 11 to 17 g/100 g fatty acids in milk fat (p < 0.001). The proportions of cis-9 10:1, cis-9 12:1, cis-9 14:1, cis-9 16:1 and cis-9 17:1 decreased (p < 0.001), whereas 17:0 and trans-11 18:1 increased (p < 0.001). In blood plasma, levels of cis (6,9,12) 18:3 (p < 0.001) and cis (8,11,14,17) 20:4 (p = 0.008) decreased after both the Co treatments. It is concluded that intravenous supply of Co reduces levels of fatty acid desaturation products in both bovine milk and blood.

  15. Infusion site adverse events in breast cancer patients receiving highly emetic chemotherapy with prophylactic anti-emetic treatment with aprepitant and fosaprepitant: A retrospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    TSUDA, TAKASHI; KYOMORI, CHISATO; MIZUKAMI, TAKURO; TANIYAMA, TOMOKO; IZAWA, NAOKI; HORIE, YOSHIKI; HIRAKAWA, MAMI; OGURA, TAKASHI; NAKAJIMA, TAKAKO EGUCHI; TSUGAWA, KOICHIRO; BOKU, NARIKAZU

    2016-01-01

    The incidences of infusion site adverse events in chemotherapy regimens, including anthracyclines with either fosaprepitant or aprepitant as the anti-emetic, were not highlighted in the randomized trial comparing aprepitant and fosaprepitant. The present retrospective analysis was performed in breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy, a combination of epirubicin and cyclophosphamide with or without 5-fluorouracil as the adjuvant or neoadjuvant, at the outpatient infusion center of St. Marianna University Hospital (Kawasaki, Japan). Infusion site adverse events were retrospectively compared between the 3 months prior to and three months following switching from 3 day oral administration of aprepitant to intravenous infusion of fosaprepitant. A total of 62 patients were included in the aprepitant group and 38 in the fosaprepitant group. Of these patients, 26 (42%) in the aprepitant group and 36 patients (96%) in the fosaprepitant group experienced any grade of infusion site adverse events at least once (P<0.001). As an anti-emetic treatment for chemotherapy using anthracyclines, fosaprepitant may be associated with a higher risk of infusion site adverse events compared with aprepitant. PMID:27073673

  16. Intravenous Paracetamol Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia With Morphine for the Pain Management Following Diagnostic Knee Arthroscopy in Trauma Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Esmaeelijah, Aliakbar; Golzari, Samad; Keyhani, Sohrab; Maserrat, Azita; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Ardehali, Seyed Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most patients undergoing outpatient surgeries have the unpleasant experience of high level pain after surgery. Compared with open surgeries, arthroscopic procedures are less painful; however, inadequate pain management could be associated with significant concerns. Opioids alone or in combination with local anesthetics are frequently used for diminishing postoperative pain using intravenous or epidural infusion pumps. Despite morphine various disadvantages, it is commonly used for controlling pain after surgery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare intravenous paracetamol and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine for the pain management following diagnostic knee arthroscopy in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: Sixty trauma patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroscopy were randomly divided into two groups. Patients immediately received intravenous infusion of 1 g paracetamol within 15 minutes after surgery and every 6 hours to 24 hours in the paracetamol group. The patient-controlled analgesia group received morphine through PCA infusion pump at 2 mL/h base rate and 1mL bolus every 15 minutes. Pain level, nausea and vomiting, and sedation were measured and recorded during entering the recovery, 15 and 30 minutes after entering the recovery, 2, 6, and 24 hours after starting morphine pump infusion in the morphine and paracetamol in the paracetamol groups. Results: There was no significant difference regarding the pain level at different times after entering the recovery between the two groups. No one from the paracetamol group developed drug complications. However, 22.3% in the PCA morphine suffered from postoperative nausea; there was a statistically significant difference regarding the sedation level, nausea, and vomiting at various times between the two groups. Conclusions: Intravenous administration of paracetamol immediately after knee arthroscopy improved postoperative pain, decreased analgesic administration

  17. The intraocular pressure-lowering properties of intravenous paracetamol

    PubMed Central

    van den Heever, Henning; Meyer, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this paper was to investigate the intraocular pressure (IOP)-changing properties of a single standard dose of intravenous (IV) paracetamol and compare it to that of topical timolol, oral acetazolamide, and no treatment. Methods A prospective, randomized, investigator-blind, parallel-group study was conducted in 73 eyes of 52 subjects. Subjects received a single dose of IV paracetamol (1 g), oral acetazolamide (250 mg), topical timolol (0.5%, one drop), or no treatment. Baseline IOP was measured, and the measurement was repeated at 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after treatment. Results Paracetamol reduced IOP from baseline by −10.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: −4.9% to −16.8%, P=0.146) at 1 hour, −13.3% (95% CI: −8.3% to −18.4%, P=0.045) at 2 hours, −11.8% (95% CI: −5.5% to −18.4%, P=1.000) at 4 hours, and −23.9% (95% CI: −17.8% to −30.1%, P=0.006) at 6 hours after treatment. In the no-treatment group, the change was −2.9% (95% CI: +1.0% to −6.7%, P= referent) at 1 hour, −2.1% (95% CI: +2.9% to −7.2%, P= referent) at 2 hours, −7.6% (95% CI: −3.9% to −11.2%, P= referent) at 4 hours, and −6.9% (95% CI: −3.6% to −10.2%, P= referent) at 6 hours. Acetazolamide reduced IOP by −18.8% (95% CI: −12.7% to −24.8%, P=0.000) at 1 hour, −26.2% (95% CI: −18.2% to −34.2%, P=0.001) at 2 hours, −24.6% (95% CI: −16.9% to −32.3%, P=0.000) after 4 hours, and −26.9% (95% CI: −19.6% to −34.3%, P=0.000) 6 hours after treatment. Timolol reduced IOP by −31.2% (95% CI: −26.7% to −35.7%, P=0.000) at 1 hour, −27.7% (95% CI: −20.7% to −34.8%, P=0.000) at 2 hours, −28.7% (95% CI: −21.1% to −36.2%, P=0.000) at 4 hours, and −21.3% (95% CI: −13.4% to −30.0%, P=0.030) at 6 hours after treatment. The average change in IOP for the no-treatment group was −4.8% (95% CI: −2.6% to −6.9%, P= referent). It was −15.7% (95% CI: −9.3% to −22.1%, P=0.021) for paracetamol, −23.1% (95% CI: −16.4% to

  18. [Intravenous drug users and the HIV epidemic].

    PubMed

    Skretting, A

    1992-06-10

    Data are taken from a study of 1,765 arrested intravenous drug users at the Oslo Central Police Station. Intravenous drug users in Oslo seem to get themselves tested for HIV regularly. In 1990-91 the average number of HIV-tests was 5.3, and the time since last test was, an average, between eight and nine months. Most intravenous drug users do not share needles and syringes. The most important source of needles and syringes in Oslo is an ambulant bus which can be found in city centre at night. HIV-seropositive drug users seem to have more regular contact with treatment programmes than those who are HIV-seronegative. Most of the HIV-seropositive drug users who are under treatment are to be found in a few institutions.

  19. 21 CFR 526.1590 - Novobiocin infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... strains of Staphylococcus aureus. (iii) Limitations. Do not milk for at least 6 hours after treatment... is used in dry cows for the treatment of mastitis caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. (iii) Limitations. Infuse each quarter at the time of drying...

  20. Infusing Catholic Identity throughout the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Amata

    2011-01-01

    This article, originally presented as a plenary address at the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities 2011 Annual Meeting, addresses a bottom-up methodology for infusing the spirit of Catholic identity more deeply throughout a campus community. The author begins with an exploration of some theoretical underpinnings of this approach and…

  1. Liquid infused surfaces in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Matthew; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang; Wang, Karen; Lee, Kevin; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow facility is used to measure the drag reduction capabilities and dynamic behavior of liquid-infused micro-patterned surfaces. Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushion-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The mobile liquid lubricant creates a surface slip with the outer turbulent shear flow as well as an energetic sink to dampen turbulent fluctuations. Micro-manufactured surfaces can be mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. Two configurations are possible, both capable of producing laminar and turbulent flows. The first configuration allows detailed investigation of the infused liquid layer and the other allows well resolved pressure gradient measurements. Both of the configurations have high aspect ratios 15-45:1. Drag reduction for a variety of liquid-infused surface architectures is quantified by measuring pressure drop in the channel. Flow in the oil film is simultaneously visualized using fluorescent dye. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  2. A Telecommunications-Infused Community Action Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Thomas; Puma, Jessica

    1996-01-01

    The Nonprofit Prophets, a telecommunications-infused community action project, was designed for high school students. Students were teamed with a nonprofit organization and produced videoconferences or Web sites for them. Although specific skills were acquired, students also gained confidence and self-esteem as well as a belief that they…

  3. The NASA SARP Software Research Infusion Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike; Pressburger, Tom; Markosian, Lawrence; Feather, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the NASA Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) research infusion projects is shown. The topics include: 1) Background/Motivation; 2) Proposal Solicitation Process; 3) Proposal Evaluation Process; 4) Overview of Some Projects to Date; and 5) Lessons Learned.

  4. Infusing interprofessional education into the nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Cranford, Joan Sistrunk; Bates, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Education for interprofessional collaboration should begin early in the nursing program with a gradual infusion of interprofessional competencies into the curriculum. The faculty developed an interprofessional education program for students in nursing, physical therapy, nutrition, and respiratory care, which focused on sharing knowledge about each discipline, developing respect and value for each other's disciplines, and emphasizing techniques to improve communication and teamwork.

  5. Continuous infusion of tracer norepinephrine may miscalculate unidirectional nerve uptake of norepinephrine in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, J.H.; Christensen, N.J.; Ring-Larsen, H. )

    1989-08-01

    In order to evaluate uptake kinetics of norepinephrine (NE) in different tissues, a catheterization study was performed in control subjects (n = 6) and patients with enhanced sympathetic nervous activity (cirrhosis, n = 12) during constant intravenous infusion of L(3H)norepinephrine ((3H)NE) for 75 minutes. In spite of a higher NE spillover from kidneys in patients compared with controls (82 vs. 49 ng/min, p less than 0.01), renal extraction ratios of (3H)NE were similar in the two groups (0.33 vs. 0.32, NS), and no significant change was observed during the time of infusion. In contrast, liver-intestine extraction ratios of (3H)NE decreased significantly and equally with infusion time in patients (from 0.57 to 0.44, p less than 0.01) and controls (from 0.59 to 0.46, p less than 0.01). This was observed despite the fact that spillover of NE from this vascular bed was observed only in patients with cirrhosis and not in controls (41 vs. -5 ng/min, p less than 0.02). In the lower limb, net release of NE was similar in patients and controls, and extraction ratios of (3H)NE decreased almost equally with infusion time (from 0.35 to 0.30, p less than 0.01 and from 0.40 to 0.24, p less than 0.1, respectively). Whole-body clearance of (3H)NE decreased over time in patients (-6%, p less than 0.01) and controls (-20%, p less than 0.01), but significant difference was not observed between the groups. We conclude that failure to attain a steady state with respect to (3H)NE removal was demonstrated in areas of large tissue volume relative to blood flow.

  6. Optimal Dose and Method of Administration of Intravenous Insulin in the Management of Emergency Hyperkalemia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Ziv; Kamel, Kamel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte disorder that can result in fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the importance of insulin as a lifesaving intervention in the treatment of hyperkalemia in an emergency setting, there is no consensus on the dose or the method (bolus or infusion) of its administration. Our aim was to review data in the literature to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of insulin in the management of emergency hyperkalemia. Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements We searched several databases from their date of inception through February 2015 for eligible articles published in any language. We included any study that reported on the use of insulin in the management of hyperkalemia. Results We identified eleven studies. In seven studies, 10 units of regular insulin was administered (bolus in five studies, infusion in two studies), in one study 12 units of regular insulin was infused over 30 minutes, and in three studies 20 units of regular insulin was infused over 60 minutes. The majority of included studies were biased. There was no statistically significant difference in mean decrease in serum potassium (K+) concentration at 60 minutes between studies in which insulin was administered as an infusion of 20 units over 60 minutes and studies in which 10 units of insulin was administered as a bolus (0.79±0.25 mmol/L versus 0.78±0.25 mmol/L, P = 0.98) or studies in which 10 units of insulin was administered as an infusion (0.79±0.25 mmol/L versus 0.39±0.09 mmol/L, P = 0.1). Almost one fifth of the study population experienced an episode of hypoglycemia. Conclusion The limited data available in the literature shows no statistically significant difference between the different regimens of insulin used to acutely lower serum K+ concentration. Accordingly, 10 units of short acting insulin given intravenously may be used in cases of hyperkalemia. Alternatively, 20 units of short acting insulin may be

  7. Intravenous dexmedetomidine versus propofol for intraoperative moderate sedation during spinal anesthesia: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pratibha Jain; Dubey, Kamta Prasad; Sahare, Kamal Kishore; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: There has been a paradigm shift of focus toward quality of spinal anesthesia with sedation being an integral aspect of this regional anesthesia technique. Thus, this study was designed to compare efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine and propofol for moderate sedation during spinal anesthesia. Material and Methods: A total of 120 patients of age group 18-60 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I & II, posted for surgeries under spinal anesthesia were randomly divided in to three groups (n = 40 each); Group D received infusion of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg over 10 min followed by maintenance infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h. Group P received infusion of propofol 6 mg/kg/h for 10 min followed by the infusion maintenance of 2.5 mg/kg/h. Group C (control group) received normal saline. Level of sedation (using observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score), pain intensity (by visual analogue scale), onset and recovery from sedation, hemodynamic changes, and overall patient's satisfaction were assessed. Results: The onset and recovery from sedation were significantly earlier with propofol (15.57 ± 1.89 min vs. 27.06 ± 2.26 min; P < 0.001) however intraoperative sedation (level 4), and overall patient's satisfaction was significantly better with dexmedetomidine group (p < 0.05). Duration of postoperative analgesia was significantly prolonged with dexmedetomidine (225.53 ± 5.61 min vs. 139.60 ± 3.03 min; P = 0.0013). Mean heart rate and blood pressure were significantly lower in the propofol group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine with its stable cardio-respiratory profile, better sedation, overall patient's satisfaction, and analgesia could be a valuable adjunct for intraoperative sedation during spinal anesthesia. PMID:27275058

  8. Pharmacokinetics of levosimendan and its circulating metabolites in patients with heart failure after an extended continuous infusion of levosimendan

    PubMed Central

    Antila, Saila; Kivikko, Matti; Lehtonen, Lasse; Eha, Jaan; Heikkilä, Aira; Pohjanjousi, Pasi; Pentikäinen, Pertti J

    2004-01-01

    Aims The purpose of the study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of levosimendan and its metabolites OR-1855 and OR-1896 in patients with congestive heart failure. Methods Levosimendan was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion for 7 days. Twelve subjects received the drug at an infusion rate of 0.05 µg kg−1 min−1 and 12 at a rate 0.1 µg kg−1 min−1. Results Steady state concentrations of levosimendan were achieved within 4 h. Peak concentrations of the metabolites occurred after termination of the infusion. The mean (± SD) half-life of the active metabolite OR-1896 was 81 ± 37 h after the lower dose and 81 ± 28 h after the higher dose (P = 0.992, 95% confidence interval on the difference −27.5, 27.7). Conclusions The metabolites of levosimendan, OR-1855 and OR-1896, were formed and eliminated slowly, their peak concentrations occurring after termination of the 7-day infusion of the drug. PMID:15025738

  9. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yagci, Cemil Ustuner, Evren Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Baltaci, Sumer; Uzun, Caglar Akyar, Serdar

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  10. Subcutaneous infusion in palliative care: a focus on the neria soft 90 infusion set.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Subcutaneous administration of medications and/or fluids can play a crucial part in supporting patients at home and thereby avoiding the need for hospitalisation. It is an area of patient care that has received little attention compared with other types of parenteral therapies. However, it is an effective and safe route for continuous administration for individuals requiring palliative care. Technological advancements have led to improved subcutaneous infusion devices, such as fine-gauge cannulae with integral sharps protection, as well as integral hypoallergenic dressings. These design features not only help to increase patient comfort but also minimise the potential for needlestick injuries, as well as providing the health professional with one sterile package containing all of the components needed to establish subcutaneous infusion. However, technological developments alone are insufficient to improve patient outcomes. Knowledge of the individual patient, together with their diagnosis and intended treatment, will influence the choice of subcutaneous infusion device, with the overall aim of minimising the potential for complications and improving comfort. This paper provides an overview of subcutaneous infusion, including the importance of patient assessment and the education and training needs of health professionals, and then focuses on one specific subcutaneous infusion device: the neria soft 90 infusion set. PMID:25426880

  11. Safety of compounded calcium chloride admixtures for peripheral intravenous administration in the setting of a calcium gluconate shortage.

