Science.gov

Sample records for 1-hour time point

  1. 40 CFR 60.2943 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic... SOURCES Operator Training and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2943 How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic... emissions at 7 percent oxygen. (b) Use Equation 2 in § 60.2975 to calculate the 12-hour rolling averages...

  2. 40 CFR 60.3042 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic... Construction On or Before December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3042 How do I convert my 1-hour... calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen. (b) Use Equation 2 in § 60.3076 to calculate the 12-hour...

  3. 40 CFR 60.2943 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... averaging times and units? (a) Use Equation 1 in § 60.2975 to calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen. (b) Use Equation 2 in § 60.2975 to calculate the 12-hour rolling averages for concentrations of...

  4. Early Time Points Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Kenneth K.; Reese, Timothy G.; Nelissen, Koen; Wu, Ona; Chan, Suk-Tak; Benner, Thomas; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Foley, Mary; Vanduffel, Wim; Chesler, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the feasibility of making relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) maps from MR images acquired with short TR by measuring the initial arrival amount of Gd-DTPA evaluated within a time window before any contrast agent has a chance to leave the tissue. We named this rCBF measurement technique utilizing the early data points of the Gd-DTPA bolus the “early time points” method (ET), based on the hypothesis that early time point signals were proportional to rCBF. Simulation data were used successfully to examine the ideal behavior of ET while monkey’s MRI results offered encouraging support to the utility of ET for rCBF calculation. A better brain coverage for ET could be obtained by applying the Simultaneous Echo Refocusing (SER) EPI technique. A recipe to run ET was presented, with attention paid to the noise problem around the time of arrival (TOA) of the contrast agent. PMID:20851196

  5. 76 FR 61098 - Guidance for 1-Hour SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...Notice is hereby given that the EPA has posted its draft non- binding guidance titled, ``Guidance for 1-Hour SO2 NAAQS SIP Submissions'' on its Web site. The EPA invites public comments on this guidance document during the comment period specified below, and plans to issue an updated version of the guidance after reviewing timely submitted...

  6. Arctic tipping points: governance in turbulent times.

    PubMed

    Young, Oran R

    2012-02-01

    Interacting forces of climate change and globalization are transforming the Arctic. Triggered by a non-linear shift in sea ice, this transformation has unleashed mounting interest in opportunities to exploit the region's natural resources as well as growing concern about environmental, economic, and political issues associated with such efforts. This article addresses the implications of this transformation for governance, identifies limitations of existing arrangements, and explores changes needed to meet new demands. It advocates the development of an Arctic regime complex featuring flexibility across issues and adaptability over time along with an enhanced role for the Arctic Council both in conducting policy-relevant assessments and in promoting synergy in interactions among the elements of the emerging Arctic regime complex. The emphasis throughout is on maximizing the fit between the socioecological features of the Arctic and the character of the governance arrangements needed to steer the Arctic toward a sustainable future. PMID:22270707

  7. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Major decision points and timing. 161.5 Section... decision points and timing. (a) The responsible action officer shall ensure compliance with these...) Environmental analysis and review of a proposed Departmental action shall be conducted as early as...

  8. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Major decision points and timing. 161.5 Section... decision points and timing. (a) The responsible action officer shall ensure compliance with these...) Environmental analysis and review of a proposed Departmental action shall be conducted as early as...

  9. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Major decision points and timing. 161.5 Section... decision points and timing. (a) The responsible action officer shall ensure compliance with these...) Environmental analysis and review of a proposed Departmental action shall be conducted as early as...

  10. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Major decision points and timing. 161.5 Section... decision points and timing. (a) The responsible action officer shall ensure compliance with these...) Environmental analysis and review of a proposed Departmental action shall be conducted as early as...

  11. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Major decision points and timing. 161.5 Section... decision points and timing. (a) The responsible action officer shall ensure compliance with these...) Environmental analysis and review of a proposed Departmental action shall be conducted as early as...

  12. Multi-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere and auroral emissions (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, Benjamin; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini; Krupp, Norbert; Grodent, Denis; Kurth, William S.; Yates, Japheth N.

    2016-04-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes which differ from the rotation period. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emission brightness. We made a 10-year survey of the quasi-periodic 1-hour energetic electron injections observed in the Saturn's outer magnetosphere by the Low-Energy Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini. The signature of these injections is pulsations in the electron fluxes at energies between a hundred keV up to several MeV. We investigated the topology and the morphology of these pulsations, as well as the signatures of the electron injections in the radio emissions and the magnetic field, respectively, measured by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) on board Cassini. The morphology of the pulsations (interpulse period, number of pulsations per event, growth and decay time) shows a weak local time dependence, which suggests a high-latitude source for the pulsed energetic electrons. This suggestion is reinforced by the observation of strong radio bursts in the auroral hiss coincident with the electron pulsations and by the higher growth rate and decay rate magnitudes at high latitudes. Moreover, since the morphological properties of the pulsations are similar at the various locations where the electron injections are observed, the acceleration mechanism of the electrons is likely common for all the events and may be directly or indirectly involving magnetic reconnection. The auroral emissions, which display the ionospheric response to magnetospheric dynamics, exhibit some quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations as well. Some pulsed auroral brightenings are observed while Cassini detects several electron

  13. Planning time-optimal robotic manipulator motions and work places for point-to-point tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, S.; Blubaugh, T. D.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented which combines simple time-optimal motions in an optimal manner to yield the minimum-time motions for an important class of complex manipulator tasks composed of point-to-point moves such as assembly, electronic component insertion, and spot welding. This method can also be used to design manipulator actions and work places so that tasks can be completed in minimum time. The method has been implemented in a computer-aided design software system. Several examples are presented. Experimental results show the method's validity and utility.

  14. Clustering space-time interest points for action representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sou-Young; Choi, Ho-Jin

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to represent human actions in a video. Our approach deals with the limitation of local representation, i.e. space-time interest points, which cannot adequately represent actions in a video due to lack of global information about geometric relationships among interest points. It adds the geometric relationships to interest points by clustering interest points using squared Euclidean distances, followed by using a minimum hexahedron to represent each cluster. Within each video, we build a multi-dimensional histogram based on the characteristics of hexahedrons in the video for recognition. The experimental results show that the proposed representation is powerful to include the global information on top of local interest points and it successfully increases the accuracy of action recognition.

  15. Internal Oblique and Transversus Abdominis Muscle Fatigue Induced by Slumped Sitting Posture after 1 Hour of Sitting in Office Workers

    PubMed Central

    Waongenngarm, Pooriput; Rajaratnam, Bala S.; Janwantanakul, Prawit

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged sitting leads to low back discomfort and lumbopelvic muscle fatigue. This study examined the characteristics of body perceived discomfort and trunk muscle fatigue during 1 hour of sitting in three postures in office workers. Methods Thirty workers sat for 1 hour in one of three sitting postures (i.e., upright, slumped, and forward leaning postures). Body discomfort was assessed using the Body Perceived Discomfort scale at the beginning and after 1 hour of sitting. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from superficial lumbar multifidus, iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, internal oblique (IO)/transversus abdominis (TrA), and rectus abdominis muscles during 1 hour of sitting. The median frequency (MDF) of the EMG power spectrum was calculated. Results Regardless of the sitting posture, the Body Perceived Discomfort scores in the neck, shoulder, upper back, low back, and buttock significantly increased after 1 hour of sitting compared with baseline values (t(9) = −11.97 to −2.69, p < 0.05). The MDF value of the EMG signal of rectus abdominis, iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, and multifidus muscles was unchanged over time in all three sitting postures. Only the right and left IO/TrA in the slumped sitting posture was significantly associated with decreased MDF over time (p = 0.019 to 0.041). Conclusion Prolonged sitting led to increased body discomfort in the neck, shoulder, upper back, low back, and buttock. No sign of trunk muscle fatigue was detected over 1 hour of sitting in the upright and forward leaning postures. Prolonged slumped sitting may relate to IO/TrA muscle fatigue, which may compromise the stability of the spine, making it susceptible to injury. PMID:27014491

  16. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  17. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging.

  18. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  19. Time scale for point-defect equilibration in nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, Paul C.; Wolf, Dieter; Desai, Tapan; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2008-10-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of high-temperature annealing are performed on nanostructured materials enabling direct observation of vacancy emission from planar defects (i.e., grain boundaries and free surfaces) to populate the initially vacancy-free grain interiors on a subnanosecond time scale. We demonstrate a universal time-length scale correlation that governs these re-equilibration processes, suggesting that nanostructures are particularly stable against perturbations in their point-defect concentrations, caused for example by particle irradiation or temperature fluctuations.

  20. 75 FR 6570 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Baton Rouge 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... and the 1-hour ozone rulemakings cited therein. See 70 FR 71612 (November 29, 2005) and in the cases... its interpretation and practice with respect to the 1-hour ozone standard. See Phase 2 Rule, 70 FR... rulemakings cited in the Phase 2 8-Hour Ozone Implementation Rule, 70 FR 71644-71646 (November 29, 2005)....

  1. Parity-time symmetry broken by point-group symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Francisco M. Garcia, Javier

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a parity-time (PT) symmetric Hamiltonian with complex eigenvalues. It is based on the dimensionless Schrödinger equation for a particle in a square box with the PT-symmetric potential V(x, y) = iaxy. Perturbation theory clearly shows that some of the eigenvalues are complex for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point-group symmetry proves useful to guess if some of the eigenvalues may already be complex for all values of the coupling constant. We confirm those conclusions by means of an accurate numerical calculation based on the diagonalization method. On the other hand, the Schrödinger equation with the potential V(x, y) = iaxy{sup 2} exhibits real eigenvalues for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point group symmetry suggests that PT-symmetry may be broken in the former case and unbroken in the latter one.

  2. Local troposphere augmentation for real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Guo, Jiming; Gao, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The IGS real-time service (RTS) enables real-time precise point positioning (PPP) at a global scale. A long convergence time however is still a challenging factor. In order to reduce the convergence time, external troposphere corrections could be introduced to remove the troposphere effects on the coordinate solution. This paper proposes the use of a local troposphere model to augment real-time PPP. First, undifferenced observations from a network of multiple stations are processed to estimate the station-based troposphere zenith wet delay (ZWD). A set of local troposphere fitting coefficients are then derived using a proposed optimal fitting model. Finally, the determined troposphere fitting coefficients are broadcast to users to reduce the convergence time in the user solution. A continuous operating reference station (CORS) network is utilized to assess the performance of the proposed approach under quiet and active troposphere conditions. The numerical results show that the overall fitting precisions of the local troposphere model can reach 1.42 and 1.05 cm under the two troposphere conditions. The convergence time of the positioning solutions, especially the height solution, can be greatly reduced using the local troposphere model. The horizontal accuracy of 9.2 cm and the vertical accuracy of 10.1 cm are obtainable under the quiet troposphere condition after 20 min of initialization time, compared to the 14.7 cm horizontal and 21.5 cm vertical accuracies in the conventional troposphere estimation approach. Moreover, the horizontal accuracies of 13.0 cm and the vertical accuracies of 12.4 cm have also been obtained after 20 min under the active troposphere condition.

  3. The timing of control signals underlying fast point-to-point arm movements.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, M; Feldman, A G

    2001-04-01

    It is known that proprioceptive feedback induces muscle activation when the facilitation of appropriate motoneurons exceeds their threshold. In the suprathreshold range, the muscle-reflex system produces torques depending on the position and velocity of the joint segment(s) that the muscle spans. The static component of the torque-position relationship is referred to as the invariant characteristic (IC). According to the equilibrium-point (EP) hypothesis, control systems produce movements by changing the activation thresholds and thus shifting the IC of the appropriate muscles in joint space. This control process upsets the balance between muscle and external torques at the initial limb configuration and, to regain the balance, the limb is forced to establish a new configuration or, if the movement is prevented, a new level of static torques. Taken together, the joint angles and the muscle torques generated at an equilibrium configuration define a single variable called the EP. Thus by shifting the IC, control systems reset the EP. Muscle activation and movement emerge following the EP resetting because of the natural physical tendency of the system to reach equilibrium. Empirical and simulation studies support the notion that the control IC shifts and the resulting EP shifts underlying fast point-to-point arm movements are gradual rather than step-like. However, controversies exist about the duration of these shifts. Some studies suggest that the IC shifts cease with the movement offset. Other studies propose that the IC shifts end early in comparison to the movement duration (approximately, at peak velocity). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the duration of the IC shifts underlying fast point-to-point arm movements. Subjects made fast (hand peak velocity about 1.3 m/s) planar arm movements toward different targets while grasping a handle. Hand forces applied to the handle and shoulder/elbow torques were, respectively, measured from a force sensor placed

  4. Single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-Lin; Zhan, Xian-Cheng; Li, Lin-Li; Lin, Bing; Jiang, Lu

    2009-03-01

    A single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity is introduced. In the new method, kinetic parameters related to both moisture and temperature were obtained by a single pair of experiments: these related to moisture by one with a group of testing humidities and a fixed temperature, those related to temperature by the other with a group of testing temperatures and a constant humidity. By a simulation, the estimates for the kinetic parameters (E(a), m, A) obtained by the proposed method and the reported programmed humidifying and heating method were statistically evaluated and were compared with those obtained by the isothermal measurements at constant humidity. Results indicated that under the same experimental conditions, the estimates obtained by the proposed method were significantly more precise than those obtained by the reported programmed humidifying and heating method. The estimates obtained by the isothermal method at constant humidity were somewhat more precise than those obtained by the proposed method. However, the experimental period needed by the isothermal method at constant humidity was greatly longer than that needed by the proposed method. The stability of dicloxacillin sodium, as a solid state model, was investigated by the single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity. The results indicated that the kinetic parameters obtained by the proposed method were comparable to those from the reported. PMID:19252391

  5. Taming the Exceptional Points of Parity-Time Symmetric Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Shi, Chengzhi; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric concept and development lead to a wide range of applications including coherent perfect absorbers, single mode lasers, unidirectional cloaking and sensing, and optical isolators. These new applications and devices emerge from the existence of a phase transition in PT symmetric complex-valued potential obtained by balancing gain and loss materials. However, the systematic extension of such devices is adjourned by the key challenge in the management of the complex scattering process within the structure in order to engineer PT phase and exceptional points. Here, based on active acoustic elements, we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous control of complex-valued potentials and multiple interference inside the structure at any given frequency. This method broadens the scope of applications for PT symmetric devices in many fields including optics, microwaves, electronics, which are crucial for sensing, imaging, cloaking, lasing, absorbing, etc.

  6. Nonparametric directionality measures for time series and point process data.

    PubMed

    Halliday, David M

    2015-06-01

    The need to determine the directionality of interactions between neural signals is a key requirement for analysis of multichannel recordings. Approaches most commonly used are parametric, typically relying on autoregressive models. A number of concerns have been expressed regarding parametric approaches, thus there is a need to consider alternatives. We present an alternative nonparametric approach for construction of directionality measures for bivariate random processes. The method combines time and frequency domain representations of bivariate data to decompose the correlation by direction. Our framework generates two sets of complementary measures, a set of scalar measures, which decompose the total product moment correlation coefficient summatively into three terms by direction and a set of functions which decompose the coherence summatively at each frequency into three terms by direction: forward direction, reverse direction and instantaneous interaction. It can be undertaken as an addition to a standard bivariate spectral and coherence analysis, and applied to either time series or point-process (spike train) data or mixtures of the two (hybrid data). In this paper, we demonstrate application to spike train data using simulated cortical neurone networks and application to experimental data from isolated muscle spindle sensory endings subject to random efferent stimulation. PMID:25958923

  7. Time trend and change point of reference evapotranspiration over Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh Talaee, P.; Shifteh Some'e, B.; Sobhan Ardakani, S.

    2014-05-01

    Identifying changes in reference evapotranspiration (ETo) can help in future planning of crop water requirements and water resources for high water-use efficiency. This study analyzes the ETo trends on a seasonal and annual timescale by applying various statistical tools to data from 41 Iranian weather stations during the period between 1966 and 2005. The Mann-Kendall test after removal of significant serial correlation was used to determine the statistical significance of the trends, and the change point in the ETo time series was determined using the cumulative sum technique. The results showed that (1) the significant increasing trends of annual ETo were observed at seven stations which are located in different parts of Iran, (2) the stations located at the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners of Iran experienced the highest positive change of annual ETo, and (3) the changes in seasonal ETo were most pronounced in the winter season, both in terms of trend magnitude and the number of stations with significant trends.

  8. The assessment of schizotypal features over two points in time.

    PubMed

    Squires-Wheeler, E; Skodol, A E; Erlenmeyer-Kimling, L

    1991-12-01

    The expression of schizotypal personality traits was assessed in mid-adolescence and again in young adulthood for three groups of offspring defined by the psychiatric diagnosis of their parents. Parental diagnoses included schizophrenic disorder (47 offspring), affective disorder (39 offspring), and 'no psychiatric disorder', or normal controls (82 offspring). Initially, schizotypal traits were assessed from video-taped semi-structured psychiatric interviews, subsequently rated by trained psychiatrists blind to the parental psychiatric status of the subjects, and/or direct clinical interviews (Schedule for Affective Disorders-Lifetime Version (SADS-L)). The second assessment was conducted by trained social workers and psychologists by means of a semi-structured interview specifically for DSM-III-R personality disorders (Personality Disorder Examination) and sections of the SDS-L where indicated. These interviewers were blind to the parental status and to previous psychiatric assessments of the offspring. The rates of stability of features or the rates of progression to axis I psychotic disorders (Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, and Unspecified Functional Psychosis) were evaluated. Concordance of assessments over time is reported as a function of threshold for expression of traits at initial evaluation, i.e., two or more, three or more, or four or more features present. Concordance increases as the threshold for expression increases, as expected. The effect of comorbid clinical status, e.g., the coexistence of schizotypal traits and anxiety and/or depressive features on the concordance pattern, is also examined by parental diagnostic group status. The offspring of affective disorder parents exhibited higher rates of anxiety and/or depressive features at both points in time, exhibited higher concordance for anxiety and/or depressive features, and exhibited higher rates of 'transformation' of initial schizotypal features to anxiety and/or depressive features

  9. Time's Arrow and Archimedes' Point - New Directions for the Physics of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Huw

    1997-12-01

    Why is the future so different from the past? Why does the past affect the future and not the other way around? What does quantum mechanics really tell us about the world? In this important and accessible book, Huw Price throws fascinating new light these great mysteries of modern physics, and connects them in a wholly original way. Price begins with the mystery of the arrow of time. Price shows that, for over a century, most physicists have thought about problems of time in the wrong way. Misled by the human perspective from within time, which distorts and exaggerates the differences between past and future, they have fallen victim to what Price calls the "double standard fallacy": proposed explanations of the difference between the past and the future turn out to rely on a difference which has been slipped in at the beginning, when the physicists themselves treat the past and future in different ways. To avoid this fallacy, Price argues, we need to overcome our natural tendency to think about the past and the future differently. We need to imagine a point outside time--an Archimedean "view from nowhen"--from which to observe time in an unbiased way. Time's Arrow and Archimedes'Point presents an innovative and controversial view of time and contemporary physics. In this exciting book, Price urges physicists, philosophers, and anyone who has ever pondered the mysteries of time to look at the world from the fresh perspective of Archimedes' Point and gain a deeper understanding of ourselves, the universe around us, and our own place in time.

  10. GOES Infrared and Reflectance 0-1 hour Lightning Initiation Indicators: Development and Initial Testing within a Convective Nowcasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Harris, R.; MacKenzie, W.; Durkee, P. A.; Iskenderian, H.; Bickmeier, L.; Nielsen, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Within cumulus cloud fields that develop in conditionally unstable air masses, only a fraction of the cumuli may eventually develop into deep convection. Identifying which of these convective clouds most likely to generate lightning often starts with little more than a qualitative visual satellite analysis. The goal of this study is to identify the observed satellite infrared (IR) signatures associated with growing cumulus clouds prior to the first lightning strike, so-called lightning initiation (LI). This study quantifies the behavior of ten Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) IR interest fields in the 1-hour in advance of LI. A total of 172 lightning-producing storms that occurred during the 2009 convective season are manually tracked and studied over four regions: Northern Alabama, Central Oklahoma, the Kennedy Space Center and Washington D.C. Four-dimensional and cloud-to-ground lightning array data provide a total cloud lightning picture (in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, cloud-to-air, cloud-to-ground) and thus precise LI points for each storm in both time and space. Statistical significance tests are conducted on observed trends for each of the ten LI fields to determine the unique information each field provides in terms of behavior prior to LI. Eight out of ten LI fields exhibited useful information at least 15 min in advance of LI, with 35 min being the average. Statistical tests on these eight fields are compared for separate large geographical areas. IR temperature thresholds are then determined as an outcome, which may be valuable when implementing a LI prediction algorithm into real-time satellite-based systems. The key LI indicators from GOES IR data (as well as 3.9 μm reflectance) will be presented. Beginning in 2010, the feasibility of using the satellite-based LI indicators found in the above analysis to forecast first lightning will be assessed within the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) CoSPA nowcasting system. The goal

  11. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide. Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols. PMID:21499552

  12. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols. PMID:21499552

  13. Real time simulator with Ti floating point digital signal processor

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Bobis, J.P.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a Real Time Simulator using Texas Instruments TMS320C30 digital signal processor. This system operates with two banks of memory which provide the input data to digital signal processor chip. This feature enables the TMS320C30 to be utilized in variety of applications for which external connections to acquire input data is not needed. In addition, some practical applications of this Real Time Simulator are discussed.

  14. [Time point and methods for emergency killing in cattle].

    PubMed

    Khol, J L; Schafbauer, T; Wittek, T

    2016-01-01

    Emergency killing is defined as the killing of injured or ill animals to avoid excessive pain or harm. Decision-making for emergency killing or a prolonged therapy can be difficult and has to be based on the case history and results of the clinical examination contributing to the prognosis, particularly in downer cows. Evaluation of enzyme activities and total bilirubin can be used as additional factors pointing to a guarded prognosis; however, none of these parameters provides a clear cut-off value indicating a poor prognosis and mandatory emergency killing. Euthanasia by intravenous drug application is seen as the least stressful method of killing and should therefore always be the first method of choice for emergency killing in cattle. Drugs containing pentobarbital as well as a combination of three different drugs (T61-Injektionslösung, MSD Animal Health) are available for euthanasia in cattle. All drugs must be administered by a veterinarian. Before application of pentobarbital, an animal should be deeply sedated. The administration of T61 requires anaesthesia of the animal and it is not licensed for use in pregnant animals. Alternative methods for emeragency killing, including captive bolt stunning and the use of firearms, although not regularly performed by veterinarians, should be assessed concerning their correct application and performance. When captive bolt stunning or emergency killing using firearms is performed, the correct position of the device is crucial as well as a quick exsanguination or the application of a pithing rod for the actual killing of the animal after captive bolt stunning. In addition to medical considerations, economic and personal factors contribute to the decision about emergency killing in cattle. Therefore, veterinarians should aim to evaluate each case thoroughly based on personal knowledge and experience, case history, clinical findings and laboratory parameters to avoid prolonged suffering of the animal. PMID:26830543

  15. Lunar Crater Rays Point to a New Lunar Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2004-09-01

    The Lunar Time Scale should be reevaluated -- suggest remote sensing studies of lunar crater rays by B. Ray Hawke (University of Hawaii) and colleagues at the University of Hawaii, NovaSol, Cornell University, National Air and Space Museum, and Northwestern University. These scientists have found that the mere presence of crater rays is not a reliable indicator that the crater is young, as once thought, and that the working definition of the Copernican/Eratosthenian (C/E) boundary should be reconsidered. The team used Earth-based spectral and radar data with FeO, TiO2, and optical maturity maps derived from Clementine UVVIS images to determine the origin and composition of selected lunar ray segments. They conclude that the optical maturity parameter, which uses chemical analyses of lunar samples as its foundation, should be used to redefine the C/E boundary. Under this classification, the Copernican System would be defined as the time required for an immature surface to reach full optical maturity.

  16. MAPT and PAICE: Tools for time series and single time point transcriptionist visualization and knowledge discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Parsa; Tremblay, Arianne; Matthews, Benjamin F; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of next-generation sequencing, -omics fields such as transcriptomics have experienced increases in data throughput on the order of magnitudes. In terms of analyzing and visually representing these huge datasets, an intuitive and computationally tractable approach is to map quantified transcript expression onto biochemical pathways while employing datamining and visualization principles to accelerate knowledge discovery. We present two cross-platform tools: MAPT (Mapping and Analysis of Pathways through Time) and PAICE (Pathway Analysis and Integrated Coloring of Experiments), an easy to use analysis suite to facilitate time series and single time point transcriptomics analysis. In unison, MAPT and PAICE serve as a visual workbench for transcriptomics knowledge discovery, data-mining and functional annotation. Both PAICE and MAPT are two distinct but yet inextricably linked tools. The former is specifically designed to map EC accessions onto KEGG pathways while handling multiple gene copies, detection-call analysis, as well as UN/annotated EC accessions lacking quantifiable expression. The latter tool integrates PAICE datasets to drive visualization, annotation, and data-mining. Availability The database is available for free at http://sourceforge.net/projects/paice/http://sourceforge.net/projects/mapt/ PMID:22493539

  17. 77 FR 34810 - Determination of Failure To Attain by 2005 and Determination of Current Attainment of the 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...EPA is issuing two separate and independent final determinations related to the Baltimore 1-hour ozone nonattainment area. First, EPA is determining that the Baltimore area previously failed to attain the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) by its applicable attainment deadline of November 15, 2005 (based on complete, quality-assured and certified ozone monitoring data......

  18. 77 FR 64036 - Determination of Attainment of the 1-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ...EPA is determining that the Sacramento Metro 1-hour ozone nonattainment area (Sacramento Metro Area) has attained the revoked National Ambient Air Quality Standard (1-hour ozone NAAQS or standard), and to exclude certain 2008 data caused by wildfire exceptional events. These air quality determinations were proposed in conjunction with a proposed determination to terminate the State of......

  19. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  20. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  1. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  2. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  3. Bifurcated method and apparatus for floating point addition with decreased latency time

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  4. Setting Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for 1 hour or 24 hour contingency exposures to airborne chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hector D.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early years of the manned space program, NASA has developed and used exposure limits called Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) to help protect astronauts from airborne toxicants. Most of these SMACS are based on an exposure duration of 7 days, since this is the duration of a 'typical' mission. A set of 'contingency SMACs' is also being developed for scenarios involving brief (1-hour or 24- hour) exposures to relatively high levels of airborne toxicants from event-related 'contingency' releases of contaminants. The emergency nature of contingency exposures dictates the use of different criteria for setting exposure limits. The NASA JSC Toxicology Group recently began a program to document the rationales used to set new SMACs and plans to review the older, 7-day SMACs. In cooperation with the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology, a standard procedure has been developed for researching, setting, and documenting SMAC values.

  5. Effect of a 1-hour single bout of moderate-intensity exercise on fat oxidation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chenevière, Xavier; Borrani, Fabio; Ebenegger, Vincent; Gojanovic, Boris; Malatesta, Davide

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of a prior 1-hour continuous exercise bout (CONT) at an intensity (Fat(max)) that elicits the maximal fat oxidation (MFO) on the fat oxidation kinetics during a subsequent submaximal incremental test (IncrC). Twenty moderately trained subjects (9 men and 11 women) performed a graded test on a treadmill (Incr), with 3-minute stages and 1-km.h(-1) increments. Fat oxidation was measured using indirect calorimetry and plotted as a function of exercise intensity. A mathematical model (SIN) including 3 independent variables (dilatation, symmetry, and translation) was used to characterize the shape of fat oxidation kinetics and to determine Fat(max) and MFO. On a second visit, the subjects performed CONT at Fat(max) followed by IncrC. After CONT performed at 57% +/- 3% (means +/- SE) maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)), the respiratory exchange ratio during IncrC was lower at every stage compared with Incr (P < .05). Fat(max) (56.4% +/- 2.3% vs 51.5% +/- 2.4% Vo(2max), P = .013), MFO (0.50 +/- 0.03 vs 0.40 +/- 0.03 g.min(-1), P < .001), and fat oxidation rates from 35% to 70% Vo(2max) (P < .05) were significantly greater during IncrC compared with Incr. However, dilatation and translation were not significantly different (P > .05), whereas symmetry tended to be greater in IncrC (P = .096). This study showed that the prior 1-hour continuous moderate-intensity exercise bout increased Fat(max), MFO, and fat oxidation rates over a wide range of intensities during the postexercise incremental test. Moreover, the shape of the postexercise fat oxidation kinetics tended to have a rightward asymmetry. PMID:19632694

  6. Validation of 1-hour post-thyroidectomy parathyroid hormone level in predicting hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior work by our group suggested that a single one hour post-thyroidectomy parathyroid hormone (1 hr PTH) level could accurately stratify patients into high and low risk groups for the development of hypocalcemia. This study looks to validate the safety and efficacy of a protocol based on a 1 hr PTH threshold of 12 pg/ml. Study design Retrospective analysis of consecutive cohort treated with standardized protocol. Methods One hundred and twenty five consecutive patients underwent total or completion thyroidectomy and their PTH level was drawn 1-hour post operatively. Based on our previous work, patients were stratified into either a low risk group (PTH < 12 pg/ml) or a high risk group (PTH ≥ 12 pg/ml). Patients in the high risk group were immediately started on prophylactic calcium carbonate (5–10 g/d) and calcitriol (0.5-1.0 mcg/d). The outcomes were then reviewed focusing mainly on how many low risk patients developed hypocalcemia (false negative rate), and how many high risk patients failed prophylactic therapy. Results Thirty one patients (25%) were stratified as high risk, and 94 (75%) as low risk. Five (16%) of the high risk patients became hypocalcemic despite prophylactic therapy. Two of the low risk group became hypocalcemic, (negative predictive value = 98%). None of the hypocalcemic patients had anything more than mild symptoms. Conclusions A single 1-hour post-thyroidectomy PTH level is a very useful way to stratify thyroidectomy patients into high and low risk groups for development of hypocalcemia. Early implementation of oral prophylactic calcium and vitamin D in the high risk patients is a very effective way to prevent serious hypocalcemia. Complex protocols requiring multiple calcium and PTH measurements are not required to guide post-thyroidectomy management. PMID:24476535

  7. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low- Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections, using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. During this period, we identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of these pulsed events to investigate their properties. This analysis reveals that the mean interpulse period is 68 ± 10 minutes and that the events are made up of less than 9 pulses in general, but they can include up to 19 pulses. The most common shape of these pulses is a fast rise followed by a slow decay. Moreover, the ratio between the rise rate and the decay rate increases with the energy. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG). Correlated pulsed signatures are observed in the plasma wave emissions, especially in the auroral hiss, for 12% of the

  8. Nonparametric decomposition of quasi-periodic time series for change-point detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, Alexey; Burnaev, Evgeny; Lokot, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    The paper is concerned with the sequential online change-point detection problem for a dynamical system driven by a quasiperiodic stochastic process. We propose a multicomponent time series model and an effective online decomposition algorithm to approximate the components of the models. Assuming the stationarity of the obtained components, we approach the change-point detection problem on a per-component basis and propose two online change-point detection schemes corresponding to two real-world scenarios. Experimental results for decomposition and detection algorithms for synthesized and real-world datasets are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of our change-point detection framework.

  9. A novel memristive time-delay chaotic system without equilibrium points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, V.-T.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Volos, C. K.; Jafari, S.; Kuznetsov, N. V.; Hoang, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    Memristor and time-delay are potential candidates for constructing new systems with complex dynamics and special features. A novel time-delay system with a presence of memristive device is proposed in this work. It is worth noting that this memristive time-delay system can generate chaotic attractors although it possesses no equilibrium points. In addition, a circuitry implementation of such time-delay system has been introduced to show its feasibility.

  10. Kick-Off, Half-Time, and Over-Time: Flexible Scheduling Scores Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Jade

    2005-01-01

    When faculty members at Furman Middle School in Sumter, South Carolina, expressed concern about the lack of time in each day to provide the interventions, remediation, and enrichment the students needed to be prepared for state testing, their principal devised a creative flexible schedule to meet student needs. These include: (1) a morning…

  11. Knee Point Search Using Cascading Top-k Sorting with Minimized Time Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Shian-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Anomaly detection systems and many other applications are frequently confronted with the problem of finding the largest knee point in the sorted curve for a set of unsorted points. This paper proposes an efficient knee point search algorithm with minimized time complexity using the cascading top-k sorting when a priori probability distribution of the knee point is known. First, a top-k sort algorithm is proposed based on a quicksort variation. We divide the knee point search problem into multiple steps. And in each step an optimization problem of the selection number k is solved, where the objective function is defined as the expected time cost. Because the expected time cost in one step is dependent on that of the afterwards steps, we simplify the optimization problem by minimizing the maximum expected time cost. The posterior probability of the largest knee point distribution and the other parameters are updated before solving the optimization problem in each step. An example of source detection of DNS DoS flooding attacks is provided to illustrate the applications of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24068888

  12. A Well-Clear Volume Based on Time to Entry Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Upchurch, Jason M.; Chamberlain, James P.; Consiglio, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    A well-clear volume is a key component of NASA's Separation Assurance concept for the integration of UAS in the NAS. This paper proposes a mathematical definition of the well-clear volume that uses, in addition to distance thresholds, a time threshold based on time to entry point (TEP). The mathematical model that results from this definition is more conservative than other candidate definitions of the wellclear volume that are based on range over closure rate and time to closest point of approach.

  13. Spatially shifting temporal points: estimating pooled within-time series variograms for scarce hydrological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, A. K.; Cabral, P.

    2015-02-01

    Estimation of pooled within-time series (PTS) variograms is a frequently used technique for geostatistical interpolation of continuous hydrological variables in spatial data-scarce regions conditional that time series are available. The only available method for estimating PTS variograms averages semivariances, which are computed for individual time steps, over each spatial lag within a pooled time series. However, semivariances computed by a~few paired comparisons for individual time steps are erratic and hence they may hamper precision of PTS variogram estimation. Here, we outlined an alternative method for estimating PTS variograms by spatializing temporal data points and shifting them. The data were pooled by ensuring consistency of spatial structure and stationarity within a time series, while pooling sufficient number of data points for reliable variogram estimation. The pooled spatial data point sets from different time steps were assigned to different coordinate sets on the same space. Then a semivariance was computed for each spatial lag within a pooled time series by comparing all point pairs separable by that spatial lag, and a PTS variogram was estimated by controlling the lower and upper boundary of spatial lags. Our method showed higher precision than the available method for PTS variogram estimation and was developed by using the freely available R open source software environment. The method will reduce uncertainty for spatial variability modeling while preserving spatiotemporal properties of data for geostatistical interpolation of hydrological variables in spatial data-scarce developing countries.

  14. Anomalous parity-time-symmetry transition away from an exceptional point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li

    2016-07-01

    Parity-time (PT ) symmetric systems have two distinguished phases, e.g., one with real-energy eigenvalues and the other with complex-conjugate eigenvalues. To enter one phase from the other, it is believed that the system must pass through an exceptional point, which is a non-Hermitian degenerate point with coalesced eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Here we reveal an anomalous PT transition that takes place away from an exceptional point in a nonlinear system: as the nonlinearity increases, the original linear system evolves along two distinct PT -symmetric trajectories, each of which can have an exceptional point. However, the two trajectories collide and vanish away from these exceptional points, after which the system is left with a PT -broken phase. We first illustrate this phenomenon using a coupled-mode theory and then exemplify it using paraxial wave propagation in a transverse periodic potential.

  15. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. (c) EPA's authority under paragraph (b) of this section... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  16. 76 FR 28195 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... attainment of the 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) through the year 2014. The... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed...

  17. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Yates, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 h in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low-Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. The one-year extension of the data and a different method of detection of the injections do not lead to a discrepancy with the results of the previous survey, indicating an absence of a long-term temporal evolution of this phenomenon. We identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of the pulsed events properties. The morphology of the pulsations shows a weak local time dependence which could imply a high-latitude acceleration source. We provide some clues that the electron population associated with this pulsed phenomenon is distinct from the field-aligned electron beams previously observed in Saturn's magnetosphere, but both populations can be mixed. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio

  18. Change-point detection in time-series data by relative density-ratio estimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Yamada, Makoto; Collier, Nigel; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2013-07-01

    The objective of change-point detection is to discover abrupt property changes lying behind time-series data. In this paper, we present a novel statistical change-point detection algorithm based on non-parametric divergence estimation between time-series samples from two retrospective segments. Our method uses the relative Pearson divergence as a divergence measure, and it is accurately and efficiently estimated by a method of direct density-ratio estimation. Through experiments on artificial and real-world datasets including human-activity sensing, speech, and Twitter messages, we demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method. PMID:23500502

  19. Multiple Spike Time Patterns Occur at Bifurcation Points of Membrane Potential Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Toups, J. Vincent; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Peter J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Tiesinga, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The response of a neuron to repeated somatic fluctuating current injections in vitro can elicit a reliable and precisely timed sequence of action potentials. The set of responses obtained across trials can also be interpreted as the response of an ensemble of similar neurons receiving the same input, with the precise spike times representing synchronous volleys that would be effective in driving postsynaptic neurons. To study the reproducibility of the output spike times for different conditions that might occur in vivo, we somatically injected aperiodic current waveforms into cortical neurons in vitro and systematically varied the amplitude and DC offset of the fluctuations. As the amplitude of the fluctuations was increased, reliability increased and the spike times remained stable over a wide range of values. However, at specific values called bifurcation points, large shifts in the spike times were obtained in response to small changes in the stimulus, resulting in multiple spike patterns that were revealed using an unsupervised classification method. Increasing the DC offset, which mimicked an overall increase in network background activity, also revealed bifurcation points and increased the reliability. Furthermore, the spike times shifted earlier with increasing offset. Although the reliability was reduced at bifurcation points, a theoretical analysis showed that the information about the stimulus time course was increased because each of the spike time patterns contained different information about the input. PMID:23093916

  20. A new method of time difference measurement: The time difference method by dual phase coincidence points detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In the high accurate measurement of periodic signals, the greatest common factor frequency and its characteristics have special functions. A method of time difference measurement - the time difference method by dual 'phase coincidence points' detection is described. This method utilizes the characteristics of the greatest common factor frequency to measure time or phase difference between periodic signals. It can suit a very wide frequency range. Measurement precision and potential accuracy of several picoseconds were demonstrated with this new method. The instrument based on this method is very simple, and the demand for the common oscillator is low. This method and instrument can be used widely.

  1. A mathematical model of saccadic reaction time as a function of the fixation point brightness gain.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Tula, Antonio; Morimoto, Carlos H; Ranvaud, Ronald D

    2015-08-01

    The gap effect refers to a reduction in saccadic reaction time (SRT) to an eccentric target, when the fixation point is removed before the target onset. Though it is known that the gap effect peaks when the fixation point is offset about 200 ms before the onset of the eccentric target, it is unknown how this effect is modulated by stimulus variations. In this paper, we propose and investigate a model of saccadic reaction time as a function of the fixation point brightness gain. The brightness gain is defined as the ratio of the final and initial intensities of the stimulus. We have conducted a typical gap effect experiment with 15 participants, where the brightness of the fixation point was manipulated under four conditions and two gap intervals, at the same time and 200 ms before the onset of the eccentric target. The conditions included removing the fixation point (offset), leaving it with constant brightness (overlap), reducing, and increasing its brightness (lower and higher brightness conditions). Experimental data showed a significant gap effect in the offset and lower brightness conditions when compared to the overlap condition. On the other hand, the SRT was significantly longer for the higher brightness condition than the SRT for the overlap condition. Linear regression analysis using ten values of brightness gain shows that our model fits the data well for the 0- and 200-ms gap, with a coefficient of determination of .89 and .94, respectively. PMID:25962456

  2. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method... dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... part, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in... potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method... dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... part, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in... potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... part, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in... potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... part, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in... potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method... dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference...

  9. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method... dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference...

  10. Acyl migration kinetics of 2-monoacylglycerols from soybean oil via 1 hour Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acyl migration kinetics of neat 2-monoacylglycerol (2-MAG) to form 1-monoacylglycerol (1-MAG) was determined using proton NMR spectroscopy to monitor the beta-proton integration ratios of the two species over time. 2-MAG was synthesized by the Novozym 435-catalyzed alcoholysis of soybean oil an...

  11. Some aspects of improving Multi-GNSS real-time precise point positioning services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ge, Maorong; Li, Xingxing; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Multi-GNSS is expected to achieve a real-time precise point positioning service with better accuracy and reliability than GPS-only service. In this contribution, we address several critical challenges in implementing a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo service to provide global users with centimeter-level positioning in real-time based on the software system developed at GFZ. The specific issues of improving GLONASS orbit quality by resolving ambiguity over long baselines, estimation of inter-system/frequency biases, ambiguity resolution in real-time clock estimation and positioning, and computation efficiency are discussed and investigated in detail. Experimental validation is carried out based on the data streams of the IGS/MGEX network. The real-time orbit and clock products are assessed by comparison with the IGS/MGEX final products, and orbits are also assessed by overlapping day boundaries and satellite laser ranging. The phase bias (uncalibrated phase delay) products are evaluated by comparison with the post-processing results. It is demonstrated that multi-GNSS can contribute significantly to improving the global real-time precise point positioning service in terms of convergence time and accuracy. Keywords: Multi-GNSS, Real-Time, Precise Orbit Determination, Precise Point Positioning, Ambiguity Resolution, Inter-System/Frequency Bias, Algorithm Efficiency

  12. Equilibrium time-correlation functions for one-dimensional hard-point systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendl, Christian B.; Spohn, Herbert

    2014-07-01

    As recently proposed, the long-time behavior of equilibrium time-correlation functions for one-dimensional systems are expected to be captured by a nonlinear extension of fluctuating hydrodynamics. We outline the predictions from the theory aimed at the comparison with molecular dynamics. We report on numerical simulations of a fluid with a hard-shoulder potential and of a hard-point gas with alternating masses. These models have in common that the collision time is zero and their dynamics amounts to iterating collision by collision. The theory is well confirmed, with the twist that the nonuniversal coefficients are still changing at longest accessible times.

  13. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Lightning one of the most dangerous weather-related phenomena, especially as many jobs and activities occur outdoors, presenting risk from a lightning strike. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning represents a considerable safety threat to people at airfields, marinas, and outdoor facilities-from airfield personnel, to people attending outdoor stadium events, on beaches and golf courses, to mariners, as well as emergency personnel. Holle et al. (2005) show that 90% of lightning deaths occurred outdoors, while 10% occurred indoors despite the perception of safety when inside buildings. Curran et al. (2000) found that nearly half of fatalities due to weather were related to convective weather in the 1992-1994 timeframe, with lightning causing a large component of the fatalities, in addition to tornadoes and flash flooding. Related to the aviation industry, CG lightning represents a considerable hazard to baggage-handlers, aircraft refuelers, food caterers, and emergency personnel, who all become exposed to the risk of being struck within short time periods while convective storm clouds develop. Airport safety protocols require that ramp operations be modified or discontinued when lightning is in the vicinity (typically 16 km), which becomes very costly and disruptive to flight operations. Therefore, much focus has been paid to nowcasting the first-time initiation and extent of lightning, both of CG and of any lightning (e.g, in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud). For this project three lightning nowcasting methodologies will be combined: (1) a GOESbased 0-1 hour lightning initiation (LI) product (Harris et al. 2010; Iskenderian et al. 2012), (2) a High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) lightning probability and forecasted lightning flash density product, such that a quantitative amount of lightning (QL) can be assigned to a location of expected LI, and (3) an algorithm that relates Pseudo-GLM data (Stano et al. 2012, 2014) to the so-called "lightning jump" (LJ) methodology (Shultz et al

  14. 1-Hour OGTT Plasma Glucose as a Marker of Progressive Deterioration of Insulin Secretion and Action in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Alessandra; Seghieri, Giuseppe; Lencioni, Cristina; Anichini, Roberto; Bertolotto, Alessandra; De Bellis, Alessandra; Resi, Veronica; Lacaria, Emilia; Del Prato, Stefano; Di Cianni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Considering old GDM diagnostic criteria, alterations in insulin secretion and action are present in women with GDM as well as in women with one abnormal value (OAV) during OGTT. Our aim is to assess if changes in insulin action and secretion during pregnancy are related to 1-hour plasma glucose concentration during OGTT. We evaluated 3 h/100 g OGTT in 4,053 pregnant women, dividing our population on the basis of 20 mg/dL increment of plasma glucose concentration at 1 h OGTT generating 5 groups (<120 mg/dL, n = 661; 120-139 mg/dL, n = 710; 140-159 mg/dL, n = 912; 160-179 mg/dL, n = 885; and ≥180 mg/dL, n = 996). We calculated incremental area under glucose (AUC(gluc)) and insulin curves (AUC(ins)), indexes of insulin secretion (HOMA-B), and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-R), AUC(ins)/AUC(gluc). AUC(gluc) and AUC(ins) progressively increased according to 1-hour plasma glucose concentrations (both P < 0.0001 for trend). HOMA-B progressively declined (P < 0.001), and HOMA-R progressively increased across the five groups. AUC(ins)/AUC(gluc) decreased in a linear manner across the 5 groups (P < 0.001). Analysing the groups with 1-hour value <180 mg/dL, defects in insulin secretion (HOMA-B: -29.7%) and sensitivity (HOMA-R: +15%) indexes were still apparent (all P < 0.001). Progressive increase in 1-hour OGTT is associated with deterioration of glucose tolerance and alterations in indexes of insulin action and secretion. PMID:22567007

  15. GPS/GLONASS time offset monitoring based on combined Precise Point Positioning (PPP) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Zhang, Q.; Fu, W.; Guo, H.

    2015-06-01

    A new strategy is proposed to monitor GPS/GLONASS time offsets for common navigation users using a combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method based on the orbit and clock products of different time scales. The results of the inter-system GPS/GLONASS time offset, the user time offset and the inter-system device delay difference were obtained using the proposed method. The properties of these results were analyzed in terms of the stability, precision and variation characteristics. Moreover, the practicality of the time offset results in an actual navigation application was tested and demonstrated. The results indicate that the monitoring and prediction of the user time offset, but not the inter-system time offset, has important values for navigation users.

  16. Portable Dew Point Mass Spectrometry System for Real-Time Gas and Moisture Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Gillespie, Stacey; Ratzel, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    A portable instrument incorporates both mass spectrometry and dew point measurement to provide real-time, quantitative gas measurements of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, along with real-time, quantitative moisture analysis. The Portable Dew Point Mass Spectrometry (PDP-MS) system comprises a single quadrupole mass spectrometer and a high vacuum system consisting of a turbopump and a diaphragm-backing pump. A capacitive membrane dew point sensor was placed upstream of the MS, but still within the pressure-flow control pneumatic region. Pressure-flow control was achieved with an upstream precision metering valve, a capacitance diaphragm gauge, and a downstream mass flow controller. User configurable LabVIEW software was developed to provide real-time concentration data for the MS, dew point monitor, and sample delivery system pressure control, pressure and flow monitoring, and recording. The system has been designed to include in situ, NIST-traceable calibration. Certain sample tubing retains sufficient water that even if the sample is dry, the sample tube will desorb water to an amount resulting in moisture concentration errors up to 500 ppm for as long as 10 minutes. It was determined that Bev-A-Line IV was the best sample line to use. As a result of this issue, it is prudent to add a high-level humidity sensor to PDP-MS so such events can be prevented in the future.

  17. Precise Point Positioning technique for short and long baselines time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, Pawel; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Lemanski, Dariusz; Foks-Ryznar, Anna; Nogas, Pawel; Dunst, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In this work the clock parameters determination of several timing receivers TTS-4 (AOS), ASHTECH Z-XII3T (OP, ORB, PTB, USNO) and SEPTENTRIO POLARX4TR (ORB, since February 11, 2012) by use of the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique were presented. The clock parameters were determined for several time links based on the data delivered by time and frequency laboratories mentioned above. The computations cover the period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 and were performed in two modes with 7-day and one-month solution for all links. All RINEX data files which include phase and code GPS data were recorded in 30-second intervals. All calculations were performed by means of Natural Resource Canada's GPS Precise Point Positioning (GPS-PPP) software based on high-quality precise satellite coordinates and satellite clock delivered by IGS as the final products. The used independent PPP technique is a very powerful and simple method which allows for better control of antenna positions in AOS and a verification of other time transfer techniques like GPS CV, GLONASS CV and TWSTFT. The PPP technique is also a very good alternative for calibration of a glass fiber link PL-AOS realized at present by AOS. Currently PPP technique is one of the main time transfer methods used at AOS what considerably improve and strengthen the quality of the Polish time scales UTC(AOS), UTC(PL), and TA(PL). KEY-WORDS: Precise Point Positioning, time transfer, IGS products, GNSS, time scales.

  18. A point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray A.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems. The method treats the solution variables of interest (that can be located at cell centers, cell edges, or cell nodes) implicitly and the rest of the information related to same or other variables are handled explicitly. The method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods, except it involves a few additional function(s) evaluation steps. Moreover, the method is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. This new approach exhibits the simplicity of implementation of explicit methods and the stability of implicit methods. It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration wherein one would like to perform time integrations with very large time steps. Because the method can be time inaccurate for fast transient problems, particularly with larger time steps, an appropriate solution strategy for a problem that evolves from a fast to a slow transient would be to integrate the fast transient with an explicit or semi-implicit technique and then switch to this point implicit method as soon as the time variation slows sufficiently. We have solved several test problems that result from scalar or systems of flow equations. Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very efficiently; and its implementation is very robust.

  19. A real-time recursive filter for the attitude determination of the Spacelab instrument pointing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time estimation filter which reduces sensitivity to system variations and reduces the amount of preflight computation is developed for the instrument pointing subsystem (IPS). The IPS is a three-axis stabilized platform developed to point various astronomical observation instruments aboard the shuttle. Currently, the IPS utilizes a linearized Kalman filter (LKF), with premission defined gains, to compensate for system drifts and accumulated attitude errors. Since the a priori gains are generated for an expected system, variations result in a suboptimal estimation process. This report compares the performance of three real-time estimation filters with the current LKF implementation. An extended Kalman filter and a second-order Kalman filter are developed to account for the system nonlinearities, while a linear Kalman filter implementation assumes that the nonlinearities are negligible. The performance of each of the four estimation filters are compared with respect to accuracy, stability, settling time, robustness, and computational requirements. It is shown, that for the current IPS pointing requirements, the linear Kalman filter provides improved robustness over the LKF with less computational requirements than the two real-time nonlinear estimation filters.

  20. Time required to obtain representative point-integrated suspended sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitto, A.; Venditti, J. G.; Kostaschuk, R.; Church, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Suspended sediment sampling by conventional bottle sampling methods remains one of the primary ways in which sediment input is measured for sediment budgets. Depth- and point-integrated methods are commonly assumed to accurately represent suspended sediment transport and to contain minimal error, however a recent study of depth-integrated sampling has identified considerable uncertainty between grain-size classes of multiple samples. The uncertainty surrounding point-integrated sampling methods is less well understood. This field study examines at-a-point variability in suspended sediment concentration, grain-size distribution, and grain-size moments to determine if traditional point-integrated methods accurately provide a representative sample of suspended sediment. Here, we present observations of suspended sediment from the sand bedded portion of the Fraser River at Mission, British Columbia, Canada, using a LISST laser-diffraction instrument. Measurements were obtained during the 2010 and 2013 freshet to address scales of sediment transport variability related to turbulence and hydraulic phenomena, respectively. Our observations indicate that the minimum sampling time to obtain representative indicators of suspended sediment transport ranges between 100 to 200 seconds. We are exploring the scales of variability embedded in the flow and the uncertainty in point-integrated sampling. Our goal is to understand the magnitude and the sources of error in suspended sediment measurements, to better understand the sources of uncertainty in sediment budgets.

  1. Search for UHE point-source emission over various time scales

    SciTech Connect

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    A method has been developed to search for pulsed and/or unpulsed ultra high energy (UHE) emission from point sources over a range of time scales. This method has been applied to data accumulated with the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array for events associated with the directions of Cyg X-3, Her X-1, the Crab nebula, and a collection of 48 secondary source candidates. An examination of time scales ranging from minutes to years has yielded results consistent with background fluctuations.

