Science.gov

Sample records for 1-hour time point

  1. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic... convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units? (a) Use the equation...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units? 60.1755 Section 60.1755 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1755 How do I convert my...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units? 60.1265 Section 60.1265 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1265 How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the...

  4. 40 CFR 60.2943 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units? 60.2943 Section 60.2943 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Operator Training and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2943 How do I convert my 1-hour...

  5. 40 CFR 60.3042 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units? 60.3042 Section 60.3042 Protection of Environment... Construction On or Before December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3042 How do I convert my...

  6. 76 FR 61098 - Guidance for 1-Hour SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...Notice is hereby given that the EPA has posted its draft non- binding guidance titled, ``Guidance for 1-Hour SO2 NAAQS SIP Submissions'' on its Web site. The EPA invites public comments on this guidance document during the comment period specified below, and plans to issue an updated version of the guidance after reviewing timely submitted...

  7. Predicting Pointing Time from Hand Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Pradipta; Robinson, Peter

    Pointing tasks form a significant part of human-computer interaction in graphical user interfaces. We have developed a model to predict the task completion time for pointing tasks for people with motor-impairment. As part of the model, we have also developed a new scale of characterizing the extent of disability of users by measuring their grip strength. We have validated the model by conducting two trials involving people with motor-impairment and in both trials the model has predicted pointing time with statistically significant accuracy.

  8. Dual-time-point Imaging and Delayed-time-point Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/Computed Tomography Imaging in Various Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Segtnan, Eivind Antonsen; Grupe, Peter; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2016-01-01

    The techniques of dual-time-point imaging (DTPI) and delayed-time-point imaging, which are mostly being used for distinction between inflammatory and malignant diseases, has increased the specificity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET for diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases. A gradually increasing trend of FDG uptake over time has been shown in malignant cells, and a decreasing or constant trend has been shown in inflammatory/infectious processes. Tumor heterogeneity can be assessed by using early and delayed imaging because differences between primary versus metastatic sites become more detectable compared with single time points. This article discusses the applications of DTPI and delayed-time-point imaging.

  9. Multi-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere and auroral emissions (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, Benjamin; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini; Krupp, Norbert; Grodent, Denis; Kurth, William S.; Yates, Japheth N.

    2016-04-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes which differ from the rotation period. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emission brightness. We made a 10-year survey of the quasi-periodic 1-hour energetic electron injections observed in the Saturn's outer magnetosphere by the Low-Energy Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini. The signature of these injections is pulsations in the electron fluxes at energies between a hundred keV up to several MeV. We investigated the topology and the morphology of these pulsations, as well as the signatures of the electron injections in the radio emissions and the magnetic field, respectively, measured by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) on board Cassini. The morphology of the pulsations (interpulse period, number of pulsations per event, growth and decay time) shows a weak local time dependence, which suggests a high-latitude source for the pulsed energetic electrons. This suggestion is reinforced by the observation of strong radio bursts in the auroral hiss coincident with the electron pulsations and by the higher growth rate and decay rate magnitudes at high latitudes. Moreover, since the morphological properties of the pulsations are similar at the various locations where the electron injections are observed, the acceleration mechanism of the electrons is likely common for all the events and may be directly or indirectly involving magnetic reconnection. The auroral emissions, which display the ionospheric response to magnetospheric dynamics, exhibit some quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations as well. Some pulsed auroral brightenings are observed while Cassini detects several electron

  10. Finding Strong Bridges and Strong Articulation Points in Linear Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Giuseppe F.; Laura, Luigi; Santaroni, Federico

    Given a directed graph G, an edge is a strong bridge if its removal increases the number of strongly connected components of G. Similarly, we say that a vertex is a strong articulation point if its removal increases the number of strongly connected components of G. In this paper, we present linear-time algorithms for computing all the strong bridges and all the strong articulation points of directed graphs, solving an open problem posed in [2].

  11. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  12. Double general point interactions: symmetry and tunneling times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Molly; Lunardi, José; Manzoni, Luiz; Nyquist, Erik

    2016-03-01

    We consider the one dimensional problem of a non-relativistic quantum particle scattering off a double barrier built from two generalized point interactions (each one characterized as a member of the four parameter family of point interactions). The properties of the double point barrier under parity transformations are investigated, using the distributional approach, and the constraints on the parameters necessary for the interaction to have a well-defined parity are obtained. We show that the limit of zero interbarrier distance of a renormalized odd arrangement with two δ' is either trivial or does not exist as a generalized point interaction. Finally, we specialize to double barriers with defined parity, calculate the phase and Salecker-Wigner-Peres clock times and argue that the emergence of the generalized Hartman effect is an artifact of the extreme opaque limit.

  13. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging.

  14. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  15. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging.

  16. Time scale for point-defect equilibration in nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, Paul C.; Wolf, Dieter; Desai, Tapan; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2008-10-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of high-temperature annealing are performed on nanostructured materials enabling direct observation of vacancy emission from planar defects (i.e., grain boundaries and free surfaces) to populate the initially vacancy-free grain interiors on a subnanosecond time scale. We demonstrate a universal time-length scale correlation that governs these re-equilibration processes, suggesting that nanostructures are particularly stable against perturbations in their point-defect concentrations, caused for example by particle irradiation or temperature fluctuations.