    PubMed

    Anger, Kevin E; Belisle, Caryn; Colwell, Megan B; Dannemiller, Robert; Alawadhi, Burhan; Wilkocki, Alex; Szumita, Paul M

    2014-10-01

    Calcium gluconate is preferred over calcium chloride for intravenous (IV) repletion of calcium deficiencies in the inpatient setting. In the setting of a national shortage of IV calcium gluconate, our institution implemented a compounded calcium chloride admixture for IV administration. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the peripheral infusion site safety of compounded IV calcium chloride admixtures in adult inpatients. A total of 222 patients, encompassing 224 inpatient admissions, from April to June 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Sterile preparations of calcium chloride in 5% dextrose (600 mg/250 mL and 300 mg/100 mL) were used during the study time period. Adverse infusion site reactions were assessed using an institutional infiltration and phlebitis grading system. A total of 333 doses were administered peripherally. In all, 4 (1.8%) patients experienced a moderate to severe infusion site reaction, with 3 due to phlebitis and 1 due to infiltration. Naranjo Nomogram for Adverse Drug Reaction Assessment classified all 4 reactions to have a possible link to calcium chloride administration. Peripheral administration of compounded calcium chloride admixtures in 5% dextrose is associated with a low incidence of IV infusion site reactions and can be considered as an alternative in the event of a calcium gluconate shortage.

  12. [Ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor resected by video-assisted thoracic surgery with intraoperative methylene blue infusion; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Okagawa, Takehiko; Hiramatsu, Yoshinori

    2014-03-01

    We report a surgical case of ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor resected by video-assisted thoracic surgery with intraoperative methylene blue infusion. It is often difficult to detect ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor during the operation because the tumor is soft, small and buried under mediastinal tissue. After methylene blue 4 mg/kg intravenously administration, the tumor was gradually dyed blue and easily detected and resected by video-assisted thoracic surgery. It is useful of methylene blue for detection of ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor.

  13. Intermittent intraperitoneal infusion of peptide YY(3-36) reduces daily food intake and adiposity in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Chelikani, Prasanth K; Haver, Alvin C; Reidelberger, Roger D

    2007-07-01

    Peptide YY(3-36) [PYY(3-36)] is a gut-brain peptide that decreases food intake when administered by intravenous infusion to lean and obese humans and rats. However, chronic administration of PYY(3-36) by osmotic minipump to lean and obese rodents produces only a transient reduction in daily food intake and weight gain. It has recently been shown that 1-h intravenous infusions of PYY(3-36) every other hour for 10 days produced a sustained reduction in daily food intake, body weight, and adiposity in lean rats. Here, we determined whether intermittent delivery of PYY(3-36) can produce a similar response in diet-induced obese rats. During a 21-day period, obese rats (body fat >25%) received twice daily intraperitoneal infusion of vehicle (n = 18) or PYY(3-36) (n = 24) during hours 1-3 and 7-9 of the dark period. Rats had free access to both a 45% fat solid diet and a 29% fat liquid diet; intakes were determined from continuous computer recording of changes in food container weights. To sustain a 15-25% reduction in daily caloric intake, the initial PYY(3-36) dose of 30 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) was reduced to 10 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) on day 10 and then increased to 17 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) on day 13. This dosing strategy produced a sustained reduction in daily caloric intake of 11-32% and prevented body weight gain (8 +/- 6 vs. 51 +/- 11 g) and fat deposition (4.4 +/- 7.6 vs. 41.0 +/- 12.8 g). These results indicate that intermittent intraperitoneal infusion of PYY(3-36) can produce a sustained reduction in food intake and adiposity in diet-induced obese rodents consuming palatable high-fat foods.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers following intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Toublanc, Nathalie; Okagaki, Takuya; Boyce, Malcolm; Chan, Robert; Mugitani, Ayumi; Watanabe, Shikiko; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Yoshida, Katsumi; Andreas, Jens-Otto

    2015-12-01

    The intravenous (iv) formulation of levetiracetam has been available in clinical practice worldwide for several years, but not in Japan. Two open-label studies were conducted: Study A evaluated the bioequivalence of iv and oral tablet formulations in healthy Japanese volunteers; and Study B subsequently compared the pharmacokinetics of iv levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Study A had a randomised, two-way crossover design; a single 1,500 mg levetiracetam dose was administered as a 15-min iv infusion and as 3 × 500 mg oral tablets to Japanese volunteers. In Study B, 1,500 mg levetiracetam was administered as single and repeated 15-min iv infusions to Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Overall, 26/27 volunteers completed Study A and 32/32 (16 Japanese; 16 Caucasian) completed Study B. In Study A, the point estimate and 90 % confidence interval (CI) for the geometric least squares mean (LSM) ratio (iv vs oral) were fully included within the acceptance range for bioequivalence (0.85-1.25) for the area under plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to last quantifiable observation (AUClast 0.97 [0.95, 0.99]), but not for the maximum plasma concentration (C max 1.64 [1.47, 1.83]). In Study B, after a single iv infusion, the point estimates (90 % CI) for the geometric LSM ratio (Japanese vs Caucasian) for body weight-normalised C max and AUClast were 1.21 (1.07, 1.36) and 0.97 (0.90, 1.04), respectively. Corresponding values after repeated iv infusions were C max,ss 1.01 (0.91, 1.12) and AUCτ,ss 0.89 (0.83, 0.96). Levetiracetam was well tolerated in both studies. Study A did not demonstrate the bioequivalence of single doses of levetiracetam 1,500 mg administered as an iv infusion and as oral tablets in healthy Japanese adults. Study B, however, showed that pharmacokinetic profiles were generally similar between Japanese and Caucasian adults after single and repeated iv infusions of levetiracetam 1,500 mg.

  15. Technology Infusion and Higher Education: Changing Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John W.; Martineau, Leonard P.; Clark, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of technology infusion in higher education focuses on whether such infusion is necessary, on barriers to more rapid expansion of technology assisted learning (both organizational barriers and individual resistance), and on changes needed to speed infusion, including changes at the system level and those to be made by individual faculty.…

  16. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10706 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10706 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-12-576) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 75 FR 21641 - Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting regarding external infusion pumps... infusion pump use, to help the agency identify quality assurance strategies to mitigate these problems,...

  1. Career Education Infused into the Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Patricia; Griggs, Shirley A.

    Social studies teachers can help students develop self- and career awareness by infusing career education into the social studies curriculum. The infusion method of career education is preferred since it can make the content of lessons more relevant for students. In addition, infusion of career education is particularly appropriate in social…

  2. Crystalline-Like Keratopathy after Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy with Incomplete Kawasaki Disease: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kocabas, Emine; Taylan Sekeroglu, Hande; Özgür, Özlem; Yagmur, Meltem; Ersoz, T. Reha

    2013-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl had presented with high body temperature and joint pain which continued for 3 days. Because of the prolonged history of unexplained fever, rash, bilateral nonpurulent conjunctival injection, oropharyngeal erythema, strawberry tongue, and extreme of age, incomplete Kawasaki disease was considered and started on an intravenous immunoglobulin infusion. Six days after this treatment, patient was referred to eye clinic with decreased vision and photophobia. Visual acuity was reduced to 20/40 in both eyes. Slit-lamp examination revealed bilateral diffuse corneal punctate epitheliopathy and anterior stromal haze. Corneal epitheliopathy seemed like crystal deposits. One day after presentation, mild anterior uveitis was added to clinical picture. All ocular findings disappeared in one week with topical steroid and unpreserved artificial tear drops. We present a case who was diagnosed as incomplete Kawasaki disease along with bilateral diffuse crystalline-like keratopathy. We supposed that unusual ocular presentation may be associated with intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. PMID:23607016

  3. Health Instruction Packages: Venipuncture and Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, P. Allen, Jr.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nursing students in techniques for initiating intravenous (I.V.) therapy. The first module, "Selection of a Venipuncture Site: Arm" by P. Allen Gray, Jr., describes the utilization of a tourniquet in locating filled veins in the arm. The second module,…

  4. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  5. Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol (KMP-TIVA) in horses undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    UMAR, Mohammed Ahmed; FUKUI, Sho; KAWASE, Kodai; ITAMI, Takaharu; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol drug combination (KMP-TIVA) were determined in 5 Thoroughbred horses undergoing surgery. The horses were anesthetized with intravenous administration (IV) of ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.04 mg/kg) following premedication with medetomidne (5 µg/kg, IV) and artificially ventilated. Surgical anesthesia was maintained by controlling propofol infusion rate (initially 0.20 mg/kg/min following an IV loading dose of 0.5 mg/kg) and constant rate infusions of ketamine (1 mg/kg/hr) and medetomidine (1.25 µg/kg/hr). The horses were anesthetized for 175 ± 14 min (range from 160 to 197 min). Propofol infusion rates ranged from 0.13 to 0.17 mg/kg/min, and plasma concentration (Cpl) of propofol ranged from 11.4 to 13.3 µg/ml during surgery. Cardiovascular measurements during surgery remained within clinically acceptable ranges in the horses (heart rate: 33 to 37 beats/min, mean arterial blood pressure: 111 to 119 mmHg, cardiac index: 48 to 53 ml/kg/min, stroke volume: 650 to 800 ml/beat and systemic vascular resistance: 311 to 398 dynes/sec/cm5). The propofol Cpl declined rapidly after the cessation of propofol infusion and was significantly lower at 10 min (4.5 ± 1.5 µg/ml), extubation (4.0 ± 1.2 µg/ml) and standing (2.4 ± 0.9 µg/ml) compared with the Cpl at the end of propofol administration (11.4 ± 2.7 µg/ml). All the horses recovered uneventfully and stood at 74 ± 28 min after the cessation of anesthesia. KMP-TIVA provided satisfactory quality and control of anesthesia with minimum cardiovascular depression in horses undergoing surgery. PMID:25409552

  6. Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol (KMP-TIVA) in horses undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Umar, Mohammed Ahmed; Fukui, Sho; Kawase, Kodai; Itami, Takaharu; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol drug combination (KMP-TIVA) were determined in 5 Thoroughbred horses undergoing surgery. The horses were anesthetized with intravenous administration (IV) of ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.04 mg/kg) following premedication with medetomidne (5 µg/kg, IV) and artificially ventilated. Surgical anesthesia was maintained by controlling propofol infusion rate (initially 0.20 mg/kg/min following an IV loading dose of 0.5 mg/kg) and constant rate infusions of ketamine (1 mg/kg/hr) and medetomidine (1.25 µg/kg/hr). The horses were anesthetized for 175 ± 14 min (range from 160 to 197 min). Propofol infusion rates ranged from 0.13 to 0.17 mg/kg/min, and plasma concentration (Cpl) of propofol ranged from 11.4 to 13.3 µg/ml during surgery. Cardiovascular measurements during surgery remained within clinically acceptable ranges in the horses (heart rate: 33 to 37 beats/min, mean arterial blood pressure: 111 to 119 mmHg, cardiac index: 48 to 53 ml/kg/min, stroke volume: 650 to 800 ml/beat and systemic vascular resistance: 311 to 398 dynes/sec/cm(5)). The propofol Cpl declined rapidly after the cessation of propofol infusion and was significantly lower at 10 min (4.5 ± 1.5 µg/ml), extubation (4.0 ± 1.2 µg/ml) and standing (2.4 ± 0.9 µg/ml) compared with the Cpl at the end of propofol administration (11.4 ± 2.7 µg/ml). All the horses recovered uneventfully and stood at 74 ± 28 min after the cessation of anesthesia. KMP-TIVA provided satisfactory quality and control of anesthesia with minimum cardiovascular depression in horses undergoing surgery.

  7. Comparison Between Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Lidocaine for Postoperative Analgesia After Elective Abdominal Hysterectomy, a Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Saghar; Taheri, Arman; Davari Tanha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of intravenous and intraperitoneal injection of lidocaine and normal saline in relieving postoperative pain after elective abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and methods: For this double-blind randomized controlled study 109 patients undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allocated to three groups :1) IV group (intravenous injection group) received intravenous lidocaine %2 bolus 1.5mg/kg 30 min before incision and then a continuous lidocaine infusion of 2mg/kg and before the wound closure an intraperitoneal injection of N/S , 2) IP group (intraperitoneal group) received intravenous N/S and intraperitoneal lidocaine 3mg/kg , 3) P group (placebo, N/S) received both intravenous and intraperitoneal N/S. The pain scores (VAS) at rest, total morphine consumption , the time to first need for rescue analgesic ,incidence of lidocaine related adverse effects and nausea and vomiting were recorded at 0,2,4,8,12 and 24 hrs postoperatively. Results: The VAS scores were significantly lower in IP and IV groups compared with placebo (p = 0.001). Total consumption of morphine (p = 0.001) and time to firs request of recue analgesic (p = 0.001) were lower too in IP and IV groups.Incidence of vomiting was comparable between groups (p < 0.05) but nausea was higher in control group (p > 0.05).There were not notable lidocaine-related adverse effects. IP and IV groups were not statistically different for all investigated variables. Conclusion: This study showed lidocaine administration both intravenously and intraperitoneally are effective in reducing the postoperative pain and also have opioid sparing effect and can be safely used in elective abdominal hysterectomy without any major adverse effects. PMID:27047566

  8. Substrate Interaction in Intravenous Feeding. Comparative Effects of Carbohydrate and Fat on Amino Acid Utilization in Fasting Man

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Bruce M.; Culebras, J. M.; Sim, A. J. W.; Ball, M. R.; Moore, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    Data are presented on the metabolic and endocrine effects of intravenous infusions in normal fasting man observed under highly controlled conditions over a period of six to eight days duration. There are comparative data on a variety of intravenous feeding programs. The data on total starvation are based on studies from the literature, some of which were carried out in this laboratory. The data on low dose glucose, high dose glucose, glycerol, fat emulsion, and amino acids, each given separately, demonstrate changes seen with simple infusion of a single substrate in fasting. These data are now compared with the utilization of amino acid infusions when accompanied by low dose glucose, high dose glucose, glycerol, and fat emulsion. In all, nine experimental intravenous feeding programs are presented, based on data from 35 subjects observed over a total of 370 subject-days. The findings show a strong interaction between glucose or lipid and protein metabolism. In fasting, glucose had protein sparing effect, most evident when given at high dose. Glycerol, in an amount equal to that contained in 2000 ml of ten per cent fat emulsion, had a mild protein sparing effect. Fat emulsion was no more effective. When amino acids were given alone, normal fasting human subjects were always in negative nitrogen balance with the daily nitrogen loss half that seen in starvation alone. Although amino acids given alone have a protein sparing effect, this is accomplished only at the expense of a high nitrogen excretion including an amount equivalent to the entire infusion plus an additional loss from the body's native proteins. The provision of energy yielding non-protein substrates with the amino acids markedly improved nitrogen economy in the following order: glycerol, low dose glucose, fat emulsion and high dose glucose. When caloric provision with glucose approached the isocaloric level for normal diet, the utilization of amino acids was maximized. When given with amino acids, fat

  9. Effects of the menstrual cycle on bispectral index and anesthetic requirement in patients with preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine following propofol induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaomin; Wang, Tingting; Huang, Shaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the menstrual cycle has the impact on sedation. No previous study has evaluated the effects of the menstrual cycle on sedation level and propofol requirement with preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine. Sixty-four adult fertile women receiving general anesthesia for elective gynecologic surgery were included in the study. Patients were classified into four groups on the basis of the phase of menstrual cycle and whether infused dexmedetomidine preoperatively: Group FS: the follicular phase (days 8-12) and preoperative intravenous normal saline; Group FD: the follicular phase (days 8-12) and preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine; Group LS: the luteal phase (days 20-24) and normal saline; Group LD: the luteal phase (days 20-24) and dexmedetomidine. The patients were infused respectively dexmedetomidine at 0, 1.0, 0 and 1.0 μg/kg over 10 min, and then propofol TCI, which was administered with target plasma concentration at 4.0 μg/ml. BIS, heart rate, MAP were recorded until BIS to 50. In the LD group, the descent range of the BIS values was significantly sharpest among the four groups at loss of eyelash reflex. From propofol administered to loss of eyelash reflex and BIS values reach to 50, propofol requirements were significantly least and duration were shortest in the LD group among the four groups. Menstrual cycle phases affect the sedation of propofol induction with preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine, which is deeper in the luteal phase. We should cautious of excessive sedation by propofol anesthesia with preoperative dexmedetomidine in the luteal phase. PMID:25664087

  10. Administrative risk quantification of subcutaneous and intravenous therapies in Italian centers utilizing the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Ponzetti, Clemente; Canciani, Monica; Farina, Massimo; Era, Sara; Walzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background In oncology, an important parameter of safety is the potential treatment error in hospitals. The analyzed hypothesis is that of subcutaneous therapies would provide a superior safety benefit over intravenous therapies through fixed-dose administrations, when analyzed with trastuzumab and rituximab. Methods For the calculation of risk levels, the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis approach was applied. Within this approach, the critical treatment path is followed and risk classification for each individual step is estimated. For oncology and hematology administration, 35 different risk steps were assessed. The study was executed in 17 hematology and 16 breast cancer centers in Italy. As intravenous and subcutaneous were the only injection routes in medical available for trastuzumab and rituximab in oncology at the time of the study, these two therapies were chosen. Results When the risk classes were calculated, eight high-risk areas were identified for the administration of an intravenous therapy in hematology or oncology; 13 areas would be defined as having a median-risk classification and 14 areas as having a low-risk classification (total risk areas: n=35). When the new subcutaneous formulation would be applied, 23 different risk levels could be completely eliminated (65% reduction). Important high-risk classes such as dose calculation, preparation and package labeling, preparation of the access to the vein, pump infusion preparation, and infusion monitoring were included in the eliminations. The overall risk level for the intravenous administration was estimated to be 756 (ex-ante) and could be reduced by 70% (ex-post). The potential harm compensation for errors related to pharmacy would be decreased from eight risk classes to only three risk classes. Conclusion The subcutaneous administration of trastuzumab (breast cancer) and rituximab (hematology) might lower the risk of administration and treatment errors for patients and could hence indirectly have

  11. Mouse intragastric infusion (iG) model

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Akiko; Lazaro, Raul; Wang, Ping-Yen; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Machida, Keigo; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Direct intragastric delivery of a diet, nutrient or test substance can be achieved in rodents (mice and rats) on a long-term (2–3 months) basis using a chronically implanted gastrostomy catheter and a flow-through swivel system. This rodent intragastric infusion (iG) model has broad applications in research on food intake, gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, GI neuroendocrinology, drug metabolism and toxicity, obesity and liver disease. It achieves maximal control over the rate and pattern of delivery and it can be combined with normal ad libitum feeding of solid diet if so desired. It may be adopted to achieve infusion at other sites of the GI system to test the role of a bypassed GI segment in neuroendocrine physiology, and its use in genetic mouse models facilitates the genetic analysis of a central question under investigation. PMID:22461066

  12. Software Engineering Technology Infusion Within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this paper, several software engineering technologies used within NASA are studied, and the mechanisms, schedules, and efforts at transferring these technologies are investigated. The goals of this study are: 1) to understand the difference between technology transfer (the adoption of a new method by large segments of an industry) as an industry-wide phenomenon and the adoption of a new technology by an individual organization (called technology infusion); and 2) to see if software engineering technology transfer differs from other engineering disciplines. While there is great interest today in developing technology transfer models for industry, it is the technology infusion process that actually causes changes in the current state of the practice.

