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Sample records for 1-hour ozone naaqs

  1. 75 FR 232 - Finding of Failure To Submit Certain State Implementation Plans Required for the 1-Hour Ozone NAAQS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Ozone NAAQS AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The EPA is... Implementation Plans (SIPs) for three ozone nonattainment areas to satisfy certain requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA) for the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). To accompany...

  2. Guidance on Developing Fee Programs Required by Clean Air Act Section 185 for the 1997 1-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This January 2010 memorandum provides additional guidance on fee collection programs for the 1997 1-hour ozone NAAQS, which are required as anti-backsliding measures during transition to the 1997 8-hour ozone standard.

  3. Ozone NAAQS Review: Policy Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is one of the six major air pollutants for which EPA has issued air quality criteria and established national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) based on those criteria. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, existing air...

  4. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti-backsliding provisions? 51.905 Section 51.905... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... implement the applicable requirements as defined in § 51.900(f), except as provided in paragraph...

  5. Ozone NAAQS Review: Risk/Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is one of the six major air pollutants for which EPA has issued air quality criteria and established national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) based on those criteria. The Clear Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, existing air ...

  6. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... met its obligation to have a fully-approved attainment demonstration SIP for the 1-hour NAAQS, the... SIP at the time of the effective date of designation and in addition to national or regional measures... obligation for an approved 1-hour ROP SIP, it must develop and submit to EPA all outstanding 1-hour ROP...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. (a... 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. The SIP revision also meets the requirements of Clean...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. (a... 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. The SIP revision also meets the requirements of Clean...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. (a... 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. The SIP revision also meets the requirements of Clean...

  10. 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Infrastructure Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Read about the EPA's infrastructure actions for the 2008 Ozone NAAQS. These actions are regarding states' failure to submit SIPs addressing various parts of the standards. Here you can read the federal register notices, fact sheets, and the docket folder.

  11. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS....

  12. Air Emissions Inventory Guidance for Implementation of Ozone and Particulate Matter NAAQS and Regional Haze Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance document on how to develop emission inventories to meet State Implementation Plan requirements for complying with the 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS), the revised particulate matter (PM) NAAQS, and the regional haze reg

  13. 76 FR 28661 - Interim Final Determination To Defer Sanctions, Sacramento Metro 1-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Interim Final Determination To Defer Sanctions, Sacramento Metro 1-Hour Ozone... the Sacramento Metro 1- hour Ozone nonattainment area (Sacramento Metro Area) to satisfy anti- backsliding requirements for the 1-hour Ozone standard. DATES: This interim final determination is...

  14. 2015 Revision to 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Supporting Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find tools for background ozone, maps of nonattainment areas, an overview of the proposal, and information on designations, monitoring and permitting requirements and a presentation on the 2015 ozone NAAQS revision.

  15. 2014 Proposed Revision to 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Supporting Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find information on the 2014 proposed ozone NAAQS revision, and find tools for background ozone, maps of nonattainment areas, an overview of the proposal, and information on designations, monitoring and permitting requirements

  16. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National...) Submit an 8-hour ozone attainment demonstration no later than 1 year following designations...

  17. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National...) Submit an 8-hour ozone attainment demonstration no later than 1 year following designations...

  18. Air Quality Modeling Technical Support Document for the 2015 Ozone NAAQS Preliminary Interstate Transport Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this technical support document (TSD) EPA describes the air quality modeling performed to support the 2015 ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) preliminary interstate transport assessment Notice of Data Availability (NODA).

  19. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  3. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  4. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  5. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  6. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  7. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  9. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  10. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  12. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  13. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  14. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  15. 77 FR 64036 - Determination of Attainment of the 1-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS or standard), and to exclude certain 2008 data caused by wildfire exceptional events... occurred due to wildfire exceptional events in 2008.\\1\\ In making its proposed determination, EPA proposed... ozone exceptional events that are caused by wildfires. These air quality determinations were...

  16. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  17. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  18. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  19. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  20. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  1. Air Quality Modeling Technical Support Document for the 2008 Ozone NAAQS Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Proposal

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this technical support document (TSD) we describe the air quality modeling performed to support the proposed Cross-State Air Pollution Rule for the 2008 ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

  2. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  3. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  4. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  5. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  6. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  7. Memoranda Associated with the Second External Review Draft of Health Risk and Exposure Assessments from the Current Review of Ozone NAAQS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Health and Environmental Impacts Division had to make corrections to some of the risk results included in earlier drafts of the Health Risk and Exposure Assessment from the current review of ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS).

  8. 77 FR 4940 - Determination of Failure To Attain by 2005 and Determination of Current Attainment of the 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    .... EPA, 375 F.3d 537(7th Cir. 2004) and Our Children's Earth Foundation v. EPA, No. 04-73032 (9thCir... monitored attainment of the 1-hour ozone NAAQS. EPA's review shows that the area has attained the 1-hour..., Associate Director, Office of Air Program Planning, Mailcode 3AP30, U.S. Environmental Protection...

  9. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment...

  10. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment...

  11. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment...

  12. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment...

  13. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment...

  14. 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Findings of Failure to Submit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This final action finds that 15 states and the District of Columbia have failed to submit specific state implementation plan (SIP) elements to satisfy certain nonattainment area, and/or Ozone Transport Region (OTR), planning requirements for the 2008 ozone

  15. 40 CFR 52.1174 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Appropriateness of a contingency measure will be determined by an urban airshed modeling analysis. The Governor or... NAAQS, determined not to be attributable to transport from upwind areas, is monitored, Michigan will... the area records a violation of the 1-hour ozone NAAQS, determined not to be attributable to...

  16. Fact Sheet - Managing Ozone Air Quality: Findings on Failure to Submit Elements of 1997 Ozone NAAQS State Implementation Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides a basic overview of the May 17, 2008 notice that 11 states missed their deadlines to submit their state implementation plans (SIPs). The deadlines are for submitting complete plans showing how they will meet the 1997 ozone standard

  17. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  18. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  19. 40 CFR 52.2275 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... strategy and regulations: Ozone. (a) Section 510.3 of revised Regulation V, which was submitted by the... Areas Did Not Attain the 1-Hour Ozone NAAQS. EPA has determined that the...

  20. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  1. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  2. 40 CFR 52.2275 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... strategy and regulations: Ozone. (a) Section 510.3 of revised Regulation V, which was submitted by the... Areas Did Not Attain the 1-Hour Ozone NAAQS. EPA has determined that the...

  3. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  4. 75 FR 51960 - Proposed Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AP30 Proposed Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New Source Review Anti-Backsliding Provisions for Former 1-Hour Ozone Standard AGENCY... designated nonattainment for the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS). The...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  10. 77 FR 8197 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... 1997 Ozone Standards for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... designations for the 2008 ozone NAAQS for transportation conformity purposes only. DATES: Comments must be... NAAQS D. Transportation Conformity and the 1997 Ozone NAAQS III. What are the proposed...

  11. Guidance for 1-Hour Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nonattainment Area State Implementation Plans (SIP) Submissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The document is intended to provide guidance and recommendations to state, local and tribal governments for the development of SIPs and tribal implementation plans (TIPs) under the 2010 1-hour primary NAAQS for Sulfur Dioxide (SO2).

  12. 78 FR 34177 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements AGENCY: Environmental... 2008 ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) (the ``2008 ozone NAAQS'') that...

  13. NODA for EPA's Updated Ozone Transport Modeling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find EPA's NODA for the Updated Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) along with the ExitExtension of Public Comment Period on CSAPR for the 2008 NAAQS.

  14. Updates to Information Presented in the Scope and Methods Plans for the Ozone NAAQS Health and Welfare Risk and Exposure Assessments, May 2012 Memo

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This memorandum provides an overview of changes to the scope and methods plan, and reasons for them, to inform the CASAC Ozone Panel and the public as they prepare to review the first drafts of the Risk and Exposure Assessments.

  15. Additional Clarification of Guidance for Implementation of the 1-hour NO2 NAAQS Under PSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  16. Guidance Concerning the Implementation of the 1-hour NO2 NAAQS for the PSD Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  17. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  18. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  19. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... designated nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS and for any area in a section 184 ozone transport...

  20. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... designated nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS and for any area in a section 184 ozone transport...

  1. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nonattainment area subject only to title I, part D, subpart 1 of the Act in accordance with § 51.902(b), the... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part 51... apply under the 8-hour NAAQS? 51.915 Section 51.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  2. Primary Sulfur Dioxide NAAQS Implementation Schedule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The effective date for the primary sulfur dioxide (SO2) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) established in 2012, is followed by designations of nonattainment areas and subsequently required state implementation plans (SIPs).

  3. PARTICULATE MATTER NAAQS RISK AND EXPOSURE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The PM REA assesses human exposure and health risks for particulate matter. To provide a quantitative assessment of PM exposures and health risks as one of the key information inputs to the Administrator in order to make an informed decision regarding the PM NAAQS. A tiered risk/exposure assessment will be conducted as part of the PM NAAQS review and will be peer reviewed by the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) of EPA’s Science Advisory Board.

  4. 76 FR 72919 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY..., ``Second External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants... review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. DATES: The public comment...

  5. 76 FR 17121 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY..., ``First External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants... review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. DATES: The public comment...

  6. 77 FR 30160 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... 1997 Ozone Standards for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... provides for the revocation of the 1997 ozone NAAQS for transportation conformity purposes to occur 1 year... Received C. Final Action VI. When is the EPA revoking the 1997 ozone NAAQS for transportation...

  7. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS? 51.913 Section 51.913 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... petition the Administrator for an exemption from NOX obligations under section 182(f) for any...

  8. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  9. Lead (Pb) NAAQS Review: Policy Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Policy Assessment (PA) is a component of the NAAQS review that bridges the gap between the scientific assessment contained in the Integrated Science Assessment and the judgments required of the EPA Administrator in determining whether it is appropriate to retain or revise the...

  10. NOx SOx Secondary NAAQS: Integrated Review Plan ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NOx SOx Secondary NAAQS Integrated Review Plan is the first document generated as part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) review process. The Plan presents background information, the schedule for the review, the process to be used in conducting the review, and the key policy-relevant science issues that will guide the review. The integrated review plan also discusses the frameworks for the various assessment documents to be prepared by the EPA as part of the review, including an Integrated Science Assessment (ISA), and as warranted, a Risk/Exposure Assessment (REA), and a Policy Assessment (PA). The primary purpose of the NOx SOx Secondary NAAQS Integrated Review Plan is to highlight the key policy-relevant issues to be considered in the Review of the Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur Secondary NAAQS. A draft of the integrated review plan will be the subject of an advisory review with the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) and made available to the public for review and comment.

  11. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  12. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  13. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  14. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  15. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  16. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  17. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  18. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  19. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  20. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  1. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  2. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS....

  4. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS....

  5. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS....

  6. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This...

  7. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In February 2006, EPA released the final document, Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Other Photochemical Oxidants. Tropospheric or surface-level ozone (O3) is one of six major air pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under the U.S. Clean Air Act. As mandated by the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must periodically review the scientific bases (or criteria) for the various NAAQS by assessing newly available scientific information on a given criteria air pollutant. This document, Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Other Photochemical Oxidants, is an updated revision of the 1996 Ozone Air Quality Criteria Document (O3 AQCD) that provided scientific bases for the current O3 NAAQS set in 1997. The Clean Air Act mandates periodic review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six common air pollutants, also referred to as criteria pollutants, including ozone.

  8. NOx SOx Secondary NAAQS: Integrated Review Plan - CASAC Advisory

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NOx SOx Secondary NAAQS Integrated Review Plan is the first document generated as part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) review process. The Plan presents background information, the schedule for the review, the process to be used in conducting the review,...

  9. Ozone: Stage Two Vapor Recovery Rule and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page includes the guidance document, fact sheet, memorandum, and final rule on removing Stage II Gasoline Vapor Control Programs from State Implementation Plans (SIP) for the Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

  10. Setting and Reviewing Standards to Control Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ozone standards are part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), which limit air pollution to protect health and the environment. Standards are periodically reviewed and updated, and air quality across the U.S. is measured against them.

  11. Ozone (O3) Standards - Policy Assessments from Current Review

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The policy assessment (PA) provides a transparent staff analysis of the scientific basis for alternative policy options for consideration by senior EPA management prior to rulemaking. These are the policy assessments used to develop the ozone NAAQS.

  12. Analyses of 1999 PM Data for the PM NAAQS Review

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These files document all analyses conducted in association with the EPA memorandum from Terence Fitz-Simons, Scott Mathias, and Mike Rizzo titled Analyses of 1999 PM Data for the PM NAAQS Review, November 17, 2000.

  13. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Georgia § 52.582 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Approval... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  15. 40 CFR 52.523 - Control strategy: Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone 52.523 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Florida § 52.523 Control strategy: Ozone (a) Disapproval. EPA is disapproving portions of Florida's infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  19. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  20. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Georgia § 52.582 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Approval... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40...

  1. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Georgia § 52.582 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Approval... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40...

  2. 40 CFR 52.523 - Control strategy: Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone 52.523 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Florida § 52.523 Control strategy: Ozone (a) Disapproval. EPA is disapproving portions of Florida's infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  4. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  5. 77 FR 34810 - Determination of Failure To Attain by 2005 and Determination of Current Attainment of the 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    .... 2004); and Our Children's Earth Foundation v. EPA, No. 04-73032 (9th Cir. June 28, 2005) (memorandum... attaining the revoked 1-hour ozone standard since 2008. EPA's determination that the area has attained the 1... inspection during normal business hours at the Air Protection Division, U.S. Environmental Protection...

  6. Ozone Risk Assessment Utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.; Jusko, M. J.; Clemmons, M. A.

    1999-08-10

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates are based on the EPA''s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.

  7. Transportation Conformity Guidance on the Revocation of the 1997 Primary Annual PM2.5 NAAQS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guidance describes how the revocation of the 1997 primary annual PM2.5 national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) will be implemented and when transportation conformity stops applying for this NAAQS fulfilling EPA's commitment to provide additional

  8. PREDICTING THE IMPACT OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE ON ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES FOR SETTING NATIONAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act provides for establishing National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to protect public welfare (including crops, forests, ecosystems, and soils) from adverrse effects of air pollutants, including tropospheric ozone. The formulation of policies is science-bas...

  9. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Primary NAAQS REVIEW: Integrated Review Plan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NOx Integrated Review Plan is the first document generated as part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) review process. The Plan presents background information, the schedule for the review, the process to be used in conducting the review, and the key policy...

  10. Policy Assessment for the Particulate Matter NAAQS Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    The policy assessment is a component of the PM NAAQS review that bridges the gap between the scientific assessment contained in the Integrated Science Assessment and the judgments required of the EPA Administration in determining whether it is appropriate to retain or revise the ...

  11. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient...

  12. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air...

  13. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient...

  14. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient...

  15. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient...

  16. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS. 51.906 Section 51.906 Protection of Environment... Standard § 51.906 Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS. For any area that is initially designated attainment or unclassifiable for the 8-hour NAAQS and that...

  17. Multi-Model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Surface Ozone Over the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  18. Multi-model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Ozone Concentrations over the United States (CM

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  19. 76 FR 54412 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Baltimore 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Ozone Nonattainment Area; MD AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to determine that the Baltimore moderate 8- hour ozone nonattainment area (the Baltimore Area) did not attain the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) by...

  20. Multi-model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Ozone Concentrations over the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  1. 76 FR 60820 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY... titled, ``Second External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical... ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. EPA is releasing this draft document to seek review...

  2. 77 FR 36534 - Third External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... AGENCY Third External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical... External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants'' (EPA/600... Standards (NAAQS) for ozone. EPA is releasing this draft document to seek review by the Clean Air...

  3. 75 FR 2935 - Extension of Deadline for Promulgating Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 50, 58 and 81 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards; Final Rule and... Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... promulgating initial area designations for the ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) that...

  4. 75 FR 45075 - Federal Implementation Plans To Reduce Interstate Transport of Fine Particulate Matter and Ozone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Interstate Transport of Fine Particulate Matter and Ozone AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Matter and Ozone'' (Transport Rule) which is published elsewhere in today's issue of the Federal Register... ozone NAAQS. Public hearing: The proposal for which EPA is holding the public hearings is...

  5. 76 FR 10893 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY... review draft of a document titled, ``First External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone... review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. EPA is releasing this...

  6. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR OZONE AND RELATED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act requires periodic (5-year) update revision of criteria and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone. The previous revision of the criteria contained in the Air Quality Criteria Document (AQCD) for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants was co...

  7. Investigating ozone in rural Nevada, USA: Results from the first year of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, M. S.; Fine, R.; Miller, M. B.; Peterson, C.; Burley, J. D.; Jaffe, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone has been measured at Great Basin National Park, located in a rural area of eastern Nevada, USA, since 1993. Observations at the Park indicate that the area likely will not be able to meet a revised U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of ≤ 70 ppbv. Routine ozone monitoring outside of the Park in Nevada has been limited to the two major metropolitan areas in the state, Reno and Las Vegas, and surrounding communities. To address this limitation, a research project, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI), was put into place. The NVROI goals are to characterize ozone concentrations, and to determine the sources contributing to observed concentrations in Nevada, and regions of the western United States. The first year of the project focused on establishing a network of ozone monitoring sites. Based on the measurements from 5 sites across the state where data were collected from July 2011 to June 2012, seasonal mean (× s) concentrations ranged from 39×15 to 54×9 ppbv (spring); 36×14 to 54×8 ppbv (summer); 27×13 to 44×6 ppbv (fall); and 23×11 to 41×5 ppbv (winter) across the state, with higher mean concentrations observed at the high elevation sites. The average daily maximum 1-hour concentrations of ozone (× s) were similar across these sites ranging from 58×6 to 69×7 ppbv (spring); 53×6 to 62×9 ppbv (summer); 44×7 to 49×6 ppbv (fall); and 37×5 to 45×4 ppbv (winter). Periods of elevated ozone were observed at these 5 NVROI network sites (1513 to 2082 m above sea level (asl)). There were 15, 28, and 81 days with at least one NVROI site experiencing a Maximum Daily 8-hour Average (MDA8) greater than 70, 65, and 60 ppbv, respectively. Events (MDA8 > 60 ppbv) were coincident with (1) passage of frontal systems (spring and early summer events), or (2) the presence of smoke generated by regional wildfires and an area of low pressure over Nevada (summer events). Atmospheric turbulence and vertical lifting is associated with frontal

  8. PREDICTING THE IMPACT OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE ON PLANTS AND ECOSYSTEMS AS A BASIS FOR SETTING NATIONAL AIR QUALITY STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act provides for establishing National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to protect public welfare (including crops, forests, ecosystems, and soils) from adverse effects of air pollutants, including tropospheric ozone. The formulation of policies is science-base...

  9. 76 FR 41111 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Carolina; 110(a)(1) and (2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... nitrogen oxides (NO X ) as an ozone precursor under the NSR program. See 76 FR 36875. EPA is not taking... maintaining the 75 ppb ozone NAAQS as well as the 1-hour 100 ppb nitrogen oxides NAAQS.'' Response 2: EPA... existing substantive SIP provisions relevant to the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS or the new nitrogen dioxide...

  10. Multi-model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Ozone Concentrations over the United States (CMAS Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  11. 75 FR 1566 - Public Hearings for Reconsideration of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... proposed rule, ``Reconsideration of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone,'' which was... the following Web site: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/ozone/s_o3_cr_fr.html for the...

  12. 77 FR 35285 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Arizona; Attainment Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Ozone Standard AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is... demonstrate attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) in the Phoenix... the SIP elements required for ozone nonattainment areas under title I, part D, subpart 1 of the...

  13. 75 FR 80420 - Reasonable Further Progress Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). Specifically, EPA is proposing that... nitrogen oxides (NO X )] that contribute to ground-level ozone concentrations. B. What should I consider...

  14. 77 FR 21690 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Ozone Nonattainment Area A. Background on the 1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS Ground-level ozone pollution is... by many types of pollution sources including on- and off-road motor vehicles and engines, power plants and industrial facilities, and smaller area sources such as lawn and garden equipment and...

  15. 77 FR 3719 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina: Approval of Section 110(a)(1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Section 110(a)(1) Maintenance Plan for the Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point 1-Hour Ozone Maintenance... (NAAQS) for the Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point, North Carolina 1-hour ozone maintenance...

  16. National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Lead (Pb) and Implementation Plans for Lead NAAQS: 1978 Final Rule (43 FR 46246 & 46264)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a copy of the Federal Register publication of the October 5, 1978 Final Rules for National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards for Lead (Pb) and Implementation Plans for Lead (Pb) NAAQS.

  17. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Final Report, 2006)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In February 2006, EPA released the final document, Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Other Photochemical Oxidants. Tropospheric or surface-level ozone (O3) is one of six major air pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under the U.S...

  18. Ozone (O3) Standards - Other Technical Documents from the Current Review

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These memoranda were each sent in to the Ozone NAAQS Review Docket, EPA-HQ-OAR-2008-0699, after the proposed rule was published. They present technical data on the methods, monitoring stations, and metrics used to estimate ozone concentrations.

  19. Fact Sheets on Review of National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone Staff Papers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The second draft Staff Paper points to an expanded body of health effects evidence suggesting a wide range of adverse health effects associated with exposure to ambient ozone. This is part of the process for review of the NAAQS for ground-level ozone.

  20. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has released the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft) for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  1. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has released the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Third External Review Draft) for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  2. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced that the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  3. 2013 Final Report: Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is announcing the availability of the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Final Report). This document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  4. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants. This document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  5. 75 FR 68736 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for the Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... .067 42-045-0002 Delaware/Pennsylvania 2009 .065 42-091-0013 Montgomery/Pennsylvania......... 2009 .070... standard (NAAQS). This extension is based in part on air quality data recorded during the 2009 ozone season. Specifically, the Philadelphia Area's 4th highest daily 8-hour monitored ozone value during the 2009...

  6. 76 FR 33647 - Approval and Promulgation of Determination of Attainment for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... 51.918, a final determination that the area has met the 1997 8-hour ozone standard suspends the state... nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51... (MO-IL) metropolitan nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour National Ambient Air...

  7. 75 FR 79302 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Dallas/Fort Worth 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area; Texas AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... nonattainment area failed to attain the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS or... Federal Regulations (CFR) for moderate nonattainment areas. This final determination is based on...

  8. 2006 Particulate Matter (PM) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Infrastructure Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Read about the EPA's infrastructure actions for the 2006 PM NAAQS. These actions are regarding states' failure to submit SIPs addressing various parts of the standards. Here you can read the federal register notices,and fact sheets

  9. Lead (Pb) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Implementation Guidance Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains implementation guidance documents for the 1978 and 2008 Lead (Pb) NAAQS. Some of the topics covered are: RACM/RACT, RFP, new source review, designations, emissions inventories, attainment dates, and transition policy

  10. Final Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) for the NO2 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This RIA provides illustrative estimates, as of January 2010, of the incremental costs and monetized human health benefits of attaining the revised NO2 NAAQS within the the existing community-wide monitoring network of 409 monitors.

  11. Table of Historical Nitrogen Dioxide National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    See the history of limits to the level of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in ambient air, set through the NAAQS review and rulemaking process under the Clean Air Act. This includes both primary and secondary standards.

  12. 2008 Lead (Pb) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Implementation Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Read about the EPA's infrastructure actions for the 2008 lead NAAQS. These actions are regarding states' failure to submit SIPs addressing various parts of the standards. Here you can read the federal register notices, fact sheets, and the docket folder.

  13. Table of Historical Sulfur Dioxide National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    See the history of limits to the level of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air, set through the NAAQS review and rulemaking process under the Clean Air Act. This includes both primary and secondary standards.

  14. Are the elements of the proposed ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards informed by the best available science?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Sax, Sonja N; Lange, Sabine; Rhomberg, Lorenz R

    2015-06-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) issues National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six criteria pollutants, including ozone. Each standard has four elements: an indicator, level, averaging time, and form. Ozone levels (i.e., air concentrations) alone in scientific studies are not directly comparable to the "level" element of the NAAQS because the standard considers the level in the context of its relation to the remaining elements. Failure to appreciate this has led to misunderstandings regarding NAAQS that would be health-protective. This can be seen with controlled human ozone exposure studies, which often involved small numbers of people exercising quasi-continuously for a long duration at an intensity not common in the general population (and unlikely achievable by most sensitive individuals), under worst-case exposure profiles. In addition, epidemiology studies have used different averaging times and have had methodological limitations that may have biased results. Such considerations can make it difficult to compare ozone levels and results across studies and to appropriately apply them in a NAAQS evaluation. Relating patterns and circumstances of exposure, and exposure measurements, to all elements of the NAAQS can be challenging, but if US EPA fully undertook this, it would be evident that available evidence does not indicate that proposed lower ozone standards would be more health protective than the current one.

  15. Pulmonary Function Response to Exposure to Low Concentration Ozone in Young Adults: Inter-comparison among Studies and Meta-Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: It is well established that moderate ozone exposures induce decrements in spirometry volume and respiratory symptoms in healthy young adults. However, studies for low concentration ozone near the current NAAQS standard (0.070 ppm) are limited to only a few and their co...

  16. 40 CFR 51.900 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone...-hour NAAQS means the 1-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.9. (b) 8-hour NAAQS means the 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.10....

  17. 40 CFR 51.900 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone...-hour NAAQS means the 1-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.9. (b) 8-hour NAAQS means the 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.10....

  18. 40 CFR 52.2275 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... strategy and regulations: Ozone. (a) Section 510.3 of revised Regulation V, which was submitted by the..., concerning the Victoria County 1-hour ozone maintenance plan. This SIP revision was adopted by TCEQ...

  19. 40 CFR 52.2275 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... strategy and regulations: Ozone. (a) Section 510.3 of revised Regulation V, which was submitted by the..., concerning the Victoria County 1-hour ozone maintenance plan. This SIP revision was adopted by TCEQ...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2275 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... strategy and regulations: Ozone. (a) Section 510.3 of revised Regulation V, which was submitted by the..., concerning the Victoria County 1-hour ozone maintenance plan. This SIP revision was adopted by TCEQ...

  1. Ozone concentrations near roadways - results of a field study in Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.; Weaver, M.; Mozier, J.

    1997-12-31

    In evaluating alternative versions of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model (pNEM/O3) to estimate the relative ozone exposures of urban populations. This model simulates the movement of susceptible population groups through various microenvironmental (ME) settings and uses ambient monitoring data and ME adjustments to estimate a sequence of exposures for each group. One ME is defined as {open_quotes}outdoors near roadway.{close_quotes} To obtain an improved modeling database for this ME, researchers conducted a two-phase field study in Cincinnati, Ohio during the summers of 1994 and 1995. Technicians measured ozone and nitric oxide from automobile exhaust at upwind and downwind locations near a variety of roadways in areas with historically high ozone levels. During the 1995 phase, measurements were taken at 2 and 10-meter elevations along a downwind pathway at right angles to each roadway. Statistical analyses of the ozone concentrations measured at these locations indicated that height above the ground was always a very significant predictor of ozone, with ozone levels at 10 m above the ground tending to be higher than those at 2 m. Ozone varied significantly as a quadratic function of distance from the road at 2 m, but not at 10 m. Downwind ozone decreased with increasing levels of downwind NO, consistent with the hypothesis that ozone is scavenged by NO from automobile exhaust. Downwind ozone levels increased with increasing temperature.

  2. THE PASSIVE OZONE NETWORK IN DALLAS (POND CONCEPT) - A MODELING OPPORTUNITY WITH COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite tremendous efforts towards regulating and controlling tropospheric ozone (O3) formation, over 70 million people currently live in U.S. counties which exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) set for 03. These high 03 concentrations alone cost the U.S. ap...