  17. Point Location in the Continuous-Time Moving Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chenglin; Luo, Jun

    We discuss two variations of the moving network Voronoi diagram. The first one addresses the following problem: given a network with n vertices and E edges. Suppose there are m sites (cars, postmen, etc) moving along the network edges and we know their moving trajectories with time information. Which site is the nearest one to a point p located on network edge at time t'? We present an algorithm to answer this query in O(log(mWlogm)) time with O(nmWlog2 m + n 2logn + nE) time and O(nmWlogm + E) space for preprocessing step, where E is the number of edges of the network graph (the definition of W is in section 3). The second variation views query point p as a customer with walking speed v. The question is which site he can catch the first? We can answer this query in O(m + log(mWlogm)) time with same preprocessing time and space as the first case. If the customer is located at some node, then the query can be answered in O(log(mWlogm)) time.

  18. Parity-time symmetry broken by point-group symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Francisco M. Garcia, Javier

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a parity-time (PT) symmetric Hamiltonian with complex eigenvalues. It is based on the dimensionless Schrödinger equation for a particle in a square box with the PT-symmetric potential V(x, y) = iaxy. Perturbation theory clearly shows that some of the eigenvalues are complex for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point-group symmetry proves useful to guess if some of the eigenvalues may already be complex for all values of the coupling constant. We confirm those conclusions by means of an accurate numerical calculation based on the diagonalization method. On the other hand, the Schrödinger equation with the potential V(x, y) = iaxy{sup 2} exhibits real eigenvalues for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point group symmetry suggests that PT-symmetry may be broken in the former case and unbroken in the latter one.

  19. Taming the Exceptional Points of Parity-Time Symmetric Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Shi, Chengzhi; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric concept and development lead to a wide range of applications including coherent perfect absorbers, single mode lasers, unidirectional cloaking and sensing, and optical isolators. These new applications and devices emerge from the existence of a phase transition in PT symmetric complex-valued potential obtained by balancing gain and loss materials. However, the systematic extension of such devices is adjourned by the key challenge in the management of the complex scattering process within the structure in order to engineer PT phase and exceptional points. Here, based on active acoustic elements, we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous control of complex-valued potentials and multiple interference inside the structure at any given frequency. This method broadens the scope of applications for PT symmetric devices in many fields including optics, microwaves, electronics, which are crucial for sensing, imaging, cloaking, lasing, absorbing, etc.

  20. Nonparametric directionality measures for time series and point process data.

    PubMed

    Halliday, David M

    2015-06-01

    The need to determine the directionality of interactions between neural signals is a key requirement for analysis of multichannel recordings. Approaches most commonly used are parametric, typically relying on autoregressive models. A number of concerns have been expressed regarding parametric approaches, thus there is a need to consider alternatives. We present an alternative nonparametric approach for construction of directionality measures for bivariate random processes. The method combines time and frequency domain representations of bivariate data to decompose the correlation by direction. Our framework generates two sets of complementary measures, a set of scalar measures, which decompose the total product moment correlation coefficient summatively into three terms by direction and a set of functions which decompose the coherence summatively at each frequency into three terms by direction: forward direction, reverse direction and instantaneous interaction. It can be undertaken as an addition to a standard bivariate spectral and coherence analysis, and applied to either time series or point-process (spike train) data or mixtures of the two (hybrid data). In this paper, we demonstrate application to spike train data using simulated cortical neurone networks and application to experimental data from isolated muscle spindle sensory endings subject to random efferent stimulation. PMID:25958923

  1. The assessment of schizotypal features over two points in time.

    PubMed

    Squires-Wheeler, E; Skodol, A E; Erlenmeyer-Kimling, L

    1991-12-01

    The expression of schizotypal personality traits was assessed in mid-adolescence and again in young adulthood for three groups of offspring defined by the psychiatric diagnosis of their parents. Parental diagnoses included schizophrenic disorder (47 offspring), affective disorder (39 offspring), and 'no psychiatric disorder', or normal controls (82 offspring). Initially, schizotypal traits were assessed from video-taped semi-structured psychiatric interviews, subsequently rated by trained psychiatrists blind to the parental psychiatric status of the subjects, and/or direct clinical interviews (Schedule for Affective Disorders-Lifetime Version (SADS-L)). The second assessment was conducted by trained social workers and psychologists by means of a semi-structured interview specifically for DSM-III-R personality disorders (Personality Disorder Examination) and sections of the SDS-L where indicated. These interviewers were blind to the parental status and to previous psychiatric assessments of the offspring. The rates of stability of features or the rates of progression to axis I psychotic disorders (Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, and Unspecified Functional Psychosis) were evaluated. Concordance of assessments over time is reported as a function of threshold for expression of traits at initial evaluation, i.e., two or more, three or more, or four or more features present. Concordance increases as the threshold for expression increases, as expected. The effect of comorbid clinical status, e.g., the coexistence of schizotypal traits and anxiety and/or depressive features on the concordance pattern, is also examined by parental diagnostic group status. The offspring of affective disorder parents exhibited higher rates of anxiety and/or depressive features at both points in time, exhibited higher concordance for anxiety and/or depressive features, and exhibited higher rates of 'transformation' of initial schizotypal features to anxiety and/or depressive features