  13. Insulin infusion therapy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Jean-Marie; Gauthier, Lyne

    2014-04-01

    While dysglycemia (hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glucose variability) is clearly associated with increased mortality in critically ill patients, target range of blood glucose control remains controversial. Standardized insulin infusion protocols constitute the basis of treatment of these patients. The choice of protocol and its implementation is a great challenge. In this article, we review the published data to help define the essential elements that compose a good protocol and apply the right conditions to make it safe and effective. PMID:24690510

  14. Mathematical Modelling of the Infusion Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslicki, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to improve the well established in clinical practice Marmarou model for intracranial volume-pressure compensation by adding the pulsatile components. It was demonstrated that complicated pulsation and growth in intracranial pressure during infusion test could be successfully modeled by the relatively simple analytical expression derived in this paper. The CSF dynamics were tested in 25 patients with clinical symptoms of hydrocephalus. Basing on the frequency spectrum of the patient's baseline pressure and identified parameters of CSF dynamic, for each patient an "ideal" infusion test curve free from artefacts and slow waves was simulated. The degree of correlation between simulated and real curves obtained from clinical observations gave insight into the adequacy of assumptions of Marmarou model. The proposed method of infusion tests analysis designates more exactly the value of the reference pressure, which is usually treated as a secondary and of uncertain significance. The properly identified value of the reference pressure decides on the degree of pulsation amplitude growth during IT, as well as on the value of elastance coefficient. The artificially generated tests with various pulsation components were also applied to examine the correctness of the used algorithm of identification of the original Marmarou model parameters.

  15. Light protection of chemotherapy drugs for infusion.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Douglas McG; Harvey, Roger; Sheepy, Dave

    2015-02-01

    Specific chemotherapy drugs which require to be delivered by continuous infusion over time can have their effectiveness impaired by exposure to optical radiation. Mechanisms and processes of drug preparation and patient administration associated with light sensitive drugs were monitored within a Chemotherapy Unit. Levels of ambient light at locations of drug preparation/administration and levels of protection afforded by optical filter elements such as infusion lines were determined using a double grating Bentham Dmc150 spectroradiometer. Models of light exposure were developed for separate components of drug preparation and infusion delivery systems where the latter included the fluid bag with protective light cover, drip chamber and giving set line. In addition, the attenuation coefficient of Dacarbazine at the concentration typically used in patient treatments was determined using specially manufactured measurement cells. The relative contributions to light absorption of the drug bag, drip chamber and patient line were identified for specific types of giving sets, spectral content/intensity of light exposure and specific drug light absorption profiles. This indicated significant differences in the level of light protection afforded by specific giving sets and either single or double layer protection of the drug bag reservoir. It is not clear, however, if these variations could lead to significant differences of levels of drug de-activation and/or creation of undesirable photo-products such as in the case of Dacarbazine. Such techniques, however, provide a means of identifying how light exposure can be maintained at levels as low as reasonably possible as a precautionary measure.

  16. Irreversible sediment formation in green tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Quan; Chen, Gen-Sheng; Wang, Qiu-Shuang; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Feng, Chun-Hong; Yin, Jun-Feng

    2012-03-01

    The formation of irreversible tea sediment (IRS) and its chemical components in green tea infusions were investigated. The results showed that the amounts of IRS in the green tea infusions from various tea cultivars ranged from 0.10 to 1.47 mg/mL. The amount of IRS was influenced remarkably by the chemical components in the green tea infusion. Principal component analysis and regression analysis indicated that gallated catechins, Mn, Ca, caffeine, Na, and (-)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG) were the principal components. IRS (mg/mL) = -4.226 + 0.275 gallated catechins + 79.551 Na + 7.321 Mn + 21.055 Ca + 0.513 caffeine - 0.129 GCG (R2 = 0.697). The contents of the main chemical components in the reversible tea sediment (RTS) and IRS were markedly different, especially the minerals. Large amount of minerals participated in the formation of irreversible green tea sediment. The amount of IRS increased with the extraction temperature. PMID:22329921

  17. Stability and Compatibility of Ceftazidime Administered by Continuous Infusion to Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Hélène; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2001-01-01

    The stability and compatibility of ceftazidime have been examined in the context of its potential use in concentrated solutions for continuous infusion in patients suffering from severe nosocomial pneumonia and receiving other intravenous medications by the same route. Ceftazidime stability in 4 to 12% solutions was found satisfactory (<10% degradation) for 24 h if kept at a temperature of 25°C (77°F) maximum. Studies mimicking the simultaneous administration of ceftazidime and other drugs as done in clinics showed physical incompatibilities with vancomycin, nicardipine, midazolam, and propofol and a chemical incompatibility with N-acetylcystein. Concentrated solutions (50 mg/ml) of erythromycin or clarithromycin caused the appearance of a precipitate, whereas gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, isepamicin, fluconazole, ketamine, sufentanil, valproic acid, furosemide, uradipil, and a standard amino acid solution were physically and chemically compatible. PMID:11502544

  18. MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps for laboratory animal research, preclinical, and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in implantable drug delivery devices is needed for novel pharmaceutical compounds such as certain biologics, gene therapy, and other small molecules that are not suitable for administration by oral, topical, or intravenous routes. This invasive dosing scheme seeks to directly bypass physiological barriers presented by the human body, release the appropriate drug amount at the site of treatment, and maintain the drug bioavailability for the required duration of administration to achieve drug efficacy. Advances in microtechnologies have led to novel MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps with unique performance and feature sets. In vivo demonstration of micropumps for laboratory animal research and preclinical studies include acute rapid radiolabeling, short-term delivery of nanomedicine for cancer treatment, and chronic ocular drug dosing. Investigation of MEMS actuators, valves, and other microstructures for on-demand dosing control may enable next generation implantable pumps with high performance within a miniaturized form factor for clinical applications. PMID:22926321

  19. Ofloxacin intravenous. Compatibility with other antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Janknegt, R; Stratermans, T; Cilissen, J; Lohman, J J; Hooymans, P M

    1991-10-18

    The physical and chemical compatibility of ofloxacin (infusion solution 100 ml = 200 mg) with amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, flucloxacillin, tobramycin, gentamicin, clindamycin, vancomycin, ceftazidime and piperacillin was investigated. Upon admixture with flucloxacillin a precipitate formed between 7 and 24 hours. No other physical or chemical incompatibilities were observed with any of the other combinations. Ofloxacin may be safely combined with the tested antimicrobial drugs, except for flucloxacillin.

  20. Intravenous maternal -arginine administration to twin-bearing ewes during late pregnancy enhances placental growth and development.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, D S; Sciascia, Q; Sales, F; Wards, N J; Oliver, M H; McCoard, S A

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate if intravenous maternal Arg administration to well-fed twin-bearing ewes, from 100 to 140 d of gestation or birth, could enhance placental development and placental nutrient transport. Ewes received intravenous infusions of saline (control) or 345 μmol Arg HCl/kg of BW 3 times daily from d 100 of pregnancy (P100) to d 140 of pregnancy (P140; cohort 1) or from P100 to birth (cohort 2). At P140, ewes in cohort 1 were euthanized and individual placentae per fetus were dissected and placentomes were classed per type (A to D) and size (light to heavy). Placentome number and individual weight were recorded. As an indicator of placental nutrient transport, blood plasma was collected from the uterine ovarian vein (UOV), uterine artery (UA), and umbilical vein and artery at the time of euthanasia and analyzed for metabolites and free AA concentrations. The ewes in cohort 2 were allowed to lamb and lambs were weighed at birth. The expelled placenta was dissected and number of cotyledons and weights of total cotyledons, remaining fetal membranes, and total placenta were recorded. At P140, Arg-infused ewes had a 63% ( = 0.03) greater number of unoccupied caruncles than control ewes. No differences were observed for placental weight at P140. At birth, lambs from Arg-infused ewes tended to have 11% ( = 0.09) greater placental weight and 34% ( = 0.03) greater total cotyledon weight compared with control lambs. Arginine-infused ewes (Arg-infused) had increased concentrations of Arg ( = 0.0001) and ornithine (Orn; = 0.004) but decreased concentrations of Met ( = 0.01) and His ( = 0.02 and = 0.09, respectively) compared with control ewes in plasma UOV and UA. Fetuses from Arg-infused ewes had increased concentrations of Orn ( = 0.005) and decreased concentrations of His ( = 0.006), Met ( = 0.003), and Lys ( = 0.01) but no differences in Arg ( > 0.10) concentrations were found compared with control fetuses in umbilical artery and vein plasma. This

  1. An evaluation of analgesic efficacy and clinical acceptability of intravenous tramadol as an adjunct to propofol sedation for third molar surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, E. A.; Roelofse, J. A.; Blignaut, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This article details a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study evaluating the analgesic efficacy and clinical acceptability of intravenous tramadol in patients undergoing surgical removal of an impacted third molar tooth under local anesthesia and intravenous sedation with propofol. Forty-five ASA status 1 dental outpatients were randomly allocated to 2 groups of 22 (group A) and 23 (group B) patients each (n = 45). Group A (T/P) received intravenous tramadol 1.5 mg/kg injected over 2 minutes, followed by a bolus dose of intravenous propofol 0.4 mg/ kg. Maintenance consisted of a continuous infusion of propofol 3 mg/kg/h, with an additional bolus dose of 0.4 mg/kg intravenously 2-3 minutes prior to the infiltration of the local anesthetic solution. Group B (P/P) patients received no tramadol but instead a saline placebo solution and an identical amount of propofol. Overall, in this study, postoperative pain was much better controlled in the group receiving tramadol 1.5 mg/kg intravenously despite there being no significant difference in the dose of propofol administered in both groups. Intravenous tramadol, when given with propofol, did not affect the cardiovascular, respiratory, and sedative effects of propofol. Following tramadol, despite being an opioid, no nausea and vomiting were reported in the early postoperative period, indicating the value of using tramadol with propofol. Thus, this pilot study demonstrated the potential use of intravenous tramadol with propofol in day-case dento-alveolar surgery. PMID:14558587

  2. Intravenous iron-dextran: studies on unsaturated iron-binding capacity

    PubMed Central

    Cox, J. S. G.; Moss, G. F.; Bremner, I.; Reason, Janet

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the plasma unsaturated iron-binding capacity in the presence of very high concentrations of iron as iron-dextran. The procedure utilizes 59Fe to label the apotransferrin with subsequent separation of ionic iron from transferrin-bound iron on an ion exchange or Sephadex G.25 column. The unsaturated iron-binding capacity has been measured in rabbits and dogs after intravenous injection of iron-dextran and in human subjects after total dose infusion of iron-dextran. No evidence of saturation of the unsaturated iron-binding capacity was found even when the plasma iron values were greater than 40,000 μg Fe/100 ml. PMID:5697365

  3. Pharmacokinetics of tilmicosin in beef cattle following intravenous and subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, K R; Portillo, T; Hassfurther, R; Hunter, R P

    2011-12-01

    The intravenous pharmacokinetic profile of tilmicosin is yet to be achieved because of the cardiovascular effects of tilmicosin. This study summarizes two pharmacokinetic studies that provided complete pharmacokinetic profile of tilmicosin in cattle. The first study was a pharmacokinetic study of tilmicosin in beef calves dosed by i.v. infusion over 5 h. The second study was a subcutaneous (s.c.) pharmacokinetic study comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of tilmicosin in light (approximately 170 kg) and heavy (approximately 335 kg) beef cattle and comparing the labeled dose range of 10 or 20 mg/kg dose. The data from the two different studies were used to calculate bioavailability values, which support the assumption that tilmicosin is 100% bioavailable in cattle. The results from the second study showed that the weight of an animal when administered tilmicosin does not have a significant effect on exposure, but did demonstrate that doubling the dose of tilmicosin administered doubles the systemic exposure to tilmicosin.

  4. Single-dose intravenous gammaglobulin can stabilize neutrophil Mac-1 activation in sickle cell pain crisis

    PubMed Central

    Manwani, Deepa; Chen, Grace; Carullo, Veronica; Serban, Stelian; Olowokure, Olugbenga; Jang, Jungeun; Huggins, Matthew; Cohen, Hillel W.; Billett, Henny; Atweh, George F.; Frenette, Paul S.; Shi, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) decreases neutrophil adhesion to endothelium and red blood cell-neutrophil interactions in sickle cell mice undergoing vaso-occlusion. In this Phase I clinical trial of sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients admitted with pain crisis, we evaluated the status of adhesion molecules on neutrophils in control and IVIG-treated subjects pre- and post-infusion up to 800 mg/kg, the same dose used in murine studies. Mac-1 function significantly decreased from baseline in the low-dose IVIG (200–400 mg/kg) cohorts. IVIG-related adverse events may have occurred in the high-dose (600–800 mg/kg) cohorts. There were no significant increases in neutrophil and leukocyte counts, suggesting that IVIG may more selectively inhibit Mac-1 function as opposed to neutrophil adhesion. This study provides the first in-human validation of pre-clinical murine studies that IVIG can decrease Mac-1 function. PMID:25616042

  5. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ejstrup, L; Peters, N D

    1985-08-01

    For several years the medical treatment of active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has been NSAID because gold, penicillamine, antimalarials and steroids have been without efficacy. In 1981, Mintz et al reported that methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) had an excellent effect in patients with AS. Seven patients with active AS and insufficient efficacy of NSAID for three months were treated with one gram methylprednisolone daily given intravenously for three successive days. Mobility and pain were recorded before, during, and after treatment. Significant pain relief and improvement of mobility of the spine for at least six weeks were clearly demonstrated (p less than 0.05). Finger to floor distance and chin manubrium distance improved significantly for at least six months (p less than 0.05). We conclude that intravenous MPPT is a useful treatment in patients with active AS when NSAID is insufficient. PMID:4042697

  6. Visualization of Coronary Arteries from Intravenous Angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    Under most circumstances, the coronary arteries are not satisfactorily visualized in intravenous angiograms. The objective of this study is to develop computer image enhancement methods that will improve the quality of the latent coronary images to a degree sufficient to detect an obstructive lesion. Such a technique, if successful, could be used as a first step alternative to conventional coronary angiography for individuals with ambiguous noninvasive cardiac tests. The determination of no lesion from the intravenous procedure would relieve the need for the conventional angiogram, while verification of an obstructive lesion could be followed by a conventional angiogram. The nature of the imaging problem and a description of the methods and initial processing results are described in this paper.