  3. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (2006 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tropospheric or surface-level ozone (O3) is one of six major air pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under the U.S. Clean Air Act. As mandated by the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must periodically review t...

  4. 75 FR 42085 - Workshop To Review Initial Health Effects Draft Materials for the Ozone (O3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... of the review of the air quality criteria and National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for Ozone... observers on a first-come, first-served basis up to the limits of available space. DATES: The workshop will...) of the Clean Air Act requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to conduct...

  5. 78 FR 32135 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...EPA is taking direct final action to approve a state implementation plan (SIP) revision, submitted by the State of Georgia, through the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GA EPD), on October 21, 2009, to address the reasonable further progress (RFP) plan requirements for the Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. The......

  6. 78 FR 32222 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour..., 2009, to address the reasonable further progress (RFP) plan requirements for the Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. The Atlanta,...

  7. 78 FR 44439 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour... Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. EPA... Planning Branch, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta,...

  8. EPA's Reference and Equivalent Supporting NAAQS Implementation through Methods Research Program: Research, Development, and Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    . To assess the ambient concentration levels of the six criteria air pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed a systematic framework of: (a) field measurements of ambient air pollutant levels ...

  9. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Primary NAAQS Review: Integrated Review Plan - Advisory with CASAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SO2 Integrated Review Plan is the first document generated as part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) review process. The Plan presents background information, the schedule for the review, the process to be used in conducting the review, and the key policy-...

  10. 40 CFR 58.30 - Special considerations for data comparisons to the NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-scale impact sites are only eligible for comparison to the 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. For example, if the PM2... average 24-hour concentrations representative of a smaller than neighborhood spatial scale, then data from... are cases where certain population-oriented microscale or middle scale PM2.5 monitoring sites...

  11. 40 CFR 58.30 - Special considerations for data comparisons to the NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Consistent with appendix D to this part, section 4.7.1, when micro- or middle-scale PM 2.5 monitoring sites... but rather of relatively unique micro-scale, or localized hot spot, or unique middle-scale impact... monitors are eligible for comparison to the 24-hour PM 2.5 NAAQS. For example, if a micro- or...

  12. 40 CFR 58.30 - Special considerations for data comparisons to the NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-scale impact sites are only eligible for comparison to the 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. For example, if the PM2... average 24-hour concentrations representative of a smaller than neighborhood spatial scale, then data from... are cases where certain population-oriented microscale or middle scale PM2.5 monitoring sites...

  13. 40 CFR 51.1008 - Emission inventory requirements for the PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PM2.5 NAAQS. 51.1008 Section 51.1008 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions for Implementation of PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards § 51.1008 Emission inventory... demonstration required under § 51.1007 and for meeting RFP requirements under § 51.1009. As determined on...

  14. 40 CFR 51.1008 - Emission inventory requirements for the PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PM2.5 NAAQS. 51.1008 Section 51.1008 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions for Implementation of PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards § 51.1008 Emission inventory... demonstration required under § 51.1007 and for meeting RFP requirements under § 51.1009. As determined on...

  15. 40 CFR 58.30 - Special considerations for data comparisons to the NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE National Air Monitoring Stations (NAMS...) There are two forms of the PM2.5 NAAQS described in part 50 of this chapter. The PM2.5 monitoring site....5 monitoring site is adjacent to a unique dominating local PM2.5 source or can be shown to...

  16. ORAMUS(WINDOWS). Ozone Risk AssessMent Utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G.; Jusko, M.J.; Biller, W.F.

    1998-12-01

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates are based on the EPA`s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.

  17. ORAMUS(DOS). Ozone Risk AssessMent Utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G.; Jusko, M.J.; Biller, W.F.

    1998-12-01

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates are based on the EPA`s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 acute health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.

  18. 75 FR 10420 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: 1-Hour Ozone Extreme Area Plan for San Joaquin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... approval/limited disapproval of SJVAPCD's Rule 4570, Confined Animal Facilities at 74 FR 33948 (July 14... ``aspirational goal.'' In addition, Earthjustice singles out El Comite Para El Bienestar de Earlimart...

  19. The 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study: analysis of meteorological and air quality data that influence local ozone concentrations.

    PubMed

    MacDonal, C P; Roberts, P T; Main, H H; Dye, T S; Coe, D L; Yarbrough, J

    2001-08-10

    The 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study and subsequent data analyses were implemented to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical processes which lead to high concentrations of ozone in the Paso del Norte study area which includes El Paso County, Texas, Sunland Park, New Mexico, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Both the data and data analysis results are being used to support photochemical grid modeling. El Paso County and Sunland Park fail to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone, and neighboring Ciudad Juárez fails to meet the Mexican ambient standard for ozone. This paper summarizes the measurement campaigns of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study and the findings and conclusions that arose from subsequent data analyses. Data analyses showed that high ozone concentrations resulted from a combination of conditions, including high surface temperatures, strong sunlight with few clouds, light surface winds and high concentrations of ozone precursors at ground level in the morning, and slow convective boundary layer (CBL) growth. Synoptic-scale meteorological conditions observed during high ozone episodes included an aloft high-pressure system and aloft warming. Aloft carryover of ozone and ozone precursors did not significantly contribute to high concentrations of ozone at the surface.

  20. 76 FR 2859 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Adoption of 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ...EPA proposes to approve the State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the Commonwealth of Virginia for the purpose of adding the 2008 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 0.075 parts per million (ppm), related reference conditions, and updating the list of appendices under ``Documents Incorporated by Reference.'' In the Final Rules section of this Federal......

  1. 76 FR 2829 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Adoption of 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... NAAQS for ozone on March 27, 2008 (73 FR 16436). II. Summary of SIP Revision On September 27, 2010, the... Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information...); Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August...

  2. A Direct sensitivity approach to predict hourly ozone resulting from compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standard

    EPA Science Inventory

    In setting primary ambient air quality standards, the EPA’s responsibility under the law is to establish standards that protect public health. As part of the current review of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), the US EPA evaluated the health exposure and ...

  3. 75 FR 43069 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard in the Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    .... 40 CFR 51.907 sets forth how sections 172(a)(2)(C) and 181(a)(5) apply to an area subject to the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. Under 40 CFR 51.907, an area will meet the requirement of section 172(a)(2)(C... Baltimore Moderate Nonattainment Area AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct...

  4. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model for Simulating Winter Ozone Formation in the Uinta Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Areas with close proximity to oil and natural gas operations in rural Utah have experienced winter ozone levels that exceed EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Through a collaborative effort, EPA Region 8 – Air Program, ORD, and OAQPS used the Commun...

  5. 78 FR 28744 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; State Implementation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, lead, and... table for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, lead and particulate matter that are found at Rule...'s Submittal a. Sulfur Dioxide On June 22, 2010, EPA revised the primary NAAQS for the 1-hour...

  6. Fact Sheets and Additional Information Regarding the 2006 Particulate Matter (PM) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains a fact sheet, a presentation providing an overview of the rule, and graphs and maps pertaining to the new standards that are supplementary to the October 2006 revision for the Particulate Matter (PM) NAAQS

  7. Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) for the Proposed Revisions to the Sulfur Dioxide National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) provides estimates of the incremental costs and monetized human health benefits of attaining a revised short‐term Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) NAAQS within the current monitoring network.

  8. Fact Sheets and Additional Information Regarding the 2012 Decision to Retain the Secondary NAAQS for Nitrogen Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On April 3, 2012, EPA sdecided to retain the current secondary national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2).This page contains a fact sheet describing that action.

  9. Fact Sheets and Additional information Regarding the 2012 Particulate Matter (PM) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find tools for particulate matter, maps of nonattainment areas, an overview of the proposal, and information on designations, monitoring and permitting requirements and a presentation on the 2012 PM NAAQS revision.

  10. Modeling Stomatal Conductance to Estimate Seasonal Uptake in the Ozone-Sensitive Bioindicator Plant Common Milkweed (A. syriaca L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergweiler, C.

    2008-12-01

    The US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) was not conceived to nor does it provide an accurate definition of the absorbed ozone dose or baseline exposure level to protect vegetation. This research presents a multiplicative modeling approach based not only on atmospheric, but on equally important physiological, phenological, and environmental parameters. Physiological constraints on ozone uptake demonstrate that actual absorption is substantially lower than that assumed by a simple interpretation of hourly atmospheric ozone concentrations. Coupled with development of foliar injury expression this provides evidence that tropospheric ozone is more toxic to vegetation than is currently understood.

  11. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols.

  12. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... Polystyrene Resins. (b)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... Polystyrene Resins. (b)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... Polystyrene Resins. (b)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... Polystyrene Resins. (b)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... Manufacturing Materials. (2) (c)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  17. Ozone trends in Atlanta, Georgia - Have emission controls been effective?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Chameldes, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nine years of summertime ozone data from the Atlanta metropolitan area are analyzed and compared to local emissions of volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides. Trends from 1979 to 1987 were studied for the number of days per year ozone exceeded the NAAQS standard, the second-highest ozone level observed per year, and the first quartile summertime average ozone observed, as well as the mean difference between the ozone level observed downwind and upwind of the city. Because this last parameter is sensitive to chemical factors but relatively insensitive to the number of days each year with meteorological conditions conducive to ozone formation, its trend may be best suited for determining how effective emission controls have been in reducing O3 in the Atlanta area. In spite of the fact that sizeable reductions have been claimed for volatile organic carbon emissions over the past several years, the data give no indication that ozone levels have decreased and in fact, imply that summertime ozone production may have increased. The results imply that either emissions have not decreased as much as has been claimed or that ozone is not sensitive to anthropogenic volatile organic carbon emissions.

  18. Estimating the Influence of Oil and Gas Emissions on Urban Ozone and Associated Health Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, S.; Nsanzineza, R.; Turner, M. D.; Henze, D. K.; Zhao, S.; Russell, M. G.; Hakami, A.; Milford, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) degrades air quality, impacting human health and public welfare. The National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) is designed to limit these impacts, but certain areas in the continental U.S. exceed this standard. Mitigating O3 NAAQS exceedances by designing emissions controls can be complicated in urban areas because of the long-range transport of ozone and its gaseous precursors as well as the complex mix of local emissions sources. Recent growth of unconventional oil and gas development near urban areas in Colorado, Texas, and the northeastern corridor has exacerbated this problem. To estimate the contribution of emissions from oil and gas development to urban O3 issues, we apply the CMAQ adjoint, which efficiently elucidates the relative influence of emissions sources on select concentration-based metrics. Specifically, the adjoint is used to calculate the spatially-specific relative contributions of emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) throughout the continental U.S. to O3 NAAQS exceedances and to ozone-related health risks in select urban areas. By evaluating these influences for different urban areas, including one in California that has been managing air quality with adjacent oil and gas development for a longer period of time, we are able to compare and contrast the emissions control strategies that may be more effective in particular regions. Additionally, the resulting relationships between emissions and concentrations provide a way to project ozone impacts when measurements provide refined estimates of emissions from this sector.

  19. Health Benefits from Large-Scale Ozone Reduction in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jesse D.; Fann, Neal; Hollingsworth, John W.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Rom, William N.; Szema, Anthony M.; Breysse, Patrick N.; White, Ronald H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ozone has been associated with adverse health effects, including premature mortality and cardiopulmonary and respiratory morbidity. In 2008, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lowered the primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone to 75 ppb, expressed as the fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hr average over a 24-hr period. Based on recent monitoring data, U.S. ozone levels still exceed this standard in numerous locations, resulting in avoidable adverse health consequences. Objectives: We sought to quantify the potential human health benefits from achieving the current primary NAAQS standard of 75 ppb and two alternative standard levels, 70 and 60 ppb, which represent the range recommended by the U.S. EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC). Methods: We applied health impact assessment methodology to estimate numbers of deaths and other adverse health outcomes that would have been avoided during 2005, 2006, and 2007 if the current (or lower) NAAQS ozone standards had been met. Estimated reductions in ozone concentrations were interpolated according to geographic area and year, and concentration–response functions were obtained or derived from the epidemiological literature. Results: We estimated that annual numbers of avoided ozone-related premature deaths would have ranged from 1,410 to 2,480 at 75 ppb to 2,450 to 4,130 at 70 ppb, and 5,210 to 7,990 at 60 ppb. Acute respiratory symptoms would have been reduced by 3 million cases and school-loss days by 1 million cases annually if the current 75-ppb standard had been attained. Substantially greater health benefits would have resulted if the CASAC-recommended range of standards (70–60 ppb) had been met. Conclusions: Attaining a more stringent primary ozone standard would significantly reduce ozone-related premature mortality and morbidity. PMID:22809899

  20. Influence of Emissions from Oil and Gas Development on Elevated Ozone in the Northern Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. M.; Helmig, D.; Thompson, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Colorado Front Range (NCFR) region has been in exceedance of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) since 2004. Rapidly growing oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations in the Denver-Julesberg Basin, NNE of the Denver metropolitan area, continue to be one of the largest volatile organic compound emitting sources in the region. Trend analysis of the last 13 years of Denver/NCFR ozone monitoring from five sites does not show any statistically significant decrease in annual regulated ozone maxima despite state efforts to mitigate ozone precursor emissions. In this work, we investigate the contribution of O&NG emissions to continued exceedances of the ozone NAAQS. We use surface ozone and wind data from two sites near Boulder, Colorado, to investigate the climatology of ozone in the NCFR region. Transport analyses show a preponderance of elevated ozone events associated with transport from the O&NG operations area in the N-ESE sector, rather than from the more densely populated Denver metro area to the SE-S. On average, between the two sites, air transport from areas associated with dense O&NG operations accounts for 65% of 1-hr averaged elevated ozone (>75 ppbv), while transport from the densely populated Denver metropolitan area accounts for only 9%.

  1. NAAQS (National Ambient Air Quality Standards) exposure model (NEM) applied to carbon monoxide: addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.A.; Johnson, T.

    1985-04-01

    The report describes the results obtained when the carbon monoxide (CO) version of NEM is used to estimate national exposures associated with attaining the current CO standard (9 ppm, one observed exceedance). This standard was not analyzed in the basic report of the same title (EPA-450/5-83-003). NEM is a simulation model that simulates the intersection of a population with pollutant concentrations over space and time to estimate exposures that would obtain if various alternative NAAQs were just met. Estimates are presented for adults with cardiovascular disease in four urban study areas and for a nationwide extrapolation.

  2. Clean Cities ozone air quality attainment and maintenance strategies that employ alternative fuel vehicles, with special emphasis on natural gas and propane

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, D.J.; Saricks, C.L.

    1998-08-04

    -fueled for gasoline-fueled heavy-duty vehicles. Finally, it raises and expands on the relevance of AFVs and their deployment to some other provisions embedded in EPA`s current guidance for implementing 1-hour NAAQS--standards which currently remain in effect--as tools to provide immediate reductions in ozone, without waiting for promised future clean technologies.

  3. Lower Boundary Layer and Ozone Profiles Over Fresno during Wildfire Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjemiyo, S. O.; Omolayo, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Ozone is a secondary pollutant in the troposphere that is largely formed as a result of photolytic reactions related to ozone precursors such as methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds like isoprene, benzene etc.). Hence, processes and factors regulating emissions of ozone precursors are important in controlling spatial and temporal variation of ozone concentrations. Giving favorable meteorological conditions, large scale wildfires in fuel rich areas have been recognized for their potential to significantly affect the regional and global distributions of tropospheric O3, and also increases the background surface ozone concentrations above the NAAQS level, even in areas that may be hundreds of miles away from wildfire locations. Improving regional ozone forecast thus requires not only the knowledge of the amount of ozone precursors released into the atmosphere and ozone produced during wildfires, but also information on boundary layer dynamics and vertical ozone transport. In this study effort is made to characterize ozone transport in the lower urban boundary layer during wildfire events. In this regard, tethersonde and ozonesonde measurements were made over Fresno California in the period the region was affected by smoke particles from the Moonlight fire in September 2007 and the Telegraph fire in July 2008. Analysis of the profiles data showed that the Fresno Eddy, in addition to boundary layer dynamics, particularly the down mixing of high ozone concentration in the residual boundary layer, were significant factors influencing hourly measured ground level ozone concentration at the site.

  4. Setting Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for 1 hour or 24 hour contingency exposures to airborne chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hector D.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early years of the manned space program, NASA has developed and used exposure limits called Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) to help protect astronauts from airborne toxicants. Most of these SMACS are based on an exposure duration of 7 days, since this is the duration of a 'typical' mission. A set of 'contingency SMACs' is also being developed for scenarios involving brief (1-hour or 24- hour) exposures to relatively high levels of airborne toxicants from event-related 'contingency' releases of contaminants. The emergency nature of contingency exposures dictates the use of different criteria for setting exposure limits. The NASA JSC Toxicology Group recently began a program to document the rationales used to set new SMACs and plans to review the older, 7-day SMACs. In cooperation with the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology, a standard procedure has been developed for researching, setting, and documenting SMAC values.

  5. 40 CFR 51.900 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions of section 182(d)(1) of the CAA. (12) NOX requirements under section 182(f) of the CAA. (13... attainment of the 1-hour NAAQS. (g) Attainment year ozone season shall mean the ozone season immediately....122. (n) Ozone season means for each State, the ozone monitoring season as defined in 40 CFR Part...

  6. 40 CFR 51.900 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of section 182(d)(1) of the CAA. (12) NOX requirements under section 182(f) of the CAA. (13... attainment of the 1-hour NAAQS. (g) Attainment year ozone season shall mean the ozone season immediately....122. (n) Ozone season means for each State, the ozone monitoring season as defined in 40 CFR Part...

  7. The Use of Regulatory Air Quality Models to Develop Successful Ozone Attainment Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canty, T. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Ring, A.; Goldberg, D. L.; He, H.; Anderson, D. C.; Vinciguerra, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed lowering the 8-hr ozone standard to between 65-70 ppb. Not all regions of the U.S. are in attainment of the current 75 ppb standard and it is expected that many regions currently in attainment will not meet the future, lower surface ozone standard. Ozone production is a nonlinear function of emissions, biological processes, and weather. Federal and state agencies rely on regulatory air quality models such as the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) to test ozone precursor emission reduction strategies that will bring states into compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). We will describe various model scenarios that simulate how future limits on emission of ozone precursors (i.e. NOx and VOCs) from sources such as power plants and vehicles will affect air quality. These scenarios are currently being developed by states required to submit a State Implementation Plan to the EPA. Projections from these future case scenarios suggest that strategies intended to control local ozone may also bring upwind states into attainment of the new NAAQS. Ground based, aircraft, and satellite observations are used to ensure that air quality models accurately represent photochemical processes within the troposphere. We will highlight some of the improvements made to the CMAQ and CAMx model framework based on our analysis of NASA observations obtained by the OMI instrument on the Aura satellite and by the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign.

  8. Ozone emissions from a "personal air purifier".

    PubMed

    Phillips, T J; Bloudoff, D P; Jenkins, P L; Stroud, K R

    1999-01-01

    Ozone emissions were measured above a "personal air purifier" (PAP) designed to be worn on a lapel, shirt pocket, or neck strap. The device is being marketed as a negative ion generator that purifies the air. However, it also produces ozone within the person's immediate breathing zone. In order to assess worst-case potential human exposure to ozone at the mouth and nose, we measured ozone concentrations in separate tests at 1, 3, 5, and 6 in. above each of two PAPs in a closed office. One PAP was new, and one had been used slightly for 3 months. Temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, room ozone concentration, and outdoor ozone concentration also were measured concurrently during the tests. Average ozone levels measured directly above the individual PAPs ranged from 65-71 ppb at 6 in. above the device to 268-389 ppb at 1 in. above the device. Ozone emission rates from the PAPs were estimated to be 1.7-1.9 microg/minute. When house dust was sprinkled on the top grid of the PAPs, one showed an initial peak of 522 ppb ozone at 1 in., and then returned to the 200-400 ppb range. Room ozone levels increased by only 0-5 ppb during the tests. Even when two PAPs were left operating over a weekend, room ozone levels did not noticeably increase beyond background room ozone levels. These results indicate that this "PAP," even without significant background ozone, can potentially elevate the user's exposures to ozone levels greater than the health-based air quality standards for outdoor air in California (0.09 ppm, 1-hour average) and the United States (0.08 ppm, 8-hour average).

  9. Ozone Basics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn the difference between good (stratospheric) and bad (tropospheric) ozone, how bad ozone affects our air quality, health, and environment, and what EPA is doing about it through regulations and standards.

  10. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  11. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  12. A survey of ozone concentrations in rural western Utah: unexpected results and spatial heterogeneity from 2010-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, S. J.; Harper, K.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone concentrations and meteorological variables were monitored at eleven sites in rural western Utah during late spring through summer of 2010-2013 to determine regional background concentrations of ozone and to determine attainment or nonattainment of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Ozone concentrations have been monitored along the Wasatch Front of Utah (Logan, Ogden, Salt Lake City and Provo) for 30 years by the Utah Division of Air Quality (DAQ), but no ozone data from outside the cities of Wasatch Front existed prior to 2010. All rural sites, except Badger Springs, west of St. George, UT, were in attainment of the ozone NAAQS, which is 75 ppb averaged over 8 hours. However, ozone concentrations were higher than expected at seven of the eleven sites. All eleven sites were located in either small rural towns or uninhabited areas of western Utah, which were distant from anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors. In 2010, ozone concentrations were relatively low along the Wasatch Front of Utah. Ozone concentrations exceeded 65 ppb for one day at three of four rural sites. Ozone concentrations at two of the four sites were generally in the range of expected rural ozone concentrations of 50-60 ppb. Ozone concentrations during 2011-2012 were higher throughout Utah compared to 2010. In 2011, 8-hour ozone concentrations exceeded 70 ppb for at least one day at four of five sites. The maximum 8-hour ozone concentration was 78 ppb, observed at Lytle Ranch, west of St. George, UT. Ozone concentrations at only one rural Utah site were in the expected range of 50-60 ppb. Ozone concentrations during 2012 were the highest observed during the four years of the study with 8-hour ozone concentrations exceeding 75 ppb at three of five rural sites and exceeding 70 ppb for at least four days at four of five sites. Although data collected was not considered regulatory by the EPA, the ozone NAAQS was exceeded at Badger Springs in southwestern Utah. Ozone

  13. 77 FR 70376 - Withdrawal of Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans and Findings of Failure To Submit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... To Submit Required Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; 1-Hour and 8-Hour Ozone Extreme Area Plan... California to provide for attainment of the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in..., 2012 determination that the California SIP satisfies the requirement regarding offsetting...

  14. Ozone Implementation Regulatory Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Training courses, presentations, and other resources to help state and local air professionals learn more about NAAQS implementation, air pollution control and emissions reduction, SIP development, and public participation.

  15. Carbon monoxide analysis of future attainment of the NAAQS (National Ambient Air Quality Standard) in Wichita, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, G. J.

    1985-06-01

    In order to comply with the NAAQS for CO in Wichita, Kansas, a special study was performed to demonstrate that CO concentrations at a special purpose monitor (SPM) located near Douglas and Main Streets would give results less than the NAAQS by 1987. The SPM site is located near the urban core in an area characterized by high nighttime traffic volumes and congested traffic flow. A dispersion modeling analysis was performed using the CALINE-3 Model for dispersion, the MOBILE-3 Model for vehicle emissions and local or national traffic and ambient conditions. Results of modeling the SPM site for baseline (1983) emissions were calibrated with maximum measured CO concentrations. Several scenarios were analyzed in this analysis including with and without the inspection/maintenance program and with and without the left-turn ban from Douglas to Main Streets.

  16. Fact Sheets and Additional Information Regarding the 2010 Revision to the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find tools for primary standards for Nitrogen Dioxide, maps of monitoring areas, an overview of the proposal, monitor requirements, design values for counties, and a presentation on the 2010 NO2 primary NAAQS revision.

  17. Fact Sheets and Additional Information Regarding the 2010 Revision to the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Sulfur Dioxide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find tools for primary standards for Sulfur Dioxide, maps of nonattainment areas, an overview of the proposal, projected nonattainment areas for 2020, and a presentation on the 2011 SO2 primary NAAQS revision.

  18. Ozone exposure and systemic biomarkers: Evaluation of evidence for adverse cardiovascular health impacts.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Prueitt, Robyn L; Sax, Sonja N; Pizzurro, Daniella M; Lynch, Heather N; Zu, Ke; Venditti, Ferdinand J

    2015-05-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently concluded that there is likely to be a causal relationship between short-term (< 30 days) ozone exposure and cardiovascular (CV) effects; however, biological mechanisms to link transient effects with chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) have not been established. Some studies assessed changes in circulating levels of biomarkers associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, coagulation, vasoreactivity, lipidology, and glucose metabolism after ozone exposure to elucidate a biological mechanism. We conducted a weight-of-evidence (WoE) analysis to determine if there is evidence supporting an association between changes in these biomarkers and short-term ozone exposure that would indicate a biological mechanism for CVD below the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 75 parts per billion (ppb). Epidemiology findings were mixed for all biomarker categories, with only a few studies reporting statistically significant changes and with no consistency in the direction of the reported effects. Controlled human exposure studies of 2 to 5 hours conducted at ozone concentrations above 75 ppb reported small elevations in biomarkers for inflammation and oxidative stress that were of uncertain clinical relevance. Experimental animal studies reported more consistent results among certain biomarkers, although these were also conducted at ozone exposures well above 75 ppb and provided limited information on ozone exposure-response relationships. Overall, the current WoE does not provide a convincing case for a causal relationship between short-term ozone exposure below the NAAQS and adverse changes in levels of biomarkers within and across categories, but, because of study limitations, they cannot not provide definitive evidence of a lack of causation.

  19. [Surface-enhanced Raman spectra of oxidation damnification of fetal bovine serum by ozone].

    PubMed

    Zou, Zu-Quan; Liu, Yan-Nan; Wu, Ying; Li, Qi-Nan; Chen, Mei-Zong; Sun, Hai-Ying; Lee, Imshik

    2007-06-01

    Fetal bovine serum was treated by ozone for 1 hour and 3 hours before getting its surface-enhanced Raman spectra from 200 to 1 800 cm(-1). Treated with ozone for 1 hour, it shows a significant decrease in band intensity. Treated with ozone for 3 hours, the band intensity has a further decrease but not so obviously, which means that oxidation of ozone is short lived. Treated with ozone, the orderly conformations of main chains in protein such as alpha-helix, beta-sheet and beta-corner are damaged seriously. Aromatic side chains and C-S of Cys and Met also are damnified greatly. All this means that strong oxidation of ozone results in denaturation, conformational changes and even degradation in protein.

  20. Chlorophyll fluorescence quenching during ozone exposure of leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris (pinto)

    SciTech Connect

    Guralnick, L.J. ); Miller, R.; Heath, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    During ozone exposure, observations have noted an initial decrease in CO{sub 2} uptake followed by a decrease in stomatal conductance. We examined this response utilizing the technique of fluorescence quenching. Fourteen day old plants were exposed to 0.3 ul/l ozone for 1 hour. Fluorescence quenching was monitored using the Hanstech modulated fluorescence system. This enabled us to measure changes in photochemical quenching (qQ) and non-photochemical quenching (qE) in control and ozone treated plants. Results have indicated no differences in qQ and qE between ozone treated and control plants. We are initiating further studies utilizing different ozone levels.