  2. GOES Infrared and Reflectance 0-1 hour Lightning Initiation Indicators: Development and Initial Testing within a Convective Nowcasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Harris, R.; MacKenzie, W.; Durkee, P. A.; Iskenderian, H.; Bickmeier, L.; Nielsen, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Within cumulus cloud fields that develop in conditionally unstable air masses, only a fraction of the cumuli may eventually develop into deep convection. Identifying which of these convective clouds most likely to generate lightning often starts with little more than a qualitative visual satellite analysis. The goal of this study is to identify the observed satellite infrared (IR) signatures associated with growing cumulus clouds prior to the first lightning strike, so-called lightning initiation (LI). This study quantifies the behavior of ten Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) IR interest fields in the 1-hour in advance of LI. A total of 172 lightning-producing storms that occurred during the 2009 convective season are manually tracked and studied over four regions: Northern Alabama, Central Oklahoma, the Kennedy Space Center and Washington D.C. Four-dimensional and cloud-to-ground lightning array data provide a total cloud lightning picture (in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, cloud-to-air, cloud-to-ground) and thus precise LI points for each storm in both time and space. Statistical significance tests are conducted on observed trends for each of the ten LI fields to determine the unique information each field provides in terms of behavior prior to LI. Eight out of ten LI fields exhibited useful information at least 15 min in advance of LI, with 35 min being the average. Statistical tests on these eight fields are compared for separate large geographical areas. IR temperature thresholds are then determined as an outcome, which may be valuable when implementing a LI prediction algorithm into real-time satellite-based systems. The key LI indicators from GOES IR data (as well as 3.9 μm reflectance) will be presented. Beginning in 2010, the feasibility of using the satellite-based LI indicators found in the above analysis to forecast first lightning will be assessed within the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) CoSPA nowcasting system. The goal

  3. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols.

  4. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols. PMID:21499552

  5. Real time simulator with Ti floating point digital signal processor

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Bobis, J.P.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a Real Time Simulator using Texas Instruments TMS320C30 digital signal processor. This system operates with two banks of memory which provide the input data to digital signal processor chip. This feature enables the TMS320C30 to be utilized in variety of applications for which external connections to acquire input data is not needed. In addition, some practical applications of this Real Time Simulator are discussed.

  6. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... major Federal action which could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. To... consideration without specifying a Departmental preference. If the content and dimensions of a proposed action... prepared in time for Congressional hearings and deliberations. (e) Because actions having effects on...

  7. [Time point and methods for emergency killing in cattle].

    PubMed

    Khol, J L; Schafbauer, T; Wittek, T

    2016-01-01

    Emergency killing is defined as the killing of injured or ill animals to avoid excessive pain or harm. Decision-making for emergency killing or a prolonged therapy can be difficult and has to be based on the case history and results of the clinical examination contributing to the prognosis, particularly in downer cows. Evaluation of enzyme activities and total bilirubin can be used as additional factors pointing to a guarded prognosis; however, none of these parameters provides a clear cut-off value indicating a poor prognosis and mandatory emergency killing. Euthanasia by intravenous drug application is seen as the least stressful method of killing and should therefore always be the first method of choice for emergency killing in cattle. Drugs containing pentobarbital as well as a combination of three different drugs (T61-Injektionslösung, MSD Animal Health) are available for euthanasia in cattle. All drugs must be administered by a veterinarian. Before application of pentobarbital, an animal should be deeply sedated. The administration of T61 requires anaesthesia of the animal and it is not licensed for use in pregnant animals. Alternative methods for emeragency killing, including captive bolt stunning and the use of firearms, although not regularly performed by veterinarians, should be assessed concerning their correct application and performance. When captive bolt stunning or emergency killing using firearms is performed, the correct position of the device is crucial as well as a quick exsanguination or the application of a pithing rod for the actual killing of the animal after captive bolt stunning. In addition to medical considerations, economic and personal factors contribute to the decision about emergency killing in cattle. Therefore, veterinarians should aim to evaluate each case thoroughly based on personal knowledge and experience, case history, clinical findings and laboratory parameters to avoid prolonged suffering of the animal.

  8. [Time point and methods for emergency killing in cattle].

    PubMed

    Khol, J L; Schafbauer, T; Wittek, T

    2016-01-01

    Emergency killing is defined as the killing of injured or ill animals to avoid excessive pain or harm. Decision-making for emergency killing or a prolonged therapy can be difficult and has to be based on the case history and results of the clinical examination contributing to the prognosis, particularly in downer cows. Evaluation of enzyme activities and total bilirubin can be used as additional factors pointing to a guarded prognosis; however, none of these parameters provides a clear cut-off value indicating a poor prognosis and mandatory emergency killing. Euthanasia by intravenous drug application is seen as the least stressful method of killing and should therefore always be the first method of choice for emergency killing in cattle. Drugs containing pentobarbital as well as a combination of three different drugs (T61-Injektionslösung, MSD Animal Health) are available for euthanasia in cattle. All drugs must be administered by a veterinarian. Before application of pentobarbital, an animal should be deeply sedated. The administration of T61 requires anaesthesia of the animal and it is not licensed for use in pregnant animals. Alternative methods for emeragency killing, including captive bolt stunning and the use of firearms, although not regularly performed by veterinarians, should be assessed concerning their correct application and performance. When captive bolt stunning or emergency killing using firearms is performed, the correct position of the device is crucial as well as a quick exsanguination or the application of a pithing rod for the actual killing of the animal after captive bolt stunning. In addition to medical considerations, economic and personal factors contribute to the decision about emergency killing in cattle. Therefore, veterinarians should aim to evaluate each case thoroughly based on personal knowledge and experience, case history, clinical findings and laboratory parameters to avoid prolonged suffering of the animal. PMID:26830543