  2. Search for UHE point-source emission over various time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    A method has been developed to search for pulsed and/or unpulsed ultra high energy (UHE) emission from point sources over a range of time scales. This method has been applied to data accumulated with the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array for events associated with the directions of Cyg X-3, Her X-1, the Crab nebula, and a collection of 48 secondary source candidates. An examination of time scales ranging from minutes to years has yielded results consistent with background fluctuations.

  3. A Point-of-Care Prothrombin Time Test on a Microfluidic Disk Analyzer Using Alternate Spinning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kun-Wei; Yen, Daniel; Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jiunn-Min; Lin, Chi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we conducted a fully integrated point-of-care prothrombin time test on a microfluidic disk analyzer. The microfluidic functions integrated on the disk were capable of separating whole blood, decanting plasma, and mixing it with reagents in sequence under alternate spinning. The assay protocol was completed by alternate spinning without using microvalves or surface modification. Clinical sample tests on prothrombin time measurement were conducted by both the microfluidic disk analyzer and the reference instrument used in medical centers. The test results showed a good correlation and agreement between the two instruments. PMID:26353663

  4. A time-domain CMOS oscillator-based thermostat with digital set-point programming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Shih-Hao

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a time-domain CMOS oscillator-based thermostat with digital set-point programming [without a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) or external resistor] to achieve on-chip thermal management of modern VLSI systems. A time-domain delay-line-based thermostat with multiplexers (MUXs) was used to substantially reduce the power consumption and chip size, and can benefit from the performance enhancement due to the scaling down of fabrication processes. For further cost reduction and accuracy enhancement, this paper proposes a thermostat using two oscillators that are suitable for time-domain curvature compensation instead of longer linear delay lines. The final time comparison was achieved using a time comparator with a built-in custom hysteresis to generate the corresponding temperature alarm and control. The chip size of the circuit was reduced to 0.12 mm2 in a 0.35-mm TSMC CMOS process. The thermostat operates from 0 to 90 °C, and achieved a fine resolution better than 0.05 °C and an improved inaccuracy of ± 0.6 °C after two-point calibration for eight packaged chips. The power consumption was 30 µW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s. PMID:23385403

  5. GPU-accelerated Modeling and Element-free Reverse-time Migration with Gauss Points Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Z.; Jia, X.

    2014-12-01

    Element-free method (EFM) has been applied to seismic modeling and migration. Compared with finite element method (FEM) and finite difference method (FDM), it is much cheaper and more flexible because only the information of the nodes and the boundary of the study area are required in computation. In the EFM, the number of Gauss points should be consistent with the number of model nodes; otherwise the accuracy of the intermediate coefficient matrices would be harmed. Thus when we increase the nodes of velocity model in order to obtain higher resolution, we find that the size of the computer's memory will be a bottleneck. The original EFM can deal with at most 81×81 nodes in the case of 2G memory, as tested by Jia and Hu (2006). In order to solve the problem of storage and computation efficiency, we propose a concept of Gauss points partition (GPP), and utilize the GPUs to improve the computation efficiency. Considering the characteristics of the Gaussian points, the GPP method doesn't influence the propagation of seismic wave in the velocity model. To overcome the time-consuming computation of the stiffness matrix (K) and the mass matrix (M), we also use the GPUs in our computation program. We employ the compressed sparse row (CSR) format to compress the intermediate sparse matrices and try to simplify the operations by solving the linear equations with the CULA Sparse's Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver instead of the linear sparse solver 'PARDISO'. It is observed that our strategy can significantly reduce the computational time of K and Mcompared with the algorithm based on CPU. The model tested is Marmousi model. The length of the model is 7425m and the depth is 2990m. We discretize the model with 595x298 nodes, 300x300 Gauss cells and 3x3 Gauss points in each cell. In contrast to the computational time of the conventional EFM, the GPUs-GPP approach can substantially improve the efficiency. The speedup ratio of time consumption of computing K, M is 120 and the

  6. Analysis of the kinetics of lipid peroxidation in terms of characteristic time-points.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2014-02-01

    Measuring peroxidation of aggregated lipids in model systems (liposomes, micelles, emulsions or microemulsions) as well as in samples of biological origin ex vivo (isolated lipoproteins, blood sera or plasma) is widely used in medical and biological investigations, to evaluate the oxidative stress, antioxidants' efficiency and lipid oxidizability in different pathophysiological states. To avoid possible artifacts, such investigations must be based on the time course of peroxidation (i.e. on kinetic studies). To be able to compare complex kinetic profiles, it is important to characterize them in terms of mechanistically meaningful and experimentally unequivocal parameters. In this review, we characterize the typically observed continuous kinetic profiles in terms of a limited number of characteristic time-points (both commonly used and additional time-points and their combinations) that can be derived from experimental time-dependencies. The meaning of each of the experimentally observed characteristic parameters is presented in terms of rate constants and concentrations, derived on the basis of mechanistic considerations. Theoretical expressions for these characteristic parameters are based on a model that includes both the inhibited peroxidation and the uninhibited peroxidation occurring after consumption of the antioxidant(s). Comparison between theoretically predicted dependencies and experimental data support our treatment considered with special emphasis on transition metals-induced peroxidation of lipoproteins. PMID:24333462

  7. Real-Time IGS products verification in the context of their use in Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Tomasz; Bosy, Jaroslaw; Kaplon, Jan; Sierny, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is a positioning technique of single GNSS receiver which applies high quality products from permanent GNSS observations to utilize the computational potential of global network analysis. Estimated satellite orbits and clocks corrections are introduced into equation system as known parameters. PPP requires the application of precise products, since their quality directly reflects the positioning accuracy. In June 2007 IGS Real-time Pilot Project has started in order to satisfy real-time users, which is especially important for Precise Point Positioning. Currently available streams including precise orbits, clocks and code biases are standardized on RTCM-SC 104 formats and may be used as a substitute for ultra-rapid products. The target combination product performances are 0.3ns for satellite clock accuracy and orbit accuracy at the level of the IGS Ultra predictions with maximum latency of 10s. This study presents the quality assessment of currently available Real-Time IGS products. Long-term test include comparisons of disseminated information with final and high-rate products, stability assessment over time, as well as latency validation of available RTCM streams.

  8. Detecting Space-Time Alternating Biological Signals Close to the Bifurcation Point

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Bien, Harold; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Time-alternating biological signals, i.e., alternans, arise in variety of physiological states marked by dynamic instabilities, e.g., period doubling. Normally, a sequence of large–small–large transients, they can exhibit variable patterns over time and space, including spatial discordance. Capture of the early formation of such alternating regions is challenging because of the spatiotemporal similarities between noise and the small-amplitude alternating signals close to the bifurcation point. We present a new approach for automatic detection of alternating signals in large noisy spatiotemporal datasets by exploiting quantitative measures of alternans evolution, e.g., temporal persistence, and by preserving phase information. The technique specifically targets low amplitude, relatively short alternating sequences and is validated by combinatorics-derived probabilities and empirical datasets with white noise. Using high-resolution optical mapping in live cardiomyocyte networks, exhibiting calcium alternans, we reveal for the first time early fine-scale alternans, close to the noise level, which are linked to the later formation of larger regions and evolution of spatially discordant alternans. This robust method aims at quantification and better understanding of the onset of cardiac arrhythmias and can be applied to general analysis of space-time alternating signals, including the vicinity of the bifurcation point. PMID:19695992

  9. Motion data classification on the basis of dynamic time warping with a cloud point distance measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switonski, Adam; Josinski, Henryk; Zghidi, Hafedh; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the problem of classification of model free motion data. The nearest neighbors classifier which is based on comparison performed by Dynamic Time Warping transform with cloud point distance measure is proposed. The classification utilizes both specific gait features reflected by a movements of subsequent skeleton joints and anthropometric data. To validate proposed approach human gait identification challenge problem is taken into consideration. The motion capture database containing data of 30 different humans collected in Human Motion Laboratory of Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology is used. The achieved results are satisfactory, the obtained accuracy of human recognition exceeds 90%. What is more, the applied cloud point distance measure does not depend on calibration process of motion capture system which results in reliable validation.

  10. Calculation of power spectrums from digital time series with missing data points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, C. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Two algorithms are developed for calculating power spectrums from the autocorrelation function when there are missing data points in the time series. Both methods use an average sampling interval to compute lagged products. One method, the correlation function power spectrum, takes the discrete Fourier transform of the lagged products directly to obtain the spectrum, while the other, the modified Blackman-Tukey power spectrum, takes the Fourier transform of the mean lagged products. Both techniques require fewer calculations than other procedures since only 50% to 80% of the maximum lags need be calculated. The algorithms are compared with the Fourier transform power spectrum and two least squares procedures (all for an arbitrary data spacing). Examples are given showing recovery of frequency components from simulated periodic data where portions of the time series are missing and random noise has been added to both the time points and to values of the function. In addition the methods are compared using real data. All procedures performed equally well in detecting periodicities in the data.

  11. An evaluation of explicit time integration schemes for use with the generalized interpolation material point method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallstedt, P. C.; Guilkey, J. E.

    2008-11-01

    The stability and accuracy of the generalized interpolation material point (GIMP) Method is measured directly through carefully-formulated manufactured solutions over wide ranges of CFL numbers and mesh sizes. The manufactured solutions are described in detail. The accuracy and stability of several time integration schemes are compared via numerical experiments. The effect of various treatments of particle "size" are also considered. The hypothesis that GIMP is most accurate when particles remain contiguous and non-overlapping is confirmed by comparing manufactured solutions with and without this property.

  12. Multiaxis inertial sensing with long-time point source atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Susannah M; Hogan, Jason M; Sugarbaker, Alex; Johnson, David M S; Kasevich, Mark A

    2013-08-23

    We show that light-pulse atom interferometry with atomic point sources and spatially resolved detection enables multiaxis (two rotation, one acceleration) precision inertial sensing at long interrogation times. Using this method, we demonstrate a light-pulse atom interferometer for 87Rb with 1.4 cm peak wave packet separation and a duration of 2T=2.3 s. The inferred acceleration sensitivity of each shot is 6.7×10(-12)g, which improves on previous limits by more than 2 orders of magnitude. We also measure Earth's rotation rate with a precision of 200 nrad/s. PMID:24010433

  13. Time reversal ultrasound focusing to a point away from the beacon location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; Sutin, Alexander; Gandhi, Gaurav; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2012-10-01

    In percutaneous procedures there is often a need to focus therapeutic ultrasound to a predefined area without affecting surrounding tissues. Focusing based on Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) principles constitutes a promising approach for generating high intensity ultrasound field tailored to the shape of the predefined area. Conventional TRA technique enables ultrasound focusing only at a site, where there is an ultrasound beacon, e.g. piezo-transducer mounted at the tip of a catheter. We developed a method of steering the focus away from the beacon location. The method is based on the measurements of impulse response (IR) in several reference points and calculating virtual IRs for the points outside the reference beacon location. The IR for the point away from the beacon is constructed based on mathematical extrapolation of the measured reference IRs frequency spectra, particularly phases. The effectiveness of extrapolated TRA focusing is explored experimentally and by computer simulation. Potential applications include ultrasounda-ssisted drug delivery, artery recanalization and tumor ablation.

  14. End points for adjuvant therapy trials: has the time come to accept disease-free survival as a surrogate end point for overall survival?

    PubMed

    Gill, Sharlene; Sargent, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    The intent of adjuvant therapy is to eradicate micro-metastatic residual disease following curative resection with the goal of preventing or delaying recurrence. The time-honored standard for demonstrating efficacy of new adjuvant therapies is an improvement in overall survival (OS). This typically requires phase III trials of large sample size with lengthy follow-up. With the intent of reducing the cost and time of completing such trials, there is considerable interest in developing alternative or surrogate end points. A surrogate end point may be employed as a substitute to directly assess the effects of an intervention on an already accepted clinical end point such as mortality. When used judiciously, surrogate end points can accelerate the evaluation of new therapies, resulting in the more timely dissemination of effective therapies to patients. The current review provides a perspective on the suitability and validity of disease-free survival (DFS) as an alternative end point for OS. Criteria for establishing surrogacy and the advantages and limitations associated with the use of DFS as a primary end point in adjuvant clinical trials and as the basis for approval of new adjuvant therapies are discussed. PMID:16794241

  15. Point Bar and Overbank Deposit Storage Time Distributions in a Simulated Meandering River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, T. R.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain storage durations are important geologically and for managing pollutants. They provide necessary input data for sediment routing models, but the functions that describe storage are hard to define with field data. Using a meandering river model, a 36ka simulation is analyzed in 20 year time steps. Channel length, and eroded, deposited, and stored sediment volumes stabilize in under 2ka while the region explored by the river expands as time0.3. The simulated channel was 70m (3 pixels) wide and freely migrated within a 30 by 40km reach simulated with constant erodibility, and mean migration rate ±0.06 channel widths per year. No incision or aggradation was permitted. Sediment storage was partitioned by elevation. Point bar deposits are emplaced immediately as the channel moves away and comprise the lower 40% of a vertical section, while the upper 60% of the floodplain consists of vertically accreted 'overbank' deposits that accumulate with decreasing rates as elevation and distance from the channel increase. Point bar deposits have the highest probability of erosion at 80 years, and contribute 2/3 of eroded material despite representing only 40% of the floodplain volume. When eroded, vertical accretion deposits are 1.25 times older than point bar deposits. Apart from these differences, the storage distributions for both deposits are very similar, though there is much more scatter in the point bar distributions. Eroded sediment 2ka in age is well fit with a power law distribution. On average, 10% of eroded material is <80 years old, 30% from 80 - 500 years, 38% from 500 - 2000 years, 15% from 2ka to 10ka and 7% of eroded material is >10ka in age. However, the fraction older than 10ka is widely variable (0% to 30%, σ = 6.8%) in any 20 year interval. The patchiness and variability in the age of eroded sediment observed in these model results may be similar to natural settings and would be difficult to quantify or address with field measurements.

  16. Real-time estimation of FLE statistics for 3-D tracking with point-based registration.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Andrew D; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Target registration error (TRE) has become a widely accepted error metric in point-based registration since the error metric was introduced in the 1990s. It is particularly prominent in image-guided surgery (IGS) applications where point-based registration is used in both image registration and optical tracking. In point-based registration, the TRE is a function of the fiducial marker geometry, location of the target and the fiducial localizer error (FLE). While the first two items are easily obtained, the FLE is usually estimated using an a priori technique and applied without any knowledge of real-time information. However, if the FLE can be estimated in real-time, particularly as it pertains to optical tracking, then the TRE can be estimated more robustly. In this paper, a method is presented where the FLE statistics are estimated from the latest measurement of the fiducial registration error (FRE) statistics. The solution is obtained by solving a linear system of equations of the form Ax=b for each marker at each time frame where x are the six independent FLE covariance parameters and b are the six independent estimated FRE covariance parameters. The A matrix is only a function of the tool geometry and hence the inverse of the matrix can be computed a priori and used at each instant in which the FLE estimation is required, hence minimizing the level of computation at each frame. When using a good estimate of the FRE statistics, Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the root mean square of the FLE can be computed within a range of 70-90 microm. Robust estimation of the TRE for an optically tracked tool, using a good estimate of the FLE, will provide two enhancements in IGS. First, better patient to image registration will be obtained by using the TRE of the optical tool as a weighting factor of point-based registration used to map the patient to image space. Second, the directionality of the TRE can be relayed back to the surgeon giving the surgeon the option

  17. Local radial point interpolation (MLRPI) method for solving time fractional diffusion-wave equation with damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Vahid Reza; Shivanian, Elyas; Chen, Wen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to determine numerical solution of time-fractional diffusion-wave equation with damping for Caputo's fractional derivative of order α (1 < α ≤ 2). A meshless local radial point interpolation (MLRPI) scheme based on Galerkin weak form is analyzed. The reason of choosing MLRPI approach is that it does not require any background integrations cells, instead integrations are implemented over local quadrature domains which are further simplified for reducing the complication of computation using regular and simple shape. The unconditional stability and convergence with order O (τ 6 - 2 α) are proved, where τ is time stepping. Also, several numerical experiments are illustrated to verify theoretical analysis.

  18. Real-time IP-hologram conversion hardware based on floating point DSPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Ryutaro; Mishina, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Kenji; Okui, Makoto

    2009-02-01

    Holography is a 3-D display method that fully satisfies the visual characteristics of the human eye. However, the hologram must be developed in a darkroom under laser illumination. We attempted hologram generation under white light by adopting an integral photography (IP) technique as the input. In this research, we developed a hardware converter to convert IP input (with 120×66 elemental images) to a hologram with high definition television (HDTV) resolution (approximately 2 million pixels). This conversion could be carried out in real time. In this conversion method, each elemental image can be independently extracted and processed. Our hardware contains twenty 300-MHz floating-point digital signal processors (DSPs) operating in parallel. We verified real-time conversion operations by the implemented hardware.

  19. Scattering experiments with microwave billiards at an exceptional point under broken time-reversal invariance.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Dietz, B; Harney, H L; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A; Schäfer, F

    2014-03-01

    Scattering experiments with microwave cavities were performed and the effects of broken time-reversal invariance (TRI), induced by means of a magnetized ferrite placed inside the cavity, on an isolated doublet of nearly degenerate resonances were investigated. All elements of the effective Hamiltonian of this two-level system were extracted. As a function of two experimental parameters, the doublet and the associated eigenvectors could be tuned to coalesce at a so-called exceptional point (EP). The behavior of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors when encircling the EP in parameter space was studied, including the geometric amplitude that builds up in the case of broken TRI. A one-dimensional subspace of parameters was found where the differences of the eigenvalues are either real or purely imaginary. There, the Hamiltonians were found to be PT invariant under the combined operation of parity (P) and time reversal (T) in a generalized sense. The EP is the point of transition between both regions. There a spontaneous breaking of PT occurs. PMID:24730915

  20. Computing the three-point correlation function of galaxies in O(N^2) time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an algorithm that computes the multipole coefficients of the galaxy three-point correlation function (3PCF) without explicitly considering triplets of galaxies. Rather, centring on each galaxy in the survey, it expands the radially binned density field in spherical harmonics and combines these to form the multipoles without ever requiring the relative angle between a pair about the central. This approach scales with number and number density in the same way as the two-point correlation function, allowing run-times that are comparable, and 500 times faster than a naive triplet count. It is exact in angle and easily handles edge correction. We demonstrate the algorithm on the LasDamas SDSS-DR7 mock catalogues, computing an edge corrected 3PCF out to 90 Mpc h-1 in under an hour on modest computing resources. We expect this algorithm will render it possible to obtain the large-scale 3PCF for upcoming surveys such as Euclid, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument.

  1. ICESAT Laser Altimeter Pointing, Ranging and Timing Calibration from Integrated Residual Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, Scott B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Carabajal, C. C.; Harding, D. H.; Bufton, J. L.; Williams, T. A.

    2003-01-01

    On January 12, 2003 the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) was successfully placed into orbit. The ICESat mission carries the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), which has a primary measurement of short-pulse laser- ranging to the Earth s surface at 1064nm wavelength at a rate of 40 pulses per second. The instrument has collected precise elevation measurements of the ice sheets, sea ice roughness and thickness, ocean and land surface elevations and surface reflectivity. The accurate geolocation of GLAS s surface returns, the spots from which the laser energy reflects on the Earth s surface, is a critical issue in the scientific application of these data. Pointing, ranging, timing and orbit errors must be compensated to accurately geolocate the laser altimeter surface returns. Towards this end, the laser range observations can be fully exploited in an integrated residual analysis to accurately calibrate these geolocation/instrument parameters. ICESat laser altimeter data have been simultaneously processed as direct altimetry from ocean sweeps along with dynamic crossovers in order to calibrate pointing, ranging and timing. The calibration methodology and current calibration results are discussed along with future efforts.

  2. Social behavior in a genetic model of dopamine dysfunction at different neurodevelopmental time points

    PubMed Central

    Kabitzke, P. A.; Simpson, E. H.; Kandel, E. R.; Balsam, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in social behavior characterize many neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. In fact, the temporal emergence and trajectory of these deficits can define the disorder, specify their treatment and signal their prognosis. The sophistication of mouse models with neurobiological endophenotypes of many aspects of psychiatric diseases has increased in recent years, with the necessity to evaluate social behavior in these models. We adapted an assay for the multimodal characterization of social behavior at different development time points (juvenile, adolescent and adult) in control mice in different social contexts (specifically, different sex pairings). Although social context did not affect social behavior in juvenile mice, it did have an effect on the quantity and type of social interaction as well as ultrasonic vocalizations in both adolescence and adulthood. We compared social development in control mice to a transgenic mouse model of the increase in postsynaptic striatal D2R activity observed in patients with schizophrenia (D2R-OE mice). Genotypic differences in social interactions emerged in adolescence and appeared to become more pronounced in adulthood. That vocalizations emitted from dyads with a D2R-OE subject were negatively correlated with active social behavior while vocalizations from control dyads were positively correlated with both active and passive social behavior also suggest social deficits. These data show that striatal dopamine dysfunction plays an important role in the development of social behavior and mouse models such as the one studied here provide an opportunity for screening potential therapeutics at different developmental time points. PMID:26176662

  3. Alterations in grapevine leaf metabolism upon inoculation with Plasmopara viticola in different time-points.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kashif; Maltese, Federica; Figueiredo, Andreia; Rex, Martina; Fortes, Ana Margarida; Zyprian, Eva; Pais, Maria Salomé; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2012-08-01

    Grapevines are easily infected by plant pathogens. It was found that resistant grapevines induce a wide range of phenolics upon the pathogen-infection. In this study in order to gain insight into these processes in different time-points the metabolic changes during the interaction of two grapevine cultivars, 'Regent' (resistant) and 'Trincadeira' (susceptible), with the downy mildew pathogen (Plasmopara viticola) were investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on leaf extracts was used at several time points after experimental inoculation. A wide range of metabolites were identified using various two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques. Multivariate data analysis characterized both the resistant and the susceptible cultivars and their response against the pathogen. Metabolites responsible for their discrimination were identified as a fertaric acid, caftaric acid, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, linolenic acid, and alanine in the resistant cultivar 'Regent', while the susceptible 'Trincadeira' showed higher levels of glutamate, succinate, ascorbate and glucose. This study portrays the analytical capability of NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analyses methods for the metabolic profiling of plant samples. The results obtained will underline the role of phenylpropanoids and flavonoids in resistance against biotic stresses which in turn provides a firm platform for the metabolic engineering of grapevine cultivars with higher resistance towards pathogens. PMID:22682569

  4. Time-critical neurological emergencies: the unfulfilled role for point-of-care testing

    PubMed Central

    Knight, William A.; Clark, Joseph F.; Beyette, Fred R.; Pancioli, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurological emergencies are common and frequently devastating. Every year, millions of Americans suffer an acute stroke, severe traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, status epilepticus, or spinal cord injury severe enough to require medical intervention. Aims Full evaluation of the diseases in the acute setting often requires advanced diagnostics, and treatment frequently necessitates transfer to specialized centers. Delays in diagnosis and/or treatment may result in worsened outcomes; therefore, optimization of diagnostics is critical. Methods Point-of-care (POC) testing brings advanced diagnostics to the patient’s bedside in an effort to assist medical providers with real-time decisions based on real-time information. POC testing is usually associated with blood tests (blood glucose, troponin, etc.), but can involve imaging, medical devices, or adapting existing technologies for use outside of the hospital. Noticeably missing from the list of current point-of-care technologies are real-time bedside capabilities that address neurological emergencies. Results Unfortunately, the lack of these technologies may result in delayed identification of patients of these devastating conditions and contribute to less aggressive therapies than is seen with other disease processes. Development of time-dependent technologies appropriate for use with the neurologically ill patient are needed to improve therapies and outcomes. Conclusion POC-CENT is designed to support the development of novel ideas focused on improving diagnostic or prognostic capabilities for acute neurological emergencies. Eligible examples include biomarkers of traumatic brain injury, non-invasive measurements of intracranial pressure or cerebral vasospasm, and improved detection of pathological bacteria in suspected meningitis. PMID:20606822

  5. Two-Time-Point FDG PET/CT: Liver SULmean Repeatability

    PubMed Central

    Tahari, Abdel K.; Paidpally, Vasavi; Chirindel, Alin; Wahl, Richard L.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of liver mean standardized uptake value normalized to lean body mass (SULmean) in the same patients at different time points within the right lobe of the liver at 18F-FDG PET/CT, in a clinical setting. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two PET/CT studies performed on two different dates from each of 130 patients who had normal livers according to structural imaging were included in this reader study. The mean (± SD) length of time between the studies was 235 ± 192 days. SULmean was measured with a 30-mm diameter spherical volume of interest (VOI) placed within the right lobe of the liver (above, below, and at the level of the main portal vein) by two expert readers. ANOVA, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman analysis were performed. RESULTS The ICC for the first and second set of studies varied between 0.487 and 0.535 for reader 1 and between 0.472 and 0.545 for reader 2. The mean percentage variation for SULmean between the two time scans for the VOIs placed above, below, and at the level of the main portal vein were 3.55% ± 23.19%, 4.65% ± 23.87%, and 4.30% ± 23.03%, respectively, for reader 1 and 4.49% ± 23.23%, 4.33% ± 23.74%, and 4.48% ± 23.01%, respectively, for reader 2. Using 95% CI, the reference range for intrapatient variations between the studies in liver SULmean was −0.5 to 0.60. CONCLUSION There is only fair repeatability of liver SULmean measured between two time points in the same patient in a clinical setting. Scan-to-scan intrapatient variation in absolute liver SULmean was −0.5 to 0.60. PMID:25615764

  6. Real-Time Single Frequency Precise Point Positioning Using SBAS Corrections.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Jia, Chun; Zhao, Lin; Cheng, Jianhua; Liu, Jianxu; Ding, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Real-time single frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is a promising technique for high-precision navigation with sub-meter or even centimeter-level accuracy because of its convenience and low cost. The navigation performance of single frequency PPP heavily depends on the real-time availability and quality of correction products for satellite orbits and satellite clocks. Satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) provides the correction products in real-time, but they are intended to be used for wide area differential positioning at 1 meter level precision. By imposing the constraints for ionosphere error, we have developed a real-time single frequency PPP method by sufficiently utilizing SBAS correction products. The proposed PPP method are tested with static and kinematic data, respectively. The static experimental results show that the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can reach decimeter level, and achieve an improvement of at least 30% when compared with the traditional SBAS method. The positioning convergence of the proposed PPP method can be achieved in 636 epochs at most in static mode. In the kinematic experiment, the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can be improved by at least 20 cm relative to the SBAS method. Furthermore, it has revealed that the proposed PPP method can achieve decimeter level convergence within 500 s in the kinematic mode. PMID:27517930

  7. Processing 3D flash LADAR point-clouds in real-time for flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, R.; Gravseth, I.; Earhart, R. P.; Bladt, J.; Barnhill, S.; Ruppert, L.; Centamore, C.

    2007-04-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. has demonstrated real-time processing of 3D imaging LADAR point-cloud data to produce the industry's first time-of-flight (TOF) 3D video capability. This capability is uniquely suited to the rigorous demands of space and airborne flight applications and holds great promise in the area of autonomous navigation. It will provide long-range, three dimensional video information to autonomous flight software or pilots for immediate use in rendezvous and docking, proximity operations, landing, surface vision systems, and automatic target recognition and tracking. This is enabled by our new generation of FPGA based "pixel-tube" processors, coprocessors and their associated algorithms which have led to a number of advancements in high-speed wavefront processing along with additional advances in dynamic camera control, and space laser designs based on Ball's CALIPSO LIDAR. This evolution in LADAR is made possible by moving the mechanical complexity required for a scanning system into the electronics, where production, integration, testing and life-cycle costs can be significantly reduced. This technique requires a state of the art TOF read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) attached to a sensor array to collect high resolution temporal data, which is then processed through FPGAs. The number of calculations required to process the data is greatly reduced thanks to the fact that all points are captured at the same time and thus correlated. This correlation allows extremely efficient FPGA processing. This capability has been demonstrated in prototype form at both Marshal Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center on targets that represent docking and landing scenarios. This report outlines many aspects of this work as well as aspects of our recent testing at Marshall's Flight Robotics Laboratory.

  8. Comparison of Result Times Between Urine and Whole Blood Point-of-care Pregnancy Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Michael; Wnek, Kristopher; Moskoff, Jordan; Christian, Errick; Bailitz, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point-of-care (POC) pregnancy testing is commonly performed in the emergency department (ED). One prior study demonstrated equivalent accuracy between urine and whole blood for one common brand of POC pregnancy testing. Our study sought to determine the difference in result times when comparing whole blood versus urine for the same brand of POC pregnancy testing. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study at an urban, academic, tertiary care hospital comparing the turnaround time between order and result for urine and whole blood pregnancy tests collected according to standard protocol without intervention from the investigators. After the blood was collected, the nurse would place three drops onto a Beckman Coulter ICON 25 Rapid HCG bedside pregnancy test and set a timer for 10 minutes. At the end of the 10 minutes, the result and time were recorded on an encoded data sheet and not used clinically. The same make and model analyzer was also used for urine tests in the lab located within the ED. The primary outcome was the difference in mean turnaround time between whole blood in the ED and urine testing in the adjacent lab results. Concordance between samples was assessed as a secondary outcome. Results 265 total patients were included in the study. The use of whole blood resulted in a mean time savings of 21 minutes (95% CI 16–25 minutes) when compared with urine (p<0.001). There was 99.6% concordance between results, with one false negative urine specimen with a quantitative HCG level of 81 mIU/L. Conclusion Our results suggest that the use of whole blood in place of urine for bedside pregnancy testing may reduce the total result turnaround time without significant changes in accuracy in this single-center study. PMID:27429695

  9. Time-Dependent Searches for Neutrino Point Sources with the IceCube Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael Francis

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a km³ detector which recently completed construction at the geographic South Pole. Here we present four searches for flaring point-sources sources of neutrinos using IceCube data using maximum-likelihood techniques. For the first time, a search is performed over the entire parameter space of energy, direction and time with sensitivity to neutrino flares lasting between 20 mus and a year duration from astrophysical sources. This work is also an important step for the IceCube experiment in utilizing a multi-messenger approach, driving IceCube neutrino analysis with information from photon observatories. The use of time information is useful since integrated searches over time are less sensitive to flares as they are affected by a larger background of atmospheric neutrinos and moons that can be reduced by the use of additional timing information. Flaring sources considered here, such as active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, are promising candidate neutrino emitters. One search is "untriggered" in the sense that it looks for any possible flare in the entire sky. The other two searches are triggered by multi-wavelength information on flares. One triggered search uses lightcurves from Fermi-LAT which provides continuous monitoring. A second triggered search uses information where the flux states have been measured only for short periods of time near the flares. A search for periodic emission of neutrinos is also performed on binary systems in the galaxy which are thought to be sources of particle acceleration. The searches use data taken by 40 strings of IceCube between Apr 5, 2008 and May 20, 2009 and by 59 strings of IceCube between May 20, 2009 and May 31, 2010. The results from all searches are compatible with a fluctuation of the background.

  10. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  11. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealy, Jennifer; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  12. In situ timing and pointing verification of the ICESat altimeter using a ground-based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, L.; Silverberg, E.; Webb, C.; Schutz, B.

    2005-11-01

    To provide validation of the ICESat laser altimeter time of measurement and geolocation, a ground-based technique was implemented at White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH), during the Laser 2a and 3a operational periods. The activities used an electro-optical detection system and a passive array of corner cube retro reflectors (CCR). The detectors and the CCRs were designed to provide an independent assessment of the laser footprint location, while the detectors also provide timing verification. This ground-based system unambiguously validated the elevation product time tag to 3 μsec +/- 1 μsec. In addition, the ground equipment provided in situ geolocations of the laser pulse. Comparing the in situ results to the ICESat GLA14 data product the positions differ by 10.6 m +/- 4.5 m for Laser 2a (Release 21) operations and 7.5 m +/- 6.6 m for Laser 3a (Release 23). These comparisons correlate to pointing validations at this site, for the specific overflight configurations.

  13. Implementation of a Point Algorithm for Real-Time Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Motaghedi, Shui; Carson, John

    2007-01-01

    The primal-dual interior-point algorithm implemented in G-OPT is a relatively new and efficient way of solving convex optimization problems. Given a prescribed level of accuracy, the convergence to the optimal solution is guaranteed in a predetermined, finite number of iterations. G-OPT Version 1.0 is a flight software implementation written in C. Onboard application of the software enables autonomous, real-time guidance and control that explicitly incorporates mission constraints such as control authority (e.g. maximum thrust limits), hazard avoidance, and fuel limitations. This software can be used in planetary landing missions (Mars pinpoint landing and lunar landing), as well as in proximity operations around small celestial bodies (moons, asteroids, and comets). It also can be used in any spacecraft mission for thrust allocation in six-degrees-of-freedom control.

  14. Single-point position and transition defects in continuous time quantum walks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of continuous time quantum walks (CTQW) with both position and transition defects defined at a single point in the line. Analytical solutions of both traveling waves and bound states are obtained, which provide valuable insight into the dynamics of CTQW. The number of bound states is found to be critically dependent on the defect parameters, and the localized probability peaks can be readily obtained by projecting the state vector of CTQW on to these bound states. The interference between two bound states are also observed in the case of a transition defect. The spreading of CTQW probability over the line can be finely tuned by varying the position and transition defect parameters, offering the possibility of precision quantum control of the system. PMID:26323855

  15. Undergraduate Consent Form Reading in Relation to Conscientiousness, Procrastination, and the Point-of-Time Effect.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Justin D; Hobbs, William B; Giordano, Peter J; Brunson, Olivia M

    2014-07-01

    Informed consent is central to conducting ethical research with human participants. The present study investigated differences in consent form reading in relation to conscientiousness, procrastination, and the point-of-time (PT) effect among undergraduate participants at a U.S. university. As hypothesized, conscientious participants and those who signed up to participate in a research study more days in advance and for earlier sessions (PT effect) read the consent form more thoroughly. However, procrastination was not related to consent form reading. Most importantly, consent form reading in general was poor, with 80% of participants demonstrating that they had not read the consent form. Conscientious participants were more likely to self-report reading the consent form, irrespective of their measured consent form reading. The article closes with suggestions to improve the process of obtaining informed consent with undergraduate participants. PMID:25746782

  16. The time-space relationships among data points from multispectral spatial scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, F.

    1983-01-01

    Multispectral scanner and thematic mapper (TM) data from Landsat satellites are discussed in terms of the perceived 'simultaineity' of the images, which are obtained by scanning techniques. Scanning the scenes ensures that the data points of the images are actually sequential, even if the scan is performed at rates that are fast relative to the motion of the spacecraft. The last datum gathered by the MSS is, in fact, taken 29 sec after the first, witih a 56 m distance being present between pixels. The spacing in uneven from band to band on the TM and analyses of the data to produce an image requires consideration of nonfixed time relationships for different locations on the scan within and among the bands. Additionally, corrective measures must be taken to compensate for instrument jitter and attitude changes.

  17. Near-real-time regional troposphere models for the GNSS precise point positioning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, T.; Kaplon, J.; Bosy, J.; Sierny, J.; Wilgan, K.

    2013-05-01

    The GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) technique requires high quality product (orbits and clocks) application, since their error directly affects the quality of positioning. For real-time purposes it is possible to utilize ultra-rapid precise orbits and clocks which are disseminated through the Internet. In order to eliminate as many unknown parameters as possible, one may introduce external information on zenith troposphere delay (ZTD). It is desirable that the a priori model is accurate and reliable, especially for real-time application. One of the open problems in GNSS positioning is troposphere delay modelling on the basis of ground meteorological observations. Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics of Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (IGG WUELS) has developed two independent regional troposphere models for the territory of Poland. The first one is estimated in near-real-time regime using GNSS data from a Polish ground-based augmentation system named ASG-EUPOS established by Polish Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography (GUGiK) in 2008. The second one is based on meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure and humidity) gathered from various meteorological networks operating over the area of Poland and surrounding countries. This paper describes the methodology of both model calculation and verification. It also presents results of applying various ZTD models into kinematic PPP in the post-processing mode using Bernese GPS Software. Positioning results were used to assess the quality of the developed models during changing weather conditions. Finally, the impact of model application to simulated real-time PPP on precision, accuracy and convergence time is discussed.

  18. On troposphere delay constraining in real-time GNSS Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Tomasz; Kazmierski, Kamil; Bosy, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    A common procedure in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is to have the adjustment model accounting for the correction to an a priori value of the total troposphere delay (ZTD) given at the first epoch of data processing, and the troposphere wet delay filter is updated epoch by epoch. This approach requires some time so that a change in satellite geometry allows to efficiently de-correlate among tropospheric delay, receiver clock error and height. Empirical troposphere state models and mapping functions are available, however they may not reflect properly the actual state of the troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. It might be more appropriate to take advantage on a regional troposphere model derived from near real-time (NRT) processing of GBAS network. To evaluate the impact of troposphere constraining in real-time PPP, one week long period was selected, that was characterized with active troposphere conditions. Using the development version of original GNSS-WARP software, a 1 Hz kinematic positioning was performed for 10 selected Polish GBAS stations using IGS Real-Time Service (RTS) products. Two processing strategies were used, one reflecting the common PPP approach and the second with NRT ZTD to constrain the troposphere delay estimates. GPS only and GPS+GLONASS positioning was performed and analyzed using both strategies. For unconstrained solutions, the convergence time of one hour (GPS only) and 15 minutes (GPS+GLONASS) was reached, providing the sub-decimeter accuracy in horizontal and vertical component. However, for some epochs, and outlying height estimates were observed with the residuals reaching up to 0.5m with the estimated error of 0.2m. At the same time, the unconstrained estimated troposphere delay differs up to 12 cm from the reference NRT ZTD solution. In case the troposphere delay is constrained, all three coordinate components remains accurate and precise for entire processing period after the convergence is reached. From the

  19. Two Point Space-Time Correlation of Density Fluctuations Measured in High Velocity Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    Two-point space-time correlations of air density fluctuations in unheated, fully-expanded free jets at Mach numbers M(sub j) = 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a Rayleigh scattering based diagnostic technique. The molecular scattered light from two small probe volumes of 1.03 mm length was measured for a completely non-intrusive means of determining the turbulent density fluctuations. The time series of density fluctuations were analyzed to estimate the integral length scale L in a moving frame of reference and the convective Mach number M(sub c) at different narrow Strouhal frequency (St) bands. It was observed that M(sub c) and the normalized moving frame length scale L*St/D, where D is the jet diameter, increased with Strouhal frequency before leveling off at the highest resolved frequency. Significant differences were observed between data obtained from the lip shear layer and the centerline of the jet. The wave number frequency transform of the correlation data demonstrated progressive increase in the radiative part of turbulence fluctuations with increasing jet Mach number.

  20. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Karadi, C

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic. 133 refs., 49 figs.

  1. Spatial Rainfall Simulation: Trading Time for Space with Multiple Point Statistics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriani, F.; Straubhaar, J.; Mariethoz, G.; Renard, P.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed rainfall spatial distribution plays an important role in various applications of hydrological management such as flood forecasting or recharge estimation. However, limited rain gauge network density often makes it difficult to characterize the small-scale variability of rainfall, and reduces the reliability of interpolations methods such as kriging. Here, we test a non-parametric technique that produces spatial rainfall fields by relying on time series data rather than dense spatial data sets. If the velocity of the rain cells is known, the time series can be projected into a one-dimensional space, reflecting the same type of variability observable in the direction of the rain cell displacement. Assuming spatio-temporal ergodicity for a small area, we estimate the mean rainfall cells displacement direction i and velocity vi by optimizing the cross correlation between two subsequent radar images at time t and t+dt. Then, given a time series in the same time lapse R([t,...,t+dt]) and applying the linear transformation R([t,...,t+dt])=S([t,...,t+dt]vi), we obtain a spatial series S generally more densely informed than the available rain-gauge network, used to represent the spatial variability in the direction i. For example, from a 1 min spaced time series R and an estimated velocity v=20 km/h, we obtain a 333 m spaced series S. The obtained spatial series are then employed as a basis to generate 2D spatial rainfall fields using the Direct Sampling (DS), a multiple-point technique that allows simulating complex statistical relations by respecting the similarity of multiple scales patterns. Here the DS is used to complete the 2D field by reproducing one-dimensional patterns borrowed from the spatial series. The approach is tested on the rain-gauge network of the Swiss plateau (Switzerland) and on radar data for the same region. The proposed technique has the potential to characterize realistic spatial fields even for sparse observation networks.

  2. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey; Chronis, Themis

    2015-01-01

    Using satellite-based methods that provide accurate 0-1 hour convective initiation (CI) nowcasts, and rely on proven success coupling satellite and radar fields in the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS; operated and developed at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory), to subsequently monitor for first-flash lightning initiation (LI) and later period lightning trends as storms evolve. Enhance IR-based methods within the GOES-R CI Algorithm (that must meet specific thresholds for a given cumulus cloud before the cloud is considered to have an increased likelihood of producing lightning next 90 min) that forecast LI. Integrate GOES-R CI and LI fields with radar thresholds (e.g., first greater than or equal to 40 dBZ echo at the -10 C altitude) and NWP model data within the WDSS-II system for LI-events from new convective storms. Track ongoing lightning using Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data to assess per-storm lightning trends (e.g., as tied to lightning jumps) and outline threat regions. Evaluate the ability to produce LI nowcasts through a "lightning threat" product, and obtain feedback from National Weather Service forecasters on its value as a decision support tool.

  3. Determination of earthquake magnitude using GPS displacement waveforms from real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Rongxin; Shi, Chuang; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-01-01

    For earthquake and tsunami early warning and emergency response, earthquake magnitude is the crucial parameter to be determined rapidly and correctly. However, a reliable and rapid measurement of the magnitude of an earthquake is a challenging problem, especially for large earthquakes (M > 8). Here, the magnitude is determined based on the GPS displacement waveform derived from real-time precise point positioning (RTPPP). RTPPP results are evaluated with an accuracy of 1 cm in the horizontal components and 2-3 cm in the vertical components, indicating that the RTPPP is capable of detecting seismic waves with amplitude of 1 cm horizontally and 2-3 cm vertically with a confidence level of 95 per cent. In order to estimate the magnitude, the unique information provided by the GPS displacement waveform is the horizontal peak displacement amplitude. We show that the empirical relation of Gutenberg (1945) between peak displacement and magnitude holds up to nearly magnitude 9.0 when displacements are measured with GPS. We tested the proposed method for three large earthquakes. For the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, our method provides a magnitude of M7.18 ± 0.18. For the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake the estimated magnitude is M8.74 ± 0.06, and for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake the value is M8.7 ± 0.1 after excluding some near-field stations. We, therefore, conclude that depending on the availability of high-rate GPS observations, a robust value of magnitude up to 9.0 for a point source earthquake can be estimated within tens of seconds or a few minutes after an event using a few GPS stations close to the epicentre. The rapid magnitude could be as a pre-requisite for tsunami early warning, fast source inversion and emergency response is feasible.

  4. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP). PMID:26829639

  5. Integrity monitoring in real-time precise point positioning in the presence of ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wezka, K.; Galas, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric disturbances are characterized as fast and random variability in the ionosphere. Those phenomena are difficult to predict, detect and model. Occurrence of some strong ionospheric disturbances can cause, inter alia degradation and interruption of GNSS signals. Therefore they are especially harmful for real-time applications, as for example Precise Point Positioning (PPP) in real time, where one of the most important requirements is to ensure the high level of reliability. In such applications verification and confirmation of a high trust degree towards the estimated coordinates is a very critical issue. In one of the previous papers (K. Wezka, 2012 -Identification of system performance parameters and their usability) two sets of parameters have been proposed for enhance reliability of the PPP. The first one for data quality control (QC) of the raw GNSS observations and the second one for examination of the quality, robustness and performance of various processing approaches (strategies). To the second group the following parameters has been proposed: accuracy, precision, availability, integrity and convergence time. In consideration of perturbation of GNSS signal resulting from sudden ionospheric disturbances, one of the most important demands is effective autonomous integrity monitoring. The poster presents first preliminary results of the applicability of the proposed parameters in order to ensure the high level of reliability/integrity of GNSS observations and positioning results under the presence of strong ionospheric anomalies. The data-set from continuously operated GNSS station located at high latitude, where ionospheric disturbances occur more frequently, were used for the analysis. Various selected Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) approaches for quality control of the GNSS observables are applied to the data sets recorded under different (low/quite and high) ionospheric activities. Based on those analyses the usability of the

  6. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP). PMID:26829639

  7. Triple positive solutions of three-point boundary value problems for p-Laplacian dynamic equations on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shihuang

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we present sufficient conditions for the existence of at least three positive solutions of three-point boundary value problems for p-Laplacian dynamic equations on a time scale. To show our main results, we apply a new fixed point theorem due to Avery and Peterson [Three positive fixed points of nonlinear operators on ordered Banach spaces, Comput. Math. Appl. 42 (2001) 313-322].

  8. Real Time Precise Point Positioning: Preliminary Results for the Brazilian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Haroldo; Monico, João.; Hirokazu Shimabukuro, Milton; Aquino, Marcio

    2010-05-01

    GNSS positioning can be carried out in relative or absolute approach. In the last years, more attention has been driven to the real time precise point positioning (PPP). To achieve centimeter accuracy with this method in real time it is necessary to have available the satellites precise coordinates as well as satellites clocks corrections. The coordinates can be used from the predicted IGU ephemeris, but the satellites clocks must be estimated in a real time. It can be made from a GNSS network as can be seen from EUREF Permanent Network. The infra-structure to realize the PPP in real time is being available in Brazil through the Brazilian Continuous Monitoring Network (RBMC) together with the Sao Paulo State GNSS network which are transmitting GNSS data using NTRIP (Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol) caster. Based on this information it was proposed a PhD thesis in the Univ. Estadual Paulista (UNESP) aiming to investigate and develop the methodology to estimate the satellites clocks and realize PPP in real time. Then, software is being developed to process GNSS data in the real time PPP mode. A preliminary version of the software was called PPP_RT and is able to process GNSS code and phase data using precise ephemeris and satellites clocks. The PPP processing can be accomplished considering the absolute satellite antenna Phase Center Variation (PCV), Ocean Tide Loading (OTL), Earth Body Tide, among others. The first order ionospheric effects can be eliminated or minimized by ion-free combination or parameterized in the receiver-satellite direction using a stochastic process, e.g. random walk or white noise. In the case of ionosphere estimation, a pseudo-observable is introduced in the mathematical model for each satellite and the initial value can be computed from Klobuchar model or from Global Ionospheric Map (GIM). The adjustment is realized in the recursive mode and the DIA (Detection Identification and Adaptation) is used for quality control. In

  9. The Way Point Planning Tool: Real Time Flight Planning for Airborne Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yubin; Blakeslee, Richard; Goodman, Michael; Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    Airborne real time observation are a major component of NASA's Earth Science research and satellite ground validation studies. For mission scientist, planning a research aircraft mission within the context of meeting the science objective is a complex task because it requires real time situational awareness of the weather conditions that affect the aircraft track. Multiple aircraft are often involved in the NASA field campaigns the coordination of the aircraft with satellite overpasses, other airplanes and the constantly evolving dynamic weather conditions often determine the success of the campaign. A flight planning tool is needed to provide situational awareness information to the mission scientist and help them plan and modify the flight tracks successfully. Scientists at the University of Alabama Huntsville and the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center developed the Waypoint Planning Tool (WPT), an interactive software tool that enables scientist to develop their own flight plans (also known as waypoints), with point and click mouse capabilities on a digital map filled with time raster and vector data. The development of this Waypoint Planning Tool demonstrates the significance of mission support in responding to the challenges presented during NASA field campaigns. Analyses during and after each campaign helped identify both issues and new requirements, initiating the next wave of development. Currently the Waypoint Planning Tool has gone through three rounds of development and analysis processes. The development of this waypoint tool is directly affected by the technology advances on GIS/Mapping technologies. From the standalone Google Earth application and simple KML functionalities to the Google Earth Plugin and Java Web Start/Applet on web platform, as well as to the rising open source GIS tools with new JavaScript frameworks, the Waypoint planning Tool has entered its third phase of technology advancement. The newly innovated, cross-platform, modular designed

  10. Quantum percolation and transition point of a directed discrete-time quantum walk

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, C. M.; Busch, Th.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum percolation describes the problem of a quantum particle moving through a disordered system. While certain similarities to classical percolation exist, the quantum case has additional complexity due to the possibility of Anderson localisation. Here, we consider a directed discrete-time quantum walk as a model to study quantum percolation of a two-state particle on a two-dimensional lattice. Using numerical analysis we determine the fraction of connected edges required (transition point) in the lattice for the two-state particle to percolate with finite (non-zero) probability for three fundamental lattice geometries, finite square lattice, honeycomb lattice, and nanotube structure and show that it tends towards unity for increasing lattice sizes. To support the numerical results we also use a continuum approximation to analytically derive the expression for the percolation probability for the case of the square lattice and show that it agrees with the numerically obtained results for the discrete case. Beyond the fundamental interest to understand the dynamics of a two-state particle on a lattice (network) with disconnected vertices, our study has the potential to shed light on the transport dynamics in various quantum condensed matter systems and the construction of quantum information processing and communication protocols. PMID:25301394

  11. Quantum percolation and transition point of a directed discrete-time quantum walk.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, C M; Busch, Th

    2014-01-01

    Quantum percolation describes the problem of a quantum particle moving through a disordered system. While certain similarities to classical percolation exist, the quantum case has additional complexity due to the possibility of Anderson localisation. Here, we consider a directed discrete-time quantum walk as a model to study quantum percolation of a two-state particle on a two-dimensional lattice. Using numerical analysis we determine the fraction of connected edges required (transition point) in the lattice for the two-state particle to percolate with finite (non-zero) probability for three fundamental lattice geometries, finite square lattice, honeycomb lattice, and nanotube structure and show that it tends towards unity for increasing lattice sizes. To support the numerical results we also use a continuum approximation to analytically derive the expression for the percolation probability for the case of the square lattice and show that it agrees with the numerically obtained results for the discrete case. Beyond the fundamental interest to understand the dynamics of a two-state particle on a lattice (network) with disconnected vertices, our study has the potential to shed light on the transport dynamics in various quantum condensed matter systems and the construction of quantum information processing and communication protocols. PMID:25301394

  12. Brachytherapy in cancer cervix: Time to move ahead from point A?

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anurita; Datta, Niloy Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy forms an integral part of the radiation therapy in cancer cervix. The dose prescription for intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cancer cervix is based on Tod and Meredith’s point A and has been in practice since 1938. This was proposed at a time when accessibility to imaging technology and dose computation facilities was limited. The concept has been in practice worldwide for more than half a century and has been the fulcrum of all ICBT treatments, strategies and outcome measures. The method is simple and can be adapted by all centres practicing ICBT in cancer cervix. However, with the widespread availability of imaging techniques, clinical use of different dose-rates, availability of a host of applicators fabricated with image compatible materials, radiobiological implications of dose equivalence and its impact on tumour and organs at risk; more and more weight is being laid down on individualised image based brachytherapy. Thus, computed tomography, magnetic-resonance imaging and even positron emission computerized tomography along with brachytherapy treatment planning system are being increasingly adopted with promising outcomes. The present article reviews the evolution of dose prescription concepts in ICBT in cancer cervix and brings forward the need for image based brachytherapy to evaluate clinical outcomes. As is evident, a gradual transition from “point” based brachytherapy to “profile” based image guided brachytherapy is gaining widespread acceptance for dose prescription, reporting and outcome evaluation in the clinical practice of ICBT in cancer cervix. PMID:25302176

  13. Ultra-Wideband Time-Difference-of-Arrival Two-Point-Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun David; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dekome, Kent; Dusl, John

    2009-01-01

    A UWB TDOA Two-Point-Tracking System has been conceived and developed at JSC. This system can provide sub-inch tracking capability of two points on one target. This capability can be applied to guide a docking process in a 2D space. Lab tests demonstrate the feasibility of this technology.