  1. Ozone Layer Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Ozone Layer Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Ozone Layer Protection Welcome to EPA's ozone layer protection web ...

  2. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  3. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  4. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  5. Ozone inhibits prostacyclin synthesis in pulmonary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Madden, M C; Saunders, D S; Gammon, K; White, G C; Kwock, L

    1985-12-01

    The effects of ozone on lung arachidonate metabolism in-vitro were studied in cultured bovine pulmonary endothelial cells exposed for 2 hours to ozone in concentrations up to 1.0 ppm. A concentration-dependent decrease in prostacyclin synthesis was found (90% decrease at the highest ozone level of 1.0 ppm). The inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis was not due to a decreased release of arachidonic acid from membrane lipids. We also examined the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictive response to 10% oxygen inhalation in anesthetized dogs in-vivo after exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone for 1 hour. Pulmonary vascular resistance was significantly increased after ozone exposure, similar to the findings in dogs given indomethacin (15 mg/kg). The percentage change in the hypoxic pulmonary pressor response was similar between the ozone exposure and indomethacin-treated groups, although due to the variance of the pulmonary vascular resistance values during hypoxia the results did not reach statistical significance. These results suggest that ozone inhalation affects pulmonary endothelial arachidonate metabolism in-vivo as well as in-vitro.

  6. Establishing policy relevant background (PRB) ozone concentrations in the United States.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Buller, Elena C; Allen, David T; Brown, Nancy; Jacob, Daniel J; Jaffe, Daniel; Kolb, Charles E; Lefohn, Allen S; Oltmans, Samuel; Parrish, David D; Yarwood, Greg; Zhang, Lin

    2011-11-15

    Policy Relevant Background (PRB) ozone concentrations are defined by the United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as those concentrations that would occur in the U.S. in the absence of anthropogenic emissions in continental North America (i.e., the U.S, Canada, and Mexico). Estimates of PRB ozone have had an important role historically in the EPA's human health and welfare risk analyses used in establishing National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The margin of safety for the protection of public health in the ozone rulemaking process has been established from human health risks calculated based on PRB ozone estimates. Sensitivity analyses conducted by the EPA have illustrated that changing estimates of PRB ozone concentrations have a progressively greater impact on estimates of mortality risk as more stringent standards are considered. As defined by the EPA, PRB ozone is a model construct, but it is informed by measurements at relatively remote monitoring sites (RRMS). This review examines the current understanding of PRB ozone, based on both model predictions and measurements at RRMS, and provides recommendations for improving the definition and determination of PRB ozone.

  7. Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Known as tropospheric or ground-level ozone, this gas is harmful to human heath and the environment. Since it forms from emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), these pollutants are regulated under air quality standards.

  8. Electroencephalogram (EEG) duration needed to detect abnormalities in angelman syndrome: is 1 hour of overnight recording sufficient?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Althea A; Goldman, Suzanne; Barnes, Gregory; Goodpaster, Luke; Malow, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    Approximately, 90% of patients with Angelman syndrome present with epileptic seizures. Obtaining an electroencephalogram (EEG) with sleep improves the chances of detecting ictal, interictal, and benign abnormal rhythms in Angelman syndrome. However, electroencephalograms, even when obtained during sleep, can be challenging in this population because of tactile sensitivities as well as anxiety related to a novel environment. We tested the hypothesis that 1 hour of sleep on an electroencephalogram would provide as much information as an entire night of electroencephalogram recording, yet more than a routine electroencephalogram conducted during the day. Overnight polysomnograms were collected in 14 children with Angelman syndrome seen at Vanderbilt University. All patients who obtained sleep within the first hour of the overnight electroencephalogram had interictal discharges recorded. Our results show that when sleep is obtained, a 1-hour electroencephalogram yields just as much information as recording an entire night.

  9. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  10. Electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons for 1 hour improves axon regeneration and the number of reinnervated muscles that function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Grumbles, Robert M; Thomas, Christine K

    2013-07-01

    Motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or disease results in muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. We have previously transplanted embryonic ventral spinal cord cells into the peripheral nerve to reinnervate denervated muscles and to reduce muscle atrophy, but reinnervation was incomplete. Here, our aim was to determine whether brief electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons in the peripheralnerve changes motoneuron survival, axon regeneration, and muscle reinnervation and function because neural depolarization is crucial for embryonic neuron survival and may promote activity-dependent axon growth. At 1 week after denervation by sciatic nerve section, embryonic day 14 to 15 cells were purified for motoneurons, injected into the tibial nerve of adult Fischer rats, and stimulated immediatelyfor up to 1 hour. More myelinated axons were present in tibial nerves 10 weeks after transplantation when transplants had been stimulated acutely at 1 Hz for 1 hour. More muscles were reinnervated if the stimulation treatment lasted for 1 hour. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy, with or without the stimulation treatment. These data suggest that brief stimulation of embryonic neurons promotes axon growth, which has a long-term impact on muscle reinnervation and function. Muscle reinnervation is important because it may enable the use of functional electrical stimulation to restore limb movements.

  11. Electrical Stimulation of Embryonic Neurons for 1 Hour Improves Axon Regeneration and the Number of Reinnervated Muscles that Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Grumbles, Robert M.; Thomas, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    Motoneuron death following spinal cord injury or disease results in muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. We have previously transplanted embryonic ventral spinal cord cells into peripheral nerve to reinnervate denervated muscles and to reduce muscle atrophy, but reinnervation was incomplete. Here, our aim was to determine whether brief electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons in peripheral nerve changes motoneuron survival, axon regeneration, and muscle reinnervation and function because neural depolarization is crucial for embryonic neuron survival and may promote activity-dependent axon growth. At 1 week after denervation by sciatic nerve section, embryonic day 14-15 cells were purified for motoneurons, injected into the tibial nerve of adult Fischer rats, and stimulated immediately for up to 1 hour. More myelinated axons were present in tibial nerves when transplants had been stimulated at 1 Hz for 1 hour at 10 weeks following transplantation. More muscles were reinnervated if the stimulation treatment lasted for 1 hour. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy, with or without the stimulation treatment. These data suggest that brief stimulation of embryonic neurons promotes axon growth, which has a long-term impact on muscle reinnervation and function. Muscle reinnervation is important because it may enable the use of functional electrical stimulation to restore limb movements. PMID:23771218

  12. Stratospheric contribution to surface ozone in the desert Southwest during the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brioude, J. F.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M.; Marchbanks, R.; Pierce, R. B.; Reddy, P. J.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.; Gustin, M. S.; Iraci, L. T.; Leblanc, T.; Yates, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was designed to investigate the potential impact of stratosphere-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport of pollution from Asia on surface O3 concentrations in Clark County, NV. This measurement campaign, which took place in May and June of 2013, was conducted at Angel Peak, NV, a high elevation site about 2.8 km above mean sea level and 45 km west of Las Vegas. The study was organized around the NOAA ESRL truck-based TOPAZ scanning ozone lidar with collocated in situ sampling of O3, CO, and meteorological parameters. These measurements were supported by the NOAA/NESDIS real time modelling system (RAQMS), FLEXPART particle dispersion model, and the NOAA GFDL AM3 model. In this talk, I will describe one of several STT events that occurred during the LVOS campaign. This intrusion, which was profiled by TOPAZ on the night of May 24-25, was also sampled by the NASA Alpha Jet, the Table Mountain ozone lidar, and by an ozonesonde flying above southern California. This event also led to significant ozone increases at surface monitors operated by Clark County, the California Air Resources Board, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NRVOI), and resulted in exceedances of the 2008 75 ppbv O3 NAAQS both in Clark County and in surrounding areas of Nevada and southern California. The potential implications of this and similar events for air quality compliance in the western U.S. will be discussed.

  13. 75 FR 57220 - Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New Source Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AP30 Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New Source Review Anti-Backsliding Provisions for Former 1-Hour Ozone Standard--Public Hearing... is announcing a public hearing to be held for the proposed ``Rule to Implement the 1997 8-Hour...

  14. Climate change impacts on projections of excess mortality at 2030 using spatially varying ozone-temperature risk surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ander; Reich, Brian J; Nolte, Christopher G; Spero, Tanya L; Hubbell, Bryan; Rappold, Ana G

    2017-01-01

    We project the change in ozone-related mortality burden attributable to changes in climate between a historical (1995-2005) and near-future (2025-2035) time period while incorporating a non-linear and synergistic effect of ozone and temperature on mortality. We simulate air quality from climate projections varying only biogenic emissions and holding anthropogenic emissions constant, thus attributing changes in ozone only to changes in climate and independent of changes in air pollutant emissions. We estimate non-linear, spatially varying, ozone-temperature risk surfaces for 94 US urban areas using observed data. Using the risk surfaces and climate projections we estimate daily mortality attributable to ozone exceeding 40 p.p.b. (moderate level) and 75 p.p.b. (US ozone NAAQS) for each time period. The average increases in city-specific median April-October ozone and temperature between time periods are 1.02 p.p.b. and 1.94 °F; however, the results varied by region. Increases in ozone because of climate change result in an increase in ozone mortality burden. Mortality attributed to ozone exceeding 40 p.p.b. increases by 7.7% (1.6-14.2%). Mortality attributed to ozone exceeding 75 p.p.b. increases by 14.2% (1.6 28.9%). The absolute increase in excess ozone mortality is larger for changes in moderate ozone levels, reflecting the larger number of days with moderate ozone levels.

  15. Regulatory ozone modeling: status, directions, and research needs.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, P G

    1995-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have established selected comprehensive, three-dimensional, Photochemical Air Quality Simulation Models (PAQSMs) as the required regulatory tools for analyzing the urban and regional problem of high ambient ozone levels across the United States. These models are currently applied to study and establish strategies for meeting the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone in nonattainment areas; State Implementation Plans (SIPs) resulting from these efforts must be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in November 1994. The following presentation provides an overview and discussion of the regulatory ozone modeling process and its implications. First, the PAQSM-based ozone attainment demonstration process is summarized in the framework of the 1994 SIPs. Then, following a brief overview of the representation of physical and chemical processes in PAQSMs, the essential attributes of standard modeling systems currently in regulatory use are presented in a nonmathematical, self-contained format, intended to provide a basic understanding of both model capabilities and limitations. The types of air quality, emission, and meteorological data needed for applying and evaluating PAQSMs are discussed, as well as the sources, availability, and limitations of existing databases. The issue of evaluating a model's performance in order to accept it as a tool for policy making is discussed, and various methodologies for implementing this objective are summarized. Selected interim results from diagnostic analyses, which are performed as a component of the regulatory ozone modeling process for the Philadelphia-New Jersey region, are also presented to provide some specific examples related to the general issues discussed in this work. Finally, research needs related to a) the evaluation and refinement of regulatory ozone modeling, b) the characterization of uncertainty in photochemical modeling, and c

  16. 40 CFR 51.1100 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standards § 51.1100 Definitions. The following definitions apply for purposes...) 1-hour NAAQS means the 1-hour primary and secondary ozone national ambient air quality standards... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definitions. 51.1100 Section...

  17. 77 FR 24399 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). The Atlanta Area is comprised of Barrow, Bartow, Carroll... 5.69 4.30 1.41 0.75 Bartow 69.92 1.31 1.30 8.05 15.76 10.56 3.89 2.54 Carroll 0.06 0.85 1.30 9.54 10... Ozone 2002 Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, 10/21/2009 4/24/2012 [Insert Base-Year Emissions Inventory....

  18. Analysis of short-term ozone and PM2.5 measurements: Characteristics and relationships for air sensor messaging.

    PubMed

    Mannshardt, Elizabeth; Benedict, Kristen; Jenkins, Scott; Keating, Martha; Mintz, David; Stone, Susan; Wayland, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Air quality sensors are becoming increasingly available to the general public, providing individuals and communities with information on fine-scale, local air quality in increments as short as 1 min. Current health studies do not support linking 1-min exposures to adverse health effects; therefore, the potential health implications of such ambient exposures are unclear. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) establishes the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and Air Quality Index (AQI) on the best science available, which typically uses longer averaging periods (e.g., 8 hr; 24 hr). Another consideration for interpreting sensor data is the variable relationship between pollutant concentrations measured by sensors, which are short-term (1 min to 1 hr), and the longer term averages used in the NAAQS and AQI. In addition, sensors often do not meet federal performance or quality assurance requirements, which introduces uncertainty in the accuracy and interpretation of these readings. This article describes a statistical analysis of data from regulatory monitors and new real-time technology from Village Green benches to inform the interpretation and communication of short-term air sensor data. We investigate the characteristics of this novel data set and the temporal relationships of short-term concentrations to 8-hr average (ozone) and 24-hr average (PM2.5) concentrations to examine how sensor readings may relate to the NAAQS and AQI categories, and ultimately to inform breakpoints for sensor messages. We consider the empirical distributions of the maximum 8-hr averages (ozone) and 24-hr averages (PM2.5) given the corresponding short-term concentrations, and provide a probabilistic assessment. The result is a robust, empirical comparison that includes events of interest for air quality exceedances and public health communication. Concentration breakpoints are developed for short-term sensor readings such that, to the extent possible, the related air

  19. Tropopause Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, M.; Zhu, X.; Hsu, J.; Neu, J.; Tang, Q.

    2009-04-01

    The tropopause, however defined, is meant to describe the boundary between the well mixed troposphere and the stably stratified stratosphere. Ozone abundances in the vicinity of the tropopause exhibit large variations with latitude and season, being controlled by a combination of large-scale transport like the Brewer-Dobson circulation, small-scale turbulent mixing unresolved by global models, and photochemistry. A clear, instantaneous, 3-D definition of the tropopause is needed for diagnostics that separate stratosphere from troposphere, e.g., strat-trop exchange fluxes. In the UCI CTM, we define the stratosphere-troposphere boundary with what is effectively an age-of-air tracer: a tracer emitted uniformly from the surface with a uniform e-fold of 90 days (designated e90). Where the abundance of e90 falls below about 70% of the mass-median value (i.e., 33 days-old), we define as the stratosphere. With this diagnostic of the mixing barrier between stratosphere and troposphere the CTM with EC IFS forecast meteorology is able to match much of the observed seasonal cycle of the tropopause pressure and ozone abundance. With the CTM we examine the importance of chemistry vs. transport in controlling tropopause ozone. For example, we note that photolysis of molecular oxygen in the upper troposphere contributes significantly to tropopause ozone in the tropics and sub-tropics.

  20. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  1. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  2. A direct sensitivity approach to predict hourly ozone resulting from compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standard.

    PubMed

    Simon, Heather; Baker, Kirk R; Akhtar, Farhan; Napelenok, Sergey L; Possiel, Norm; Wells, Benjamin; Timin, Brian

    2013-03-05

    In setting primary ambient air quality standards, the EPA's responsibility under the law is to establish standards that protect public health. As part of the current review of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), the US EPA evaluated the health exposure and risks associated with ambient ozone pollution using a statistical approach to adjust recent air quality to simulate just meeting the current standard level, without specifying emission control strategies. One drawback of this purely statistical concentration rollback approach is that it does not take into account spatial and temporal heterogeneity of ozone response to emissions changes. The application of the higher-order decoupled direct method (HDDM) in the community multiscale air quality (CMAQ) model is discussed here to provide an example of a methodology that could incorporate this variability into the risk assessment analyses. Because this approach includes a full representation of the chemical production and physical transport of ozone in the atmosphere, it does not require assumed background concentrations, which have been applied to constrain estimates from past statistical techniques. The CMAQ-HDDM adjustment approach is extended to measured ozone concentrations by determining typical sensitivities at each monitor location and hour of the day based on a linear relationship between first-order sensitivities and hourly ozone values. This approach is demonstrated by modeling ozone responses for monitor locations in Detroit and Charlotte to domain-wide reductions in anthropogenic NOx and VOCs emissions. As seen in previous studies, ozone response calculated using HDDM compared well to brute-force emissions changes up to approximately a 50% reduction in emissions. A new stepwise approach is developed here to apply this method to emissions reductions beyond 50% allowing for the simulation of more stringent reductions in ozone concentrations. Compared to previous rollback methods, this

  3. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey; Chronis, Themis

    2015-01-01

    Using satellite-based methods that provide accurate 0-1 hour convective initiation (CI) nowcasts, and rely on proven success coupling satellite and radar fields in the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS; operated and developed at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory), to subsequently monitor for first-flash lightning initiation (LI) and later period lightning trends as storms evolve. Enhance IR-based methods within the GOES-R CI Algorithm (that must meet specific thresholds for a given cumulus cloud before the cloud is considered to have an increased likelihood of producing lightning next 90 min) that forecast LI. Integrate GOES-R CI and LI fields with radar thresholds (e.g., first greater than or equal to 40 dBZ echo at the -10 C altitude) and NWP model data within the WDSS-II system for LI-events from new convective storms. Track ongoing lightning using Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data to assess per-storm lightning trends (e.g., as tied to lightning jumps) and outline threat regions. Evaluate the ability to produce LI nowcasts through a "lightning threat" product, and obtain feedback from National Weather Service forecasters on its value as a decision support tool.

  4. A periodicity of approximately 1 hour in X-ray emission from the active galaxy RE J1034+396.

    PubMed

    Gierliński, Marek; Middleton, Matthew; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris

    2008-09-18

    Active galactic nuclei and quasars are thought to be scaled-up versions of Galactic black hole binaries, powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes with masses of 10(6)-10(9) M[symbol: see text], as opposed to the approximately 10 M [symbol: see text] in binaries (here M [symbol: see text] is the solar mass). One example of the similarities between these two types of systems is the characteristic rapid X-ray variability seen from the accretion flow. The power spectrum of this variability in black hole binaries consists of a broad noise with multiple quasi-periodic oscillations superimposed on it. Although the broad noise component has been observed in many active galactic nuclei, there have hitherto been no significant detections of quasi-periodic oscillations. Here we report the discovery of an approximately 1-hour X-ray periodicity in a bright active galaxy, RE J1034+396. The signal is highly statistically significant (at the 5.6 sigma level) and very coherent, with quality factor Q > 16. The X-ray modulation arises from the direct vicinity of the black hole.

  5. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  6. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    Observations of Antarctic ozone levels and the discovery of a hole in the Antarctic region are examined. The effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on the level of stratospheric ozone are analyzed. Three cycles explaining the cause of ozone depletion in the poles are proposed. A comparison of field data and proposed depletion cycles reveals that the chemical origin of the ozone hole is due to CFCs. The potential global effects of the Antarctic ozone hole are discussed.

  7. Variations in the Martian Ozone Layer during 2004-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, F.; Bertaux, J.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-12-01

    Ozone on Mars is a secondary product of CO2 photolysis and is rapidly destroyed (~1 hour) by H, OH, and HO2 radicals. This tight coupling between ozone and HOx species makes ozone a useful tracer of the hydrogen chemistry that stabilizes the CO2 atmosphere of Mars, and ozone measurements offer a powerful constraint for photochemical models. We present observations of the Martian ozone layer performed during 2004-2012 from the SPICAM spectrometer on board Mars Express. SPICAM measures the ultraviolet spectrum transmitted by the atmosphere between 118 and 320 nm in various modes of observation. We will focus here on the data acquired in nadir mode allowing the determination of the vertically-integrated ozone column. The dataset acquired since January 2004 has a near-global coverage and covers more than 4 Martian years. We will discuss the variability of ozone at the day-to-day, seasonal and interannual scales, and the measurements will be compared to three-dimensional model simulations to evaluate our quantitative understanding of Mars photochemistry.

  8. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Yates, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 h in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low-Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. The one-year extension of the data and a different method of detection of the injections do not lead to a discrepancy with the results of the previous survey, indicating an absence of a long-term temporal evolution of this phenomenon. We identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of the pulsed events properties. The morphology of the pulsations shows a weak local time dependence which could imply a high-latitude acceleration source. We provide some clues that the electron population associated with this pulsed phenomenon is distinct from the field-aligned electron beams previously observed in Saturn's magnetosphere, but both populations can be mixed. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio

  9. GOES Infrared and Reflectance 0-1 hour Lightning Initiation Indicators: Development and Initial Testing within a Convective Nowcasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Harris, R.; MacKenzie, W.; Durkee, P. A.; Iskenderian, H.; Bickmeier, L.; Nielsen, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Within cumulus cloud fields that develop in conditionally unstable air masses, only a fraction of the cumuli may eventually develop into deep convection. Identifying which of these convective clouds most likely to generate lightning often starts with little more than a qualitative visual satellite analysis. The goal of this study is to identify the observed satellite infrared (IR) signatures associated with growing cumulus clouds prior to the first lightning strike, so-called lightning initiation (LI). This study quantifies the behavior of ten Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) IR interest fields in the 1-hour in advance of LI. A total of 172 lightning-producing storms that occurred during the 2009 convective season are manually tracked and studied over four regions: Northern Alabama, Central Oklahoma, the Kennedy Space Center and Washington D.C. Four-dimensional and cloud-to-ground lightning array data provide a total cloud lightning picture (in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, cloud-to-air, cloud-to-ground) and thus precise LI points for each storm in both time and space. Statistical significance tests are conducted on observed trends for each of the ten LI fields to determine the unique information each field provides in terms of behavior prior to LI. Eight out of ten LI fields exhibited useful information at least 15 min in advance of LI, with 35 min being the average. Statistical tests on these eight fields are compared for separate large geographical areas. IR temperature thresholds are then determined as an outcome, which may be valuable when implementing a LI prediction algorithm into real-time satellite-based systems. The key LI indicators from GOES IR data (as well as 3.9 μm reflectance) will be presented. Beginning in 2010, the feasibility of using the satellite-based LI indicators found in the above analysis to forecast first lightning will be assessed within the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) CoSPA nowcasting system. The goal

  10. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Lightning one of the most dangerous weather-related phenomena, especially as many jobs and activities occur outdoors, presenting risk from a lightning strike. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning represents a considerable safety threat to people at airfields, marinas, and outdoor facilities-from airfield personnel, to people attending outdoor stadium events, on beaches and golf courses, to mariners, as well as emergency personnel. Holle et al. (2005) show that 90% of lightning deaths occurred outdoors, while 10% occurred indoors despite the perception of safety when inside buildings. Curran et al. (2000) found that nearly half of fatalities due to weather were related to convective weather in the 1992-1994 timeframe, with lightning causing a large component of the fatalities, in addition to tornadoes and flash flooding. Related to the aviation industry, CG lightning represents a considerable hazard to baggage-handlers, aircraft refuelers, food caterers, and emergency personnel, who all become exposed to the risk of being struck within short time periods while convective storm clouds develop. Airport safety protocols require that ramp operations be modified or discontinued when lightning is in the vicinity (typically 16 km), which becomes very costly and disruptive to flight operations. Therefore, much focus has been paid to nowcasting the first-time initiation and extent of lightning, both of CG and of any lightning (e.g, in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud). For this project three lightning nowcasting methodologies will be combined: (1) a GOESbased 0-1 hour lightning initiation (LI) product (Harris et al. 2010; Iskenderian et al. 2012), (2) a High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) lightning probability and forecasted lightning flash density product, such that a quantitative amount of lightning (QL) can be assigned to a location of expected LI, and (3) an algorithm that relates Pseudo-GLM data (Stano et al. 2012, 2014) to the so-called "lightning jump" (LJ) methodology (Shultz et al

  11. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  12. Plasmadynamic ozone generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, Yu. N.; Ogurechnikov, V. A.; Chizhov, Yu. L.

    2009-10-01

    The formation of ozone in a low-temperature supersonic flow of a mixture of air and partly dissociated oxygen supplied from a discharge plasmatron has been experimentally studied. For an oxygen mass fraction of 1.1% in the total gas flow supplied to this ozone generator, an ozone-air mixture containing 4.88 × 10-3 kg/m3 ozone is obtained at a specific energy consumption of 25.8 MJ/(kg ozone). In this regime, the ozone generator could operate for several dozen minutes.

  13. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For the historical perspective, the events leading up to the discovery of the 'hole' are presented, as well as the response from the international community and the measures taken to protect the ozone layer now and into the future.

  14. Reference and Equivalent Methods Used to Measure National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Criteria Air Pollutants - Volume I

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a number of Federal Reference Method (FRM) and Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) systems used to monitor the six criteria air pollutants (Lead [Pb], Carbon Monoxide [CO], Sulfur Dioxide [SO2], Nitrogen Dioxide [NO2], Ozone [O3], Particulate Matter [PM]) to determine if an...

  15. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  16. [Analysis on prevalence of physical activity time <1 hour and related factors in students aged 9-22 years in China, 2014].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z H; Dong, Y H; Song, Y; Yang, Z P; Ma, J

    2017-03-10

    Objective: To explore the prevalence of physical activity time <1 hour and related factors in students aged 9-22 years in China. Methods: A total of 220 159 students (110 039 boys and 110 120 girls) aged 9-22 years who completed the questionnaire of physical activity and lifestyle behaviors were selected from " 2014 National Physical Fitness and Health Surveillance" for the current study. All the participants were divided into 2 groups, i.e. physical activity time <1 hour and physical activity time ≥1 hour according the suggestion of Central Government, stratified by age and gender. χ(2) tests were used to compare the difference in the prevalence of physical activity time <1 hour between boys and girls in every age groups. Univariate and multivariate log-binomial regression models were used to explore the factors that influenced the prevalence of physical activity time <1 hour. Results: The boy's prevalence of physical activity time <1 hour was 73.3%, with the lowest (57.0%) in 9-years-old group, and highest (82.5%) in 18 years old group. The girl's prevalence of physical activity time <1 hour was 79.1%, with the lowest (60.1%) in 9-years-old group, and highest (89.8%) in 21 years old group. Overall, The prevalence of physical activity time <1 hour was significantly higher in girls than in boys (P<0.001), and the prevalence were significantly higher in girls than in boys in all the age groups (P<0.001), and it was observed that the prevalence of physical activity <1 hour increased with age in both boys and girls (P<0.001). Multivariate log-binomial regression model found that being girl (PR=1.05, 95%CI: 1.05-1.06), parents' disliking children to participate physical activity (PR=1.08, 95% CI: 1.07-1.09), heavy homework (PR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.12-1.14), long homework time (PR =1.08, 95%CI: 1.07-1.08), long time spending on electronic screen watching (PR=1.01, 95%CI: 1.00-1.01) and disliking physical class (PR=1.11, 95%CI: 1.10-1.12) could be the risk factors for

  17. Ozone Trend Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The detection of anthropogenic disturbances in the Earth's ozone layer was studied. Two topics were addressed: (1) the level at which a trend in total ozoning is detected by existing data sources; and (2) empirical evidence in the prediction of the depletion in total ozone. Error sources are identified. The predictability of climatological series, whether empirical models can be trusted, and how errors in the Dobson total ozone data impact trend detectability, are discussed.

  18. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  19. Ozone drinking water treatment handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This book explains how ozone can be used to provide primary disinfection, while minimizing halogenated by-products. This is of use to those who design pilot plant studies in full scale ozone plants-and those who employ ozone and regulatory personnel. Detailed section on components of an ozonization system outlines feed gas preparation (air and oxygen), ozone generation, ozone contacting, ozone off gas destruction, monitoring and control of ozonation systems, engineering aspects of ozone, cost factors in ozone technology, case histories (European and U.S.).

  20. Ozone Antimicrobial Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is a potent germicide that has been used extensively for water purification. In Europe, 90 percent of the municipal water systems are treated with ozone, and in France, ozone has been used to treat drinking water since 1903. However, there is limited information on the bioc...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of... daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1265 How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the...