  9. MAPT and PAICE: Tools for time series and single time point transcriptionist visualization and knowledge discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Parsa; Tremblay, Arianne; Matthews, Benjamin F; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of next-generation sequencing, -omics fields such as transcriptomics have experienced increases in data throughput on the order of magnitudes. In terms of analyzing and visually representing these huge datasets, an intuitive and computationally tractable approach is to map quantified transcript expression onto biochemical pathways while employing datamining and visualization principles to accelerate knowledge discovery. We present two cross-platform tools: MAPT (Mapping and Analysis of Pathways through Time) and PAICE (Pathway Analysis and Integrated Coloring of Experiments), an easy to use analysis suite to facilitate time series and single time point transcriptomics analysis. In unison, MAPT and PAICE serve as a visual workbench for transcriptomics knowledge discovery, data-mining and functional annotation. Both PAICE and MAPT are two distinct but yet inextricably linked tools. The former is specifically designed to map EC accessions onto KEGG pathways while handling multiple gene copies, detection-call analysis, as well as UN/annotated EC accessions lacking quantifiable expression. The latter tool integrates PAICE datasets to drive visualization, annotation, and data-mining. Availability The database is available for free at http://sourceforge.net/projects/paice/http://sourceforge.net/projects/mapt/ PMID:22493539

  10. Bifurcated method and apparatus for floating point addition with decreased latency time

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  11. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low- Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections, using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. During this period, we identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of these pulsed events to investigate their properties. This analysis reveals that the mean interpulse period is 68 ± 10 minutes and that the events are made up of less than 9 pulses in general, but they can include up to 19 pulses. The most common shape of these pulses is a fast rise followed by a slow decay. Moreover, the ratio between the rise rate and the decay rate increases with the energy. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG). Correlated pulsed signatures are observed in the plasma wave emissions, especially in the auroral hiss, for 12% of the

  12. Nonparametric decomposition of quasi-periodic time series for change-point detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, Alexey; Burnaev, Evgeny; Lokot, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    The paper is concerned with the sequential online change-point detection problem for a dynamical system driven by a quasiperiodic stochastic process. We propose a multicomponent time series model and an effective online decomposition algorithm to approximate the components of the models. Assuming the stationarity of the obtained components, we approach the change-point detection problem on a per-component basis and propose two online change-point detection schemes corresponding to two real-world scenarios. Experimental results for decomposition and detection algorithms for synthesized and real-world datasets are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of our change-point detection framework.

  13. A novel memristive time-delay chaotic system without equilibrium points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, V.-T.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Volos, C. K.; Jafari, S.; Kuznetsov, N. V.; Hoang, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    Memristor and time-delay are potential candidates for constructing new systems with complex dynamics and special features. A novel time-delay system with a presence of memristive device is proposed in this work. It is worth noting that this memristive time-delay system can generate chaotic attractors although it possesses no equilibrium points. In addition, a circuitry implementation of such time-delay system has been introduced to show its feasibility.

  14. Kick-Off, Half-Time, and Over-Time: Flexible Scheduling Scores Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Jade

    2005-01-01

    When faculty members at Furman Middle School in Sumter, South Carolina, expressed concern about the lack of time in each day to provide the interventions, remediation, and enrichment the students needed to be prepared for state testing, their principal devised a creative flexible schedule to meet student needs. These include: (1) a morning…

  15. Validation of a point-of-care prothrombin time test after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Meesters, M I; Kuiper, G; Vonk, A B A; Loer, S A; Boer, C

    2016-10-01

    Point-of-care coagulation monitoring can be used for the guidance of haemostasis management. However, the influence of time on point-of-care prothrombin time testing following protamine administration after cardiopulmonary bypass has not been investigated. Bland-Altman and error grid analysis were used to analyse the level of agreement between prothrombin time measurements from point-of-care and laboratory tests before cardiopulmonary bypass, and then 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after protamine administration. Prothrombin times were expressed as International Normalised Ratios. While the point-of-care and laboratory prothrombin time measurements showed a high level of agreement before bypass, this agreement deteriorated following protamine administration to a mean (SD) bias of -0.22 (0.13) [limits of agreement 0.48-0.04]. Error grid analysis revealed that 35 (70%) of the paired values showed a clinically relevant discrepancy in international normalised ratio. At 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after cardiopulmonary bypass there is a clinical unacceptable discrepancy between the point-of-care and laboratory measurement of prothrombin time. PMID:27501250

  16. Validation of a point-of-care prothrombin time test after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Meesters, M I; Kuiper, G; Vonk, A B A; Loer, S A; Boer, C

    2016-10-01

    Point-of-care coagulation monitoring can be used for the guidance of haemostasis management. However, the influence of time on point-of-care prothrombin time testing following protamine administration after cardiopulmonary bypass has not been investigated. Bland-Altman and error grid analysis were used to analyse the level of agreement between prothrombin time measurements from point-of-care and laboratory tests before cardiopulmonary bypass, and then 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after protamine administration. Prothrombin times were expressed as International Normalised Ratios. While the point-of-care and laboratory prothrombin time measurements showed a high level of agreement before bypass, this agreement deteriorated following protamine administration to a mean (SD) bias of -0.22 (0.13) [limits of agreement 0.48-0.04]. Error grid analysis revealed that 35 (70%) of the paired values showed a clinically relevant discrepancy in international normalised ratio. At 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after cardiopulmonary bypass there is a clinical unacceptable discrepancy between the point-of-care and laboratory measurement of prothrombin time.