  14. Tripled Readout Slices in Multi Time-Point pCASL Using Multiband Look-Locker EPI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Yun, Seong Dae; Shah, N. Jon

    2015-01-01

    Multi time-point pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) with a Look-Locker EPI readout can sample the signal curve of blood kinetics at multiple time points after the labelling pulse. However, due to signal relaxation of labelled blood, the number of readout slices is limited. The aim of this study is to employ a multiband excitation technique to triple the number of readout slices in multi time-point pCASL. The multiband technique, along with 2-fold in-plane parallel imaging, was incorporated into the Look-Locker EPI for the multi time-point sampling of blood kinetic behaviour following the pCASL labelling scheme. The performance evaluation of the multiband and the single-band techniques were performed on four healthy subjects using a 32-channel head RF coil at 3T. Quantitative perfusion maps were analysed using a combination of labelling with and without flow suppression gradients. The perfusion maps provided by the multiband accelerated multi time-point pCASL were in good agreement with the conventional single-band technique. Multiband acceleration caused SNR loss but offered quantitative perfusion maps in 6.23 min with 18 slices compared with 6 slices within the same time period for the single-band method. As conclusion, the multiband technique can successfully triple the number of readout slices while achieving comparable perfusion data in the same measurement time as the conventional single-band readout. PMID:26544715

  15. Stochastic modelling for biodosimetry: Predicting the chromosomal response to radiation at different time points after exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ritter, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetic data accumulated from the experiments with peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to densely ionizing radiation clearly demonstrate that for particles with linear energy transfer (LET) >100 keV/ μm the derived relative biological effectiveness (RBE) will strongly depend on the time point chosen for the analysis. A reasonable prediction of radiation-induced chromosome damage and its distribution among cells can be achieved by exploiting Monte Carlo methodology along with the information about the radius of the penetrating ion-track and the LET of the ion beam. In order to examine the relationship between the track structure and the distribution of aberrations induced in human lymphocytes and to clarify the correlation between delays in the cell cycle progression and the aberration burden visible at the first post-irradiation mitosis, we have analyzed chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to Fe-ions with LET values of 335 keV/ μm and formulated a Monte Carlo model which reflects time-delay in mitosis of aberrant cells. Within the model the frequency distributions of aberrations among cells follow the pattern of local energy distribution and are well approximated by a time-dependent compound Poisson statistics. The cell-division cycle of undamaged and aberrant cells and chromosome aberrations are modelled as a renewal process represented by a random sum of (independent and identically distributed) random elements S N = ∑ N i=0 X i . Here N stands for the number of particle traversals of cell nucleus, each leading to a statistically independent formation of X i aberrations. The parameter N is itself a random variable and reflects the cell cycle delay of heavily damaged cells. The probability distribution of S N follows a general law for which the moment generating function satisfies the relation Φ S N = Φ N ( Φ X i ). Formulation of the Monte Carlo model which allows to predict expected fluxes of aberrant and non-aberrant cells has been based

  16. New definitions of pointing stability - ac and dc effects. [constant and time-dependent pointing error effects on image sensor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucke, Robert L.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; San Martin, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    For most imaging sensors, a constant (dc) pointing error is unimportant (unless large), but time-dependent (ac) errors degrade performance by either distorting or smearing the image. When properly quantified, the separation of the root-mean-square effects of random line-of-sight motions into dc and ac components can be used to obtain the minimum necessary line-of-sight stability specifications. The relation between stability requirements and sensor resolution is discussed, with a view to improving communication between the data analyst and the control systems engineer.

  17. Radioisotopic Tie Points of the Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS): How Accurate and Precise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of the geomagnetic field are recorded globally by sedimentary and volcanic rocks. These geodynamo instabilities provide a rich set of chronostratigraphic tie points for the Quaternary period that can provide tests of age models central to paleoclimate studies. Radioisotopic dating of volcanic rocks, mainly 40Ar/39Ar dating of lava flows, coupled with astronomically-dated deep sea sediments, reveals 10 polarity reversals and 27 field excursions during the Quaternary (Singer, 2014). A key question concerns the uncertainties associated with radioisotopic dates of those geodynamo instabilities that have been identified both in terrestrial volcanic rocks and in deep sea sediments. These particular features offer the highest confidence in linking 40Ar/39Ar dates to the global marine climate record. Geological issues aside, for rocks in which the build-up of 40Ar by decay of 40K may be overwhelmed by atmospheric 40Ar at the time of eruption, the uncertainty in 40Ar/39Ar dates derives from three sources: (1) analytical uncertainty associated with measurement of the isotopes; this is straightforward to estimate; (2) systematic uncertainties stemming from the age of standard minerals, such as the Fish Canyon sanidine, and in the 40K decay constant; and (3) systematic uncertainty introduced during analysis, mainly the size and reproducibility of procedural blanks. Whereas 1 and 2 control the precision of an age determination, 2 and 3 also control accuracy. In parallel with an astronomical calibration of 28.201 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine standard, awareness of the importance of procedural blanks, and a new generation multi-collector mass spectrometer capable of exceptionally low-blank and isobar-free analysis, are improving both accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dates. Results from lavas recording the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal, the Santa Rosa excursion, and the reversal at the top of the Cobb Mtn subchron demonstrate these advances. Current best

  18. Hereditary angioedema: Validation of the end point time to onset of relief by correlation with symptom intensity.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonathan A; Ritchie, Bruce; Levy, Robyn J; Wasserman, Richard L; Bewtra, Againdra K; Hurewitz, David S; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Reshef, Avner; Moldovan, Dumitru; Shirov, Todor; Grivcheva-Panovska, Vesna; Kiessling, Peter C; Keinecke, Heinz-Otto; Craig, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Time to onset of symptom relief in hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a common primary end point in clinical studies but it has never been validated by correlation with the course of HAE symptoms. This study was designed as a retrospective validation of the primary end point for a placebo-controlled phase II/III study in patients with HAE. Ninety-eight abdominal attacks were treated with 10 or 20 U/kg of a highly purified C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate or placebo. The primary end point was the time to onset of symptom relief, as determined by the patients. Patients assessed the intensity of the symptoms of pain, nausea, vomiting, cramps, and diarrhea over time. By Spearman rank correlation, the primary end point was compared with the time to first reduction of (1) any symptom intensity, (2) the sum of symptom intensity scores, and (3) the intensity of the last symptom present at baseline. The C1-INH, 20 U/kg, and placebo groups were compared by one-sided two-sample Wilcoxon tests. The time to first reduction in intensity of the last symptom present at baseline had the highest correlation with the primary end point (r = 0.77). The time to onset of symptom relief and the time to the first reduction in intensity of the last symptom were significantly shorter for the C1-INH, 20 U/kg, group compared with placebo (p = 0.009 and p = 0.0036, respectively). The association with the intensity of single symptoms confirmed that the time to onset of symptom relief is an appropriate end point for assessing the efficacy of C1-INH therapy. PMID:21262096

  19. [Effect of coal tar on cignolin erythema--1 hour treatment of psoriasis with high-dose cignolin with and without tar].

    PubMed

    Schauder, S; Mahrle, G

    1985-06-01

    Coal tar applied simultaneously showed a suppressive effect on anthralin erythema. This effect was demonstrated by an epicutaneous test 24 hours (27 patients) and 1 hour (46 patients) after application of various concentrations of anthralin combined with tar 3%. In a clinical study on 9 patients, anthralin 3% alone or combined with tar 10% were administered in a right and left comparison on symmetrical chronic psoriatic lesions for 1 hour daily. Anthralin plus tar exhibited a stronger anti-psoriatic effect than anthralin alone did. Tar reduced the anthralin erythema in the perilesional skin. These findings favor the combination of coal tar and anthralin in the 1-hour treatment schedule of psoriasis. PMID:3160177

  20. Inference of fitness values and putative appearance time points for evolvable self-replicating molecules from time series of occurrence frequencies in an evolution reactor.

    PubMed

    Aita, Takuyo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2016-07-21

    We have established a translation-coupled RNA replication system within a cell-like compartment, and conducted an experimental evolution of the RNA molecules in the system. Then, we obtained a time series of occurrence frequencies of 91 individual genotypes through random sampling and next-generation sequencing. The time series showed a complex clonal interference and a polymorphic population called the "quasispecies". By fitting a deterministic kinetic model of evolvable simple self-replicators to the time series, we estimated the fitness value and "putative appearance time point" for each of the 91 major genotypes identified, where the putative appearance time point is defined as a certain time point at which a certain mutant genotype is supposed to appear in the deterministic kinetic model. As a result, the kinetic model was well fitted and additionally we confirmed that the estimated fitness values for 11 genotypes were considerably close to the experimentally measured ones (Ichihashi et al., 2015). In this sequel paper, with the theoretical basis of the deterministic kinetic model, we present the details of inference of the fitness values and putative appearance time points for the 91 genotypes. It may be possible to apply this methodology to other self-replicating molecules, viruses and bacteria. PMID:27091052

  1. FUSING POINT AND AREAL LEVEL SPACE-TIME DATA WITH APPLICATION TO WET DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Motivated by the problem of predicting annual wet chemical deposition in the eastern United States, this paper develops a framework for joint modeling of point and grid referenced spatio-temporal data. The proposed hierarchical model is able to provide accurate spatial interpolat...

  2. Change over Time in First Graders' Strategic Use of Information at Point of Difficulty in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Lea M.; Kim, Hwewon; Nelson, Kathryn S.; Fried, Mary D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe young students' actions at point of difficulty in reading and examine changes in their strategic use of sources of information. We examined errors from running records of first graders who entered Reading Recovery (RR) in the fall and ended the year reading at the first-grade level compared with RR first graders who did…

  3. Different RAN Components Relate to Reading at Different Points in Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Kaizer, Eleni L.

    2014-01-01

    The present 10-year longitudinal study examined how rapid automatized naming (RAN) components--articulation time and pause time--relate to reading fluency. Seventy-five Greek-speaking children were followed from Grade 1 to Grade 10 and were assessed five times (in Grades 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10) on RAN (digits and objects) and reading fluency (word…

  4. Real-time 2D floating-point fast Fourier transforms for seeker simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Richard; Lord, Eric; Shand, David J.

    2002-07-01

    The floating point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is one of the most useful basic functions available to the image and signal processing engineer allowing many complex and detailed special functions to be implemented more simply in the frequency domain. In the Hardware-in-the-Loop field an image transformed using FFT would allow the designer to think about accurate frequency based simulation of seeker lens effects, motion blur, detector transfer functions and much more. Unfortunately, the transform requires many hundreds of thousands or millions of floating point operations on a single modest sized image making it impractical for realtime Hardware-in-the-Loop systems. .until now. This paper outlines the development, by Nallatech, of an FPGA based IEEE floating point core. It traces the subsequent use of this core to develop a full 256 X 256 FFT and filter process implemented on COTS hardware at frame rates up to 150Hz. This transform can be demonstrated to model optical transfer functions at a far greater accuracy than the current spatial models. Other applications and extensions of this technique will be discussed such as filtering for image tracking algorithms and in the simulation of radar processing in the frequency domain.

  5. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  6. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  7. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... requirement to submit a maintenance plan for purposes of paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  8. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... requirement to submit a maintenance plan for purposes of paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  9. Real-time GPS sensing of atmospheric water vapor: Precise point positioning with orbit, clock, and phase delay corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Heise, Stefan; Wickert, Jens; Bender, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The recent development of the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service Real-Time Pilot Project and the enormous progress in precise point positioning (PPP) techniques provide a promising opportunity for real-time determination of Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) using GPS ground networks for various geodetic and meteorological applications. In this study, we develop a new real-time GPS water vapor processing system based on the PPP ambiguity fixing technique with real-time satellite orbit, clock, and phase delay corrections. We demonstrate the performance of the new real-time water vapor estimates using the currently operationally used near-real-time GPS atmospheric data and collocated microwave radiometer measurements as an independent reference. The results show that an accuracy of 1.0 ~ 2.0 mm is achievable for the new real-time GPS based IWV value. Data of such accuracy might be highly valuable for time-critical geodetic (positioning) and meteorological applications.

  10. The Effects of Part-Time Employment on High School Students' Grade Point Averages and Rate of School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffez, Jack

    To determine what effects employment will have on high school students' grade point averages and rate of school attendance, the author involved fifty-six students in an experiment. Twenty-eight students were employed part-time under the Youth Incentive Entitlement Project (YIEP). The twenty-eight students in the control group were eligible for…

  11. 13 CFR 121.602 - At what point in time must a 8(a) BD applicant be small?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BD applicant be small? 121.602 Section 121.602 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS SIZE REGULATIONS Size Eligibility Provisions and Standards Size Eligibility Requirements for the 8(a) Business Development Program § 121.602 At what point in time must a 8(a) BD...

  12. 13 CFR 121.602 - At what point in time must a 8(a) BD applicant be small?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) BD applicant be small? 121.602 Section 121.602 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS SIZE REGULATIONS Size Eligibility Provisions and Standards Size Eligibility Requirements for the 8(a) Business Development Program § 121.602 At what point in time must a 8(a) BD...

  13. 13 CFR 121.602 - At what point in time must a 8(a) BD applicant be small?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) BD applicant be small? 121.602 Section 121.602 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS SIZE REGULATIONS Size Eligibility Provisions and Standards Size Eligibility Requirements for the 8(a) Business Development Program § 121.602 At what point in time must a 8(a) BD...

  14. 13 CFR 121.602 - At what point in time must a 8(a) BD applicant be small?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) BD applicant be small? 121.602 Section 121.602 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS SIZE REGULATIONS Size Eligibility Provisions and Standards Size Eligibility Requirements for the 8(a) Business Development Program § 121.602 At what point in time must a 8(a) BD...

  15. 13 CFR 121.602 - At what point in time must a 8(a) BD applicant be small?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) BD applicant be small? 121.602 Section 121.602 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS SIZE REGULATIONS Size Eligibility Provisions and Standards Size Eligibility Requirements for the 8(a) Business Development Program § 121.602 At what point in time must a 8(a) BD...

  16. An Exploratory Investigation of Diffused Point Arrival Time and Source Credibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Leslie A.; Ward, Jean M.

    Because much conjecture (but limited empirical research) exists about the nonverbal variable to time, this exploratory study investigated the effects of differential arrival times on four dimensions of source credibility: sociability, dynamism, competence, and composure. Subjects were 84 educational secretaries with a mean age of 49 years. Each…

  17. The Use and Abuse of Part-Time Faculty: The Part-Timers' Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Wendy L.

    Problems faced by part-time faculty members are identified, and suggestions to avoid mistreatment of these teachers are offered. Disadvantages of part-time teaching include the lack of equitable pay and benefits. Since most institutions have a standard pay rate for part-timers, it is suggested that teaching excellence be recognized by creating…

  18. Point process time-frequency analysis of respiratory sinus arrhythmia under altered respiration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heartbeat. We propose an algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat interval and respiratory recordings under dynamic respiration conditions. The blood volume pressure derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PI) are modeled as an inverse gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PI and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated by a frequency domain transfer function approach. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. Experimental results confirm the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states. PMID:21096135

  19. Point process time-frequency analysis of dynamic respiratory patterns during meditation practice.

    PubMed

    Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heart beats. We propose a robust algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat intervals and respiratory recordings under dynamic breathing patterns. The blood volume pressure-derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PIs) are modeled as an inverse Gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PIs and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated via a frequency domain transfer function evaluated at instantaneous respiratory frequency where high coherence between respiration and PIs is observed. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. The presented analysis confirms the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states, reporting statistically significant increase in RSA gain as measured by our paradigm. PMID:22350435

  20. A hierarchical model combining distance sampling and time removal to estimate detection probability during avian point counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amundson, Courtney L.; Royle, J. Andrew; Handel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Imperfect detection during animal surveys biases estimates of abundance and can lead to improper conclusions regarding distribution and population trends. Farnsworth et al. (2005) developed a combined distance-sampling and time-removal model for point-transect surveys that addresses both availability (the probability that an animal is available for detection; e.g., that a bird sings) and perceptibility (the probability that an observer detects an animal, given that it is available for detection). We developed a hierarchical extension of the combined model that provides an integrated analysis framework for a collection of survey points at which both distance from the observer and time of initial detection are recorded. Implemented in a Bayesian framework, this extension facilitates evaluating covariates on abundance and detection probability, incorporating excess zero counts (i.e. zero-inflation), accounting for spatial autocorrelation, and estimating population density. Species-specific characteristics, such as behavioral displays and territorial dispersion, may lead to different patterns of availability and perceptibility, which may, in turn, influence the performance of such hierarchical models. Therefore, we first test our proposed model using simulated data under different scenarios of availability and perceptibility. We then illustrate its performance with empirical point-transect data for a songbird that consistently produces loud, frequent, primarily auditory signals, the Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla); and for 2 ptarmigan species (Lagopus spp.) that produce more intermittent, subtle, and primarily visual cues. Data were collected by multiple observers along point transects across a broad landscape in southwest Alaska, so we evaluated point-level covariates on perceptibility (observer and habitat), availability (date within season and time of day), and abundance (habitat, elevation, and slope), and included a nested point

  1. A new universal equation for the time of transfer between two points of the central gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdaev, M. N.

    2011-10-01

    The paper presents the derivation of two new equations for calculating the time of transfer between two points of the central gravitational field: for hyperbolic orbits and the universal equation for elliptical and hyperbolic orbits. In the paper we have used as an independent variable, instead of the linear elements (semimajor axis, focal parameter of orbit or a chord connecting the ends of boundary radii of transfer), the angular parameter—the angle between the radius vector of an initial point of transfer and the vector of initial velocity of transfer. Paper's material is a continuation of that presented in the "Space research" Journal, vol. 2, March-April, 2009.

  2. Atmospheric plume progression as a function of time and distance from the release point for radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Hayes, James C.; Miley, Harry S.

    2015-10-01

    The International Monitoring System contains up to 80 stations around the world that have aerosol and xenon monitoring systems designed to detect releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere from nuclear tests. A rule of thumb description of plume concentration and duration versus time and distance from the release point is useful when designing and deploying new sample collection systems. This paper uses plume development from atmospheric transport modeling to provide a power-law rule describing atmospheric dilution factors as a function of distance from the release point.

  3. Timing readout in paper device for quantitative point-of-use hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme-based bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Fan, Jinlong; Nie, Jinfang; Le, Shangwang; Zhu, Wenyuan; Gao, Dong; Yang, Jiani; Zhang, Songbai; Li, Jianping

    2015-11-15

    This work describes a quantitative point-of-use hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme-based assay that integrates a simple timing detection motif with low-cost, portable microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs). The timing readout is based on the selective DNAzyme-mediated wettability change of paper from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity. Its utility is well demonstrated with sensitive, specific detection of K(+) ion as a model analyte in artificial samples as well as real human serum samples. This new method only requires a ubiquitous cheap timer (or a cell phone with a timing function) to provide quantitative results. It could offer new opportunities for the development of more peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme-based bioassays that are simple, affordable, portable, and operable by minimally-trained users for broad point-of-use applications especially in resource-poor settings. PMID:26042873

  4. Grayscale image segmentation for real-time traffic sign recognition: the hardware point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tam P.; Deng, Guang; Elton, Darrell

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we study several grayscale-based image segmentation methods for real-time road sign recognition applications on an FPGA hardware platform. The performance of different image segmentation algorithms in different lighting conditions are initially compared using PC simulation. Based on these results and analysis, suitable algorithms are implemented and tested on a real-time FPGA speed sign detection system. Experimental results show that the system using segmented images uses significantly less hardware resources on an FPGA while maintaining comparable system's performance. The system is capable of processing 60 live video frames per second.

  5. A key time point for cell growth and magnetosome synthesis of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense based on real-time analysis of physiological factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Li, Shuqi; Huang, Xiuliang; Tang, Tao; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhang, Tongwei; Li, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Pure culture of magnetotactic bacteria with high magnetosome yield has been achieved for only a few strains. The major obstacles involve the nutritional requirements and culture conditions of the cells. To increase cell density and magnetosome production, it is necessary to elucidate the physiological characteristics of a particular strain during cell growth and develop an appropriate artificial control strategy. Large-scale culture of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 was successfully performed for 48 h in a 42-L autofermentor, and several key physiological parameters were measured in real time. Maximal values of cell density (OD565) (19.4) and cell yield (dry weight) (4.76 g/L) were attained at 40 h. The key time point for cell growth and magnetosome formation was found to be 18–20 h. At this point, cells entered the log phase of growth, the maximal values of Cmag (1.78), iron content (0.47%), and magnetosome number (26 ± 3 per cell) were observed, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity began to decrease more rapidly, ATP content dropped to an extremely low level (0.17 fmol), and reducing power (NADH/NAD+ ratio) began to increase very rapidly. Excessive levels of dissolved oxygen (≥20 ppb) and lactic acid in the medium caused notable cytotoxic effects after 20 h. Artificial control measures for fermentation must be based on realistic cell physiological conditions. At the key time point (18–20 h), cell density is high and magnetosomes have matured. The process of magnetosome synthesis involves a high consumption of ATP and reducing power, and the cells require replenishment of nutrients prior to the 18–20 h time point. Culture conditions that effectively minimize dissolved oxygen accumulation, lactic acid content, and reducing power at this point will enhance magnetosome yield without obvious inhibition of cell growth. PMID:23898327

  6. Grade Point Average as a Predictor of Timely Graduation from Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Delores J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if admission selection strategies that utilize cumulative and/or pre-requisite GPA are predictive of timely graduation for associate degree nursing (RN-AD) students. Data were obtained from de-identified records of 437 associate degree nursing students enrolled in three Midwest community colleges from…

  7. The cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay: A point-of-care diagnostic at an opportune time.

    PubMed

    Tang, Michele W; Clemons, Karl V; Katzenstein, David A; Stevens, David A

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a devastating HIV-related opportunistic infection, affecting nearly 1 million individuals and causing over 500 000 deaths each year. The burden of disease is greatest in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, where cryptococcal disease is the most common cause of meningitis. Rapid, accurate and affordable diagnosis of cryptococcal disease has been lacking in many of the most heavily affected areas. Here, we review a point-of-care assay for cryptococcal disease, the dipstick-formatted cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (LFA) (IMMY, Norman, OK). In comparison to culture, the assay is 99.5% sensitive and 98% specific. In comparison to other commercially available tests for cryptococcal antigen, the LFA has equal or superior sensitivity and specificity in CSF, plasma and serum samples. We discuss potential applications for the use of the assay in resource-limited settings, including what is likely to be an important role of the LFA in screening for early cryptococcal infection before clinical disease and in evaluating pre-emptive treatment. PMID:25612826

  8. [Forestalling policy as a strategic objective of space biology and medicine at the present time point].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B

    2011-01-01

    The article ushers into the acrimonious debates about paths of innovative development and criticality of fundamental sciences in technological progress for Russia security, and breakthrough potential. Among the alternative routes of technical development are different forms of priority boost of growing points in which Russia has attained and held steadily the leading position occupying a prominent segment in the international division of labor. Space effort of Russia gives a model example of successful implementation of the national program and demonstrates leadership in this area of human activities. The article presents analysis of the factors and circumstances that predetermined the winning in the early, Gagarin's period of piloted space flights of the forefront position of the country as well as the vector of cosmonautics' advance for many years ahead Despite the host of issues with implementation of the ISS utilization program and planning of exploration missions to the Moon and Mars, the unique experience of preparations and carrying out investigations and tests with humans in space, the enormous groundwork in fundamental biomedical researches over the past 50 years of piloted flights allow optimistic prognosis of gaining headway with essentially new ambitious space projects. The key question is whether the forestalling policy of priority development of piloted cosmonautics as the most integrated and science intensive sector of innovation techniques will be realized. The answer will guide near- and long-term future of the space industry and, consequently, the fortune of national fundamental space sciences, space biomedicine being its part and parcel. PMID:21675188

  9. [Multiple time scales analysis of spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss within watershed].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-bing; Chen, Xing-wei; Chen, Ying

    2015-07-01

    Identification of the critical source areas of non-point source pollution is an important means to control the non-point source pollution within the watershed. In order to further reveal the impact of multiple time scales on the spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss, a SWAT model of Shanmei Reservoir watershed was developed. Based on the simulation of total nitrogen (TN) loss intensity of all 38 subbasins, spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen loss and critical source areas were analyzed at three time scales of yearly average, monthly average and rainstorms flood process, respectively. Furthermore, multiple linear correlation analysis was conducted to analyze the contribution of natural environment and anthropogenic disturbance on nitrogen loss. The results showed that there were significant spatial differences of TN loss in Shanmei Reservoir watershed at different time scales, and the spatial differentiation degree of nitrogen loss was in the order of monthly average > yearly average > rainstorms flood process. TN loss load mainly came from upland Taoxi subbasin, which was identified as the critical source area. At different time scales, land use types (such as farmland and forest) were always the dominant factor affecting the spatial distribution of nitrogen loss, while the effect of precipitation and runoff on the nitrogen loss was only taken in no fertilization month and several processes of storm flood at no fertilization date. This was mainly due to the significant spatial variation of land use and fertilization, as well as the low spatial variability of precipitation and runoff. PMID:26710649

  10. Joint transfer of time and frequency signals and multi-point synchronization via fiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Cheng; Wei, Chen; Qin, Liu; Dan, Xu; Fei, Yang; You-Zhen, Gui; Hai-Wen, Cai

    2016-01-01

    A system of jointly transferring time signals with a rate of 1 pulse per second (PPS) and frequency signals of 10 MHz via a dense wavelength division multiplex-based (DWDM) fiber is demonstrated in this paper. The noises of the fiber links are suppressed and compensated for by a controlled fiber delay line. A method of calibrating and characterizing time is described. The 1PPS is synchronized by feed-forward calibrating the fiber delays precisely. The system is experimentally examined via a 110 km spooled fiber in laboratory. The frequency stabilities of the user end with compensation are 1.8×10-14 at 1 s and 2.0×10-17 at 104 s average time. The calculated uncertainty of time synchronization is 13.1 ps, whereas the direct measurement of the uncertainty is 12 ps. Next, the frequency and 1PPS are transferred via a metropolitan area optical fiber network from one central site to two remote sites with distances of 14 km and 110 km. The frequency stabilities of 14 km link reach 3.0×10-14 averaged in 1 s and 1.4×10-17 in 104 s respectively; and the stabilities of 110 km link are 8.3×10-14 and 1.7×10-17, respectively. The accuracies of synchronization are estimated to be 12.3 ps for the 14 km link and 13.1 ps for the 110 km link, respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405227).

  11. Real-Time Point Positioning Performance Evaluation of Single-Frequency Receivers Using NASA's Global Differential GPS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Iijima, Byron; Meyer, Robert; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Accad, Elie

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of a single-frequency receiver using the 1-Hz differential corrections as provided by NASA's global differential GPS system. While the dual-frequency user has the ability to eliminate the ionosphere error by taking a linear combination of observables, the single-frequency user must remove or calibrate this error by other means. To remove the ionosphere error we take advantage of the fact that the magnitude of the group delay in range observable and the carrier phase advance have the same magnitude but are opposite in sign. A way to calibrate this error is to use a real-time database of grid points computed by JPL's RTI (Real-Time Ionosphere) software. In both cases we evaluate the positional accuracy of a kinematic carrier phase based point positioning method on a global extent.

  12. A material point time integration procedure for anisotropic, thermo rheologically simple, viscoelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, H.; Ahmad, M. F.

    This study presents an effective and robust time integration procedure for general anisotropic, thermal rheologically simple viscoelasticity, that is suitable for implementation in a broad spectrum of general purpose nonlinear finite element programs. It features a judicious choice of state variables which record the extent of inelastic flow (creep), a stable backward Euler integration step, and a consistent tangent operator. Numerical examples involving homogeneous stress states such as uniaxial tension and simple shear, and non-uniform stress states such as a beam under tip load, were carried out by incorporating the present scheme into a general purpose FEM package. Excellent agreement with analytical results is observed.

  13. Solar glare hazard analysis tool on account of determined points of time

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K; Sims, Cianan Alexander

    2014-09-23

    Technologies pertaining to determining when glare will be perceived by a hypothetical observer from a glare source and the intensity of glare that will be perceived by the hypothetical observer from the glare source are described herein. A first location of a potential source of solar glare is received, and a second location of the hypothetical observer is received. Based upon such locations, including respective elevations, and known positions of the sun over time, a determination as to when the hypothetical observer will perceive glare from the potential source of solar glare is made. Subsequently, an amount of irradiance entering the eye of the hypothetical observer is calculated to assess potential ocular hazards.

  14. Self-action of a point charge in a wormhole space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Khusnutdinov, Nail R.; Bakhmatov, Ilya V.

    2007-12-15

    We consider the self-energy and the self-force for an electrically charged particle at rest in the wormhole space-time. We develop a general approach to finding the self-force and apply it to the two specific profiles of the wormhole throat with singular and with smooth curvature. The self-force for these two profiles is found in manifest form; it turns out to be an attractive force. We also find an expression for the self-force in the case of arbitrary symmetric throat profile. Far from the throat the self-force is always attractive.

  15. The relative timing between eye and hand in rapid sequential pointing is affected by time pressure, but not by advance knowledge.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, F J A; van Polanen, V; Savelsbergh, G J P; Bennett, S J

    2011-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of timing constraints and advance knowledge on eye-hand coordination strategy in a sequential pointing task. Participants were required to point at two successively appearing targets on a screen while the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and the trial order were manipulated, such that timing constraints were high (ISI = 300 ms) or low (ISI = 450 ms) and advance knowledge of the target location was present (fixed order) or absent (random order). Analysis of eye and finger onset and completion times per segment of the sequence indicated that oculo-manual behaviour was in general characterized by eye movements preceding the finger, as well as 'gaze anchoring' (i.e. eye fixation of the first target until completion of the finger movement towards that target). Advance knowledge of future target locations lead to shorter latency times of eye and hand, and smaller eye-hand lead times, which in combination resulted in shorter total movement times. There was, however, no effect of advance knowledge on the duration of gaze anchoring. In contrast, gaze anchoring did change as a function of the interval between successive stimuli and was shorter with a 300 ms ISI versus 450 ms ISI. Further correlation analysis provided some indication that shorter residual latency is associated with shorter pointing duration, without affecting accuracy. These results are consistent with a neural mechanism governing the coupling of eye and arm movements, which has been suggested to reside in the superior colliculus. The temporal coordination resulting from this coupling is a function of the time pressure on the visuo-manual system resulting from the appearance of external stimuli. PMID:21744087

  16. An engineering time-domain model for curve squeal: Tangential point-contact model and Green's functions approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenzerovic, I.; Kropp, W.; Pieringer, A.

    2016-08-01

    Curve squeal is a strong tonal sound that may arise when a railway vehicle negotiates a tight curve. In contrast to frequency-domain models, time-domain models are able to capture the nonlinear and transient nature of curve squeal. However, these models are computationally expensive due to requirements for fine spatial and time discretization. In this paper, a computationally efficient engineering model for curve squeal in the time-domain is proposed. It is based on a steady-state point-contact model for the tangential wheel/rail contact and a Green's functions approach for wheel and rail dynamics. The squeal model also includes a simple model of sound radiation from the railway wheel from the literature. A validation of the tangential point-contact model against Kalker's transient variational contact model reveals that the point-contact model performs well within the squeal model up to at least 5 kHz. The proposed squeal model is applied to investigate the influence of lateral creepage, friction and wheel/rail contact position on squeal occurrence and amplitude. The study indicates a significant influence of the wheel/rail contact position on squeal frequencies and amplitudes. Friction and lateral creepage show an influence on squeal occurrence and amplitudes, but this is only secondary to the influence of the contact position.

  17. Specific inhibition of nitric oxide synthases at different time points in a murine model of pulmonary sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Hamahata, Atsumori; Traber, Daniel L; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2011-01-21

    Excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase (NOS) and a subsequent oxidative stress reaction are thought to be critically involved in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Previous studies suggested that NO production by neuronal NOS (nNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) is implemented in the disease process at different time points after the injury. Here we tested the roles of selective pharmacological inhibition of nNOS and iNOS at different time points in a murine model of pulmonary sepsis. The injury was induced by intranasal administration of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.2×10(7) colony-forming units) in C57BL/6 wild-type mice. The animals received no treatment (control) or treatment with a specific nNOS inhibitor (4 or 8h), iNOS inhibitor (4 or 8h), or non-specific NOS inhibitor (4 or 8h). In controls, the injury was associated with excessive releases of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the plasma, enhanced tissue lipid peroxidation, and decreased survival. Non-specific NOS inhibition at either time point did not influence survival and was not further investigated. While nNOS inhibition at 4h was associated with a trend toward improved survival and significantly reduced contents of lung nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) and liver malondialdehyde, the blockade of nNOS at 8h had no effect on these parameters. In contrast, early iNOS inhibition was associated with a trend toward decreased survival and no effects on lung NO(x) and liver malondialdehyde contents, whereas later iNOS blockade was associated with decreased malondialdehyde content in liver homogenates. In conclusion, pulmonary sepsis in mice may be beneficially influenced by specific pharmacological nNOS inhibition at an earlier time point and iNOS inhibition at a later time points post-injury. Future investigations should identify the time changes of the expression and activation of NOS isoforms. PMID:21184738

  18. Instantaneous and time-averaged dispersion and measurement models for estimation theory applications with elevated point source plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamante, J. M.; Englar, T. S., Jr.; Jazwinski, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Estimation theory, which originated in guidance and control research, is applied to the analysis of air quality measurements and atmospheric dispersion models to provide reliable area-wide air quality estimates. A method for low dimensional modeling (in terms of the estimation state vector) of the instantaneous and time-average pollutant distributions is discussed. In particular, the fluctuating plume model of Gifford (1959) is extended to provide an expression for the instantaneous concentration due to an elevated point source. Individual models are also developed for all parameters in the instantaneous and the time-average plume equations, including the stochastic properties of the instantaneous fluctuating plume.

  19. Multiple Time Courses of Vestibular Set-Point Adaptation Revealed by Sustained Magnetic Field Stimulation of the Labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Jareonsettasin, Prem; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Ward, Bryan K; Roberts, Dale C; Schubert, Michael C; Zee, David S

    2016-05-23

    A major focus in neurobiology is how the brain adapts its motor behavior to changes in its internal and external environments [1, 2]. Much is known about adaptively optimizing the amplitude and direction of eye and limb movements, for example, but little is known about another essential form of learning, "set-point" adaptation. Set-point adaptation balances tonic activity so that reciprocally acting, agonist and antagonist muscles have a stable platform from which to launch accurate movements. Here, we use the vestibulo-ocular reflex-a simple behavior that stabilizes the position of the eye while the head is moving-to investigate how tonic activity is adapted toward a new set point to prevent eye drift when the head is still [3, 4]. Set-point adaptation was elicited with magneto-hydrodynamic vestibular stimulation (MVS) by placing normal humans in a 7T MRI for 90 min. MVS is ideal for prolonged labyrinthine activation because it mimics constant head acceleration and induces a sustained nystagmus similar to natural vestibular lesions [5, 6]. The MVS-induced nystagmus diminished slowly but incompletely over multiple timescales. We propose a new adaptation hypothesis, using a cascade of imperfect mathematical integrators, that reproduces the response to MVS (and more natural chair rotations), including the gradual decrease in nystagmus as the set point changes over progressively longer time courses. MVS set-point adaptation is a biological model with applications to basic neurophysiological research into all types of movements [7], functional brain imaging [8], and treatment of vestibular and higher-level attentional disorders by introducing new biases to counteract pathological ones [9]. PMID:27185559

  20. Real-time resolution of point mutations that cause phenovariance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Zhan, Xiaowei; Bu, Chun-Hui; Lyon, Stephen; Pratt, David; Hildebrand, Sara; Choi, Jin Huk; Zhang, Zhao; Zeng, Ming; Wang, Kuan-wen; Turer, Emre; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Duanwu; Yue, Tao; Wang, Ying; Shi, Hexin; Wang, Jianhui; Sun, Lei; SoRelle, Jeff; McAlpine, William; Hutchins, Noelle; Zhan, Xiaoming; Fina, Maggy; Gobert, Rochelle; Quan, Jiexia; Kreutzer, McKensie; Arnett, Stephanie; Hawkins, Kimberly; Leach, Ashley; Tate, Christopher; Daniel, Chad; Reyna, Carlos; Prince, Lauren; Davis, Sheila; Purrington, Joel; Bearden, Rick; Weatherly, Jennifer; White, Danielle; Russell, Jamie; Sun, Qihua; Tang, Miao; Li, Xiaohong; Scott, Lindsay; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; McInerney, Gerald M.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; Xie, Yang; Beutler, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    With the wide availability of massively parallel sequencing technologies, genetic mapping has become the rate limiting step in mammalian forward genetics. Here we introduce a method for real-time identification of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutations that cause phenotypes in mice. All mutations are identified by whole exome G1 progenitor sequencing and their zygosity is established in G2/G3 mice before phenotypic assessment. Quantitative and qualitative traits, including lethal effects, in single or multiple combined pedigrees are then analyzed with Linkage Analyzer, a software program that detects significant linkage between individual mutations and aberrant phenotypic scores and presents processed data as Manhattan plots. As multiple alleles of genes are acquired through mutagenesis, pooled “superpedigrees” are created to analyze the effects. Our method is distinguished from conventional forward genetic methods because it permits (1) unbiased declaration of mappable phenotypes, including those that are incompletely penetrant (2), automated identification of causative mutations concurrent with phenotypic screening, without the need to outcross mutant mice to another strain and backcross them, and (3) exclusion of genes not involved in phenotypes of interest. We validated our approach and Linkage Analyzer for the identification of 47 mutations in 45 previously known genes causative for adaptive immune phenotypes; our analysis also implicated 474 genes not previously associated with immune function. The method described here permits forward genetic analysis in mice, limited only by the rates of mutant production and screening. PMID:25605905

  1. Real-time resolution of point mutations that cause phenovariance in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhan, Xiaowei; Bu, Chun-Hui; Lyon, Stephen; Pratt, David; Hildebrand, Sara; Choi, Jin Huk; Zhang, Zhao; Zeng, Ming; Wang, Kuan-wen; Turer, Emre; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Duanwu; Yue, Tao; Wang, Ying; Shi, Hexin; Wang, Jianhui; Sun, Lei; SoRelle, Jeff; McAlpine, William; Hutchins, Noelle; Zhan, Xiaoming; Fina, Maggy; Gobert, Rochelle; Quan, Jiexia; Kreutzer, McKensie; Arnett, Stephanie; Hawkins, Kimberly; Leach, Ashley; Tate, Christopher; Daniel, Chad; Reyna, Carlos; Prince, Lauren; Davis, Sheila; Purrington, Joel; Bearden, Rick; Weatherly, Jennifer; White, Danielle; Russell, Jamie; Sun, Qihua; Tang, Miao; Li, Xiaohong; Scott, Lindsay; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; McInerney, Gerald M; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Xie, Yang; Beutler, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    With the wide availability of massively parallel sequencing technologies, genetic mapping has become the rate limiting step in mammalian forward genetics. Here we introduce a method for real-time identification of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutations that cause phenotypes in mice. All mutations are identified by whole exome G1 progenitor sequencing and their zygosity is established in G2/G3 mice before phenotypic assessment. Quantitative and qualitative traits, including lethal effects, in single or multiple combined pedigrees are then analyzed with Linkage Analyzer, a software program that detects significant linkage between individual mutations and aberrant phenotypic scores and presents processed data as Manhattan plots. As multiple alleles of genes are acquired through mutagenesis, pooled "superpedigrees" are created to analyze the effects. Our method is distinguished from conventional forward genetic methods because it permits (1) unbiased declaration of mappable phenotypes, including those that are incompletely penetrant (2), automated identification of causative mutations concurrent with phenotypic screening, without the need to outcross mutant mice to another strain and backcross them, and (3) exclusion of genes not involved in phenotypes of interest. We validated our approach and Linkage Analyzer for the identification of 47 mutations in 45 previously known genes causative for adaptive immune phenotypes; our analysis also implicated 474 genes not previously associated with immune function. The method described here permits forward genetic analysis in mice, limited only by the rates of mutant production and screening. PMID:25605905

  2. Regulation of intracellular Zn homeostasis in two intestinal epithelial cell models at various maturation time points.

    PubMed

    Gefeller, Eva-Maria; Bondzio, Angelika; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Martens, Holger; Einspanier, Ralf; Scharfen, Franziska; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert; Lodemann, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    After weaning, piglets are often fed diets supplemented with high concentrations of zinc (Zn) to decrease post-weaning diarrhea. The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulation of Zn homeostasis within intestinal epithelial cells during excessive Zn exposure. High Zn concentrations elevated the intracellular Zn level in IPEC-J2 and Caco-2 cells which was influenced by differentiation status and time of exposure. With increasing Zn concentrations, mRNA and protein levels of metallothionein (MT) and zinc transporter 1 (ZnT1) were upregulated, whereas zinc transporter 4 (ZIP4) expression was downregulated. Metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF1) mRNA expression was upregulated at high Zn concentrations in IPEC-J2 cells, which corresponded to higher intracellular Zn concentrations. Based on these results, we suggest that intestinal epithelial cells adapt the expression of these genes to the amount of extracellular Zn available in order to maintain Zn homeostasis. Cell line-dependent differences in the regulation of Zn homeostasis were detected. PMID:25757458

  3. Station-keeping of real Earth-Moon libration point orbits using discrete-time sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yijun; Gómez, Gerard; Masdemont, Josep J.; Tang, Guojian

    2014-10-01

    In this work, station-keeping of real Earth-Moon libration point orbits is studied using discrete-time sliding mode control (DSMC). For comparison, a discrete linear quadratic regulator (DLQR) controller is also considered. The libration orbits are termed “real” in the sense that they are obtained in a complete Solar System model, taking into account all the gravitational forces of the planets, the Moon, and the Sun. This is a key point for any station-keeping study, that the use of far from real orbits as nominal ones increases unnecessarily the station-keeping cost. The resulting controlled system, linearised with respect to some nominal orbit, takes a discrete-time form suitable for applying impulsive maneuvers. The DSMC controller is designed by the reaching law with the parameters chosen in an adaptive way. A method for designing the sliding surface is proposed. In order to assess and compare the performance of the two controllers, simulations are done for six libration point orbits around the L2 point (three halo orbits and three Lissajous ones) during a time span of 10 years. Several practical constraints are also considered in the simulations. Extensive Monte Carlo results show that the proposed DSMC approach is able to maintain the spacecraft within a close vicinity of the nominal orbits with a maneuver cost less than 2 m/s per year, and it outperforms the DLQR approach in terms of the position controllability. Some comparison with previous results obtained by other authors with different procedures is also given.

  4. Immunoendocrine responses of male spinal cord injured athletes to 1-hour self-paced exercise: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allgrove, Judith E; Chapman, Mark; Christides, Tatiana; Smith, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a 1 h, self-paced handcycling time trial on blood leukocytes, mucosal immunity, and markers of stress in paraplegic athletes. Nine male paraplegic athletes (spinal injury level thoracic 4-lumbar 2) performed 1 h of handcycling exercise on a standard 400 m athletics track. Heart rate (HR) was measured continuously during exercise, and a retrospective rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was obtained immediately after. Venous blood and saliva samples were collected immediately before exercise (Pre-Ex), after exercise (End-Ex), and 1 h postexercise (1-h Post). The athletes completed mean +/- standard error of mean 22.4 +/- 1.1 km cycling at HR 165 +/- 2 beats/min, RPE 15 +/- 1, and blood lactate 7.9 +/- 2.5 mmol/L. Total leukocytes increased 72% and neutrophils increased 74% End-Ex; both remained elevated at 1-h Post (both p < 0.05). Lymphocytes increased 53% and natural killer cells increased 175% End-Ex (both p < 0.05), but returned to near baseline levels 1-h Post. Increases (p < 0.05) were observed End-Ex in alpha-amylase activity (p < 0.05), which returned to baseline at 1-h Post, but there was no significant change in saliva flow rate, salivary immunoglobulin A, or cortisol. These data confirm that 1 h of handcycling exercise elevated circulating leukocytes but had a minimal effect on mucosal immunity. These changes appear to be associated with alpha-amylase rather than cortisol. PMID:23299262

  5. Real time, TV-based, point-image quantizer and sorter

    DOEpatents

    Case, Arthur L.; Davidson, Jackson B.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for improving the vertical resolution in a television-based, two-dimensional readout for radiation detection systems such as are used to determine the location of light or nuclear radiation impinging a target area viewed by a television camera, where it is desired to store the data indicative of the centroid location of such images. In the example embodiment, impinging nuclear radiation detected in the form of a scintillation occurring in a crystal is stored as a charge image on a television camera tube target. The target is scanned in a raster and the image position is stored according to a corresponding vertical scan number and horizontal position number along the scan. To determine the centroid location of an image that may overlap a number of horizontal scan lines along the vertical axis of the raster, digital logic circuits are provided with at least four series-connected shift registers, each having 512 bit positions according to a selected 512 horizontal increment of resolutions along a scan line. The registers are shifted by clock pulses at a rate of 512 pulses per scan line. When an image or portion thereof is detected along a scan, its horizontal center location is determined and the present front bit is set in the first shift register and shifted through the registers one at a time for each horizontal scan. Each register is compared bit-by-bit with the preceding register to detect coincident set bit positions until the last scan line detecting a portion of the image is determined. Depending on the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the image is shifted, circuitry is provided to store the vertical center position of the event according to the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the event is shifted. Interpolation circuitry is provided to determine if the event centroid is between adjacent scan lines and stored in a vertical address accordingly. The horizontal location of the event

  6. An Efficient Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (RT-PPP) Solution for Offshore Surveys in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Nurhan Çelik, Rahmi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the international global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) service (IGS) has launched the real-time service (IGS-RTS). The IGS-RTS has shown promise accuracy in precise point positioning applications. Currently, the precise point positioning technique is used extensively in marine applications. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the real-time precise point positioning (RT-PPP) solution using the IGS-RTS for offshore surveys in Turkey. Dual-frequency GPS data is collected onboard a vessel and then processed using the Bernese 5.2 PPP module. The IGS-RTS precise orbit and clock products are used in order to account for the satellite orbit and clock products. To investigate the accuracy of the RT-PPP technique, the positioning accuracy is assessed and compared with the traditional double-difference solution. It is shown that the RT-PPP solution has good agreement with the double-difference solution. Also, the proposed solution efficiently fulfills the international maritime organization (IMO) standards for the offshore surveys.

  7. Remotely-sensed, nocturnal, dew point correlates with malaria transmission in Southern Province, Zambia: a time-series study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum transmission has decreased significantly in Zambia in the last decade. The malaria transmission is influenced by environmental variables. Incorporation of environmental variables in models of malaria transmission likely improves model fit and predicts probable trends in malaria disease. This work is based on the hypothesis that remotely-sensed environmental factors, including nocturnal dew point, are associated with malaria transmission and sustain foci of transmission during the low transmission season in the Southern Province of Zambia. Methods Thirty-eight rural health centres in Southern Province, Zambia were divided into three zones based on transmission patterns. Correlations between weekly malaria cases and remotely-sensed nocturnal dew point, nocturnal land surface temperature as well as vegetation indices and rainfall were evaluated in time-series analyses from 2012 week 19 to 2013 week 36. Zonal as well as clinic-based, multivariate, autoregressive, integrated, moving average (ARIMAX) models implementing environmental variables were developed to model transmission in 2011 week 19 to 2012 week 18 and forecast transmission in 2013 week 37 to week 41. Results During the dry, low transmission season significantly higher vegetation indices, nocturnal land surface temperature and nocturnal dew point were associated with the areas of higher transmission. Environmental variables improved ARIMAX models. Dew point and normalized differentiated vegetation index were significant predictors and improved all zonal transmission models. In the high-transmission zone, this was also seen for land surface temperature. Clinic models were improved by adding dew point and land surface temperature as well as normalized differentiated vegetation index. The mean average error of prediction for ARIMAX models ranged from 0.7 to 33.5%. Forecasts of malaria incidence were valid for three out of five rural health centres; however, with poor

  8. A porcine model of relief of unilateral ureteral obstruction: study on self-repairing capability over multiple time points.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Sun, Jing; Miao, Lining; Ji, Lei; Luo, Manyu; Li, Bing; Cui, Wenpeng; Wang, Yangwei; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-08-01

    It is still controversial whether renal tubular interstitial fibrosis (TIF) is a reversible process. Although previous studies examining TIF have been carried out in rodents, their kidney size and physiological character differ with humans, and the difference among diverse individuals before and after damage was obvious. Thus an experimental animal model to simulate human kidney disease was urged to be established. In order to clarify whether TIF is reversible, and the exact time points that the kidney has the capacity to be repaired, a porcine relief of unilateral ureteral obstruction (R-UUO) model was developed. Kidney damage and reparation were observed dynamically in vivo over various time points. Pigs were randomized divided into three groups (n = 6): UUO 5 days group, UUO 7 days, and UUO 10 days group. Each porcine in that groups underwent UUO and subsequent R-UUO for three time points. Renal function, histological structure, and protein expressions of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin and E-cadherin were evaluated at different time points. Following R-UUO after 5 and 7 days of UUO, compared to UUO, serum creatinine levels were significantly decreased. Renal pathological tissue damage was repaired. The expressions of α-SMA and vimentin were decreased and E-cadherin expression was increased (P < 0.05). However, during R-UUO 14, 28, and 56 days after 10 days of UUO, serum creatinine was not decreased significantly. The expressions of α-SMA and vimentin consistently remained at high levels. Renal damage was unable to be restored and resulted in chronic lesions. Kidney damage induced by UUO can be reversed in early stages. However, longer time of UUO with significant levels of TIF showed limited reversibility. The porcine R-UUO model provides an ideal animal model for the investigation of kidney injury and repair as well as for the evaluation of the effect of drug treatment. PMID:27381184

  9. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of this part, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of this part, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of this part, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of this part, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate...