  2. Identifying ozone production from oil and gas versus urban emissions sources in the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Zaragoza, J.; Abeleira, A.; Flocke, F. M.; Farmer, D.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    During summertime, ozone concentrations in the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range of Colorado often exceed the 8-hour average EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 75 ppbv. Ambient measurements of ozone, ozone precursors - volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) - and other secondary pollutants such as peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) were collected during spring (15 Mar-18 May) and summer (6 Jul-9 Sept) 2015 at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Erie, Colorado. These measurements were made in conjunction with airborne measurements from the Shale Oil and Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in spring 2015, which focused on studying the air quality impacts of emissions from oil and gas production in the western U.S. Using the in-situ ground-based measurements collected at the BAO field site, we attempt to identify and compare regional ozone production originating from oil and gas emissions (e.g., the Denver-Julesburg oil basin northeast of BAO) with that from urban and mobile sources (e.g., the Denver/Boulder metropolitan area south and west of BAO). We use ozone production efficiency (i.e., the number of molecules of ozone produced per molecule of NOx oxidized) and emissions ratios of selected VOCs as a metric for comparing ozone production associated with these different sources of emissions as well as seasonal differences between observations collected in spring versus summer.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of osseous spine metastasis before and 1 hour after high-dose image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lis, Eric; Saha, Atin; Peck, Kyung K; Zatcky, Joan; Zelefsky, Michael J; Yamada, Yoshiya; Holodny, Andrei I; Bilsky, Mark H; Karimi, Sasan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE High-dose image-guided radiation therapy (HD IGRT) has been instrumental in mitigating some limitations of conventional RT. The recent emergence of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to investigate tumor physiology can be used to verify the response of human tumors to HD IGRT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the near-immediate effects of HD IGRT on spine metastases through the use of DCE MRI perfusion studies. METHODS Six patients with spine metastases from prostate, thyroid, and renal cell carcinoma who underwent HD IGRT were studied using DCE MRI prior to and 1 hour after HD IGRT. The DCE perfusion parameters plasma volume (Vp) and vascular permeability (Ktrans) were measured to assess the near-immediate and long-term tumor response. A Mann-Whitney U-test was performed to compare significant changes (at p ≤ 0.05) in perfusion parameters before and after RT. RESULTS The authors observed a precipitous drop in Vp within 1 hour of HD IGRT, with a mean decrease of 65.2%. A significant difference was found between Vp values for before and 1 hour after RT (p ≤ 0.05). No significant change was seen in Vp (p = 0.31) and Ktrans (p = 0.1) from 1 hour after RT to the first follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The data suggest that there is an immediate effect of HD IGRT on the vascularity of spine metastases, as demonstrated by a precipitous decrease in Vp. The DCE MRI studies can detect such changes within 1 hour after RT, and findings are concordant with existing animal models.

  4. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  5. Changes in US background ozone due to global anthropogenic emissions from 1970 to 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopmongcol, Uarporn; Jung, Jaegun; Kumar, Naresh; Yarwood, Greg

    2016-09-01

    Estimates of North American and US Background (NAB and USB) ozone (O3) are critical in setting and implementing the US National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore influence population exposure to O3 across the US. NAB is defined as the O3 concentration in the absence of anthropogenic O3 precursor emissions from North America whereas USB excludes anthropogenic emissions inside the US alone. NAB and USB vary geographically and with time of year. Analyses of O3 trends at rural locations near the west coast suggest that background O3 is rising in response to increasing non-US emissions. As the O3 NAAQS is lowered, rising background O3 would make attaining the NAAQS more difficult. Most studies of changing US background O3 have inferred trends from observations whereas air quality management decisions tend to rely on models. Thus, it is important that the models used to develop O3 management strategies are able to represent the changes in background O3 in order to increase confidence that air quality management strategies will succeed. We focus on how changing global emissions influence USB rather than the effects of inter-annual meteorological variation or long-term climate change. We use a regional model (CAMx) nested within a global model (GEOS-Chem) to refine our grid resolution over high terrain in the western US and near US borders where USB tends to be higher. We determine USB from CAMx simulations that exclude US anthropogenic emissions. Over five decades, from 1970 to 2020, estimated USB for the annual fourth highest maximum daily 8-h average O3 (H4MDA8) in the western US increased from mostly in the range of 40-55 ppb to 45-60 ppb, but remained below 45 ppb in the eastern US. USB increases in the southwestern US are consistent with rising emissions in Asia and Mexico. USB decreases in the northeast US after 1990 follow declining Canadian emissions. Our results show that the USB increases both for the top 30 MDA8 days and the H4MDA8 (the former

  6. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  7. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  8. Probabilistic aspects of meteorological and ozone regional ensemble forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Monache, L D; Hacker, J; Zhou, Y; Deng, X; Stull, R

    2006-03-20

    This study investigates whether probabilistic ozone forecasts from an ensemble can be made with skill; i.e., high verification resolution and reliability. Twenty-eight ozone forecasts were generated over the Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia, Canada, for the 5-day period 11-15 August 2004, and compared with 1-hour averaged measurements of ozone concentrations at five stations. The forecasts were obtained by driving the CMAQ model with four meteorological forecasts and seven emission scenarios: a control run, {+-} 50% NO{sub x}, {+-} 50% VOC, and {+-} 50% NO{sub x} combined with VOC. Probabilistic forecast quality is verified using relative operating characteristic curves, Talagrand diagrams, and a new reliability index. Results show that both meteorology and emission perturbations are needed to have a skillful probabilistic forecast system--the meteorology perturbation is important to capture the ozone temporal and spatial distribution, and the emission perturbation is needed to span the range of ozone-concentration magnitudes. Emission perturbations are more important than meteorology perturbations for capturing the likelihood of high ozone concentrations. Perturbations involving NO{sub x} resulted in a more skillful probabilistic forecast for the episode analyzed, and therefore the 50% perturbation values appears to span much of the emission uncertainty for this case. All of the ensembles analyzed show a high ozone concentration bias in the Talagrand diagrams, even when the biases from the unperturbed emissions forecasts are removed from all ensemble members. This result indicates nonlinearity in the ensemble, which arises from both ozone chemistry and its interaction with input from particular meteorological models.

  9. Probabilistic aspects of meteorological and ozone regional ensemble forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Monache, Luca; Hacker, Joshua P.; Zhou, Yongmei; Deng, Xingxiu; Stull, Roland B.

    2006-12-01

    This study investigates whether probabilistic ozone forecasts from an ensemble can be made with skill: i.e., high verification resolution and reliability. Twenty-eight ozone forecasts were generated over the Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia, Canada, for the 5-day period 11-15 August 2004 and compared with 1-hour averaged measurements of ozone concentrations at five stations. The forecasts were obtained by driving the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) model with four meteorological forecasts and seven emission scenarios: a control run, ±50% NOx, ±50% volatile organic compounds (VOC), and ±50% NOx combined with VOC. Probabilistic forecast quality is verified using relative operating characteristic curves, Talagrand diagrams, and a new reliability index. Results show that both meteorology and emission perturbations are needed to have a skillful probabilistic forecast system: the meteorology perturbation is important to capture the ozone temporal and spatial distribution and the emission perturbation is needed to span the range of ozone concentration magnitudes. Emission perturbations are more important than meteorology perturbations for capturing the likelihood of high ozone concentrations. Perturbations involving NOx resulted in a more skillful probabilistic forecast for the episode analyzed, and therefore the 50% perturbation values appear to span much of the emission uncertainty for this case. All of the ensembles analyzed show a high ozone concentration bias in the Talagrand diagrams, even when the biases from the unperturbed emissions forecasts are removed from all ensemble members. This result indicates nonlinearity in the ensemble, which arises from both ozone chemistry and its interaction with input from particular meteorological models.

  10. Variability and sources of surface ozone at rural sites in Nevada, USA: Results from two years of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative.

    PubMed

    Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu B; Burley, Joel; Jaffe, Daniel A; Pierce, R Bradley; Lin, Meiyun; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-10-15

    Ozone (O3) has been measured at Great Basin National Park (GBNP) since September 1993. GBNP is located in a remote, rural area of eastern Nevada. Data indicate that GBNP will not comply with a more stringent National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O3, which is based upon the 3-year average of the annual 4th highest Maximum Daily 8-h Average (MDA8) concentration. Trend analyses for GBNP data collected from 1993 to 2013 indicate that MDA8 O3 increased significantly for November to February, and May. The greatest increase was for May at 0.38, 0.35, and 0.46 ppb yr(-1) for the 95th, 50th, and 5th percentiles of MDA8 O3 values, respectively. With the exception of GBNP, continuous O3 monitoring in Nevada has been limited to the greater metropolitan areas. Due to the limited spatial detail of O3 measurements in rural Nevada, a network of rural monitoring sites was established beginning in July 2011. For a period ranging from July 2011 to June 2013, maximum MDA8 O3 at 6 sites occurred in the spring and summer, and ranged from 68 to 80ppb. Our analyses indicate that GBNP, in particular, is ideally positioned to intercept air containing elevated O3 derived from regional and global sources. For the 2 year period considered here, MDA8 O3 at GBNP was an average of 3.1 to 12.6 ppb higher than at other rural Nevada sites. Measured MDA8 O3 at GBNP exceeded the current regulatory threshold of 75 ppb on 7 occasions. Analyses of synoptic conditions, model tracers, and air mass back-trajectories on these days indicate that stratospheric intrusions, interstate pollution transport, wildfires, and Asian pollution contributed to elevated O3 observed at GBNP. We suggest that regional and global sources of ozone may pose challenges to achieving a more stringent O3 NAAQS in rural Nevada.

  11. 78 FR 58884 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Kentucky; Stage II Requirements for Enterprise...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ...'' nonattainment area for the 1-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) as part of the Cincinnati... Kentucky, through the Kentucky Division for Air Quality (KDAQ) on April 25, 2013, for the purpose of... for Enterprise Holdings, Inc. at Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International Airport in Boone...

  12. Key drivers of Western U.S. surface ozone variability during 1980-2050: From background trends to extreme transport events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to lower the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone from 75 ppbv to a range of 60-70 ppbv on the basis of the latest health evidence. Rising Asian emissions, more frequent wildfires, and poorly understood deep stratospheric intrusions may pose challenges to achieving more stringent ozone standards over high-elevation Western U.S. (WUS) regions. Understanding the factors driving daily to decadal variability in sources of ozone is thus relevant to an effective implementation of the ozone NAAQS in WUS states. Here I present a detailed analysis of WUS surface ozone variability during 1980-2050, based on observations and a suite of chemistry-climate model simulations designed to isolate the role of changes in meteorology, background, STT, wildfires, methane, and Asian vs. North American anthropogenic emissions. Our analysis identifies the key role of stratospheric intrusion frequency on year-to-year variability in springtime high-ozone events measured at high-elevation WUS sites. We show more frequent late spring deep stratospheric intrusions when the polar jet stream meanders towards the southwestern United States, as occurs following strong La Niña conditions. Fewer and weaker intrusion events followed the pronounced positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation in response to volcanic aerosols from the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. With Asian emissions, global methane, and meteorology varying with time, the model simulates a background ozone increase of 0.20-0.45 ppb yr-1 (P≤0.01) at high-elevation WUS sites for spring during 1988-2012. With global methane and meteorology varying with time, the model shows an increasing ozone trend of 0.1-0.2 ppb yr-1 in spring (0.01ozone over the northeastern U.S., with implications for

  13. Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation for 1 Hour Induces Protection Against Lethal Radiation Doses but Does Not Affect Life Span of DBA/2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Altaner, Čestmír; Altanerova, Veronika; Ebbesen, Peter; Pettersen, Erik O.

    2016-01-01

    Prior findings showed that serum from DBA/2 mice that had been given whole-body irradiation for 1 hour at a low dose rate (LDR) of 30 cGy/h induced protection against radiation in reporter cells by a mechanism depending on transforming growth factor β3 and inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. In the present study, the effect of the 1 hour of LDR irradiation on the response of the preirradiated mice to a subsequent lethal dose and on the life span is examined. These DBA/2 mice were prime irradiated for 1 hour at 30 cGy/h. Two experiments with 9 and 9.5 Gy challenge doses given 6 weeks after priming showed increased survival in primed mice compared to unprimed mice followed up to 225 and 81 days after challenge irradiation, respectively. There was no overall significant difference in life span between primed and unprimed mice when no challenge irradiation was given. The males seemed to have a slight increase in lifespan after priming while the opposite was seen for the females. PMID:27867323

  14. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  15. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  16. Tropospheric Ozone Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Lefohn, A. S.; Scheel, H.; Brunke, E. G.; Claude, H.; Tarasick, D. W.; Galbally, I.; Bodeker, G.; Redondas, A.; Simmonds, P.; Koide, T.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Harris, J. M.; Johnson, B. J.; Davies, J.; Cuevas, E.; Meyer, C.; Shadwick, D.

    2008-12-01

    Growing recognition of the role of "background" tropospheric ozone on climate forcing and as a boundary condition for air quality changes highlights the importance of obtaining a broad picture of tropospheric ozone changes. Key surface and ozonesonde observing sites with tropospheric ozone measurement records longer than ~15 years have been selected to characterize longer term tropospheric ozone changes over broad geographic regions. The sites chosen vary from those with minimal impact by local ozone pollution sources to those that are in relatively close proximity to ozone precursor emissions and are thus affected in part by these sources. Consideration is given to the extent to which various time series represent broad geographic scales. Some series with more limited geographic representativeness can provide valuable information because of the length of the record, particularly in an underrepresented region. The vertical profile information from the ozonesonde stations, which have some of the longest tropospheric ozone records, provides a unique perspective on ozone in the free troposphere that is much less influenced by more local conditions. The general slowing or flattening of ozone increases seen at a number of locations beginning in the early 1990s has generally continued. At Naha, Japan there has been a significant increase in recent years that has not been seen at other Japanese ozonesonde locations. At high latitudes over North America a decade long decline in tropospheric ozone beginning in the 1980s has generally reversed with amounts now similar to those at the beginning of the record. In the S.H. several sites in the mid latitudes have shown significant increases. Although some overall patterns on changes emerge on regional scales and in some cases on continental scales, more general conclusions on hemispheric and global scales do not emerge. This is likely consistent with the varied pattern of ozone lifetimes, precursor emission changes, and

  17. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  18. SMM mesospheric ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    The main objective was to understand the secular and seasonal behavior of ozone in the lower mesosphere, 50 to 70 km. This altitude region is important in understanding the factors which determine ozone behavior. A secondary objective is the study of stratospheric ozone in the polar regions. Use is made of results from the SBUV satellite borne instrument. In the Arctic the interaction between chlorine compounds and low molecular weight hydrocarbons is studied. More than 30,000 profiles were obtained using the UVSP instrument on the SMM spacecraft. Several orbits of ozone data per day were obtained allowing study of the current rise in solar activity from the minimum until the present. Analysis of Nimbus 7 SBUV data in Antarctic spring indicates that ozone is depleted within the polar vortex relative to ozone outside the vortex. This depletion confirms the picture of ozone loss at altitudes where polar stratospheric clouds exist. In addition, there is ozone loss above the cloud level indicating that there is another mechanism in addition to ozone loss initiated by heterogeneous chlorine reactions on cloud particles.

  19. The Impact of Oil and Natural Gas Activity on Ozone Formation in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Hills, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Campos, T. L.; Stell, M. H.; Heikes, B.; Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Cohen, R. C.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Knote, C. J.; Emmons, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) was a ground-based and airborne field study designed to characterize and understand air quality in the Colorado Front Range, where National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) ozone levels are frequently exceeded during summertime. A primary goal of the study was to determine the factors controlling surface ozone in the Front Range. As part of the project, measurements of many trace gases were observed on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 by a suite of instrumentation, including the NCAR Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), which made measurements of a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are crucial for characterizing emissions and photochemical processing in the Front Range, as well as the air transported into the region. During recent years, oil and natural gas (O&NG) activity in the Front Range has been growing rapidly. Ratios of observed aromatic hydrocarbons, butanes and pentanes demonstrate distinct fingerprinting that can be used to distinguish both between different types of O&NG activities and between O&NG extraction regions in the FRAPPE study region and beyond. Using the observed hydrocarbon data along with other trace gas observations, we will compare contributions of O&NG emissions to OH reactivities in different regions in the Front Range, and present box model results demonstrating the impact of O&NG activities on ozone formation.

  20. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Fioletov, Vitali; Bishop, Lane; Godin, Sophie; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Kirchhoff, Volker; Chanin, Marie-Lise; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Chu, William

    1991-01-01

    An update of the extensive reviews of the state of knowledge of measured ozone trends published in the Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel is presented. The update contains a review of progress since these reports, including reviewing of the ozone records, in most cases through March 1991. Also included are some new, unpublished reanalyses of these records including a complete reevaluation of 29 stations located in the former Soviet Union. The major new advance in knowledge of the measured ozone trend is the existence of independently calibrated satellite data records from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAG) instruments. These confirm many of the findings, originally derived from the Dobson record, concerning northern mid-latitude changes in ozone. We now have results from several instruments, whereas the previously reported changes were dependent on the calibration of a single instrument. This update will compare the ozone records from many different instruments to determine whether or not they provide a consistent picture of the ozone change that has occurred in the atmosphere. The update also briefly considers the problem of stratospheric temperature change. As in previous reports, this problem received significantly less attention, and the report is not nearly as complete. This area needs more attention in the future.

  1. Saving Our Ozone Shield.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoste, Beatrice

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and continued use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as related to stratospheric ozone depletion. Presents the characteristics of CFCs conducive to the chemical reaction with ozone, the history of CFC use and detection of related environmental problems, health hazards, and alternatives to CFC use. (MCO)

  2. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  3. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  4. Observing trends in total ozone and extreme ozone events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-05-01

    The ozone layer in the stratosphere has been recovering since the 1989 Montreal Protocol reduced the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Fitzka et al. observed trends in total ozone levels and the vertical distribution of ozone at Hoher Sonnblick, a mountain in Austria, from 1994 to 2011.

  5. Investigation of the influence of transport from oil and natural gas regions on elevated ozone levels in the northern Colorado front range.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jason M; Helmig, Detlev

    2017-02-01

    The Northern Colorado Front Range (NCFR) has been in exceedance of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) since 2004, which has led to much debate over the sources of ozone precursors to the region, as this area is home to both the Denver, CO, metropolitan area and the Denver-Julesburg Basin, which has experienced rapid growth of oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations and associated emissions. Several recent studies have reported elevated levels of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as a result of O&NG emissions and the potential for significant ozone production from these emissions, despite implementation of stricter O&NG VOC emissions regulations in 2008. Approximately 88% of 1-hr elevated ozone events (>75 ppbv) occur during June-August, indicating that elevated ozone levels are driven by regional photochemistry. Analyses of surface ozone and wind observations from two sites, namely, South Boulder and the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, both near Boulder, CO, show a preponderance of elevated ozone events associated with east-to-west airflow from regions with O&NG operations in the N-ESE, and a relatively minor contribution of transport from the Denver Metropolitan area to the SE-S. Transport from upwind areas associated with abundant O&NG operations accounts for on the order of 65% (mean for both sites) of 1-hr averaged elevated ozone levels, while the Denver urban corridor accounts for 9%. These correlations contribute to mounting evidence that air transport from areas with O&NG operation has a significant impact on ozone and air quality in the NCFR.

  6. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  7. The Two Faces of Ozone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Provides answers to questions regarding the ozone problem: (1) nature of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere; (2) possibility of sending the excess ozone at ground level to the stratosphere; (3) possibility of producing pure ozone and carrying it to the stratosphere; and (4) banning chlorofluorocarbons. (YP)

  8. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using ozone involves the introduction of ozone gas (O3) into the subsurface to degrade organic contaminants of concern. Ozone is tri-molecular oxygen (O2) that is a gas under atmospheric conditions and is a strong oxidant. Ozone may react with ...

  9. Information on the Interstate Transport Good Neighbor Provision for the 2012 Fine Particulate Matter (PM) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under Clean Air Act (CAA) Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this March 2016 memorandum is to provide information to EPA regional offices and states as they develop and review SIPs that address the interstate transport Good Neighbor provision as it pertains to the PM2.5 NAAQS

  10. Modeling ozone episodes in the Baltimore-Washington region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, William F.

    1994-01-01

    Surface ozone (O3) concentrations in excess of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) continue to occur in metropolitan areas in the United States despite efforts to control emissions of O3 precursors. Future O3 control strategies will be based on results from modeling efforts that have just begun in many areas. Two initial questions that arise are model sensitivity to domain-specific conditions and the selection of episodes for model evaluation and control strategy development. For the Baltimore-Washington region (B-W), the presence of the Chesapeake Bay introduces a number of issues relevant to model sensitivity. In this paper, the specific questions of the determination of model volume (mixing height) for the Urban Airshed Model (UAM) is discussed and various alternative methods compared. For the latter question, several analytic approaches, Cluster Analysis and classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis are undertaken to determine meteorological conditions associated with severe O3 events in the B-W domain.

  11. Ozone - plant surface reactions an important ozone loss term?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Canaval, Eva; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billions dollar per year. Plant injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: How much ozone enters the plant through open stomata and how much ozone is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? Until now surface losses are estimated from measured total ozone deposition fluxes and calculated stomatal conductance values. While stomatal conductance of CO2 and H2O is well understood and extensively used in describing plant atmosphere gas exchange, stomatal conductance of ozone is not well known. Here we use different Nicotiana tabacum varieties and find that surface reactions of ozone with diterpenoids synthesized by glandular trichomes reduce ozone flux through open stomata. Our measurements reveal that fast ozone loss at the plant surface is accompanied with prompt release of oxygenated volatile compounds. In the ozone fumigation experiments of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties the release of specific volatile oxy-VOCs allowed to identify the semi volatile precursor compounds at the plant surface. Ozone fumigation experiments with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), two common species in the Northern Hemisphere, show also a significant ozone loss at the plant surface for Picea abies. Fluid dynamic calculations of ozone transport in the diffusive leaf boundary layer reveal a vertical but no horizontal ozone gradient thus reducing ozone fluxes through the pores in case of efficient ozone scavenging plant surfaces. We explain this efficient ozone protection mechanism by the porous surface architecture of plants in combination with unsaturated semi-volatile compounds deposited at the plant surface. These results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at

  12. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  13. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  14. Ozone and NOx chemistry in the eastern US: evaluation of CMAQ/CB05 with satellite (OMI) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canty, T. P.; Hembeck, L.; Vinciguerra, T. P.; Anderson, D. C.; Goldberg, D. L.; Carpenter, S. F.; Allen, D. J.; Loughner, C. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2015-02-01

    Regulatory air quality models, such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ), are used by federal and state agencies to guide policy decisions that determine how to best achieve adherence with National Ambient Air Quality Standards for surface ozone. We use observations of ozone and its important precursor NO2 to test the representation of the photochemistry and emission of ozone precursors within CMAQ. Observations of tropospheric column NO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), retrieved by two independent groups, show that the model overestimates urban NO2 and underestimates rural NO2 under all conditions examined for July and August 2011 in the US Northeast. The overestimate of the urban to rural ratio of tropospheric column NO2 for this baseline run of CMAQ (CB05 mechanism, mobile NOx emissions from the National Emissions Inventory; isoprene emissions from MEGAN v2.04) suggests this model may under estimate the importance of interstate transport of NOx. This CMAQ simulation leads to a considerable overestimate of the 2 month average of 8 h daily maximum surface ozone in the US Northeast, as well as an overestimate of 8 h ozone at AQS sites during days when the state of Maryland experienced NAAQS exceedances. We have implemented three changes within CMAQ motivated by OMI NO2 as well as aircraft observations obtained in July 2011 during the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign: (a) the modeled lifetime of organic nitrates within CB05 has been reduced by a factor of 10, (b) emissions of NOx from mobile sources has been reduced by a factor of 2, and (c) isoprene emissions have been reduced by using MEGAN v2.10 rather than v2.04. Compared to the baseline simulation, the CMAQ run using all three of these changes leads to a considerably better simulation of the ratio of urban to rural column NO2, better agreement with the 2 month average of daily 8 h maximum ozone in the US Northeast, fewer number of false positives of an ozone exceedance throughout the domain

  15. Ozone and NOx chemistry in the eastern US: evaluation of CMAQ/CB05 with satellite (OMI) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canty, T. P.; Hembeck, L.; Vinciguerra, T. P.; Anderson, D. C.; Goldberg, D. L.; Carpenter, S. F.; Allen, D. J.; Loughner, C. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory air quality models, such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ), are used by federal and state agencies to guide policy decisions that determine how to best achieve adherence with National Ambient Air Quality Standards for surface ozone. We use observations of ozone and its important precursor NO2 to test the representation of the photochemistry and emission of ozone precursors within CMAQ. Observations of tropospheric column NO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), retrieved by two independent groups, show that the model overestimates urban NO2 and underestimates rural NO2 under all conditions examined for July and August 2011 in the US Northeast. The overestimate of the urban to rural ratio of tropospheric column NO2 for this baseline run of CMAQ (CB05 mechanism, mobile NOx emissions from the National Emissions Inventory; isoprene emissions from MEGAN v2.04) suggests this model may underestimate the importance of interstate transport of NOx. This CMAQ simulation leads to a considerable overestimate of the 2-month average of 8 h daily maximum surface ozone in the US Northeast, as well as an overestimate of 8 h ozone at AQS sites during days when the state of Maryland experienced NAAQS exceedances. We have implemented three changes within CMAQ motivated by OMI NO2 as well as aircraft observations obtained in July 2011 during the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign: (a) the modeled lifetime of organic nitrates within CB05 has been reduced by a factor of 10, (b) emissions of NOx from mobile sources has been reduced by a factor of 2, and (c) isoprene emissions have been reduced by using MEGAN v2.10 rather than v2.04. Compared to the baseline simulation, the CMAQ run using all three of these changes leads to considerably better simulation of column NO2 in both urban and rural areas, better agreement with the 2-month average of daily 8 h maximum ozone in the US Northeast, fewer number of false positives of an ozone exceedance throughout the domain

  16. Ozone Profiles and Tropospheric Ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Sioris, C. E.; Sparr, R. J. D.; Kuregm, T. P.; Martin, R. V.; Newchurch, M. J.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ozone profiles are derived from backscattered radiances in the ultraviolet spectra (290-340 nm) measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment using optimal estimation. Tropospheric O3 is directly retrieved with the tropopause as one of the retrieval levels. To optimize the retrieval and improve the fitting precision needed for tropospheric O3, we perform extensive wavelength and radiometric calibrations and improve forward model inputs. Retrieved O3 profiles and tropospheric O3 agree well with coincident ozonesonde measurements, and the integrated total O3 agrees very well with Earth Probe TOMS and Dobson/Brewer total O3. The global distribution of tropospheric O3 clearly shows the influences of biomass burning, convection, and air pollution, and is generally consistent with our current understanding.

  17. The impact of meteorology on ozone in Houston

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, B.K.; Davis, J.M.; Nychka, D.

    1997-12-31

    This paper compares the results from both a one-stage hierarchical clustering technique (average linkage) and a two-stage technique (average linkage then k-means) as part of an objective meteorological Classification scheme designed to better elucidate ozone`s dependence on meteorology in the Houston, Texas, area. When applied to twelve years of meteorological data (1981-1992), each technique identified seven statistically distinct meteorological regimes, the majority of which exhibited significantly different daily 1-hour maximum ozone (O{sub 3}) concentrations. While both clustering approaches proved successful, the two-stage approach did appear superior in terms of better segregation of the mean O{sub 3}, concentrations. Both approaches indicated that the largest mean daily one-hour maximum concentrations are associated with migrating anticyclones and not with the quasi-permanent Bermuda High that often dominates the southeastern United States during the summer. As a result, maximum ozone concentrations are just as likely during the months of April, May, September and October as they are during the summer months. These findings support and help explain the unique O{sub 3}, climatology experienced by the Houston area.