  17. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. (c) EPA's authority under paragraph (b) of this section... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  18. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  19. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  20. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. (c) EPA's authority under paragraph (b) of this section... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  1. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  2. 77 FR 4940 - Determination of Failure To Attain by 2005 and Determination of Current Attainment of the 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Air pollution control, National parks, Wilderness Areas. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. Dated... Attainment of the 1-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the Baltimore Nonattainment Area in... National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) by the applicable attainment date of November 15,...

  3. 76 FR 28195 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... attainment of the 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) through the year 2014. The... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed...

  4. A Well-Clear Volume Based on Time to Entry Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Upchurch, Jason M.; Chamberlain, James P.; Consiglio, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    A well-clear volume is a key component of NASA's Separation Assurance concept for the integration of UAS in the NAS. This paper proposes a mathematical definition of the well-clear volume that uses, in addition to distance thresholds, a time threshold based on time to entry point (TEP). The mathematical model that results from this definition is more conservative than other candidate definitions of the wellclear volume that are based on range over closure rate and time to closest point of approach.

  5. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Yates, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 h in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low-Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. The one-year extension of the data and a different method of detection of the injections do not lead to a discrepancy with the results of the previous survey, indicating an absence of a long-term temporal evolution of this phenomenon. We identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of the pulsed events properties. The morphology of the pulsations shows a weak local time dependence which could imply a high-latitude acceleration source. We provide some clues that the electron population associated with this pulsed phenomenon is distinct from the field-aligned electron beams previously observed in Saturn's magnetosphere, but both populations can be mixed. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio

  6. Robust Optimization of Fixed Points of Nonlinear Discrete Time Systems with Uncertain Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastsian, Darya; Monnigmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This contribution extends the normal vector method for the optimization of parametrically uncertain dynamical systems to a general class of nonlinear discrete time systems. Essentially, normal vectors are used to state constraints on dynamical properties of fixed points in the optimization of discrete time dynamical systems. In a typical application of the method, a technical dynamical system is optimized with respect to an economic profit function, while the normal vector constraints are used to guarantee the stability of the optimal fixed point. We derive normal vector systems for flip, fold, and Neimark-Sacker bifurcation points, because these bifurcation points constitute the stability boundary of a large class of discrete time systems. In addition, we derive normal vector systems for a related type of critical point that can be used to ensure a user-specified disturbance rejection rate in the optimization of parametrically uncertain systems. We illustrate the method by applying it to the optimization of a discrete time supply chain model and a discretized fermentation process model.

  7. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... part, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in... potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method... dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... part, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in... potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1755 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... part, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in... potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method... dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15210 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method... dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference...

  13. Fourier-transform spectrophotometer for time-resolved emission measurements using a 100-point transient digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preses, Jack M.; Hall, Gregory E.; Muckerman, James T.; Sears, Trevor J.; Weston, Ralph E., Jr.; Guyot, Christian; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Flynn, George W.; Bernstein, Herbert J.

    1993-01-01

    An infrared time-resolved Fourier-transform emission spectrophotometer was constructed and its use demonstrated. The instrument is based on a commercial interferometer combined with a data acquisition system. Operation in a smooth scan mode and the use of a transient digitizer provides good time efficiency for data acquisition and reduces the need to maintain constant energy pulses for long periods of time. An entire 100-point time history of a single point of an interferogram is obtained from a single laser pulse and usable data can be obtained from 10 to 50 mirror scans. The experimental apparatus, data acquisition program, and data evaluation are reviewed. Time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy is an efficient method of determining the dynamics of molecular reactions and relaxation.

  14. Multiple Spike Time Patterns Occur at Bifurcation Points of Membrane Potential Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Toups, J. Vincent; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Peter J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Tiesinga, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The response of a neuron to repeated somatic fluctuating current injections in vitro can elicit a reliable and precisely timed sequence of action potentials. The set of responses obtained across trials can also be interpreted as the response of an ensemble of similar neurons receiving the same input, with the precise spike times representing synchronous volleys that would be effective in driving postsynaptic neurons. To study the reproducibility of the output spike times for different conditions that might occur in vivo, we somatically injected aperiodic current waveforms into cortical neurons in vitro and systematically varied the amplitude and DC offset of the fluctuations. As the amplitude of the fluctuations was increased, reliability increased and the spike times remained stable over a wide range of values. However, at specific values called bifurcation points, large shifts in the spike times were obtained in response to small changes in the stimulus, resulting in multiple spike patterns that were revealed using an unsupervised classification method. Increasing the DC offset, which mimicked an overall increase in network background activity, also revealed bifurcation points and increased the reliability. Furthermore, the spike times shifted earlier with increasing offset. Although the reliability was reduced at bifurcation points, a theoretical analysis showed that the information about the stimulus time course was increased because each of the spike time patterns contained different information about the input. PMID:23093916

  15. A proxy method for real-time 3-DOF haptic rendering of streaming point cloud data.

    PubMed

    Rydén, Fredrik; Chizeck, Howard Jay

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new haptic rendering method for streaming point cloud data. It provides haptic rendering of moving physical objects using data obtained from RGB-D cameras. Thus, real-time haptic interaction with moving objects can be achieved using noncontact sensors. This method extends "virtual coupling"-based proxy methods in a way that does not require preprocessing of points and allows for spatial point cloud discontinuities. The key ideas of the algorithm are iterative motion of the proxy with respect to the points, and the use of a variable proxy step size that results in better accuracy for short proxy movements and faster convergence for longer movements. This method provides highly accurate haptic interaction for geometries in which the proxy can physically fit. Another advantage is a significant reduction in the risk of "pop through" during haptic interaction with dynamic point clouds, even in the presence of noise. This haptic rendering method is computationally efficient; it can run in real time on available personal computers without the need for downsampling of point clouds from commercially available depth cameras.