  13. Time-Point Dependent Activation of Autophagy and the UPS in SOD1G93A Mice Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana Cristina; Gasco, Samanta; Muñoz, María Jesús; Zaragoza, Pilar; Osta, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a selective loss of motor neurons together with a progressive muscle weakness. Albeit the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease remain unknown, growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle can be a target of ALS toxicity. In particular, the two main intracellular degradation mechanisms, autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome degradative system (UPS) have been poorly studied in this tissue. In this study we investigated the activation of autophagy and the UPS as well as apoptosis in the skeletal muscle from SOD1G93A mice along disease progression. Our results showed a significant upregulation of proteasome activity at early symptomatic stage, while the autophagy activation was found at presymptomatic and terminal stages. The mRNA upregulated levels of LC3, p62, Beclin1, Atg5 and E2f1 were only observed at symptomatic and terminal stages, which reinforced the time-point activation of autophagy. Furthermore, no apoptosis activation was observed along disease progression. The combined data provided clear evidence for the first time that there is a time-point dependent activation of autophagy and UPS in the skeletal muscle from SOD1G93A mice. PMID:26244336

  14. Does Delayed-Time-Point Imaging Improve 18F-FDG-PET in Patients With MALT Lymphoma?

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhoefer, Marius E.; Giraudo, Chiara; Senn, Daniela; Hartenbach, Markus; Weber, Michael; Rausch, Ivo; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Herold, Christian J.; Hacker, Marcus; Pones, Matthias; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Müllauer, Leonhard; Dolak, Werner; Lukas, Julius; Raderer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether in patients with extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT), delayed–time-point 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) performs better than standard–time-point 18F-FDG-PET. Materials and Methods Patients with untreated histologically verified MALT lymphoma, who were undergoing pretherapeutic 18F-FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) and consecutive 18F-FDG-PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using a single 18F-FDG injection, in the course of a larger-scale prospective trial, were included. Region-based sensitivity and specificity, and patient-based sensitivity of the respective 18F-FDG-PET scans at time points 1 (45–60 minutes after tracer injection, TP1) and 2 (100–150 minutes after tracer injection, TP2), relative to the reference standard, were calculated. Lesion-to-liver and lesion-to-blood SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake values) ratios were also assessed. Results 18F-FDG-PET at TP1 was true positive in 15 o f 23 involved regions, and 18F-FDG-PET at TP2 was true-positive in 20 of 23 involved regions; no false-positive regions were noted. Accordingly, region-based sensitivities and specificities were 65.2% (confidence interval [CI], 45.73%–84.67%) and 100% (CI, 100%-100%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP1; and 87.0% (CI, 73.26%–100%) and 100% (CI, 100%-100%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP2, respectively. FDG-PET at TP1 detected lymphoma in at least one nodal or extranodal region in 7 of 13 patients, and 18F-FDG-PET at TP2 in 10 of 13 patients; accordingly, patient-based sensitivity was 53.8% (CI, 26.7%–80.9%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP1, and 76.9% (CI, 54.0%–99.8%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP2. Lesion-to-liver and lesion-to-blood maximum standardized uptake value ratios were significantly lower at TP1 (ratios, 1.05 ± 0.40 and 1.52 ± 0.62) than at TP2 (ratios, 1.67 ± 0.74 and 2.56 ± 1.10; P = 0.003 and P = 0.001). Conclusions Delayed–time-point imaging

  15. The effects of arm movement on reaction time in patients with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Marzieh; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Maroufi, Nader; Ahmadi, Amir; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Emrani, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myofascial pain syndrome is a significant source of mechanical pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of arm movement on reaction time in females with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. Methods: In this interventional study, a convenience sample of fifteen women with one active MTP, fifteen women with one latent MTP in the upper trapezius, and fifteen normal healthy women were participated. Participants were asked to stand for 10 seconds in an erect standing position. Muscle reaction times were recorded including anterior deltoid (AD), cervical paraspinal (CP) lumbar paraspinal (LP), both of upper trapezius (UT), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and medial head of gastrocnemius (GcM). Participants were asked to flex their arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA Test. Results: There was significant differences in motor time and reaction time between active and control groups (p< 0.05) except for GcM. There was no significant difference in motor time between active and passive groups except for UT without MTP and SCM (p< 0.05). Also, there were no significant differences in motor times between latent MTP and control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in premotor times between the three groups. Conclusion: The present study shows that patients with active MTP need more time to react to stimulus, but patients with latent MTP are similar to healthy subjects in the reaction time. Patients with active MTP had less compatibility with environmental stimulations, and they responded to a specific stimulation with variability in Surface Electromyography (SEMG). PMID:26913258

  16. Prospective validation of a 1-hour algorithm to rule-out and rule-in acute myocardial infarction using a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay

    PubMed Central

    Reichlin, Tobias; Twerenbold, Raphael; Wildi, Karin; Gimenez, Maria Rubini; Bergsma, Nathalie; Haaf, Philip; Druey, Sophie; Puelacher, Christian; Moehring, Berit; Freese, Michael; Stelzig, Claudia; Krivoshei, Lian; Hillinger, Petra; Jäger, Cedric; Herrmann, Thomas; Kreutzinger, Philip; Radosavac, Milos; Weidmann, Zoraida Moreno; Pershyna, Kateryna; Honegger, Ursina; Wagener, Max; Vuillomenet, Thierry; Campodarve, Isabel; Bingisser, Roland; Miró, Òscar; Rentsch, Katharina; Bassetti, Stefano; Osswald, Stefan; Mueller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to prospectively validate a novel 1-hour algorithm using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement for early rule-out and rule-in of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: In a multicentre study, we enrolled 1320 patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected acute MI. The high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, incorporating baseline values as well as absolute changes within the first hour, was validated against the final diagnosis. The final diagnosis was then adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists using all available information, including coronary angiography, echocardiography, follow-up data and serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels. Results: Acute MI was the final diagnosis in 17.3% of patients. With application of the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, 786 (59.5%) patients were classified as “rule-out,” 216 (16.4%) were classified as “rule-in” and 318 (24.1%) were classified to the “observational zone.” The sensitivity and the negative predictive value for acute MI in the rule-out zone were 99.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 97.6%–99.9%) and 99.9% (95% CI 99.3%–100%), respectively. The specificity and the positive predictive value for acute MI in the rule-in zone were 95.7% (95% CI 94.3%–96.8%) and 78.2% (95% CI 72.1%–83.6%), respectively. The 1-hour algorithm provided higher negative and positive predictive values than the standard interpretation of highsensitivity cardiac troponin T using a single cut-off level (both p < 0.05). Cumulative 30-day mortality was 0.0%, 1.6% and 1.9% in patients classified in the rule-out, observational and rule-in groups, respectively (p = 0.001). Interpretation: This rapid strategy incorporating high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T baseline values and absolute changes within the first hour substantially accelerated the management of suspected acute MI by allowing safe rule-out as well as accurate

  17. A Time Scheduling Model of Logistics Service Supply Chain Based on the Customer Order Decoupling Point: A Perspective from the Constant Service Operation Time

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  18. A time scheduling model of logistics service supply chain based on the customer order decoupling point: a perspective from the constant service operation time.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  19. Enhancing the focal-resolution of aeroacoustic time-reversal using a point sponge-layer damping technique.

    PubMed

    Mimani, A; Doolan, C J; Medwell, P R

    2014-09-01

    This letter presents the Point-Time-Reversal-Sponge-Layer (PTRSL) technique to enhance the focal-resolution of aeroacoustic Time-Reversal (TR). A PTRSL is implemented on a square domain centered at the predicted source location and is based on damping the radial components of the incoming and outgoing fluxes propagating toward and away from the source, respectively. A PTRSL is shown to overcome the conventional half-wavelength diffraction-limit; its implementation significantly reduces the focal spot size to one-fifth of a wavelength for a monopole source. Furthermore, PTRSL reduces the focal spots of a dipole source to three-tenths of a wavelength, as compared to three-fifths without its implementation. PMID:25190421

  20. Impacts of real-time satellite clock errors on GPS precise point positioning-based troposphere zenith delay estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Li, Yihe; Gao, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a cost-effective tool to determine troposphere zenith total delay (ZTD) with accuracy comparable to other atmospheric sensors such as the radiosonde, the water vapor radiometer, the radio occultation and so on. However, the high accuracy of GPS troposphere ZTD estimates relies on the precise satellite orbit and clock products available with various latencies. Although the International GNSS Service (IGS) can provide predicted orbit and clock products for real-time applications, the predicted clock accuracy of 3 ns cannot always guarantee the high accuracy of troposphere ZTD estimates. Such limitations could be overcome by the use of the newly launched IGS real-time service which provides 5 cm orbit and 0.2-1.0 ns (an equivalent range error of 6-30 cm) clock products in real time. Considering the relatively larger magnitude of the clock error than that of the orbit error, this paper investigates the effect of real-time satellite clock errors on the GPS precise point positioning (PPP)-based troposphere ZTD estimation. Meanwhile, how the real-time satellite clock errors impact the GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation has also been studied to obtain the most precise ZTD solutions. First, two types of real-time satellite clock products are assessed with respect to the IGS final clock product in terms of accuracy and precision. Second, the real-time GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation is conducted using data from 34 selected IGS stations over three independent weeks in April, July and October, 2013. Numerical results demonstrate that the precision, rather than the accuracy, of the real-time satellite clock products impacts the real-time PPP-based ZTD solutions more significantly. In other words, the real-time satellite clock product with better precision leads to more precise real-time PPP-based troposphere ZTD solutions. Therefore, it is suggested that users should select and apply real-time satellite products with

  1. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI. PMID:27408892

  2. Location and release time identification of pollution point source in river networks based on the Backward Probability Method.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Alireza; Mazaheri, Mehdi; Mohammad Vali Samani, Jamal

    2016-09-15

    The pollution of rivers due to accidental spills is a major threat to environment and human health. To protect river systems from accidental spills, it is essential to introduce a reliable tool for identification process. Backward Probability Method (BPM) is one of the most recommended tools that is able to introduce information related to the prior location and the release time of the pollution. This method was originally developed and employed in groundwater pollution source identification problems. One of the objectives of this study is to apply this method in identifying the pollution source location and release time in surface waters, mainly in rivers. To accomplish this task, a numerical model is developed based on the adjoint analysis. Then the developed model is verified using analytical solution and some real data. The second objective of this study is to extend the method to pollution source identification in river networks. In this regard, a hypothetical test case is considered. In the later simulations, all of the suspected points are identified, using only one backward simulation. The results demonstrated that all suspected points, determined by the BPM could be a possible pollution source. The proposed approach is accurate and computationally efficient and does not need any simplification in river geometry and flow. Due to this simplicity, it is highly recommended for practical purposes. PMID:27219462

  3. ICESat Laser Altimeter Pointing, Ranging and Timing Calibration from Integrated Residual Analysis: A Summary of Early Mission Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutchke, Scott B.; Rowlands, David D.; Harding, David J.; Bufton, Jack L.; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Williams, Teresa A.

    2003-01-01

    On January 12, 2003 the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) was successfUlly placed into orbit. The ICESat mission carries the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), which consists of three near-infrared lasers that operate at 40 short pulses per second. The instrument has collected precise elevation measurements of the ice sheets, sea ice roughness and thickness, ocean and land surface elevations and surface reflectivity. The accurate geolocation of GLAS's surface returns, the spots from which the laser energy reflects on the Earth's surface, is a critical issue in the scientific application of these data Pointing, ranging, timing and orbit errors must be compensated to accurately geolocate the laser altimeter surface returns. Towards this end, the laser range observations can be fully exploited in an integrated residual analysis to accurately calibrate these geolocation/instrument parameters. Early mission ICESat data have been simultaneously processed as direct altimetry from ocean sweeps along with dynamic crossovers resulting in a preliminary calibration of laser pointing, ranging and timing. The calibration methodology and early mission analysis results are summarized in this paper along with future calibration activities

  4. Beach response dynamics of a littoral cell using a 17-year single-point time series of sand thickness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, P.L.; Hubbard, D.M.; Dugan, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    A 17-year time series of near-daily sand thickness measurements at a single intertidal location was compared with 5. years of semi-annual 3-dimensional beach surveys at the same beach, and at two other beaches within the same littoral cell. The daily single point measurements correlated extremely well with the mean beach elevation and shoreline position of ten high-spatial resolution beach surveys. Correlations were statistically significant at all spatial scales, even for beach surveys 10s of kilometers downcoast, and therefore variability at the single point monitoring site was representative of regional coastal behavior, allowing us to examine nearly two decades of continuous coastal evolution. The annual cycle of beach oscillations dominated the signal, typical of this region, with additional, less intense spectral peaks associated with seasonal wave energy fluctuations (~. 45 to 90. days), as well as full lunar (~. 29. days) and semi-lunar (~. 13. days; spring-neap cycle) tidal cycles. Sand thickness variability was statistically linked to wave energy with a 2. month peak lag, as well as the average of the previous 7-8. months of wave energy. Longer term anomalies in sand thickness were also apparent on time scales up to 15. months. Our analyses suggest that spatially-limited morphological data sets can be extremely valuable (with robust validation) for understanding the details of beach response to wave energy over timescales that are not resolved by typical survey intervals, as well as the regional behavior of coastal systems. ?? 2011.

  5. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI. PMID:27408892

  6. Rapid earthquake magnitude from real-time GPS precise point positioning for earthquake early warning and emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Rongxin; Shi, Chuang; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-05-01

    For earthquake early warning (EEW) and emergency response, earthquake magnitude is the crucial parameter to be determined rapidly and correctly. However, a reliable and rapid measurement of the magnitude of an earthquake is a challenging problem, especially for large earthquakes (M>8). Here, the magnitude is determined based on the GPS displacement waveform derived from real-time precise point positioning (PPP). The real-time PPP results are evaluated with an accuracy of 1 cm in the horizontal components and 2-3 cm in the vertical components, indicating that the real-time PPP is capable of detecting seismic waves with amplitude of 1cm horizontally and 2-3cm vertically with a confidence level of 95%. In order to estimate the magnitude, the unique information provided by the GPS displacement waveform is the horizontal peak displacement amplitude. We show that the empirical relation of Gutenberg (1945) between peak displacement and magnitude holds up to nearly magnitude 9.0 when displacements are measured with GPS. We tested the proposed method for three large earthquakes. For the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, our method provides a magnitude of M7.18±0.18. For the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake the estimated magnitude is M8.74±0.06, and for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake the value is M8.7±0.1 after excluding some near-field stations. We therefore conclude that depending on the availability of high-rate GPS observations, a robust value of magnitude up to 9.0 for a point source earthquake can be estimated within 10s of seconds or a few minutes after an event using a few GPS stations close to the epicenter. The rapid magnitude could be as a pre-requisite for tsunami early warning, fast source inversion, and emergency response is feasible.

  7. Assessing short- and long-time displacements in the Venice coastland by synthetic aperture radar interferometric point target analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teatini, Pietro; Strozzi, Tazio; Tosi, Luigi; Wegmüller, Urs; Werner, Charles; Carbognin, Laura

    2007-03-01

    The Venice Lagoon in Italy is a unique environment vulnerable to loss in surface elevation relative to the mean sea level. We present detailed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometric analyses on persistent point targets for the historical center of Venice, the tourist area of Sottomarina, and the Zennare farmland close to the southern lagoon edge. The selected areas are characterized by different degrees of development and our analyses show the remarkable capability of SAR Interferometric Point Target Analysis (IPTA) to map land displacement rates in densely urbanized zones and to detect movement information on isolated structures with a mm/year accuracy. A detailed analysis of the time series from 1992 to 2000 provided by IPTA shows that the vertical component of the measured displacements are the superposition of a short timescale, generally seasonal, movement on the order of 1 cm that is likely related to the fluctuation of environmental variables (temperature, piezometric head in the aquifer system underlying the lagoon, sea/lagoon water level) and a long-term ground deformation associated with building construction, the geomorphology of the area, and the human development of natural resources. If Venice is confirmed to be generally stable, significant long-term subsidence on the order of 4 mm/year is detected at the Sottomarina coastland. The highest displacement rates, of up to 8-10 mm/year, are recorded in the farmland bounding the lagoon margin where the movements are found to be highly site-specific.

  8. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Bastin, Mark E; Boardman, James P

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39(+5) weeks, range 37(+2)-41(+6)). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development. PMID:27242423

  9. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G.; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Bastin, Mark E.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39+5 weeks, range 37+2–41+6). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development. PMID:27242423

  10. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission.

  11. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM).

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  12. Reducing start-up time and minimizing energy losses of Microbial Fuel Cells using Maximum Power Point Tracking strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molognoni, Daniele; Puig, Sebastià; Balaguer, M. Dolors; Liberale, Alessandro; Capodaglio, Andrea G.; Callegari, Arianna; Colprim, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are considered to be an environmental friendly energy conversion technology. The main limitations that delay their industrialization include low current and power densities achievable and long start-up times. Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) has been proposed as a method to enhance MFCs electrical performances. However, the specialized literature is still lacking of experimental works on scaled-up reactors and/or real wastewater utilization. This study evaluates the impact of a MPPT system applied to MFCs treating swine wastewater in terms of start-up time and long-term performance. For this purpose, two replicate cells were compared, one with applied MPPT control and one working with fixed resistance. Both MFCs were continuously fed with swine wastewater to validate the control system under real and dynamic conditions. The study demonstrated that the automatic resistance control was able to reduce the start-up time of about one month. Moreover, MPPT system increased of 40% the Coulombic efficiency at steady-state conditions, reduced energy losses associated with anode and cathode reactions and limited methanogenic activity in the anode chamber. A power density of 5.0 ± 0.2 W m-3 NAC was achieved feeding the system at an organic loading rate of 10 kg COD m-3 d-1.

  13. A space-time point process model for analyzing and predicting case patterns of diarrheal disease in northwestern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jaeil; Johnson, Timothy D.; Bhavnani, Darlene; Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2014-01-01

    We consider modeling case-patterns under a complex spatial and longitudinal sampling design as conducted via a serial case–control study of diarrheal disease in northwestern Ecuador. We build a two-stage space-time model to understand the role of spatially and temporally referenced covariates that reflect social and natural environments in the sampled region, after accounting for unmeasured residual heterogeneities. All diarrheal case events are collected from 21 sampled communities in Esmeraldes province in Ecuador, during seven sampling cycles from 2003 to 2008. The region of interest comprises 158 communities along a river basin. Prediction of case counts at unsampled communities at a future time is of interest along with estimation of risk-related parameters. We propose a computationally feasible two-stage Bayesian approach to estimate the risk-related parameters and conduct predictive inference. We first apply the log Gaussian Cox process (LGCP), commonly used to model spatial clustering of point patterns, to accommodate temporal variation within the sampled communities. Prediction of the number of cases at unsampled communities at a future time is obtained by a disease mapping model conditional on the expected case counts from Stage I. PMID:24889991

  14. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  15. Defect states and exceptional point splitting in the band gaps of one-dimensional parity-time lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2015-08-24

    We investigated defect states in band gaps of one-dimensional photonic lattices with delicate modulations of gain and loss that respect parity-time-symmetry (PT-symmetry), viz. n(z) = n*(-z). For the sake of generality, we employ not only periodic structures but also quasiperiodic structures, e.g. Fibonacci sequences, to construct aperiodic PT lattices. Differed from lossless systems for which the defect state is related to only one exceptional point (EP) of the S-matrix, we observed the splitting of one EP into a pair after the introduction of judiciously designed gain and loss in those PT systems, where the defect state enters a non-threshold broken symmetry phase bounded by the EP pair. Some interesting properties associated with defect states and EP splitting are demonstrated, such as enhanced spectral localization, double optical phase abrupt change, and wavelength sensitive reversion of unidirectional transparency. PMID:26368199

  16. Atmospheric plume progression as a function of time and distance from the release point for radioactive isotopes.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Paul W; Bowyer, Ted W; Cameron, Ian M; Hayes, James C; Miley, Harry S

    2015-10-01

    The radionuclide network of the International Monitoring System comprises up to 80 stations around the world that have aerosol and xenon monitoring systems designed to detect releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere from nuclear explosions. A rule of thumb description of plume concentration and duration versus time and distance from the release point is useful when designing and deploying new sample collection systems. This paper uses plume development from atmospheric transport modeling to provide a power-law rule describing atmospheric dilution factors as a function of distance from the release point. Consider the plume center-line concentration seen by a ground-level sampler as a function of time based on a short-duration ground-level release of a nondepositing radioactive tracer. The concentration C (Bq m(-3)) near the ground varies with distance from the source with the relationship C=R×A(D,C) ×e (-λ(-1.552+0.0405×D)) × 5.37×10(-8) × D(-2.35) where R is the release magnitude (Bq), D is the separation distance (km) from the ground level release to the measurement location, λ is the decay constant (h(-1)) for the radionuclide of interest and AD,C is an attenuation factor that depends on the length of the sample collection period. This relationship is based on the median concentration for 10 release locations with different geographic characteristics and 365 days of releases at each location, and it has an R(2) of 0.99 for 32 distances from 100 to 3000 km. In addition, 90 percent of the modeled plumes fall within approximately one order of magnitude of this curve for all distances. PMID:26151301

  17. Reference intervals for coagulation times using two point-of-care analysers in healthy pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Mentré, V; Bulliot, C; Linsart, A; Ronot, P

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of this study was to establish reference intervals for prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial prothrombin time (aPTT) in healthy rabbits using two different point-of-care analysers (Idexx Coag DX and MS Quick Vet Coag Combo). These intervals would be useful in the diagnosis of coagulopathies and in the determination of coagulation status in critical patients. We are unaware of reports of coagulation values in pet rabbits. Blood samples were analysed from 81 clinically healthy pet rabbits under three years of age (49 females and 32 males). The reference intervals were as follows (non-parametric method for the MS Quick Vet Coag Combo and Box-Cox Robust method for the Idexx Coag DX, p<0.05 limit for statistical significance): PT (MS Quick Vet Coag Combo)=N=33, 17.2-28.5; PT (Idexx Coag DX)=N=48, 10.0-14.8, aPTT (MS Quick Vet Coag Combo)=N=33, 103.2-159.2 and aPTT (Idexx Coag DX)=N=48, 104.2-159.1. PT was significantly longer using the MS Quick Vet Coag Combo. aPTT was significantly shorter with the MS Quick Vet Coag Combo. On each type of analyser, there was no significant difference between sexes and blood sampling sites. A significant difference was present for the use or not of anaesthesia with the MS Quick Vet Coag Combo analyser. This study on healthy pet rabbits will be useful in point-of-care diagnosis of coagulopathies. PMID:24722233

  18. Potential performance of dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT compared with single-time-point imaging for differential diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Deng, Houfu; Hu, Shuang; Jia, Zhiyun

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, dual-time-point (DTP) fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a new method for evaluating metastatic lymph nodes in cancer patients. We performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the performance of DTP PET/CT compared with single-time-point (STP) imaging for differential diagnosis of lymph nodes metastases. On the basis of data from included studies, pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were calculated. Summary receiver-operating characteristic curves were also constructed to assess the diagnostic value of DTP PET/CT and STP imaging in detecting metastatic lymph nodes. Totally, 17 articles were included in the analysis. On a per-patient basis, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.79] and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.72-0.81) for DTP PET/CT and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.61-0.73) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.78-0.85) for STP PET/CT, respectively. On a per-lesion basis, the pooled sensitivity of DTP and STP PET/CT was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.79-0.84) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.78-0.83), respectively. The pooled specificity was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.86-0.89) for DTP PET/CT and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.80-0.84) for STP PET/CT. Compared with STP imaging, DTP PET/CT has higher sensitivity but lower specificity in detecting lymph nodes metastases on a per-patient analysis, and DTP PET/CT performs only a little better than STP PET/CT on a per-lesion basis. The current results of our meta-analysis do not support the routine use of DTP imaging for the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes. Further prospective research with large samples is required to better define the potential benefits of DTP PET/CT imaging. PMID:25023998

  19. Principal Component Analysis of the Time- and Position-dependent Point-Spread Function of the Advanced Camera for Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. J.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Sirianni, M.; Martel, A. R.; White, R. L.; Ford, H. C.

    2007-12-01

    We describe the time- and position-dependent point-spread function (PSF) variation of the wide-field channel (WFC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) with the principal component analysis (PCA) technique. The time-dependent change is caused by the temporal variation of the HST focus, whereas the position-dependent PSF variation in ACS WFC at a given focus is mainly the result of changes in aberrations and charge diffusion across the detector, which appear as position-dependent changes in the elongation of the astigmatic core and blurring of the PSF, respectively. Using ˜ 20 ) of principal components or "eigen-PSFs" per exposure can robustly reproduce the observed variation of the ellipticity and size of the PSF. Our primary interest in this investigation is the application of this PSF library to precision weak-lensing analyses, where accurate knowledge of the instrument's PSF is crucial. However, the high fidelity of the model judged from the nice agreement with observed PSFs suggests that the model is potentially also useful in other applications, such as crowded field stellar photometry, galaxy profile fitting, AGN studies, etc., which similarly demand a fair knowledge of the PSFs at objects' locations. Our PSF models, applicable to any WFC image rectified with the Lanczos3 kernel, are publicly available.

  20. A multiscale maximum entropy moment closure for locally regulated space-time point process models of population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Raghib, Michael; Hill, Nicholas A; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of structure in biological populations challenges fundamental assumptions at the heart of continuum models of population dynamics based only on mean densities (local or global). Individual-based models (IBMs) were introduced during the last decade in an attempt to overcome this limitation by following explicitly each individual in the population. Although the IBM approach has been quite useful, the capability to follow each individual usually comes at the expense of analytical tract ability, which limits the generality of the statements that can be made. For the specific case of spatial structure in populations of sessile (and identical) organisms, space-time point processes with local regulation seem to cover the middle ground between analytical tract ability and a higher degree of biological realism. This approach has shown that simplified representations of fecundity, local dispersal and density-dependent mortality weighted by the local competitive environment are sufficient to generate spatial patterns that mimic field observations. Continuum approximations of these stochastic processes try to distill their fundamental properties, and they keep track of not only mean densities, but also higher order spatial correlations. However, due to the non-linearities involved they result in infinite hierarchies of moment equations. This leads to the problem of finding a 'moment closure'; that is, an appropriate order of (lower order) truncation, together with a method of expressing the highest order density not explicitly modelled in the truncated hierarchy in terms of the lower order densities. We use the principle of constrained maximum entropy to derive a closure relationship for truncation at second order using normalisation and the product densities of first and second orders as constraints, and apply it to one such hierarchy. The resulting 'maxent' closure is similar to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, or 'power-3' closure, but it is

  1. Dynamics of the Sanières rockslide from the time-lapse analysis of airborne and terrestrial point clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, Jean-Philippe; Skupinsky, Gregorz; Guérin, Antoine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Bornemann, Pierrick

    2015-04-01

    The Roche-Plombée rocsklide (South French Alps) has been triggered in early August 2013 in the lower part of the Sanières catchment as a result of undercutting of the torrent banks after a debris flow event. During several days, a large amount of debris have been mobilised along a 300m length cliff. Deposits have reached and filled the torrential channel downslope. Several field observations carried out in the following weeks have shown the progressive opening of fissures along the main scarp. Today, large volumes of unstable debris are still available on the slope. Local stakeholders are now expecting the formation of a debris-dam in the channel which could lead to a debris flow in case of failure. This work is focused on the use of remote sensing techniques (terrestrial photogrammetry, airborne and terrestrical LiDAR) to detect and quantify spatial and temporal distribution of materials on the slope. The Structure From Motion (SFM) technique is used to generate multi-date high-resolution digital elevation models (HRDEMs) in order to quantify volumes changes; a time-lapse image correlation analysis of four terrestrial LiDAR scans is used to estimate displacements at the surface. The analysis of the point cloud dataset indicates a global deformation of the rockslope along several slip surfaces. The progressive development of the main scarp with velocity of a few cm.month-1 is also monitored. The analysis of an airborne LiDAR point cloud allows to characterize the main discontinuities. The possibility of extension of the rockslide is discussed.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of single-point engine-block vibration measurements for multiple excitation-event identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulli, S.; Dunne, J. F.; Potenza, R.; Richardson, D.; King, P.

    2009-04-01

    The short-term-Fourier-transform (STFT) is used to identify different sources of IC engine-block vibration from single-point acceleration measurements taken with a commercial knock sensor. Interest is focused on using the STFT to distinguish normal combustion from other sources of excitation including valve impact, injector pulses, and abnormal combustion, such as knocking. Positive identification of these other events using a single method can be useful for pre-processing of measured knock-sensor data for neural-network-based reconstruction of cylinder pressure. It can also be useful separately as part of a fast knock detection system. A series of experiments is discussed to create the data to isolate these different events on a 3-cylinder gasoline engine. In each case, the measured data is processed using the STFT to attempt to isolate the occurrence of particular events in the time domain. Four classes of experiments are undertaken: (i) an un-fired (motored) engine, driven by a dynamometer, with spark plugs fitted, and then removed, to isolate valve impact; (ii) a fired engine running under idle conditions, to contrast no-load combustion with no combustion; (iii) a part-loaded engine running normally, and then running with one injector switched-off, and (iv) a fully-loaded engine running normally, and then running with knock-control switched-off. The paper shows that a single Time-frequency analysis method, applied to knock sensor data in the form of an appropriately-tuned STFT, can effectively identify the occurrence of these events in the time domain if responses are adequately separated and strong enough.

  3. Adaptive error detection for HDR/PDR brachytherapy: Guidance for decision making during real-time in vivo point dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kertzscher, Gustavo Andersen, Claus E.; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents an adaptive error detection algorithm (AEDA) for real-timein vivo point dosimetry during high dose rate (HDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BT) where the error identification, in contrast to existing approaches, does not depend on an a priori reconstruction of the dosimeter position. Instead, the treatment is judged based on dose rate comparisons between measurements and calculations of the most viable dosimeter position provided by the AEDA in a data driven approach. As a result, the AEDA compensates for false error cases related to systematic effects of the dosimeter position reconstruction. Given its nearly exclusive dependence on stable dosimeter positioning, the AEDA allows for a substantially simplified and time efficient real-time in vivo BT dosimetry implementation. Methods: In the event of a measured potential treatment error, the AEDA proposes the most viable dosimeter position out of alternatives to the original reconstruction by means of a data driven matching procedure between dose rate distributions. If measured dose rates do not differ significantly from the most viable alternative, the initial error indication may be attributed to a mispositioned or misreconstructed dosimeter (false error). However, if the error declaration persists, no viable dosimeter position can be found to explain the error, hence the discrepancy is more likely to originate from a misplaced or misreconstructed source applicator or from erroneously connected source guide tubes (true error). Results: The AEDA applied on twoin vivo dosimetry implementations for pulsed dose rate BT demonstrated that the AEDA correctly described effects responsible for initial error indications. The AEDA was able to correctly identify the major part of all permutations of simulated guide tube swap errors and simulated shifts of individual needles from the original reconstruction. Unidentified errors corresponded to scenarios where the dosimeter position was

  4. CONSORT: Effects of adding adefovirdipivoxil to peginterferon alfa-2a at different time points on HBeAg-positivepatients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ka; Cao, Hong; Liang, Jiayi; Shu, Xin; Sun, Haixia; Li, Gang; Xu, Qihuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy and safety of the addition of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) (started at different time points) to pegylated interferon alpha-2a (PEG-INF-α2a) and PEG-INF-α2a monotherapy. This prospective, randomized study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of PEG-INF-α2a and ADV at different time points.120 patients were randomized into groups that received PEG-INF-α2a as monotherapy (group A) or in combination with ADV started at week 0 (group B), 12 (group C), or 24 (group D). All patients were followed for 48 weeks. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed. Methods: Patients in group a received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a by subcutaneous injection once weekly for 48 weeks. Patients in the ADV add-on group received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a subcutaneously once weekly and received 10 mg of ADV administered once daily for 48 weeks. HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBeAg, and hepatitis B e antibody levels were determined. Responses were determined at week 12 (ADV add-on), the end of treatment for PEG-INF-α2a (48weeks) and ADV (EOT) and at the end of 96 weeks of follow-up (EOF). Results: The rate of HBV DNA loss were higher in the combination groups than group A at the week 12, week 48, the EOT and EOF (P < 0.05). The rates of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss were similar among the treatment groups (P>0.05). The alanineaminotransferase (ALT) normalization rate was higher in the combination group than group A only at the EOT (P = 0.007). By the EOF, the patients with ADV added at week 12 achieved higher rates of HBV DNA loss (71.9%), HBeAg seroconversion (50.0%), HBsAg loss (15.6%), and ALT normalization (78.1%). Conclusions: PEG-INF-α2a plus ADV combination therapy is safe and superior to PEG-INF-α2amonotherapyfor decreasing serum HBV DNA and normalizing the ALT level but has no significant impact on the rate of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss. Adding ADV at week 12 may be an

  5. Effect of time-of-flight and point spread function modeling on detectability of myocardial defects in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Nappi, Carmela

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A study was designed to investigate the impact of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling on the detectability of myocardial defects. Methods: Clinical FDG-PET data were used to generate populations of defect-present and defect-absent images. Defects were incorporated at three contrast levels, and images were reconstructed by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) iterative methods including ordinary Poisson, alone and with PSF, TOF, and PSF+TOF. Channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was the surrogate for human observer performance. Results: For three iterations, 12 subsets, and no postreconstruction smoothing, TOF improved overall defect detection SNR by 8.6% as compared to its non-TOF counterpart for all the defect contrasts. Due to the slow convergence of PSF reconstruction, PSF yielded 4.4% less SNR than non-PSF. For reconstruction parameters (iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing kernel size) optimizing observer SNR, PSF showed larger improvement for faint defects. The combination of TOF and PSF improved mean detection SNR as compared to non-TOF and non-PSF counterparts by 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. Conclusions: For typical reconstruction protocol used in clinical practice, i.e., less than five iterations, TOF improved defect detectability. In contrast, PSF generally yielded less detectability. For large number of iterations, TOF+PSF yields the best observer performance.

  6. The effects of cuing in time-shared tasks. [for aircraft flight route-way-point information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chechile, R. A.; Sadoski, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two divided-attention experiments involving the editing of route-way-point displays on an avionics computer unit are reported. Two side tasks were required of the subjects, and either no cue, verbal cues appearing on the CRT, or symbolic cues (lights on the keyboard adjacent to keys to be used) were given to facilitate the primary editing task. Forty female and 30 male undergraduates were trained in the separate and combined tasks and divided randomly into groups of 25 for the cuing tests. A second test with three 10-subject groups was conducted at least one month later to investigate the efficacy of cuing for infrequently used procedures. It is found that only symbolic cuing significantly improved primary-task performance, increasing editing accuracy in the repetitive tests and reducing editing time in the delayed tests. Verbal cuing, probably because it requires additional cognitive effort, has no significant beneficial effect. These results are considered important for designing instruments for work environments requiring the performance of concurrent tasks, and as aircraft cockpits.

  7. Effect of time-of-flight and point spread function modeling on detectability of myocardial defects in PET

    PubMed Central

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Nappi, Carmela; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A study was designed to investigate the impact of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling on the detectability of myocardial defects. Methods: Clinical FDG-PET data were used to generate populations of defect-present and defect-absent images. Defects were incorporated at three contrast levels, and images were reconstructed by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) iterative methods including ordinary Poisson, alone and with PSF, TOF, and PSF+TOF. Channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was the surrogate for human observer performance. Results: For three iterations, 12 subsets, and no postreconstruction smoothing, TOF improved overall defect detection SNR by 8.6% as compared to its non-TOF counterpart for all the defect contrasts. Due to the slow convergence of PSF reconstruction, PSF yielded 4.4% less SNR than non-PSF. For reconstruction parameters (iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing kernel size) optimizing observer SNR, PSF showed larger improvement for faint defects. The combination of TOF and PSF improved mean detection SNR as compared to non-TOF and non-PSF counterparts by 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. Conclusions: For typical reconstruction protocol used in clinical practice, i.e., less than five iterations, TOF improved defect detectability. In contrast, PSF generally yielded less detectability. For large number of iterations, TOF+PSF yields the best observer performance. PMID:24877836

  8. Clinical Impact of Time-of-Flight and Point Response Modeling in PET Reconstructions: A Lesion Detection Study

    PubMed Central

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua; Casey, Michael; Townsend, David; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling have been shown to improve PET reconstructions, but the impact on physicians in the clinical setting has not been thoroughly investigated. A lesion detection and localization study was performed using simulated lesions in real patient images. Four reconstruction schemes were considered: ordinary Poisson OSEM (OP) alone and combined with TOF, PSF, and TOF+PSF. The images were presented to physicians experienced in reading PET images, and the performance of each was quantified using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC). Numerical observers (non-prewhitening and Hotelling) were used to identify optimal reconstruction parameters, and observer SNR was compared to the performance of the physicians. The numerical models showed good agreement with human performance, and best performance was achieved by both when using TOF+PSF. These findings suggest a large potential benefit of TOF+PSF for oncology PET studies, especially in the detection of small, low-intensity, focal disease in larger patients. PMID:23403399

  9. The use of multiple versus single assessment time points to improve screening accuracy in identifying children at risk for later serious antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Petras, Hanno; Buckley, Jacquelyn A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2013-10-01

    Guided by Kraemer et al.'s (Psychological Methods, 3:257-271, 1999) framework for measuring the potency of risk factors, we sought to improve on the classification accuracy reported in Petras et al. (Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 43:88-96, 2004a) and Petras et al. (Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 44:790-797, 2005) by using multiple as opposed to single point in time assessments of early aggressive and disruptive behavior in the classification of youth who would likely benefit from targeted preventive interventions. Different from Petras et al. (2004a, 2005), the outcome used in this study included serious antisocial behavior in young adulthood as well as in adolescence. Among males, the use of multiple time points did not yield greater classification accuracy than the highest single time points, that is, third and fifth grades. For females, although fifth grade represented the best single time point in terms of classification accuracy, no significant association was found between earlier time points and the later outcome, rendering a test of the multiple time points hypothesis moot. The findings presented in this study have strong implications for the design of targeted intervention for violence prevention, indicating that the screening quality based on aggression ratings during the elementary years is rather modest, particularly for females. PMID:23408279

  10. Effects of ulinastatin administered at different time points on the pathological morphologies of the lung tissues of rats with hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    QIN, ZAI-SHENG; TIAN, PEI; WU, XIA; YU, HONG-MEI; GUO, NA

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia not only directly induces cell injury of body tissues, but also causes the body to release large amounts of inflammatory mediators and cells with extensive biological activities to induce a systemic inflammatory response and immune dysfunction. Thus, hyperthermia causes systemic inflammatory response syndrome, aggravating injuries to various organs. This study aimed to observe the effects of ulinastatin (UTI) administered at different time points on the cellular morphologies of the lung tissues of rats with systemic hyperthermia. A total of 40 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: The normal control group (C group), the hyperthermia group without medication (H group), the hyperthermia and UTI pre-treatment group (HU group), the group treated with UTI at 1 h after hyperthermia (HU1 group), and the group treated with UTI at 2 h after hyperthermia (HU2 group). The systemic hyperthermia rat model was established in a heating chamber with a biological oxygen supply. For the HU, HU1 and HU2 groups, UTI (5×104 U/kg) was administered at different time points. For the C and H groups, an equivalent volume of normal saline was administered. During heating, the respiratory frequency and rectal temperature were measured and recorded once every 30 min. After 2.5 h of heating, the wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio of the lung tissues of the rats was measured. Additionally, the cellular morphologies of the lung tissues were observed under light and electron microscopes. The respiratory frequencies and lung tissue W/D ratios of the rats in the various hyperthermia groups were significantly higher than those of the rats in the C group (all P<0.05). The respiratory frequencies and lung tissue W/D values of the HU and HU1 groups were significantly lower than those of the H group (all P<0.05). Under the light microscope, the bronchial surrounding tissues of the HU and HU1 groups were loose, and the majority of the pulmonary alveolar structures were

  11. The Origin of Sterol Biosynthesis: A Time-Point for the Evolution of Eukaryotes and the Presence of O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Budin, M.; Brocks, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    The evolution of sterol biosynthesis is of critical interest to geoscientists as well as to evolutionary biologists. The first enzyme in the pathway, squalene monooxygenase (Sqmo), requires molecular oxygen (O2), suggesting that this process post-dates the evolution of Cyanobacteria. Additionally, the presence of steranes in ancient rocks marks the suggested time-point of eukaryogenesis(1). Sterol biosynthesis is viewed primarily as a eukaryotic process, and the frequency of its occurrence in bacteria long has been a subject of controversy. In this work, 19 protein gene sequences for Sqmo from eukaryotes were compared to all available complete and partial prokaryotic genomes. Twelve protein gene sequences representing oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), the second enzyme of the sterol biosynthetic pathway, also were examined. The only unequivocal matches among the bacteria were the alpha-proteobacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus, in which sterol biosynthesis already is known, and the planctomycete, Gemmata obscuriglobus. The latter species contains the most abbreviated sterol pathway yet identified in any organism. Experiments show that the major sterols in Gemmata are lanosterol and its uncommon isomer, parkeol. In bacteria, the sterol biosynthesis genes occupy a contiguous coding region and may represent a single operon. Phylogenetic trees show that the sterol pathway in bacteria and eukaryotes has a common ancestry. Gemmata may retain the most ancient remnants of the pathway's origin, and it is likely that sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes was acquired through gene transfer from bacteria. However, this work indicates that no known prokaryotes could produce the 24-ethyl steranes found in Archaean rocks(1). Therefore these compounds remain indicative of the presence of both eukaryotes and O2 at 2.7 Ga. 1. J. J. Brocks, G. A. Logan, R. Buick, R. E. Summons, (1999) Science 285, 1033-1036.

  12. Change Points in the Population Trends of Aerial-Insectivorous Birds in North America: Synchronized in Time across Species and Regions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam C; Hudson, Marie-Anne R; Downes, Constance M; Francis, Charles M

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of aerial insectivorous birds are in steep decline. Aerial insectivores (AI) are a group of bird species that feed almost exclusively on insects in flight, and include swallows, swifts, nightjars, and flycatchers. The causes of the declines are not well understood. Indeed, it is not clear when the declines began, or whether the declines are shared across all species in the group (e.g., caused by changes in flying insect populations) or specific to each species (e.g., caused by changes in species' breeding habitat). A recent study suggested that population trends of aerial insectivores changed for the worse in the 1980s. If there was such a change point in trends of the group, understanding its timing and geographic pattern could help identify potential causes of the decline. We used a hierarchical Bayesian, penalized regression spline, change point model to estimate group-level change points in the trends of 22 species of AI, across 153 geographic strata of North America. We found evidence for group-level change points in 85% of the strata. Change points for flycatchers (FC) were distinct from those for swallows, swifts and nightjars (SSN) across North America, except in the Northeast, where all AI shared the same group-level change points. During the 1980s, there was a negative change point across most of North America, in the trends of SSN. For FC, the group-level change points were more geographically variable, and in many regions there were two: a positive change point followed by a negative change point. This group-level synchrony in AI population trends is likely evidence of a response to a common environmental factor(s) with similar effects on many species across broad spatial extents. The timing and geographic patterns of the change points that we identify here should provide a spring-board for research into the causes behind aerial insectivore declines. PMID:26147572

  13. Change Points in the Population Trends of Aerial-Insectivorous Birds in North America: Synchronized in Time across Species and Regions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam C.; Hudson, Marie-Anne R.; Downes, Constance M.; Francis, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of aerial insectivorous birds are in steep decline. Aerial insectivores (AI) are a group of bird species that feed almost exclusively on insects in flight, and include swallows, swifts, nightjars, and flycatchers. The causes of the declines are not well understood. Indeed, it is not clear when the declines began, or whether the declines are shared across all species in the group (e.g., caused by changes in flying insect populations) or specific to each species (e.g., caused by changes in species’ breeding habitat). A recent study suggested that population trends of aerial insectivores changed for the worse in the 1980s. If there was such a change point in trends of the group, understanding its timing and geographic pattern could help identify potential causes of the decline. We used a hierarchical Bayesian, penalized regression spline, change point model to estimate group-level change points in the trends of 22 species of AI, across 153 geographic strata of North America. We found evidence for group-level change points in 85% of the strata. Change points for flycatchers (FC) were distinct from those for swallows, swifts and nightjars (SSN) across North America, except in the Northeast, where all AI shared the same group-level change points. During the 1980s, there was a negative change point across most of North America, in the trends of SSN. For FC, the group-level change points were more geographically variable, and in many regions there were two: a positive change point followed by a negative change point. This group-level synchrony in AI population trends is likely evidence of a response to a common environmental factor(s) with similar effects on many species across broad spatial extents. The timing and geographic patterns of the change points that we identify here should provide a spring-board for research into the causes behind aerial insectivore declines. PMID:26147572

  14. Identification of a time-varying point source in a system of two coupled linear diffusion-advection- reaction equations: application to surface water pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Adel

    2009-11-01

    This paper deals with the identification of a point source (localization of its position and recovering the history of its time-varying intensity function) that constitutes the right-hand side of the first equation in a system of two coupled 1D linear transport equations. Assuming that the source intensity function vanishes before reaching the final control time, we prove the identifiability of the sought point source from recording the state relative to the second coupled transport equation at two observation points framing the source region. Note that at least one of the two observation points should be strategic. We establish an identification method that uses these records to identify the source position as the root of a continuous and strictly monotonic function. Whereas the source intensity function is recovered using a recursive formula without any need of an iterative process. Some numerical experiments on a variant of the surface water pollution BOD-OD coupled model are presented.

  15. A Jiles-Atherton and fixed-point combined technique for time periodic magnetic field problems with hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Chiampi, M.; Repetto, M.; Chiarabaglio, D.

    1995-11-01

    The hysteresis phenomenon can significantly affect the behavior of magnetic cores in electrical machines and devices. This paper presents a finite element solution of periodic steady state magnetic field problems in soft materials with scalar hysteresis. The Jiles-Atherton model is employed for the generation of symmetric B-H loops and it is coupled with the Fixed Point Technique for handling magnetic nonlinearities. The proposed procedure is applied to a hysteretic model problem whose analytical solution is available. The results show that the Fixed Point Technique can efficiently deal with non-single valued material characteristics under periodic operating conditions.

  16. Identification of potential surrogate end points in randomized clinical trials of aggressive and indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: correlation of complete response, time-to-event and overall survival end points

    PubMed Central

    Lee, L.; Wang, L.; Crump, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The correlation between efficacy end points in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of systemic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was investigated to identify an appropriate surrogate end point for overall survival (OS). Methods: RCTs of previously untreated NHL published from 1990 to 2009 were identified. Associations between absolute differences in efficacy end points were determined using nonparametric Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (rs). Results: Thirty-eight RCTs representing 85 treatment arms for aggressive NHL and 20 RCTs representing 42 arms for indolent NHL were included. For aggressive NHL, differences in 3-year progression-free survival (PFS)/event-free survival (EFS) were high correlated with differences in 5-year OS {rs of 0.90 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–0.96]} and linear regression determined that a 10% improvement in 3-year EFS or PFS would predict for a 7% ± 1% improvement in 5-year OS. For indolent histology disease, differences in complete response were strongly correlated with differences in 3-year EFS [rs 0.86 (95% CI 0.35–0.97)], but there was no correlation between 3-year time-to-event end points and 5-year OS. Conclusions: Improvements in 3-year EFS/PFS are highly correlated with improvements in 5-year OS in aggressive NHL and should be explored as a candidate surrogate end point. Definition of these relationships may inform future clinical trial design and interpretation of interim trial data. PMID:21266519

  17. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: a conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a technique for determining the trace gas emission rate from a point source. The technique was tested using data from controlled methane release experiments and from measurement downwind of a natural gas production facility in Wyoming. Concentration measuremen...

  18. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: A conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Albertson, John D.

    2015-08-01

    Emerging mobile fugitive emissions detection and measurement approaches require robust inverse source algorithms to be effective. Two Gaussian plume inverse approaches are described for estimating emission rates from ground-level point sources observed from remote vantage points. The techniques were tested using data from 41 controlled methane release experiments (14 studies) and further investigated using 7 field studies executed downwind of oil and gas well pads in Wyoming. Analyzed measurements were acquired from stationary observation locations 18-106 m downwind of the emission sources. From the fluctuating wind direction, the lateral plume geometry is reconstructed using a derived relationship between the wind direction and crosswind plume position. The crosswind plume spread is determined with both modeled and reconstructed Gaussian plume approaches and estimates of source emission rates are found through inversion. The source emission rates were compared to a simple point source Gaussian emission estimation approach that is part of Draft EPA Method OTM 33A. Compared to the known release rates, the modeled, reconstructed, and point source Gaussian controlled release results yield average percent errors of -5%, -2%, and 6% with standard deviations of 29%, 25%, and 37%, respectively. Compared to each other, the three methods agree within 30% for 78% of all 48 observations (41 CR and 7 Wyoming).

  19. Real-time attitude commanding to detect coverage gaps and generate high resolution point clouds for RSO shape characterization with a laser rangefinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M.; Beck, J.; Udrea, B.

    This paper expands on previous studies by the authors into 3D imaging with a single-beam laser rangefinder (LRF) by implementing real-time attitude maneuvers of a chaser satellite flying in relative orbit around a resident space object (RSO). Point clouds generated with an LRF are much sparser than those generated with an imaging LIDAR, making it difficult to autonomously distinguish between gaps in coverage and truly empty space. Furthermore, if both the attitude and the shape of the target RSO are unknown, it is particularly difficult to register a collection of LRF strike points together and detect gaps in strike point coverage in realtime. This paper presents the incorporation of a narrow field of-view (NFOV) camera that detects the strike point on the RSO and supplements LRF distance measurements with image data. This data is used to generate attitude command profiles that efficiently fill LRF coverage gaps and generate high density point clouds, thus maximizing coverage of an unknown RSO. Results obtained so far point the way to a real-time implementation of the algorithm. A method to detect and close gaps in LRF strike point coverage is presented first. Coverage gap detection is achieved using Voronoi diagrams, where Voronoi cells are centered at the LRF strike points. A three-part algorithm is used that 1) creates a 3D panoramic map from “ stitched” NFOV camera images; 2) correlates the areas of sparse LRF coverage to the map; and 3) generates attitude commands to close the coverage gaps. The map provides a consistent and reliable method to register positions of strike points relative to each other and to the NFOV image of the RSO without a priori knowledge of the RSO attitude. Using this algorithm, gaps and sparse areas in LRF coverage are covered with strike points, allowing for the generation of a higher-resolution point cloud than that obtained with preprogrammed attitude profiles. Attitude maneuvers can now be designed on-line in real-ti- e such

  20. Effects of Varying Epoch Lengths, Wear Time Algorithms, and Activity Cut-Points on Estimates of Child Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity from Accelerometer Data

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Jorge A.; Haydel, K. Farish; Davila, Tania; Desai, Manisha; Haskell, William L.; Matheson, Donna; Robinson, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of accelerometer epoch lengths, wear time (WT) algorithms, and activity cut-points on estimates of WT, sedentary behavior (SB), and physical activity (PA). Methods 268 7–11 year-olds with BMI ≥ 85th percentile for age and sex wore accelerometers on their right hips for 4–7 days. Data were processed and analyzed at epoch lengths of 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-seconds. For each epoch length, WT minutes/day was determined using three common WT algorithms, and minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) PA were determined using five common activity cut-points. ANOVA tested differences in WT, SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA when using the different epoch lengths, WT algorithms, and activity cut-points. Results WT minutes/day varied significantly by epoch length when using the NHANES WT algorithm (p < .0001), but did not vary significantly by epoch length when using the ≥ 20 minute consecutive zero or Choi WT algorithms. Minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA varied significantly by epoch length for all sets of activity cut-points tested with all three WT algorithms (all p < .0001). Across all epoch lengths, minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA also varied significantly across all sets of activity cut-points with all three WT algorithms (all p < .0001). Conclusions The common practice of converting WT algorithms and activity cut-point definitions to match different epoch lengths may introduce significant errors. Estimates of SB and PA from studies that process and analyze data using different epoch lengths, WT algorithms, and/or activity cut-points are not comparable, potentially leading to very different results, interpretations, and conclusions, misleading research and public policy. PMID:26938240

  1. A Bayesian approach to estimation of a statistical change-point in the mean parameter for high dimensional non-linear time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speegle, Darrin; Steward, Robert

    2015-08-01

    We propose a semiparametric approach to infer the existence of and estimate the location of a statistical change-point to a nonlinear high dimensional time series contaminated with an additive noise component. In particular, we consider a p―dimensional stochastic process of independent multivariate normal observations where the mean function varies smoothly except at a single change-point. Our approach first involves a dimension reduction of the original time series through a random matrix multiplication. Next, we conduct a Bayesian analysis on the empirical detail coefficients of this dimensionally reduced time series after a wavelet transform. We also present a means to associate confidence bounds to the conclusions of our results. Aside from being computationally efficient and straight forward to implement, the primary advantage of our methods is seen in how these methods apply to a much larger class of time series whose mean functions are subject to only general smoothness conditions.

  2. Three-point compact finite difference scheme on non-uniform meshes for the time-fractional Black-Scholes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Yuri M.; Vulkov, Lubin G.

    2015-11-01

    We construct a three-point compact finite difference scheme on a non-uniform mesh for the time-fractional Black-Scholes equation. We show that for special graded meshes used in finance, the Tavella-Randall and the quadratic meshes the numerical solution has a fourth-order accuracy in space. Numerical experiments are discussed.

  3. Analysis of biological time-lapse microscopic experiment from the point of view of the information theory.

    PubMed

    Štys, Dalibor; Urban, Jan; Vaněk, Jan; Císař, Petr

    2011-06-01

    We report objective analysis of information in the microscopic image of the cell monolayer. The process of transfer of information about the cell by the microscope is analyzed in terms of the classical Shannon information transfer scheme. The information source is the biological object, the information transfer channel is the whole microscope including the camera chip. The destination is the model of biological system. The information contribution is analyzed as information carried by a point to overall information in the image. Subsequently we obtain information reflection of the biological object. This is transformed in the biological model which, in information terminology, is the destination. This, we propose, should be constructed as state transitions in individual cells modulated by information bonds between the cells. We show examples of detected cell states in multidimensional state space. This space is reflected as colour channel intensity phenomenological state space. We have also observed information bonds and show examples of them. PMID:25478628

  4. Analysis of biological time-lapse microscopic experiment from the point of view of the information theory.

    PubMed

    Stys, Dalibor; Urban, Jan; Vanek, Jan; Císar, Petr

    2010-07-01

    We report objective analysis of information in the microscopic image of the cell monolayer. The process of transfer of information about the cell by the microscope is analyzed in terms of the classical Shannon information transfer scheme. The information source is the biological object, the information transfer channel is the whole microscope including the camera chip. The destination is the model of biological system. The information contribution is analyzed as information carried by a point to overall information in the image. Subsequently we obtain information reflection of the biological object. This is transformed in the biological model which, in information terminology, is the destination. This, we propose, should be constructed as state transitions in individual cells modulated by information bonds between the cells. We show examples of detected cell states in multidimensional state space reflected in space an colour channel intensity phenomenological state space. We have also observed information bonds and show examples of them. PMID:20194026

  5. Comparison of Affective Credit Attitude Scores and Credit Use of College Students at Two Points in Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayhoe, Celia Ray

    2002-01-01

    A study of 120 college students' use of credit in 1997 and 1999 showed that, during that time, 60 students graduated; 41 had more credit cards in 1999 than 1997; 62 had fewer; and 32 were repaying student loans. Affective credit attitude scores for those with four or more credit cards and for students who had graduated were lower in 1999 than in…

  6. Points of Transition: Understanding the Constructed Identities of L2 Learners/Users across Time and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adawu, Anthony; Martin-Beltran, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    Using sociocultural and poststructuralist theoretical lenses, this study examines the narrative construction of language-learner identity across time and space. We applied cross-narrative methodologies to analyze language-learning autobiographies and interview data from three English users who had recently transitioned to a U.S. context for…

  7. Higher-order time-symmetry-breaking phase transition due to meeting of an exceptional point and a Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Garmon, Savannah; Kanki, Kazuki; Petrosky, Tomio

    2016-08-01

    We have theoretically investigated the time-symmetry-breaking phase-transition process for two discrete states coupled with a one-dimensional continuum by solving the nonlinear eigenvalue problem for the effective Hamiltonian associated with the discrete spectrum. We obtain the effective Hamiltonian with use of the Feshbach-Brillouin-Wigner projection method. Strong energy dependence of the self-energy appearing in the effective Hamiltonian plays a key role in the time-symmetry-breaking phase transition: As a result of competition in the decay process between the Van Hove singularity and the Fano resonance, the phase transition becomes a higher-order transition when both the two discrete states are located near the continuum threshold.