  7. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition123

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10–15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  8. Diurnal Variation in Response to Intravenous Glucose*

    PubMed Central

    Whichelow, Margaret J.; Sturge, R. A.; Keen, H.; Jarrett, R. J.; Stimmler, L.; Grainger, Susan

    1974-01-01

    Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (25 g) were performed in the morning and afternoon on 13 apparently normal persons. The individual K values (rate of decline of blood sugar) were all higher in the morning tests, and the mean values were significantly higher in the morning. Fasting blood sugar levels were slightly lower in the afternoon. There was no difference between the fasting morning and afternoon plasma insulin levels, but the levels after glucose were lower in the afternoon. Growth hormone levels were low at all times in non-apprehensive subjects and unaffected by glucose. The results suggest that the impaired afternoon intravenous glucose tolerance, like oral glucose tolerance, is associated with impaired insulin release and insulin resistance. PMID:4817160

  9. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10-15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  10. Case report: multisystem failure following intravenous iopamidol.

    PubMed

    Lucas, L M; Colley, C A; Gordon, G H

    1992-04-01

    A case of life-threatening adverse effects following intravenous administration of a non-ionic contrast medium is reported. The patient, a 68-year-old diabetic hypertensive male with dyspnoea and cough had an abnormal chest radiograph, revealing congestive heart failure and an enlarged right hilum. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest was performed using 100 cm3 of intravenous iopamidol. Within half an hour the patient developed abdominal cramping, vomiting, and diarrhoea, followed by hypotension, tachycardia, fever to 40 degrees C, and delirium. His course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, respiratory arrest, and atrial fibrillation. There was no evidence of infection, neoplastic disease, or myocardial infarction. Over the next month the patient slowly recovered. One other case report implicates a contrast agent with a similar syndrome. The features of this case fulfil the criteria for a probable adverse drug reaction of a type and severity rarely encountered.

  11. Detection of exhaled hydrogen sulphide gas in healthy human volunteers during intravenous administration of sodium sulphide

    PubMed Central

    Toombs, Christopher F; Insko, Michael A; Wintner, Edward A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Usansky, Helen; Jamil, Khurram; Goldstein, Brahm; Cooreman, Michael; Szabo, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule and potential therapeutic agent. Emerging studies indicate its therapeutic potential in a variety of cardiovascular diseases and in critical illness. Augmentation of endogenous sulphide concentrations by intravenous administration of sodium sulphide can be used for the delivery of H2S to the tissues. In the current study, we have measured H2S concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy human volunteers subjected to increasing doses sodium sulphide in a human phase I safety and tolerability study. METHODS We have measured reactive sulphide in the blood via ex vivo derivatization of sulphide with monobromobimane to form sulphide-dibimane and blood concentrations of thiosulfate (major oxidative metabolite of sulphide) via ion chromatography. We have measured exhaled H2S concentrations using a custom-made device based on a sulphide gas detector (Interscan). RESULTS Administration of IK-1001, a parenteral formulation of Na2S (0.005–0.20 mg kg−1, i.v., infused over 1 min) induced an elevation of blood sulphide and thiosulfate concentrations over baseline, which was observed within the first 1–5 min following administration of IK-1001 at 0.10 mg kg−1 dose and higher. In all subjects, basal exhaled H2S was observed to be higher than the ambient concentration of H2S gas in room air, indicative of on-going endogenous H2S production in human subjects. Upon intravenous administration of Na2S, a rapid elevation of exhaled H2S concentrations was observed. The amount of exhaled H2S rapidly decreased after discontinuation of the infusion of Na2S. CONCLUSION Exhaled H2S represents a detectable route of elimination after parenteral administration of Na2S. PMID:20565454

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous inotropic agents.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Lasse A; Antila, Saila; Pentikäinen, Pertti J

    2004-01-01

    Positive inotropic drugs have various mechanisms of action. Long-term use of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent drugs has adverse effects on the prognosis of heart failure patients, whereas digoxin has neutral effect on mortality. There are, however, little data on the effects of intravenous inotropic drugs on the outcome of patients. Intravenous inotropic agents are used to treat cardiac emergencies and refractory heart failure. beta-Adrenergic agonists are rapid acting and easy to titrate, with short elimination half-life. However, they increase myocardial oxygen consumption and are thus hazardous during myocardial ischaemia. Furthermore they may promote myocyte apoptosis. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III inhibiting drugs (amrinone, milrinone and enoximone) increase contractility by reducing the degradation of cAMP. In addition, they reduce both preload and afterload via vasodilation. Short-term use of intravenous milrinone is not associated with increased mortality, and some symptomatic benefit may be obtained when it is used in refractory heart failure. Furthermore, PDE III inhibitors facilitate weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass machine after cardiac surgery. Levosimendan belongs to a new group of positive inotropic drugs, the calcium sensitisers. It has complex pharmacokinetics and long-lasting haemodynamic effects as a result of its active metabolites. In comparative trials, it has been better tolerated than the most widely used beta-agonist inotropic drug, dobutamine. The pharmacokinetics of the intravenous inotropic drugs might sometimes greatly modify and prolong the response to the therapy, for example because of long-acting active metabolites. These drugs display considerable differences in their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and the selection of the most appropriate inotropic drug for each patient should be based on careful consideration of the clinical status of the patient and on the pharmacology of the drug.

  13. Pulmonary Thromboembolism: Evaluation By Intravenous Angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, Gerald D.; Cook, Glenn C.; Woolfenden, James M.; Dodge, Russell R.

    1981-11-01

    Using perfusion lung scans as a guide, digital video subtraction angiography of the pulmonary arteries was performed in human subjects suspected of having pulmonary embolism. Dogs were employed as a pulmonary embolism model and both routine pulmonary angiography and intravenous pulmonary angiograms were obtained for comparison purposes. We have shown by our preliminary results that the technique is extremely promising as a safe and accurate alternative to routine pulmonary angiography in selected patients.

  14. Differential Postoperative Effects of Volatile Anesthesia and Intraoperative Remifentanil Infusion in 7511 Thyroidectomy Patients: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jun-Young; Choi, Seong-Soo; Yi, Jung Min; Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Se Ung; Sim, Ji-Hoon; Karm, Myong-Hwan; Ku, Seungwoo

    2016-02-01

    Although remifentanil is used widely by many clinicians during general anesthesia, there are recent evidences of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as an adverse effect. This study aimed to determine if intraoperative remifentanil infusion caused increased pain during the postoperative period in patients who underwent a thyroidectomy. A total of 7511 patients aged ≥ 20 years, who underwent thyroidectomy between January 2009 and December 2013 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. Enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups: group N (no intraoperative remifentanil and only volatile maintenance anesthesia) and group R (intraoperative remifentanil infusion including total intravenous anesthesia and balanced anesthesia). Following propensity score matching analysis, 2582 patients were included in each group. Pain scores based on numeric rating scales (NRS) were compared between the 2 groups at the postoperative anesthetic care unit and at the ward until 3 days postoperation. Incidences of postoperative complications, such as nausea, itching, and shivering were also compared. The estimated NRS pain score on the day of surgery was 5.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.97-5.19) in group N patients and 6.73 (95% CI 6.65-6.80) in group R patients (P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in NRS scores on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3 between the 2 groups. Postoperative nausea was less frequent in group R (31.4%) than in group N (53.5%) (P < 0.001). However, the incidence of itching was higher in group R (4.3%) than in group N (0.7%) (P < 0.001). Continuous infusion of remifentanil during general anesthesia can cause higher intensity of postoperative pain and more frequent itching than general anesthesia without remifentanil infusion immediately after thyroidectomy. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of continuous remifentanil infusion, volatile anesthesia without opioid may be a good choice for minor surgeries

  15. [Reactions to infliximab infusions in dermatologic patients: consensus statement and treatment protocol. Working Group of the Grupo Español de Psoriasis de la Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología ].

    PubMed

    Puig Sanz, Lluís; Sáez, E; Lozano, M J; Bordas, X; Carrascosa, J M; Gallardo, F; Luelmo, J; Sánchez-Regaña, M; Alsina, M; García-Patos, V

    2009-03-01

    Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to and blocks tumor necrosis factor alpha and is the most effective biologic agent approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. It is administered by intravenous infusion, usually in day hospitals on an outpatient basis. The main problem with the administration of infliximab is the possibility of infusion reactions, which may be immediate or delayed; these reactions are related to the immunogenicity of this monoclonal antibody, leading to the production of anti-infliximab antibodies. Infusion reactions to infliximab are not usually anaphylactic (ie, they are not mediated by immunoglobulin E), and re-exposure of the patient using specific protocols to prevent and treat these reactions is therefore possible. The extensive experience in the use of infliximab for the treatment of rheumatic conditions and chronic inflammatory bowel disease has made it possible to develop infusion reaction management protocols; these can be applied to dermatologic patients, who constitute a growing proportion of patients treated with intravenous biological agents. The aim of this review is to draw up a consensus protocol for the treatment of infusion reactions in dermatologic patients treated with infliximab.

  16. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, H.D.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-rays and an iodine containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic x-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the x-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation x-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contains a contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth.

  17. Synthetic Strategies for Engineering Intravenous Hemostats

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leslie W.-G.; White, Nathan J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    While there are currently many well-established topical hemostatic agents for field administration, there are still limited tools to staunch bleeding at less accessible injury sites. Current clinical methods of restoring hemostasis after large volume blood loss include platelet and clotting factor transfusion, which have respective drawbacks of short shelf-life and risk of viral transmission. Therefore, synthetic hemostatic agents that can be delivered intravenously and encourage stable clot formation after localizing to sites of vascular injury are particularly appealing. In the past three decades, platelet substitutes have been prepared using drug delivery vehicles such as liposomes and PLGA nanoparticles that have been modified to mimic platelet properties. Additionally, structural considerations such as particle size, shape, and flexibility have been addressed in a number of reports. Since platelets are the first responders after vascular injury, platelet substitutes represent an important class of intravenous hemostats under development. More recently, materials affecting fibrin formation have been introduced to induce faster or more stable blood clot formation through fibrin crosslinking. Fibrin represents a major structural component in the final blood clot, and a fibrin-based hemostatic mechanism acting downstream of initial platelet plug formation may be a safer alternative to platelets to avoid undesired thrombotic activity. This review explores intravenous hemostats under development and strategies to optimize their clotting activity. PMID:25803791

  18. Intensive care experience with intravenous cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Hall, W M; Ratliff, T B

    1990-10-01

    This study reports the results of a retrospective review of the case records of 28 seriously ill patients who received intravenous cimetidine (generally 300 mg q8h) for the treatment of gastric discomfort and/or hemorrhage or for prophylaxis against stress-induced ulcers. Most of these patients presented with complex symptoms arising from a variety of pathological conditions including ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, and trauma. A number of patients also had acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Over two-thirds of the patients treated with intravenous cimetidine demonstrated a reduction in gastrointestinal symptom severity, and a statistically significant reduction in the mean severity rating for all patients was observed. Adverse reactions reported during cimetidine therapy were generally mild to moderate in severity and required discontinuance of therapy in only one patient. The most common complaint was headache. Intravenous cimetidine administered q8h offers a safe and cost-effective approach to H2-receptor blockade and reduction of gastric acid secretion in patients who are temporarily unable to take oral medication.

  19. Safety of guidewire-based measurement of fractional flow reserve and the index of microvascular resistance using intravenous adenosine in patients with acute or recent myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nadeem; Layland, Jamie; Carrick, David; Petrie, Mark C.; McEntegart, Margaret; Eteiba, Hany; Hood, Stuart; Lindsay, Mitchell; Watkins, Stuart; Davie, Andrew; Mahrous, Ahmed; Carberry, Jaclyn; Teng, Vannesa; McConnachie, Alex; Curzen, Nick; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Berry, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Coronary guidewire-based diagnostic assessments with hyperemia may cause iatrogenic complications. We assessed the safety of guidewire-based measurement of coronary physiology, using intravenous adenosine, in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Methods We prospectively enrolled invasively managed STEMI and NSTEMI patients in two simultaneously conducted studies in 6 centers (NCT01764334; NCT02072850). All of the participants underwent a diagnostic coronary guidewire study using intravenous adenosine (140 μg/kg/min) infusion for 1–2 min. The patients were prospectively assessed for the occurrence of serious adverse events (SAEs) and symptoms and invasively measured hemodynamics were also recorded. Results 648 patients (n = 298 STEMI patients in 1 hospital; mean time to reperfusion 253 min; n = 350 NSTEMI in 6 hospitals; median time to angiography from index chest pain episode 3 (2, 5) days) were included between March 2011 and May 2013. Two NSTEMI patients (0.3% overall) experienced a coronary dissection related to the guidewire. No guidewire dissections occurred in the STEMI patients. Chest symptoms were reported in the majority (86%) of patient's symptoms during the adenosine infusion. No serious adverse events occurred during infusion of adenosine and all of the symptoms resolved after the infusion ceased. Conclusions In this multicenter analysis, guidewire-based measurement of FFR and IMR using intravenous adenosine was safe in patients following STEMI or NSTEMI. Self-limiting symptoms were common but not associated with serious adverse events. Finally, coronary dissection in STEMI and NSTEMI patients was noted to be a rare phenomenon. PMID:26418191

  20. Mixing during intravertebral arterial infusions in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Robert J; Warren, Kathy; Balis, Frank; Patronas, Nicholas; Dedrick, Robert L

    2002-06-01

    Regional delivery of drugs can offer a pharmacokinetic advantage in the treatment of localized tumors. One method of regional delivery is by intra-arterial infusion into the basilar/vertebral artery network that provides local access to infratentorial tumors, which are frequent locations of childhood brain cancers. Proper delivery of drug by infused solutions requires adequate mixing of the infusate at the site of infusion within the artery lumen. Our mixing studies with an in vitro model of the vertebral artery network indicate that streaming of drug solution is likely to occur at low, steady infusion rates of 2 ml/min. Streaming leads to maldistribution of drug to distal perfused brain regions and may result in toxic levels in some regions while concurrently yielding subtherapeutic levels in adjacent regions. According to our model findings, distribution to both brain hemispheres is not likely following infusion into a single vertebral artery even if the infusate is well-mixed at the infusion site. This outcome results from the unique fluid flow properties of two converging channels, which are represented by the left and right vertebral branches converging into the basilar. Fluid in the model remains stratified on the side of the basilar artery served by the infused vertebral artery. Careful thought and planning of the methods of intravertebral drug infusions for treating posterior fossa tumors are required to assure proper distribution of the drug to the desired tissue regions. Improper delivery may be responsible for some noted toxicities or for failure of the treatments. PMID:12164691

  1. Primary erythromelalgia in a child responding to intravenous lidocaine and oral mexiletine treatment.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Aruna; Rose, John B; Guite, Jessica W; Hehir, David; Milovcich, Karen

    2005-04-01

    infusion of local anesthetics, which could not be continued because he found the motor blockade that accompanied his analgesia intolerable. However, intravenous lidocaine infusion, with subsequent transition to oral mexiletine therapy, proved very effective in reducing the frequency and severity of the pain episodes. The patient was discharged from the hospital with oral mexiletine therapy and has been monitored at the pain management clinic. He returned to and completed school, attended summer camp, and enjoys an active happy life. He walks without precipitating pain in his feet and sleeps 9 to 10 hours every night. He has needed to soak his feet on only 4 occasions in the 6 months since his discharge from the hospital. His quality of life has improved significantly. He has shown no evidence of liver toxicity, and his mexiletine levels have been stable. PMID:15741349

  2. A noble method of using intravenous infusion set as a stent in localized lower posterior vestibuloplasty: A technical note

    PubMed Central

    Velavan, K.; Kannan, V. Sadesh; Ahamed, A. Saneem; Abia, V. Roshmi; Elavarasi, E.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibuloplasty is the procedure for shallow vestibule, prior to the prosthesis. Usually, vestibuloplasty is carried out in patients with completely edentulous arches. There are multiple techniques of vestibuloplasty described in the review of literature. However, it has not been emphasized on isolated shallow vestibule. This article describes our experience in the isolated or localized vestibuloplasty for a partially edentulous individual with a shallow vestibule pertaining to a single missing tooth. PMID:26538976

  3. Hemodynamic effects of 6% hydroxyethyl starch infusion in sevoflurane-anesthetized thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Minoru; Kurimoto, Shinjiro; Tokushige, Hirotaka; Kuroda, Taisuke; Ishikawa, Yuhiro

    2013-07-31

    To determine hemodynamic effects of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) infusion during anesthesia in horses, incremental doses of 6% HES were administered to 6 healthy Thoroughbred horses. Anesthesia was induced with xylazine, guaifenesin and thiopental and maintained with sevoflurane at 2.8% of end-tidal concentration in all horses. The horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency and administered 3 intravenous dose of 6% HES (5 ml/kg) over 15 min with 15-min intervals in addition to constant infusion of lactated Ringer's solution at 10 ml/kg/hr. Hemodynamic parameters were measured before and every 15 min until 90 min after the administration of 6% HES. There was no significant change in heart rate and arterial blood pressures throughout the experiment. The HES administration produced significant increases in mean right atrial pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output (CO) and decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in a dose-dependent manner. There was no significant change in electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)) throughout the experiment, however, packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, and total protein and albumin concentrations decreased in a dose-dependent manner following the HES administration. In conclusion, the HES administration provides a dose-dependent increase in CO, but has no impact upon arterial blood pressures due to a simultaneous decrease in SVR. PMID:23411483

  4. False-negative dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial imaging after caffeine infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Corstens, F.H.; Aengevaeren, W.R.; Wackers, F.J.; Thien, T. )

    1991-08-01

    The vasodilator effect of intravenously administered dipyridamole may be caused by an increase in endogenous plasma adenosine levels. The authors evaluated the effect of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, on the diagnostic results of dipyridamole-201Tl myocardial imaging in eight patients with coronary artery disease. Caffeine infusion significantly attenuated the dipyridamole-induced fall in blood pressure and the accompanied increase in heart rate. The infusion of dipyridamole alone resulted in chest pain and ST-segment depressions on the electrocardiogram in four patients, whereas none of these problems occurred when the tests were repeated after caffeine. In six of eight patients, caffeine was responsible for false-negative dipyridamole-201Tl tests. Semiquantitive scores of the dipyridamole-induced 201Tl perfusion defects were decreased by caffeine from 9.0 {plus minus} 0.9 to 2.0 {plus minus} 1.1 points (p less than 0.05). Computerized analysis revealed a caffeine-mediated reduction in the percent reversibility of the images from 46% {plus minus} 16% to 6% {plus minus} 10% (p less than 0.05). They conclude that the use of caffeinated products prior to dipyridamole-201Tl testing may be responsible for false-negative findings.