  18. Polar Ozone Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, a great deal of attention has been focused on the polar regions to both identify the chemistry and physics of the large losses, and to provide an understanding of the future of polar ozone. In this review talk, I will discuss the secular trends of ozone in both the Antarctic and Arctic regions, and I will review some of the principal research results of the last few years. In particular, I will emphasize some of the results from the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign that occurred over the course of the winter of 1999-2000.

  19. A phase 2 safety study of accelerated elotuzumab infusion, over less than 1 hour, in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Berenson, James; Manges, Robert; Badarinath, Suprith; Cartmell, Alan; McIntyre, Kristi; Lyons, Roger; Harb, Wael; Mohamed, Hesham; Nourbakhsh, Ali; Rifkin, Robert

    2017-02-18

    Elotuzumab, an immunostimulatory SLAMF7-targeting monoclonal antibody, induces myeloma cell death with minimal effects on normal tissue. In a previous phase 3 study in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM), elotuzumab (10 mg/kg, ∼3-hour infusion), combined with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, demonstrated durable efficacy and acceptable safety; 10% (33/321) of patients had infusion reactions (IRs; Grade 1/2: 29; Grade 3: 4). This phase 2 study (NCT02159365) investigated an accelerated infusion schedule in 70 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma or RRMM. The primary endpoint was cumulative incidence of Grade 3/4 IRs by completion of treatment Cycle 2. Dosing comprised elotuzumab 10 mg/kg intravenously (weekly, Cycles 1-2; biweekly, Cycles 3+), lenalidomide 25 mg (daily, Days 1-21) and dexamethasone (28 mg orally and 8 mg intravenously, weekly, Cycles 1-2; 40 mg orally, weekly, Cycles 3+), in 28-day cycles. Premedication with diphenhydramine, acetaminophen, and ranitidine (or their equivalents) was given as in previous studies. If no IRs occurred, infusion rate was increased in Cycle 1 from 0.5 to 2 mL/min during dose 1 (∼2 hours 50 min duration) to 5 mL/min for the entire infusion by dose 3 and also during all subsequent infusions (∼1-hour duration). Median number of treatment cycles was six. No Grade 3/4 IRs occurred; only one Grade 1 and one Grade 2 IR occurred, both during the first infusion. These data support the safety of a faster infusion of elotuzumab administered over ∼1 hour by the third dose, providing a more convenient alternative dosing option for patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  1. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  2. Ozone Correlative Measurements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the necessary parameters for the correlation of data on Earth ozone. Topics considered were: (1) measurement accuracy; (2) equipment considerations (SBUV); and (3) ground based measurements to support satellite data.

  3. Chronic lung injury risk estimates for urban areas having ozone patterns similar to those in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, M.; Narducci, P.; Whitfield, R.; Richmond, H.M.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the approach and result of an assessment of health risks associated with long-term exposure to ozone. The health endpoint of interest is the probability of formation of mild lesions in the centriacinar region of the lung among children living in New York City. The risk model incorporates an exposure model and a health model. The exposure model is preliminary results of the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model (P-NEM) for ozone, and the health model is the judgments of active researchers about the likelihood of formation of ozone-induced lesions in the human lung. Children and New York City were chosen as the population and city of interest because it is believed that children are more sensitive to ozone than any other group of people, and New York City is more representative of other urban areas than Los Angeles, the other city of which P-NEM exposure results are available. Risk results are presented for ten exposure distributions generated by P-NEM, two air quality scenarios (``as-is`` and ``attainment``), and two exposure periods (1 and 10 ozone seasons). The results vary across experts, are not very sensitive to variations in P-NEM exposure distributions, are lower for attainment conditions than as-is conditions, and are lower for 1 season of exposure than 10 seasons. Although these results are specific to children living in areas having exposure patterns similar to those found in the Northeast, they are fairly representative of results for outdoor workers in the Northeast and Southern California and for children in Southern California. The reason for this is that many experts believe that children and outdoor workers respond in a similar fashion to the given exposure patterns, or that exposure patterns in the Northeast and Southern California are similar. Some experts held both of these beliefs. These results should help policymakers evaluate alternative national ambient air quality standards for ozone. 4 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Chronic lung injury risk estimates for urban areas having ozone patterns similar to those in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, M.; Narducci, P.; Whitfield, R. ); Richmond, H.M. . Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards)

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the approach and result of an assessment of health risks associated with long-term exposure to ozone. The health endpoint of interest is the probability of formation of mild lesions in the centriacinar region of the lung among children living in New York City. The risk model incorporates an exposure model and a health model. The exposure model is preliminary results of the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model (P-NEM) for ozone, and the health model is the judgments of active researchers about the likelihood of formation of ozone-induced lesions in the human lung. Children and New York City were chosen as the population and city of interest because it is believed that children are more sensitive to ozone than any other group of people, and New York City is more representative of other urban areas than Los Angeles, the other city of which P-NEM exposure results are available. Risk results are presented for ten exposure distributions generated by P-NEM, two air quality scenarios ( as-is'' and attainment''), and two exposure periods (1 and 10 ozone seasons). The results vary across experts, are not very sensitive to variations in P-NEM exposure distributions, are lower for attainment conditions than as-is conditions, and are lower for 1 season of exposure than 10 seasons. Although these results are specific to children living in areas having exposure patterns similar to those found in the Northeast, they are fairly representative of results for outdoor workers in the Northeast and Southern California and for children in Southern California. The reason for this is that many experts believe that children and outdoor workers respond in a similar fashion to the given exposure patterns, or that exposure patterns in the Northeast and Southern California are similar. Some experts held both of these beliefs. These results should help policymakers evaluate alternative national ambient air quality standards for ozone. 4 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Stratospheric ozone is decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-03-01

    The recent discovery that chlorofluorocarbons create the Antarctic ozone hole every October through reactions mediated by ice particles formed at the lowest temperatures of the stratosphere is discussed. A large-scale reanalysis of measurements reveals that protective stratospheric ozone has decreased during the past 17 yrs with some decreases greatly exceeding predictions. It is noted that standard models did not, and still do not, include the ice in their reaction schemes. A tendency toward larger losses at higher colder latitudes is seen.

  6. The ozone backlash

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-06-11

    While evidence for the role of chlorofluorocarbons in ozone depletion grows stronger, researchers have recently been subjected to vocal public criticism of their theories-and their motives. Their understanding of the mechanisms of ozone destruction-especially the annual ozone hole that appears in the Antarctic-has grown stronger, yet everywhere they go these days, they seem to be confronted by critics attacking their theories as baseless. For instance, Rush Limbaugh, the conservative political talk-show host and now-best-selling author of The Way Things Ought to Be, regularly insists that the theory of ozone depletion by CFCs is a hoax: bladerdash and poppycock. Zoologist Dixy Lee Ray, former governor of the state of Washington and former head of the Atomic Energy Commission, makes the same argument in her book, Trashing the Planet. The Wall Street Journal and National Review have run commentaries by S. Fred Singer, a former chief scientists for the Department of Transportation, purporting to shoot holes in the theory of ozone depletion. Even the June issue of Omni, a magazine with a circulation of more than 1 million that publishes a mixture of science and science fiction, printed a feature article claiming to expose ozone research as a politically motivated scam.

  7. Investigating ambient ozone formation regimes in neighboring cities of shale plays in the Northeast United States using photochemical modeling and satellite retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Yuan; Faust, Eric; Hou, Xiangting; Lee, Pius; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Hedquist, Brent C.; Liao, Kuo-Jen

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates long-term (i.e., 2007-2014) fluctuations in ambient ozone formation regimes for cities adjacent to shale plays in the Northeast United States (U.S.). Ozone air quality in many cities of the Northeast U.S. does not meet the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), and understanding ambient ozone formation regimes is essential to develop effective air pollution mitigation strategies for cities violating the air quality standards. Since 2013, the U.S. has become the world's largest producer of tight oil and natural gas from shale rock, and previous studies show that emissions of air pollutant precursors from shale oil and gas-related activities would have the potential to affect ambient ozone air quality in adjacent cities of shale plays. This work leveraged (1) satellite-retrieved column densities of formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from multiple instruments (i.e., Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2)); (2) photochemical air quality modeling and sensitivity analysis; and (3) ratios of satellite-retrieved air pollutant column densities to investigate ambient ozone formation regimes in neighboring cities of shale plays (i.e., Marcellus Shale) in the Northeast U.S. from 2007 to 2014. Our results show that ambient ozone formation in Boston, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. (which are close to Marcellus Shale) was in the NOx -limited or transition regime during the period of study. Ambient ozone formation in New York City was in the transition regime during 2010-2013 and VOC -limited regime during 2007-2009 and in 2014. Based on the result of this study, we conclude that controls NOx emissions would mitigate ozone air pollution from 2007 to 2014 in most of the cities examined in this study. Controls of local VOC emissions would ease ozone air pollution in New York City during the study period. With projected increases in oil and gas production from shale plays in

  8. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area...

  9. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area...

  10. The Ozone Problem | Ground-level Ozone | New England | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    Many factors impact ground-level ozone development, including temperature, wind speed and direction, time of day, and driving patterns. Due to its dependence on weather conditions, ozone is typically a summertime pollutant and a chief component of summertime smog.

  11. Recovery of the Ozone Layer: The Ozone Depleting Gas Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, David J.; Montzka, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone layer, through absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, protects all biological systems on Earth. In response to concerns over the depletion of the global ozone layer, the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 mandates that NASA and NOAA monitor stratospheric ozone and ozone-depleting substances. This information is critical for assessing whether the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer, an international treaty that entered into force in 1989 to protect the ozone layer, is having its intended effect of mitigating increases in harmful ultraviolet radiation. To provide the information necessary to satisfy this congressional mandate, both NASA and NOAA have instituted and maintained global monitoring programs to keep track of ozone-depleting gases as well as ozone itself. While data collected for the past 30 years have been used extensively in international assessments of ozone layer depletion science, the language of scientists often eludes the average citizen who has a considerable interest in the health of Earth's protective ultraviolet radiation shield. Are the ozone-destroying chemicals declining in the atmosphere? When will these chemicals decline to pre-ozone hole levels so that the Antarctic ozone hole might disappear? Will this timing be different in the stratosphere above midlatitudes?

  12. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  13. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  14. Effects of nitrogen oxide emission controls on Eastern US surface ozone: A comparison between urban cores and rural background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls have led to improved air quality over the past two decades, particularly over the Eastern US. In recent work we quantified the effects of the efforts to abate surface ozone (O3) pollution under the NOx State Implementation Plan (NOx SIP Call) for Eastern US background sites (available from the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET)) using methods from statistical extreme value theory (Rieder et al., 2013). Our analysis showed that the number of summer (JJA) days above the US national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) declined on average by a factor of two between 1988-1998 and 1999-2009 and that probabilistic 1-yr O3 return values declined by about 10 ppb between these two time periods. Here we extend the analysis to observations available from the US EPA Air Quality System (AQS), comprising sites ranging from polluted urban cores to rural sites. We focus on changes in (i) the seasonal and annual average number of days with maximum daily 8-hour average surface O3 above the NAAQS and (ii) probabilistic O3 return values following the NOx SIP Call. Particular focus is given on similarities and differences in surface O3 responses on regional to local level and on contrasting urban cores and rural background sites. References: Rieder H.E., Fiore A.M., Polvani L.M., Lamarque J.-F., Fang Y. (2013): Changes in the frequency and return level of high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States following emission controls, Environ. Res. Lett., 8, 014012, 2013.

  15. Achievements in Stratospheric Ozone Protection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes achievements in protecting the ozone layer, the benefits of these achievements, and strategies involved (e.g., using alternatives to ozone-depleting substances, phasing out harmful substances, and creating partnerships).

  16. Air Quality Guide for Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Air Quality Guide for Ozone Ground-level ozone is one ... exposure and protect your health. For your local air quality, visit www.airnow.gov View or print guide ...

  17. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  18. Health Effects of Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Inhaling ozone can cause coughing, shortness of breath, worse asthma or bronchitis symptoms, and irritation and damage to airways.You can reduce your exposure to ozone pollution by checking air quality where you live.

  19. "OZONE SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN CMAQ'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone source attribution has been used to support various policy purposes including interstate transport (Cross State Air Pollution Rule) by U.S. EPA and ozone nonattainment area designations by State agencies. Common scientific applications include tracking intercontinental tran...

  20. Production of NOx and other precursors of ozone formation in the Uinta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E.; Lyman, S. N.; Martin, R. S.; Anderson, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Uinta Basin, located in northeastern Utah, sometimes experiences ozone mixing ratios greater than the EPA NAAQS during specific meteorological conditions that include a combination of snow cover and inversion. We monitored ozone and some of its precursors, including NO, NO2, NOx (NO + NO2), and NOy (sum of reactive nitrogen species), at two sites (Roosevelt and Horse Pool). The Roosevelt site is in a city of about 6,000 people, and the Horse Pool site is in an area of intensive oil and gas production. In February and March 2012, NO, NO2, and NOy mixing ratios were 0.5 ± 0.8, 5.2 ± 2.6, and 6.5 ± 3.9 ppb at Roosevelt and 0 ± 1.3, 2.8 ± 2.7, and 4.1 ± 4.4 ppb at Horse Pool, respectively (mean ± standard deviation). NO, NO2, and NOx were measured at 7 other sites around the Basin by other entities. The spatial and temporal patterns in NOx and NOy indicate the dominance of local source influences on observed mixing ratios. NOx at urban sites and in oil and gas production areas appeared strongly influenced by traffic patterns. At some sites, wind direction analysis and air trajectory analysis indicated that areas of oil and gas production are significant sources of NOx, though pinpointing individual NOx sources proved difficult.

  1. Mars ozone: Mariner 9 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of the UV spectroscopy technique used by Mariner 9 to remotely measure ozone abundance at Mars is discussed. Previously-inferred ozone abundances could be underestimated by as much as a factor of 3, and much of the observed variability in the ozone abundance could be due to temporal and spatial variability in cloud and dust amount.

  2. Ames ER-2 ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R., Jr.; Vedder, James F.; Starr, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study ozone (O3) in the stratosphere. Measurements of the ozone mixing ratio at 1 s intervals are obtained with an ultraviolet photometer which flies on the ER-2 aircraft. The photometer determines the amount of ozone in air by measuring the transmission of ultraviolet light through a fixed path with and without ambient O3 present.

  3. An examination of utility emissions contributions to elevated ozone concentrations in the Chicago area

    SciTech Connect

    Fernau, M.E.; Guziel, K.A.; South, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce the pollutant load to the atmosphere and subsequent damaging effects, Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAAs) require reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]), nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Title IV is aimed at reducing acidic deposition and requires utilities to reduce SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions to specified levels. As a consequence of this, many utilities will have to install SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] control technologies. Title I is concerned with bringing regions into compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for the criteria pollutants, among which is ozone (O[sub 3]). The NAAQS for O[sub 3] is 120 ppb (parts per billion by volume) hourly average concentration, not to be exceeded four times in three years. O[sub 3] is a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when NO[sub x] and VOCs react together in the presence of sunlight. Utilities are a significant source of NO[sub x] and an unimportant source of VOCs. In the past, O[sub 3] control strategy has focused on reducing VOC emissions because of the possibility that reducing NO[sub x] actually might make O[sub 3] concentrations higher. However, this approach has not worked, perhaps because of underestimation of natural and manmade VOC emissions and transport of O[sub 3] from other regions. Computer modeling has shown that for many highly polluted areas massive NO[sub x] reductions may be necessary in addition to or in place of VOC controls. Utilities are a potential source of these NO[sub x] reductions.

  4. An examination of utility emissions contributions to elevated ozone concentrations in the Chicago area

    SciTech Connect

    Fernau, M.E.; Guziel, K.A.; South, D.W.

    1993-05-01

    In order to reduce the pollutant load to the atmosphere and subsequent damaging effects, Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAAs) require reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Title IV is aimed at reducing acidic deposition and requires utilities to reduce SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions to specified levels. As a consequence of this, many utilities will have to install SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control technologies. Title I is concerned with bringing regions into compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for the criteria pollutants, among which is ozone (O{sub 3}). The NAAQS for O{sub 3} is 120 ppb (parts per billion by volume) hourly average concentration, not to be exceeded four times in three years. O{sub 3} is a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when NO{sub x} and VOCs react together in the presence of sunlight. Utilities are a significant source of NO{sub x} and an unimportant source of VOCs. In the past, O{sub 3} control strategy has focused on reducing VOC emissions because of the possibility that reducing NO{sub x} actually might make O{sub 3} concentrations higher. However, this approach has not worked, perhaps because of underestimation of natural and manmade VOC emissions and transport of O{sub 3} from other regions. Computer modeling has shown that for many highly polluted areas massive NO{sub x} reductions may be necessary in addition to or in place of VOC controls. Utilities are a potential source of these NO{sub x} reductions.

  5. Western US Tropospheric Ozone: An Assessment of Vertical and Seasonal Variations over California and Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E.; Iraci, Laura T.; Johnson, Matthew; Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Pierce, Bradley R.; Cullis, Patrick; Gore, Warren J. Y.; Ives, Michael; Johnson, Bryan; LeBlanc, Thierry; Sterling, Chance W.; Tanaka, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    In the rural western US free-tropospheric O3 has risen in recent years as a result of rising Asian emissions, deep stratospheric intrusions and more frequent wildfires. This increasing O3 trend combined with the high surface elevation of much of the western US, which aids mixing between boundary layer and free-troposphere, pose challenges in attaining the more stringent O3 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) at many western US rural surface sites. As such, the ability to identify various sources and transport mechanisms that contribute towards surface O3 is increasingly important. This paper analyzes vertical profiles of O3 from the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) over California and Nevada, ozonesondes from Trinidad Head, CA and tropospheric ozone profiles from the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) at the JPL Table Mountain Facility, CA. Surface O3 from the US EPA Clean air Status and Trends Network (CASNET) are used to discuss surface trends. GEOS-Chem determines the trends in regional O3 and assess the contributions of various sources on surface O3. And Realtime Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) is used to forecast and interpret free-tropospheric observations. Specifically we will address the following questions: What are the effects of the lowered NAAQS? Do we observe elevated O3 during 2012 at surface sites reported in previous studies? And if so, what are the causes? How variable is free-tropospheric O3 over California and Nevada? How frequently do we observe high O3 lamina in the free troposphere and what are the surface impacts?

  6. Ozone in Rural Nevada: Investigating spatio-temporal patterns and source regions contributing to elevated concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, Rebekka

    In 1993, an ozone (O3) monitoring site was established at Great Basin National Park (GBNP), located in rural eastern Nevada. Analyses of data from this site indicate that compliance with a revised National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) ≤70 ppb will be challenging. With the exception of GBNP, ambient O3 monitoring has been limited to the areas in and around the 3 urban areas of Nevada. The objectives of the research presented here were to (1) characterize spatial and temporal trends in ambient O 3 across rural Nevada, and (2) identify source regions contributing to elevated O3 in rural Nevada. To pursue these objectives, a network of 13 monitoring sites was established throughout rural Nevada over a period ranging from July 2011 to June 2014. Data from 6 sites during the first 2 years of measurement indicate that maximum MDA8 O3 ranged from 68 to 80 ppb. Ambient O3 measured at GBNP was significantly higher than that measured at other rural Nevada sites. Back trajectory analyses, vertical profile measurements from aircrafts and sondes, statistical analyses, as well as results of regional and global models were employed to identify sources contributing to elevated O3. Our analyses indicate that regional and global sources contribute to O3 at surface sites throughout rural Nevada and that the high elevation and complex terrain make the State ideally situated to intercept air from the free troposphere and thus, pollution derived from complex sources included long-range transport, stratospheric intrusions, and regional emissions. Our data suggest that regional and global cooperation will be necessary to comply with a revised NAAQS in rural Nevada.

  7. MDA8 O3 Values at Rural Surface Sites in Nevada, USA: Results from Two Years of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, M. S.; Fine, R.; Miller, M. B.; Burley, J. D.; Jaffe, D. A.; Pierce, R. B.; Lin, M.

    2014-12-01

    Local anthropogenic emissions are limited in Nevada (USA); however, data collected at Great Basin National Park (GBNP), which is located in rural eastern Nevada, indicate that ozone (O3) routinely exceeds the threshold proposed for a more stringent National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Here, we focused on data collected between July 2011 and June 2013. For this period, the maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) O3 at GBNP exceeded the current NAAQS threshold (75 ppb) 7 times. Our analyses indicate that a combination of sources including emissions from regional wildfires and urban areas of southern California as well as stratospheric intrusions and long-range transport of Asian pollution contributed to elevated O3 observed at GBNP. Although MDA8 O3 measured at GBNP was well correlated with that measured at 5 other rural Nevada sites during this period, MDA8 O3 was 3.1 to 12.6 ppb greater at GBNP than at these other rural sites which emphasizes the need for spatially detailed measurements particularly in areas of complex terrain. The maximum MDA8 O3 at these 6 rural NV sites ranged from 68 to 80 ppb. GBNP was the only rural site to exceed the current NAAQS threshold during the period considered; however, when lower thresholds were considered the spatial and temporal extent of exceedances in rural Nevada increased indicating that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to reduce ambient O3 concentrations in rural Nevada. MDA8 O3 at rural Nevada sites were significantly correlated with measurements at urban Nevada (r = 0.64 to 0.82; p < 0.05) and rural California (r = 0.61 to 0.83; p = 0.00) sites suggesting that common mechanisms influence O3 observed throughout the region.

  8. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  9. Physicochemical patterns of ozone absorption by wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Results from studying aspen and pine wood ozonation are presented. The effect the concentration of ozone, the reagent residence time, and the content of water in a sample of wood has on ozone consumption rate and ozone demand are analyzed. The residence time is shown to determine the degree of ozone conversion degree and the depth of substrate destruction. The main patterns of ozone absorption by wood with different moisture content are found. Ways of optimizing the ozonation of plant biomass are outlined.

  10. Total Ozone Prediction: Stratospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Ramdy; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The correct prediction of total ozone as a function of latitude and season is extremely important for global models. This exercise tests the ability of a particular model to simulate ozone. The ozone production (P) and loss (L) will be specified from a well- established global model and will be used in all GCMs for subsequent prediction of ozone. This is the "B-3 Constrained Run" from M&MII. The exercise mostly tests a model stratospheric dynamics in the prediction of total ozone. The GCM predictions will be compared and contrasted with TOMS measurements.

  11. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  12. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  13. High efficiency ozone generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.L.

    1990-01-09

    This final report entails research prepared to verify the workings and the efficiency of producing ozone with the ELK'' Ozone Generator, which operates at an elevated gas pressure of up to 20 MPA (3000 psi) and is an improvement of the corona discharge ozone generator. The increased pressure produces an increase in the density of oxygen gas fed into the generator. This, in turn, leads to an increased yield of ozone in the ozone oxygen gas mixture leaving the generator. The design of this new ozone generator incorporates a novel positioning of the dielectric to preserve its mechanical integrity at high operating pressures and also incorporates a novel heat removal technique. A large number of ozone production runs have been made at different pressures. Large populations of data such as, temperature points throughout the generator, gas flow, cooling water flow parameters, operating gas pressure, ozone concentration, and data on the dielectric cooling, have been compiled and fed into our computer. This new data indicates not only that high pressures used in a controlled fashion will produce more ozone per watt hour but also indicates what problems exist when pressures are increased, such as the generation of high temperatures not only in the area of ozone generation but within the dielectric. The data also shows the necessary residence time for maximum ozone production at a particular pressure, voltage, temperature and electrode spacing. 14 refs., 22 figs.

  14. Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Winslow, N.; Wargan, K.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Rood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will discuss assimilation of ozone data from satellite-borne instruments. Satellite observations of ozone total columns and profiles have been measured by a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instruments, and more recently by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. Additional profile data are provided by instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by occultation instruments on other platforms. Instruments on Envisat' and future EOS Aura satellite will supply even more comprehensive data about the ozone distribution. Satellite data contain a wealth of information, but they do not provide synoptic global maps of ozone fields. These maps can be obtained through assimilation of satellite data into global chemistry and transport models. In the ozone system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) any combination of TOMS, SBUV, and Microwave Limb sounder (MLS) data can be assimilated. We found that the addition of MLS to SBUV and TOMS data in the system helps to constrain the ozone distribution, especially in the polar night region and in the tropics. The assimilated ozone distribution in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is sensitive also to finer changes in the SBUV and TOMS data selection and to changes in error covariance models. All results are established by comparisons of assimilated ozone with independent profiles from ozone sondes and occultation instruments.

  15. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  16. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  17. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  18. Dobson ozone spectrophotometer modification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a modified version of the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer in which several outdated electronic design features have been replaced by circuitry embodying more modern design concepts. The resulting improvement in performance characteristics has been obtained without changing the principle of operation of the original instrument.

  19. Ozone, CFCs and aerosols.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are, from the chemist's point of view, unique compounds with very valuable properties. They are inert, cheap and stable. But they also have devastating effects on the environment, destroying the ozone layer and adding to global warming or the greenhouse effect.

  20. Ozone Layer Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide has been developed through a collaborative effort involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the results of scientific research on ozone depletion are…

  1. Ozone and Cavitation Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, Ernestina; Traversoni, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    From laboratory measurements it is well known that the addition of ozone and cavitation enhances the properties of both, understanding for that the ones related to disinfection and carbon removal from waste water. This paper shows modeling of such phenomena that gives some light to the understanding of it and also provides the opportunity to improve the effectiveness of the current procedures.

  2. Assessing the Influence of Western Boundary Ozone Inflow for the Pacific Northwest Using the AIRPACT-4 Air-Quality Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, J. K.; Chung, S. H.; Herron-Thorpe, F. L.; Lamb, B. K.; Zhang, R.; Mount, G. H.; Emmons, L. K.

    2013-12-01

    The AIRPACT project has provided state, local and tribal air quality managers in the Pacific and Inland Northwest with state-of-the-art near-real time air quality forecasts, beginning in 2001 (Vaughan et al., 2004). Air-quality modeling is also an important tool for evaluating strategies for complying with the NAAQS, especially as the ozone standard is likely to be tightened from 75 ppb to 60 - 70 ppb. For the Pacific Northwest a perennial issue is the significance of trans-boundary transport effects on air quality. Under the EPA Exceptional Events Policy, for example, a nominal exceedance can be excluded from design value calculation if it can be credibly ascribed to long-range transport (LRT); air-quality modeling is an accepted tool for making a case that LRT contributes to an exceedance, and thus qualifies as an Exceptional Event. Also, evidence is accumulating that local air pollution should sometimes be viewed in the context of baseline pollution levels, and that these baseline levels are influenced by LRT (Wigder et al., 2013). AIRPACT4, a WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ air quality modeling system, uses chemical boundary conditions from global MOZART4 model runs that assimilate MOPITT/TERRA satellite CO (Herron-Thorpe et al., 2012). Here we use a non-reactive tracer species version of CMAQv4.7.1 to develop a chemical climatology describing trans-boundary ozone contributions (across the western boundary only) to the ozone background of the Pacific Northwest, including ozone input to the domain from trans-Pacific transport originating in Asia. Discrete tracers are assigned to the boundary condition ozone from each of the 21 model layers. The modeling results are analyzed for ozone-season months to determine: 1) monthly statistics on the ratio of trans-boundary tracer ozone to standard AIRPACT4 ground level ozone, and 2) the contribution of trans-boundary tracer ozone to episodes of high ozone concentration. Preliminary results will be presented along with discussion of

  3. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  4. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  5. Precision ozone calibration system based on vapor pressures of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1987-01-01

    A precision ozone calibration system for stratospheric research has been developed and evaluated. Vapor pressures above solid ozone are mixed with a carrier gas (N2) to produce stratospheric ozone mixing ratios at total pressures of 1 to cover 20 torr. The uncertainty in the ozone mixing ratios is approximately + or - 1.5 percent, the stability of ozone is + or - 0.3 percent. Experiments to be calibrated may sample the gas mixture over a wide range of flow rates; the maximum throughput of gas with corrections of less than 1 percent to ozone is about 200 torr 1/min. A mass spectrometer system continuously monitors the purity and stability of the N2-O3 gas mixture.