  8. Pure Point Spectrum of the Floquet Hamiltonian for the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator Under Time Quasi-Periodic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.-M.

    2008-01-01

    We prove that the 1- d quantum harmonic oscillator is stable under spatially localized, time quasi-periodic perturbations on a set of Diophantine frequencies of positive measure. This proves a conjecture raised by Enss-Veselic in their 1983 paper [EV] in the general quasi-periodic setting. The motivation of the present paper also comes from construction of quasi-periodic solutions for the corresponding nonlinear equation.

  9. Real-time adaptive optics testbed to investigate point-ahead angle in pre-compensation of Earth-to-GEO optical communication.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Nina; Berlich, René; Minardi, Stefano; Barth, Alexander; Mauch, Steffen; Mocci, Jacopo; Goy, Matthias; Appelfelder, Michael; Beckert, Erik; Reinlein, Claudia

    2016-06-13

    We explore adaptive optics (AO) pre-compensation for optical communication between Earth and geostationary (GEO) satellites in a laboratory experiment. Thus, we built a rapid control prototyping breadboard with an adjustable point-ahead angle where downlink and uplink can operate both at 1064 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. With our real-time system, beam wander resulting from artificial turbulence was reduced such that the beam hits the satellite at least 66% of the time as compared to merely 3% without correction. A seven-fold increase of the average Strehl ratio to (28 ± 15)% at 18 μrad point-ahead angle leads to a considerable reduction of the calculated fading probability. These results make AO pre-compensation a viable technique to enhance Earth-to-GEO optical communication. PMID:27410333

  10. A Remark on the Heat Equation with a Point Perturbation, the Feynman-Kac Formula with Local Time and Derivative Pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albeverio, Sergio; Fassari, Silvestro; Rinaldi, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the probabilistic representation of the solutions of the heat equation perturbed by a repulsive point interaction in terms of a perturbation of Brownian motion, via a Feynman-Kac formula involving a local time functional. An application to option pricing is given, interpolating between the extreme cases of classical Black-Scholes options and knockouts having the barrier situated exactly at the exercise price.

  11. Body mass index in adolescent anorexia nervosa patients in relation to age, time point and site of admission.

    PubMed

    Bühren, Katharina; von Ribbeck, Linda; Schwarte, Reinhild; Egberts, Karin; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Fleischhaker, Christian; Wewetzer, Christoph; Kennes, Lieven N; Dempfle, Astrid; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate

    2013-07-01

    Body mass index (BMI) at admission is an important predictor of outcome in adolescent eating disorders. However, few studies have investigated BMI at admission, its changes in recent years, or modifying factors, such as duration of illness and age at onset in different geographical regions. Thus, this study aimed to investigate changes in BMI at admission over the past decade in one clinic, the differences in BMI between various treatment sites and the influence of duration of illness before admission and age at admission. Our sample consisted of 158 adolescent female patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) admitted between 2001 and 2009 to a major university hospital and 169 adolescent female patients recruited in a multicenter study between 2007 and 2010. We assessed the differences between departments in different regions of Germany in the multi-site sample. Changes over time in age-adjusted BMI and age at admission as well as modifying factors for age-adjusted BMI at admission, such as age at admission and duration of illness, were assessed in a representative local sample. There were no significant differences between departments in different regions of Germany. Over the course of the local study, there was a small but significant increase in the age-adjusted BMI score and absolute BMI at admission. In addition, there was a positive association between year of admission and age at admission. Older adolescents with AN had a lower age-adjusted BMI score and a longer duration of illness at the time of admission. The BMI at admission, which is one of the most important predictors of outcome in AN, has increased slightly during the past 10 years. Education strategies for parents and professionals should continue to be improved to further shorten the duration of illness before admission, especially for older adolescents. PMID:23392754

  12. Pb enamel biomarker: Deposition of pre- and postnatal Pb isotope injection in reconstructed time points along rat enamel transect

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, A.L.; Kleinman, M.T.; Ericson, J.E. . E-mail: jeericso@uci.edu

    2005-10-01

    Exposure to lead (Pb) as well as other heavy metals in the environment is still a matter of public health concern. The development of the enamel biomarker for heavy metal exposure assessment is designed to improve studies of dose-effect relationships to developmental anomalies, particularly embryonic dysfunctions, and to provide a time-specific recount of past exposures. The work presented in this paper demonstrates maternal transfer across the placental barrier of the enriched isotope {sup 206}Pb tracer to the enamel of the rat pup. Likewise, injections of {sup 204}Pb-enriched tracer in the neonate rat resulted in deposition of the tracer in the enamel histology as measured by secondary ion microprobe spectrometry. Through enamel, we were able to observe biological removal and assimilation of prenatal and postnatal tracers, respectively. This research demonstrates that enamel can be used as a biomarker of exposure to Pb and may illustrate the toxicokinetics of incorporating Pb into fetal and neonatal steady-state system processes. The biomarker technique, when completely developed, may be applied to cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological research.

  13. Application of a develop end point detector as a timely and cost-effective alternative to using an SEM for CD measurement in production photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikov, Dimitri L.; Goldman, Mark; Hester, Dee; Kukas, Alan W.; Takemoto, Clifford H.; Goetz, Ken; Zhang, Hua; Karklin, Linard

    1996-05-01

    This paper focuses on the use of a track-mounted, in-situ develop end point (EP) to reduce CD measurement via scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the production environment. Commonly, a few wafers are selected from a lot and examined to ensure conformance with desired CDs. Typically, the wafer's image linewidth is measured. If required, a corresponding adjustment is made to the stepper's exposure energy in order to obtain the targeted CD. While this methodology works, it does have its shortcomings such as: incomplete determination of wafer-to-wafer variations, the impossibility of detecting random 'problem' wafers, and the additional backlog CD measurement adds to the SEM station -- which generally results in production bottlenecks. The use of a track-mounted, in-situ develop end point detector facilitates rapid and accurate measurement of photoresist characteristics. Due to the direct correlation between develop end point time and CDs, a detector can be used to signal out-of- spec conditions. The nature of the data collected and analyzed by the detector allows exposure and other process variations to be revealed. In addition to providing this 'watchdog' function, some detectors can be programmed to automatically correct out-of-spec CDs by varying the development cycle time. Use of an in-situ detector, as described, will have a direct bearing on reducing the use of high-cost SEMs in the production environment as well as minimizing the number of scrapped wafers.

  14. A Four-Point Screening Method for Assessing Molecular Mechanism of Action (MMOA) Identifies Tideglusib as a Time-Dependent Inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Swinney, Zachary T.; Haubrich, Brad A.; Xia, Shuangluo; Ramesha, Chakk; Gomez, Stephen R.; Guyett, Paul; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo; Swinney, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background New therapeutics are needed for neglected tropical diseases including Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a progressive and fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. There is a need for simple, efficient, cost effective methods to identify new molecules with unique molecular mechanisms of action (MMOAs). The mechanistic features of a binding mode, such as competition with endogenous substrates and time-dependence can affect the observed inhibitory IC50, and differentiate molecules and their therapeutic usefulness. Simple screening methods to determine time-dependence and competition can be used to differentiate compounds with different MMOAs in order to identify new therapeutic opportunities. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report a four point screening methodology to evaluate the time-dependence and competition for inhibition of GSK3β protein kinase isolated from T. brucei. Using this method, we identified tideglusib as a time-dependent inhibitor whose mechanism of action is time-dependent, ATP competitive upon initial binding, which transitions to ATP non-competitive with time. The enzyme activity was not recovered following 100-fold dilution of the buffer consistent with an irreversible mechanism of action. This is in contrast to the T. brucei GSK3β inhibitor GW8510, whose inhibition was competitive with ATP, not time-dependent at all measured time points and reversible in dilution experiments. The activity of tideglusib against T. brucei parasites was confirmed by inhibition of parasite proliferation (GI50 of 2.3 μM). Conclusions/Significance Altogether this work demonstrates a straightforward method for determining molecular mechanisms of action and its application for mechanistic differentiation of two potent TbGSK3β inhibitors. The four point MMOA method identified tideglusib as a mechanistically differentiated TbGSK3β inhibitor. Tideglusib was shown to inhibit parasite

  15. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability. PMID:26914799

  16. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  17. Point of no return in diving emperor penguins: is the timing of the decision to return limited by the number of strokes?

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Kozue; Sato, Katsufumi; Ponganis, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    At some point in a dive, breath-hold divers must decide to return to the surface to breathe. The issue of when to end a dive has been discussed intensively in terms of foraging ecology and behavioral physiology, using dive duration as a temporal parameter. Inevitably, however, a time lag exists between the decision of animals to start returning to the surface and the end of the dive, especially in deep dives. In the present study, we examined the decision time in emperor penguins under two different conditions: during foraging trips at sea and during dives at an artificial isolated dive hole. It was found that there was an upper limit for the decision-to-return time irrespective of dive depth in birds diving at sea. However, in a large proportion of dives at the isolated dive hole, the decision-to-return time exceeded the upper limit at sea. This difference between the decision times in dives at sea versus the isolated dive hole was accounted for by a difference in stroke rate. The stroke rates were much lower in dives at the isolated hole and were inversely correlated with the upper limit of decision times in individual birds. Unlike the decision time to start returning, the cumulative number of strokes at the decision time fell within a similar range in the two experiments. This finding suggests that the number of strokes, but not elapsed time, constrained the decision of emperor penguins to return to the surface. While the decision to return and to end a dive may be determined by a variety of ecological, behavioral and physiological factors, the upper limit to that decision time may be related to cumulative muscle workload. PMID:22162861

  18. An algorithm for approximating the L * invariant coordinate from the real-time tracing of one magnetic field line between mirror points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, Solène

    2014-08-01

    The L * invariant coordinate depends on the global electromagnetic field topology at a given instance, and the standard method for its determination requires a computationally expensive drift contour tracing. This fact makes L * a cumbersome parameter to handle. In this paper, we provide new insights on the L * parameter, and we introduce an algorithm for an L * approximation that only requires the real-time tracing of one magnetic field line between mirrors points. This approximation is based on the description of the variation of the magnetic field mirror intensity after an adiabatic dipolarization, i.e., after the nondipolar components of a magnetic field have been turned off with a characteristic time very long in comparison with the particles' drift periods. The corresponding magnetic field topological variations are deduced, assuming that the field line foot points remain rooted in the Earth's surface, and the drift average operator is replaced with a computationally cheaper circular average operator. The algorithm results in a relative difference of a maximum of 12% between the approximate L * and the output obtained using the International Radiation Belt Environment Modeling library, in the case of the Tsyganenko 89 model for the external magnetic field (T89). This margin of error is similar to the margin of error due to small deviations between different magnetic field models at geostationary orbit. This approximate L * algorithm represents therefore a reasonable compromise between computational speed and accuracy of particular interest for real-time space weather forecast purposes.

  19. Using the Guttman Scale to Define and Estimate Measurement Error in Items over Time: The Case of Cognitive Decline and the Meaning of “Points Lost”

    PubMed Central

    Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Yumoto, Futoshi; Aisen, Paul S.; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Mislevy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    We used a Guttman model to represent responses to test items over time as an approximation of what is often referred to as “points lost” in studies of cognitive decline or interventions. To capture this meaning of “point loss”, over four successive assessments, we assumed that once an item is incorrect, it cannot be correct at a later visit. If the loss of a point represents actual decline, then failure of an item to fit the Guttman model over time can be considered measurement error. This representation and definition of measurement error also permits testing the hypotheses that measurement error is constant for items in a test, and that error is independent of “true score”, which are two key consequences of the definition of “measurement error” –and thereby, reliability- under Classical Test Theory. We tested the hypotheses by fitting our model to, and comparing our results from, four consecutive annual evaluations in three groups of elderly persons: a) cognitively normal (NC, N = 149); b) diagnosed with possible or probable AD (N = 78); and c) cognitively normal initially and a later diagnosis of AD (converters, N = 133). Of 16 items that converged, error-free measurement of “cognitive loss” was observed for 10 items in NC, eight in converters, and two in AD. We found that measurement error, as we defined it, was inconsistent over time and across cognitive functioning levels, violating the theory underlying reliability and other psychometric characteristics, and key regression assumptions. PMID:22363411

  20. A physical model study of the travel times and reflection points of SH-waves reflected from transversely isotropic media with tilted symmetry axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li-Chung; Chang, Young-Fo; Chang, Chih-Hsiung; Chung, Chia-Lung

    2012-05-01

    In reflection seismology, detailed knowledge of how seismic waves propagate in anisotropic media is important for locating reservoirs accurately. The SH-wave possesses a pure mode polarization which does not convert to P- and SV-waves when reflecting from a horizontal interface, and vice versa. The simplicity of the SH-wave thus provides an easy way to view the details of SH-wave propagation in anisotropic media. In this study, we attempt to inspect the theoretical reflection moveouts of SH-waves reflected from transversely isotropic (TI) layers with tilted symmetry axes and to verify the reflection point, which could be shifted away from the common midpoint (CMP), by numerical calculations and physical modelling. In travel time-offset analyses, the moveout curves of SH-waves reflected from horizontal TI media (TIM) with different tilted angles of symmetry axes are computed by the TI modified hyperbolic equation and Fermat's principle, respectively. It turns out that both the computed moveout curves are similar and fit well to the observed physical data. The reflection points of SH-waves for a CMP gather computed by Fermat's principle show that they are close to the CMP for TIM with the vertical and horizontal symmetry axes, but they shift away from the CMP for the other tilted angles of symmetry axes. The shifts of the reflection points of the SH-waves from the CMP were verified by physical modelling.

  1. A physical model study of the travel times and conversion point locations of P-SV converted waves in vertical transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C.

    2013-12-01

    In exploration seismology, subsurface medium commonly exhibits anisotropy, characterized by a vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) model. Due to the need of exploring small reservoirs in complex structures, the seismic exploration is extended to deal with anisotropic media. The P-S converted wave seismic exploration is a relatively inexpensive, broadly applicable, and effective way to obtain the S-wave information of the medium. In anisotropic traveltime analysis, the moveout curve of horizontal P-SV event can help to determine the ratio of the P- and SV-wave vertical velocities, the normal moveout (NMO) velocity of SV-waves, and the anisotropy parameters. The P-SV conversion point (CP) location is of great importance to P-SV data binning, NMO corrections and common conversion point (CCP) stacking, and the anisotropy has a more significant effect on the conversion point location than on the moveout. In this study, we attempt to inspect the theoretical non-hyperbolic moveout and CP equations for the P-SV waves reflected from a VTI layer by numerical calculations and physical modeling. We are also interested in visualizing the variations of the conversion point locations from a designed VTI medium. In traveltime analysis, the theoretical moveout curve is accurate up to offsets about one and a half times the reflector depth (x/z=1.5). However, the moveout curve computed by Fermat's principle fits well to the physical data. The CP locations of P-SV waves are similar to those calculated by Fermat's principle and theoretical CP equation, which are verified by the physical modeling.

  2. Investigating flow patterns and related dynamics in multi-instability turbulent plasmas using a three-point cross-phase time delay estimation velocimetry scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-04-01

    Complexities of flow patterns in the azimuthal cross-section of a cylindrical magnetized helicon plasma and the corresponding plasma dynamics are investigated by means of a novel scheme for time delay estimation velocimetry. The advantage of this introduced method is the capability of calculating the time-averaged 2D velocity fields of propagating wave-like structures and patterns in complex spatiotemporal data. It is able to distinguish and visualize the details of simultaneously present superimposed entangled dynamics and it can be applied to fluid-like systems exhibiting frequently repeating patterns (e.g., waves in plasmas, waves in fluids, dynamics in planetary atmospheres, etc.). The velocity calculations are based on time delay estimation obtained from cross-phase analysis of time series. Each velocity vector is unambiguously calculated from three time series measured at three different non-collinear spatial points. This method, when applied to fast imaging, has been crucial to understand the rich plasma dynamics in the azimuthal cross-section of a cylindrical linear magnetized helicon plasma. The capabilities and the limitations of this velocimetry method are discussed and demonstrated for two completely different plasma regimes, i.e., for quasi-coherent wave dynamics and for complex broadband wave dynamics involving simultaneously present multiple instabilities.

  3. The drug efficacy and adverse reactions in a mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with oxaliplatin at different time points during a day

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Zhao, Ningbo; Zhao, Dan; Chen, Dan; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that the growth and proliferation of cancer cells in vivo exhibit circadian rhythm, and the efficacy and adverse reactions of platinum-based anticancer drugs administered at different times of the day vary significantly on colon cancer. However, since the circadian rhythms of growth and proliferation of various cancer cells often differ, the question of whether the administration of platinum anticancer drugs at different times of the day exerts significantly different efficacy and adverse effects on oral cancers remains to be elucidated. This study has compared the efficacy and adverse effects of oxaliplatin (L-OHP) administration at different times during a day on oral squamous cell carcinoma in mice and has analyzed cellular circadian rhythms. Methods The mouse model for oral squamous cell carcinoma was established in 75 nude mice, housed in a 12 hour light/12 hour dark cycle environment. The mice were randomly divided into five groups; four experimental groups were intravenously injected with L-OHP at four time points within a 24-hour period (4, 10, 16, and 22 hours after lights on [HALO]). The control group was intravenously injected with the same volume of saline. Treatment efficacy and adverse reactions were compared on the seventh day after the injection, at 22 HALO. The existence of circadian rhythms was determined by cosine analysis. Results Only injections of L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO significantly prolonged animal survival time. The adverse reactions in mice injected with L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO were significantly less than those observed in mice administered L-OHP at 4 and 10 HALO. The cosine fitting curve showed that the survival time and adverse reactions exhibited circadian rhythm. Conclusion The time factor should be considered when treating patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma with L-OHP in order to achieve better efficacy, reduce the adverse reactions, and improve the patients’ survival time and quality

  4. Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction in groundwater: a detailed time-series study of a point-source plume.

    PubMed

    Berna, Emily C; Johnson, Thomas M; Makdisi, Richard S; Basu, Anirban

    2010-02-01

    Chromium stable isotope ratios show promise as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction in groundwater, but no published study has yet demonstrated that expected relationships between (53)Cr/(52)Cr and Cr(VI) concentration, position, and time occur in an actual groundwater plume. We present an extensive data set from a point-source plume in Berkeley, CA; data extend over 5 years and 14 locations covering the entire plume. We interpret the data using a Rayleigh distillation model with an effective fractionation factor that incorporates an intrinsic fractionation factor determined from incubations of site sediments and accounts for reservoir effects in the restricted subsurface zones where Cr(VI) reduction is thought to occur. The groundwater (53)Cr/(52)Cr and Cr(VI) concentration data are consistent with a scenario where the system has reached a steady state: Cr(VI) reduction continues, the extent of reduction at any point is constant over time, reduction proceeds to completion at the downgradient edge of the plume, and the plume is no longer advancing. The overall consistency of the results with a reasonable model for the site supports the use of Cr isotope-based estimates of reduction, but we discuss current uncertainties and limitations of the approach as well. PMID:20039722

  5. Impact of the single point of access referral system to reduce waiting times and improve clinical outcomes in an assistive technology service.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Jonathan; Gibson, Colin

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of a single point referral system that prioritises clients depending on case complexity and overcomes the need for re-admittance to a waiting list via a review system has been shown to significantly reduce maximum waiting times for a Posture and Mobility (Special Seating) Service from 102.0 ± 24.33 weeks to 19.2 ± 8.57 weeks (p = 0.015). Using this service model linear regression revealed a statistically significant improvement in the performance outcome of prescribed seating solutions with shorter Episode of Care completion times (p = 0.023). In addition, the number of Episodes of Care completed per annum was significantly related to the Episode of Care completion time (p = 0.019). In conclusion, it is recommended that it may be advantageous to apply this service model to other assistive technology services in order to reduce waiting times and to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:27098983

  6. Time-Lapse Analysis of Methane Quantity in the Mary Lee Group of Coal Seams Using Filter-Based Multiple-Point Geostatistical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Olea, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Coal seam degasification and its success are important for controlling methane, and thus for the health and safety of coal miners. During the course of degasification, properties of coal seams change. Thus, the changes in coal reservoir conditions and in-place gas content as well as methane emission potential into mines should be evaluated by examining time-dependent changes and the presence of major heterogeneities and geological discontinuities in the field. In this work, time-lapsed reservoir and fluid storage properties of the New Castle coal seam, Mary Lee/Blue Creek seam, and Jagger seam of Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, were determined from gas and water production history matching and production forecasting of vertical degasification wellbores. These properties were combined with isotherm and other important data to compute gas-in-place (GIP) and its change with time at borehole locations. Time-lapsed training images (TIs) of GIP and GIP difference corresponding to each coal and date were generated by using these point-wise data and Voronoi decomposition on the TI grid, which included faults as discontinuities for expansion of Voronoi regions. Filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulations, which were preferred in this study due to anisotropies and discontinuities in the area, were used to predict time-lapsed GIP distributions within the study area. Performed simulations were used for mapping spatial time-lapsed methane quantities as well as their uncertainties within the study area. The systematic approach presented in this paper is the first time in literature that history matching, TIs of GIPs and filter simulations are used for degasification performance evaluation and for assessing GIP for mining safety. Results from this study showed that using production history matching of coalbed methane wells to determine time-lapsed reservoir data could be used to compute spatial GIP and representative GIP TIs generated through Voronoi decomposition

  7. Radiative transfer theory with time delay for the effect of pulse entrapping in a resonant random medium: general transfer equation and point-like scatterer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanenkov, Yu N.; Barabanenkov, M. Yu

    1997-10-01

    A pulse propagation of a vector electromagnetic wave field in a discrete random medium under the condition of Mie resonant scattering is considered on the basis of the Bethe - Salpeter equation in the two-frequency domain in the form of an exact kinetic equation which takes into account the energy accumulation inside scatterers. The kinetic equation is simplified using the transverse field and far wave zone approximations which give a new general tensor radiative transfer equation with strong time delay by resonant scattering. This new general radiative transfer equation, being specified in terms of the low-density limit and the resonant point-like scatterer model, takes the form of a new tensor radiative transfer equation with three Lorentzian time-delay kernels by resonant scattering. In contrast to the known phenomenological scalar Sobolev equation with one Lorentzian time-delay kernel, the derived radiative transfer equation does take into account effects of (i) the radiation polarization, (ii) the energy accumulation inside scatterers, (iii) the time delay in three terms, namely in terms with the Rayleigh phase tensor, the extinction coefficient and a coefficient of the energy accumulation inside scatterers, respectively (i.e. not only in a term with the Rayleigh phase tensor). It is worth noting that the derived radiative transfer equation is coordinated with Poynting's theorem for non-stationary radiation, unlike the Sobolev equation. The derived radiative transfer equation is applied to study the Compton - Milne effect of a pulse entrapping by its diffuse reflection from the semi-infinite random medium when the pulse, while propagating in the medium, spends most of its time inside scatterers. This specific albedo problem for the derived radiative transfer equation is resolved in scalar approximation using a version of the time-dependent invariance principle. In fact, the scattering function of the diffusely reflected pulse is expressed in terms of a

  8. Time evolution of phase composition and microstructure in the Ag/Bi-2223 composite superconductor heat-treated at specific pO2/temperature set points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurceanu, R. M.; Maroni, V. A.; Merchant, N. N.; Fischer, A. K.; McNallan, M. J.; Parrella, R. D.

    2002-07-01

    The time evolution of the phases present in the ceramic cores of silver-sheathed (Bi, Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Ag/Bi-2223) multifilament superconducting tapes heat-treated at selected oxygen partial pressure/temperature (pO2/T) set points was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy coupled with computer-based image processing methods. The numerical values for individual phase contents and non-superconducting second phase (NSP) size distributions generated in this way were used to quantify the temporal evolution of composition in the variably treated Ag/Bi-2223 tapes. Results for the three pO2/T set points investigated (21.0% O2/835 °C, 7.5% O2/825 °C and 4.0% O2/815 °C) revealed characteristic patterns of recurring maxima and minima in the time evolution of the NSPs. (Ca, Sr)14Cu24O41 was found to be the stable phase at 21.0% O2/835 °C, possibly evolving as a co-product of the Bi-2223 formation reaction, while (Ca, Sr)2CuO3 and CuO were stable at 4.0% O2/815 °C, presumably as a consequence of competitive secondary reactions proceeding in parallel with Bi-2223 formation. The best-aligned grains were formed in Ag/Bi-2223 tapes treated at 21.0% O2/835 °C, while the best conversion to Bi-2223, together with the least amount of NSP particles >0.5 μm in major dimension, was produced by the 7.5% O2/825 °C treatment. A forward-looking conclusion of the study is that it appears possible to minimize the amount and size of NSP particles during Ag/Bi-2223 heat treatment by using a combinatorial sequence of appropriately timed pO2/T set points.

  9. Dynamics of pulsed laser ablation plasmas in high-density CO2 near the critical point investigated by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Kato, Toru; Himeno, Shohei; Kato, Satoshi; Stauss, Sven; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) plasmas generated in high-density gases and liquids are promising for the synthesis of nanomaterials. However, the characteristics of such plasmas are still not well understood. In order to improve the understandings of PLA plasmas in high-density fluids including gases, liquids, and supercritical fluids (SCFs), we have investigated the dynamics of PLA plasmas in high-density carbon dioxide (CO2) . We report on experimental results of time-resolved shadowgraph imaging, from the generation of plasma plume to the extinction of cavitation bubbles. Shadowgraph images revealed that the PLA plasma dynamics showed two distinct behaviors. These are divided by gas-liquid coexistence curve and the so-called Widom line, which separates gas-like and liquid-like SCF domains. Furthermore, cavitation bubble observed in liquid CO2 near the critical point showed peculiar characteristics, the formation of an inner bubble and an outer shell structure, which so far has never been reported. The experiments indicate that thermophysical properties of PLA plasmas can be tuned by controlling solvent temperature and pressure around the critical point, which may be useful for materials processing. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (No. 21110002) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  10. An Estimation of the Likelihood of Significant Eruptions During 2000-2009 Using Poisson Statistics on Two-Point Moving Averages of the Volcanic Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1750, the number of cataclysmic volcanic eruptions (volcanic explosivity index (VEI)>=4) per decade spans 2-11, with 96 percent located in the tropics and extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere. A two-point moving average of the volcanic time series has higher values since the 1860's than before, being 8.00 in the 1910's (the highest value) and 6.50 in the 1980's, the highest since the 1910's peak. Because of the usual behavior of the first difference of the two-point moving averages, one infers that its value for the 1990's will measure approximately 6.50 +/- 1, implying that approximately 7 +/- 4 cataclysmic volcanic eruptions should be expected during the present decade (2000-2009). Because cataclysmic volcanic eruptions (especially those having VEI>=5) nearly always have been associated with short-term episodes of global cooling, the occurrence of even one might confuse our ability to assess the effects of global warming. Poisson probability distributions reveal that the probability of one or more events with a VEI>=4 within the next ten years is >99 percent. It is approximately 49 percent for an event with a VEI>=5, and 18 percent for an event with a VEI>=6. Hence, the likelihood that a climatically significant volcanic eruption will occur within the next ten years appears reasonably high.

  11. Real-time predictions of drug release and end point detection of a coating operation by in-line near infrared measurements.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Boiret, Mathieu; Genty, Muriel; Chaminade, Pierre; Pean, Jean Manuel

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this work was to carry out real-time near infrared (NIR) predictions of drug release from sustained release coated tablets and to determine end point of coating operation. In-line measurements were ensured by implementation of a NIR probe inside a pan coater. Tablets were coated using a functional aqueous dispersion of ethylcellulose blended with PVA-PEG graft copolymer to obtain a controlled drug release dosage form over 16h. Samples were collected at regular intervals and subjected to a standardized curing step. Percentages of released drug at 4h, 8h and 12h were selected to describe the controlled drug release of cured tablets. These dissolution criteria were used as reference values to calibrate NIR spectral information and to develop three partial least squares regressions. Low predictive errors of 1.7%, 1.9% and 1.5%, respectively, were obtained. The coating operation was stopped while desired dissolution criteria were achieved, corresponding to a coating level around 10%. The present study demonstrated that real-time NIR measurements could be performed on non-finished drug products to predict dissolution properties of cured coated tablets. This novel and innovative approach fulfils the expectations of ICH Q8 guideline on pharmaceutical development, in terms of process understanding and process analytical technology (PAT) control strategy. This approach should be however adapted to curing operation to allow a real-time release testing. PMID:21983094

  12. Self-Organizing Hierarchical Particle Swarm Optimization with Time-Varying Acceleration Coefficients for Economic Dispatch with Valve Point Effects and Multifuel Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polprasert, Jirawadee; Ongsakul, Weerakorn; Dieu, Vo Ngoc

    2011-06-01

    This paper proposes a self-organizing hierarchical particle swarm optimization (SPSO) with time-varying acceleration coefficients (TVAC) for solving economic dispatch (ED) problem with non-smooth functions including multiple fuel options (MFO) and valve-point loading effects (VPLE). The proposed SPSO with TVAC is the new approach optimizer and good performance for solving ED problems. It can handle the premature convergence of the problem by re-initialization of velocity whenever particles are stagnated in the search space. To properly control both local and global explorations of the swarm during the optimization process, the performance of TVAC is included. The proposed method is tested in different ED problems with non-smooth cost functions and the obtained results are compared to those from many other methods in the literature. The results have revealed that the proposed SPSO with TVAC is effective in finding higher quality solutions for non-smooth ED problems than many other methods.

  13. Processing time-series point clouds to reveal strain conditions of the Helheim Glacier terminus and its adjacent mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, L. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Gadomski, P. J.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Flow near the termini of tidewater glaciers varies over short time-scales due to mechanisms that are poorly understood. Repeat observations with high temporal and spatial resolution, recorded around the terminus, are required to better understand the processes that control flow variability. Progress in light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology permit such observations of the near-terminus and the pro-glacial ice mélange, though standard workflows for quantifying deformation from point clouds currently do not exist. Here, we test and develop methods for processing displacements from LiDAR data of complexly deforming bodies. We use data collected at 30-minute intervals over three-days in August 2013 at Helheim Glacier, Greenland by a long-range (6-10 km), 1064 nm wavelength Terrestrial LiDAR Scanner (TLS). The total area of coverage was ~25 km2. Distributed shear in glaciers prevents a simple transformation for aligning repeat point clouds, but within small regions (~100 m2) strain is assumed to be minor between scans. Registering a large number of these individual regions, subset from the full point-cloud, results in reduced alignment errors. By subsetting in a regular grid, rasters of velocities between scans are created. However, using data-dependent properties such as point density causes the generation of unevenly spaced velocity estimations, which can locally improve resolution or decrease registration errors. The choice of subsets therefore controls the output product's resolution and accuracy. We test how the spatial segmentation scheme affects the displacement results and alignment errors, finding that displacements can be quantified with limited assumption of the true value of displacement for the subset, barring great morphological changes. By identifying areas that do not deform over the temporal domain of the dataset, and using these as the subsets to align, it should be possible to deduce which structures are accommodating strain. This allows for

  14. Assessing the Influence of Land Use and Land Cover Datasets with Different Points in Time and Levels of Detail on Watershed Modeling in the North River Watershed, China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinliang; Zhou, Pei; Zhou, Zengrong; Huang, Yaling

    2012-01-01

    Land use and land cover (LULC) information is an important component influencing watershed modeling with regards to hydrology and water quality in the river basin. In this study, the sensitivity of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to LULC datasets with three points in time and three levels of detail was assessed in a coastal subtropical watershed located in Southeast China. The results showed good agreement between observed and simulated values for both monthly and daily streamflow and monthly NH4+-N and TP loads. Three LULC datasets in 2002, 2007 and 2010 had relatively little influence on simulated monthly and daily streamflow, whereas they exhibited greater effects on simulated monthly NH4+-N and TP loads. When using the two LULC datasets in 2007 and 2010 compared with that in 2002, the relative differences in predicted monthly NH4+-N and TP loads were −11.0 to −7.8% and −4.8 to −9.0%, respectively. There were no significant differences in simulated monthly and daily streamflow when using the three LULC datasets with ten, five and three categories. When using LULC datasets from ten categories compared to five and three categories, the relative differences in predicted monthly NH4+-N and TP loads were −6.6 to −6.5% and −13.3 to −7.3%, respectively. Overall, the sensitivity of the SWAT model to LULC datasets with different points in time and levels of detail was lower in monthly and daily streamflow simulation than in monthly NH4+-N and TP loads prediction. This research provided helpful insights into the influence of LULC datasets on watershed modeling. PMID:23271303

  15. Association of a multibiomarker disease activity score at multiple time-points with radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial

    PubMed Central

    Hambardzumyan, Karen; Bolce, Rebecca J; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Forslind, Kristina; Wallman, Johan K; Cruickshank, Scott E; Sasso, Eric H; Chernoff, David; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), predictive biomarkers for subsequent radiographic progression (RP) could improve therapeutic choices for individual patients. We previously showed that the multibiomarker disease activity (MBDA) score in patients with newly diagnosed RA identified patients at risk for RP. We evaluated the MBDA score at multiple time-points as a predictor of RP during 2 years of follow-up. Methods A subset of patients with RA (N=220) from the Swedish Farmacotherapy (SWEFOT) trial were analysed for MBDA score, disease activity score of 28 joints (DAS28), C reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at baseline (BL), month 3 and year 1, for predicting RP based on modified Sharp/van der Heijde scores at BL, year 1 and year 2. Results Patients with persistently low MBDA (<30) scores or those with a decrease from moderate (30–44) to low MBDA scores, did not develop RP during 2 years of follow-up. The highest risk for RP during 2 years of follow-up (42%) was observed among patients with persistently high (>44) MBDA scores. Among methotrexate non-responders with a high MBDA score at BL or month 3, significantly more of those who received triple therapy had RP at year 2 compared with those who received antitumour necrosis factor therapy. Conclusions Measuring the MBDA score both before and during treatment in RA was useful for the assessment of individual patient risk for RP during 2 years of follow-up. In comparison with low CRP, ESR or DAS28, a low MBDA score at any time-point was associated with numerically lower proportions of RP. Trial registration number NCT00764725. PMID:26958364

  16. Impact of Different Initial Epinephrine Treatment Time Points on the Early Postresuscitative Hemodynamic Status of Children With Traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan-Ren; Syue, Yuan-Jhen; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Lu, Huai-En; Chang, Chin-Fu; Chang, Chih-Yu; Chen, Cheng Hsu; Chen, Wen-Liang; Li, Chao-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The postresuscitative hemodynamic status of children with traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) might be impacted by the early administration of epinephrine, but this topic has not been well addressed. The aim of this study was to analyze the early postresuscitative hemodynamics, survival, and neurologic outcome according to different time points of first epinephrine treatment among children with traumatic OHCA. Information on 388 children who presented to the emergency departments of 3 medical centers and who were treated with epinephrine for traumatic OHCA during the study period (2003–2012) was retrospectively collected. The early postresuscitative hemodynamic features (cardiac functions, end-organ perfusion, and consciousness), survival, and neurologic outcome according to different time points of first epinephrine treatment (early: <15, intermediate: 15–30, and late: >30 minutes after collapse) were analyzed. Among 165 children who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation, 38 children (9.8%) survived to discharge and 12 children (3.1%) had good neurologic outcomes. Early epinephrine increased the postresuscitative heart rate and blood pressure in the first 30 minutes, but ultimately impaired end-organ perfusion (decreased urine output and initial creatinine clearance) (all P < 0.05). Early epinephrine treatment increased the chance of achieving sustained return of spontaneous circulation, but did not increase the rates of survival and good neurologic outcome. Early epinephrine temporarily increased heart rate and blood pressure in the first 30 minutes of the postresuscitative period, but impaired end-organ perfusion. Most importantly, the rates of survival and good neurologic outcome were not significantly increased by early epinephrine administration. PMID:27015217

  17. Real-time estimation of prostate tumor rotation and translation with a kV imaging system based on an iterative closest point algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Rugaard Poulsen, Per; Keall, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that during cancer radiotherapy a small translation or rotation of the tumor can lead to errors in dose delivery. Current best practice in radiotherapy accounts for tumor translations, but is unable to address rotation due to a lack of a reliable real-time estimate. We have developed a method based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm that can compute rotation from kilovoltage x-ray images acquired during radiation treatment delivery. A total of 11 748 kilovoltage (kV) images acquired from ten patients (one fraction for each patient) were used to evaluate our tumor rotation algorithm. For each kV image, the three dimensional coordinates of three fiducial markers inside the prostate were calculated. The three dimensional coordinates were used as input to the ICP algorithm to calculate the real-time tumor rotation and translation around three axes. The results show that the root mean square error was improved for real-time calculation of tumor displacement from a mean of 0.97 mm with the stand alone translation to a mean of 0.16 mm by adding real-time rotation and translation displacement with the ICP algorithm. The standard deviation (SD) of rotation for the ten patients was 2.3°, 0.89° and 0.72° for rotation around the right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively. The correlation between all six degrees of freedom showed that the highest correlation belonged to the AP and SI translation with a correlation of 0.67. The second highest correlation in our study was between the rotation around RL and rotation around AP, with a correlation of -0.33. Our real-time algorithm for calculation of rotation also confirms previous studies that have shown the maximum SD belongs to AP translation and rotation around RL. ICP is a reliable and fast algorithm for estimating real-time tumor rotation which could create a pathway to investigational clinical treatment studies requiring real-time

  18. Real-time estimation of prostate tumor rotation and translation with a kV imaging system based on an iterative closest point algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; O'Brien, Ricky T; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that during cancer radiotherapy a small translation or rotation of the tumor can lead to errors in dose delivery. Current best practice in radiotherapy accounts for tumor translations, but is unable to address rotation due to a lack of a reliable real-time estimate. We have developed a method based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm that can compute rotation from kilovoltage x-ray images acquired during radiation treatment delivery. A total of 11 748 kilovoltage (kV) images acquired from ten patients (one fraction for each patient) were used to evaluate our tumor rotation algorithm. For each kV image, the three dimensional coordinates of three fiducial markers inside the prostate were calculated. The three dimensional coordinates were used as input to the ICP algorithm to calculate the real-time tumor rotation and translation around three axes. The results show that the root mean square error was improved for real-time calculation of tumor displacement from a mean of 0.97 mm with the stand alone translation to a mean of 0.16 mm by adding real-time rotation and translation displacement with the ICP algorithm. The standard deviation (SD) of rotation for the ten patients was 2.3°, 0.89° and 0.72° for rotation around the right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively. The correlation between all six degrees of freedom showed that the highest correlation belonged to the AP and SI translation with a correlation of 0.67. The second highest correlation in our study was between the rotation around RL and rotation around AP, with a correlation of -0.33. Our real-time algorithm for calculation of rotation also confirms previous studies that have shown the maximum SD belongs to AP translation and rotation around RL. ICP is a reliable and fast algorithm for estimating real-time tumor rotation which could create a pathway to investigational clinical treatment studies requiring real-time

  19. Model-based testing for space-time interaction using point processes: An application to psychiatric hospital admissions in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sebastian; Warnke, Ingeborg; Rössler, Wulf; Held, Leonhard

    2016-05-01

    Spatio-temporal interaction is inherent to cases of infectious diseases and occurrences of earthquakes, whereas the spread of other events, such as cancer or crime, is less evident. Statistical significance tests of space-time clustering usually assess the correlation between the spatial and temporal (transformed) distances of the events. Although appealing through simplicity, these classical tests do not adjust for the underlying population nor can they account for a distance decay of interaction. We propose to use the framework of an endemic-epidemic point process model to jointly estimate a background event rate explained by seasonal and areal characteristics, as well as a superposed epidemic component representing the hypothesis of interest. We illustrate this new model-based test for space-time interaction by analysing psychiatric inpatient admissions in Zurich, Switzerland (2007-2012). Several socio-economic factors were found to be associated with the admission rate, but there was no evidence of general clustering of the cases. PMID:27246269

  20. Survival of time-evolved quantum correlations depending on whether quenching is across a critical point in an X Y spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R.

    2016-04-01

    The time dynamics of quantum correlations in the quantum transverse anisotropic X Y spin chain of infinite length is studied at zero and finite temperatures. The evolution occurs due to the instantaneous quenching of the coupling constant between the nearest-neighbor spins of the model, which is performed either within the same phase or across the quantum phase-transition point connecting the order-disorder phases of the model. We characterize the time-evolved quantum correlations, viz., entanglement and quantum discord, which exhibit varying behavior depending on the initial state and the quenching scheme. We show that the system is endowed with enhanced nearest-neighbor bipartite quantum correlations compared to that of the initial state, when quenched from the ordered to the deep disordered phase. However, nearest-neighbor quantum correlations are almost washed out when the system is quenched from the disordered to the ordered phase with the initial state being at the zero temperature. We also identify the condition for the occurrence of enhanced bipartite correlations when the system is quenched within the same phase. Moreover, we investigate the bipartite quantum correlations when the initial state is a thermal equilibrium state with finite temperature, which reveals the effects of thermal fluctuation on the phenomena observed at zero temperature. Finally, an analogous analysis is carried out for zero-temperature next-nearest-neighbor quantum correlations.

  1. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Haixia; Xue, Zhixiao; Yin, Huijuan; Niu, Qing; Chen, Hongli

    2015-12-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  2. Time-lapse analysis of methane quantity in Mary Lee group of coal seams using filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karacan, C. Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic approach presented in this paper is the first time in literature that history matching, TIs of GIPs and filter simulations are used for degasification performance evaluation and for assessing GIP for mining safety. Results from this study showed that using production history matching of coalbed methane wells to determine time-lapsed reservoir data could be used to compute spatial GIP and representative GIP TIs generated through Voronoi decomposition. Furthermore, performing filter simulations using point-wise data and TIs could be used to predict methane quantity in coal seams subjected to degasification. During the course of the study, it was shown that the material balance of gas produced by wellbores and the GIP reductions in coal seams predicted using filter simulations compared very well, showing the success of filter simulations for continuous variables in this case study. Quantitative results from filter simulations of GIP within the studied area briefly showed that GIP was reduced from an initial ∼73 Bcf (median) to ∼46 Bcf (2011), representing a 37 % decrease and varying spatially through degasification. It is forecasted that there will be an additional ∼2 Bcf reduction in methane quantity between 2011 and 2015. This study and presented results showed that the applied methodology and utilized techniques can be used to map GIP and its change within coal seams after degasification, which can further be used for ventilation design for methane control in coal mines.

  3. A Seamless Handoff Scheme with Access Point Load Balance for Real-Time Services Support in 802.11 Wireless LANs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manodham, Thavisak; Loyola, Luis; Miki, Tetsuya

    IEEE 802.11 wirelesses LANs (WLANs) have been rapidly deployed in enterprises, public areas, and households. Voice-over-IP (VoIP) and similar applications are now commonly used in mobile devices over wireless networks. Recent works have improved the quality of service (QoS) offering higher data rates to support various kinds of real-time applications. However, besides the need for higher data rates, seamless handoff and load balancing among APs are key issues that must be addressed in order to continue supporting real-time services across wireless LANs and providing fair services to all users. In this paper, we introduce a novel access point (AP) with two transceivers that improves network efficiency by supporting seamless handoff and traffic load balancing in a wireless network. In our proposed scheme, the novel AP uses the second transceiver to scan and find neighboring STAs in the transmission range and then sends the results to neighboring APs, which compare and analyze whether or not the STA should perform a handoff. The initial results from our simulations show that the novel AP module is more effective than the conventional scheme and a related work in terms of providing a handoff process with low latency and sharing traffic load with neighbor APs.

  4. Time-integrated passive sampling as a complement to conventional point-in-time sampling for investigating drinking-water quality, McKenzie River Basin, Oregon, 2007 and 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Alvarez, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Eugene Water & Electric Board (EWEB) supplies drinking water to approximately 200,000 people in Eugene, Oregon. The sole source of this water is the McKenzie River, which has consistently excellent water quality relative to established drinking-water standards. To ensure that this quality is maintained as land use in the source basin changes and water demands increase, EWEB has developed a proactive management strategy that includes a combination of conventional point-in-time discrete water sampling and time‑integrated passive sampling with a combination of chemical analyses and bioassays to explore water quality and identify where vulnerabilities may lie. In this report, we present the results from six passive‑sampling deployments at six sites in the basin, including the intake and outflow from the EWEB drinking‑water treatment plant (DWTP). This is the first known use of passive samplers to investigate both the source and finished water of a municipal DWTP. Results indicate that low concentrations of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organohalogen compounds are consistently present in source waters, and that many of these compounds are also present in finished drinking water. The nature and patterns of compounds detected suggest that land-surface runoff and atmospheric deposition act as ongoing sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, some currently used pesticides, and several legacy organochlorine pesticides. Comparison of results from point-in-time and time-integrated sampling indicate that these two methods are complementary and, when used together, provide a clearer understanding of contaminant sources than either method alone.

  5. Magnitude, Timing, and Geometry of Extension in the Southern Sevier Desert Basin From Piercing Points, Seismic-Stratigraphic Reconstruction, and Deep well Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, J. C.; Decelles, P. G.

    2007-12-01

    Palinspastic reconstruction of Mesozoic thrust sheets provides the main constraint for an estimated 47 km of Cenozoic extensional displacement along the Sevier Desert detachment (SDD) in the central Sevier Desert Basin. Hanging wall and footwall piercing points indicate that the SDD accommodated a minimum of 35 km of extensional displacement in the narrower southern part of the basin. The piercing points for the SDD are defined by the intersection of the SDD, the Canyon Range thrust (CRT), and a regional early Cenozoic erosion surface (ES). The hanging wall piercing point lies immediately northeast of the Cricket Mountains, where the SDD-CRT- ES intersection is narrowly defined by intersecting structure maps derived from published seismic reflection data. The footwall piercing point lies in the southern foothills of the Canyon Range, where the SDD breakaway plane is well constrained by an industry seismic line that lies within 2 km of the exposed intersection of the CRT with the base of the Oligocene Oak City Formation. Timing of extension in the southern Sevier Desert basin is constrained by a kinematic reconstruction of detachment and imbricate fault displacement, footwall uplift, and supradetachment sedimentation for Oligocene, Miocene, and Plio-Pleistocene seismic sequences. The reconstruction is centered on a seismic reflection and gravity interpretation along the published Pan Canadian profiles 2 and 3 that is tied to dated intervals in six industry wells. Fault restoration indicates that Oligocene and Miocene phases of slip each accounted for about 40 percent of the total displacement. Simultaneous backstripping of the Oligocene, Miocene, and Plio-Pleistocene supradetachment sequences records hanging wall subsidence simultaneous with footwall uplift, with a footwall burial history that is consistent with published Miocene apatite and zircon fission-track ages of footwall samples. The geometric evolution of the southern SDD extensional system is consistent

  6. Real-time PCR array chip with capillary-driven sample loading and reactor sealing for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Naveen; Liu, Hao-Bing; Dai, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qinghui; M Hui, Kam; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2009-10-01

    A major challenge for the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) community is to develop point-of-care diagnostic chips that do not use instruments. Such instruments include pumping or liquid handling devices for distribution of patient's nucleic-acid test sample among an array of reactors and microvalves or mechanical parts to seal these reactors. In this paper, we report the development of a primer pair pre-loaded PCR array chip, in which the loading of the PCR mixture into an array of reactors and subsequent sealing of the reactors were realized by a novel capillary-based microfluidics with a manual two-step pipetting operations. The chip is capable of performing simultaneous (parallel) analyses of multiple gene targets and its performance was tested by amplifying twelve different gene targets against cDNA template from human hepatocellular carcinoma using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye. The versatility and reproducibility of the PCR-array chip are demonstrated by real-time PCR amplification of the BNI-1 fragment of SARS cDNA cloned in a plasmid vector. The reactor-to-reactor diffusion of the pre-loaded primer pairs in the chip is investigated to eliminate the possibility of primer cross-contamination. Key technical issues such as PCR mixture loss in gas-permeable PDMS chip layer and bubble generation due to different PDMS-glass bonding methods are investigated. PMID:19421862

  7. Added Value of Dual-Time-Point 18F-FDG PET/CT With Delayed Imaging for Detecting Aortic Graft Infection: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Yung; Chang, Cheng-Pei; Shih, Chun-Che; Yang, Bang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Chang, Chi-Wei; Chu, Lee-Shing; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2015-07-01

    F-FDG PET/CT is a promising tool in detecting aortic graft infection. Present study investigated the value of dual-time-point F-FDG PET/CT imaging (DTPI) with delayed imaging in assessing aortic graft infection.Twenty-nine patients with suspected aortic graft infection were prospectively enrolled in this DTPI study. Two nuclear medicine physicians read all the images and achieved consensus about the measurement of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and grading of image quality. The percentages of SUVmax change between initial and delayed images were recorded as retention index (RI); sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated based on reference standard.All the 5 infected aortic grafts had positive RIs, which were generally higher than that of noninfected grafts. Those noninfected grafts had variable RIs. Seven patients had improved image quality in delayed imaging. DTPI with delayed image detected all the infected grafts with improved specificity (88%) and accuracy (90%), providing conspicuous delineation of the infected graft extent.In conclusion, noninfected aortic grafts had more variable RIs than infected ones. DTPI might be useful for detecting aortic graft infection, improving image quality, and enhancing delineation of the infected aortic grafts. PMID:26166113

  8. Multi-point, multi-scale observation of the near-Earth current sheet reconfiguration during storm-time multi-onset substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Plaschke, F.; Narita, Y.; Schmid, D.; Panov, E. V.; Andriopoulou, M.; Voros, Z.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Steller, M.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Le, G.; Bromund, K. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Chutter, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Vaith, H.; Le Contel, O.; Argall, M. R.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Pollock, C. J.; Dorelli, J.; Gershman, D. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Mauk, B.; Baker, D. N.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Singer, H. J.; Sergeev, V. A.; Escoubet, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    On June 23, 2015 between 03 and 06 UT, during the recovery phase of a storm, signatures of two major substorms with multiple-onsets are detected by a fleet of spacecraft in the near-Earth region providing an unique opportunity to study the evolution of the near-Earth current sheet reconfiguration from sub-ion scale to larger scale across the inner magnetosphere. The two onsets around 0315 and 0505 are observed by MMS near the boundary of the premidnight-plasma sheet as a thinning of the current sheet and as dipolarization at GOES 13 and 15 in the dusk to premidnight region, then followed by crossing of an active separatrix region. By using high-resolution magnetic field data onboard MMS, we investigate the detailed propagation properties of the disturbances and structures based on different multi-point analysis techniques (timing, gradient, and wave telescope analysis). By also comparing with current wedge model from ground-based data we identify the 3D evolution of the near-Earth current sheet.