  16. A new method of time difference measurement: The time difference method by dual phase coincidence points detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In the high accurate measurement of periodic signals, the greatest common factor frequency and its characteristics have special functions. A method of time difference measurement - the time difference method by dual 'phase coincidence points' detection is described. This method utilizes the characteristics of the greatest common factor frequency to measure time or phase difference between periodic signals. It can suit a very wide frequency range. Measurement precision and potential accuracy of several picoseconds were demonstrated with this new method. The instrument based on this method is very simple, and the demand for the common oscillator is low. This method and instrument can be used widely.

  17. Accurate quantification of two key time points used in the determination of hydroxyl polyaluminum species by ferron timed spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yong, Xiaojing; Zhao, Dongyan; Shi, Qiuyi

    2015-01-01

    The content of mononuclear Al (Ala%) changed with its determination time (ta) under different dosages of Ferron (7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid, [Ferron]), and the change of Ala% with [Ferron] at different ta was systematically investigated for the first time. Thus, the most appropriate ta was found with the optimal [Ferron]. Also, the judgment of the platform (flat or level portion) of the complete reaction on the absorption-time curve determined in the hydroxyl polyaluminum solution by Ferron timed spectrophotometry (Ferron assay) was first digitized. The time point (tb) of complete reaction between the medium polyaluminum (Alb) and Ferron reagent depended on the reaction extent, and time could not be used only to judge. Thus, the tb was accurately determined and reduced to half of original, which improved the experiment efficiency significantly. The Ferron assay was completely optimized.

  18. A mathematical model of saccadic reaction time as a function of the fixation point brightness gain.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Tula, Antonio; Morimoto, Carlos H; Ranvaud, Ronald D

    2015-08-01

    The gap effect refers to a reduction in saccadic reaction time (SRT) to an eccentric target, when the fixation point is removed before the target onset. Though it is known that the gap effect peaks when the fixation point is offset about 200 ms before the onset of the eccentric target, it is unknown how this effect is modulated by stimulus variations. In this paper, we propose and investigate a model of saccadic reaction time as a function of the fixation point brightness gain. The brightness gain is defined as the ratio of the final and initial intensities of the stimulus. We have conducted a typical gap effect experiment with 15 participants, where the brightness of the fixation point was manipulated under four conditions and two gap intervals, at the same time and 200 ms before the onset of the eccentric target. The conditions included removing the fixation point (offset), leaving it with constant brightness (overlap), reducing, and increasing its brightness (lower and higher brightness conditions). Experimental data showed a significant gap effect in the offset and lower brightness conditions when compared to the overlap condition. On the other hand, the SRT was significantly longer for the higher brightness condition than the SRT for the overlap condition. Linear regression analysis using ten values of brightness gain shows that our model fits the data well for the 0- and 200-ms gap, with a coefficient of determination of .89 and .94, respectively. PMID:25962456

  19. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Lightning one of the most dangerous weather-related phenomena, especially as many jobs and activities occur outdoors, presenting risk from a lightning strike. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning represents a considerable safety threat to people at airfields, marinas, and outdoor facilities-from airfield personnel, to people attending outdoor stadium events, on beaches and golf courses, to mariners, as well as emergency personnel. Holle et al. (2005) show that 90% of lightning deaths occurred outdoors, while 10% occurred indoors despite the perception of safety when inside buildings. Curran et al. (2000) found that nearly half of fatalities due to weather were related to convective weather in the 1992-1994 timeframe, with lightning causing a large component of the fatalities, in addition to tornadoes and flash flooding. Related to the aviation industry, CG lightning represents a considerable hazard to baggage-handlers, aircraft refuelers, food caterers, and emergency personnel, who all become exposed to the risk of being struck within short time periods while convective storm clouds develop. Airport safety protocols require that ramp operations be modified or discontinued when lightning is in the vicinity (typically 16 km), which becomes very costly and disruptive to flight operations. Therefore, much focus has been paid to nowcasting the first-time initiation and extent of lightning, both of CG and of any lightning (e.g, in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud). For this project three lightning nowcasting methodologies will be combined: (1) a GOESbased 0-1 hour lightning initiation (LI) product (Harris et al. 2010; Iskenderian et al. 2012), (2) a High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) lightning probability and forecasted lightning flash density product, such that a quantitative amount of lightning (QL) can be assigned to a location of expected LI, and (3) an algorithm that relates Pseudo-GLM data (Stano et al. 2012, 2014) to the so-called "lightning jump" (LJ) methodology (Shultz et al

  20. Effects of time response on the point spread function of a scanning radiometer.

    PubMed

    Smith, G L

    1994-10-20

    Scanning radiometers on satellites have a finite response time, because of the detector and the associated electronics. The radiometer measurement as it scans over a point source of radiation of unit strength is the point spread function (PSF). The time response causes a widening and skewing of the PSF. The PSF of a scanning radiometer that has well-focused optics together with time responses for the detector and electronic filter is treated in the time domain. The PSF can be expressed in terms of the system time response to a step input. For a first-order system time response, the displacement of the centroid is the product of the system time constant and the scan rate of the radiometer. The electronic filter further displaces the centroid of the PSF by the product of the scan rate and the filter time constant. Also, the width of the PSF in the scan direction will be increased because of the system time response. The minimum resolvable feature is of the order of the width of the PSF, thus the system time response limits the resolution in the scan direction that can be obtained. The analysis is illustrated by applying it to the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System experiment scanning radiometer.