  6. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area that... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false For an area that fails to attain the 8... the CAA? 51.907 Section 51.907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  7. Measurement of ozone production sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla Andrade, Maria Del Carmen

    The Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) is a new ambient air monitor that measures directly the rate of ozone production in the atmosphere. The sensor consists of two environmental chambers made of UV-transmitting Teflon film continuously exposed to the solar radiation, a unit to convert NO2 to O3, and a modified ozone monitor. In the sample chamber, photolysis processes and radical chemistry produce ozone just as it happens in the atmosphere. In the second chamber, called the reference chamber, a UV-blocking film prevents radical formation in a way that only the photostationary state component of ozone formation is retained. High-efficiency conversion of NO2 to O3 accounts for differences in the NOx photostationary state between both chambers. An ozone monitor operating without its ozone scrubber detects the ozone differential between the sample and the reference chamber. By doing so, the photostationary state component of ozone formation is canceled out and the ozone produced via radical chemistry is detected. The ozone differential is divided by the exposure time of the air in the chambers to find the rate of ozone production. Radical abundance measurements, wall loss tests and radiometric measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The MOPS was deployed in a rural environment, on the campus of Penn State University (September 2008), and in an urban environment, in Houston during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors SHARP (15 Apr to 31 May, 2009). The MOPS retrieved the first experimental plots of ambient P(O 3) vs. NO in both locations. In addition, the sensitivity of ozone production in these two environments was studied by adding NOx mixtures to the ambient air and looking at the response in the production of ozone. The results presented in this work demonstrate how an extended use of the MOPS can contribute to the improvement of air quality regulations by quantifying ozone production and ozone transport at a regional

  8. TOMS Ozone Anomalies and Ozone Retrieval Errors Over Cloudy Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Newchurch, M.; Kim, J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Loughman, R.

    2003-12-01

    This study characterizes TOMS Ozone Retrieval Errors (OREs) associated with incorrect Cloud-Top Pressures (CTPs) and with assuming opaque Lambertian clouds, investigates these errors' effects on tropospheric ozone derivation, and analyzes ozone anomalies over TOMS data. Large errors occurring in TOMS assumed CTPs and inaccurate CTP-caused OREs are most significantly from inappropriately added ozone below clouds. Because OREs are usually within the TOMS retrieval precision when Cloud Optical Depth (COD)>20, assuming Lambertian surface is good. Because of In-Cloud Ozone Absorption ENhancement (ICOAEN), assuming opaque clouds can introduce large positive OREs even for optically thick clouds. For a 2-12 km water cloud of COD 40 with 20.8 DU ozone inside the cloud, the ORE is 17.8 DU at nadir. The ICOAEN effect depends strongly on viewing geometry and inter-cloud ozone amount and distribution; it is typically 5-13 DU over the tropical Atlantic and Africa and 1-7 DU over the tropical Pacific for deep convective clouds. The negative errors from using the TOMS Partial Cloud Model (PCM) partly cancel other positive errors. At COD < 5, the TOMS algorithm retrieves approximately the correct total ozone because of compensating errors. With increasing COD up to 20-40, negative PCM effect decreases to almost zero, and the overall positive ORE increases and is dominated by ICOAEN effect. The ICOAEN effect can largely underestimate tropospheric ozone derived from cloudy/clear difference techniques. The convective cloud differential and cloud-clear pair methods use minimum ozone above clouds to cancel positive errors. A Positive or Negative Ozone Anomaly (POA/NOA) is defined to occur if the ozone/reflectivity correlation coefficient in a region is >0.5 or <-0.5. Average fractions of OA occurrence are 31.8% and 35.8% in Nimbus-7 and Earth-Probe TOMS data, respectively. Most tropical NOAs result from large cloud-height errors; corrections lead to 50-70% POAs in the tropics because of

  9. Ozonated olive oils and the troubles

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    One of the commonly used methods for ozone therapy is ozonated oils. Most prominent type of used oils is extra virgin olive oil. But still, each type of unsaturated oils may be used for ozonation. There are a lot of wrong knowledge on the internet about ozonated oils and its use as well. Just like other ozone therapy studies, also the studies about ozone oils are inadequate to avoid incorrect knowledge. Current data about ozone oil and its benefits are produced by supplier who oversees financial interests and make misinformation. Despite the rapidly increasing ozone oil sales through the internet, its quality and efficacy is still controversial. Dozens of companies and web sites may be easily found to buy ozonated oil. But, very few of these products are reliable, and contain sufficiently ozonated oil. This article aimed to introduce the troubles about ozonated oils and so to inform ozonated oil users. PMID:26401346

  10. Three air quality studies: Great Lakes ozone formation and nitrogen dry deposition; and Tucson aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 was promulgated after thousands of lives were lost in four catastrophic air pollution events. It authorized the establishment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards or (NAAQS) for six pollutants that are harmful to human health and welfare: carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, ozone and sulfur dioxide. The Clean Air Act also led to the establishment of the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to set and enforce regulations. The first paper in this dissertation studies ozone in the Lake Michigan region (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Jacko, R., Hillery, J., 2011. Lake Michigan air quality: The 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP). Atmospheric Environment 45, 3192-3202.) The Chicago-Milwaukee-Gary metropolitan area has been unable to meet the ozone NAAQS since the Clean Air Act was implemented. The Lake Michigan Air Directors' Consortium (LADCO) hypothesized that land breezes transport ozone precursor compounds over the lake, where a large air/water temperature difference creates a shallow conduction layer, which is an efficient reaction chamber for ozone formation. In the afternoon, lake breezes and prevailing synoptic winds then transport ozone back over the land. To further evaluate this hypothesis, LADCO sponsored the 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP) to measure the air quality over Lake Michigan and the surrounding areas. This study has found that the LAP data supports this hypothesis of ozone formation, which has strong implications for ozone control strategies in the Lake Michigan region. The second paper is this dissertation (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Wolf, A.M.A., 2012. Ambient PM10 and metal concentrations measured in the Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, Arizona. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 43, 67-76) evaluated the airborne concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 microns or less) and eight metalloids and metals

  11. Secular variations of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrgian, A. Kh.

    1988-02-01

    The dependence of secular variations of tropospheric ozone on decreases of temperature and cloud growth in Central Europe is assessed on the basis of Vienna, Paris, and Athens data for 1853-1920. Decreases in ozone content occurring with a certain time lag after major volcanic eruptions (e.g., Krakatoa) are examined. The effect of the Tungusk-meteorite fall on ozone content is also discussed.

  12. Mars ozone: Mariner 9 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of the UV reflectance spectroscopy technique used by Mariner 9 to remotely measure ozone abundance at Mars is discussed. Due to temporal and spatial variability in cloud and dust amount, previously inferred ozone abundances could be underestimated by a factor of 3. Until the large uncertainty in cloud and dust scattering properties and opacities can be reduced, the ozone abundance inferred by the reflectance spectroscopy technique will always have significant uncertainty.

  13. Ozone Health Risk Assessment for Selected Urban Areas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The health risk assessment described in this report estimated various health effects associated with O3 exposures as well as the reduced risks for one O3 season associated with just meeting the current O3 NAAQS.

  14. Protecting beans from ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    1983-03-01

    A chemical treatment to protect navy beans from ozone damage increased yields by an average of more than 20% in 3 years of tests. An experimental antioxidant chemical, EDU, made by the DuPont company was tested as soil applications and sprays on several varieties and under a variety of soil and planting conditions. The average yield increases were between 16 and 24%. Chemical treatment also increased snap bean pod production by 12%.

  15. Protecting the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  16. Ozone measurement systems improvements studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W.; Guard, K.; Holland, A. C.; Spurling, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Results are summarized of an initial study of techniques for measuring atmospheric ozone, carried out as the first phase of a program to improve ozone measurement techniques. The study concentrated on two measurement systems, the electro chemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde and the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer, and consisted of two tasks. The first task consisted of error modeling and system error analysis of the two measurement systems. Under the second task a Monte-Carlo model of the Dobson ozone measurement technique was developed and programmed for computer operation.

  17. Investigation of Ground-Level Ozone and High-Pollution Episodes in a Megacity of Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Heng; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Wenxin; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) was used for the long-term observation of ground-level ozone (O3) from March 2010 to March 2013 over Shanghai, China. The 1-hour average concentration of O3 was 27.2 ± 17.0 ppbv. O3 level increased during spring, reached the peak in late spring and early summer, and then decreased in autumn and finally dropped to the bottom in winter. The highest monthly average O3 concentration in June (41.1 ppbv) was nearly three times as high as the lowest level recorded in December (15.2 ppbv). In terms of pollution episodes, 56 hourly samples (on 14 separate days) in 2010 exceeded the 1-hour ozone limit of 200 μg/m3 specified by the Grade II of the Chinese Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS, revised GB 3095-2012). Utilizing the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, the primary contribution to high ozone days (HODs) was identified as the regional transportation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and high concentrations of O3 from the chemical industrial zone in the Jinshan district of Shanghai. HODs showed higher concentrations of HONO and NO2 than non-episode conditions, implying that HONO at high concentration during HODs was capable of increasing the O3 concentration. The photolysis rate of HONO was estimated, suggesting that the larger number of OH radicals resulting from high concentrations of HONO have a considerable impact on ozone concentrations. PMID:26121146

  18. Comparing and evaluating model estimates of background ozone in surface air over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberman, J.; Fiore, A. M.; Lin, M.; Zhang, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone adversely affects human health and vegetation, and is thus a criteria pollutant regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Ozone is produced in the atmosphere via photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The present EPA approach considers health risks associated with exposure to ozone enhancement above the policy-relevant background (PRB), which is currently defined as the surface concentration of ozone that would exist without North American anthropogenic emissions. PRB thus includes production by natural precursors, production by precursors emitted on foreign continents, and transport of stratospheric ozone into surface air. As PRB is not an observable quantity, it must be estimated using numerical models. We compare PRB estimates for the year 2006 from the GFDL Atmospheric Model 3 (AM3) chemistry-climate model (CCM) and the GEOS-Chem (GC) chemical transport model (CTM). We evaluate the skill of the models in reproducing total surface ozone observed at the U.S. Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), dividing the stations into low-elevation (< 1.5 km in altitude, primarily eastern) and high-elevation (> 1.5 km in altitude, all western) subgroups. At the low-elevation sites AM3 estimates of PRB (38±9 ppbv in spring, 27±9 ppbv in summer) are higher than GC (27±7 ppbv in spring, 21±8 ppbv in summer) in both seasons. Analysis at these sites is complicated by a positive bias in AM3 total ozone with respect to the observed total ozone, the source of which is yet unclear. At high-elevation sites, AM3 PRB is higher in the spring (47±8 ppbv) than in the summer (33±8 ppbv). In contrast, GC simulates little seasonal variation at high elevation sites (39±5 ppbv in spring vs. 38±7 ppbv in summer). Seasonal average total ozone at these sites was within 4 ppbv of the observations for both

  19. The impact of climate change on ozone-related mortality in Sydney.

    PubMed

    Physick, William; Cope, Martin; Lee, Sunhee

    2014-01-13

    Coupled global, regional and chemical transport models are now being used with relative-risk functions to determine the impact of climate change on human health. Studies have been carried out for global and regional scales, and in our paper we examine the impact of climate change on ozone-related mortality at the local scale across an urban metropolis (Sydney, Australia). Using three coupled models, with a grid spacing of 3 km for the chemical transport model (CTM), and a mortality relative risk function of 1.0006 per 1 ppb increase in daily maximum 1-hour ozone concentration, we evaluated the change in ozone concentrations and mortality between decades 1996-2005 and 2051-2060. The global model was run with the A2 emissions scenario. As there is currently uncertainty regarding a threshold concentration below which ozone does not impact on mortality, we calculated mortality estimates for the three daily maximum 1-hr ozone concentration thresholds of 0, 25 and 40 ppb. The mortality increase for 2051-2060 ranges from 2.3% for a 0 ppb threshold to 27.3% for a 40 ppb threshold, although the numerical increases differ little. Our modeling approach is able to identify the variation in ozone-related mortality changes at a suburban scale, estimating that climate change could lead to an additional 55 to 65 deaths across Sydney in the decade 2051-2060. Interestingly, the largest increases do not correspond spatially to the largest ozone increases or the densest population centres. The distribution pattern of changes does not seem to vary with threshold value, while the magnitude only varies slightly.

  20. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  1. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    SciTech Connect

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  2. Effects of ambient ozone on first-year growth and physiology of black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, T.E.; Skelly, J.M.; Steiner, K.C.; Dunn, K. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park )

    1993-06-01

    Black cherry seedlings of two open-pollinated families were exposed to ambient ozone in open plots (100%) and plots receiving non-filtered (95%), half-filtered (60%) and full-filtered (40%) concentrations via open-top chambers between early June and late-September 1992 in a replicated field experiment in central Pennsylvania. Seasonal 24-hour ambient ozone concentration averaged 34 ppb with a peak 1-hour concentration of 110 ppb. Foliar symptoms of ozone damage (adaxial stipple) occurred most prominently in open and non-filtered plots and differed between families. Net photosynthetic rate for both families was significantly lower in open and non-filtered plots compared with half- and full-filtered plots on most dates, while ozone concentration had no consistent effect on leaf conductance or dark respiration. Leaf conductance of the ozone sensitive family was significantly greater than the ozone tolerant family on most dates. First-year height and diameter growth were significantly lower in open and non-filtered plots compared with half- and full-filtered plots for both families.

  3. 77 FR 50033 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Arkansas; Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ...; Infrastructure Requirements for the 1997 Ozone NAAQS and the 1997 and 2006 PM2.5 NAAQS and Interstate Transport Requirements for the 1997 Ozone NAAQS and 2006 PM2.5 NAAQS AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health or...

  4. 77 FR 16785 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alaska: Infrastructure Requirements for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... 110(a)(1) and (2) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) for the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS... Clean Air Act (CAA) for the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) promulgated for ozone on July..., 2008 ozone NAAQS, and 2008 lead NAAQS which EPA intends to act on at a later time. This action...

  5. Unequivocal detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole through significant increases in atmospheric layers with minimum ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Jos; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    An important new landmark in present day ozone research is presented through MLS satellite observations of significant ozone increases during the ozone hole season that are attributed unequivocally to declining ozone depleting substances. For many decades the Antarctic ozone hole has been the prime example of both the detrimental effects of human activities on our environment as well as how to construct effective and successful environmental policies. Nowadays atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are on the decline and first signs of recovery of stratospheric ozone and ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole have been observed. The claimed detection of significant recovery, however, is still subject of debate. In this talk we will discuss first current uncertainties in the assessment of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole by using multi-variate regression methods, and, secondly present an alternative approach to identify ozone hole recovery unequivocally. Even though multi-variate regression methods help to reduce uncertainties in estimates of ozone recovery, great care has to be taken in their application due to the existence of uncertainties and degrees of freedom in the choice of independent variables. We show that taking all uncertainties into account in the regressions the formal recovery of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole cannot be established yet, though is likely before the end of the decade (before 2020). Rather than focusing on time and area averages of total ozone columns or ozone profiles, we argue that the time evolution of the probability distribution of vertically resolved ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole contains a better fingerprint for the detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole. The advantages of this method over more tradition methods of trend analyses based on spatio-temporal average ozone are discussed. The 10-year record of MLS satellite measurements of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole shows a

  6. 77 FR 29904 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Infrastructure Requirements for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... ozone on July 18, 1997. EPA finds that the current Oregon SIP meets the following 110(a)(2) infrastructure elements for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS: (A), (B), (C), (D)(ii), (E), (F), (G), (H), (J), (K), (L.... Background On July 18, 1997, EPA promulgated a new NAAQS for ozone. EPA revised the ozone NAAQS to provide...

  7. 77 FR 64425 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alaska: Infrastructure Requirements for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... for ozone on July 18, 1997. EPA finds that the Alaska SIP meets the following 110(a)(2) infrastructure elements for the 1997 8- hour ozone NAAQS: (A), (B), (C), (D)(ii), (E), (F), (G), (H), (J), (K), (L), and... 18, 1997, EPA promulgated a new NAAQS for ozone. EPA revised the ozone NAAQS to provide an...

  8. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  9. Simplified ozone detection by chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Rogowski, R. S.; Richards, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ozone is detected by film coated with solid, such as rubrene, that reacts with ozone to degree proportional to concentration in sample gas. Gas flow is stopped, and film is heated to produce light (chemiluminescence) in proportion to amount of reacted material on sensor.

  10. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  11. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  12. Plant responses to tropospheric ozone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropospheric ozone is the second most abundant air pollutant and an important component of the global climate change. Over five decades of research on the phytotoxicity of ozone in model plants systems, crop plants and forest trees have provided some insight into the physiological, biochemical and m...

  13. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    During the period March 1977 through May 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center and three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at the Churchill Research Range. One additional flight was conducted at Wallops Flight Center in support of Nimbus 4 SBUV. Data results and flight profiles for the period covered are presented.

  14. Ozone Hole Not Yet Recovering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-08-01

    The depletion of ozone in the stratospherecaused by chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons(CFCs)-and the resulting annualhole in the ozone layer over Antarctica-isnot getting any worse, although recovery hasnot yet begun, according to two of the scientistswho discovered the cause of the ozonehole 20 years ago.

  15. Source attribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a harmful pollutant with adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. As well as these effects, tropospheric ozone is also a powerful greenhouse gas, with an anthropogenic radiative forcing one quarter of that of CO2. Along with methane and atmospheric aerosol, tropospheric ozone belongs to the so-called Short Lived Climate forcing Pollutants, or SLCP. Recent work has shown that efforts to reduce concentrations of SLCP in the atmosphere have the potential to slow the rate of near-term climate change, while simultaneously improving public health and reducing crop losses. Unlike many other SLCP, tropospehric ozone is not directly emitted, but is instead influenced by two distinct sources: transport of air from the ozone-rich stratosphere; and photochemical production in the troposphere from the emitted precursors NOx (oxides of nitrogen), CO (Carbon Monoxide), and VOC (volatile organic compounds, including methane). Better understanding of the relationship between ozone production and the emissions of its precursors is essential for the development of targeted emission reduction strategies. Several modeling methods have been employed to relate the production of tropospheric ozone to emissions of its precursors; emissions perturbation, tagging, and adjoint sensitivity methods all deliver complementary information about modelled ozone production. Most studies using tagging methods have focused on attribution of tropospheric ozone production to emissions of NOx, even though perturbation methods have suggested that tropospheric ozone is also sensitive to VOC, particularly methane. In this study we describe the implementation into a global chemistry-climate model of a scheme for tagging emissions of NOx and VOC with an arbitrary number of labels, which are followed through the chemical reactions of tropospheric ozone production in order to perform attribution of tropospehric ozone to its emitted precursors. Attribution is performed to both

  16. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  17. Options to accelerate ozone recovery: ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-08-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and N2O are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact on ozone depletion that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS and N2O emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional restrictions. Direct radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower from the elimination of anthropogenic N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower from the destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. Due to the potential impact of N2O on future ozone levels, we provide an approach to incorporate it into the EESC formulation, which is used extensively in ozone depletion analyses. The ability of EESC to describe total ozone changes arising from additional ODS and N2O controls is also quantified.

  18. Nitroaromatic hydrocarbon ozonation in water. 1: Single ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Encinar, J.M.; Alonso, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Single ozonation of two nitroaromatic hydrocarbons (nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene) under different experimental conditions (ozone feed rate, pH, temperature, hydroxyl radical scavengers) has been studied. The absence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, pHs 7--9, and temperatures below 30 C are optimum conditions for nitroaromatic removal. Due to the importance of hydroxyl radical reactions, removal rates in natural water are much lower than those observed in laboratory ultrapure water. Rate constants of the direct reaction between ozone and nitroaromatic hydrocarbons at 20 C have been found to be lower than 6 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. More than 99% of nitroaromatic removal is due to hydroxyl radical oxidation. Single ozonation of nitroaromatics can then be classified as a real advanced oxidation technology. Nitrophenols, compounds very reactive toward ozone and hydroxyl radicals, and 2,6-dinitrobenzaldehyde, identified in the single ozonation of nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, respectively, are some of the first intermediates of single ozonation.

  19. Global distribution of ozone for various seasons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koprova, L. I.

    1979-01-01

    A technique which was used to obtain a catalog of the seasonal global distribution of ozone is presented. The technique is based on the simultaneous use of 1964-1975 data on the total ozone content from a worldwide network of ozonometric stations and on the vertical ozone profile from ozone sounding stations.

  20. Is the Ozone Hole over Your Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Eugene C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey of first year university science students regarding their understanding of the ozone layer, ozone depletion, and the effect of ozone depletion on Australia. Suggests that better teaching resources for environmental issues such as ozone depletion and global warming are needed before improvements in student understanding can be…

  1. Total ozone changes in the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Doiron, Scott D.; Sechrist, Frank; Galimore, Reginald

    1988-01-01

    The development of the Antarctic ozone minimum was observed in 1987 with the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument. In the first half of August the near-polar (60 and 70 deg S) ozone levels were similar to those of recent years. By September, however, the ozone at 70 and 80 deg S was clearly lower than any previous year including 1985, the prior record low year. The levels continued to decrease throughout September until October 5 when a new record low of 109 DU was established at a point near the South Pole. This value is 29 DU less than the lowest observed in 1985 and 48 DU less than the 1986 low. The zonal mean total ozone at 60 deg S remained constant throughout the time of ozone hole formation. The ozone decline was punctuated by local minima formed away from the polar night boundary at about 75 deg S. The first of these, on August 15 to 17, formed just east of the Palmer Peninsula and appears to be a mountain wave. The second major minimum formed on September 5 to 7 again downwind of the Palmer Peninsula. This event was larger in scale than the August minimum and initiated the decline of ozone across the polar region. The 1987 ozone hole was nearly circular and pole centered for its entire life. In previous years the hole was perturbed by intrusions of the circumpolar maximum into the polar regions, thus causing the hole to be elliptical. The 1987 hole also remained in place until the end of November, a few days longer than in 1985, and this persistence resulted in the latest time for recovery to normal values yet observed.

  2. Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011.

    PubMed

    Manney, Gloria L; Santee, Michelle L; Rex, Markus; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Pitts, Michael C; Veefkind, Pepijn; Nash, Eric R; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Froidevaux, Lucien; Poole, Lamont R; Schoeberl, Mark R; Haffner, David P; Davies, Jonathan; Dorokhov, Valery; Gernandt, Hartwig; Johnson, Bryan; Kivi, Rigel; Kyrö, Esko; Larsen, Niels; Levelt, Pieternel F; Makshtas, Alexander; McElroy, C Thomas; Nakajima, Hideaki; Parrondo, Maria Concepción; Tarasick, David W; von der Gathen, Peter; Walker, Kaley A; Zinoviev, Nikita S

    2011-10-02

    Chemical ozone destruction occurs over both polar regions in local winter-spring. In the Antarctic, essentially complete removal of lower-stratospheric ozone currently results in an ozone hole every year, whereas in the Arctic, ozone loss is highly variable and has until now been much more limited. Here we demonstrate that chemical ozone destruction over the Arctic in early 2011 was--for the first time in the observational record--comparable to that in the Antarctic ozone hole. Unusually long-lasting cold conditions in the Arctic lower stratosphere led to persistent enhancement in ozone-destroying forms of chlorine and to unprecedented ozone loss, which exceeded 80 per cent over 18-20 kilometres altitude. Our results show that Arctic ozone holes are possible even with temperatures much milder than those in the Antarctic. We cannot at present predict when such severe Arctic ozone depletion may be matched or exceeded.

  3. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  4. Trends in ozone profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, H.; Aikin, A.; Barnes, R.; Chandra, S.; Cunnold, D.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1989-01-01

    From an examination of the agreements and differences between different satellite instruments, it is difficult to believe that existing satellite instruments determine upper stratospheric ozone much better than 4 pct.; by extension, it probably would require at least a 4 pct. change to be reliably detected as a change. The best estimates of the vertical profiles of ozone change in the upper stratosphere between 1979 and 1986 are judged to be those given by the two SAGE satellite instruments. SAGE-2 minus SAGE-1 gives a much lower ozone reduction than that given by the archived Solar Backscatter UV data. The average SAGE profiles of ozone changes between 20 and 50 degs north and between 20 and 50 degs south are given. The SAGE-1 and SAGE-2 comparison gives an ozone reduction of about 4 pct. at 25 km over temperate latitudes. Five ground based Umkehr stations between 36 and 52 degs north, corrected for the effects of volcanic aerosols, report an ozone reduction between 1979 and 1987 at Umkehr layer 8 of 9 + or - 5 pct. The central estimate of upper stratospheric ozone reduction given by SAGE at 40 km is less than the central value estimated by the Umkehr method at layer 8.

  5. Total ozone trend over Cairo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, G. K. Y.

    1994-01-01

    A world wide interest in protecting ozone layer against manmade effects is now increasing. Assessment of the ozone depletion due to these activities depends on how successfully we can separate the natural variabilities from the data. The monthly mean values of total ozone over Cairo (30 05N) for the period 1968-1988, have been analyzed using the power spectral analysis technique. The technique used in this analysis does not depend on a pre-understanding of the natural fluctuations in the ozone data. The method depends on increasing the resolution of the spectral peaks in order to obtain the more accurate sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. Also it handles the possible sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. The results show that it is possible to detect some of the well known national fluctuations in the ozone record such as annual, semiannual, quasi-biennial and quasi-quadrennial oscillations. After separating the natural fluctuations from the ozone record, the trend analysis of total ozone over Cairo showed that a decrease of about -1.2% per decade has occurred since 1979.

  6. Ozone is mutagenic in Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, D.; Combes, R.; McConville, M.; Zeiger, E. )

    1992-01-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive gas that has been tested for genotoxicity in a number of systems. Induced genetic damage resulting from ozone treatment may not be readily observed because of the high toxicity of the chemical and difficulties in generating and administering controlled concentrations. The mutagenicity of ozone was investigated in Salmonella typhimurium using a plate test protocol designed for reactive vapours and gases. Ozone, at two to three consecutive doses, induced weak, albeit statistically significant, mutagenic responses in tester strain TA102 with and without Aroclor-induced rat liver S9 (lowest effective mean concentration of 0.019 ppm; 35 min total exposure). However, dose-related responses were not always obtained. No mutagenicity was detected in strains TA98, TA100, or TA1535, with or without S9. In strain TA104, ozone induced a weak response only at a single dose with S9; this response was not reproducible. Mutagenicity was dependent on the ozone flow rate and total exposure time, with variations in the optimum dose-time regimen leading to toxicity or complete inactivity. The data show that ozone is a very weak bacterial mutagen and only when tested under narrowly prescribed, subtoxic dosing conditions.