  9. Time point-based integrative analyses of deep-transcriptome identify four signal pathways in blastemal regeneration of zebrafish lower jaw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xuelong; Lyu, Kailun; Gao, Siqi; Wang, Guan; Fan, Chunxin; Zhang, Xin A; Yan, Jizhou

    2015-03-01

    There has been growing interest in applying tissue engineering to stem cell-based regeneration therapies. We have previously reported that zebrafish can faithfully regenerate complicated tissue structures through blastemal cell type conversions and tissue reorganization. To unveil the regenerative factors and engineering arts of blastemal regeneration, we conducted transcriptomal analyses at four time points corresponding to preamputation, re-epitheliation, blastemal formation, and respecification. By combining the hierarchical gene ontology term network, the DAVID annotation system, and Euclidean distance clustering, we identified four signaling pathways: foxi1-foxo1b-pou3f1, pax3a-mant3a-col11/col2, pou5f1-cdx4-kdrl, and isl1-wnt11 PCP-sox9a. Results from immunohistochemical staining and promoter-driven transgenic fish suggest that these pathways, respectively, define wound epidermis reconstitution, cell type conversions, blastemal angiogenesis/vasculogenesis, and cartilage matrix-orientation. Foxi1 morpholino-knockdown caused expansions of Foxo1b- and Pax3a-expression in the basal layer-blastemal junction region. Moreover, foxi1 morphants displayed increased sox9a and hoxa2b transcripts in the embryonic pharyngeal arches. Thus, a Foxi1 signal switch is required to establish correct tissue patterns, including re-epitheliation and blastema formation. This study provides novel insight into a blastema regeneration strategy devised by epithelial cell transdifferentiation, blood vessel engineering, and cartilage matrix deposition. PMID:25420467

  10. Using digital image correlation and three dimensional point tracking in conjunction with real time operating data expansion techniques to predict full-field dynamic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avitabile, Peter; Baqersad, Javad; Niezrecki, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Large structures pose unique difficulties in the acquisition of measured dynamic data with conventional techniques that are further complicated when the structure also has rotating members such as wind turbine blades and helicopter blades. Optical techniques (digital image correlation and dynamic point tracking) are used to measure line of sight data without the need to contact the structure, eliminating cumbersome cabling issues. The data acquired from these optical approaches are used in conjunction with a unique real time operating data expansion process to obtain full-field dynamic displacement and dynamic strain. The measurement approaches are described in this paper along with the expansion procedures. The data is collected for a single blade from a wind turbine and also for a three bladed assembled wind turbine configuration. Measured strains are compared to results from a limited set of optical measurements used to perform the expansion to obtain full-field strain results including locations that are not available from the line of sight measurements acquired. The success of the approach clearly shows that there are some very extraordinary possibilities that exist to provide very desperately needed full field displacement and strain information that can be used to help identify the structural health of structures.

  11. Splitting the Cartesian point

    SciTech Connect

    Blodwell, J.F.

    1987-10-01

    It is argued that the point structure of space and time must be constructed from the primitive extensional character of space and time. A procedure for doing this is laid down and applied to one-dimensional and two-dimensional systems of abstract extensions. Topological and metrical properties of the constructed point systems, which differ nontrivially from the usual R and R/sup 2/ models, are examined. Briefly, constructed points are associated with directions and the Cartesian point is split. In one-dimension each point splits into a point pair compatible with the linear ordering. An application to one-dimensional particle motion is given, with the result that natural topological assumptions force the number of left point, right point transitions to remain locally finite in a continuous motion. In general, Cartesian points are seen to correspond to certain filters on a suitable Boolean algebra. Constructed points correspond to ultrafilters. Thus, point construction gives a natural refinement of the Cartesian systems.

  12. Differential Diagnosis of Malaria on Truelab Uno®, a Portable, Real-Time, MicroPCR Device for Point-Of-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Chandrasekhar Bhaskaran; Manjula, Jagannath; Subramani, Pradeep Annamalai; Nagendrappa, Prakash B.; Manoj, Mulakkapurath Narayanan; Malpani, Sukriti; Pullela, Phani Kumar; Subbarao, Pillarisetti Venkata; Ramamoorthy, Siva; Ghosh, Susanta K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensitive and specific detection of malarial parasites is crucial in controlling the significant malaria burden in the developing world. Also important is being able to identify life threatening Plasmodium falciparum malaria quickly and accurately to reduce malaria related mortality. Existing methods such as microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have major shortcomings. Here, we describe a new real-time PCR-based diagnostic test device at point-of-care service for resource-limited settings. Methods Truenat® Malaria, a chip-based microPCR test, was developed by bigtec Labs, Bangalore, India, for differential identification of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax parasites. The Truenat Malaria tests runs on bigtec’s Truelab Uno® microPCR device, a handheld, battery operated, and easy-to-use real-time microPCR device. The performance of Truenat® Malaria was evaluated versus the WHO nested PCR protocol. The Truenat® Malaria was further evaluated in a triple-blinded study design using a sample panel of 281 specimens created from the clinical samples characterized by expert microscopy and a rapid diagnostic test kit by the National Institute of Malaria Research (NIMR). A comparative evaluation was done on the Truelab Uno® and a commercial real-time PCR system. Results The limit of detection of the Truenat Malaria assay was found to be <5 parasites/μl for both P. falciparum and P. vivax. The Truenat® Malaria test was found to have sensitivity and specificity of 100% each, compared to the WHO nested PCR protocol based on the evaluation of 100 samples. The sensitivity using expert microscopy as the reference standard was determined to be around 99.3% (95% CI: 95.5–99.9) at the species level. Mixed infections were identified more accurately by Truenat Malaria (32 samples identified as mixed) versus expert microscopy and RDTs which detected 4 and 5 mixed samples, respectively. Conclusion The Truenat® Malaria microPCR test is a valuable

  13. Tipping Point

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  14. Point-of-care detection and real-time monitoring of intravenously delivered drugs via tubing with an integrated SERS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsin-Yu; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate an approach for detection, identification, and kinetic monitoring of drugs flowing within tubing, through the use of a plasmonic nanodome array (PNA) surface. The PNA structures are fabricated using a low-cost nanoreplica molding process upon a flexible plastic substrate that is subsequently integrated with a flow cell that connects in series with ordinary intravenous (IV) drug delivery tubing. To investigate the potential clinical applications for point-of-care detection and real-time monitoring, we perform SERS detection of ten pharmaceutical compounds (hydrocodone, levorphanol, morphine, oxycodone, methadone, phenobarbital, dopamine, diltiazem, promethazine, and mitoxantrone). We demonstrate dose-dependent SERS signal magnitude, resulting in detection limits (ng ml-1) well below typical administered dosages (mg ml-1). Further, we show that the detected drugs are not permanently attached to the PNA surface, and thus our approach is capable of performing continuous monitoring of drug delivery as materials flow through IV tubing that is connected in series with the sensor. Finally, we demonstrate the potential co-detection of multiple drugs when they are mixed together, and show excellent reproducibility and stability of SERS measurements for periods extending at least five days. The capabilities reported here demonstrate the potential to use PNA SERS surfaces for enhancing the safety of IV drug delivery.We demonstrate an approach for detection, identification, and kinetic monitoring of drugs flowing within tubing, through the use of a plasmonic nanodome array (PNA) surface. The PNA structures are fabricated using a low-cost nanoreplica molding process upon a flexible plastic substrate that is subsequently integrated with a flow cell that connects in series with ordinary intravenous (IV) drug delivery tubing. To investigate the potential clinical applications for point-of-care detection and real-time monitoring, we perform SERS detection of ten

  15. Estimated times to exhaustion and power outputs at the gas exchange threshold, physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold, and respiratory compensation point.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Zuniga, Jorge M; Camic, Clayton L; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the power outputs and estimated times to exhaustion (T(lim)) at the gas exchange threshold (GET), physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold (PWC(RPE)), and respiratory compensation point (RCP). Three male and 5 female subjects (mean ± SD: age, 22.4 ± 2.8 years) performed an incremental test to exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer to determine peak oxygen consumption rate, GET, and RCP. The PWC(RPE) was determined from ratings of perceived exertion data recorded during 3 continuous workbouts to exhaustion. The estimated T(lim) values for each subject at GET, PWC(RPE), and RCP were determined from power curve analyses (T(lim) = ax(b)). The results indicated that the PWC(RPE) (176 ± 55 W) was not significantly different from RCP (181 ± 54 W); however, GET (155 ± 42 W) was significantly less than PWC(RPE) and RCP. The estimated T(lim) for the GET (26.1 ± 9.8 min) was significantly greater than PWC(RPE) (14.6 ± 5.6 min) and RCP (11.2 ± 3.1 min). The PWC(RPE) occurred at a mean power output that was 13.5% greater than the GET and, therefore, it is likely that the perception of effort is not driven by the same mechanism that underlies the GET (i.e., lactate buffering). Furthermore, the PWC(RPE) and RCP were not significantly different and, therefore, these thresholds may be associated with the same mechanisms of fatigue, such as increased levels of interstitial and (or) arterial [K⁺]. PMID:22716291

  16. Point-of-Care Autofluorescence Imaging for Real-Time Sampling and Treatment Guidance of Bioburden in Chronic Wounds: First-in-Human Results

    PubMed Central

    DaCosta, Ralph S.; Kulbatski, Iris; Lindvere-Teene, Liis; Starr, Danielle; Blackmore, Kristina; Silver, Jason I.; Opoku, Julie; Wu, Yichao Charlie; Medeiros, Philip J.; Xu, Wei; Xu, Lizhen; Wilson, Brian C.; Rosen, Cheryl; Linden, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditionally, chronic wound infection is diagnosed by visual inspection under white light and microbiological sampling, which are subjective and suboptimal, respectively, thereby delaying diagnosis and treatment. To address this, we developed a novel handheld, fluorescence imaging device (PRODIGI) that enables non-contact, real-time, high-resolution visualization and differentiation of key pathogenic bacteria through their endogenous autofluorescence, as well as connective tissues in wounds. Methods and Findings This was a two-part Phase I, single center, non-randomized trial of chronic wound patients (male and female, ≥18 years; UHN REB #09-0015-A for part 1; UHN REB #12-5003 for part 2; clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01378728 for part 1 and NCT01651845 for part 2). Part 1 (28 patients; 54% diabetic foot ulcers, 46% non-diabetic wounds) established the feasibility of autofluorescence imaging to accurately guide wound sampling, validated against blinded, gold standard swab-based microbiology. Part 2 (12 patients; 83.3% diabetic foot ulcers, 16.7% non-diabetic wounds) established the feasibility of autofluorescence imaging to guide wound treatment and quantitatively assess treatment response. We showed that PRODIGI can be used to guide and improve microbiological sampling and debridement of wounds in situ, enabling diagnosis, treatment guidance and response assessment in patients with chronic wounds. PRODIGI is safe, easy to use and integrates into the clinical workflow. Clinically significant bacterial burden can be detected in seconds, quantitatively tracked over days-to-months and their biodistribution mapped within the wound bed, periphery, and other remote areas. Conclusions PRODIGI represents a technological advancement in wound sampling and treatment guidance for clinical wound care at the point-of-care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01651845; ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01378728 PMID:25790480

  17. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  18. Strain distribution in thin concrete pavement panels under three-point loading to failure with pre-pulse-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yi; Cain, John; Chen, Yizheng; Huang, Ying; Chen, Genda; Palek, Leonard

    2015-04-01

    Thin concrete panels reinforced with alloy polymer macro-synthetic fibers have recently been introduced to rapidly and cost-effectively improve the driving condition of existing roadways by laying down a fabric sheet on the roadways, casting a thin layer of concrete, and then cutting the layer into panels. This study is aimed to understand the strain distribution and potential crack development of concrete panels under three-point loading. To this end, six full-size 6ft×6ft×3in concrete panels were tested to failure in the laboratory. They were instrumented with three types of single-mode optical fiber sensors whose performance and ability to measure the strain distribution and detect cracks were compared. Each optical fiber sensor was spliced and calibrated, and then attached to a fabric sheet using adhesive. A thin layer of mortar (0.25 ~ 0.5 in thick) was cast on the fabric sheet. The three types of distributed sensors were bare SM-28e+ fiber, SM-28e+ fiber with a tight buffer, and concrete crack cable, respectively. The concrete crack cable consisted of one SM-28e+ optical fiber with a tight buffer, one SM-28e+ optical fiber with a loose buffer for temperature compensation, and an outside protective tight sheath. Distributed strains were collected from the three optical fiber sensors with pre-pulse-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis in room temperature. Among the three sensors, the bare fiber was observed to be most fragile during construction and operation, but most sensitive to strain change or micro-cracks. The concrete crack cable was most rugged, but not as sensitive to micro-cracks and robust in micro-crack measurement as the bare fiber. The ruggedness and sensitivity of the fiber with a tight buffer were in between the bare fiber and the concrete crack cable. The strain distribution resulted from the three optical sensors are in good agreement, and can be applied to successfully locate cracks in the concrete panels. It was observed that the

  19. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-inoculation at different time points influences the outcome of C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong-Hua; Wang, Ji-Chun; Liu, Jun; Du, Yun-Ting; Cui, Li-Wang; Cao, Ya-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine. We performed a series of co-infection experiments with BCG-Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi Landau, 1965 AS using C57BL/6 mice to analyse whether BCG can affect the development of protective immunity to infection with Plasmodium spp. and the mechanism of this protection. We divided mice into four groups: BCG-inoculation 4 weeks prior to P. c. chabaudi AS infection (B-4w-Pc); simultaneous BCG-inoculation and P. c. chabaudi AS infection (Pc+B); BCG-inoculation 3 days post P. c. chabaudi AS (Pc-3-B) infection; and mono-P. c. chabaudi AS infection as control (Pc). The parasitemia level in the B-4w-Pc group was noticeably higher than control group at 6-19 days post infection (dpi). Compared with the control group, the proportion of CD4(+)CD69(+) T cells was significantly reduced 5, 8 and 12 dpi, but the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs was significantly increased in the B-4w-Pc group on 5 and 8 dpi. The B-4w-Pc group also demonstrated reduced levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α on 5 and 8 dpi and significantly elevated level of IL-10 on 12 dpi. There were significantly fewer mDCs (CD11c(+)CD11b(+)) and pDCs (CD11c(+)B220(+)) in the B-4w-Pc group than the control group at all the time points post infection and the expression of MHC II was noticeably reduced on day 8 pi. Our findings confirmed that BCG inoculation prior to Plasmodium infection resulted in excessive activation and proliferation of Tregs and upregulation of anti-inflammatory mediators, which inhibited establishment of a Th1-dominant immune response during the early stages of Plasmodium infection by inhibiting dendritive cells response. BCG inoculation prior to P. c. chabaudi AS infection may contribute to overgrowth of parasites as well as mortality in mice. PMID:27188912

  20. The grade is: 66 out of 100. Commonwealth gives U.S. healthcare a sickly ranking, but some say it's time to offer solutions, not point out problems.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2006-09-25

    When the Commonwealth Fund issued its first scorecard on the U.S. healthcare system, the news wasn't so great. But the project's authors said the score of 66 points out of 100 shouldn't be interpreted as a failing grade, but a sign the nation can do much better. The U.S. spends 16% of its GDP on healthcare, said Karen Davis, president of the Commonwealth Fund. "We are not getting good value for that investment." PMID:17037270

  1. Detection of the A2058G and A2059G 23S rRNA Gene Point Mutations Associated with Azithromycin Resistance in Treponema pallidum by Use of a TaqMan Real-Time Multiplex PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Pillay, Allan; Nachamkin, Eli; Su, John R.; Ballard, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide treatment failure in syphilis patients is associated with a single point mutation (either A2058G or A2059G) in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene in Treponema pallidum strains. The conventional method for the detection of both point mutations uses nested PCR combined with restriction enzyme digestions, which is laborious and time-consuming. We initially developed a TaqMan-based real-time duplex PCR assay for detection of the A2058G mutation, and upon discovery of the A2059G mutation, we modified the assay into a triplex format to simultaneously detect both mutations. The point mutations detected by the real-time triplex PCR were confirmed by pyrosequencing. A total of 129 specimens PCR positive for T. pallidum that were obtained from an azithromycin resistance surveillance study conducted in the United States were analyzed. Sixty-six (51.2%) of the 129 samples with the A2058G mutation were identified by both real-time PCR assays. Of the remaining 63 samples that were identified as having a macrolide-susceptible genotype by the duplex PCR assay, 17 (27%) were found to contain the A2059G mutation by the triplex PCR. The proportions of macrolide-susceptible versus -resistant genotypes harboring either the A2058G or the A2059G mutation among the T. pallidum strains were 35.6, 51.2, and 13.2%, respectively. None of the T. pallidum strains examined had both point mutations. The TaqMan-based real-time triplex PCR assay offers an alternative to conventional nested PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses for the rapid detection of both point mutations associated with macrolide resistance in T. pallidum. PMID:23284026

  2. The time-space relationship of the data point (Pixels) of the thematic mapper and multispectral scanner or the myth of simultaneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified explanation of the time space relationships among scanner pixels is presented. The examples of the multispectral scanner (MSS) on Landsats 1, 2, and 3 and the thematic mapper (TM) of Landsat D are used to describe the concept and degree of nonsimultaneity of scanning system data. The time aspects of scanner data acquisition and those parts of the MSS and TM systems related to that phenomena are addressed.

  3. The Association between HbA1c, Fasting Glucose, 1-Hour Glucose and 2-Hour Glucose during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test and Cardiovascular Disease in Individuals with Elevated Risk for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Marcus; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Nerman, Olle; Eriksson, Johan; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Peltonen, Markku; Pivodic, Aldina; Lindström, Jaana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 1-hour (1 hPG) and 2-hour (2 hPG) glucose after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes. Design We studied the relationship between baseline, updated mean and updated (last) value of HbA1c, FPG, 1 hPG and 2 hPG after an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and acute CVD events in 504 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) at baseline enrolled in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Setting Follow-up of clinical trial. Participants 504 individuals with IGT were followed with yearly evaluations with OGTT, FPG and HbA1c. Main Outcome Measure Relative risk of CVD. Results Over a median follow-up of 9.0 years 34 (6.7%) participants had a CVD event, which increased to 52 (10.3%) over a median follow-up of 13.0 years when including events that occurred among participants following a diagnosis of diabetes. Updated mean HbA1c, 1 hPG and 2 hPG, HR per 1 unit SD of 1.57 (95% CI 1.16 to 2.11), p = 0.0032, 1.51 (1.03 to 2.23), p = 0.036 and 1.60 (1.10 to 2.34), p = 0.014, respectively, but not FPG (p = 0.11), were related to CVD. In analyses of the last value prior to the CVD event the same three glycaemic measurements were associated with the CVD events, with HRs per 1 unit SD of 1.45 (1.06 to 1.98), p = 0.020, 1.55 (1.04 to 2.29), p = 0.030 and 2.19 (1.51 to 3.18), p<0.0001, respectively but only 2 hPG remained significant in pairwise comparisons. Including the follow-up period after diabetes onset updated 2 hPG (p = 0.003) but not updated mean HbA1c (p = 0.08) was related to CVD. Conclusions and Relevance Current 2 hPG level in people with IGT is associated with increased risk of CVD. This supports its use in screening for prediabetes and monitoring glycaemic levels of people with prediabetes. PMID:25285769

  4. A biospectroscopic analysis of human prostate tissue obtained from different time periods points to a trans-generational alteration in spectral phenotype.

    PubMed

    Theophilou, Georgios; Lima, Kássio M G; Briggs, Matthew; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Stringfellow, Helen F; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly-diagnosed malignancy in males worldwide; however, there is marked geographic variation in incidence that may be associated with a Westernised lifestyle. We set out to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) or Raman spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis or variable selection techniques employing genetic algorithm or successive projection algorithm could be utilised to explore differences between prostate tissues from differing years. In total, 156 prostate tissues from transurethral resection of the prostate procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia from 1983 to 2013 were collected. These were distributed to form seven categories: 1983-1984 (n = 20), 1988-1989 (n = 25), 1993-1994 (n = 21), 1998-1999 (n = 21), 2003-2004 (n = 21), 2008-2009 (n = 20) and 2012-2013 (n = 21). Ten-μm-thick tissue sections were floated onto Low-E (IR-reflective) slides for ATR-FTIR or Raman spectroscopy. The prostate tissue spectral phenotype altered in a temporal fashion. Examination of the two categories that are at least one generation (30 years) apart indicated highly-significant segregation, especially in spectral regions containing DNA and RNA bands (≈1,000-1,490 cm(-1)). This may point towards alterations that have occurred through genotoxicity or through epigenetic modifications. Immunohistochemical studies for global DNA methylation supported this. This study points to a trans-generational phenotypic change in human prostate. PMID:26310632

  5. A biospectroscopic analysis of human prostate tissue obtained from different time periods points to a trans-generational alteration in spectral phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Theophilou, Georgios; Lima, Kássio M. G.; Briggs, Matthew; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L.; Stringfellow, Helen F.; Martin, Francis L.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly-diagnosed malignancy in males worldwide; however, there is marked geographic variation in incidence that may be associated with a Westernised lifestyle. We set out to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) or Raman spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis or variable selection techniques employing genetic algorithm or successive projection algorithm could be utilised to explore differences between prostate tissues from differing years. In total, 156 prostate tissues from transurethral resection of the prostate procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia from 1983 to 2013 were collected. These were distributed to form seven categories: 1983–1984 (n = 20), 1988–1989 (n = 25), 1993–1994 (n = 21), 1998–1999 (n = 21), 2003–2004 (n = 21), 2008–2009 (n = 20) and 2012–2013 (n = 21). Ten-μm-thick tissue sections were floated onto Low-E (IR-reflective) slides for ATR-FTIR or Raman spectroscopy. The prostate tissue spectral phenotype altered in a temporal fashion. Examination of the two categories that are at least one generation (30 years) apart indicated highly-significant segregation, especially in spectral regions containing DNA and RNA bands (≈1,000–1,490 cm−1). This may point towards alterations that have occurred through genotoxicity or through epigenetic modifications. Immunohistochemical studies for global DNA methylation supported this. This study points to a trans-generational phenotypic change in human prostate. PMID:26310632

  6. Pointing to others: How the target gender influences pointing performance.

    PubMed

    Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Jacquemot, Charlotte; Cruveiller, Virginie; Dupoux, Emmanuel; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Pointing is a communicative gesture that allows individuals to share information about surrounding objects with other humans. Patients with heterotopagnosia are specifically impaired in pointing to other humans' body parts but not in pointing to themselves or to objects. Here, we describe a female patient with heterotopagnosia who was more accurate in pointing to men's body parts than to women's body parts. We replicated this gender effect in healthy participants with faster reaction times for pointing to men's body parts than to women's body parts. We discuss the role of gender stereotypes in explaining why it is more difficult to point to women than to men. PMID:27593456

  7. Exploratory space-time analysis of dengue incidence in Trinidad: a retrospective study using travel hubs as dispersal points, 1998–2004

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is an acute arboviral disease responsible for most of the illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions. Over the last 25 years there has been increase epidemic activity of the disease in the Caribbean, with the co-circulation of multiple serotypes. An understanding of the space and time dynamics of dengue could provide health agencies with important clues for reducing its impact. Methods Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) cases observed for the period 1998–2004 were georeferenced using Geographic Information System software. Spatial clustering was calculated for individual years and for the entire study period using the Nearest Neighbor Index. Space and time interaction between DHF cases was determined using the Knox Test while the Nearest Neighbor Hierarchical method was used to extract DHF hot spots. All space and time distances calculated were validated using the Pearson r significance test. Results Results shows that (1) a decrease in mean distance between DHF cases correlates with activity leading up to an outbreak, (2) a decrease in temporal distance between DHF cases leads to increased geographic spread of the disease, with an outbreak occurrence about every 2 years, and (3) a general pattern in the movement of dengue incidents from more rural to urban settings leading up to an outbreak with hotspot areas associated with transportation hubs in Trinidad. Conclusion Considering only the spatial dimension of the disease, results suggest that DHF cases become more concentrated leading up to an outbreak. However, with the additional consideration of time, results suggest that when an outbreak occurs incidents occur more rapidly in time leading to a parallel increase in the rate of distribution of the disease across space. The results of this study can be used by public health officers to help visualize and understand the spatial and temporal patterns of dengue, and to prepare warnings for the public. Dengue space-time patterns and

  8. Design of a nanoscale time-of-flight sensor and an integrated multiscale module for the point-of-care diagnosis of stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, Matthew

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States, however, there remains no rapid diagnostic test for differentiating between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke within the three-hour treatment window. Here we describe the design of a multiscale microfluidic module with an embedded time-of-flight nanosensor for the clinical diagnosis of stroke. The nanosensor described utilizes two synthetic pores in series, relying on resistive pulse sensing (RPS) to measure the passage of molecules through the time-of-flight tube. Once the nanosensor design was completed, a multiscale module to process patient samples and house the sensors was designed in a similar iterative process. This design utilized pillar arrays, called "pixels" to immobilize oligonucleotides from patient samples for ligase detection reactions (LDR) to be carried out. COMSOL simulations were performed to understand the operation and behavior of both the nanosensor and the modular chip once the designs were completed.

  9. The evolution of ROAN 2016 - Radio surveillance of meteors and determination of reflection points through calculation of the radio path, based on times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, T.; Georgescu, A.; Lesanu, C.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the activity calendar describing the steps until the finalization of the Allsky project in December 2016. It presents also the new developed technology for detection and localization of meteors' ionic traces, which is based on information time-stamped on the radio carrier. The year 2016 is the final one for our project, during which our target is the creation of 25 integrated stations (radio and video, Allsky MK3 type) and to install the ROAN radio beacon. Its location will be the operation base initially, before being moved to an eastern spot, near the Ukrainian border. The novelty of it all is brought by the newly patented technology of time-stamping.

  10. SOFIA pointing history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Hans J.; Kunz, Nans; Temi, Pasquale; Krabbe, Alfred; Wagner, Jörg; Süß, Martin

    2014-07-01

    The original pointing accuracy requirement of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy SOFIA was defined at the beginning of the program in the late 1980s as very challenging 0.2 arcsec rms. The early science flights of the observatory started in December 2010 and the observatory has reached in the mean time nearly 0.7 arcsec rms, which is sufficient for most of the SOFIA science instruments. NASA and DLR, the owners of SOFIA, are planning now a future 4 year program to bring the pointing down to the ultimate 0.2 arcsec rms. This may be the right time to recall the history of the pointing requirement and its verification and the possibility of its achievement via early computer models and wind tunnel tests, later computer aided end-to-end simulations up to the first commissioning flights some years ago. The paper recollects the tools used in the different project phases for the verification of the pointing performance, explains the achievements and may give hints for the planning of the upcoming final pointing improvement phase.

  11. Methods of a large prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end-point study comparing morning versus evening dosing in hypertensive patients: the Treatment In Morning versus Evening (TIME) study

    PubMed Central

    Rorie, David A; Rogers, Amy; Mackenzie, Isla S; Ford, Ian; Webb, David J; Willams, Bryan; Brown, Morris; Poulter, Neil; Findlay, Evelyn; Saywood, Wendy; MacDonald, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nocturnal blood pressure (BP) appears to be a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than daytime BP. The BP lowering effects of most antihypertensive therapies are often greater in the first 12 h compared to the next 12 h. The Treatment In Morning versus Evening (TIME) study aims to establish whether evening dosing is more cardioprotective than morning dosing. Methods and analysis The TIME study uses the prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end-point (PROBE) design. TIME recruits participants by advertising in the community, from primary and secondary care, and from databases of consented patients in the UK. Participants must be aged over 18 years, prescribed at least one antihypertensive drug taken once a day, and have a valid email address. After the participants have self-enrolled and consented on the secure TIME website (http://www.timestudy.co.uk) they are randomised to take their antihypertensive medication in the morning or the evening. Participant follow-ups are conducted after 1 month and then every 3 months by automated email. The trial is expected to run for 5 years, randomising 10 269 participants, with average participant follow-up being 4 years. The primary end point is hospitalisation for the composite end point of non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), non-fatal stroke (cerebrovascular accident; CVA) or any vascular death determined by record-linkage. Secondary end points are: each component of the primary end point, hospitalisation for non-fatal stroke, hospitalisation for non-fatal MI, cardiovascular death, all-cause mortality, hospitalisation or death from congestive heart failure. The primary outcome will be a comparison of time to first event comparing morning versus evening dosing using an intention-to-treat analysis. The sample size is calculated for a two-sided test to detect 20% superiority at 80% power. Ethics and dissemination TIME has ethical approval in the UK, and results will be published in a

  12. Critical points of DNA quantification by real-time PCR – effects of DNA extraction method and sample matrix on quantification of genetically modified organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cankar, Katarina; Štebih, Dejan; Dreo, Tanja; Žel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    Background Real-time PCR is the technique of choice for nucleic acid quantification. In the field of detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) quantification of biotech products may be required to fulfil legislative requirements. However, successful quantification depends crucially on the quality of the sample DNA analyzed. Methods for GMO detection are generally validated on certified reference materials that are in the form of powdered grain material, while detection in routine laboratories must be performed on a wide variety of sample matrixes. Due to food processing, the DNA in sample matrixes can be present in low amounts and also degraded. In addition, molecules of plant origin or from other sources that affect PCR amplification of samples will influence the reliability of the quantification. Further, the wide variety of sample matrixes presents a challenge for detection laboratories. The extraction method must ensure high yield and quality of the DNA obtained and must be carefully selected, since even components of DNA extraction solutions can influence PCR reactions. GMO quantification is based on a standard curve, therefore similarity of PCR efficiency for the sample and standard reference material is a prerequisite for exact quantification. Little information on the performance of real-time PCR on samples of different matrixes is available. Results Five commonly used DNA extraction techniques were compared and their suitability for quantitative analysis was assessed. The effect of sample matrix on nucleic acid quantification was assessed by comparing 4 maize and 4 soybean matrixes. In addition 205 maize and soybean samples from routine analysis were analyzed for PCR efficiency to assess variability of PCR performance within each sample matrix. Together with the amount of DNA needed for reliable quantification, PCR efficiency is the crucial parameter determining the reliability of quantitative results, therefore it was chosen as the primary

  13. Time-resolved measurement of photon emission during fast crack propagation in three-point bending fracture of silica glass and soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Tadashi Sato, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Kouichi

    2014-03-10

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of photon emission (PE) and fast crack propagation upon bending fracture were conducted in silica glass and soda lime glass. Observation of fracture surfaces revealed that macroscopic crack propagation behavior was similar between the silica glass and soda lime glass when fracture loads for these specimens were comparable and cracks propagated without branching. However, a large difference in the PE characteristics was found between the two glasses. In silica glass, PE (645–655 nm) was observed during the entire crack propagation process, whereas intense PE (430–490 nm and 500–600 nm) was observed during the initial stages of propagation. In contrast, only weak PE was detected in soda lime glass. These results show that there is a large difference in the atomic processes involved in fast crack propagation between these glasses, and that PE can be used to study brittle fracture on the atomic scale.

  14. Development of a real-time performance predictor and an investigation of a return to point vehicle for high altitude ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Joseph P., Jr.

    Scope and method of study. The goal of this study was twofold: First, to gain a better understanding of the governing dynamics in near-space missions and to investigate the feasibility of a low cost autonomous parafoil for control during the descent phase. A study of balloon expansion and drag was conducted to investigate the ascent phase of a flight. The next phase of the project created of a custom prediction program used in real-time to accurately predict the landing location of payloads well before they actually landed. The program was designed to detect and adjust the major dynamic parameters as seen during the flight, and then to use this information to increase the accuracy of predictions. The second goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of using a low cost autonomous parafoil to increase the control over a desired landing zone. This study was conducted in two phases: The first phase tested the autopilot on a ground vehicle to gain confidence in the system. The second phase tested autopilot on an actual parafoil. Findings and conclusions. The major findings for this project are: An increase in understanding of the balloon dynamics in the ascent phase was required in order to correctly predict the reaction of the system. In the process of gaining this understanding, two major items were found: First, near-space balloons can be modeled as zero-pressure balloons and thus their expansion is governed by the Ideal Gas Law. Second, the assumed drag model for near-space missions in the size range of 10 to 20 lbs and 600 cu ft of Helium was grossly misunderstood. While the system does transition from a high to low drag coefficient, it does so at a much slower rate than that a classical sphere. The method of detecting and correcting parameters in real-time lead to a major increase in accuracy in the predicted landing zone just after burst. Typically, the system has an accuracy of 2 miles or better, two minutes after burst has occurred. The second part

  15. Spatio-temporal statistical model for the optimal combination of precipitation measured at different time scales for estimating unobserved point values and disaggregating to finer timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bàrdossy, Andràs; Pegram, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    Precipitation observations are unique in space and time, so if not observed, the values can only be estimated. Many applications, such as the calculation of water balances, calibration of hydrological models or the provision of unbiased ground truth for remote sensing require full datasets. Thus a reliable estimation of the missing observations is of great importance. The problem is exacerbated by the ubiquitous decimation of gauge networks. We consider 2 problems as examples of the methodology: (i) infilling monthly data where some days are missing in the monthly records and (ii) infilling missing hourly values in daily records with the assistance of some nearby pluviometers. The key is that we need estimates of the distributions of the infilled values, not just their expectations, as we have found that the traditional 'best' values bias the spatial estimates. We first performed monthly precipitation interpolation using 311 full records, 31 stations of which were randomly decimated to artificially create incomplete records as inequality constraints. Interpolation was carried out (i) without using these 31 in any way and (ii) using them as inequality constraints, in the sense that we determine a lower limit by aggregating the surviving data in a decimated record. We compare the errors if (i) the 31 stations with incomplete records are not considered against (ii) the errors if the incomplete records are considered as inequalities, and found that the partially decimated data add considerable value, as compared to neglecting them. In a second application we performed a disaggregation in time. We take a set of complete hourly pluviometer data, then aggregate some stations to days. These then have their hourly missing data reconstructed and we evaluate the success of the procedure by cross-validation. In this application the daily sums for a location are considered as a constraint and the disaggregated daily data are compared to their observed hourly precipitation. The

  16. Early life stress disrupts social behavior and prefrontal cortex parvalbumin interneurons at an earlier time-point in females than in males

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Freedom H.; Ganguly, Prabarna; Potter, David N.; Chartoff, Elena H.; Brenhouse, Heather C.

    2014-01-01

    Early life stress exposure (ELS) yields risk for psychiatric disorders that might occur though a population-specific mechanism that impacts prefrontal cortical development. Sex differences in ELS effects are largely unknown and are also essential to understand social and cognitive development. ELS can cause dysfunction within parvalbumin (PVB)-containing inhibitory interneurons in the prefrontal cortex and in several prefrontal cortex-mediated behaviors including social interaction. Social behavior deficits are often the earliest observed changes in psychiatric disorders, therefore the time-course and causation of social interaction deficits after ELS are important to determine. PVB interneuron dysfunction can disrupt social behavior, and has been correlated in males with elevated markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, such as cyclooxygenase-2 after ELS. Here, we measured the effects of maternal separation ELS on social interaction behaviors in males and females. Prefrontal cortex PVB and cyclooxygenase-2 were also measured in juveniles and adolescents using Western blots. ELS led to social interaction alterations earlier in females than males. Sexually dimorphic behavioral changes were consistent with prefrontal cortex PVB loss after ELS. PVB levels were decreased in ELS-exposed juvenile females, while males exposed to ELS do not display parvalbumin decreases until adolescence. Early behavioral and PVB changes in females did not appear to be mediated through cyclooxygenase-2, since levels were not affected in ELS females. Therefore, these data suggest that ELS affects males and females differently and with distinct developmental profiles. PMID:24565933

  17. Space-time design of the tangled C-points and optical vortex chain and loop reactions in paraxial dynamic elliptic speckle fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskin, Marat S.; Vasil'ev, Vasil I.

    2013-04-01

    The unique effect of ‘optical damage’ in photorefractive LiNbO3:Fe crystals produces a developing speckle field in the propagating beam of a He-Ne laser (0.63 μm). Elliptic developing speckle fields were created and investigated thoroughly by means of the Stokes polarimetry and monstardom (Dennis 2008 Opt. Lett. 33 2572). The ergodicity of elliptic speckle fields under the index (star, monstar, lemon) and contour (elliptic, hyperbolic) classifications was revealed experimentally by our measurements for developing speckle fields, measurements for static elliptic speckle fields, as well as theory (Flossmann et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 203902). Both hyperbolic (H) and elliptic (E) diabolos were fixed. All the probable topological structures for the neighbour diabolos in the developing elliptic speckle field were measured. All the measured nucleation/annihilation events occur as H(S)+H(M) reactions. The evolution of the singularities occurs separately in the speckle-field areas with fixed handedness and is realized through minimizing the changes needed for the developing speckle fields at each moment. The general regularities of the elliptic speckle-field development were revealed and confirmed. They occur through the time-limited loop and continuous chain reactions in both single and multiple speckles in 1:4 proportion. Strict morphological scenarios for their evolution were found. Applications of the methods of dynamical singular optics are discussed.

  18. Antibacterial effects on dry-fast and traditional water-based surgical scrubbing methods: a two-time points experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Hwa; Chou, Chuan-Yu; Huang, Jui-Chen; Tang, Ya-Fen; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Chien, Li-Yu

    2014-06-01

    This study determined the in-use effects of dry-fast and traditional hand-washing surgical scrubs among operating room staff members. This is a static group comparison study with purposive sampling. A total of 156 staff members were recruited in an operating room in a medical center located in southern Taiwan. The participants were divided into traditional and dry-fast hand-washing groups. Microbial counts were measured right after the two groups finished surgical scrubbing and at the completion of surgery. The results showed that the use of dry-fast antisepsis has a better persistent effect (P = 0.001), more nurses chose dry-fast antisepsis than surgeons (P = 0.012), and the post-operation number of colonies for nurses was significantly higher than that for surgeons (P = 0.003). Operating room nurses are long-term and frequent users of antibacterial agents, and their requirement of skin protection is higher. The dry-fast technique has the advantage of being less irritating to the skin and less time consuming; therefore, brush-free and dry-fast antisepsis is recommended. PMID:23992610

  19. Lack of Intraclonal Diversification in Ig Heavy and Light Chain V Region Genes Expressed by CD5+IgM+ Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells: A Multiple Time Point Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Schettino, Edward W.; Cerutti, Andrea; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the modalities of clonal expansion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, we sequenced at multiple time points the V(D)J genes expressed by CD5+IgM+CLL B cells in three patients. All three V(D)J gene sequences were found to be point mutated. The mutation frequency in the Ig VH (3.96 × 10−2 and 2.41 × 10−2 change/bp) and Vκ and Vλ (6.67 × 10−2 and 1.74 × 10−2 change/bp) genes of two CLLs (1.19 and 1.32, respectively) was similar, and higher than that in the corresponding gene segments of the third CLL (1.69; 3.4 × 10−3 and 6.67 × 10−3 change/bp). In all three CLLs, there was no preferential representation of nucleotide changes yielding amino acid replacement (R mutations), nor was there any preferential segregation of R mutations within the Ig V gene complementarity-determining regions. In all three CLLs, the somatic mutations were all identical in multiple Ig VHDJH transcripts at any given time point, and were all conserved at multiple time points throughout a 2-yr period. The lack of concentration of R mutations in the complementarity-determining regions and the lack of intraclonal heterogeneity suggest that Ag may no longer be able to play a significant role in the clonal expansion of these cells. This conclusion would be strengthened further by the germline configuration of the bcl-1 and bcl-2 proto-oncogenes that are translocated in neoplastic B cells that display significant traces of intraclonal diversification and Ag-dependent selection, such as B-prolymphocytic leukemia and low grade follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:9551917

  20. Time-dependent current decline in cyclic GMP-gated bovine channels caused by point mutations in the pore region expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bucossi, G; Eismann, E; Sesti, F; Nizzari, M; Seri, M; Kaupp, U B; Torre, V

    1996-01-01

    1. Amino acids with a charged or a polar residue in the putative pore region, between lysine 346 and glutamate 372 of the alpha-subunit of the cGMP-gated channel from bovine rods were mutated to a different amino acid. The mRNA encoding for the wild-type, i.e. the alpha-subunit, or mutant channels was injected in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 2. When glutamate 363 was mutated to asparagine, serine or alanine, the current activated by a steady cGMP concentration declined in mutant channels. No current decline was observed when glutamate 363 was mutated to aspartate, glutamine or glycine, when theronine 359, 360 and 364 were mutated to alanine or when other charged residues in the pore region were neutralized. 3. The amount of current decline and its time course were significantly voltage dependent. In mutant E363A the current decline developed within about 1.5 s at -100 mV, but in about 6 s at +100 mV. In the same mutant, the current declined to about 55% of its initial level at +100 mV and to about 10% at -100 mV. 4. The current decline in mutants E363A, E363S and E363N was only moderately dependent on the cGMP concentration (from 10 to 1000 microM) and was not caused by a reduced affinity of the mutant channels for cGMP. Analysis of current fluctuations at a single-channel level indicated that current decline was primarily caused by a decrease of the open probability. 5. The wild-type channel was not permeable to dimethylammonium. When glutamate 363 was replaced by a smaller residue such as serine, mutant channels became permeable to dimethylammonium. 6. The current decline observed in mutant channels is reminiscent of desensitization of ligand-gated channels and of inactivation of voltage-gated channels. These results suggest also that gating and permeation through the cGMP-gated channel from bovine rods are intrinsically coupled and that glutamate 363 is part of the molecular structure controlling both the gating and the narrowest region of the pore. PMID:8782105

  1. Effects of immunological castration and distiller's dried grains with solubles on carcass cutability and commercial bacon slicing yields of barrows slaughtered at two time points.

    PubMed

    Tavárez, M A; Bohrer, B M; Asmus, M D; Schroeder, A L; Matulis, R J; Boler, D D; Dilger, A C

    2014-07-01

    Male pigs were randomly assigned to a castration method at birth and allotted to 48 pens (28 pigs/pen). Physically castrated (PC) barrows were castrated at 2 d of age; immunologically castrated (IC) barrows were administered Improvest (GnRF analog diphtheria toxoid conjugate; Zoetis, Kalamazoo, MI) at 16 and 20 wk of age. Distiller's dried grains with solubles (DDGS) feeding strategies included either 0% DDGS (control), 30% DDGS (30% DDGS) fed from 6 wk of age to slaughter, or 30% DDGS fed from 6 wk of age to second dose of Improvest and then fed 0% DDGS until slaughter (withdrawal). Four barrows closest to the median pen weight at 4.5 wk after second dose were selected for evaluation; two were randomly selected and slaughtered at 5 wk and the other two at 7 wk after second dose. Data from each slaughter time were analyzed independently as a 2 × 3 factorial design with pen as the experimental unit. At 5 wk after second dose, bone-in lean cutting yields were 2.63% units greater (P < 0.01) in IC when compared to PC. Bellies were thicker (P < 0.01) and tended to have greater belly flop distances (P = 0.07) in PC compared to IC, however iodine values (IV) were not altered (P = 0.84). Carcass traits (P ≥ 0.10), cutting yields (P ≥ 0.43), and fresh belly characteristics (P ≥ 0.08) were minimally affected by DDGS feeding strategy. Bacon slicing yields (percentage of green weight) were 6.10% units less (P < 0.01) in IC compared with PC. At 7 wk after second dose, bone-in lean cutting yields were 1.57% units greater (P = 0.03) in IC compared with PC. Distiller's grains feeding strategy had no effect (P ≥ 0.83) on boneless carcass cutting yields in IC; while in PC, these yields were 2.32% units less (P < 0.02) in control-fed barrows when compared to other feeding strategies (castration method × feeding strategy; P = 0.03). Bellies from PC tended to be thicker (P = 0.07) and have similar flop distances (P = 0.44) and IV (P = 0.54) when compared with IC. Iodine value

  2. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Dang, R. S.; Ando, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  3. GLAS Spacecraft Pointing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, George H.; Gold, Kenn; Ondrey, Michael; Kubitschek, Dan; Axelrad, Penina; Komjathy, Attila

    1998-01-01

    Science requirements for the GLAS mission demand that the laser altimeter be pointed to within 50 m of the location of the previous repeat ground track. The satellite will be flown in a repeat orbit of 182 days. Operationally, the required pointing information will be determined on the ground using the nominal ground track, to which pointing is desired, and the current propagated orbit of the satellite as inputs to the roll computation algorithm developed by CCAR. The roll profile will be used to generate a set of fit coefficients which can be uploaded on a daily basis and used by the on-board attitude control system. In addition, an algorithm has been developed for computation of the associated command quaternions which will be necessary when pointing at targets of opportunity. It may be desirable in the future to perform the roll calculation in an autonomous real-time mode on-board the spacecraft. GPS can provide near real-time tracking of the satellite, and the nominal ground track can be stored in the on-board computer. It will be necessary to choose the spacing of this nominal ground track to meet storage requirements in the on-board environment. Several methods for generating the roll profile from a sparse reference ground track are presented.

  4. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  5. Resonant frequency analysis of a Lamé-mode resonator on a quartz plate by the finite-difference time-domain method using the staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takashi; Hasegawa, Koji; Hirayama, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method using a staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities (SGCV) was formulated for elastic waves propagating in anisotropic solids and for a rectangular SGCV. Resonant frequency analysis of Lamé-mode resonators on a quartz plate was carried out to confirm the accuracy and validity of the proposed method. The resonant frequencies for the fundamental and higher-order Lamé-modes calculated by the proposed method agreed very well with their theoretical values.

  6. The Point of No Return

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Bartlett (1958) described the point of no return as a point of irrevocable commitment to action, which was preceded by a period of gradually increasing commitment. As such, the point of no return reflects a fundamental limit on the ability to control thought and action. I review the literature on the point of no return, taking three perspectives. First, I consider the point of no return from the perspective of the controlled act, as a locus in the architecture and anatomy of the underlying processes. I review experiments from the stop-signal paradigm that suggest that the point of no return is located late in the response system. Then I consider the point of no return from the perspective of the act of control that tries to change the controlled act before it becomes irrevocable. From this perspective, the point of no return is a point in time that provides enough “lead time” for the act of control to take effect. I review experiments that measure the response time to the stop signal as the lead time required for response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm. Finally, I consider the point of no return in hierarchically controlled tasks, in which there may be many points of no return at different levels of the hierarchy. I review experiments on skilled typing that suggest different points of no return for the commands that determine what is typed and the countermands that inhibit typing, with increasing commitment to action the lower the level in the hierarchy. I end by considering the point of no return in perception and thought as well as action. PMID:25633089

  7. Assessment of the usefulness of the standardized uptake values and the radioactivity levels for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer measured by using 18F-FDG PET/CT dual-time-point imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeon-Guck; Hong, Seong-Jong; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Han, Man-Seok; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Ik-Han

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the changes in the SUV (standardized uptake value), the 18F-FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) uptake pattern, and the radioactivity level for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer via dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT (positron emission tomographycomputed tomography) imaging. Moreover, the study aimed to verify the usefulness and significance of SUV values and radioactivity levels to discriminate tumor malignancy. A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients who received 18F-FDG PET/CT for thyroid cancer as a primary tumor. To set the background, we compared changes in values by calculating the dispersion of scattered rays in the neck area and the lung apex, and by comparing the mean and SD (standard deviation) values of the maxSUV and the radioactivity levels. According to the statistical analysis of the changes in 18F-FDG uptake for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, a high similarity was observed with the coefficient of determination being R2 = 0.939, in the SUVs and the radioactivity levels. Moreover, similar results were observed in the assessment of tumor malignancy using dual-time-point. The quantitative analysis method for assessing tumor malignancy using radioactivity levels was neither specific nor discriminative compared to the semi-quantitative analysis method.

  8. At the Tipping Point

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2011-02-28

    There comes a time in every field of science when things suddenly change. While it might not be immediately apparent that things are different, a tipping point has occurred. Biology is now at such a point. The reason is the introduction of high-throughput genomics-based technologies. I am not talking about the consequences of the sequencing of the human genome (and every other genome within reach). The change is due to new technologies that generate an enormous amount of data about the molecular composition of cells. These include proteomics, transcriptional profiling by sequencing, and the ability to globally measure microRNAs and post-translational modifications of proteins. These mountains of digital data can be mapped to a common frame of reference: the organism’s genome. With the new high-throughput technologies, we can generate tens of thousands of data points from each sample. Data are now measured in terabytes and the time necessary to analyze data can now require years. Obviously, we can’t wait to interpret the data fully before the next experiment. In fact, we might never be able to even look at all of it, much less understand it. This volume of data requires sophisticated computational and statistical methods for its analysis and is forcing biologists to approach data interpretation as a collaborative venture.

  9. Prognostic value of the standardized uptake value maximum change calculated by dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Feng; Zhu, Hui; Fu, Zheng; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of the standardized uptake value maximum (SUVmax) change calculated by dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective review of 115 patients with advanced NSCLC who underwent pretreatment dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET acquired at 1 and 2 hours after injection. The SUVmax from early images (SUVmax1) and SUVmax from delayed images (SUVmax2) were recorded and used to calculate the SUVmax changes, including the SUVmax increment (ΔSUVmax) and percent change of the SUVmax (%ΔSUVmax). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were determined by the Kaplan–Meier method and were compared with the studied PET parameters, and the clinicopathological prognostic factors in univariate analyses and multivariate analyses were constructed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results One hundred and fifteen consecutive patients were reviewed, and the median follow-up time was 12.5 months. The estimated median PFS and OS were 3.8 and 9.6 months, respectively. In univariate analysis, SUVmax1, SUVmax2, ΔSUVmax, %ΔSUVmax, clinical stage, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scores were significant prognostic factors for PFS. Similar results were significantly correlated with OS, except %ΔSUVmax. In multivariate analysis, ΔSUVmax and %ΔSUVmax were significant factors for PFS. On the other hand, ECOG scores were only identified as independent predictors of OS. Conclusion Our results demonstrated the prognostic value of the SUVmax change in predicting the PFS of patients with advanced NSCLC. However, SUVmax change could not predict OS. PMID:27284249

  10. Characterization of plant materials by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry: high-resolution mass spectrometry, time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry, and Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of spruce needles

    SciTech Connect

    Schulten, H.F.; Simmleit, N.; Mueller, R.

    1989-02-01

    In the course of a forest damage research project spruce needles are analyzed, without pretreatment except drying and milling, by in-source pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry. The mass signals are assigned by using high-resolution mass measurements and thermal degradation products identified by Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography. It is demonstrated that the thermal degradation products characterize the main chemical constituents of spruce needs such as polysaccharides and lignin. Furthermore, thermostable constituents such as lipids, steroids, and flavons are detected. The thermal degradation process is studied by temperature-programmed microfurnace pyrolysis in combination with time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry. The integrated interpretation of results achieved by the presented methods can be applied for the universal characterization of complex and in particular nonsoluble, polydisperse biological and geochemical materials.

  11. Two alternative multiplex PCRs for the identification of the seven species of anglerfish (Lophius spp.) using an end-point or a melting curve analysis real-time protocol.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Armani, Andrea; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius spp.) is consumed worldwide and is an important economic resource though its seven species are often fraudulently interchanged due to their different commercial value, especially when sold in the form of fillets or pieces. Molecular analysis is the only possible mean to verify traceability and counteract fraud. We developed two multiplex PCRs, one end-point and one real-time with melting curve post-amplification analysis, which can even be run with the simplest two-channel thermocyclers. The two methods were tested on seventy-five reference samples. Their specificity was checked in twenty more species of those most commonly available on the market and in other species of the Lophiidae family. Both methods, the choice of which depends on the equipment and budget of the lab, provide a rapid and easy-to-read response, improving both the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of existing methods for identifying Lophius species. PMID:25053020

  12. Characterizing configurations of fire ignition points through spatiotemporal point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, C.; Costafreda-Aumedes, S.; Vega-Garcia, C.

    2014-04-01

    Human-caused forest fires are usually regarded as unpredictable but often exhibit trends towards clustering in certain locations and periods. Characterizing such configurations is crucial for understanding spatiotemporal fire dynamics and implementing preventive actions. Our objectives were to analyse the spatiotemporal point configuration and to test for spatiotemporal interaction. We characterized the spatiotemporal structure of 984 fire ignition points in a study area of Galicia, Spain, during 2007-2011 by the K-Ripley's function. Our results suggest the presence of spatiotemporal structures for time lags of less than two years and ignition point distances in the range 0-12 km. Ignition centre points at time lags of less than 100 days are aggregated for any inter-event distance. This cluster structure loses strength as the time lag increases, and at time lags of more than 365 days this cluster structure is not significant for any lag distance. Our results also suggest spatiotemporal interdependencies at time lags of less than 100 days and inter-event distances of less than 10 km. At time lags of up to 365 days spatiotemporal components are independent for any point distance. These results suggest that risk conditions occur locally and are short-lived in this study area.