  5. Changes in the endocochlear potential and cochlear blood flow induced by ATP infusion and arterial occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Jiang, S; Gu, R

    1995-06-01

    To assess the relationship between cochlear blood flow (CBF) and auditory function, a procedure of intravital microscopy for observations of the lateral wall vessels of the cochlea coupled with the simultaneous measurement of the endocochlear potential (EP) was established in guinea pigs with gradual ischemia of the cochlea. It was found that occlusions of both common carotid arteries and one of the vertebral arteries produced a minor reduction in CBF with no significant alteration in the EP. When intravenous infusion of ATP induced sharp and severe decreases in CBF, the EP varied only slightly from the baseline in some animals while there were no alteration in others. Furthermore, ATP infusions combined with arterial occlusions caused even more severe declines in CBF and a moderate decrease in the EP. The results indicate that not only does the CBF satisfy the basic needs of the processes of cochlear function, but also has a regulatory mechanism to ensure the normal function of the cochlea in the ischemia condition. It was also found that the changes in the stria vascularis vessels induced by decreases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rates were more severe than those of the spiral ligament vessels. This phenomenon indicated that the stria vascularis vessels were more sensitive to decreases of BP and heart rates. PMID:7555252

  6. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats. PMID:27423150

  7. Comparing the Efficacy of Intravenous Acetaminophen and Intravenous Meperidine in Pain Relief After Outpatient Urological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdouzan, Khosro; Eydi, Mahmood; Mohammadipour Anvari, Hassan; Golzari, Samad EJ; Abri, Reyhaneh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain relief after surgery is an essential component of postoperative care. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen and intravenous meperidine in pain relief after outpatient urological surgery. Patients and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 100 outpatients of urological surgery were studied in two groups of acetaminophen (A) and meperidine (M). Patients in group A received 1g of acetaminophen in 100 mL saline within 15 minutes and patients in group M received a single intravenous injection of meperidine 0.5 mg/kg, 15 minutes prior to the end of operation. Postoperative pain was recorded using visual analog scale (VAS). Vital signs, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and respiratory depressions were compared between the two groups. Results: Pain severity in patients treated with intravenous acetaminophen six hours after the operation within one-hour interval was significantly lower than meperidine group (P < 0.0001). Ninety patients in the meperidine group and five patients in the acetaminophen group required additional doses of analgesics. Nausea was significantly lower in acetaminophen group than meperidine group. Conclusions: Intravenous acetaminophen reduced pain following outpatient urological surgery more significantly than meperidine. PMID:25798377

  8. Effects of dietary manipulations and glucose infusion on glucagon response during exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Tadjoré, M; Bergeron, R; Latour, M; Désy, F; Warren, C; Lavoie, J M

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that blood glucose concentration is not always related to glucagon response during exercise. Three groups of rats were submitted to a prolonged (3-h) swimming exercise. Two groups of rats had their normal food intake restricted by 50% the night before the experiment. One of these two groups of rats was intravenously infused with glucose throughout exercise to maintain euglycemia. The third group of rats swam while under normal dietary conditions. Plasma glucose, sampled in arterial blood, was reduced (P < 0.05) at 75, 105, 150, and 170 min of exercise (from approximately 130 to 110 mg/dl) in the food-restricted animals without glucose infusion, whereas a significant (P < 0.05) increase was measured in the two other groups during exercise. A significant (P < 0.01) difference in the mean integrated areas under the glucose-concentration curve was found only between the fed and the two food-restricted groups. Plasma insulin concentrations decreased (P < 0.05) similarly in all groups during exercise, whereas plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations increased significantly (P < 0.01) in all groups. Despite differences between groups in plasma glucose response during exercise, and despite the absence of any decrease in exercising blood glucose levels in at least two of the three groups, plasma glucagon responses were increased (P < 0.05) similarly in all groups (from approximately 250 to 550 pg/ml) at the end of the exercise period. The increase in glucagon was significant after 90 min of exercise in the food-restricted groups, with or without glucose infusion, but only after 140 min in the fed group. These results indicate that the glucagon response during exercise is not always linked to the decrease in plasma glucose.

  9. Evaluation and optimisation of propofol pharmacokinetic parameters in cats for target-controlled infusion.

    PubMed

    Cattai, A; Pilla, T; Cagnardi, P; Zonca, A; Franci, P

    2016-05-14

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a pharmacokinetic model-driven infusion of propofol in premedicated cats. In a first step, propofol (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously over 60 seconds to induce anaesthesia for the elective neutering of seven healthy cats, premedicated intramuscularly with 0.3 mg/kg methadone, 0.01 mg/kg medetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine. Venous blood samples were collected over 240 minutes, and propofol concentrations were measured via a validated high-performance liquid chromatography assay. Selected pharmacokinetic parameters, determined by a three-compartment open linear model, were entered into a computer-controlled infusion pump (target-controlled infusion-1 (TCI-1)). In a second step, TCI-1 was used to induce and maintain general anaesthesia in nine cats undergoing neutering. Predicted and measured plasma concentrations of propofol were compared at specific time points. In a third step, the pharmacokinetic parameters were modified according to the results from the use of TCI-1 and were evaluated again in six cats. For this TCI-2 group, the median values of median performance error and median absolute performance error were -1.85 per cent and 29.67 per cent, respectively, indicating that it performed adequately. Neither hypotension nor respiratory depression was observed during TCI-1 and TCI-2. Mean anaesthesia time and time to extubation in the TCI-2 group were 73.90 (±20.29) and 8.04 (±5.46) minutes, respectively. PMID:27044652

  10. Intermittent outpatient nesiritide infusion reduces hospital admissions in patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ernst R; Najam, Sabeen; Akel, Rami; Sulimanjee, Nasir; Bionat, Susan; Rosanio, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    Recombinant B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a therapeutic modality in patients with decompensated congestive heart failure. Retrospectively tested are the effects of intermittent outpatient nesiritide infusion on symptoms, hospital readmission rates, endogenous BNP, and renal function in patients with advanced heart failure. Twenty-four patients in heart failure in New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes III-IV received a 6- to 8-hour intermittent nesiritide outpatient infusion (0.01 mcg/kg/min continuously intravenously) once weekly for a total duration of 3 months in addition to standard medical therapy. Data were analyzed retrospectively to compare hospital readmission rates, endogenous BNP levels, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine levels 1 year before and up to 12 months after starting treatment. All patients tolerated nesiritide infusions well with no significant adverse events. At the end of the observation period, NYHA classes had improved 1 class in 16 patients and 2 classes in 4 patients and remained unchanged in 4 patients. There was a significant reduction in hospital readmissions within 1 year with nesiritide treatment compared with the year before (0.94 +/- 0.8 vs 3.6 +/- 2.2, P < .005). No significant changes were seen regarding endogenous BNP levels (1002 +/- 870 vs 1092 +/- 978 pg/mL, P = .95), blood urea nitrogen levels (45 +/- 28 vs 45 +/- 26 mg/dL, P = .96), and a tendency of slightly elevated creatinine levels that did not differ significantly compared with prior levels (1.76 +/- 0.85 vs 1.1 +/- 0.56 mg/dL, P = .5). Intermittent outpatient nesiritide treatment resulted in improved symptoms and reduced hospital readmission rates without a significant decline in renal function in patients with advanced heart failure but did not alter endogenous BNP levels.

  11. Exogenous lactate infusion improved neurocognitive function of patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bisri, Tatang; Utomo, Billy A.; Fuadi, Iwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies showed a better recovery of cognitive function after administration of exogenous lactate during moderate-severe traumatic brain injury. However, the study evaluating lactate effect on mild traumatic brain injury is still limited. Aims: To evaluate the effect of exogenous lactate on cognitive function in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Settings and Design: Prospective, single blind, randomized controlled study on 60 mild traumatic brain injury patients who were undergoing neurosurgery. Materials and Methods: Subjects were randomly assigned into hyperosmolar sodium lactate (HSL) group or hyperosmolar sodium chloride (HSS) group. Patients in each group received either intravenous infusion of HSL or NaCl 3% at 1.5 ml/KgBW within 15 min before neurosurgery. During the surgery, patients in both groups received maintenance infusion of NaCl 0.9% at 1.5 ml/KgBW/hour. Statistical Analysis: Cognitive function, as assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score at 24 h, 30 and 90 days post-surgery, was analyzed by Anova repeated measures test. Results: The MMSE score improvement was significantly better in HSL group than HSS group (P < 0.001). In HSL group the MMSE score improved from 16.00 (13.75-18.00) at baseline to 21.00 (18.75-22.00); 25.00 (23.75-26.00); 28.00 (27.00-29.00) at 24 h, 30, 90 days post-surgery, respectively. In contrast, in HSS group the MMSE score almost unchanged at 24 h and only slightly increased at 30 and 90 days post-surgery. Conclusions: Hyperosmolar sodium lactate infusion during mild traumatic brain injury improved cognitive function better than sodium chloride 3%. PMID:27057222

  12. Adenosine infusion during isoflurane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia: indications of perioperative analgesic effect.

    PubMed

    Sollevi, A

    1992-08-01

    Adenosine, an endogenous compound with a known antinociceptive effect when administered into the CNS, was applied in nine patients (21-65 years) by the peripheral intravenous route (70-130 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) as a replacement for peroperative opioids during inhalation anaesthesia for surgical procedures not requiring muscle relaxation. Lorazepam was given as premedication, thiopentone was used for induction, and succinylcholine facilitated intubation of the trachea. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane [initial surgery endtidal concentration (ET) 0.88% (range 0.7-1%)] and nitrous oxide (60-70%) in oxygen. Adenosine infusion was initiated 5-10 min prior to surgery, and stopped close to or when isoflurane was terminated at the end of surgery. The duration of anaesthesia, adenosine infusion, and surgery were 120 min (range 80-165), 90 min (range 70-145), and 90 min (range 60-135), respectively. Spontaneous unassisted ventilation was maintained in all patients. Mean heart rate increased 10 beats.min-1 (range 0-35) upon induction of surgery, while systolic blood pressure was unaffected at 105 mmHg (range 85-120) (14 kPa (range 11.3-16.0)). Spo2 and ETCO2 were in the normal range. The isoflurane concentration was gradually reduced in most cases [mid-surgery ET 0.63% (range 0.5-0.8) and end-surgery ET 0.57% (range 0.3-0.8)]. Extubation and verbal communication were rapidly achieved after anaesthesia. The mean postoperative (24 h) opioid requirement was 4 mg (range 0-10 mg). These pilot cases suggest that systemic adenosine infusion may replace opioids during inhalation anaesthesia, and that adequate spontaneous ventilation can be achieved.

  13. Intraosseous infusion and pulmonary fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M. Yousuf; Kissoon, Niranjan; Khan, Taj M.; Saldajeno, Virgilio; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Murphy, Suzanne P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of pulmonary fat embolism after the intraosseous (IO) infusion of normal saline and drugs and to determine whether pulmonary capillary blood is a predictor of lung fat embolism. DESIGN: A randomized, prospective, animal study. SETTING: Animal research laboratory of a university hospital. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight mixed breed piglets (average weight 30.9 kg). Interventions and Methods: Animals were anesthetized, intubated, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. IO needles were placed in the tibial bone. Animals were assigned to one of four groups: Group 1 received fluid (20 mL/kg) under 300 mm Hg pressure (n = 6); group 2 received fluid (20 mL/kg) at free flow under gravity (n = 6); group 3 received 100 mL of fluid over 20 mins (n = 8); and group 4 received 100 mL of fluid over 7 mins (n = 8). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Buffy coat samples were obtained from pulmonary arterial catheter in the occluded position at baseline, after IO needle placement, and at the end of infusion. Lung specimens (both upper and lower lobes) were obtained at the end of the infusion. Specimens were stained with oil red O and graded for fat emboli by a pathologist blinded to experimental conditions. Fat emboli (one to three emboli per high power field) were found in about 30% of the lung specimens. The difference in number of fat emboli between groups was not statistically significant. Buffy coat stains yielded fat emboli, which were distributed sporadically in all groups. CONCLUSION: Fat embolism is common; however, the method of IO fluid administration does not influence the number of emboli. Our study therefore implies that the risk of fat embolization is of concern, but its clinical relevance is unclear. Until the clinical significance of pulmonary fat emboli and the prevalence of fat emboli syndrome are delineated more precisely, the IO route is an effective but not necessarily safe route for delivery of fluids and drugs. PMID:12797872

  14. A Pilot Chemical and Physical Stability Study of Extemporaneously Compounded Levetiracetam Intravenous Solution.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Chenzira D; Zhao, Fang; Hughes, Susan E; Juba, Katherine M

    2015-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a commonly used antiepileptic medication for tumor-related epilepsy. However, the 100 mL intravenous (IV) infusion volume can be burdensome to imminently dying hospice patients. A reduced infusion volume would improve patient tolerability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of 1000 mg/25 mL (40 mg/mL) levetiracetam IV solution in sodium chloride 0.9%. We prepared levetiracetam 40 mg/mL IV solution and added it to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags, polyolefin bags, and polypropylene syringes. Triplicate samples of each product were stored at refrigeration (2-8°C) and analyzed on days 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14. Samples were subjected to visual inspection, pH measurement, and stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Over the 2-week storage period, there was no significant change in visual appearance or pH for any of the stability samples. The HPLC results confirmed that all stability samples retained 94.2-101.3% of initial drug concentration and no degradation products or leachable material from the packaging materials were observed. We conclude that levetiracetam 1000 mg/25 mL IV solution in sodium chloride 0.9% is physically and chemically stable for up to 14 days under refrigeration in polypropylene syringes, PVC bags, and polyolefin bags. PMID:26654410

  15. Vented spikes improve delivery from intravenous bags with no air headspace.

    PubMed

    Galush, William J; Horst, Travis A

    2015-07-01

    Flexible plastic bags are the container of choice for most intravenous (i.v.) infusions. Under certain circumstances, however, the air-liquid interface present in these i.v. bags can lead to physical instability of protein biopharmaceuticals, resulting in product aggregation. In principle, the air headspace present in the bags can be removed to increase drug stability, but experiments described here show that this can result in incomplete draining of solution from the bag using gravity delivery, or generation of negative pressure in the bag when an infusion pump is used. It is expected that these issues could lead to incomplete delivery of medication to patients or pump-related problems, respectively. However, here it is shown that contrary to the standard pharmacy practice of using nonvented spikes with i.v. bags, the use of vented spikes with i.v. bags that lack air headspace allows complete delivery of the dose solution without impacting the physical stability of a protein-based drug.