  7. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  8. Ozone and Ozonated Oils in Skin Diseases: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Travagli, V.; Zanardi, I.; Valacchi, G.; Bocci, V.

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics. PMID:20671923

  9. Dobson spectrophotometer ozone measurements during international ozone rocketsonde intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the total ozone content of the atmosphere, made with seven ground based instruments at a site near Wallops Island, Virginia, are discussed in terms for serving as control values with which the rocketborne sensor data products can be compared. These products are profiles of O3 concentration with altitude. By integrating over the range of altitudes from the surface to the rocket apogee and by appropriately estimating the residual ozone amount from apogee to the top of the atmosphere, a total ozone amount can be computed from the profiles that can be directly compared with the ground based instrumentation results. Dobson spectrophotometers were used for two of the ground-based instruments. Preliminary data collected during the IORI from Dobson spectrophotometers 72 and 38 are presented. The agreement between the two and the variability of total ozone overburden through the experiment period are discussed.

  10. Ozone absorption coefficients' role in Dobson instrument ozone measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basher, R. E.

    1982-11-01

    The differences of 10% or more between the laboratory measurements of UV absorption coefficients by different investigators indicate accuracies that are quite inadequate for current needs in the measurement of atmospheric ozone. The standard band-integrated set of coefficients now used with the Dobson instrument are mutually consistent to about 2%, but their absolute accuracy is still in question. The accurate calculation of band-integrated coefficients must take account of their dependence on source spectral irradiance, atmospheric spectral transmittance, mean ozone temperature, and instrument spectral transmittance. A careful examination shows that Komhyr's (1980) case for an error of about +5% in the standard Dobson AD ozone estimation is subject to large uncertainties and certain lacks of independence. The obvious solution to this accuracy problem lies in better laboratory measurements of ozone absorption.

  11. Ozone and ozonated oils in skin diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Travagli, V; Zanardi, I; Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics.

  12. Analysis of error in TOMS total ozone as a function of orbit and attitude parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W. W.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Braun, W. C.; Vallette, B. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ray, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of orbital scenarios were performed to examine the effects of orbital altitude, equator crossing time, attitude uncertainty, and orbital eccentricity on ozone observations by future satellites. These effects were assessed by determining changes in solar and viewing geometry and earth daytime coverage loss. The importance of these changes on ozone retrieval was determined by simulating uncertainties in the TOMS ozone retrieval algorithm. The major findings are as follows: (1) Drift of equator crossing time from local noon would have the largest effect on the quality of ozone derived from TOMS. The most significant effect of this drift is the loss of earth daytime coverage in the winter hemisphere. The loss in coverage increases from 1 degree latitude for + or - 1 hour from noon, 6 degrees for + or - 3 hours from noon, to 53 degrees for + or - 6 hours from noon. An additional effect is the increase in ozone retrieval errors due to high solar zenith angles. (2) To maintain contiguous earth coverage, the maximum scan angle of the sensor must be increased with decreasing orbital altitude. The maximum scan angle required for full coverage at the equator varies from 60 degrees at 600 km altitude to 45 degrees at 1200 km. This produces an increase in spacecraft zenith angle, theta, which decreases the ozone retrieval accuracy. The range in theta was approximately 72 degrees for 600 km to approximately 57 degrees at 1200 km. (3) The effect of elliptical orbits is to create gaps in coverage along the subsatellite track. An elliptical orbit with a 200 km perigee and 1200 km apogee produced a maximum earth coverage gap of about 45 km at the perigee at nadir. (4) An attitude uncertainty of 0.1 degree in each axis (pitch, roll, yaw) produced a maximum scan angle to view the pole, and maximum solar zenith angle).

  13. Inhibitory effect of hydrogen sulfide on ozone-induced airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyu; Li, Feng; Wiegman, Coen H; Zhang, Min; Hong, Yan; Gong, Jicheng; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The goal of this study was to examine whether these adverse effects of ozone could be prevented or reversed by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a reducing agent. The H2S donor sodium (NaHS) (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1 hour before and after 3-hour ozone (2.5 ppm) or air exposure, and the mice were studied 24 hours later. Preventive and therapeutic treatment with NaHS reduced the ozone-induced increases in the total cells, including neutrophils and macrophages; this treatment also reduced levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid; inhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness; and attenuated ozone-induced increases in total malondialdehyde in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreases in the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the lung. Ozone exposure led to decreases in the H2S production rate and in mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine-β-synthetase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in the lung. These effects were prevented and reversed by NaHS treatment. Furthermore, NaHS prevented and reversed the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27. H2S may have preventive and therapeutic value in the treatment of airway diseases that have an oxidative stress basis.

  14. Evaluation of emission control strategies to reduce ozone pollution in the Paso del Norte region using a photochemical air quality modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Victor Hugo

    Air pollution emissions control strategies to reduce ozone precursor pollutants are analyzed by applying a photochemical modeling system. Simulations of air quality conditions during an ozone episode which occurred in June, 2006 are undertaken by increasing or reducing area source emissions in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Two air pollutants are primary drivers in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) undergo multiple chemical reactions under favorable meteorological conditions to form ozone, which is a secondary pollutant that irritates respiratory systems in sensitive individuals especially the elderly and young children. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to limit ambient air pollutants such as ozone by establishing an 8-hour average concentration of 0.075 ppm as the threshold at which a violation of the standard occurs. Ozone forms primarily due reactions in the troposphere of NOx and VOC emissions generated primarily by anthropogenic sources in urban regions. Data from emissions inventories indicate area sources account for ˜15 of NOx and ˜45% of regional VOC emissions. Area sources include gasoline stations, automotive paint bodyshops and nonroad mobile sources. Multiplicity of air pollution emissions sources provides an opportunity to investigate and potentially implement air quality improvement strategies to reduce emissions which contribute to elevated ozone concentrations. A baseline modeling scenario was established using the CAMx photochemical air quality model from which a series of sensitivity analyses for evaluating air quality control strategies were conducted. Modifications to area source emissions were made by varying NOx and / or VOC emissions in the areas of particular interest. Model performance was assessed for each sensitivity analysis. Normalized bias (NB) and normalized error (NE) were used to identify

  15. Ecosystem Effects of Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ground level ozone is absorbed by the leaves of plants, where it can reduce photosynthesis, damage leaves and slow growth. It can also make sensitive plants more susceptible to certain diseases, insects, harsh weather and other pollutants.

  16. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    MedlinePlus

    Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Forecast Current AQI AQI Loop More Maps AQI: Good (0 - ... September 2016, Busan, South Korea. More more announcements Air Quality Basics Air Quality Index | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke ...

  17. In situ Mars ozone detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee; Weinstock, Elliot M.

    1994-01-01

    We propose sending a balloon-borne UV photometer sensor package to measure atmospheric ozone on Mars, and this package could be a Discovery Program sensor candidate. Past measurements of ozone on Mars are highly uncertain, perhaps a factor of 3 or so uncertain, due primarily to interference and masking by cloud and dust. In-situ balloon measurements would avoid these problems, and would provide 'ground truth' which remote sensing techniques cannot. We have explored this approach to measure ozone abundance in the terrestrial stratosphere with a balloon-borne UV absorption photometer. Atmospheric pressures and temperatures and ozone concentrations near the surface of Mars are similar to those in the terrestrial stratosphere.

  18. Ozonation of cooling tower waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.; Howe, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Continuous ozone injection into water circulating between a cooling tower and heat exchanger with heavy scale deposits inhibits formation of further deposits, promotes flaking of existing deposits, inhibits chemical corrosion and controls algae and bacteria.

  19. Biological effects of ozone reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of increased UV radiation on the biosphere are described with ongoing research, and research areas that should be investigated. Some mention is also made of the potential climatic effects of ozone reduction on agriculture and the biosphere.

  20. A search For Artic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Four atmospheric scientists took off with their instruments for Greenland last week, where they will try to see if depletion of stratospheric ozone in the Arctic can be detected as it has been in Antarctica since 1985.Members of the scientific team include Susan Solomon and George Mount of the Aeronomy Laboratory at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colo., and Ryan Sanders and Roger Jakoubec of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science in Norman, Okla. These four participated in previous National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) investigations at McMurdo Station in Antarctica that helped document the ozone “hole,” decreases of up to 50% in ozone during the early austral spring in September and October of the last 2 years (1986-1987).

  1. Ozone (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Videos Games Experiments For Teachers Home ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Ozone The Basics A single atom ...

  2. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  3. Method of sterilization using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize, organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganism and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  4. Ozone Treatment For Cooling Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwelder, Rick; Baldwin, Leroy V.; Feeney, Ellen S.

    1990-01-01

    Report presents results of study of cooling tower in which water treated with ozone instead of usual chemical agents. Bacteria and scale reduced without pollution and at low cost. Operating and maintenance costs with treatment about 30 percent of those of treatment by other chemicals. Corrosion rates no greater than with other chemicals. Advantage of ozone, even though poisonous, quickly detected by smell in very low concentrations.

  5. Ozonation of Common Textile Auxiliaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskender, Gulen; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Koyunluoglu, Sebnem; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Germirli Babuna, Fatos

    2016-10-01

    The treatability of four different commonly applied textile auxiliary chemicals, namely two tannin formulations (Tannin 1: a condensation product of aryl sulphonate; Tannin 2: natural tannic acid) and two biocidal finishing agents (Biocide 1: 2,4,4’-trichloro-2’- hydroxydiphenyl ether; Biocide 2: a nonionic diphenyl alkane derivative) with ozone was investigated. Increasing the ozone dose yielded higher COD removals for the natural tannin. Optimum ozone doses of 485 and 662 mg/h were obtained at a pH of 3.5 for natural and synthetic tannin carrying textile bath discharges, respectively. When the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0, a slight decrease in COD removal was observed for the natural tannin due to ozone selectivity towards its polyaromatic structure. The same increase in ozonation pH enhanced COD removals for the synthetic tannin as a result of enhanced ozone decomposition rendering free radical chain reactions dominant. Optimum ozone doses of 499 and 563 mg/h were established for Biocide 1 and 2, respectively. With the increase of ozonation, pH exhibited a positive influence on COD removals for both textile tannins. A substantial improvement in terms of TOC removals was observed as the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0 for the synthetic tannin, and from 7 to 12 for both textile biocides. Higher AOX removals were evident at pH 7 than at pH 12 for Biocide 1 as a result of the higher selectivity of the dehalogenation reaction at neutral pH.

  6. Chlorine compounds and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicerone, R. J.; Walters, S.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A report by Cicerone et al. (1974) concerned with the potential size of the atmospheric perturbation produced by man-made chlorofluoromethanes is considered, giving attention to a number of errors made in the first investigation and their correction. However, the corrections do not significantly change the results reported. It had been found that chlorine oxides which arise from chlorofluoromethane usage will within 10 or 15 years provide a sink for stratospheric ozone which will dominate the natural sinks for ozone.

  7. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  8. The 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million km2. This area is most strongly controlled by levels of inorganic chlorine and bromine oncentrations. In addition, dynamical variations modulate the size of the ozone hole by either cooling or warming the polar vortex collar region. We will review the size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. Using a simple trajectory model, we will demonstrate the sensitivity of the ozone hole to dynamical forcing, and we will use these observations to discuss the size of the ozone hole during the 2002 Austral spring. We will further show how the Cly decreases in the stratosphere will cause the ozone hole to decrease by 1-1.5% per year. We will also show results from a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) that has been continuously run since 1999. These CTM results directly show how strong dynamics acts to reduce the size of the ozone hole.

  9. New dynamic NNORSY ozone profile climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaifel, A. K.; Felder, M.; Declercq, C.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Climatological ozone profile data are widely used as a-priori information for total ozone using DOAS type retrievals as well as for ozone profile retrieval using optimal estimation, for data assimilation or evaluation of 3-D chemistry-transport models and a lot of other applications in atmospheric sciences and remote sensing. For most applications it is important that the climatology represents not only long term mean values but also the links between ozone and dynamic input parameters. These dynamic input parameters should be easily accessible from auxiliary datasets or easily measureable, and obviously should have a high correlation with ozone. For ozone profile these parameters are mainly total ozone column and temperature profile data. This was the outcome of a user consultation carried out in the framework of developing a new, dynamic ozone profile climatology. The new ozone profile climatology is based on the Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) widely used for ozone profile retrieval from UV and IR satellite sounder data. NNORSY allows implicit modelling of any non-linear correspondence between input parameters (predictors) and ozone profile target vector. This paper presents the approach, setup and validation of a new family of ozone profile climatologies with static as well as dynamic input parameters (total ozone and temperature profile). The neural network training relies on ozone profile measurement data of well known quality provided by ground based (ozonesondes) and satellite based (SAGE II, HALOE, and POAM-III) measurements over the years 1995-2007. In total, four different combinations (modes) for input parameters (date, geolocation, total ozone column and temperature profile) are available. The geophysical validation spans from pole to pole using independent ozonesonde, lidar and satellite data (ACE-FTS, AURA-MLS) for individual and time series comparisons as well as for analysing the vertical and meridian structure of different modes of

  10. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  11. Impact of downward-mixing ozone on surface ozone accumulation in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ho

    2008-04-01

    The ozone that initially presents in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer can remain in the nighttime atmosphere and then be carried over to the next morning. Finally, this ozone can be brought to the ground by downward mixing as mixing depth increases during the daytime, thereby increasing surface ozone concentrations. Variation of ozone concentration during each of these periods is investigated in this work. First, ozone concentrations existing in the daily early morning atmosphere at the altitude range of the daily maximum mixing depth (residual ozone concentrations) were measured using tethered ozonesondes on 52 experimental days during 2004-2005 in southern Taiwan. Daily downward-mixing ozone concentrations were calculated by a box model coupling the measured daily residual ozone concentrations and daily mixing depth variations. The ozone concentrations upwind in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer were estimated by the combination of back air trajectory analysis and known previous day's surface ozone distributions. Additionally, the relationship between daily downward-mixing ozone concentration and daily photochemically produced ozone concentration was examined. The latter was calculated by removing the former from daily surface maximum ozone concentration. The measured daily residual ozone concentrations distributed at 12-74 parts per billion (ppb) with an average of 42 +/- 17 ppb are well correlated with the previous upwind ozone concentration (R2 = 0.54-0.65). Approximately 60% of the previous upwind ozone was estimated to be carried over to the next morning and became the observed residual ozone. The daily downward-mixing ozone contributes 48 +/- 18% of the daily surface maximum ozone concentration, indicating that the downward-mixing ozone is as important as daily photochemically produced ozone to daily surface maximum ozone accumulation. The daily downward-mixing ozone is poorly correlated with the daily photochemically produced ozone and

  12. Distribution of total ozone and stratospheric ozone in the tropics - Implications for the distribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack; Larsen, Jack C.

    1987-01-01

    Climatologies of total columnar ozone and integrated stratospheric ozone amounts at low latitudes (15 deg N to 15 deg S), derived from satellite observations, are presented. A significant longitudinal variability in total ozone is present, with highest values generally located between 60 deg W and 60 deg E. The integrated stratospheric component of total ozone, on the other hand, does not exhibit a longitudinal preference for high values. Therefore it is hypothesized that the climatological longitudinal distribution of total ozone reflects the variability of the abundance of tropospheric ozone at low latitudes. Furthermore, it is speculated that in situ photochemical production of ozone resulting from biomass burning may be responsible for the observed enhancement of total ozone at these longitudes.

  13. Assimilation of MLS and OMI Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone data from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were assimilated into the ozone model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). This assimilation produces ozone fields that are superior to those from the operational GMAO assimilation of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument data. Assimilation of Aura data improves the representation of the "ozone hole" and the agreement with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III and ozone sonde data. Ozone in the lower stratosphere is captured better: mean state, vertical gradients, spatial and temporal variability are all improved. Inclusion of OMI and MLS data together, or separately, in the assimilation system provides a way of checking how consistent OMI and MLS data are with each other, and with the ozone model. We found that differences between OMI total ozone column data and model forecasts decrease after MLS data are assimilated. This indicates that MLS stratospheric ozone profiles are consistent with OMI total ozone columns. The evaluation of error characteristics of OMI and MLS ozone will continue as data from newer versions of retrievals becomes available. We report on the initial step in obtaining global assimilated ozone fields that combine measurements from different Aura instruments, the ozone model at the GMAO, and their respective error characteristics. We plan to use assimilated ozone fields in estimation of tropospheric ozone. We also plan to investigate impacts of assimilated ozone fields on numerical weather prediction through their use in radiative models and in the assimilation of infrared nadir radiance data from NASA's Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

  14. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, W A

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. Tube growth rates in the presence of a range of ozone dosages, of pollen populations exhibiting differing ozone sensitivity can be measured and different growth rates can be correlated with ozone dosages. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Petunia and tobacco pollen are especially useful because they store well at ordinary freezer temperatures and do not require special preparation prior to storage. Modified Brewbacker's growth medium is suitable for growth of both these pollen types. Four useful cultivars are Bel W-3, ozone-sensitive and Bel B, ozone-tolerant tobacco, and White Bountiful, ozone-sensitive and Blue Lagoon, ozone-tolerant petunia. Observations can be made directly by using a TV scanner, or by time lapse or interval photography. Year-round pollen production can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:7460876

  15. A Study on Generation Ice Containing Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Koyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiromi

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it changes back into oxygen. Recently, ice containing ozone is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ice containing ozone seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to effects of cooling and sterilization of ice containing ozone. In the present study, we investigated the influence of temperatures of water dissolving ozone on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in water. We also investigated the influence of cooling temperature, ice diameter, initial temperatures of water dissolving ozone and container internal pressure of the water dissolving ozone on ozone concentration in the ice. In addition, we investigated the influence of the ice diameter on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in the ice. It was confirmed that the solidification experimental data can be adjusted by a correlation between ozone concentration in the ice and solidification time.

  16. Spatial observation of the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin-Beekmann, Sophie

    2010-04-01

    This article provides an overview of the various satellite instruments, which have been used to observe stratospheric ozone and other chemical compounds playing a key role in stratospheric chemistry. It describes the various instruments that have been launched since the late 1970s for the measurement of total ozone column and ozone vertical profile, as well as the major satellite missions designed for the study of stratospheric chemistry. Since the discovery of the ozone hole in the early 1980s, spatial ozone measurements have been widely used to evaluate and quantify the spatial extension of polar ozone depletion and global ozone decreasing trends as a function of latitude and height. Validation and evaluation of satellite ozone data have been the subject of intense scientific activity, which was reported in the various ozone assessments of the state of the ozone layer published after the signature of the Montreal protocol. Major results, based on satellite observations for the study of ozone depletion at the global scale and chemical polar ozone loss, are provided. The use of satellite observations for the validation of chemistry climate models that simulate the recovery of the ozone layer and in data assimilation is also described.

  17. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  18. Intercomparison of planetary boundary layer parameterization and its impacts on surface ozone concentration in the WRF/Chem model for a case study in Houston/Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchiara, G. C.; Li, X.; Carvalho, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2014-10-01

    With over 6 million inhabitants the Houston metropolitan area is the fourth-largest in the United States. Ozone concentration in this southeast Texas region frequently exceeds the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). For this reason our study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) to quantify meteorological prediction differences produced by four widely used PBL schemes and analyzed its impact on ozone predictions. The model results were compared to observational data in order to identify one superior PBL scheme better suited for the area. The four PBL schemes include two first-order closure schemes, the Yonsei University (YSU) and the Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2); as well as two turbulent kinetic energy closure schemes, the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) and Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE). Four 24 h forecasts were performed, one for each PBL scheme. Simulated vertical profiles for temperature, potential temperature, relative humidity, water vapor mixing ratio, and the u-v components of the wind were compared to measurements collected during the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) Radical and Aerosol Measurements Project (TRAMP) experiment in summer 2006. Simulated ozone was compared against TRAMP data, and air quality stations from Continuous Monitoring Station (CAMS). Also, the evolutions of the PBL height and vertical mixing properties within the PBL for the four simulations were explored. Although the results yielded high correlation coefficients and small biases in almost all meteorological variables, the overall results did not indicate any preferred PBL scheme for the Houston case. However, for ozone prediction the YSU scheme showed greatest agreements with observed values.

  19. Intercomparison of Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization and its Impacts on Surface Ozone Concentration in the WRF/Chem Model for a Case Study in Houston/Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchiara, Gustavo C.; Li, Xiangshang; Carvalho, Jonas; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    With over 6 million inhabitants the Houston metropolitan area is the fourth-largest in the United States. Ozone concentration in this southeast Texas region frequently exceeds the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). For this reason our study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) to quantify meteorological prediction differences produced by four widely used PBL schemes and analyzed its impact on ozone predictions. The model results were compared to observational data in order to identify one superior PBL scheme better suited for the area. The four PBL schemes include two first-order closure schemes, the Yonsei University (YSU) and the Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2); as well as two turbulent kinetic energy closure schemes, the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) and Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE). Four 24 h forecasts were performed, one for each PBL scheme. Simulated vertical profiles for temperature, potential temperature, relative humidity, water vapor mixing ratio, and the u-v components of the wind were compared to measurements collected during the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) Radical and Aerosol Measurements Project (TRAMP) experiment in summer 2006. Simulated ozone was compared against TRAMP data, and air quality stations from Continuous Monitoring Station (CAMS). Also, the evolutions of the PBL height and vertical mixing properties within the PBL for the four simulations were explored. Although the results yielded high correlation coefficients and small biases in almost all meteorological variables, the overall results did not indicate any preferred PBL scheme for the Houston case. However, for ozone prediction the YSU scheme showed greatest agreements with observed values.

  20. Global tropospheric ozone investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.

    1998-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is one of the most important trace gases in the troposphere, and it is responsible for influencing many critical chemical and radiative processes. Ozone contributes to the formation of the hydroxyl radical (OH), which is central to most chemical reactions in the lower atmosphere, and it absorbs UV, visible, and infrared radiation which affects the energy budget and atmospheric temperatures. In addition, O3 can be used as a tracer of atmospheric pollution and stratosphere troposphere exchange. At elevated concentrations, O3 can also produce detrimental biological and human health effects. The US National Research Council (NRC) Board on Sustainable Development reviewed the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) [NRC, 1995], and it identified tropospheric chemistry as one of the high priority areas for the USGCRP in the next decade. The NRC identified the following specific challenges in tropospheric chemistry. Although we understand the reason for the high levels of 03 over several regions of the world, we need to better establish the distribution of O3 in the troposphere in order to document and understand the changes in the abundance of global tropospheric O3. This information is needed to quantify the contribution of O3 to the Earth' s radiative balance and to understand potential impacts on the health of the biosphere. Having recognized the importance of particles in the chemistry of the stratosphere, we must determine how aerosols and clouds affect the chemical processes in the troposphere. This understanding is essential to predict the chemical composition of the atmosphere and to assess the resulting forcing effects in the climate system. We must determine if the self-cleansing chemistry of the atmosphere is changing as a result of human activities. This information is required to predict the rate at which pollutants are removed from the atmosphere. Over nearly two decades, airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems have been used in

  1. Observing Tropospheric Ozone From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The importance of tropospheric ozone embraces a spectrum of relevant scientific issues ranging from local environmental concerns, such as damage to the biosphere and human health, to those that impact global change questions, Such is climate warming. From an observational perspective, the challenge is to determine the tropospheric ozone global distribution. Because its lifetime is short compared with other important greenhouse gases that have been monitored over the past several decades, the distribution of tropospheric ozone cannot be inferred from a relatively small set of monitoring stations. Therefore, the best way to obtain a true global picture is from the use of space-based instrumentation where important spatial gradients over vast ocean expanses and other uninhabited areas can be properly characterized. In this paper, the development of the capability to measure tropospheric ozone from space over the past 15 years is summarized. Research in the late 1980s successfully led to the determination of the climatology of tropospheric ozone as a function of season; more recently, the methodology has improved to the extent where regional air pollution episodes can be characterized. The most recent modifications now provide quasi-global (50 N) to 50 S) maps on a daily basis. Such a data set would allow for the study of long-range (intercontinental) transport of air pollution and the quantification of how regional emissions feed into the global tropospheric ozone budget. Future measurement capabilities within this decade promise to offer the ability to provide Concurrent maps of the precursors to the in situ formation of tropospheric ozone from which the scientific community will gain unprecedented insight into the processes that control global tropospheric chemistry

  2. 76 FR 40624 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The rationale for this action is explained in this notice and... sections 110(a)(1) and (2) necessary to implement, maintain, and enforce the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. II... enforcement of the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. The rationale supporting EPA's proposed action is explained in...

  3. 76 FR 40619 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The rationale for this action is explained in this rule... 8-hour ozone NAAQS. The rationale supporting EPA's proposed action is explained in the proposal and... 110(a)(1) and (2) for ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS for various states across the country. Commenters on...

  4. Projected changes in high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States over the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, A. M.; Rieder, H.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past few decades, thresholds for the United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (O3), established to protect public health and welfare, have been lowered repeatedly. We recently applied methods from extreme value theory (EVT) to maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3) observed by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) to quantify the significant decline in both frequency and magnitude of high O3 pollution events over the Eastern US from 1988 to 2009. These improvements to Eastern US air quality have been reported in prior studies and result from changes in air quality regulations and subsequent control measures (e.g., the 'NOx SIP Call') as demonstrated by our analysis of 1-year and 5-year return levels. Here we extend this analysis to future projections of high O3 pollution events spanning the course of the 21st century. To this aim, we analyze simulations from the GFDL CM3 chemistry-climate model under selected Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (representing a moderate and strong climate warming with a global mean temperature change by 2100 compared to present day of +2.3K and +4.5K, respectively). Under both scenarios, NOx emissions decrease by ~80% over North America by 2100 under the assumption of aggressive ozone pollution controls. A third scenario, termed RCP4.5_WMGG, in which well-mixed greenhouse gases follow the RCP4.5 scenario but O3 and aerosol precursor emissions are held at 2005 levels, enables us to isolate the role of climate change from that of emission reductions. As we find a positive bias in GFDL CM3 MDA8 O3 compared to the Eastern US CASTNet O3 measurements during summer (a common feature in the current generation of models), we develop a correction method based on quantile-mapping. This bias correction effectively removes the model bias while preserving the temporal changes in MDA8 O3 as simulated under different RCPs over the course of the 21st

  5. Projected changes in high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States over the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Horrowitz, Larry W.; Naik, Vaishali

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few decades, thresholds for the United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (O3), established to protect public health and welfare, have been lowered repeatedly. We recently applied methods from extreme value theory (EVT) to maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3) observed by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) to quantify the significant decline in both frequency and magnitude of high O3 pollution events over the Eastern US from 1988 to 2009. These improvements to Eastern US air quality have been reported in prior studies and result from changes in air quality regulations and subsequent control measures (e.g., the "NOx SIP Call") as demonstrated by our analysis of 1-year and 5-year return levels. Here we extend this analysis to future projections of high O3 pollution events spanning the course of the 21st century. To this aim, we analyze simulations from the GFDL CM3 chemistry-climate model under selected Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (representing a moderate and strong climate warming with a global mean temperature change by 2100 compared to present day of +2.3K and +4.5K, respectively). Under both scenarios, NOx emissions decrease by ~80% over North America by 2100 under the assumption of aggressive ozone pollution controls. A third scenario, termed RCP4.5_WMGG, in which well-mixed greenhouse gases follow the RCP4.5 scenario but O3 and aerosol precursor emissions are held at 2005 levels, enables us to isolate the role of climate change from that of emission reductions. As we find a positive bias in GFDL CM3 MDA8 O3 compared to the Eastern US CASTNet O3 measurements during summer (a common feature in the current generation of models), we develop a correction method based on quantile-mapping. This bias correction effectively removes the model bias while preserving the temporal changes in MDA8 O3 as simulated under different RCPs over the course of the 21st

  6. Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Ozone, Air Quality, ... can also affect lung function. continue How Poor Air Quality Affects People With Asthma Air pollution is a ...