  13. Is It Possible to Detect Activated Brown Adipose Tissue in Humans Using Single-Time-Point Infrared Thermography under Thermoneutral Conditions? Impact of BMI and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schick, Fritz; Schwenzer, Nina F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility to detect activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) using single-time-point infrared thermography of the supraclavicular skin region under thermoneutral conditions. To this end, infrared thermography was compared with 18-F-FDG PET, the current reference standard for the detection of activated BAT. Methods 120 patients were enrolled in this study. After exclusion of 18 patients, 102 patients (44 female, 58 male, mean age 58±17 years) were included for final analysis. All patients underwent a clinically indicated 18F-FDG-PET/CT examination. Immediately prior to tracer injection skin temperatures of the supraclavicular, presternal and jugular regions were measured using spatially resolved infrared thermography at room temperature. The presence of activated BAT was determined in PET by typical FDG uptake within the supraclavicular adipose tissue compartments. Local thickness of supraclavicular subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) was measured on CT. Measured skin temperatures were statistically correlated with the presence of activated BAT and anthropometric data. Results Activated BAT was detected in 9 of 102 patients (8.8%). Local skin temperature of the supraclavicular region was significantly higher in individuals with active BAT compared to individuals without active BAT. However, after statistical correction for the influence of BMI, no predictive value of activated BAT on skin temperature of the supraclavicular region could be observed. Supraclavicular skin temperature was significantly negatively correlated with supraclavicular SCAT thickness. Conclusion We conclude that supraclavicular SCAT thickness influences supraclavicular skin temperature and thus makes a specific detection of activated BAT using single-time-point thermography difficult. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the possibility of BAT detection using alternative thermographic methods, e.g. dynamic thermography or MR-based thermometry taking into account BMI

  14. Fat-subtracted three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography of the neck by use of fat-only images with the two-point Dixon technique.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Isao; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hirohiko; Adachi, Toshiki

    2015-07-01

    For improvement of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) image quality in the neck, fat-subtracted MRA by use of the two-point Dixon technique was compared with conventional fat-suppressed MRA techniques. Three different types of neck 3D-TOF-MRA were obtained [minimum echo time (TE) (1.9 ms), opposed-phase TE (3.4 ms), and chemical shift selective fat suppression (CHESS) (TE = 1.9 ms)] on five volunteers at 3.0 T. MRA was obtained with subtraction of fat-only images (produced by a two-point Dixon sequence) from minimum-TE MRA images, and compared with other fat-suppressed MRA images. Fat-subtracted MRA demonstrated uniform fat suppression compared with other techniques. The mean vessel-to-fat contrast in fat-subtracted MRA was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than in other MRA images (minimum-TE: 0.137 ± 0.086, opposed-phase TE: 0.268 ± 0.102, CHESS: 0.307 ± 0.052, fat-subtracted: 0.965 ± 0.101). The mean vessel-to-muscle contrast in opposed-phase TE MRA was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than in other MRA images (minimum-TE: 0.526 ± 0.036, opposed-phase TE: 0.419 ± 0.188, CHESS: 0.511 ± 0.023, fat-subtracted: 0.573 ± 0.016). Fat-subtracted MRA by use of the two-point Dixon technique improves the image quality of neck MRA. This technique would be a useful method for MRA, especially in areas with inhomogeneous magnetic fields, such as the neck. PMID:25577234

  15. Vernal Point and Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez-Campos, Teodosio; Chavez S, Nadia; Chavez-Sumarriva, Israel

    2014-05-01

    The time scale was based on the internationally recognized formal chronostratigraphical /geochronological subdivisions of time: The Phanerozoic Eonathem/Eon; the Cenozoic Erathem/Era; the Quaternary System/Period; the Pleistocene and Holocene Series/Epoch. The Quaternary was divided into: (1) The Pleistocene that was characterized by cycles of glaciations (intervals between 40,000 and 100,000 years). (2) The Holocene that was an interglacial period that began about 12,000 years ago. It was believed that the Milankovitch cycles (eccentricity, axial tilt and the precession of the equinoxes) were responsible for the glacial and interglacial Holocene periods. The magnetostratigraphic units have been widely used for global correlations valid for Quaternary. The gravitational influence of the sun and moon on the equatorial bulges of the mantle of the rotating earth causes the precession of the earth. The retrograde motion of the vernal point through the zodiacal band is 26,000 years. The Vernal point passes through each constellation in an average of 2000 years and this period of time was correlated to Bond events that were North Atlantic climate fluctuations occurring every ≡1,470 ± 500 years throughout the Holocene. The vernal point retrogrades one precessional degree approximately in 72 years (Gleissberg-cycle) and approximately enters into the Aquarius constellation on March 20, 1940. On earth this entry was verify through: a) stability of the magnetic equator in the south central zone of Peru and in the north zone of Bolivia, b) the greater intensity of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in Peru and Bolivia since 1940. With the completion of the Holocene and the beginning of the Anthropocene (widely popularized by Paul Crutzen) it was proposed the date of March 20, 1940 as the beginning of the Anthropocene. The date proposed was correlated to the work presented in IUGG (Italy 2007) with the title "Cusco base meridian for the study of geophysical data"; Cusco was

  16. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  17. Floating Point Control Library

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  18. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy. PMID:24864393

  19. Tipping point leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point. PMID:12687920

  20. 76 FR 66925 - Guidance for 1-Hour SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Do not submit information that you consider to be CBI or... boxed information. Instructions: Direct your comments to Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR- 2010-1059. The EPA's... available online at http://www.regulations.gov , including any personal information provided, unless...

  1. Point-to-Point Multicast Communications Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Gregory T.; Nakano, Russell; Delagi, Bruce A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a protocol to support point-to-point interprocessor communications with multicast. Dynamic, cut-through routing with local flow control is used to provide a high-throughput, low-latency communications path between processors. In addition multicast transmissions are available, in which copies of a packet are sent to multiple destinations using common resources as much as possible. Special packet terminators and selective buffering are introduced to avoid a deadlock during multicasts. A simulated implementation of the protocol is also described.

  2. Point by Point: Adding up Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchionda, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Students often view their course grades as a mysterious equation of teacher-given grades, teacher-given grace, and some other ethereal components based on luck. However, giving students the power to earn points based on numerous daily/weekly assignments and attendance makes the grading process objective and personal, freeing the instructor to…

  3. Oil point pressure of Indian almond kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aregbesola, O.; Olatunde, G.; Esuola, S.; Owolarafe, O.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of preprocessing conditions such as moisture content, heating temperature, heating time and particle size on oil point pressure of Indian almond kernel was investigated. Results showed that oil point pressure was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by above mentioned parameters. It was also observed that oil point pressure reduced with increase in heating temperature and heating time for both coarse and fine particles. Furthermore, an increase in moisture content resulted in increased oil point pressure for coarse particles while there was a reduction in oil point pressure with increase in moisture content for fine particles.

  4. Point-Force Energy Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Tristan; Squires, Kyle

    2005-11-01

    Fully resolved simulations of particle-laden turbulent flows are computationally expensive even with a single particle. Therefore, simulations of flows with realistic numbers of particles typically treat the disperse phase as point-particles and models are used to account for the interaction between the phases. The particle trajectories are determined using a Lagrangian particle equation of motion that accounts for the fluid forces. The effect of the particulate phase on the fluid is included using point-force momentum coupling, where the opposite of the force applied to each particle by the fluid is distributed back to fluid grid points in a local region. In this work, we perform direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a particle moving at a prescribed constant or time-dependent velocity through a stationary fluid, and use the resulting force history in a corresponding point-force simulation to study point-force energy coupling. The energy input from the moving particle and the fluid dissipation in the DNS are compared to corresponding quantities in the unresolved calculation. A range of particle Reynolds numbers and ratios of the particle diameter to the unresolved grid spacing are considered to determine the conditions under which point-force momentum coupling provides accurate energy coupling.

  5. Value Added: the Case for Point-of-View Camera use in Orthopedic Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geb W.; Taylor, Leah; Liu, Xiaoxing; Anthony, Chris A.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Orthopedic surgical education is evolving as educators search for new ways to enhance surgical skills training. Orthopedic educators should seek new methods and technologies to augment and add value to real-time orthopedic surgical experience. This paper describes a protocol whereby we have started to capture and evaluate specific orthopedic milestone procedures with a GoPro® point-of-view video camera and a dedicated video reviewing website as a way of supplementing the current paradigm in surgical skills training. We report our experience regarding the details and feasibility of this protocol. Methods Upon identification of a patient undergoing surgical fixation of a hip or ankle fracture, an orthopedic resident places a GoPro® point-of-view camera on his or her forehead. All fluoroscopic images acquired during the case are saved and later incorporated into a video on the reviewing website. Surgical videos are uploaded to a secure server and are accessible for later review and assessment via a custom-built website. An electronic survey of resident participants was performed utilizing Qualtrics software. Results are reported using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 51 surgical videos involving 23 different residents have been captured to date. This includes 20 intertrochanteric hip fracture cases and 31 ankle fracture cases. The average duration of each surgical video was 1 hour and 16 minutes (range 40 minutes to 2 hours and 19 minutes). Of 24 orthopedic resident surgeons surveyed, 88% thought capturing a video portfolio of orthopedic milestones would benefit their education Conclusions There is a growing demand in orthopedic surgical education to extract more value from each surgical experience. While further work in development and refinement of such assessments is necessary, we feel that intraoperative video, particularly when captured and presented in a non-threatening, user friendly manner, can add significant value to the

  6. Ferulic Acid Administered at Various Time Points Protects against Cerebral Infarction by Activating p38 MAPK/p90RSK/CREB/Bcl-2 Anti-Apoptotic Signaling in the Subacute Phase of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Yi; Tang, Nou-Ying; Kao, Shung-Te; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ferulic acid (FA) administered at various time points before or after 30 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) followed by 7 d of reperfusion and to examine the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in the cortical penumbra. Methods FA was intravenously administered to rats at a dose of 100 mg/kg 24 h before ischemia (B-FA), 2 h before ischemia (P-FA), immediately after ischemic insult (I-FA), 2 h after reperfusion (R-FA), or 24 h after reperfusion (D-FA). Results Our study results indicated that P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA effectively reduced cerebral infarct areas and neurological deficits. P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA significantly downregulated glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), mitochondrial Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and effectively restored the phospho-p38 MAPK (p-p38 MAPK)/p38 MAPK ratio, phospho-90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p-p90RSK) expression, phospho-Bad (p-Bad) expression, the phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB)/CREB ratio, the cytosolic and mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratios, and the cytosolic Bcl-xL/Bax ratio in the cortical penumbra 7 d after reperfusion. SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, administered 30 min prior to ischemia abrogated the downregulating effects of I-FA on cerebral infarction, and mitochondrial Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and the upregulating effects of I-FA on the p-p38 MAPK/p38 MAPK ratio, p-p90RSK expression, p-Bad expression, and the p-CREB/CREB, and cytosolic and mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratios. Conclusions Our study results thus indicate that P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA effectively suppress reactive astrocytosis and exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral infarction by activating p38 MAPK signaling. The regulating effects of P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA on Bax-induced apoptosis result from activation of the p38 MAPK/p90RSK/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling pathway, and eventually contribute to

  7. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  8. Nickel Curie Point Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient…

  9. Torsade de pointes.

    PubMed

    Munro, P T; Graham, C A

    2002-09-01

    A case is described of torsade de pointes in a 41 year old woman with pre-existing QTc prolongation, potentially exacerbated by treatment with sotalol. Previous cardiac investigations had been normal and after a second episode of ventricular fibrillation the patient was referred for electrophysiological studies. The authors review the physiology, causes, and treatment of QTc prolongation and torsade de pointes. PMID:12205024

  10. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  11. Impact of selected troposphere models on Precise Point Positioning convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Jakub; Rzepecka, Zofia

    2016-04-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) absolute method is currently intensively investigated in order to reach fast convergence time. Among various sources that influence the convergence of the PPP, the tropospheric delay is one of the most important. Numerous models of tropospheric delay are developed and applied to PPP processing. However, with rare exceptions, the quality of those models does not allow fixing the zenith path delay tropospheric parameter, leaving difference between nominal and final value to the estimation process. Here we present comparison of several PPP result sets, each of which based on different troposphere model. The respective nominal values are adopted from models: VMF1, GPT2w, MOPS and ZERO-WET. The PPP solution admitted as reference is based on the final troposphere product from the International GNSS Service (IGS). The VMF1 mapping function was used for all processing variants in order to provide capability to compare impact of applied nominal values. The worst case initiates zenith wet delay with zero value (ZERO-WET). Impact from all possible models for tropospheric nominal values should fit inside both IGS and ZERO-WET border variants. The analysis is based on data from seven IGS stations located in mid-latitude European region from year 2014. For the purpose of this study several days with the most active troposphere were selected for each of the station. All the PPP solutions were determined using gLAB open-source software, with the Kalman filter implemented independently by the authors of this work. The processing was performed on 1 hour slices of observation data. In addition to the analysis of the output processing files, the presented study contains detailed analysis of the tropospheric conditions for the selected data. The overall results show that for the height component the VMF1 model outperforms GPT2w and MOPS by 35-40% and ZERO-WET variant by 150%. In most of the cases all solutions converge to the same values during first

  12. Multispectral Image Feature Points

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Cristhian; Barrera, Fernando; Lumbreras, Felipe; Sappa, Angel D.; Toledo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel feature point descriptor for the multispectral image case Far-Infrared and Visible Spectrum images. It allows matching interest points on images of the same scene but acquired in different spectral bands. Initially, points of interest are detected on both images through a SIFT-like based scale space representation. Then, these points are characterized using an Edge Oriented Histogram (EOH) descriptor. Finally, points of interest from multispectral images are matched by finding nearest couples using the information from the descriptor. The provided experimental results and comparisons with similar methods show both the validity of the proposed approach as well as the improvements it offers with respect to the current state-of-the-art.

  13. Arctic climate tipping points.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points. PMID:22270703

  14. Point tenderness - abdomen

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003273.htm Point tenderness - abdomen To use the sharing features on this page, ... over a certain part of the belly area (abdomen). Considerations The abdomen is an area of the ...

  15. Triple Point Topological Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ziming; Winkler, Georg W.; Wu, QuanSheng; Li, Ju; Soluyanov, Alexey A.

    2016-07-01

    Topologically protected fermionic quasiparticles appear in metals, where band degeneracies occur at the Fermi level, dictated by the band structure topology. While in some metals these quasiparticles are direct analogues of elementary fermionic particles of the relativistic quantum field theory, other metals can have symmetries that give rise to quasiparticles, fundamentally different from those known in high-energy physics. Here, we report on a new type of topological quasiparticles—triple point fermions—realized in metals with symmorphic crystal structure, which host crossings of three bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level protected by point group symmetries. We find two topologically different types of triple point fermions, both distinct from any other topological quasiparticles reported to date. We provide examples of existing materials that host triple point fermions of both types and discuss a variety of physical phenomena associated with these quasiparticles, such as the occurrence of topological surface Fermi arcs, transport anomalies, and topological Lifshitz transitions.

  16. Nickel Curie point engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-04-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient heat source. A simple but elegant device illustrates this phenomenon beautifully.

  17. Bloch points are sticky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Kim, Se Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Bloch points are zero-dimensional topological defects in three-dimensional ferromagnets. A representative magnetic configuration is a hedgehog with magnetization pointing away from a center. The singular nature of a Bloch point's core leads to interesting and observable consequences. A simple argument based on dimensional analysis shows that a magnetic lattice creates a periodic potential that can pin a Bloch point even if the lattice has no defects. The pinning force is of the order of the micromagnetic exchange constant, a few piconewtons in a typical ferromagnet. A domain wall in a cylindrical ferromagnetic wire with the diameter of a few tens of nanometers may contain a Bloch point. Such a domain wall will have a sizable depinning field, tens of oersteds. A Bloch point moving through an atomic lattice should emit electromagnetic waves at the frequency of a few hundred gigahertz. Research supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grants No. DMR-0520491 and No. DMR-1104753.

  18. Robust sharp features infer from point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Juming; Wushour, Slam; Yao, Xinhui; Li, NaiQian; Liang, Jin; Liang, Xinhe; Liu, Jianwei

    2011-07-01

    A novel sharp features extraction method is proposed in this paper. First, we calculate the displacement between the point and its local weighted average position and we label the point with salient this value as the candidate sharp feature points and we estimate the normal direction of those candidate sharp feature points by means of local PCA methods. Then we refine the normal estimated by inferring the orientation of the points near the candidate sharp feature region and bilateral filtering in the normal field of point clouds. At last we project the displacement between point and its local weighted average position along the direction of normal .We use value of this projection as the criteria of whether a point can be labeled as sharp feature. The extracted discrete sharp feature points are represented in the form of piecewised B-Spline lines. Experiment on both real scanner point clouds and synthesized point clouds show that our method of sharp features extraction are simple to be implemented and efficient for both space and time overhead as well as it robust to the noise ,outlier and un even sample witch are inherent in the point clouds.

  19. Hyperbolic Weyl Point in Reciprocal Chiral Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Lin, Qian; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-01

    We report the existence of Weyl points in a class of noncentral symmetric metamaterials, which has time reversal symmetry, but does not have inversion symmetry due to chiral coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This class of metamaterial exhibits either type-I or type-II Weyl points depending on its nonlocal response. We also provide a physical realization of such metamaterial consisting of an array of metal wires in the shape of elliptical helices which exhibits type-II Weyl points.

  20. Change Point Detection in Correlation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Ian; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Many systems of interacting elements can be conceptualized as networks, where network nodes represent the elements and network ties represent interactions between the elements. In systems where the underlying network evolves, it is useful to determine the points in time where the network structure changes significantly as these may correspond to functional change points. We propose a method for detecting change points in correlation networks that, unlike previous change point detection methods designed for time series data, requires minimal distributional assumptions. We investigate the difficulty of change point detection near the boundaries of the time series in correlation networks and study the power of our method and competing methods through simulation. We also show the generalizable nature of the method by applying it to stock price data as well as fMRI data. PMID:26739105

  1. Investigating Two Different Training Time Frames during Ramadan Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Kordi, Ramin; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Memari, Amir-Hossein; Najafabadi, Mahboubeh Ghayour

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Muslim athletes may continue training and competing while they are fasting. There is a concern about negative effects of fasting on sports performance. This study aimed to investigate the influence of two training time frames on athletes’ body composition and performance during Ramadan fasting. Methods An observational study was conducted and thirty four male volunteer athletes from different sports including volleyball, karate, taekwondo and football were assigned in two groups. The first group included 14 elite athletes who during Ramadan voluntarily participated in training sessions at 1 hour before Iftar (BI) and the second group of 20 elite athletes who during Ramadan participated in training sessions at 3 hours after Iftar (AI). Testing was performed one week before; in the first and fourth weeks of Ramadan and one week after Ramadan. Weights, heights and skinfold thickness were assessed at each time point and body mass index was calculated. Each player was assessed for agility and explosive strength as well. Results The mean weight and body mass index of both groups decreased significantly during Ramadan (P<0.001). Performance variables were not negatively affected by fasting in BI or AI group athletes. Conclusions Weight reduction might come with either BI or AI training schedules in Ramadan. Daytime or evening training did not inversely affect the agility and power performances in a group of elite athletes during Ramadan fasting. PMID:22375240

  2. Critical points of metal vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new method is proposed for calculating the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid (insulator–metal) phase transition in vapors of metals with multielectron valence shells. The method is based on a model developed earlier for the vapors of alkali metals, atomic hydrogen, and exciton gas, proceeding from the assumption that the cohesion determining the basic characteristics of metals under normal conditions is also responsible for their properties in the vicinity of the critical point. It is proposed to calculate the cohesion of multielectron atoms using well-known scaling relations for the binding energy, which are constructed for most metals in the periodic table by processing the results of many numerical calculations. The adopted model allows the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid phase transition in metal vapors to be calculated using published data on the properties of metals under normal conditions. The parameters of critical points have been calculated for a large number of metals and show satisfactory agreement with experimental data for alkali metals and with available estimates for all other metals. Binodals of metals have been calculated for the first time.

  3. ATLAS solar pointing operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, C. A.; Zimmerman, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ATLAS-series of Spacelab missions are comprised of a diverse group of scientific instruments including instruments for studying the sun and how the sun's energy changes across an eleven-year solar cycle. The ATLAS solar instruments are located on one or more pallets in the Orbiter payload bay and use the Orbiter as a pointing platform for their examinations of the sun. One of the ATLAS instruments contained a sun sensor which allowed scientists and engineers on the ground to see the pointing error of the sun with respect to the instrument and correct for the error based upon the information coming from the ATLAS 1 and ATLAS 2 missions with particular attention given to identifying the sources of pointing discrepancies of the solar instruments and to describe the crew and ground controller procedures that were developed to correct for these discrepancies. The Orbiter pointing behavior from the ATLAS 1 and ATLAS 2 flights presented in this paper can be applied to future flights which use the Orbiter as a pointing platform.

  4. NSDC Policy Points. Volume 1, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Staff Development Council, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "NSDC Policy Points" is a newsletter published by the National Staff Development Council (NSDC). This issue of "NSDC Policy Points" features schools that practice effective professional development. Included in this newsletter are: (1) Surprise, Arizona: Coaches support classroom improvements; (2) Loveland, Colorado: Redefining time use to…

  5. A holographic critical point

    SciTech Connect

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Rosen, Christopher; Gubser, Steven S.

    2011-04-15

    We numerically construct a family of five-dimensional black holes exhibiting a line of first-order phase transitions terminating at a critical point at finite chemical potential and temperature. These black holes are constructed so that the equation of state and baryon susceptibilities approximately match QCD lattice data at vanishing chemical potential. The critical end point in the particular model we consider has temperature 143 MeV and chemical potential 783 MeV. Critical exponents are calculated, with results that are consistent with mean-field scaling relations.

  6. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  7. MountPointAttributes

    2001-06-16

    MountPointAttributes is a software component that provides client code with a technique to raise the local namespace of a file to a global namespace. Its abstractions and mechanisms allow the client code to gather global properties of a file and to use them in devising an effective storage access strategy on this file.

  8. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  9. EndPoints 2000

    2009-08-13

    The application leads the user through a logical framework to determine the minimum effort and cost necessary to reach the desired end state for each space, system, and facility. Endpoints are used to plan the project work, track and manage the determination, management, verification, and closure of D&D endpoints, consistent with DOE End Point guidance documents.

  10. EcoTipping Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Gerald G.; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Contrary to what we often hear and teach, there is good news to be found on the environmental front. Environmental success stories show us not only that sustainability is possible, but also how people have made it happen. We can make these stories and their lessons accessible to students with help from the EcoTipping Points Project, which has…

  11. Optical Pointing Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.; Metz, Brandon C.

    2010-01-01

    The optical pointing sensor provides a means of directly measuring the relative positions of JPL s Formation Control Testbed (FCT) vehicles without communication. This innovation is a steerable infrared (IR) rangefinder that gives measurements in terms of range and bearing to a passive retroreflector.

  12. The Lagrange Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of all five Lagrange points by methods accessible to sixth-form students, and provides a further opportunity to match Newtonian gravity with centripetal force. The predictive powers of good scientific theories are also discussed with regard to the philosophy of science. Methods for calculating the positions of the…

  13. Noncommutative Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.

    2008-02-15

    We construct a perturbative solution to classical noncommutative gauge theory on R{sup 3} minus the origin using the Groenewald-Moyal star product. The result describes a noncommutative point charge. Applying it to the quantum mechanics of the noncommutative hydrogen atom gives shifts in the 1S hyperfine splitting which are first order in the noncommutativity parameter.

  14. Points and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Syed Jamil; Heddon, Dee; Mackey, Sally

    2007-01-01

    This collection of three articles represents the "Points and Practices" section of this month's issue of "Research in Drama Education." The first article, "'Fitting the Bill' for 'Helping Them.' A Response to 'Integrated Popular Theatre Approach in Africa' and 'Commissioned Theatre Projects on Human Rights in Pakistan,'" by Syed Jamil Ahmed,…

  15. Point and Shoot Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoot, John E.

    2011-05-01

    A new generation of point and shoot digital cameras, when combined with open source firmware enhancements can operate as astrographs. This paper explores the research and astro-photographic opportunities and capabilities offered by this pairing of mass production optics and open source functional extensions that retail for as little as $200.

  16. Topological photonic crystal with ideal Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of symmetry-related Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We propose to realize these ``ideal'' Weyl points in modified double-gyroid photonic crystals, which is confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Photonic crystals with ideal Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications such as angular and frequency selectivity, broadband invisibility cloaking, and broadband 3D-imaging.

  17. Topological photonic crystal with equifrequency Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on general symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of four symmetry-related (consequently equifrequency) Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We further propose an experimentally feasible way to modify double-gyroid photonic crystals to realize four equifrequency Weyl points, which is explicitly confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Remarkably, photonic crystals with equifrequency Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications including angular selectivity, frequency selectivity, invisibility cloaking, and three-dimensional imaging.

  18. Eigenspace-based tracking for feature points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chen; Chen, Qian; Qian, Wei-xian

    2014-05-01

    Feature point tracking deals with image streams that change over time. Most existing feature point tracking algorithms only consider two adjacent frames at a time, and forget the feature information of previous frames. In this paper, we present a new eigenspace-based tracking method that learns an eigenspace representation of training features online, and finds the target feature point with Gauss-Newton style search method. A coarse-to-fine processing strategy is introduced to handle large affine transformations. Several simulations and experiments on real images indicate the effectiveness of the proposed feature tracking algorithm under the conditions of large pose changes and temporary occlusions.

  19. Proximal Point Methods Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boikanyo, Oganeditse A.; Moroşanu, Gheorghe

    2011-09-01

    The proximal point methods have been widely used in the last decades to approximate the solutions of nonlinear equations associated with monotone operators. Inspired by the iterative procedure defined by B. Martinet (1970), R.T. Rockafellar introduced in 1976 the so-called proximal point algorithm (PPA) for a general maximal monotone operator. The sequence generated by this iterative method is weakly convergent under appropriate conditions, but not necessarily strongly convergent, as proved by O. Güler (1991). This fact explains the introduction of different modified versions of the PPA which generate strongly convergent sequences under appropriate conditions, including the contraction-PPA defined by H.K. Xu in 2002. Here we discuss Xu's modified PPA as well as some of its generalizations. Special attention is paid to the computational errors, in particular the original Rockafellar summability assumption is replaced by the condition that the error sequence converges to zero strongly.

  20. Optimal time-points for minimal residual disease monitoring change on the basis of the method used in patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a comparison between multiparameter flow cytometry and Wilms' tumor 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giovanni; Carella, Angelo Michele; Minervini, Maria Marta; di Nardo, Francesco; Waure, Chiara de; Greco, Michele Mario; Merla, Emanuela; Cillis, Giovanni Pio de; Di Renzo, Nicola; Melpignano, Angela; Capalbo, Silvana; Palumbo, Gaetano; Pisapia, Giovanni; Cascavilla, Nicola

    2015-02-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) of 30 adult AML patients was monitored by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) and WT1 expression before and after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Diagnostic performance of pre-transplant MRD measured by MFC was higher than that obtained by WT1 expression. Comparable results were displayed at day +30 post-transplant, while better values by WT1 compared to MFC were found at day +90. Positive MRD by MFC predicted a shorter disease free survival (DFS) before and 1 month after transplant (p=0.006 and p=0.005), while only high WT1 levels at 1 month from the transplant significantly impacted on DFS (p=0.010). Our results support the idea that MRD monitoring by MFC should be suggested before and 30 days after the transplant, while WT1 expression should be preferred after this procedure. The assessment of MRD at day +30 from allo-SCT is recommended as post transplant check-point for the predictive role displayed, independently of the method used. PMID:25498507

  1. A point matching algorithm based on reference point pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Huanxin; Zhu, Youqing; Zhou, Shilin; Lei, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Outliers and occlusions are important degradation in the real application of point matching. In this paper, a novel point matching algorithm based on the reference point pairs is proposed. In each iteration, it firstly eliminates the dubious matches to obtain the relatively accurate matching points (reference point pairs), and then calculates the shape contexts of the removed points with reference to them. After re-matching the removed points, the reference point pairs are combined to achieve better correspondences. Experiments on synthetic data validate the advantages of our method in comparison with some classical methods.

  2. Best-practices approach to determination of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at specific time points: Combination of ante-mortem alcohol pharmacokinetic modeling and post-mortem alcohol generation and transport considerations.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Maskrey, Joshua R; Fung, Ernest S; Woods, Tyler A; Stabryla, Lisa M; Scott, Paul K; Finley, Brent L

    2016-07-01

    Alcohol concentrations in biological matrices offer information regarding an individual's intoxication level at a given time. In forensic cases, the alcohol concentration in the blood (BAC) at the time of death is sometimes used interchangeably with the BAC measured post-mortem, without consideration for alcohol concentration changes in the body after death. However, post-mortem factors must be taken into account for accurate forensic determination of BAC prior to death to avoid incorrect conclusions. The main objective of this work was to describe best practices for relating ante-mortem and post-mortem alcohol concentrations, using a combination of modeling, empirical data and other qualitative considerations. The Widmark modeling approach is a best practices method for superimposing multiple alcohol doses ingested at various times with alcohol elimination rate adjustments based on individual body factors. We combined the selected ante-mortem model with a suggestion for an approach used to roughly estimate changes in BAC post-mortem, and then analyzed the available data on post-mortem alcohol production in human bodies and potential markers for alcohol production through decomposition and putrefaction. Hypothetical cases provide best practice approaches as an example for determining alcohol concentration in biological matrices ante-mortem, as well as potential issues encountered with quantitative post-mortem approaches. This study provides information for standardizing BAC determination in forensic toxicology, while minimizing real world case uncertainties. PMID:27041394

  3. Prelinguistic Vocalizations Distinguish Pointing Acts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunloh, Thomas; Liszkowski, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether point-accompanying characteristics, like vocalizations and hand shape, differentiate infants' underlying motives of prelinguistic pointing. We elicited imperative (requestive) and declarative (expressive and informative) pointing acts in experimentally controlled situations, and analyzed accompanying…

  4. Stress-Induced Accumulation of DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a Transcripts Coincides with Critical Time Point for Structural Biomass Prediction in Carrot Primary Cultures (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Campos, M Doroteia; Nogales, Amaia; Cardoso, Hélia G; Kumar, Sarma R; Nobre, Tânia; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Stress-adaptive cell plasticity in target tissues and cells for plant biomass growth is important for yield stability. In vitro systems with reproducible cell plasticity can help to identify relevant metabolic and molecular events during early cell reprogramming. In carrot, regulation of the central root meristem is a critical target for yield-determining secondary growth. Calorespirometry, a tool previously identified as promising for predictive growth phenotyping has been applied to measure the respiration rate in carrot meristem. In a carrot primary culture system (PCS), this tool allowed identifying an early peak related with structural biomass formation during lag phase of growth, around the 4th day of culture. In the present study, we report a dynamic and correlated expression of carrot AOX genes (DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a) during PCS lag phase and during exponential growth. Both genes showed an increase in transcript levels until 36 h after explant inoculation, and a subsequent down-regulation, before the initiation of exponential growth. In PCS growing at two different temperatures (21°C and 28°C), DcAOX1 was also found to be more expressed in the highest temperature. DcAOX genes' were further explored in a plant pot experiment in response to chilling, which confirmed the early AOX transcript increase prior to the induction of a specific anti-freezing gene. Our findings point to DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a as being reasonable candidates for functional marker development related to early cell reprogramming. While the genomic sequence of DcAOX2a was previously described, we characterize here the complete genomic sequence of DcAOX1. PMID:26858746

  5. Stress-Induced Accumulation of DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a Transcripts Coincides with Critical Time Point for Structural Biomass Prediction in Carrot Primary Cultures (Daucus carota L.)

    PubMed Central

    Campos, M. Doroteia; Nogales, Amaia; Cardoso, Hélia G.; Kumar, Sarma R.; Nobre, Tânia; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Stress-adaptive cell plasticity in target tissues and cells for plant biomass growth is important for yield stability. In vitro systems with reproducible cell plasticity can help to identify relevant metabolic and molecular events during early cell reprogramming. In carrot, regulation of the central root meristem is a critical target for yield-determining secondary growth. Calorespirometry, a tool previously identified as promising for predictive growth phenotyping has been applied to measure the respiration rate in carrot meristem. In a carrot primary culture system (PCS), this tool allowed identifying an early peak related with structural biomass formation during lag phase of growth, around the 4th day of culture. In the present study, we report a dynamic and correlated expression of carrot AOX genes (DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a) during PCS lag phase and during exponential growth. Both genes showed an increase in transcript levels until 36 h after explant inoculation, and a subsequent down-regulation, before the initiation of exponential growth. In PCS growing at two different temperatures (21°C and 28°C), DcAOX1 was also found to be more expressed in the highest temperature. DcAOX genes’ were further explored in a plant pot experiment in response to chilling, which confirmed the early AOX transcript increase prior to the induction of a specific anti-freezing gene. Our findings point to DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a as being reasonable candidates for functional marker development related to early cell reprogramming. While the genomic sequence of DcAOX2a was previously described, we characterize here the complete genomic sequence of DcAOX1. PMID:26858746

  6. Non-Gimbaled Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Jeannine S.

    1997-01-01

    The small satellite community has been interested in accessing fixed ground stations for means of space-to-ground transmissions, although a problem arises from the limited global coverage. There is a growing interest for using the Space Network (SN) or Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) as the primary support for communications because of the coverage it provides. This thesis will address the potential for satellite access of the Space Network with a non-gimbaled antenna configuration and low-power, coded transmission. The non-gimbaled antenna and the TDRS satellites, TDRS-East, TDRS-West, and TDRS-Zone of Exclusion, were configured in an orbital analysis software package called Satellite Tool Kit to emulate the three-dimensional position of the satellites. The access potential, which is the average number of contacts per day and the average time per contact, were obtained through simulations run over a 30-day period to gain all the possible orientations. The orbital altitude was varied from 600 km through 1200 km with the results being a function of orbital inclination angles varying from 20 deg through 100 deg and pointing half-angles of I0 deg through 40 deg. To compare the validity of the simulations, Jet Propulsion Laboratory granted the use of the TOPEX satellite. The TOPEX satellite was configured to emulate a spin-stabilized antenna with its communications antenna stowed in the zenith-pointing direction. This mimicked the antenna pointing spin-stabilized satellite in the simulations. To make valid comparisons, the TOPEX orbital parameters were entered into Satellite Tool Kit and simulated over five test times provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. Pointing control for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Briggs, C.

    1988-01-01

    One important aspect of the LDR control problem is the possible excitations of structural modes due to random disturbances, mirror chopping, and slewing maneuvers. An analysis was performed to yield a first order estimate of the effects of such dynamic excitations. The analysis involved a study of slewing jitters, chopping jitters, disturbance responses, and pointing errors, making use of a simplified planar LDR model which describes the LDR dynamics on a plane perpendicular to the primary reflector. Briefly, the results indicate that the command slewing profile plays an important role in minimizing the resultant jitter, even to a level acceptable without any control action. An optimal profile should therefore be studied.

  8. Point and click solutions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Al

    2003-01-01

    In a time when people use computers to buy stocks, order pizza, apply for a mortgage, or search for a mate, it was only a matter of time before health care facilities turned to online technology to make bill paying more efficient and convenient for patients. PMID:12953662

  9. Instrument Pointing Capabilities: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Murray, Emmanuell; Scharf, Daniel P.; Aung, Mimi; Bayard, David; Brugarolas, Paul; Hadaegh, Fred; Lee, Allan; Milman, Mark; Sirlin, Sam; Kang, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the instrument pointing capabilities of past, present and future space telescopes and interferometers. As an important aspect of this survey, we present a taxonomy for "apples-to-apples" comparisons of pointing performances. First, pointing errors are defined relative to either an inertial frame or a celestial target. Pointing error can then be further sub-divided into DC, that is, steady state, and AC components. We refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to the inertial frame as absolute pointing accuracy, and we refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to a celestial target as relative pointing accuracy. The magnitude of the AC error is referred to as pointing stability. While an AC/DC partition is not new, we leverage previous work by some of the authors to quantitatively clarify and compare varying definitions of jitter and time window averages. With this taxonomy and for sixteen past, present, and future missions, pointing accuracies and stabilities, both required and achieved, are presented. In addition, we describe the attitude control technologies used to and, for future missions, planned to achieve these pointing performances.

  10. Relative Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Debra

    2013-05-01

    Relative equilibria of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems with symmetry are critical points of appropriate scalar functions parametrized by the Lie algebra (or its dual) of the symmetry group. Setting aside the structures - symplectic, Poisson, or variational - generating dynamical systems from such functions highlights the common features of their construction and analysis, and supports the construction of analogous functions in non-Hamiltonian settings. If the symmetry group is nonabelian, the functions are invariant only with respect to the isotropy subgroup of the given parameter value. Replacing the parametrized family of functions with a single function on the product manifold and extending the action using the (co)adjoint action on the algebra or its dual yields a fully invariant function. An invariant map can be used to reverse the usual perspective: rather than selecting a parametrized family of functions and finding their critical points, conditions under which functions will be critical on specific orbits, typically distinguished by isotropy class, can be derived. This strategy is illustrated using several well-known mechanical systems - the Lagrange top, the double spherical pendulum, the free rigid body, and the Riemann ellipsoids - and generalizations of these systems.

  11. 2. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING NNE. GIS N-37 43 44.3 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  12. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. SAME VIEW AT CA-157-2. LOOKING NNE. GIS: N-37' 43 44.3 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  13. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  14. First Point of Aries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    An alternative term for vernal equinox. At one time (some 2000 years ago) the vernal equinox lay in the constellation of Aries but, due to precession, this is no longer the case and the vernal equinox has moved into Pisces....

  15. Point Source All Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky as seen by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The measured brightnesses of half a billion stars (points) have been combined into colors representing three distinct wavelengths of infrared light: blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns. This image is centered on the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, toward the constellation of Sagittarius. The reddish stars seemingly hovering in the middle of the Milky Way's disc -- many of them never observed before -- trace the densest dust clouds in our galaxy. The two faint smudges seen in the lower right quadrant are our neighboring galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  16. ViewPoint

    PubMed Central

    Hallam, Jeffrey S.; Nagy, M. Christine

    2014-01-01

    ViewPoint features candid conversations with prominent health behavior scholars. The column focuses on the human or interpersonal side of research and addresses such topics as how renowned researchers were initiated into the world of research, why they continue to do it, personal challenges encountered over the years, ingredients necessary to be a success as an investigator, key characteristics and qualities of inspirational mentors, sources of consternation, challenges that lie ahead, hot topics worthy of pursuit, and books and materials that are must reading. The intention is to share the viewpoints and thinking processes of our leading health behavior scholars. We hope that the column will be an inspiration to young and seasoned scholars alike. PMID:19063654

  17. Hyperbolic Weyl Point in Reciprocal Chiral Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Lin, Qian; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-29

    We report the existence of Weyl points in a class of noncentral symmetric metamaterials, which has time reversal symmetry, but does not have inversion symmetry due to chiral coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This class of metamaterial exhibits either type-I or type-II Weyl points depending on its nonlocal response. We also provide a physical realization of such metamaterial consisting of an array of metal wires in the shape of elliptical helices which exhibits type-II Weyl points. PMID:27517792

  18. Curvature-correction-based time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor with an inaccuracy of -0.8 °C-1.2 °C after one-point calibration from -40 °C to 120 °C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Shih-Hao; Lin, Yi

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor featuring on-chip curvature correction and one-point calibration support for thermal management systems. Time-domain inverter-based temperature sensors, which exhibit the advantages of low power and low cost, have been proposed for on-chip thermal monitoring. However, the curvature is large for the thermal transfer curve, which substantially affects the accuracy as the temperature range increases. Another problem is that the inverter is sensitive to process variations, resulting in difficulty for the sensors to achieve an acceptable accuracy for one-point calibration. To overcome these two problems, a temperature-dependent oscillator with curvature correction is proposed to increase the linearity of the oscillatory width, thereby resolving the drawback caused by a costly off-chip second-order master curve fitting. For one-point calibration support, an adjustable-gain time amplifier was adopted to eliminate the effect of process variations, with the assistance of a calibration circuit. The proposed circuit occupied a small area of 0.073 mm(2) and was fabricated in a TSMC CMOS 0.35-μm 2P4M digital process. The linearization of the oscillator and the effect cancellation of process variations enabled the sensor, which featured a fixed resolution of 0.049 °C/LSB, to achieve an optimal inaccuracy of -0.8 °C to 1.2 °C after one-point calibration of 12 test chips from -40 °C to 120 °C. The power consumption was 35 μW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s. PMID:24985845

  19. Statistical aspects of point count sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.J.; Sauer, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The dominant feature of point counts is that they do not census birds, but instead provide incomplete counts of individuals present within a survey plot. Considering a simple model for point count sampling, we demon-strate that use of these incomplete counts can bias estimators and testing procedures, leading to inappropriate conclusions. A large portion of the variability in point counts is caused by the incomplete counting, and this within-count variation can be confounded with ecologically meaningful varia-tion. We recommend caution in the analysis of estimates obtained from point counts. Using; our model, we also consider optimal allocation of sampling effort. The critical step in the optimization process is in determining the goals of the study and methods that will be used to meet these goals. By explicitly defining the constraints on sampling and by estimating the relationship between precision and bias of estimators and time spent counting, we can predict the optimal time at a point for each of several monitoring goals. In general, time spent at a point will differ depending on the goals of the study.

  20. Stretched to breaking point.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    A review of 17 regional neonatal transport services has shown that they are 'understaffed, under-resourced and part time', but that these problems are not related to the dedication of the nurses and doctors who work in them. PMID:27156399

  1. Function Point Analysis Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, R.; Martinez, El; Szafran, J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot is a web application originally designed by one of the NE-C3 branch's engineers, Jamie Szafran, and created specifically for the Software Development team of the Launch Control Systems (LCS) project. The application consists of evaluating the work of each developer to be able to get a real estimate of the hours that is going to be assigned to a specific task of development. The Architect Team had made design change requests for the depot to change the schema of the application's information; that information, changed in the database, needed to be changed in the graphical user interface (GUI) (written in Ruby on Rails (RoR and the web service/server side in Java to match the database changes. These changes were made by two interns from NE-C, Ricardo Muniz from NE-C3, who made all the schema changes for the GUI in RoR and Edwin Martinez, from NE-C2, who made all the changes in the Java side.

  2. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee...

  3. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee...

  4. ChangePoint

    2006-10-18

    This software allows one to locate the sudden intensity changes in fluorescence time trajectoreis photon by photon. It also automatically calculate the most probable number of intensity levels in the trajectory according to Bayesian statistics measure. This allows an accurate and unbiased analysis and interpretation of experimental data. The code can be applied to analysis of DNA sequencing data, for example, to allow rapid single-molecule and single-base resolution.

  5. What's the Point? The Benefits of Grading without Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brilleslyper, Mike; Ghrist, Michelle; Holcomb, Trae; Schaubroeck, Beth; Warner, Bradley; Williams, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Most instructors desire to create a learning environment conducive to deep learning. However, in courses where grades are based upon the accumulation of points, students may focus on collecting points rather than on learning and achieving the course objectives. We discuss an alternative points-free course design based on the development of clear…

  6. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee must request a modification of the station license. (c) Control points not collocated with station records...

  7. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee must request a modification of the station license. (c) Control points not collocated with station records...

  8. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee must request a modification of the station license. (c) Control points not collocated with station records...

  9. Using Covariance Analysis to Assess Pointing Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David; Kang, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    A Pointing Covariance Analysis Tool (PCAT) has been developed for evaluating the expected performance of the pointing control system for NASA s Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). The SIM pointing control system is very complex, consisting of multiple feedback and feedforward loops, and operating with multiple latencies and data rates. The SIM pointing problem is particularly challenging due to the effects of thermomechanical drifts in concert with the long camera exposures needed to image dim stars. Other pointing error sources include sensor noises, mechanical vibrations, and errors in the feedforward signals. PCAT models the effects of finite camera exposures and all other error sources using linear system elements. This allows the pointing analysis to be performed using linear covariance analysis. PCAT propagates the error covariance using a Lyapunov equation associated with time-varying discrete and continuous-time system matrices. Unlike Monte Carlo analysis, which could involve thousands of computational runs for a single assessment, the PCAT analysis performs the same assessment in a single run. This capability facilitates the analysis of parametric studies, design trades, and "what-if" scenarios for quickly evaluating and optimizing the control system architecture and design.

  10. The power of PowerPoint.

    PubMed

    Niamtu, J

    2001-08-01

    Carousel slide presentations have been used for academic and clinical presentations since the late 1950s. However, advances in computer technology have caused a paradigm shift, and digital presentations are quickly becoming standard for clinical presentations. The advantages of digital presentations include cost savings; portability; easy updating capability; Internet access; multimedia functions, such as animation, pictures, video, and sound; and customization to augment audience interest and attention. Microsoft PowerPoint has emerged as the most popular digital presentation software and is currently used by many practitioners with and without significant computer expertise. The user-friendly platform of PowerPoint enables even the novice presenter to incorporate digital presentations into his or her profession. PowerPoint offers many advanced options that, with a minimal investment of time, can be used to create more interactive and professional presentations for lectures, patient education, and marketing. Examples of advanced PowerPoint applications are presented in a stepwise manner to unveil the full power of PowerPoint. By incorporating these techniques, medical practitioners can easily personalize, customize, and enhance their PowerPoint presentations. Complications, pitfalls, and caveats are discussed to detour and prevent misadventures in digital presentations. Relevant Web sites are listed to further update, customize, and communicate PowerPoint techniques. PMID:11496193

  11. Freezing point and melting point of barnacle muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Caillé, J P

    1983-10-01

    The freezing point and the melting point of myoplasm were measured with two experimental models. In all samples, a supercooled stage was reached by lowering the temperature of the sample to approximately - 7 degrees C, and the freezing of the sample was mechanically induced. The freezing process was associated with a phase transition in the interstices between the contractile filaments. In intact muscle fibers, the freezing point showed a structural component (0.43 degrees C), and the melting point indicated that the intracellular and the extracellular compartments are isotonic. When the sample of myoplasm, previously inserted in a cylindrical cavity was incubated in an electrolyte solution, the freezing point showed a structural component similar to that of the intact muscle fiber, but the melting point was lower than the freezing and the melting points of the embedding solution. This was interpreted as evidence that the counterions around the contractile filaments occupied a nonnegligible fraction of the intracellular compartment. PMID:6640420

  12. On Pfaffian Random Point Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, V.

    2014-02-01

    We study Pfaffian random point fields by using the Moore-Dyson quaternion determinants. First, we give sufficient conditions that ensure that a self-dual quaternion kernel defines a valid random point field, and then we prove a CLT for Pfaffian point fields. The proofs are based on a new quaternion extension of the Cauchy-Binet determinantal identity. In addition, we derive the Fredholm determinantal formulas for the Pfaffian point fields which use the quaternion determinant.

  13. Time Series ARIMA Models of Undergraduate Grade Point Average.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bruce G.

    The Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) Models, often referred to as Box-Jenkins models, are regression methods for analyzing sequential dependent observations with large amounts of data. The Box-Jenkins approach, a three-stage procedure consisting of identification, estimation and diagnosis, was used to select the most appropriate…

  14. Turning Points: Priorities for Teacher Education in a Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Rosalie M.

    2009-01-01

    Every generation has its moment, some turning point that will mark its place in the historical record. Such points provide the direction of our history and our future. Turning points are, characteristically, times of turmoil based on a fundamental change in models or events--what Thomas Kuhn called a "paradigm shift." In terms of a democratic…

  15. At the Tipping Point

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Josette A.; Fried, Linda P.; Weiss, Carlos O.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify clinical measures that aid detection of impending severe mobility difficulty in older women. DESIGN Cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort study. SETTING Urban community in Baltimore, Maryland. PARTICIPANTS One thousand two community-dwelling, moderate to severely disabled women aged 65 and older in the Women’s Health and Aging Study I. MEASUREMENTS Self-report and performance measures representing six domains necessary for mobility: central and peripheral nervous systems, muscles, bones and joints, perception, and energy. Severe mobility difficulty was defined as usual gait of 0.5 m/s or less, any reported difficulty walking across a small room, or dependence on a walking aid during a 4-m walking test. RESULTS Four hundred sixty-seven out of 984 (47%) had severe mobility difficulty at baseline, and 104/474 (22%) developed it within 12 months. Baseline mobility difficulty was correlated with poor vision, knee pain, feelings of helplessness, inability to stand with feet side by side for 10 seconds, difficulty keeping balance while dressing or walking, inability to rise from a chair five times, and cognitive impairment. Of these, knee pain (odds ratio (OR) = 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05–2.89), helplessness (OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.10–3.24), poor vision (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.06–3.89), inability to rise from a chair five times (OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.15–5.41), and cognitive impairment (OR = 4.75, 95% CI = 1.67–13.48) predicted incident severe mobility difficulty within 12 months, independent of age. CONCLUSION Five simple measures may aid identification of disabled older women at high risk of severe mobility difficulty. Further studies should determine generalizability to men and higher-functioning individuals. PMID:18808598

  16. Discovering new points of differentiation.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, I C; McGrath, R G

    1997-01-01

    Most profitable strategies are built on differentiation: offering customers something they value that competitors don't have. But most companies concentrate only on their products or services. In fact, a company can differentiate itself every point where it comes in contact with its customers--from the moment customers realize they need a product or service to the time when they dispose of it. The authors believe that if companies open up their thinking to their customer's entire experience with a product or service--the consumption chain--they can uncover opportunities to position their offerings in ways that neither they nor their competitors though possible. The authors show how even a mundane product such as candles can be successfully differentiated. By analyzing its customers' experiences and exploring various options, Blyth Industries, for example, has grown from a $2 million U.S. candle manufacturer into a global candle and accessory business with nearly $500 million in sales and a market value of $1.2 billion. Finding ways to differentiate one's company is a skill that can be nurtured, the authors contend. In this Manager's Tool Kit, they have designed a two-part approach that can help companies continually identify new points of differentiation and develop the ability to generate successful differentiation strategies. "Mapping the Consumption Chain" captures the customer's total experience with a product or service. "Analyzing Your Customer's Experience" shows managers how directed brainstorming about each step in the consumption chain can elicit numerous ways to differentiate any offering. PMID:10168333

  17. The Herschel Point Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Schulz, Bernhard; Altieri, Bruno; Calzoletti, Luca; Kiss, Csaba; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Paladini, Roberta; Papageorgiou, Andreas; Pearson, Chris; Rector, John; Shupe, David; Valtchanov, Ivan; Verebélyi, Erika; Xu, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the submillimetre and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinized and still has potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments that scanned >10% of the sky at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns. Some source catalogs have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that would never be analyzed for their full source content. To maximize the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, our international team of instrument experts is in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalog (HPSC) from all scan map observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The extracted point sources will contain individual YSOs of our Galaxy, unresolved YSO clusters in resolved nearby galaxies and unresolved galaxies of the local and distant Universe that are related to star formation. Such a huge dataset will help scientists better understand the evolution from interstellar clouds to individual stars. Furthermore the analysis of stellar clusters and the star formation on galactic scales will add more details to the understanding of star formation laws through time.We present our findings on comparison of different source detection and photometric tools. First results of the extractions are shown along with the description of our pipelines and catalogue entries. We also provide an additional science product, the structure noise map, that is used for the quality assessment of the catalogue in

  18. Ground point filtering of UAV-based photogrammetric point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Niels; Seijmonsbergen, Arie; Masselink, Rens; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have proved invaluable for generating high-resolution and multi-temporal imagery. Based on photographic surveys, 3D surface reconstructions can be derived photogrammetrically so producing point clouds, orthophotos and surface models. For geomorphological or ecological applications it may be necessary to separate ground points from vegetation points. Existing filtering methods are designed for point clouds derived using other methods, e.g. laser scanning. The purpose of this paper is to test three filtering algorithms for the extraction of ground points from point clouds derived from low-altitude aerial photography. Three subareas were selected from a single flight which represent different scenarios: 1) low relief, sparsely vegetated area, 2) low relief, moderately vegetated area, 3) medium relief and moderately vegetated area. The three filtering methods are used to classify ground points in different ways, based on 1) RGB color values from training samples, 2) TIN densification as implemented in LAStools, and 3) an iterative surface lowering algorithm. Ground points are then interpolated into a digital terrain model using inverse distance weighting. The results suggest that different landscapes require different filtering methods for optimal ground point extraction. While iterative surface lowering and TIN densification are fully automated, color-based classification require fine-tuning in order to optimize the filtering results. Finally, we conclude that filtering photogrammetric point clouds could provide a cheap alternative to laser scan surveys for creating digital terrain models in sparsely vegetated areas.