  16. Intravenous lipid emulsion for levobupivacaine intoxication in acidotic and hypoxaemic pigs.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, J A; Skrifvars, M B; Haasio, J; Backman, J T; Rosenberg, P H; Litonius, E

    2016-03-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion is, in some countries, the recommended treatment for local anaesthetic toxicity. Systemic local anaesthetic toxicity results in hypoxaemia and acidosis, and whether this influences the effects of lipid therapy on drug concentrations and cardiovascular recovery is currently unknown. Twenty anaesthetised pigs were given a 3-mg/kg bolus of levobupivacaine followed by a five minute phase of hypoventilation and 1 mmol/kg of lactic acid in one minute. After lactic acid infusion, pigs were treated, in randomised order, with either 20% lipid emulsion or Ringer's acetate for 30 min: a 1.5-ml/kg bolus followed by a 0.25-ml/kg/minute infusion. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded and blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no difference between the groups in the area under the plasma levobupivacaine concentration-time curve (AUC) or between that and AUC of unentrapped levobupivacaine in the Lipid group, or in the plasma half-lives. The cardiovascular outcome and normalisation of the electrocardiogram were similar in both groups. Five pigs developed marked hypotension: one in both groups died, while two in the Lipid group and one in the Ringer group needed adrenaline. Administration of lipid emulsion did not improve cardiovascular recovery from levobupivacaine toxicity exacerbated by acidosis and hypoxaemia. Lipid emulsion did not entrap levobupivacaine or affect levobupivacaine pharmacokinetics. PMID:27029660

  17. Vented spikes improve delivery from intravenous bags with no air headspace.

    PubMed

    Galush, William J; Horst, Travis A

    2015-07-01

    Flexible plastic bags are the container of choice for most intravenous (i.v.) infusions. Under certain circumstances, however, the air-liquid interface present in these i.v. bags can lead to physical instability of protein biopharmaceuticals, resulting in product aggregation. In principle, the air headspace present in the bags can be removed to increase drug stability, but experiments described here show that this can result in incomplete draining of solution from the bag using gravity delivery, or generation of negative pressure in the bag when an infusion pump is used. It is expected that these issues could lead to incomplete delivery of medication to patients or pump-related problems, respectively. However, here it is shown that contrary to the standard pharmacy practice of using nonvented spikes with i.v. bags, the use of vented spikes with i.v. bags that lack air headspace allows complete delivery of the dose solution without impacting the physical stability of a protein-based drug. PMID:25953689

  18. Inadvertent venous air embolism during cesarean section: collapsible intravenous fluid bags without self-sealing outlet have risks. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Esen, Asim; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozturk, Erdogan

    2013-01-01

    The anesthesiologist must be aware of the causes, diagnosis and treatment of venous air embolism and adopt the practice patterns to prevent its occurrence. Although venous air embolism is a known complication of cesarean section, we describe an unusual inattention that causes iatrogenic near fatal venous air embolism during a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. One of the reasons for using self-collapsible intravenous (IV) infusion bags instead of conventional glass or plastic bottles is to take precaution against air embolism. We also demonstrated the risk of air embolism for two kinds of plastic collapsible intravenous fluid bags: polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polypropylene-based. Fluid bags without self-sealing outlets pose a risk for air embolism if the closed system is broken down, while the flexibility of the bag limits the amount of air entry. PVC-based bags, which have more flexibility, have significantly less risk of air entry when IV administration set is disconnected from the outlet. Using a pressure bag for rapid infusion can be dangerous without checking and emptying all air from the IV bag.

  19. Inadvertent venous air embolism during cesarean section: Collapsible intravenous fluid bags without self-sealing outlet have risks. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Esen, Asim; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozturk, Erdogan

    2013-01-01

    The anesthesiologist must be aware of the causes, diagnosis and treatment of venous air embolism and adopt the practice patterns to prevent its occurrence. Although venous air embolism is a known complication of cesarean section, we describe an unusual inattention that causes iatrogenic near fatal venous air embolism during a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. One of the reasons for using self-collapsible intravenous (IV) infusion bags instead of conventional glass or plastic bottles is to take precaution against air embolism. We also demonstrated the risk of air embolism for two kinds of plastic collapsible intravenous fluid bags: polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polypropylene-based. Fluid bags without self-sealing outlets pose a risk for air embolism if the closed system is broken down, while the flexibility of the bag limits the amount of air entry. PVC-based bags, which have more flexibility, have significantly less risk of air entry when IV administration set is disconnected from the outlet. Using a pressure bag for rapid infusion can be dangerous without checking and emptying all air from the IV bag.

  20. [Neurological symptoms following infusion of infliximab].

    PubMed

    Bebe, Anna C K M; Harboe, Kirstine Moll; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2012-10-01

    Infliximab is indicated for treatment of plaque psoriasis when traditional systemic therapy is inadequate or inappropriate. The treatment is efficient but also carries a risk of serious adverse drug events. We describe a case of neurological symptoms following the first infusion of infliximab in a patient treated for plaque psoriasis. The patient fully recovered after sensation of the therapy. We believe the symptoms could be related to infliximab and stress the importance of thorough information of patients treated with tumour necrosis factor-α-inhibitors, also about the risk of serious adverse events.

  1. Intravenous Acetate Elicits a Greater Free Fatty Acid Rebound in Normal than Hyperinsulinaemic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Judlyn; Vogt, Janet; Wolever, Thomas MS

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Colonic fermentation of dietary fiber may improve insulin sensitivity via the metabolic effects of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) in reducing free fatty acids (FFA). The main objectives of this study were to compare peripheral uptake of acetate (AC) in participants with normal (< 40pmol/L, NI) and high (≥ 40pmol/L, HI) plasma-insulin and the ability of AC to reduce FFA in both groups. Subject/Methods Overnight fasted NI (n = 9) and HI (n = 9) participants were given an intravenous (IV) infusion of 140 mmol/L sodium acetate at 3 different rates over 90 minutes. The total amount of AC infused was 51.85 mmols. Results Acetate clearance in NI participants was not significantly different than that in HI participants (2.11 ± 0.23 vs 2.09 ± 0.24 ml/min). FFA fell in both groups, but rebounded to a greater extent in NI than HI participants (time × group interaction, P = 0.001). Significant correlations between insulin resistance (IR) indices (HOMA-IR, Matsuda and Insulinogenic Index) vs FFA rebound during IV AC infusion were also observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that AC uptake is similar in both groups. Participants with lower plasma insulin and lower IR indices had a greater FFA rebound. These results support the hypothesis that increasing AC concentrations in the systemic circulation may reduce lipolysis and plasma FFA concentrations and thus improve insulin sensitivity. More in-depth studies are needed to look at the effects of SCFA on FFA metabolism in insulin resistant participants. PMID:22828730

  2. Safety of Atomoxetine in Combination with Intravenous Cocaine in Cocaine- Experienced Participants

    PubMed Central

    Cantilena, Louis; Kahn, Roberta; Duncan, Connie C.; Li, Shou-Hua; Anderson, Ann; Elkashef, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Atomoxetine has been considered as an agonist replacement therapy for cocaine. We investigated the safety of the interaction of atomoxetine with cocaine, and also whether cognitive function was affected by atomoxetine during short-term administration. Methods In a double-blind placebo-controlled inpatient study of 20 cocaine-dependent volunteers, participants received atomoxetine 80 mg daily followed by 100 mg daily for 5 days each. On the fourth and fifth day at each dose, cocaine (20 mg and 40 mg) was infused intravenously in sequential daily sessions. Results Pre-infusion mean systolic pressures showed a small but statistically significant difference between placebo and both doses of atomoxetine. Pre-infusion mean diastolic pressures were significant between placebo and atomoxetine 80 mg only. The diastolic pressure response to 40 mg cocaine was statistically significant only between the 80 mg and 100 mg atomoxetine doses. All ECG parameters were unchanged. VAS scores for “bad effect” in the atomoxetine group were significantly higher at baseline, then declined, and for “likely to use” declined with atomoxetine treatment. On the ARCI the atomoxetine group scored significantly lower on amphetamine, euphoria and energy subscales (p<0.0001). Other VAS descriptors, BSCS, POMS, and BPRS showed no differences. Atomoxetine did not affect cocaine pharmacokinetics. In tests of working memory, sustained attention, cognitive flexibility, and decision-making, atomoxetine improved performance on the visual n-back task. There were no differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters for cocaine with atomoxetine. Conclusions Atomoxetine was tolerated safely by all participants. Certain cognitive improvements and a dampening effect on VAS scores after cocaine were observed, but should be weighed against small but significant differences in hemodynamic responses after atomoxetine. PMID:22987022

  3. Influence of cue-conditioning on acquisition, maintenance and relapse of cocaine intravenous self-administration.

    PubMed

    Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique; Piat, Frédéric; Le Moal, Michel; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo

    2002-04-01

    Conditioning theories propose that, through a Pavlovian associative process, discrete stimuli acquire the ability to elicit neural states involved in the maintenance and relapse of a drug-taking behaviour. Experimental evidence indicates that drug-related cues play a role in relapse, however, their influence on the development and maintenance of drug self-administration has been poorly investigated. In this report, we analysed the effects of a drug-associated cue light on acquisition, maintenance and reinstatement of intravenous cocaine self-administration. The results show that a cocaine-associated cue light can act as an incentive in absence of the drug, but does not directly modify drug-reinforcing effects. Contingent and non-contingent presentations of a cocaine-associated cue light reinstated an extinguished self-administration behaviour. However, regardless of whether or not a cue light was associated with cocaine infusions, rats acquire cocaine intravenous self-administration reaching the same levels of intake. Furthermore, after self-administration has been acquired in presence of the cue light, the omission of the cue light or its non-contingent presentation did not modify rat behaviour. In conclusion, our work shows that cocaine-associated explicit cues do not directly interfere with the reinforcing effects of the drug.

  4. Effect of intravenous calcium borogluconate and sodium phosphate in cows with parturient paresis.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Zulliger, P; Liesegang, A; Bleul, U; Hässig, M

    2009-03-01

    Thirty cows with parturient paresis were divided into three groups of 10. All the cows were given 500 ml of a 40 per cent calcium borogluconate solution intravenously over a period of 10 minutes, and 20 were also given 500 ml of a 10 per cent solution of sodium phosphate intravenously; in 10 of the cows this solution was administered over a period of 10 minutes immediately after the calcium borogluconate solution, and in the other 10 cows 200 ml of the solution was administered rapidly and the remaining 300 ml was added to 10 litres of sodium chloride and glucose solution and infused slowly over six hours. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to the outcome of the treatments; six or seven of the cows in each group stood within eight hours of the treatment. There were no significant differences between the changes in serum calcium concentrations among the groups. The mean concentrations of inorganic phosphorus in the groups given sodium phosphate were increased above the normal range initially, but after eight hours there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the numbers of cows that were hypophosphataemic. There were no significant differences between the three groups with respect to changes after treatment in the serum concentrations of magnesium or parathyroid hormone.

  5. High Dose Intraveneous Vitamin C and Chikungunya Fever: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Michael J.; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R.; Berdiel, Miguel J.; Duconge, Jorge; Rodríguez-López, Joshua L.; Hunninghake, Ron; Cobas-Rosario, Vicente J.

    2015-01-01

    The Chikungunya (CHIKV) fever is a viral disease produced by a single-stranded RNA Alphavirus from the Togaviridae genus. Its transmission occurs only through mosquito vectors, principally Aedes aegypti. It requires a human-mosquito-human transmission cycle. It is associated with severe arthritis/arthralgias, myalgias, high fever, headache, and maculopapular rash. Joint ache appears to be symmetrical. The virus has an incubation period of 2 to 7 days, where the high fever is typically presented. It is followed by arthralgias and myalgias, and rashes, which last for 3 to 5 days. However, the arthralgias can persist for months after the infection, which can contribute to severe arthritis. As of now, no vaccine exists for the virus and no official treatment has been developed aside from standard procedures of the use of acetaminophen (paracetamol), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This is a case report of a 54-year old Hispanic individual that reported left shoulder pain, left knee pain and fever. The symptoms started on a Saturday in September 2014 in middle of the night. The patient was treated with high doses of intravenous vitamin C over two days. The symptoms resolved after the infusions without any side effects. Based on the positive outcome in this case, we propose that intravenous vitamin C should be studied further as a potential treatment for acute viral infections. PMID:25705076

  6. Schedule Dependence in Cancer Therapy: Intravenous Vitamin C and the Systemic Saturation Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Massari, Jorge R.; Duconge, Jorge; Riordan, Neil H.; Ichim, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significant number of in vitro and in vivo studies to assess vitamin C effects on cancer following the application of large doses and its extensive use by alternative medicine practitioners in the USA; the precise schedule for successful cancer therapy is still unknown. Based on interpretation of the available data, we postulate that the relationship between Vitamin C doses and plasma concentration x time, the capability of tissue stores upon distribution, and the saturable mechanism of urinary excretion are all important determinants to understand the physiology of high intravenous vitamin C dose administration and its effect on cancer. Practitioners should pay more attention to the cumulative vitamin C effect instead of the vitamin C concentrations to account for observed discrepancy in antitumor response. We suggest that multiple, intermittent, short-term intravenous infusions of vitamin C over a longer time period will correlate with greater antitumor effects than do single continuous IV doses of the same total exposure. This approach would be expected to minimize saturation of renal reabsorption, providing a continuous “dynamic flow” of vitamin C in the body for optimal systemic exposure and clinical outcomes. This prevents the “systemic saturation” phenomena, which may recycle vitamin C and render it less effective as an anticancer agent. Nonetheless, more pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies are needed to fully understand this schedule-dependence phenomenon. PMID:24860238

  7. Evaluating the Effects and Safety of Intravenous Lipid Emulsion on Haloperidol-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Vahabzadeh, Maryam; Etemad, Leila; Memar, Bahram; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    There are many reports on the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) as an antidote in drugs related toxicities. We determined the effects of ILE on neurotoxicity of haloperidol (HA), a highly lipophilic antipsychotic, as a model of antipsychotics poisoning. We used six groups of five male rabbits. Two groups received distilled water intravenously followed by infusions of either 18 mL/kg of normal saline or ILE 20%, after 30 minutes. The third group received 18 mL/kg of normal saline after HA (2.6 mg/kg) administration. The three other groups received ILE 20% solution (6, 12, and 18 mL/kg) following HA injection. Catalepsy scores, temperature, pupil size, and mortality rate were measured at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 24 hours after HA administration began. Blood and tissue samples were taken from all animals at 24 hours or at death time for biochemical, cell count, and pathological studies. ILE reversed cataleptic scores, miotic pupils, and hypothermia of HA intoxication much faster than normal saline (P < 0.001). Biochemical complications and mortality rate of the animals were significantly higher in the HA + 18 mL/Kg ILE group. ILE reversed sings of HA neurotoxicity; however, synergistic effect of high dose of ILE and HA increased complications and mortality. PMID:24971362

  8. Evaluating the effects and safety of intravenous lipid emulsion on haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Vahabzadeh, Maryam; Etemad, Leila; Memar, Bahram; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    There are many reports on the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) as an antidote in drugs related toxicities. We determined the effects of ILE on neurotoxicity of haloperidol (HA), a highly lipophilic antipsychotic, as a model of antipsychotics poisoning. We used six groups of five male rabbits. Two groups received distilled water intravenously followed by infusions of either 18 mL/kg of normal saline or ILE 20%, after 30 minutes. The third group received 18 mL/kg of normal saline after HA (2.6 mg/kg) administration. The three other groups received ILE 20% solution (6, 12, and 18 mL/kg) following HA injection. Catalepsy scores, temperature, pupil size, and mortality rate were measured at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 24 hours after HA administration began. Blood and tissue samples were taken from all animals at 24 hours or at death time for biochemical, cell count, and pathological studies. ILE reversed cataleptic scores, miotic pupils, and hypothermia of HA intoxication much faster than normal saline (P < 0.001). Biochemical complications and mortality rate of the animals were significantly higher in the HA + 18 mL/Kg ILE group. ILE reversed sings of HA neurotoxicity; however, synergistic effect of high dose of ILE and HA increased complications and mortality. PMID:24971362

  9. Identification of Risk Factors for Intravenous Infiltration among Hospitalized Children: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study was aimed to identify risk factors of intravenous (IV) infiltration for hospitalized children. The participants were 1,174 children admitted to a general hospital, who received peripheral intravenous injection therapy at least once, and had complete records. Data were analyzed with frequency and percentage or mean and standard deviation were calculated, and odds ratio (OR) from univariate and multiple logistic regressions. The number and % of infiltrations were 92 and 7.8%, respectively. IV infiltration risk factors were lower limb (OR = 1.72), phenytoin (OR = 11.03), 10% dextrose (OR = 6.55), steroids (OR = 6.21), vancomycin (OR = 4.10), high-concentration electrolytes (OR = 3.49), and ampicillin/sulbactam combination (OR = 3.37). Nurses working at children’s hospitals should consider the risk of IV infiltration for children receiving IV infusion therapy and make a preventive effort to identify IV infiltration in high-risk children at an early stage. PMID:27351488

  10. Effect of central glucagon infusion on macronutrient selection in rats.

    PubMed

    Komenami, N; Su, F H; Thibault, L

    1996-02-01

    Compared were the light-dark pattern of absolute energy intake and macronutrient selection of male Wistar rats intracerebroventricularly infused with glucagon (5 ng/h) or saline for 7 days in a three-way selection of macronutrients. Glucagon infusion induced a decrease in 24 h and nocturnal energy intake, whereas no significant change in kcal intake accompanied vehicle infusion. The decrease in kcal intake was due to a suppression of nocturnal ingestion of carbohydrate. This parameter was left unaffected with central vehicle infusion. Glucagon-infused rats had a significantly lower body weight gain than those infused with vehicle. Our study supports the hypothesis of central glucagon's suppressive effect on food intake, but reveals that the latter reflects a lower disposition to eat carbohydrate during the dark phase. The present work emphasizes the role of glucagon in the circadian regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  11. Remote ischemic postconditioning enhances cell retention in the myocardium after intravenous administration of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qin; Song, Peng; Wang, Enshi; Li, Jun; Hu, Shengshou; Zhang, Hao