  7. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  8. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. In this talk we will demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating 61 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area's variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  9. OZONE GENERATORS IN INDOOR AIR SETTINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on home/office ozone generators. It discusses their current uses as amelioratives for environmental tobacco smoke, biocontaminants, volatile organic compounds, and odors and details the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ozone appears to work well ...

  10. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Sue

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. Herein we demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating C1 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area s variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  11. NASA satellite helps airliners avoid ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Results from a test to determine the effectiveness of satellite data for helping airlines avoid heavy concentrations of ozone are reported. Information from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, aboard the Nimbus-7 was transmitted, for use in meteorological forecast activities. The results show: (1) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer profile of total ozone in the atmosphere accurately represents upper air patterns and can be used to locate meteorological activity; (2) route forecasting of highly concentrated ozone is feasible; (3) five research aircraft flights were flown in jet stream regions located by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer to determine winds, temperatures, and air composition. It is shown that the jet stream is coincides with the area of highest total ozone gradient, and low total ozone amounts are found where tropospheric air has been carried along above the tropopause on the anticyclonic side of the subtropical jet stream.

  12. Calculations of Polar Ozone Loss Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Wu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate vortex-averaged ozone loss rates at 465-K potential temperature during the Aug.-Sept. time period in the southern hemisphere and Feb.-Mar. time period in the northern hemisphere. Ozone loss rates are calculated two ways. First, from the time series of measurements of 03. Second, from measurements of ClO, from which ozone loss is inferred based on our theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone destruction. Both measurement sets are from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument. We find good agreement between vortex-averaged ozone loss rates calculated from these methods. Our analysis provides no support for recent work suggesting that current theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone loss underestimate the observed decrease in polar ozone during the ozone "hole" period.

  13. Cryptosporidiosis associated with ozonated apple cider.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Brian G; Mazurek, Jacek M; Hlavsa, Michele; Park, Jean; Tillapaw, Matt; Parrish, MaryKay; Salehi, Ellen; Franks, William; Koch, Elizabeth; Smith, Forrest; Xiao, Lihua; Arrowood, Michael; Hill, Vince; da Silva, Alex; Johnston, Stephanie; Jones, Jeffrey L

    2006-04-01

    We linked an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis to ozonated apple cider by using molecular and epidemiologic methods. Because ozonation was insufficient in preventing this outbreak, its use in rendering apple cider safe for drinking is questioned.

  14. Ozone concentration in the cabin of a Gates Learjet measured simultaneously with atmospheric ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Perkins, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Gates Learjet Model 23 was instrumented with monitors to measure simultaneously the atmospheric and the cabin concentrations of ozone at altitudes up to 13 kilometers. Six data flights were made in February 1978. Results indicated that only a small amount of the atmospheric ozone is destroyed in the cabin pressurization system. Ozone concentrations measured in the cabin near the conditioned-air outlets were only slightly lower than the atmospheric ozone concentration. For the two cabin configurations tested, the ozone retention in the cabin was 63 and 41 percent of the atmospheric ozone concentration. Maximum cabin ozone concentration measured during these flights was 410 parts per billion by volume.

  15. Total ozone, ozone vertical distributions, and stratospheric temperatures at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986 and 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.; Reitelbach, P. J.; Franchois, P. R.; Kuester, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-six electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesondes were flown at South Pole, Antarctica, during 1987 in a continuing program to document year-round changes in Antarctica ozone that are dynamically and photochemically induced. Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone observations were also made. For the twilight months of March and September when Dobson instrument observations cannot be made at South Pole, total ozone amounts were deduced from the ECC ozonesonde soundings. ECC sonde total ozone data obtained during the polar night (April to August), supplemented the sparse total ozone data obtained from Dobson instrument moon observations. Similar ozone profile and total ozone observations were made at South Pole in 1986.

  16. A Reevaluation of the Ozone Budget with HALOE UARS Data: No Evidence for the Ozone Deficit.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, P J; Grooß, J U; Brühl, C; Müller, R; Russell, J M

    1995-05-05

    Recently, additional ozone production mechanisms have been proposed to resolve the ozone deficit problem, which arises from greater ozone destruction than production in several photochemical models of the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. A detailed ozone model budget analysis was performed with simultaneous observations of O(3), HCl, H(2)O, CH(4), NO, and NO(2) from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) under conditions with the strongest photochemical control of ozone. The results indicate that an ozone deficit may not exist. On the contrary, the use of currently recommended photochemical parameters leads to insufficient ozone destruction in the model.

  17. Ozone monitoring instrument (OMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Johan; van den Oord, Gijsbertus H. J.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; te Plate, Maurice B.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Dirksen, Ruud

    2002-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is an UV-Visible imaging spectrograph using two dimensional CCD detectors to register both the spectrum and the swath perpendicular to the flight direction. This allows having a wide swath (114 degrees) combined with a small ground pixel (nominally 13 x 24 km). The instrument is planned for launch on NASA's EOS-AURA satellite in June 2003. Currently the OMI Flight Model is being build. This shortly follows the Instrument Development Model (DM) which was built to, next to engineering purposes, verify the instrument performance. The paper presents measured results from this DM for optical parameters such as distortion, optical efficiency, stray light and polarization sensitivity. Distortion in the spatial direction is shown to be on sub-pixel level and the stray light levels are very low and almost free from ghost peaks. The polarization sensitivity is presently demonstrated to be below 10-3 but we aim to lower the detection limit by an order of magnitude to make sure that spectral residuals do not mix with trace gas absorption spectra. Critical detector parameters are presented such as the very high UV quantum efficiency (60 % at 270 nm), dark current behavior and the sensitivity to radiation.

  18. Tropospheric Ozone from the TOMS TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) Technique During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Frolov, A. D.; Hudson, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There are a number of published residual-type methods for deriving tropospheric ozone from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer). The basic concept of these methods is that within a zone of constant stratospheric ozone, the tropospheric ozone column can be computed by subtracting stratospheric ozone from the TOMS Level 2 total ozone column, We used the modified-residual method for retrieving tropospheric ozone during SAFARI-2000 and found disagreements with in-situ ozone data over Africa in September 2000. Using the newly developed TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) method that uses TOMS radiances and a modified lookup table based on actual profiles during high ozone pollution periods, new maps were prepared and found to compare better to soundings over Lusaka, Zambia (15.5 S, 28 E), Nairobi and several African cities where MOZAIC aircraft operated in September 2000. The TDOT technique and comparisons are described in detail.

  19. Associations between ozone and morbidity using the Spatial Synoptic Classification system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Synoptic circulation patterns (large-scale tropospheric motion systems) affect air pollution and, potentially, air-pollution-morbidity associations. We evaluated the effect of synoptic circulation patterns (air masses) on the association between ozone and hospital admissions for asthma and myocardial infarction (MI) among adults in North Carolina. Methods Daily surface meteorology data (including precipitation, wind speed, and dew point) for five selected cities in North Carolina were obtained from the U.S. EPA Air Quality System (AQS), which were in turn based on data from the National Climatic Data Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We used the Spatial Synoptic Classification system to classify each day of the 9-year period from 1996 through 2004 into one of seven different air mass types: dry polar, dry moderate, dry tropical, moist polar, moist moderate, moist tropical, or transitional. Daily 24-hour maximum 1-hour ambient concentrations of ozone were obtained from the AQS. Asthma and MI hospital admissions data for the 9-year period were obtained from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. Generalized linear models were used to assess the association of the hospitalizations with ozone concentrations and specific air mass types, using pollutant lags of 0 to 5 days. We examined the effect across cities on days with the same air mass type. In all models we adjusted for dew point and day-of-the-week effects related to hospital admissions. Results Ozone was associated with asthma under dry tropical (1- to 5-day lags), transitional (3- and 4-day lags), and extreme moist tropical (0-day lag) air masses. Ozone was associated with MI only under the extreme moist tropical (5-day lag) air masses. Conclusions Elevated ozone levels are associated with dry tropical, dry moderate, and moist tropical air masses, with the highest ozone levels being associated with the dry tropical air mass. Certain synoptic

  20. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  2. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg... defined in § 170.3(o)(2) of this chapter. (c) The additive meets the specifications for ozone in the...

  3. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs....1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas with a pungent... maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone per liter of bottled...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  6. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  7. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  9. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  10. Comparison of the effects of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone on HBV-contaminated hospital quilts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dan; Li, Ziqiong; Jia, Bei; Che, Xiaoqiong; Song, Tianshuang; Huang, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Besides being highly infectious, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. In hospital settings, it is easy for the environment and quilts to be contaminated by HBV patient blood and body fluids. Therefore, HBV can be transmitted to other patients via contaminated environmental surfaces or quilts, resulting in an HBV nosocomial infection. Formaldehyde and ozone are commonly used disinfectants that may influence this infectious situation. Objective: To investigate the clinical effectiveness of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone for the terminal cleaning of hospital quilts contaminated by HBV. Methods: Thin cloth and thick cotton soaked with the serum from high HBV copy number patients were prepared and disinfected using formaldehyde fumigation and gaseous ozone at different times. The copy numbers of HBV DNA in the HBV-contaminated cloth and cotton samples were measured quantitatively with fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: When gaseous ozone was used to disinfect HBV-contaminated quilts for 23 minutes (min), 36 min, 49 min, and 90 min, the HBV DNA copy number displayed no significant decrease compared with the copy number before disinfection (P > 0.05). In comparison, the copy number of the HBV DNA in the cloth group decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after formaldehyde fumigation disinfection for 1 hour (h), and there was no difference when longer times and increased concentrations were used. In the thick cotton group, there was also a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of the HBV DNA copy numbers, but the decrease was not as dramatic. In addition, in this group, the disinfection effect observed at 4 h was the strongest. Conclusions: The application of ozone to disinfect HBV-contaminated hospital quilts possibly has no effect, whereas, formaldehyde oxide fumigation effectively reduced HBV copy numbers. PMID:26770591

  11. Ozone-induced inactivation of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Ki; Mok Kim, Sang; Han, Sanghwa

    2003-10-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant that damages a variety of biomolecules. We investigated ozone-induced inactivation of three major antioxidant enzymes. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase was inactivated by ozone in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentration of ozone for 50% inactivation was approximately 45 microM when 10 microM Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase was incubated for 30 min in the presence of ozone. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) showed that the enzyme was randomly fragmented. Both ascorbate and glutathione were very effective in protecting Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from ozone-induced inactivation. The other two enzymes, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, were much more resistant to ozone than Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. The ozone concentrations for 50% inactivation of 10 microM catalase and glutathione peroxidase were 500 and 240 microM, respectively. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that ozone caused formation of high molecular weight aggregates in catalase and dimerization in glutathione peroxidase. Glutathione protected catalase and glutathione peroxidase from ozone but the effective concentrations were much higher than that for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Ascorbate was almost ineffective. The result suggests that, among the three antioxidant enzymes, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase is a major target for ozone-induced inactivation and both glutathione and ascorbate are very effective in protecting the enzyme from ozone.

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS IN OZONATED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because ozonation is becoming a popular alternative to chlorination for disinfection of drinking water and because little is known about the potential adverse effects of ozonation disinfection by-products (DBPs), we have sought to identify ozone DBPs, particularly brominated orga...

  13. Ozone, Climate, and Global Atmospheric Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Joel S.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of global atmospheric problems relating to ozone depletion and global warming. Provides background information on the composition of the earth's atmosphere and origin of atmospheric ozone. Describes causes, effects, and evidence of ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect. A vignette provides a summary of a 1991 assessment of…

  14. A Chemiluminescence Detector for Ozone Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H.; And Others

    An ozone detector was built and evaluated for its applicability in smog chamber studies. The detection method is based on reaction of ozone with ethylene and measurement of resultant chemiluminescence. In the first phase of evaluation, the detector's response to ozone was studied as a function of several instrument parameters, and optimum…

  15. Generation and delivery device for ozone gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides an ozone generation and delivery system that lends itself to small scale applications and requires very low maintenance. The system preferably includes an anode reservoir and a cathode phase separator each having a hydrophobic membrane to allow phase separation of produced gases from water. The hydrogen gas, ozone gas and water containing ozone may be delivered under pressure.

  16. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    The question of air quality in polluted regions represents one of the issues of geochemistry with direct implications for human well-being. Human health and well-being, along with the well-being of plants, animals, and agricultural crops, are dependent on the quality of air we breathe. Since the start of the industrial era, air quality has become a matter of major importance, especially in large cities or urbanized regions with heavy automobile traffic and industrial activity.Concern over air quality existed as far back as the 1600s. Originally, polluted air in cities resulted from the burning of wood or coal, largely as a source of heat. The industrial revolution in England saw a great increase in the use of coal in rapidly growing cities, both for industrial use and domestic heating. London suffered from devastating pollution events during the late 1800s and early 1900s, with thousands of excess deaths attributed to air pollution (Brimblecombe, 1987). With increasing use of coal, other instances also occurred in continental Europe and the USA. These events were caused by directly emitted pollutants (primary pollutants), including sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulates. They were especially acute in cities with northerly locations during fall and winter when sunlight is at a minimum. These original pollution events gave rise to the term "smog" (a combination of smoke and fog). Events of this type have become much less severe since the 1950s in Western Europe and the US, as natural gas replaced coal as the primary source of home heating, industrial smokestacks were designed to emit at higher altitudes (where dispersion is more rapid), and industries were required to install pollution control equipment.Beginning in the 1950s, a new type of pollution, photochemical smog, became a major concern. Photochemical smog consists of ozone (O3) and other closely related species ("secondary pollutants") that are produced photochemically from directly

  17. Tropospheric ozone and vehicular emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.

    1988-06-01

    The paper examines changes in the transportation system as a means of reducing tropospheric ozone in the South Coast Air Basin of California. It takes this issue as a paradigm for the broader national situation where there are environmental risks for which no plausible, politically or economically acceptable remedies exist. It summarizes the health risks of ozone, the current and prospective levels of control required to avoid them, the prospective contribution of transportation controls, and the information required to put the issue in a social benefits and costs framework for decision. 23 refs.

  18. CRISTA ozone measurements/validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, M.; Offermann, D.; Preusse, P.; Riese, M.; Claude, H.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    1997-05-01

    Seven days of global high resolution middle atmosphere ozone profiles have been measured by the CRyogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) in November 1994. Measurements cover the altitude range from 10 to 80 km and latitudes from 59 degS to 64 degN. An example of a global ozone map is presented and demonstrates the ability of the instrument to detect medium and even small scale structures. Comparisons with ECC- and Brewer Mast balloon-sonde underflights are discussed. Reasonable agreement between CRISTA and balloon-sondes is found especially in the altitude interval between about 19km and 27km.

  19. Ozone modeling in an ethanol, gasoline and diesel fuels environment: The metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, M.F.; Miguel, A.H.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1995-12-01

    Over the past several years, in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo (MASP), ambient ozone concentrations have reached over five times the concentration considered protective of public health by the World Health Organization, with routine occurrence of levels that exceed Brazil`s 1 hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (160 {mu}g/m{sup 3}). For the past 19 years, ethanol has been used both as fuel (E95) and as gasoline additive (E20G80) in light duty vehicles. This talk will discuss the results of the application of the CIT photochemical airshed model to the February 16-17, 1989 meteorological experiment carried out in the MASP. Simulated hourly ozone concentrations for the 1989 vehicular fleet included three cases: (1) the actual fleet (F.95, E20G80, and diesels), (2) a light duty fleet fueled with E95 only, and (3) entirely with gasoline.

  20. Options to accelerate ozone recovery:ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), including N2O, are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2{%} during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower due to the elimination of N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower due to destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. The ability of EESC to be a suitable metric for total ozone is also quantified. Responding to the recent suggestion that N2O should be considered an ODS, we provide an approach to incorporate N2O into the EESC formulation.

  1. Ozone Control Strategies | Ground-level Ozone | New ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    The Air Quality Planning Unit's primary goal is to protect your right to breathe clean air. Guided by the Clean Air Act, we work collaboratively with states, communities, and businesses to develop and implement strategies to reduce air pollution from a variety of sources that contribute to the ground-level ozone or smog problem.

  2. Options to Accelerate Ozone Recovery: Ozone and Climate Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, E. L.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone primarily originated from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine). Representatives from governments have met periodically over the years to establish international regulations starting with the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which greatly limited the release of these ozone-depleting substances (DDSs). Two global models have been used to investigate the impact of hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ODSs on total column ozone. The investigations primarily focused on chlorine- and bromine-containing gases, but some computations also included nitrous oxide (N2O). The Montreal Protocol with ODS controls have been so successful that further regulations of chlorine- and bromine-containing gases could have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. if all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Chlorine- and bromine-containing gases and nitrous oxide are also greenhouse gases and lead to warming of the troposphere. Elimination of N 20 emissions would result in a reduction of radiative forcing of 0.23 W/sq m in 2100 than presently computed and destruction of the CFC bank would produce a reduction in radiative forcing of 0.005 W/sq m in 2100. This paper provides a quantitative way to consider future regulations of the CFC bank and N 20 emissions

  3. Defense meteorological satellite measurements of total ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovill, J. E.; Ellis, J. S.; Luther, F. M.; Sullivan, T. J.; Weichel, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A multichannel filter radiometer (MFR) on Defense Meteorological Satellites (DMS) that measured total ozone on a global-scale from March 1977 - February 1980 is described. The total ozone data measured by the MFR were compared with total ozone data taken by surfaced-based Dobson spectrophotometers. When comparisons were made for five months, the Dobson spectrophotometer measured 2-5% more total ozone than the MFR. Comparisons between the Dobson spectrophotometer and the MFR showed a reduced RMS difference as the comparisons were made at closer proximity. A Northern Hemisphere total ozone distribution obtained from MFR data is presented.

  4. The Chemistry and Physics of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Randall R.

    Perhaps no other environmental issue has captured as much widespread public interest and concern as stratospheric ozone depletion due to man-made chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Increasing scientific understanding of the connections between CFCs and global-scale ozone changes, highlighted by observations of dramatic ozone loss in the Antarctic, has led to a landmark international treaty and subsequent treaty amendments. As outgrowths of these developments, stratospheric ozone depletion has found its way into science fiction fare and the term “ozone hole” has become part of the English lexicon.

  5. 75 FR 79300 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Mississippi; Prevention of Significant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Significant Deterioration Rules: Nitrogen Oxides as a Precursor to Ozone AGENCY: Environmental Protection... NAAQS specifically incorporating nitrogen oxides (NO X ) as a precursor to ozone. EPA's approval...

  6. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  7. Ozone production during an urban air stagnation episode over Nashville, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, R. J.; Imhoff, R. E.; Tanner, R. L.; Meagher, J. F.; Daum, P. H.; Hardesty, R. M.; Banta, R. M.; Alvarez, R. J.; McNider, R. T.; Gillani, N. V.

    1998-09-01

    The highest O3 levels observed during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study in middle Tennessee occurred during a period of air stagnation from July 11 through July 15. Extensive airborne (two fixed wing and one helicopter) and ground-based measurements of the chemistry and meteorology of this episode near Nashville, Tennessee, are presented. In situ airborne measurements include O3, NOy, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, nitrate, hydrocarbons, and aldehydes. Airborne LIDAR O3 measurements are also utilized to map the vertical and horizontal extent of the urban plume. The use of multiple instrumented research aircraft permitted highly detailed mapping of the plume chemistry in the vertical and horizontal dimensions. Interactions between the urban Nashville plume (primarily a NOx and hydrocarbon source) and the Gallatin coal-fired power plant plume (primarily a NOx and SO2 source) are also documented, and comparisons of ozone formation in the isolated and mixed urban and power plant plume are presented. The data suggest that during this episode the background air and the edges of the urban plume are NOx sensitive and the core of the urban plume is hydrocarbon sensitive. Under these worst case meteorological conditions, ambient O3 levels well over the level of the new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (80 ppb) were observed over and just downwind of Nashville. For example, on July 12, the boundary layer air upwind of Nashville showed 60 to 70 ppb O3, while just downwind of the city the urban plume maximum was over 140 ppb O3. With a revised ozone standard set at 80 ppb (8 hour average) and upwind levels already within 10 or 20 ppb of the standard, only a slight increase in ozone from the urban area will cause difficulty in attaining the standard at monitors near the core of the urban plume during this type of episode. The helicopter mapping and LIDAR aircraft data clearly illustrate that high O3 levels can occur during stagnation episodes within a few kilometers of

  8. Natural hydrocarbons, urbanization, and urban ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, C. A.; Chameides, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The combined effects of emission control and urbanization, with its concomitant intensification of the urban heat island, on urban ozone concentrations are studied. The effect of temperature on ozone is considered, and attention is given to the temperature effect on ozone photochemistry. Model calculations suggest that ozone concentration enhancements are caused by the effect of temperature on the atmospheric chemistry of peroxyacetyl nitrate, as well as the temperature dependence of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. It is pointed out that, because of the sensitivity of urban ozone to local climatic conditions and the ability of trees to moderate summertime temperatures, the inadvertent removal of trees from urbanization can have an adverse effect on urban ozone concentration, while a temperature increase in the urban heat island caused by urbanization can essentially cancel out the ozone-reducing benefits obtained from a 50-percent reduction in anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions.

  9. Ozone Depletion, UVB and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The primary constituents of the Earth's atmosphere are molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen. Ozone is created when ultraviolet light from the sun photodissociates molecular oxygen into two oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms undergo many collisions but eventually combine with a molecular oxygen to form ozone (O3). The ozone molecules absorb ultraviolet solar radiation, primarily in the wavelength region between 200 and 300 nanometers, resulting in the dissociation of ozone back into atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. The oxygen atom reattaches to an O2 molecule, reforming ozone which can then absorb another ultraviolet photon. This sequence goes back and forth between atomic oxygen and ozone, each time absorbing a uv photon, until the oxygen atom collides with and ozone molecule to reform two oxygen molecules.

  10. When will the Antarctic ozone hole recover?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Sue M.

    2006-06-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. We demonstrate a parametric model of ozone hole area that is based upon a new algorithm for estimating chlorine and bromine levels over Antarctica and late spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This model explains 95% of the ozone hole area's variance. We then use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur around 2068 and the area will very slowly decline between 2001 and 2017. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until about 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  11. Formation of the 1988 Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, A.J.; Stolarski, R.S.; Schoeberl, M.R. )

    1989-05-01

    The 1988 Antarctic ozone hole, as observed with the Nimbus 7 TOMS instrument, formed in August but failed to deepen significantly during September. The structure of the surrounding total ozone maxima also differed from the prior year. The 1987 total ozone pattern was pole centered and symmetrical. During 1988 a persistent strong wavenumber 1 perturbation in total ozone developed in August which resulted in displacement of the polar ozone minimum to the base of the Antarctic Peninsula. Subsequently, a series of transient events diminished and a larger scale decrease in polar total ozone began. The decrease lasted less than two weeks, resulting in a net change of only 25 DU compared with the nearly 100 DU decline observed during the same period in 1987. The minimum values remained roughly constant until October 19, 1988 and then increased rapidly. The 1988 Antarctic ozone hole subsequently drifted off the Antarctic continent in late October and dissipated in mid-November.

  12. Trends in total column ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, F. S.; Angell, J.; Attmannspacher, W.; Bloomfield, P.; Bojkov, R. D.; Harris, N.; Komhyr, W.; Mcfarland, M.; Mcpeters, R.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    It is important to ensure the best available data are used in any determination of possible trends in total ozone in order to have the most accurate estimates of any trends and the associated uncertainties. Accordingly, the existing total ozone records were examined in considerable detail. Once the best data set has been produced, the statistical analysis must examine the data for any effects that might indicate changes in the behavior of global total ozone. The changes at any individual measuring station could be local in nature, and herein, particular attention was paid to the seasonal and latitudinal variations of total ozone, because two dimensional photochemical models indicate that any changes in total ozone would be most pronounced at high latitudes during the winter months. The conclusions derived from this detailed examination of available total ozone can be split into two categories, one concerning the quality and the other the statistical analysis of the total ozone record.

  13. Quantifying the contribution of thermally driven recirculation to a high-ozone event along the Colorado Front Range using lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, John T.; McGee, Thomas J.; Langford, Andrew O.; Alvarez, Raul J.; Senff, Christoph J.; Reddy, Patrick J.; Thompson, Anne M.; Twigg, Laurence W.; Sumnicht, Grant K.; Lee, Pius; Weinheimer, Andrew; Knote, Christoph; Long, Russell W.; Hoff, Raymond M.

    2016-09-01

    A high-ozone (O3) pollution episode was observed on 22 July 2014 during the concurrent "Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality" (DISCOVER-AQ) and "Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment" (FRAPPE) campaigns in northern Colorado. Surface O3 monitors at three regulatory sites exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) daily maximum 8 h average (MDA8) of 75 ppbv. To further characterize the polluted air mass and assess transport throughout the event, measurements are presented from O3 and wind profilers, O3-sondes, aircraft, and surface-monitoring sites. Observations indicate that thermally driven upslope flow was established throughout the Colorado Front Range during the pollution episode. As the thermally driven flow persisted throughout the day, O3 concentrations increased and affected high-elevation Rocky Mountain sites. These observations, coupled with modeling analyses, demonstrate a westerly return flow of polluted air aloft, indicating that the mountain-plains solenoid circulation was established and impacted surface conditions within the Front Range.

  14. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  15. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  16. Ozone: Does It Affect Me?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Karla G.

    This curriculum unit on the ozone is intended for high school students and contains sections on environmental science and chemistry. It has been structured according to a learning cycle model and contains numerous activities, some of which are in a cooperative learning format. Skills emphasized include laboratory procedures, experimental design,…

  17. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  18. Exicimer lidar measurements of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, T.; Uchino, O.; Maeda, M.

    1985-01-01

    The observation of the atmospheric ozone profile in an altitude range of 3 to 28 km by means of differential absorption lidar in combination with an XeCl laser (308 nm) and SRS pumped by a KrF laser (249 nm) is discussed.

  19. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  20. Computer model predictions of the local effects of large, solid-fuel rocket motors on stratospheric ozone. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zittel, P.F.

    1994-09-10

    The solid-fuel rocket motors of large space launch vehicles release gases and particles that may significantly affect stratospheric ozone densities along the vehicle's path. In this study, standard rocket nozzle and flowfield computer codes have been used to characterize the exhaust gases and particles through the afterburning region of the solid-fuel motors of the Titan IV launch vehicle. The models predict that a large fraction of the HCl gas exhausted by the motors is converted to Cl and Cl2 in the plume afterburning region. Estimates of the subsequent chemistry suggest that on expansion into the ambient daytime stratosphere, the highly reactive chlorine may significantly deplete ozone in a cylinder around the vehicle track that ranges from 1 to 5 km in diameter over the altitude range of 15 to 40 km. The initial ozone depletion is estimated to occur on a time scale of less than 1 hour. After the initial effects, the dominant chemistry of the problem changes, and new models are needed to follow the further expansion, or closure, of the ozone hole on a longer time scale.