  1. Electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons for 1 hour improves axon regeneration and the number of reinnervated muscles that function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Grumbles, Robert M; Thomas, Christine K

    2013-07-01

    Motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or disease results in muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. We have previously transplanted embryonic ventral spinal cord cells into the peripheral nerve to reinnervate denervated muscles and to reduce muscle atrophy, but reinnervation was incomplete. Here, our aim was to determine whether brief electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons in the peripheralnerve changes motoneuron survival, axon regeneration, and muscle reinnervation and function because neural depolarization is crucial for embryonic neuron survival and may promote activity-dependent axon growth. At 1 week after denervation by sciatic nerve section, embryonic day 14 to 15 cells were purified for motoneurons, injected into the tibial nerve of adult Fischer rats, and stimulated immediatelyfor up to 1 hour. More myelinated axons were present in tibial nerves 10 weeks after transplantation when transplants had been stimulated acutely at 1 Hz for 1 hour. More muscles were reinnervated if the stimulation treatment lasted for 1 hour. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy, with or without the stimulation treatment. These data suggest that brief stimulation of embryonic neurons promotes axon growth, which has a long-term impact on muscle reinnervation and function. Muscle reinnervation is important because it may enable the use of functional electrical stimulation to restore limb movements. PMID:23771218

  2. Generalization of the analytical solution of neutron point kinetics equations with time-dependent external source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidi, M.; Behnia, S.; Khodabakhsh, R.

    2014-09-01

    Point reactor kinetics equations with one group of delayed neutrons in the presence of the time-dependent external neutron source are solved analytically during the start-up of a nuclear reactor. Our model incorporates the random nature of the source and linear reactivity variation. We establish a general relationship between the expectation values of source intensity and the expectation values of neutron density of the sub-critical reactor by ignoring the term of the second derivative for neutron density in neutron point kinetics equations. The results of the analytical solution are in good agreement with the results obtained with numerical solution.

  3. Portable Dew Point Mass Spectrometry System for Real-Time Gas and Moisture Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Gillespie, Stacey; Ratzel, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    A portable instrument incorporates both mass spectrometry and dew point measurement to provide real-time, quantitative gas measurements of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, along with real-time, quantitative moisture analysis. The Portable Dew Point Mass Spectrometry (PDP-MS) system comprises a single quadrupole mass spectrometer and a high vacuum system consisting of a turbopump and a diaphragm-backing pump. A capacitive membrane dew point sensor was placed upstream of the MS, but still within the pressure-flow control pneumatic region. Pressure-flow control was achieved with an upstream precision metering valve, a capacitance diaphragm gauge, and a downstream mass flow controller. User configurable LabVIEW software was developed to provide real-time concentration data for the MS, dew point monitor, and sample delivery system pressure control, pressure and flow monitoring, and recording. The system has been designed to include in situ, NIST-traceable calibration. Certain sample tubing retains sufficient water that even if the sample is dry, the sample tube will desorb water to an amount resulting in moisture concentration errors up to 500 ppm for as long as 10 minutes. It was determined that Bev-A-Line IV was the best sample line to use. As a result of this issue, it is prudent to add a high-level humidity sensor to PDP-MS so such events can be prevented in the future.

  4. Orienting attention to points in time improves stimulus processing both within and across modalities.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kathrin; Röder, Brigitte

    2006-05-01

    Spatial attention affects the processing of stimuli of both a task-relevant and a task-irrelevant modality. The present study investigated if similar cross-modal effects exist when attention is oriented to a point in time. Short (600 msec) and long (1,200 msec) empty intervals, marked by a tactile onset and an auditory or a tactile offset marker, were presented. In each block, the participants had to attend one interval and one modality. Event-related potentials (ERPs) to auditory and tactile offset markers of attended as compared to unattended intervals were characterized by an enhancement of early negative deflections of the auditory and somatosensory ERPs (audition, 100-140 msec; touch, 130-180 msec) when audition or touch was task relevant, respectively. Similar effects were found for auditory stimuli when touch was task relevant. An additional reaction time experiment revealed faster responses to both auditory and tactile stimuli at the attended as compared to the unattended point in time, irrespective of which modality was primary. Both behavioral and ERP data show that attention can be focused on a point in time, which results in a more efficient processing of auditory and tactile stimuli. The ERP data further suggest that a relative enhancement at perceptual processing stages contributes to the processing advantage for temporally attended stimuli. The existence of cross-modal effects of temporal attention underlines the importance of time as a feature for binding input across different modalities.

  5. Simulation of braided river elevation model time series with multiple-point statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirot, Guillaume; Straubhaar, Julien; Renard, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    A new method is proposed to generate successive topographies in a braided river system. Indeed, braided river morphology models are a key factor influencing river-aquifer interactions and have repercussions in ecosystems, flood risk or water management. It is essentially based on multivariate multiple-point statistics simulations and digital elevation models as training data sets. On the one hand, airborne photography and LIDAR acquired at successive time steps have contributed to a better understanding of the geomorphological processes although the available data are sparse over time and river scales. On the other hand, geostatistics provide simulation tools for multiple and continuous variables, which allow the exploration of the uncertainty of many assumption scenarios. Illustration of the approach demonstrates the ability of multiple-point statistics to produce realistic topographies from the information provided by digital elevation models at two time steps.