  19. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  20. Point-based manifold harmonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Prabhakaran, Balakrishnan; Guo, Xiaohu

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm to build a set of orthogonal Point-Based Manifold Harmonic Bases (PB-MHB) for spectral analysis over point-sampled manifold surfaces. To ensure that PB-MHB are orthogonal to each other, it is necessary to have symmetrizable discrete Laplace-Beltrami Operator (LBO) over the surfaces. Existing converging discrete LBO for point clouds, as proposed by Belkin et al., is not guaranteed to be symmetrizable. We build a new point-wisely discrete LBO over the point-sampled surface that is guaranteed to be symmetrizable, and prove its convergence. By solving the eigen problem related to the new operator, we define a set of orthogonal bases over the point cloud. Experiments show that the new operator is converging better than other symmetrizable discrete Laplacian operators (such as graph Laplacian) defined on point-sampled surfaces, and can provide orthogonal bases for further spectral geometric analysis and processing tasks. PMID:22879345

  1. [Focal point emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Lange, R; Popp, S; Erbguth, F

    2016-06-01

    The number of patients treated in hospital emergency departments in Germany has risen in recent years to approximately 20 million. This escalation also applies to the increasing numbers of patients presenting with neurological symptoms and diseases, which occur in approximately 20 % of emergency patients. In addition to patients with stroke, inflammatory or degenerative central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders who need urgent treatment, more and more patients with nonspecific complaints or conditions attend emergency departments for elective treatment, not least because timely appointments with specialist neurologists in practices could not be obtained. Neurological expertise and presence in emergency departments at the level of specialist standard are therefore indispensable for providing a professional level of treatment, which also corresponds to current legal requirements. The implementation of a generalist emergency physician in Germany, as introduced in some European countries, would mean a retrograde step for neurological expertise in emergency admission management. The discipline of neurology must work together with other emergency disciplines to improve the financing of emergency departments and provide neurologists working there with a substantive curriculum of further and continuing education in emergency-related aspects of neurology. The discipline of neurology has a responsibility to emergency patients within its range of competencies and must, therefore, strengthen and improve its role in healthcare politics and concerning organizational and personnel aspects of neurological emergencies. PMID:27167888

  2. Misuse the Power, Miss the Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses a problem that plagues virtually all academics, as well as most people in business, K-12 education, and many other walks of life. At one time or another most members of post-millennial western society have suffered through that most hideous of well-intentioned experiences, the botched PowerPoint presentation.…

  3. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future. PMID:26759062

  4. Intrinsic time quantum geometrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ita, Eyo Eyo; Soo, Chopin; Yu, Hoi-Lai

    2015-08-01

    Quantum geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl curvature hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational "arrows of time" point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's general relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of gravitation and quantum mechanics.

  5. Real-time GPS positioning of the Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabak, I.; Santillan, V. M.; Scrivner, C. W.; Melbourne, T. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA) is now comprised of nearly 130 continuously operating GPS receivers located throughout the Cascadia subduction zone. The stations straddle active crustal faults, volcanoes and landslides, they span the megathrust forearc and tsunamigenic regions along the Pacific coast, and they monitor ageing man-made structures such as dams, levees and elevated freeways. All data are streamed in real-time into CWU where they are processed in real-time into station position and tropospheric water content within a reference frame defined in central Washington. To disseminate these streams, we currently provide 16 station position streams via an interface to Google Maps to present geographically the three component real-time plots in 5 min, 1 hour, and 24 hour time periods. The user's web browser makes repeated requests at a refresh rate of 5 seconds and after the initial request it only requests new data points from the web server. The 5 min real-time plot is updated every second. The web server provides the data streams in a compact JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) form and data plotting is handled by the user's web browser. The data streams are parsed into JavaScript arrays and plotted using the new HTML5 "canvas" element. This approach produces faster response times for the data streams, and by reducing the load on the web server, allows distribution to large numbers of users. Data are also available via a dedicated Ntrip/TCP-IP socket interface. These real-time data are now being used to monitor geodetic displacements caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides; current efforts to develop real-time finite fault inversions and automated alarm systems will be discussed.

  6. Landform skeleton reconstruction from unorganized points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingliang; Tang, Guoan; Liu, Xuejun; Bian, Lu

    2007-11-01

    Landform skeleton are lines that indicate significant topographic features of the terrain. It is widely used in mapping and surveying, hydrology simulation, topography representation and engineering designing. In order to derive the landform skeleton, many kinds of data source have been used, including digitized contour lines, Grid-DEMs and TIN. As time goes by, more and more unorganized points have been acquired, created, maintained and disseminated in many fields. Those unorganized points are the most original and important information which is vital for mapping and surveying. How to extract the feature lines from unorganized points has been the hot-pot in computer design and reverse-engineering. Methods used to extract landform features in existence have shown dependence on data types and thresholds more or less. In the paper, the view sheds principle used to extract the feature points has been put forward and then those points have been organized into feature lines according to related rules. The result has shown that the view sheds principle can extract the features and give the levels of feature points.

  7. Magnetic suspension and pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Groom, N. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is reported for accurate pointing of instruments on a carrier vehicle and for isolation of the instruments from the vehicle's motion disturbances. The apparatus includes two assemblies with connecting interfaces. The first assembly is attached to the carrier vehicle and consists of an azimuth gimbal and an elevation gimbal which provide coarse pointing by allowing two rotations of the instruments relative to the carrier vehicle. The second or vernier pointing assembly is made up of magnetic suspension and fine pointing actuators, roll motor segments, and an instrument mounting plase which provides appropriate magnetic circuits for the actuators and the roll motor segments. The vernier pointing assembly provides attitude fine pointing and roll positioning of the instruments as well as six degree-of-freedom isolation from carrier motion disturbances.

  8. Fermat's point from five perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungeun; Flores, Alfinio

    2015-04-01

    The Fermat point of a triangle is the point such that minimizes the sum of the distances from that point to the three vertices. Five approaches to study the Fermat point of a triangle are presented in this article. First, students use a mechanical device using masses, strings and pulleys to study the Fermat point as the one that minimizes the potential energy of the system. Second, students use soap films between parallel planes connecting three pegs. The tension on the film will be minimal when the sum of distances is minimal. Third, students use an empirical approach, measuring distances in an interactive GeoGebra page. Fourth, students use Euclidean geometry arguments for two proofs based on the Torricelli configuration, and one using Viviani's Theorem. And fifth, the kinematic method is used to gain additional insight on the size of the angles between the segments joining the Fermat point with the vertices.

  9. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  10. Error Mitigation of Point-to-Point Communication for Fault-Tolerant Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akamine, Robert L.; Hodson, Robert F.; LaMeres, Brock J.; Ray, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Fault tolerant systems require the ability to detect and recover from physical damage caused by the hardware s environment, faulty connectors, and system degradation over time. This ability applies to military, space, and industrial computing applications. The integrity of Point-to-Point (P2P) communication, between two microcontrollers for example, is an essential part of fault tolerant computing systems. In this paper, different methods of fault detection and recovery are presented and analyzed.

  11. Method of forming pointed structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of forming an array of pointed structures comprises depositing a ferrofluid on a substrate, applying a magnetic field to the ferrofluid to generate an array of surface protrusions, and solidifying the surface protrusions to form the array of pointed structures. The pointed structures may have a tip radius ranging from approximately 10 nm to approximately 25 micron. Solidifying the surface protrusions may be carried out at a temperature ranging from approximately 10 degrees C. to approximately 30 degrees C.

  12. Timely arguments.

    PubMed

    Callahan, S

    1991-04-01

    The consideration of time is central to philosophical resolution of issues of protection of human life. The central question is, how much future living is possible at a given point in time. Fetal life merits protection because of the potential for rational self-governance and moral self-consciousness. In contrast, a dying person consciousness or functioning. In the author's view, allowing a comatose person to die reflects the same respect for human life as protecting embryos from abortion. There is no moral justification for using technology to prolong a life when future consciousness is impossible. Viewed from the perspective of future potential, the opposition of many who are part of the antiabortion movement to the removal of feeding tubes from a comatose US woman, Nancy Cruzan, is senseless. PMID:10109972

  13. Evaluating Voxel Enabled Scalable Intersection of Large Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Lindenbergh, R.; Menenti, M.

    2015-08-01

    Laser scanning has become a well established surveying solution for obtaining 3D geo-spatial information on objects and environment. Nowadays scanners acquire up to millions of points per second which makes point cloud huge. Laser scanning is widely applied from airborne, carborne and stable platforms, resulting in point clouds obtained at different attitudes and with different extents. Working with such different large point clouds makes the determination of their overlapping area necessary but often time consuming. In this paper, a scalable point cloud intersection determination method is presented based on voxels. The method takes two overlapping point clouds as input. It consecutively resamples the input point clouds according to a preset voxel cell size. For all non-empty cells the center of gravity of the points in contains is computed. Consecutively for those centers it is checked if they are in a voxel cell of the other point cloud. The same process is repeated after interchanging the role of the two point clouds. The quality of the results is evaluated by the distance to the pints from the other data set. Also computation time and quality of the results are compared for different voxel cell sizes. The results are demonstrated on determining he intersection between an airborne and carborne laser point clouds and show that the proposed method takes 0.10%, 0.15%, 1.26% and 14.35% of computation time compared the the classic method when using cell sizes of of 10, 8, 5 and 3 meters respectively.

  14. Quantum point contacts as heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgram, Sebastian; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency of macroscopic heat engines is restricted by the second law of thermodynamics. They can reach at most the efficiency of a Carnot engine. In contrast, heat currents in mesoscopic heat engines show fluctuations. Thus, there is a small probability that a mesoscopic heat engine exceeds Carnot's maximum value during a short measurement time. We illustrate this effect using a quantum point contact as a heat engine. When a temperature difference is applied to a quantum point contact, the system may be utilized as a source of electrical power under steady state conditions. We first discuss the optimal working point of such a heat engine that maximizes the generated electrical power and subsequently calculate the statistics for deviations of the efficiency from its most likely value. We find that deviations surpassing the Carnot limit are possible, but unlikely.

  15. Acceleration feature points of unsteady shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, Jens; Reininghaus, Jan; Hotz, Ingrid; Hege, Hans-Christian; Noack, Bernd R.; Daviller, Guillaume; Comte, Pierre; Morzyúski, Marek

    2012-11-01

    We generalize velocity topology with centers (vortices) and saddle points in a Galilean-invariant manner. In particular, a computationally robust (derivative-free) framework for their extraction of two-dimensional unsteady flows is presented. The key enabler is the definition of feature points based on the acceleration magnitude. The extracted feature points are tracked over time resulting in corresponding trajectories. Using homological persistence and lifetime of features, a spatiotemporal importance measure for vortex core lines is introduced that enables a hierarchical filtering. As example, homological persistence is shown to discriminate between hydrodynamic and aeroacoustic flow structures. Our framework is applied to analytic examples as well as simulations of a cylinder wake, of a two-dimensional mixing layer and of a jet. Partially supported by the ANR Chair of Excellence TUCOROM and the German Research Foundation.

  16. Market turning points forecasting using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Limiao; Yan, Sen; Zheng, Xiaolian; Chen, Ben M.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the system adaptation framework we previously proposed, a frequency domain based model is developed in this paper to forecast the major turning points of stock markets. This system adaptation framework has its internal model and adaptive filter to capture the slow and fast dynamics of the market, respectively. The residue of the internal model is found to contain rich information about the market cycles. In order to extract and restore its informative frequency components, we use wavelet multi-resolution analysis with time-varying parameters to decompose this internal residue. An empirical index is then proposed based on the recovered signals to forecast the market turning points. This index is successfully applied to US, UK and China markets, where all major turning points are well forecasted.

  17. NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-point source pollution is a diffuse source that is difficult to measure and is highly variable due to different rain patterns and other climatic conditions. In many areas, however, non-point source pollution is the greatest source of water quality degradation. Presently, stat...

  18. Brocard Point and Euler Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper takes a known point from Brocard geometry, a known result from the geometry of the equilateral triangle, and bring in Euler's [empty set] function. It then demonstrates how to obtain new Brocard Geometric number theory results from them. Furthermore, this paper aims to determine a [triangle]ABC whose Crelle-Brocard Point [omega]…

  19. MASSACHUSETTS DEP EELGRASS VERIFIED POINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field verified points showing presence or absence of submerged rooted vascular plants along Massachusetts coastline. In addition to the photo interpreted eelgrass coverage (EELGRASS), this point coverage (EGRASVPT) was generated based on field-verified sites as well as all field...

  20. PowerPointing the Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Deborah J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes instructional uses of Microsoft PowerPoint software as demonstrated in a summer workshop for educators. Notes three uses: open house-type presentations, tutorials, and student-produced projects. Discusses how PowerPoint was used to present general information about the school and gives examples of uses in science and music history…

  1. Inertial Pointing and Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Robert (Inventor); Robbins, Fred (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An inertial pointing and control system and method for pointing to a designated target with known coordinates from a platform to provide accurate position, steering, and command information. The system continuously receives GPS signals and corrects Inertial Navigation System (INS) dead reckoning or drift errors. An INS is mounted directly on a pointing instrument rather than in a remote location on the platform for-monitoring the terrestrial position and instrument attitude. and for pointing the instrument at designated celestial targets or ground based landmarks. As a result. the pointing instrument and die INS move independently in inertial space from the platform since the INS is decoupled from the platform. Another important characteristic of the present system is that selected INS measurements are combined with predefined coordinate transformation equations and control logic algorithms under computer control in order to generate inertial pointing commands to the pointing instrument. More specifically. the computer calculates the desired instrument angles (Phi, Theta. Psi). which are then compared to the Euler angles measured by the instrument- mounted INS. and forms the pointing command error angles as a result of the compared difference.

  2. Planetary system detection by POINTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The final report and semiannual reports 1, 2, and 3 in response to the study of 'Planetary System Detection by POINTS' is presented. The grant covered the period from 15 Jun. 1988 through 31 Dec. 1989. The work during that period comprised the further development and refinement of the POINTS concept. The status of the POINTS development at the end of the Grant period was described by Reasenberg in a paper given at the JPL Workshop on Space Interferometry, 12-13 Mar. 1990, and distributed as CfA Preprint 3138. That paper, 'POINTS: a Small Astrometric Interferometer,' follows as Appendix-A. Our proposal P2276-7-09, dated July 1990, included a more detailed description of the state of the development of POINTS at the end of the tenure of Grant NAGW-1355. That proposal, which resulted in Grant NAGW-2497, is included by reference.

  3. Memory bias in the temporal bisection point

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Joshua M.; Namboodiri, Vijay M. K.; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to time intervals confers organisms, including humans, with many remarkable capabilities. A common method for studying interval timing is classification, in which a subject must indicate whether a given probe duration is nearer a previously learned short or long reference interval. This task is designed to reveal the probe duration that is equally likely to be labeled as short or long, known as the temporal bisection point. Studies have found that this bisection point is influenced by a variety of factors including the ratio of the target intervals, the spacing of the probe durations, the modalities of the stimuli, the attentional load, and the inter-trial duration. While several of these factors are thought to be mediated by memory effects, the prototypical classification task affords no opportunity to measure these memory effects directly. Here, we present a novel bisection task, termed the “Bisection by Classification and Production” (BiCaP) task, in which classification trials are interleaved with trials in which subjects must produce either the short or long referents or their midpoint. Using this method, we found a significant correlation between the means of the remembered referents and the bisection points for both classification and production trials. We then cross-validated the bisection points for production and classification trials by showing that they were not statistically differentiable. In addition to these population-level effects, we found within-subject evidence for co-variation across a session between the production bisection points and the means of the remembered referents. Finally, by using two sets of referent durations, we showed that only memory bias-corrected measures were consistent with a previously reported effect in which the ratio of the referents affects the location of the bisection point. These results suggest that memory effects should be considered in temporal tasks. PMID:26217198

  4. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 15-20 Sept. 1993 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on 20 Sept. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured FWHM distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0.30 sec) and an average value of 250 km (0.35 sec). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0.17 sec) and the largest is 600 km (O.69 sec). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this area fraction measurement in the context of

  5. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 1993 September 15-20 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on September 20. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0 sec .30) and an average value of 250 km (0 sec .35). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0 sec .17) and the largest is 600 km (O sec .69). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this

  6. A C++ class library for telescope pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrett, David L.

    2006-06-01

    tpk is a C++ class library, layered on TCSpk and slalib that implements virtual telescope objects for generating mount and rotator position (and optionally, velocity and acceleration) demands, predicting the position of guide probes etc. in the focal plane and tip and tilt for steerable optics. These objects allocate and manage storage for the kernel context in a thread safe manner enabling a pointing kernel for a specific telescope configuration to be constructed simply by creating the necessary objects and calling their "fast", "medium" and "slow" update methods at the appropriate rates. Additional facilities include: Tracking of solar system objects using orbital elements as tabulated by the Minor Planet Center, the JPL Horizons system and the Astronomical Almanac or the for the major planets, built-in ephemeredes due to Chapront and Francou - Management of pointing models including the logging of pointing test data capable of being read into TPOINT, catalogues of pointing reference stars and pointing adjustments from handsets and guiders including the necessary digital filters - Generation of world coordinate system mappings and FITS keywords for instruments. The library can be tailored for a particular operating environment by replacing the mutex and clock classes. For "off-line" or otherwise non time-critical application the existing Posix and Windows implementations can be used.

  7. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-01-01

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5. PMID:25737108

  8. An X-point ergodic divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, M.S.; Jensen, T.H.; La Haye, R.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Evans, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    A new ergodic divertor is proposed. It utilizes a system of external (n = 3) coils arranged to generate overlapping magnetic islands in the edge region of a diverted tokamak and connect the randomized field lines to the external (cold) divertor plate. The novel feature in the configuration is the placement of the external coils close to the X-point. A realistic design of the external coil set is studied by using the field line tracing method for a low aspect ratio (A {approx equal} 3) tokamak. Two types of effects are observed. First, by placing the coils close to the X-point, where the poloidal magnetic field is weak and the rational surfaces are closely packed only a moderate amount of current in the external coils is needed to ergodize the edge region. This ergodized edge enhances the edge transport in the X-point region and leads to the potential of edge profile control and the avoidance of edge localized modes (ELMs). Furthermore, the trajectories of the field lines close to the X-point are modified by the external coil set, causing the hit points on the external divertor plates to be randomized and spread out in the major radius direction. A time-dependent modulation of the currents in the external (n = 3) coils can potentially spread the heat flux more uniformly on the divertor plate avoiding high concentration of the heat flux. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  9. GONG Magnetogram Zero-Point Correction Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R.; Harvey, J.; Hill, F.; Toner, C.

    2003-05-01

    Line-of-sight component magnetograms from GONG+ are produced every minute at every site. The noise level is about 3 G per pixel but the zero point is incorrect by as much as 10 G. This zero point error varies across the solar image and with time. This error precludes using the magnetograms for meaningful extrapolations of weak photospheric fields into the corona. Experiments show the cause is slow, asymmetric, locally varying switching of the LCD modulator from one retardation state to the other, generating a false magnetic field pattern (zero error). The mirrors directing sunlight into the instrument produce slight ( 1 varying during the day which interacts with modulator imperfections to make a complicated correction problem. Atmospheric variations during the one-minute integration period can also cause trouble. The zero point error should affect the daily calibration in virtually the same way as a regular magnetogram taken at the same time. The daily calibration is used to create a 'magnetic flat field' to correct a nearly simultaneous regular magnetogram. The result should be a nearly rror-free magnetogram that can then be used to determine the zero point error during the rest of the day by subtracting suitably rotated and masked versions of the data. This error is then fit with a suitable function (e.g. Zernike polynomials) and the coefficients used to synthesize a correction at any time. The coefficients are smoothed and averaged over several days to reduce instrumental and atmospheric noise, and real solar changes that might leak through the masks. Present performance, determined by comparison among different sites, is good to about 1 G. A limitation appears to be seeing effects causing rapidly changing, small fluctuations of the zero point error. This is being investigated.

  10. Toroidally symmetric plasma vortex at tokamak divertor null point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, M. V.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2016-03-01

    Reduced MHD equations are used for studying toroidally symmetric plasma dynamics near the divertor null point. Numerical solution of these equations exhibits a plasma vortex localized at the null point with the time-evolution defined by interplay of the curvature drive, magnetic restoring force, and dissipation. Convective motion is easier to achieve for a second-order null (snowflake) divertor than for a regular x-point configuration, and the size of the convection zone in a snowflake configuration grows with plasma pressure at the null point. The trends in simulations are consistent with tokamak experiments which indicate the presence of enhanced transport at the null point.

  11. Effective dynamics of a classical point charge

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-03-15

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham–Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to quantum anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out. -- Highlights: •Extension of the classical action principle for dissipative systems. •New derivation of the Abraham–Lorentz force for a point charge. •Absence of a runaway solution of the Abraham–Lorentz force. •Acausality in classical electrodynamics. •Renormalization of classical electrodynamics of point charges.

  12. Likelihood methods for point processes with refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Citi, Luca; Ba, Demba; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    Likelihood-based encoding models founded on point processes have received significant attention in the literature because of their ability to reveal the information encoded by spiking neural populations. We propose an approximation to the likelihood of a point-process model of neurons that holds under assumptions about the continuous time process that are physiologically reasonable for neural spike trains: the presence of a refractory period, the predictability of the conditional intensity function, and its integrability. These are properties that apply to a large class of point processes arising in applications other than neuroscience. The proposed approach has several advantages over conventional ones. In particular, one can use standard fitting procedures for generalized linear models based on iteratively reweighted least squares while improving the accuracy of the approximation to the likelihood and reducing bias in the estimation of the parameters of the underlying continuous-time model. As a result, the proposed approach can use a larger bin size to achieve the same accuracy as conventional approaches would with a smaller bin size. This is particularly important when analyzing neural data with high mean and instantaneous firing rates. We demonstrate these claims on simulated and real neural spiking activity. By allowing a substantive increase in the required bin size, our algorithm has the potential to lower the barrier to the use of point-process methods in an increasing number of applications. PMID:24206384

  13. Pivots for Pointing: Visually-Monitored Pointing Has Higher Arm Elevations than Pointing Blindfolded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wnuczko, Marta; Kennedy, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Observers pointing to a target viewed directly may elevate their fingertip close to the line of sight. However, pointing blindfolded, after viewing the target, they may pivot lower, from the shoulder, aligning the arm with the target as if reaching to the target. Indeed, in Experiment 1 participants elevated their arms more in visually monitored…

  14. Radio Timing and Analysis of Black Widow Pulsar J2256-1024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowter, Kathryn; Stairs, Ingrid H.; McPhee, Christie A.; Archibald, Anne M.; Boyles, Jason; Hessels, Jason; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Kondratiev, Vlad I.; Lorimer, Duncan; Lynch, Ryan S.; McLaughlin, Maura; Pennucci, Timothy; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar J2256-1024, discovered in a 350MHz GBT drift-scan survey and subsequently detected by Fermi-LAT, is a black widow millisecond pulsar in an eclipsing binary system. Black widow pulsars have a rather interesting history. They started life in a binary system, were then spun up by their companions into millisecond pulsars but at some point started ablating those companions, slowly destroying them - thus the moniker "black widow". They are characterized by relatively short orbital periods, in this case 5.1 hours, a low companion mass and, if the inclination angle is right, eclipses. For J2256-1024 we see very clear radio eclipses. Black widow systems used to be few and far between but are now more common with at least 18 currently known. Black widows are interesting for a variety of reasons. They provide potential insight into the formation of isolated millisecond pulsars which must have formed in a binary but are now seen alone, and in eclipsing systems pulses travel through the magnetosphere of the companion providing a probe of that region. Here we present timing and polarization results for J2256-1024 based on radio observations with the GBT.

  15. Davies Critical Point and Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Hoseong

    2012-04-01

    From the point of view of tunneling, the physical meaning of the Davies critical point of a second-order phase transition in the black hole thermodynamics is clarified. At the critical point, the nonthermal contribution vanishes so that the black hole radiation is entirely thermal. It separates two phases: one with radiation enhanced by the nonthermal contribution, the other suppressed by the nonthermal contribution. We show this in both charged and rotating black holes. The phase transition is also analyzed in the cases in which emissions of charges and angular momenta are incorporated.

  16. NOTE: Do acupuncture points exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi; Liu, Chenglin; Dang, Ruishan; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei; Ding, Guanghong

    2009-05-01

    We used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analysis to probe the distribution of four chemical elements in and around acupuncture points, two located in the forearm and two in the lower leg. Three of the four acupuncture points showed significantly elevated concentrations of elements Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in relation to levels in the surrounding tissue, with similar elevation ratios for Cu and Fe. The mapped distribution of these elements implies that each acupuncture point seems to be elliptical with the long axis along the meridian.

  17. Ill-Posed Point Neuron Models.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik; Wyller, John

    2016-12-01

    We show that point-neuron models with a Heaviside firing rate function can be ill posed. More specifically, the initial-condition-to-solution map might become discontinuous in finite time. Consequently, if finite precision arithmetic is used, then it is virtually impossible to guarantee the accurate numerical solution of such models. If a smooth firing rate function is employed, then standard ODE theory implies that point-neuron models are well posed. Nevertheless, in the steep firing rate regime, the problem may become close to ill posed, and the error amplification, in finite time, can be very large. This observation is illuminated by numerical experiments. We conclude that, if a steep firing rate function is employed, then minor round-off errors can have a devastating effect on simulations, unless proper error-control schemes are used. PMID:27129667

  18. Pointing Device Performance in Steering Tasks.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Ransalu; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S

    2016-06-01

    Use of touch-screen-based interactions is growing rapidly. Hence, knowing the maneuvering efficacy of touch screens relative to other pointing devices is of great importance in the context of graphical user interfaces. Movement time, accuracy, and user preferences of four pointing device settings were evaluated on a computer with 14 participants aged 20.1 ± 3.13 years. It was found that, depending on the difficulty of the task, the optimal settings differ for ballistic and visual control tasks. With a touch screen, resting the arm increased movement time for steering tasks. When both performance and comfort are considered, whether to use a mouse or a touch screen for person-computer interaction depends on the steering difficulty. Hence, a input device should be chosen based on the application, and should be optimized to match the graphical user interface. PMID:27216944

  19. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E

    2007-02-28

    The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention

  20. Tipping point analysis of atmospheric oxygen concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livina, Valerie N.; Vaz Martins, Teresa M.; Forbes, Alistair

    2015-04-01

    We apply tipping point analysis to atmospheric oxygen concentration records. We warn that decrease of oxygen concentration from 21% to 19% would lead to significant health problems for humans and other animals, and estimate the time scale of such decline under various antropogenic scenarios. We suggest that society should be careful with introduction of new mass technologies that utilise double sink of atmospheric oxygen by both combustion and air-consuming synthesis in energy generation and product manufacturing.

  1. Floating-to-Fixed-Point Conversion for Digital Signal Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Daniel; Chillet, Daniel; Sentieys, Olivier

    2006-12-01

    Digital signal processing applications are specified with floating-point data types but they are usually implemented in embedded systems with fixed-point arithmetic to minimise cost and power consumption. Thus, methodologies which establish automatically the fixed-point specification are required to reduce the application time-to-market. In this paper, a new methodology for the floating-to-fixed point conversion is proposed for software implementations. The aim of our approach is to determine the fixed-point specification which minimises the code execution time for a given accuracy constraint. Compared to previous methodologies, our approach takes into account the DSP architecture to optimise the fixed-point formats and the floating-to-fixed-point conversion process is coupled with the code generation process. The fixed-point data types and the position of the scaling operations are optimised to reduce the code execution time. To evaluate the fixed-point computation accuracy, an analytical approach is used to reduce the optimisation time compared to the existing methods based on simulation. The methodology stages are described and several experiment results are presented to underline the efficiency of this approach.

  2. Detecting determinism from point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  3. NULL convention floating point multiplier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anitha Juliette; Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  4. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  5. Hermit Points on a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard; Grinstead, Charles; Grindstead, Marshall; Bergstrand, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Suppose that we are given a rectangular box in 3-space. Given any two points on the surface of this box, we can define the surface distance between them to be the length of the shortest path between them on the surface of the box. This paper determines the pairs of points of maximum surface distance for all boxes. It is often the case that these…

  6. Optimizing robot placement for visit-point tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.K.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    We present a manipulator placement algorithm for minimizing the length of the manipulator motion performing a visit-point task such as spot welding. Given a set of points for the tool of a manipulator to visit, our algorithm finds the shortest robot motion required to visit the points from each possible base configuration. The base configurations resulting in the shortest motion is selected as the optimal robot placement. The shortest robot motion required for visiting multiple points from a given base configuration is computed using a variant of the traveling salesman algorithm in the robot joint space and a point-to-point path planner that plans collision free robot paths between two configurations. Our robot placement algorithm is expected to reduce the robot cycle time during visit- point tasks, as well as speeding up the robot set-up process when building a manufacturing line.

  7. The Use and Management of Secondary Teachers' Time after the Education Reform Act 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, R. J.; Neill, S. R. St. J.

    A sample of 348 secondary teachers in England and Wales kept a week's record of their work and completed a questionnaire on time usage. The survey indicated that the total mean time spent on work and work-related activities was 54.4 hours per week. Of this, teachers spent 16.9 hours on teaching, 12.9 hours on preparation, 18.1 hours in…

  8. An Emprical Point Error Model for Tls Derived Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozendi, Mustafa; Akca, Devrim; Topan, Hüseyin

    2016-06-01

    The random error pattern of point clouds has significant effect on the quality of final 3D model. The magnitude and distribution of random errors should be modelled numerically. This work aims at developing such an anisotropic point error model, specifically for the terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) acquired 3D point clouds. A priori precisions of basic TLS observations, which are the range, horizontal angle and vertical angle, are determined by predefined and practical measurement configurations, performed at real-world test environments. A priori precision of horizontal (𝜎𝜃) and vertical (𝜎𝛼) angles are constant for each point of a data set, and can directly be determined through the repetitive scanning of the same environment. In our practical tests, precisions of the horizontal and vertical angles were found as 𝜎𝜃=±36.6𝑐𝑐 and 𝜎𝛼=±17.8𝑐𝑐, respectively. On the other hand, a priori precision of the range observation (𝜎𝜌) is assumed to be a function of range, incidence angle of the incoming laser ray, and reflectivity of object surface. Hence, it is a variable, and computed for each point individually by employing an empirically developed formula varying as 𝜎𝜌=±2-12 𝑚𝑚 for a FARO Focus X330 laser scanner. This procedure was followed by the computation of error ellipsoids of each point using the law of variance-covariance propagation. The direction and size of the error ellipsoids were computed by the principal components transformation. The usability and feasibility of the model was investigated in real world scenarios. These investigations validated the suitability and practicality of the proposed method.

  9. Robot positioning based on point-to-point motion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S.; Cho, H. S.; Koh, K. C.

    2000-03-20

    This paper presents an optimal search method for determining the base location of a robot manipulator so that the robot can have a designated point-to-point (PTP) motion capabilities. Based on the topological characterization of the manipulator workspace and the definitions of various p-connectivity, a computational method is developed for enumerating various PTP motion capabilities into quantitative cost functions. Then an unconstrained search by minimizing the cost function yields the task feasible location of the robot base. This methodology is useful for placement of mobile manipulators and robotic workcell layout design.

  10. Stagnation Point Radiative Heating Relations for Venus Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael E.; Palmer, Grant E.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Improved analytic expressions for calculating the stagnation point radiative heating during entry into the atmosphere of Venus have been developed. These analytic expressions can be incorporated into entry trajectory simulation codes. Together with analytical expressions for convective heating at the stagnation point, the time-integrated total heat load at the stagnation point is used in determining the thickness of protective material required, and hence the mass of the fore body heatshield of uniform thickness.

  11. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  12. X -Point Effect on Plasma Blob Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, F.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma blob dynamics on the high-field side in the proximity of a magnetic field null (X point) is investigated in TORPEX. A significant acceleration of the blobs towards the X point is observed. Close to the X point the blobs break apart. The E ×B drifts associated with the blobs are measured, isolating the background drift component from the fluctuating contribution of the blob internal potential dipole. The time evolution of the latter is consistent with the fast blob dynamics. An analytical model based on charge conservation is derived for the potential dipole, including ion polarization, diamagnetic, and parallel currents. In the vicinity of the X point, a crucial role in determining the blob motion is played by the decrease of the poloidal magnetic field intensity. This variation increases the connection length that short circuits the potential dipole of the blob. Good quantitative agreement is found between the model and the experimental data in the initial accelerating phase of the blob dynamics.

  13. GRATIS: Pointing and Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiffert, M. D.; Lubin, P. M.; Craig, W. W.; McLean, R.; Harrison, F.

    1992-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Arc Minute Telescope Imaging System (GRATIS; see companion paper by Harrison et al.) requires a balloon-borne stabilized platform capable of 20 arc second absolute pointing accuracy. We have developed a system which uses computer-based inertial-guidance control of an azimuth-elevation pointing mechanism for the telescope. An innovative computer-based star pattern recognition system automatically generates drift corrections from an image acquired by a Peltier cooled CCD camera. The inertial guidance system provides three axis pointing information with approximately 12 arc seconds precision. This is a true inertial guidance system with gyros, accelerometers, and an integral navigational processor. The gyros have high relative pointing precision, but a slow drift component degrades their absolute accuracy. Control of the elevation position is accomplished through a torque motor that is directly coupled to the telescope. Azimuth control is accomplished through an active zero-stiction bearing at the top of the gondola and a reaction wheel at the bottom. The pointing system has been fully constructed and tested and has been mated with the telescope. We present the results of an extensive series of tracking tests.

  14. Point Positioning Service for Natural Hazard Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Sever, Y. E.

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to improve natural hazard monitoring, JPL has invested in updating and enlarging its global real-time GNSS tracking network, and has launched a unique service - real-time precise positioning for natural hazard monitoring, entitled GREAT Alert (GNSS Real-Time Earthquake and Tsunami Alert). GREAT Alert leverages the full technological and operational capability of the JPL's Global Differential GPS System [www.gdgps.net] to offer owners of real-time dual-frequency GNSS receivers: Sub-5 cm (3D RMS) real-time, absolute positioning in ITRF08, regardless of location Under 5 seconds turnaround time Full covariance information Estimates of ancillary parameters (such as troposphere) optionally provided This service enables GNSS networks operators to instantly have access to the most accurate and reliable real-time positioning solutions for their sites, and also to the hundreds of participating sites globally, assuring inter-consistency and uniformity across all solutions. Local authorities with limited technical and financial resources can now access to the best technology, and share environmental data to the benefit of the entire pacific region. We will describe the specialized precise point positioning techniques employed by the GREAT Alert service optimized for natural hazard monitoring, and in particular Earthquake monitoring. We address three fundamental aspects of these applications: 1) small and infrequent motion, 2) the availability of data at a central location, and 3) the need for refined solutions at several time scales

  15. Tipping Points in Texas Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Anticipating geomorphic tipping points requires that we learn from the past. Major geomorphic changes in coastal plain rivers of Texas resulting in river metamorphosis or regime shifts were identified, and the major driving factors determined. Nine fluvial tipping points were identified from contemporary observations, historical records, and Quaternary reconstructions. Two of the tipping points (between general aggrading and degrading valley states) are associated with reversals in a fundamental system control (sea-level). One (stable or aggrading vs. degrading channels) is associated with an abrupt change in sediment supply due to dam construction, and two others (changes from meandering to anastomosing channel patterns, and different anastomosis styles) are similarly related to changes in sediment supply and/or transport capacity, but with additional elements of historical contingency. Three tipping points are related to avulsions. One, from a regime dominated to reoccupation of former channels to one dominated by progradation into flood basins, is driven by progressive long term filling of incised valleys. Another, nodal avulsions, are driven by disturbances associated with tectonics or listric faults. The third, avulsions and related valley metamorphosis in unfilled incised valleys, is due to fundamental dynamical instabilities within the fluvial system. This synthesis and analysis suggests that geomorphic tipping points are sometimes associated with general extrinsic or intrinsic (to the fluvial system) environmental change, independent of any disturbances or instabilities. Others are associated with natural (e.g., tectonic) or human (dams) disturbances, and still others with intrinsic geomorphic instabilities. This suggests that future tipping points will be equally diverse with respect to their drivers.

  16. Point estimates for probability moments

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblueth, Emilio

    1975-01-01

    Given a well-behaved real function Y of a real random variable X and the first two or three moments of X, expressions are derived for the moments of Y as linear combinations of powers of the point estimates y(x+) and y(x-), where x+ and x- are specific values of X. Higher-order approximations and approximations for discontinuous Y using more point estimates are also given. Second-moment approximations are generalized to the case when Y is a function of several variables. PMID:16578731

  17. Inflection point inflation and reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the inflection point inflation with an extended discussion to large field values and consider the reheating effects on the inflationary predictions. Parametrizing the reheating dynamics in terms of the reheating temperature and the equation of state during reheating, we show how the observationally favored parameter space of inflection point inflation is affected by reheating dynamics. Consequently, we apply the general results to the inflation models with non-minimal coupling, such as the SM Higgs inflation and the B-L Higgs inflation.

  18. Energy-efficient technologies for point-to-point fiber access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka-Lun; Li, Jie; Chan, Chien Aun; Anthapadmanabhan, N. Prasanth; Chow, Hungkei (Keith)

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the fundamental issues and the technologies to achieve an energy-efficient Gigabit-Ethernet point-to-point (PtP) fiber access network. To minimize the power consumption of PtP fiber access for long-term development, it is essential to optimize each of the network components such as optical transceiver, user network interface, Ethernet aggregator and also their modes of operation. Our analysis shows that the energy consumption of a PtP fiber access network using our proposed technologies can be up to 7.5 times lower than that of the 2010 technologies when a combination of appropriate technologies is applied.

  19. Practical Point-to-Point Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution over 1/2 KM

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01

    We have demonstrated point-to-point single-photon quantum key distribution (QKD) over a free-space optical path of {approximately}475 m under daylight conditions. This represents an increase of >1,000 times farther than any reported point-to-point demonstration, and >6 times farther than the previous folded path daylight demonstration. We expect to extend the daylight range to 2 km or more within the next few months. A brief description of the system is given here. The QKD transmitter, a.k.a. ''Alice'' (Fig. 1), consists of three thermoelectrically cooled diode lasers, a single interference filter (IF), two optical attenuators, two linear polarizers, two non-polarization beam-splitters (BSs), and a 27x beam expander. The two data-lasers' (dim-lasers') wavelengths are temperature controlled and constrained by the IF to {approximately}773 {+-} 0.5 nm, while the transmitted wavelength of the bright-laser (timing-laser) is {approximately}768 nm; the data-lasers are configured to emit a weak pulse of approximately 1 ns duration. The transmitter incorporates no active polarization switching--a first in QKD.

  20. A miniaturized pointing mount for Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, C. G.; Howell, T., Jr.; Nicaise, P. D.; Parker, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A Miniaturized Pointing Mount (MPM) for Spacelab missions is defined and simulation results are described. This mount is proposed to complement the Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS). It uses the same mount isolator concept as the Spacelab IPS but is much more efficient and economical for the accommodation of small shuttle payloads. The MPM is built from star tracker assemblies left over from the Apollo Telescope Mount program thereby assuring low cost and development risk. Simulation results indicate a high level of instrument stability can be expected. The short development time of the MPM would permit it to serve as a precursor to the Spacelab IPS for verifying critical new concepts such as the mount isolation and hold down mechanisms.

  1. Evolution of fluctuations near QCD critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanov, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    We propose to describe the time evolution of quasistationary fluctuations near QCD critical point by a system of stochastic Boltzmann-Langevin-Vlasov-type equations. We derive the equations and study the system analytically in the linearized regime. Known results for equilibrium stationary fluctuations as well as the critical scaling of diffusion coefficient are reproduced. We apply the approach to the long-standing question of the fate of the critical point fluctuations during the hadronic rescattering stage of the heavy-ion collision after chemical freeze-out. We find that if conserved particle number fluctuations survive the rescattering, so do, under a certain additional condition, the fluctuations of nonconserved quantities, such as mean transverse momentum. We derive a simple analytical formula for the magnitude of this memory effect.

  2. 1. DEPENDENCY Both pointed and flat shingles appear to be ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DEPENDENCY Both pointed and flat shingles appear to be original. Original purpose of this building was not recorded at the time of this survey. - Annandale Plantation, Dependency, State Routes 30 & 18 vicinity, Georgetown, Georgetown County, SC

  3. EPA FACILITY POINT LOCATION FILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data includes locations of facilities from which pollutants are discharged. The epapoints.tar.gz file is a gzipped tar file of 14 Arc/Info export files and text documents. The .txt files define the attributes located in the INFO point coverage files. Projections are defined in...

  4. Turning Points: Opportunity or Trouble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Anthony W.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews recommendations of the Carnegie report "Turning Points: Preparing American Youth for the 21st Century" with respect to the internal restructuring of middle schools and ways of integrating community and parental support. Discusses suggestions concerning small learning communities, core academic programs, ensuring student success, expert…

  5. The Mean as Balance Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Robin S.

    2012-01-01

    There are two primary interpretations of the mean: as a leveler of data (Uccellini 1996, pp. 113-114) and as a balance point of a data set. Typically, both interpretations of the mean are ignored in elementary school and middle school curricula. They are replaced with a rote emphasis on calculation using the standard algorithm. When students are…

  6. Decimal Fractions: An Important Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinie, Sherri L.

    2014-01-01

    How can a simple dot--the decimal point--be the source of such frustration for students and teachers? As the author worked through her own frustrations, she found that her students seemed to fall into groups in terms of misconceptions that they revealed when talking about and working with decimals. When asking students to illustrate their thinking…

  7. High Points of Human Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Curt

    1975-01-01

    Discusses such high points of human genetics as the study of chromosomes, somatic cell hybrids, the population formula: the Hardy-Weinberg Law, biochemical genetics, the single-active X Theory, behavioral genetics and finally how genetics can serve humanity. (BR)

  8. Revised correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC properties and coincident TIMED/SABER mesospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb-scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002--2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each coincidence identified within ±1 degree latitude, ±2 degrees longitude and ≤1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1, 3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs, actually located at higher (and colder) altitudes are detected at lower altitudes. S.V. Petelina, D.A. Degenstein, E.J. Llewellyn, N.D. Lloyd, C.J. Mertens, M.G. Mlynczak, and J.M. Russell III, "Thermal conditions for PMC existence derived from Odin/OSIRIS and TIMED/SABER data", Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L

  9. Libration Point Navigation Concepts Supporting Exploration Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Folta, David C.; Moreau, Michael C.; Gramling, Cheryl J.

    2004-01-01

    Farquhar described several libration point navigation concepts that would appear to support NASA s current exploration vision. One concept is a Lunar Relay Satellite operating in the vicinity of Earth-Moon L2, providing Earth-to-lunar far-side and long- range surface-to-surface navigation and communications capability. Reference [ 1] lists several advantages of such a system in comparison to a lunar orbiting relay satellite constellation. Among these are one or two vs. many satellites for coverage, simplified acquisition and tracking due to very low relative motion, much longer contact times, and simpler antenna pointing. An obvious additional advantage of such a system is that uninterrupted links to Earth avoid performing critical maneuvers "in the blind." Another concept described is the use of Earth-Moon L1 for lunar orbit rendezvous, rather than low lunar orbit as was done for Apollo. This rendezvous technique would avoid large plane change and high fuel cost associated with high latitude landing sites and long stay times. Earth-Moon L1 also offers unconstrained launch windows from the lunar surface. Farquhar claims this technique requires only slightly higher fuel cost than low lunar orbit rendezvous for short-stay equatorial landings. Farquhar also describes an Interplanetary Transportation System that would use libration points as terminals for an interplanetary shuttle. This approach would offer increased operational flexibility in terms of launch windows, rendezvous, aborts, etc. in comparison to elliptical orbit transfers. More recently, other works including Folta[3] and Howell[4] have shown that patching together unstable trajectories departing Earth-Moon libration points with stable trajectories approaching planetary libration points may also offer lower overall fuel costs than elliptical orbit transfers. Another concept Farquhar described was a Deep Space Relay at Earth-Moon IA and/or L5 that would serve as a high data rate optical navigation and

  10. 51. LINES AT TIME OFFICE NO. 13 AT CHECKOUT TIME. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. LINES AT TIME OFFICE NO. 13 AT CHECKOUT TIME. SEAPLANE HANGARS (BLDGS. 1-2) IN BACKGROUND. USN PHOTO, JULY 11, 1941. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  11. Change point analysis of mean annual air temperature in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani, A.

    2015-06-01

    The existence of change point in the mean of air temperature is an important indicator of climate change. In this study, Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric Change Point Models (CPMs) were applied to test whether a change point has occurred in the mean of annual Air Temperature Anomalies Time Series (ATATS) of 27 synoptic stations in different regions of Iran for the period 1956-2010. The Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) was also applied to evaluate the detected change points. The ATATS of all stations except Bandar Anzali and Gorgan stations, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series as an input file for the CPMs and LRT. Both the Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs detected the change point in the ATATS of (a) Tehran Mehrabad, Abadan, Kermanshah, Khoramabad and Yazd in 1992, (b) Mashhad and Tabriz in 1993, (c) Bandar Anzali, Babolsar and Ramsar in 1994, (d) Kerman and Zahedan in 1996 at 5% significance level. The likelihood ratio test shows that the ATATS before and after detected change points in these 12 stations are normally distributed with different means. The Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs suggested different change points for individual stations in Bushehr, Bam, Shahroud, and Gorgan. However, the LRT confirmed the change points in these four stations as 1997, 1996, 1993, and 1996, respectively. No change points were detected in the remaining 11 stations.

  12. ZERO-TIME INDICATOR

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1960-08-30

    The travel time of a nuclear shock wave from its point of origin to a location can be determined accurately by an apparatus for noting and comparably recording both zerotime, as indicated by the electromagnetic transient associated with the nuclear detonation, and shock wave arrival time.

  13. Four-point function in the IOP matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ben; Polchinski, Joseph; Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Suh, S. Josephine

    2016-05-01

    The IOP model is a quantum mechanical system of a large- N matrix oscillator and a fundamental oscillator, coupled through a quartic interaction. It was introduced previously as a toy model of the gauge dual of an AdS black hole, and captures a key property that at infinite N the two-point function decays to zero on long time scales. Motivated by recent work on quantum chaos, we sum all planar Feynman diagrams contributing to the four-point function. We find that the IOP model does not satisfy the more refined criteria of exponential growth of the out-of-time-order four-point function.

  14. Real-time prediction of magnetospheric activity using the Boyle Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Ramkumar; Reiff, P. H.; Landivar, J. E.

    2009-04-01

    We present a new algorithm with an improvement in the accuracy and lead time in short-term space weather predictions by coupling the Boyle Index, Φ = 10-4ν2 + 11.7Bsin3(?/2) kV, to artificial neural networks. The algorithm takes inputs from ACE and a handful of ground-based magnetometers to predict the next upcoming Kp in real time. The model yields a correlation coefficient of over 86% when predicting Kp with a lead time of 1 hour and over 85% for a 2 hour ahead prediction, significantly larger than the Kp persistence of 0.80. The Boyle Index, available in near-real time from http://space.rice.edu/ISTP/wind.html, has been in use for over 5 years now to predict geomagnetic activity. The logarithm of both 3-hour and 1-hour averages of the Boyle Index correlates well with the following Kp: Kp = 8.93 log10 < Boyle Index> -12.55. Using the Boyle Index alone, the algorithm yields a correlation coefficient of 85% when predicting Kp with a lead time of 1 hour and over 84% for a 3 hour ahead prediction, nearly as good as when using Kp in the history but without any possibility of "persistence contamination." Although the Boyle Index generally overestimates the polar cap potential for severe events, it does predict that severe activity will occur. Also, 1-hour value less than 100 kV is a good indicator that the magnetosphere will be quiet. However, some storm events with Kp > 6 occur when the Boyle Index is relatively low; the new algorithm is successful in predicting those events by capturing the influence of preconditioning.

  15. Ignition timing control

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.E.; Bedross, G.M.

    1993-05-25

    An engine ignition control system for controlling the timing of the spark for initiating burning in the combustion chamber of a four stroke cycle, single cylinder, internal combustion engine is described; said engine having a cylinder, a piston in said cylinder, a crankshaft connected to said piston, said piston being adapted to reciprocate between a top dead center position and a bottom dead center position; a speed sensor means for developing periodic sensor voltage timing pulses, the cycle time between timing pulses being an indication of engine crankshaft speed; means for developing ignition timing pulses, each timing pulse having a leading edge corresponding to a voltage change in a timing voltage pulse and a trailing edge corresponding to an opposite voltage change in a timing voltage pulse; means for developing a spark voltage including an ignition coil and a source of ignition coil current, said spark voltage occurring at a coil primary current interrupt point; means for measuring in real-time, cycle time and a timing pulse time for one engine cycle; and means for computing an optimum delay time from the leading edge of a timing pulse for said one cycle to said interrupt point whereby combustion is initiated at a time in advance of the top dead center position.

  16. Active point out-of-plane ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Hyunjae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common intraoperative medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the transducer and the ultrasound image. Point-based phantoms are considered to be accurate, but their calibration framework assumes that the point is in the image plane. In this work, we present the use of an active point phantom and a calibration framework that accounts for the elevational uncertainty of the point. Given the lateral and axial position of the point in the ultrasound image, we approximate a circle in the axial-elevational plane with a radius equal to the axial position. The standard approach transforms all of the imaged points to be a single physical point. In our approach, we minimize the distances between the circular subsets of each image, with them ideally intersecting at a single point. We simulated in noiseless and noisy cases, presenting results on out-of-plane estimation errors, calibration estimation errors, and point reconstruction precision. We also performed an experiment using a robot arm as the tracker, resulting in a point reconstruction precision of 0.64mm.

  17. Interpretation of human pointing by African elephants: generalisation and rationality.

    PubMed

    Smet, Anna F; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-11-01

    Factors influencing the abilities of different animals to use cooperative social cues from humans are still unclear, in spite of long-standing interest in the topic. One of the few species that have been found successful at using human pointing is the African elephant (Loxodonta africana); despite few opportunities for learning about pointing, elephants follow a pointing gesture in an object-choice task, even when the pointing signal and experimenter's body position are in conflict, and when the gesture itself is visually subtle. Here, we show that the success of captive African elephants at using human pointing is not restricted to situations where the pointing signal is sustained until the time of choice: elephants followed human pointing even when the pointing gesture was withdrawn before they had responded to it. Furthermore, elephants rapidly generalised their response to a type of social cue they were unlikely to have seen before: pointing with the foot. However, unlike young children, they showed no sign of evaluating the 'rationality' of this novel pointing gesture according to its visual context: that is, whether the experimenter's hands were occupied or not. PMID:24942107

  18. Peripheral phlebitis: a point-prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Washington, Georgita T; Barrett, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine the factors influencing peripheral phlebitis in the adult medical-surgical population. The authors would then be able to use those data to determine whether a change in practice was warranted. Data collection and analysis of 188 intravenous sites revealed that females with higher doses of medications in intravenous sites of longer dwell times and suboptimal nutrition were at greater risk of developing peripheral phlebitis. The point prevalence was greater than the recommended 5%, which led the authors to review their facility's patient care and documentation practices. PMID:22759829

  19. Formation of on-site normal points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, G. M.; Sinclair, Andrew T.

    1993-01-01

    We describe our methods of fitting a smoothing function to observational range differences from a predicted orbit, by deducing corrections to the orbit in the radial and along-track directions. The method has been used on observations of a variety of satellites, and using predicted orbits computed both by numerical integration using IRV's as starting values and analytically from orbital elements. The along-track corrections to the predicted orbit have been successfully used in the form of time biases to improve subsequent predictions, and a statistical test has been devised to ensure that the range residuals may be used to form unbiased quick look normal points.

  20. Sensing with Superconducting Point Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors. PMID:22778630