    2013-03-01

    Efficacy of intravenous administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for myocardial infarction (MI) is limited by low cell retention in the damaged myocardium. Previous studies indicated that remote ischemic conditioning could protect against ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury by release of various cytokines including stromal cell derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α). However, whether remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) can also enhance the retention of infused cells in the myocardium by activating MSC homing is unclear. In this study, RIPostC was induced with 4cycles of 5min occlusion and reperfusion of the abdominal aorta in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats which underwent ligation of the coronary artery 1week previously. Cytokine levels in serum and myocardium were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 1, 6, 24 and 48h after RIPostC. Then, a total of 4×10(6) male MSCs were infused intravenously at 24h after RIPostC. The number of survived cells in the myocardium was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis for Y chromosome and the heart function was evaluated by echocardiography at 1month after cell infusion. Furthermore, 10μg/kg rabbit anti-rat CXCR4 polyclonal antibody was injected intraperitoneally to prove the role of SDF-1α for RIPostC. RIPostC induced an increase in SDF-1α in serum at 1h and enhanced SDF-1α transcription and protein synthesis in the myocardium at 24h after the procedure. 1month after cell transplantation, RIPostC significantly increased MSC myocardial retention by 79.1±12.3% and thereby contributed to enhanced cardiac function in comparison with cell transplantation without RIPostC. Furthermore, blockade with a CXCR4-specific antibody after RIPostC markedly attenuated the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy. We conclude that RIPostC activated SDF-1α expression and enhanced retention of the infused MSCs in the injured myocardium. Priming of the heart with RIPostC might be a novel

  12. Simple and rapid analysis of endocrine disruptors in liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions by automated in-tube solid-phase microextraction/high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Kurie; Narimatsu, Shizuo; Izushi, Fumio; Kataoka, Hiroyuki

    2003-07-14

    A simple and rapid method was developed for analyzing contamination of endocrine disruptors in liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions. Endocrine disrupting compounds such as bisphenol A (BPA), alkylphenols and phthalates were quantitated by on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (in-tube SPME/HPLC) with UV detection. The liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions could be used directly without any pretreatment, and the BPA, alkylphenols and phthalates in these solutions were automatically analyzed. The limits of quantification for these compounds were 1-10 ng/ml. Recoveries of these compounds spiked to the intravenous injection solutions was over 80%, except for some phthalates. Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) was detected at a concentration of 7-60 ng/ml in most intravenous injection solutions in plastic containers, but it was not detected in solutions in glass bottles. Diethyl phthalate, di-n-propyl phthalate, DBP and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were also detected in syrup, lotion and eye drops in plastic containers. On the other hand, BPA and alkylphenols were not detected at all in these solutions. DEHP contamination from an administration set increased when total vitamin formulation was added to the infusion solution. DEHP was easily leached from polyvinyl chloride tubing by polysorbate 80. The in-tube SPME/HPLC method is simple, rapid and automatic, and it provides a useful tool for the screening and determination of endocrine disruptor contamination in liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions.

  13. Supercritical Fluid Infusion of Iron Additives in Polymeric Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazem, Negin; Taylor, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was the experimentation to measure preparation of iron nanophases within polymeric matrices via supercritical fluid infusion of iron precursors followed by thermal reduction. Another objective was to determine if supercritical CO2 could infuse into the polymer. The experiment is described along with the materials, and the supercritical fluid infusion and cure procedures. X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron micrographs were obtained. The results are summarized in charts, and tables.

  14. Clinically relevant infusion rates of mu-opioid agonist remifentanil cause bradypnea in decerebrate dogs but not via direct effects in the pre-Bötzinger complex region.

    PubMed

    Mustapic, Sanda; Radocaj, Tomislav; Sanchez, Antonio; Dogas, Zoran; Stucke, Astrid G; Hopp, Francis A; Stuth, Eckehard A E; Zuperku, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Systemic administration of mu-opioids at clinical doses for analgesia typically slows respiratory rate. Mu-opioid receptors (MORs) on pre-Bötzinger Complex (pre-BötC) respiratory neurons, the putative kernel of respiratory rhythmogenesis, are potential targets. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of pre-BötC MORs to the bradypnea produced in vivo by intravenous administration of clinically relevant infusion rates of remifentanil (remi), a short-acting, potent mu-opioid analgesic. In decerebrate dogs, multibarrel micropipettes were used to record pre-BötC neuronal activity and to eject the opioid antagonist naloxone (NAL, 0.5 mM), the glutamate agonist D-homocysteic acid (DLH, 20 mM), or the MOR agonist [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO, 100 microM). Inspiratory and expiratory durations (T(I) and T(E)) and peak phrenic nerve activity (PPA) were measured from the phrenic neurogram. The pre-BötC was functionally identified by its rate altering response (typically tachypnea) to DLH microinjection. During intravenous remi-induced bradypnea (approximately 60% decrease in central breathing frequency, f(B)), bilateral injections of NAL in the pre-BötC did not change T(I), T(E), f(B), and PPA. Also, NAL picoejected onto single pre-BötC neurons depressed by intravenous remi had no effect on their discharge. In contrast, approximately 60 microg/kg of intravenous NAL rapidly reversed all remi-induced effects. In a separate group of dogs, microinjections of DAMGO in the pre-BötC increased f(B) by 44%, while subsequent intravenous remi infusion more than offset this DAMGO induced tachypnea. These results indicate that mu-opioids at plasma concentrations that cause profound analgesia produce their bradypneic effect via MORs located outside the pre-BötC region.

  15. Fentanyl Pharmacokinetics in Pregnant Sheep after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration to the Ewe.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Emma M; Voipio, Hanna-Marja; Laaksonen, Sakari; Haapala, Linnea; Räsänen, Juha; Acharya, Ganesh; Erkinaro, Tiina; Haapsamo, Mervi; Hautajärvi, Heidi; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Heikkinen, Aki T

    2015-09-01

    Fentanyl is used for pain treatment during pregnancy in human beings and animals. However, fentanyl pharmacokinetics during pregnancy has not been fully established. The aim of this study was to characterize fentanyl pharmacokinetics in pregnant sheep after intravenous and transdermal dosing during surgical procedure performed to ewe and foetus. Pharmacokinetic parameters reported for non-pregnant sheep and nominal transdermal dose rate were utilized for a priori calculation to achieve analgesic fentanyl concentration (0.5-2 ng/ml) in maternal plasma. A total of 20 Aland landrace ewes at 118-127 gestational days were used. In the first protocol, 1 week before surgery, 10 animals received 2 μg/kg fentanyl intravenous bolus, and on the operation day, transdermal fentanyl patches at nominal dose rate of 2 μg/kg/hr were applied to antebrachium, and ewes were then given a 2 μg/kg intravenous bolus followed by an intra-operative 2.5 μg/kg/hr infusion. In the second protocol, 10 animals received fentanyl only as transdermal patches on the operation day and oxycodone for rescue analgesia. The data were analysed with population pharmacokinetic modelling. Intra- and post-operative fentanyl concentrations were similar and slightly lower than the a priori predictions, and elimination and distribution clearances appeared slower during than before or after the surgery. Transdermal patches provided sustained fentanyl absorption for up to 5 days, but the absorption rate was slower than the nominal dose rate and showed a high interindividual variability. Further research is warranted to evaluate the clinical relevance of the observations made in sheep.

  16. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  17. A multicenter randomized controlled trial of intravenous magnesium for sickle cell pain crisis in children.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, David C; Scott, J Paul; Badaki-Makun, Oluwakemi; Darbari, Deepika S; Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Airewele, Gladstone E; Ellison, Angela M; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Mahajan, Prashant; Sarnaik, Sharada A; Casper, T Charles; Cook, Lawrence J; Dean, J Michael; Leonard, Julie; Hulbert, Monica L; Powell, Elizabeth C; Liem, Robert I; Hickey, Robert; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Hillery, Cheryl A; Nimmer, Mark; Panepinto, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium, a vasodilator, anti-inflammatory, and pain reliever, could alter the pathophysiology of sickle cell pain crises. We hypothesized that intravenous magnesium would shorten length of stay, decrease opioid use, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) for pediatric patients hospitalized with sickle cell pain crises. The Magnesium for Children in Crisis (MAGiC) study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous magnesium vs normal saline placebo conducted at 8 sites within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN). Children 4 to 21 years old with hemoglobin SS or Sβ(0) thalassemia requiring hospitalization for pain were eligible. Children received 40 mg/kg of magnesium or placebo every 8 hours for up to 6 doses plus standard therapy. The primary outcome was length of stay in hours from the time of first study drug infusion, compared using a Van Elteren test. Secondary outcomes included opioid use and HRQL. Of 208 children enrolled, 204 received the study drug (101 magnesium, 103 placebo). Between-group demographics and prerandomization treatment were similar. The median interquartile range (IQR) length of stay was 56.0 (27.0-109.0) hours for magnesium vs 47.0 (24.0-99.0) hours for placebo (P = .24). Magnesium patients received 1.46 mg/kg morphine equivalents vs 1.28 mg/kg for placebo (P = .12). Changes in HRQL before discharge and 1 week after discharge were similar (P > .05 for all comparisons). The addition of intravenous magnesium did not shorten length of stay, reduce opioid use, or improve quality of life in children hospitalized for sickle cell pain crisis. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01197417.

  18. Intravenous paracetamol versus intramuscular pethidine in relief of labour pain in primigravid women

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Mohammad-Hasan; Mojibian, Mahdiye; Pishgahi, Alireza; Mallah, Fatemeh; Dareshiri, Shahla; Mohammadi, Sahar; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intramuscular pethidine is one of most common opioids used for labour analgesia. There are a number of concerns in the literature regarding the use of pethidine. The aim of this study is to compare analgesic efficacy of paracetamol with pethidine for labour pain in normal vaginal delivery. Materials and Methods: In this single-blinded, randomised control trial, 80 primigravid singleton women with full-term pregnancy candidate for normal vaginal delivery, were entered the trial and divided in to pethidine (A) and paracetamol (B) groups. At the time of admission, age and body mass index of mother and gestational age based on last day of period were recorded. In both groups, intravenous promethazine and hyoscine were administered to each patient at the first stage of delivery. From beginning of active phase of delivery, patients in group A received 50 mg intramuscular pethidine injection. At the same time patients in group B, received an intravenous solution infusion containing 1000 mg paracetamol and 300 cc of normal saline. After child birth, average labour pain was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) by direct questioning from patient in both groups. Results: After patients' selection, 19 individual omitted during study due to exclusion criteria and finally 30 patients in paracetamol group and 31 patients in pethidine group remained to enter the trial. There was no significant difference in age and BMI of mothers between both groups (P > 0.05). Maternal age and labour duration in paracetamol group had no meaningful difference with maternal age and labour duration of patients in pethidine group (P > 0.05). The average VAS pain score was significantly lower in paracetamol comparing to that of pethidine group (8.366 out of 10, 9.612 out of 10, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: It is concluded that intravenous paracetamol is more effective than intramuscular pethidine to relief labour pain in normal vaginal delivery. PMID:24970971

  19. Effect of intravenous amino acids on interdigestive antroduodenal motility and small bowel transit time

    PubMed Central

    Gielkens, H; van den Biggelaar, A; Vecht, J; Onkenhout, W; Lamers, C; Masclee, A

    1999-01-01

    Background—Patients on total parenteral nutrition have an increased risk of developing gallstones because of gall bladder hypomotility. High dose amino acids may prevent biliary stasis by stimulating gall bladder emptying. 
Aims—To investigate whether intravenous amino acids also influence antroduodenal motility. 
Methods—Eight healthy volunteers received, on three separate occasions, intravenous saline (control), low dose amino acids (LDA), or high dose amino acids (HDA). Antroduodenal motility was recorded by perfusion manometry and duodenocaecal transit time (DCTT) using the lactulose breath hydrogen test. 
Results—DCTT was significantly prolonged during LDA and HDA treatment compared with control. The interdigestive motor pattern was maintained and migrating motor complex (MMC) cycle length was significantly reduced during HDA compared with control and LDA due to a significant reduction in phase II duration. Significantly fewer phase IIIs originated in the gastric antrum during LDA and HDA compared with control. Duodenal phase II motility index was significantly reduced during HDA, but not during LDA, compared with control. 
Conclusions—Separate intravenous infusion of high doses of amino acids in healthy volunteers: (1) modulates interdigestive antroduodenal motility; (2) shortens MMC cycle length due to a reduced duration of phase II with a lower contractile incidence both in the antrum and duodenum (phase I remains unchanged whereas the effect on phase III is diverse: in the antrum phase III is suppressed and in the duodenum the frequency is increased); and (3) prolongs interdigestive DCTT. 

 Keywords: amino acids; antroduodenal motility; small bowel transit time; total parenteral nutrition PMID:9895384

  20. A Case of Influenza Associated Fulminant Myocarditis Successfully Treated with Intravenous Peramivir

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Han Saem; Kim, Sun Jin; Yoon, Young Kyung; Sohn, Jang Wook

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with fulminant myocarditis caused by influenza A virus, who presented with acute-onset heart failure and cardiogenic shock and was treated successfully with single dose of intravenous peramivir and with pharmacologic hemodynamic support. A 45-year-old Korean woman presented to our emergency department (ED) with shortness of breath and an episode of seizure that developed abruptly 5 hours before she arrived in the ED. She had a history of recurrent epileptic seizure 25 years ago, but denied other specific medical illnesses. In the ED, she was hypoxemic (arterial partial pressure of oxygen, 59.8 mmHg on room air) and chest radiography revealed bilateral alveolar infiltrates. A rapid antigen test for influenza A virus was positive, and she was administered a single dose of peramivir (300 mg) intravenously. Five hours later, the patient's dyspnea had worsened and she was hypotensive (blood pressure, 86/53 mmHg), requiring norepinephrine infusion. Further evaluation disclosed an increased cardiac troponin I level of 1.36 ng/mL and a depressed left ventricular ejection fraction of 30%. Under the diagnosis of influenza A-associated myocarditis and cardiogenic shock, she was managed with continuous critical care in the intensive care unit. On day 3, the patient's dyspnea began to resolve and her ventricular function returned to normal. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for influenza viruses in serial nasopharyngeal aspirates were positive for influenza A (hH3N2) with a threshold cycle value of 27.39 on day 2, but these became negative by day 4. The patient recovered and was discharged on day 9 after admission. In conclusion, this case indicates that intravenous peramivir might be an effective antiviral agent for the treatment of severe influenza A virus infection. PMID:26788413

  1. A multicenter randomized controlled trial of intravenous magnesium for sickle cell pain crisis in children

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J. Paul; Badaki-Makun, Oluwakemi; Darbari, Deepika S.; Chumpitazi, Corrie E.; Airewele, Gladstone E.; Ellison, Angela M.; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Mahajan, Prashant; Sarnaik, Sharada A.; Casper, T. Charles; Cook, Lawrence J.; Dean, J. Michael; Leonard, Julie; Hulbert, Monica L.; Powell, Elizabeth C.; Liem, Robert I.; Hickey, Robert; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Nimmer, Mark; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium, a vasodilator, anti-inflammatory, and pain reliever, could alter the pathophysiology of sickle cell pain crises. We hypothesized that intravenous magnesium would shorten length of stay, decrease opioid use, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) for pediatric patients hospitalized with sickle cell pain crises. The Magnesium for Children in Crisis (MAGiC) study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous magnesium vs normal saline placebo conducted at 8 sites within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN). Children 4 to 21 years old with hemoglobin SS or Sβ0 thalassemia requiring hospitalization for pain were eligible. Children received 40 mg/kg of magnesium or placebo every 8 hours for up to 6 doses plus standard therapy. The primary outcome was length of stay in hours from the time of first study drug infusion, compared using a Van Elteren test. Secondary outcomes included opioid use and HRQL. Of 208 children enrolled, 204 received the study drug (101 magnesium, 103 placebo). Between-group demographics and prerandomization treatment were similar. The median interquartile range (IQR) length of stay was 56.0 (27.0-109.0) hours for magnesium vs 47.0 (24.0-99.0) hours for placebo (P = .24). Magnesium patients received 1.46 mg/kg morphine equivalents vs 1.28 mg/kg for placebo (P = .12). Changes in HRQL before discharge and 1 week after discharge were similar (P > .05 for all comparisons). The addition of intravenous magnesium did not shorten length of stay, reduce opioid use, or improve quality of life in children hospitalized for sickle cell pain crisis. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01197417. PMID:26232172

  2. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  3. [Intracranial pressure and hypotonic infusion solutions].

    PubMed

    Zander, R

    2009-04-01

    The physiological osmolality of plasma is 288+/-5 mosmol/kgH2O when measured by freezing-point depression. The theoretical osmolarity (290 mosmol/l) calculated from composition, osmotic coefficient (0.93) and water content (0.94) is practically identical. Saline (0.9% NaCl) has an osmolarity of 308 mosmol/l and an osmolality of 286 mosmol/kgH2O (water content ca. 1.0). The osmolality in vivo is more important than that measured in vitro. A 5% dextrose solution in water (D5W) is isotonic in vitro, but the in vivo effect is that of pure water because the glucose is rapidly metabolized. Every infusion fluid should be isotonic (290+/-10 mosmol/kgH2O). Hypotonic solutions must move water from the extracellular space to the intracellular space. Typical examples are Ringer's lactate and acetate solutions (256 instead of 290 mosmol/kgH2O). The brain (central nervous system, CNS) is the critical organ: The rigidly shaped skull contains three incompressible compartments, only blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be partially, but limitedly shifted outside the skull. The consequence of a volume load is an increasing intracranial pressure (ICP). A decrease in plasma osmolality by only 3% produces an increase in ICP of about 15 mmHg. Therefore, infusion of larger volumes of hypotonic solutions should be avoided at all costs.

  4. Reduction of central neuropathic pain with ketamine infusion in a patient with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tony Chung Tung; Yeung, Stephen Tung; Lee, Sujin; Skavinski, Kira; Liao, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ehlers–Danlos syndrome frequently causes acute and chronic pain because of joint subluxations and dislocations secondary to hypermobility. Current treatments for pain related to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and central pain syndrome are inadequate. This case report discusses the therapeutic use of ketamine intravenous infusion as an alternative. Case report A 27-year-old Caucasian female with a history of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and spinal cord ischemic myelopathy resulting in central pain syndrome, presented with severe generalized body pain refractory to multiple pharmacological interventions. After a 7-day course of ketamine intravenous infusion under controlled generalized sedation in the intensive care unit, the patient reported a dramatic reduction in pain levels from 7–8 out of 10 to 0–3 out of 10 on a numeric rating scale and had a significant functional improvement. The patient tolerated a reduction in her pain medication regimen, which originally included opioids, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conclusion Ketamine infusion treatment has been used in various pain syndromes, including central neuropathic pain, ischemic pain, and regional pain syndrome. Reports have suggested that ketamine modulates pain by the regression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor to a resting state. As such, propagation of nociceptive signal to brain is interrupted allowing for the restoration of physiological balance between pain inhibition and facilitation. The present report shows that this treatment option can be used in patients with refractory central pain syndrome in the setting of spinal cord myelopathy secondary to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. In addition, as seen in this case, this protocol can potentially decrease the chronic use of pain medication, such as opioids.

  5. Reduction of central neuropathic pain with ketamine infusion in a patient with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tony Chung Tung; Yeung, Stephen Tung; Lee, Sujin; Skavinski, Kira; Liao, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ehlers–Danlos syndrome frequently causes acute and chronic pain because of joint subluxations and dislocations secondary to hypermobility. Current treatments for pain related to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and central pain syndrome are inadequate. This case report discusses the therapeutic use of ketamine intravenous infusion as an alternative. Case report A 27-year-old Caucasian female with a history of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and spinal cord ischemic myelopathy resulting in central pain syndrome, presented with severe generalized body pain refractory to multiple pharmacological interventions. After a 7-day course of ketamine intravenous infusion under controlled generalized sedation in the intensive care unit, the patient reported a dramatic reduction in pain levels from 7–8 out of 10 to 0–3 out of 10 on a numeric rating scale and had a significant functional improvement. The patient tolerated a reduction in her pain medication regimen, which originally included opioids, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conclusion Ketamine infusion treatment has been used in various pain syndromes, including central neuropathic pain, ischemic pain, and regional pain syndrome. Reports have suggested that ketamine modulates pain by the regression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor to a resting state. As such, propagation of nociceptive signal to brain is interrupted allowing for the restoration of physiological balance between pain inhibition and facilitation. The present report shows that this treatment option can be used in patients with refractory central pain syndrome in the setting of spinal cord myelopathy secondary to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. In addition, as seen in this case, this protocol can potentially decrease the chronic use of pain medication, such as opioids. PMID:27695362

  6. Infusion pump inspection frequencies. How often is inspection really needed?

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    As noted in this issue's Evaluation of infusion pump analyzers, the frequency at which a facility inspects its infusion pumps can help determine its need for one or more analyzers. It can also have a financial impact on the clinical engineering department. In this article, we discuss inspection issues affecting infusion pumps, including our recommendations and how facilities can set intervals for their equipment. (For ECRI's procedure for inspecting infusion devices, refer to Procedure/Checklist 416-0595 in the Health Devices Inspection and Preventive Maintenance [IPM] System; contact ECRI's Communications Department at [610] 825-6000, ext. 888, for more information about this publication.) PMID:9595314

  7. Broadening infusion specialization as an adjunct to organizational sustainability.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britt M

    2014-01-01

    As changes in reimbursement structures create a stringent focus on the prevention of infection and other infusion-related complications that predispose to infection, it becomes important to examine the impact of vascular access and infusion specialty practices and procedures on overall organization sustainability and to implement strategies for disseminating infusion expertise to a broader contingent of nurses. This article discusses infusion nursing practice as it impacts the organization as a whole and details a performance improvement initiative for implementing a novel peripherally inserted central catheter tip determination technology that encompasses many of the goals of the industry standards. PMID:24384884

  8. Concurrent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion and Intra-arterial Drug Infusion via Ipsilateral Common Carotid Artery Catheter in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Jessica A.; Chen, Bo; Lei, I-Farn; Pereira, Benedict; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Lyden, Patrick D.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-clinical development of therapy for acute ischemic stroke requires robust animal models; the rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model using a nylon filament inserted into the internal carotid artery is the most popular. Drug screening requires targeted delivery of test substance in a controlled manner. To address these needs, we developed a novel method for delivering substances directly into the ischemic brain during MCAo in the awake rat. An indwelling catheter is placed in the common carotid artery ipsilateral to the occlusion at the time of the surgical placement of the occluding filament. The internal and common carotid arteries are left patent to allow superfusion anterograde. The surgeries can be completed quickly to allow rapid recovery from anesthesia; tests substances can be infused at any given time for any given duration. To simulate clinical scenarios, the occluding filament can be removed minutes or hours later (reperfusion) followed by therapeutic infusions. By delivering drug intra-arterially to the target tissue, “first pass” loss in the liver is reduced and drug effects are concentrated in the ischemic zone. To validate our method, rats were infused with Evans blue dye either intra-arterially or intravenously during a 4 hour MCAo. After a 30 minute reperfusion period, the dye was extracted from each hemisphere and quantitated with a spectrophotometer. Significantly more dye was measured in the ischemic hemispheres that received the dye intra-arterially. PMID:23261656

  9. Effect of a recombinant dimeric tumor necrosis factor receptor on inflammatory responses to intravenous endotoxin in normal humans.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Coyle, S M; Levi, M; Jansen, P M; Dentener, M; Barbosa, K; Buurman, W A; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W; Agosti, J M; Lowry, S F

    1997-05-15

    To determine the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, 12 healthy subjects received an intravenous injection with LPS (2 ng/kg) preceded by infusion of either a recombinant human dimeric TNF receptor type II-IgG fusion protein (TNFR:Fc; 6 mg/m2; n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6) from -30 minutes to directly before LPS injection. LPS elicited a transient increase in plasma TNF activity, peaking after 1.5 hours (219 +/- 42 pg/mL; P < .05). Infusion of TNFR:Fc completely neutralized endogenous TNF activity. LPS administration was associated with an early activation of fibrinolysis (plasma concentrations of tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator activity, and plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes), followed by inhibition (plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor type I), changes that were completely prevented by TNFR:Fc. By contrast, TNFR:Fc did not influence LPS-induced activation of coagulation (plasma levels of prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 and thrombin-antithrombin III complexes). TNFR:Fc strongly inhibited endothelial cell activation (plasma levels of soluble E-selectin), modestly reduced neutrophil responses (neutrophilia and plasma concentrations of elastase-alpha1-antitrypsin complexes and lactoferrin), but did not affect the release of secretory phospholipase A2 or lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (P > .05). Infusion of TNFR:Fc only (without LPS) in another 6 normal subjects did not induce any inflammatory response. These data indicate that TNF is involved in only some inflammatory responses to intravenous LPS in humans.

  10. Pulmonary toxicity of inhaled and intravenous talc.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, M A

    1990-07-01

    Talc (magnesium silicate) is a widely used, generally considered benign substance. It is principally used as an inert filler material in drug tablets or as a drying ingredient in baby powders. However, in both cases inappropriate use can lead to severe pulmonary toxicological responses. On the one hand, intravenous injection of 'solubilized', CNS active pills can produce microemboli in small pulmonary vessels. This can lead to various degrees of granuloma formation, compromised pulmonary function, or death. Overzealous application of baby powder can also produce severe pulmonary complications if the infant inspires the powder. Although the data are relatively scarce, a number of reports suggest the existence of a chronic problem in this area.

  11. Advances in Pediatric Intravenous Iron Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be very common worldwide. Intravenous (IV) iron is an infrequently used therapeutic option in children with IDA despite numerous studies in adults and several small but notable pediatric studies showing efficacy and safety. Presently, the availability of newer IV iron products allows for replacement of the total iron deficit at a single setting. These products appear safer compared to the high molecular weight iron dextrans of the past. Herein, we review the medical literature and suggest that front line use of IV iron should be strongly considered in diseases associated with IDA in children.

  12. Intravenous infection of mice with Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    May, R G; John, D T

    1982-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri produced fatal meningoencephalitis in mice following intravenous (i.v.) inoculation. Amebae were present in the peripheral circulation for 120 minutes after i.v. inoculation with a dose of 10(7) trophozoites per mouse. Amebae were cultured from and observed in brain (days 1-21), lung (days 1-12), and liver and kidney (days 1-5). Infected mice exhibited weight loss, leukocytosis, reduced lymphocyte/neutrophil ratio, neurologic symptoms, and mortality. Histologically, the disease was characterized by an acute, hemorrhagic, necrotizing meningoencephalitis. Although amebae were detected in tissues other than brain, pathologic involvement of these tissues was minimal.

  13. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial of Continuous Intravenous Ketorolac vs Placebo for Adjuvant Pain Control After Renal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grimsby, Gwen M.; Conley, Sarah P.; Trentman, Terrence L.; Castle, Erik P.; Andrews, Paul E.; Mihalik, Laurie A.; Hentz, Joseph G.; Humphreys, Mitchell R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel, continuous intravenous infusion of ketorolac, a powerful nonopioid analgesic, for postoperative pain control. Patients and Methods A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a continuous infusion of ketorolac tromethamine in 1 L of normal saline vs placebo was performed in 135 patients aged 18 to 75 years after laparoscopic donor nephrectomy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy completed from October 7, 2008, through July 21, 2010. Primary study end points were the 24-hour differences in visual analog pain scores and total narcotic consumption, whereas secondary end points were differences in urine output, serum creatinine level, and hemoglobin level. Results The study was stopped after randomization of 135 patients (68 in the ketorolac group and 67 in the placebo group) when interim analysis indicated that the difference in mean pain scores between the 2 groups (difference, 0.6) was smaller than the 1-point threshold set forth in the power calculations. No statistically significant change was noted in hemoglobin levels from preoperative to postoperative values (P=.13) or in postoperative serum creatinine levels (P=.13). Conclusion Although continuous infusion of ketorolac produced only a modest decrease in the use of narcotics, it appears to offer a safe therapeutic option for nonnarcotic pain control. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00765128 and NCT00765232 PMID:23058854

  14. Intravenous administration of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in patients of PiZ and PiM phenotype. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, K.M.; Smith, R.M.; Spragg, R.G.; Tisi, G.M.

    1988-06-24

    Nine patients with moderate pulmonary emphysema, six of PiZ phenotype and three of PiM phenotype, have received a single intravenous infusion of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (human) (A1PI), in a dose of 60 mg/kg over a 30-minute period. They also received a tracer dose (300 microCi) of /sup 131/I-labeled A1PI. No active or passive immunization against hepatitis was given. No acute toxicity was observed. Compared with baseline data, significant elevations of serum A1PI (measured both antigenically and as anti-elastase activity) occurred, with a serum half-life approximating 110 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, obtained 48 hours after infusion, reflected a significant increase in A1PI concentration versus baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid values. Serial gamma camera images of the lungs confirmed persistence of enhanced lung radioactivity for several days. Urinary desmosine excretion did not change following A1PI infusion. During the period of follow-up thus far, no patient has had chronic toxicity, results of liver function tests have been stable, and there has been no development of hepatitis B antigen or antibodies to hepatitis B surface or core antigens.

  15. [Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome following Scoliosis Surgery during Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia (IV-PCA) with Fentanyl: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroyoshi; Izumi, Kaoru; Kawasaki, Sho; Jimi, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Rieko; Mizuno, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Compression and obstruction of the duodenum can occur after surgical correction of spinal scoliosis. We report a case of 15-year-old girl who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) following scoliosis surgery. On the 4th postoperative day, the patient complained of nausea and vomiting, which was considered as side effects of opioids as she was treated with intravenous fentanyl infusion with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device. Nasogastric tube was placed and background infusion rate of the PCA was tapered. On the 5th postoperative day, fentanyl infusion was stopped, but she complained of persistent nausea and vomiting. Barium upper gastrointestinal series and abdominal echography revealed compression in the third portion of the duodenum between the superior mesenteric artery and aorta on the 7th postoperative day. She responded to conservative treatment (nutritional and fluid supplementation), which lasted about two weeks. She was discharged home on the 51st postoperative day. SMAS is rare but sometimes carries serious complications. Vomiting following scoliosis surgery should be examined thoroughly including the possibility of SMAS, especially during postoperative pain management with opioids (i. e., IV-PCA with fentanyl). Early diagnosis and institution of appropriate conservative therapy is essential to reduce the likelihood of future complications and avoid the need for surgery.

  16. Something's missing: peripheral intravenous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Glassberg, Elon; Lending, Gadi; Abbou, Benyamine; Lipsky, Ari M

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of peripheral intravenous catheter fracture occurring during a routine training exercise. The supervising instructor immediately placed a venous tourniquet proximal to the insertion site and urgently transported the patient to the hospital. The missing catheter segment was identified within the median cubital vein under ultrasonography and was removed by venous cutdown under local anesthesia. An investigation determined that reinsertion of the needle into the advanced catheter likely caused the fracture and that application of a tourniquet may have prevented embolism of the fractured segment. Our literature review suggested that peripheral intravenous catheter fracture is likely vastly underreported, with only one prior case identified in the English literature. Action was taken following the event to educate all Israeli Defense Force medical providers regarding both proper preventive measures and recognition and treatment of catheter fracture should it occur. This case highlights the importance of health care providers being aware of the possibility of catheter fracture, as well as steps to take to prevent and mitigate its occurrence.

  17. The Human Experience with Intravenous Levodopa

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Shan H.; Abraham, Natalia K.; Geiger, Christopher L.; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies. Background: While safe intravenous (IV) use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND) application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data. Methods: Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit, and side effects. Results: We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959–1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. At least 2760 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson's disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis. Conclusion: At least 2760 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration. PMID:26779024

  18. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.A.; Glenny, R.W.; Godwin, J.D.; Hampson, N.B.; Cantino, M.E.; Reichenbach, D.D. )

    1991-03-01

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  19. Intravenous radionuclide cystography for the detection of vesicorenal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Pollet, J.E.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Davidson, A.I.; Miller, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Intravenous radionuclide cystography using a single intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, provides information on individual kidney function, coarse anatomy and vesicorenal reflux. This study investigates the effectiveness of intravenous radionuclide cystography in detecting reflux. In 58 children intravenous radionuclide cystography detected 53 ureters with reflux compared to 32 detected by voiding cystography. This difference was investigated further with patients in whom other test suggested reflux. While there was no statistically significant difference for patients having pyelonephritis or hydronephrosis, intravenous radionuclide cystography detected significantly more ureters with reflux in patients with abnormal ureteral orifices or infected urine and, therefore, predisposed to reflux. Intravenous radionuclide cystography is a more comprehensive and sensitive test for vesicorenal reflux than voiding cystography.

  20. Leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets after a short pharmacological stress by intravenous epinephrine and hydrocortisone in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Brohee, D; Vanhaeverbeek, M; Kennes, B; Neve, P

    1990-08-01

    Nine healthy volunteers received epinephrine and hydrocortisone intravenously in order to assess the typical acute response to a brief stress, of leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets, acute phase reactants and lymphocyte reactivity to T and B mitogens. At 10 min., all leukocyte subsets were increased, especially mononuclear cells. At 1 hour, moderate lymphopenia and monocytopenia occurred. At 6 hours, neutrophilia and eosinopenia were observed. During the lymphocytic early wave, all the lymphocyte subset counts increased, particularly T-suppressive/cytotoxic and natural killer cells. As a consequence, the percentage of T cells decreased and the CD4/CD8 ratio fell. No changes in acute phase reactants occurred over the 24 hours of the study. All leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets were normalized and mitogen reactivity was unchanged 24 hours after the stress. These typical shifts in leukocyte subsets could probe the adrenocortical and medullary response to an environmental stressor.