  6. A point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray A.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems. The method treats the solution variables of interest (that can be located at cell centers, cell edges, or cell nodes) implicitly and the rest of the information related to same or other variables are handled explicitly. The method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods, except it involves a few additional function(s) evaluation steps. Moreover, the method is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. This new approach exhibits the simplicity of implementation of explicit methods and the stability of implicit methods. It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration wherein one would like to perform time integrations with very large time steps. Because the method can be time inaccurate for fast transient problems, particularly with larger time steps, an appropriate solution strategy for a problem that evolves from a fast to a slow transient would be to integrate the fast transient with an explicit or semi-implicit technique and then switch to this point implicit method as soon as the time variation slows sufficiently. We have solved several test problems that result from scalar or systems of flow equations. Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very efficiently; and its implementation is very robust.

  7. A real-time recursive filter for the attitude determination of the Spacelab instrument pointing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time estimation filter which reduces sensitivity to system variations and reduces the amount of preflight computation is developed for the instrument pointing subsystem (IPS). The IPS is a three-axis stabilized platform developed to point various astronomical observation instruments aboard the shuttle. Currently, the IPS utilizes a linearized Kalman filter (LKF), with premission defined gains, to compensate for system drifts and accumulated attitude errors. Since the a priori gains are generated for an expected system, variations result in a suboptimal estimation process. This report compares the performance of three real-time estimation filters with the current LKF implementation. An extended Kalman filter and a second-order Kalman filter are developed to account for the system nonlinearities, while a linear Kalman filter implementation assumes that the nonlinearities are negligible. The performance of each of the four estimation filters are compared with respect to accuracy, stability, settling time, robustness, and computational requirements. It is shown, that for the current IPS pointing requirements, the linear Kalman filter provides improved robustness over the LKF with less computational requirements than the two real-time nonlinear estimation filters.

  8. Point-of-care diagnostics: will the hurdles be overcome this time?

    PubMed

    Huckle, David

    2006-07-01

    Point-of-care diagnostics have been proposed as the latest development in clinical diagnostics several times in the last 30 years; however, they have not yet fully developed into a business sector to match the projections. This perspective examines the reasons for past failures and the failure of technology to meet user needs. Advances have taken place in the last few years that effectively remove technology as a barrier to the development of point-of-care testing. Even regulatory issues regarding how products are developed and claims supported have been absorbed, understood and now accepted. The emphasis here is on the possible favorable aspects that are novel this time around. These changes have arisen as a result of the situation with global healthcare economics and the pressure from patients to be treated more like customers. The final hurdles relate to the conflict between diagnosis with the patient present and treated as soon as the point-of-care result is available and the entrenched positions of the central laboratory, the suppliers and their established distribution chains, and the way in which healthcare budgets are allocated. The ultimate hurdle that encapsulates all of these issues is reimbursement, which is the final barrier to a significant point-of-care diagnostics market--without reimbursement there will be no market.

  9. Bayesian change-point analysis in hydrometeorological time series. Part 2. Comparison of change-point models and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, L.; Bernier, J.; Bobée, B.; Parent, E.

    2000-08-01

    This paper provides a methodology to test existence, type, and strength of changes in the distribution of a sequence of hydrometeorological random variables. Unlike most published work on change-point analysis, which consider a single structure of change occurring with certainty, it allows for the consideration in the inference process of the no change hypothesis and various possible situations that may occur. The approach is based on Bayesian model selection and is illustrated using univariate normal models. Four univariate normal models are considered: the no change hypothesis, a single change in the mean level only, a single change in the variance only, and a simultaneous change in both the mean and the variance. First, inference analysis of posterior distributions via Gibbs sampling for a given change-point model is recalled. This scientific reporting framework is then generalized to the problem of selecting among different configurations of a single change and the no change hypothesis. The important operational issue of forecasting a future observation, often neglected in the literature on change-point analysis, is also treated in the previous model selection perspective. To illustrate the approach, a case study involving annual energy inflows for eight large hydropower systems situated in Québec is detailed.

  10. A Point-of-Care Prothrombin Time Test on a Microfluidic Disk Analyzer Using Alternate Spinning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kun-Wei; Yen, Daniel; Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jiunn-Min; Lin, Chi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we conducted a fully integrated point-of-care prothrombin time test on a microfluidic disk analyzer. The microfluidic functions integrated on the disk were capable of separating whole blood, decanting plasma, and mixing it with reagents in sequence under alternate spinning. The assay protocol was completed by alternate spinning without using microvalves or surface modification. Clinical sample tests on prothrombin time measurement were conducted by both the microfluidic disk analyzer and the reference instrument used in medical centers. The test results showed a good correlation and agreement between the two instruments. PMID:26353663

  11. A Point-of-Care Prothrombin Time Test on a Microfluidic Disk Analyzer Using Alternate Spinning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kun-Wei; Yen, Daniel; Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jiunn-Min; Lin, Chi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we conducted a fully integrated point-of-care prothrombin time test on a microfluidic disk analyzer. The microfluidic functions integrated on the disk were capable of separating whole blood, decanting plasma, and mixing it with reagents in sequence under alternate spinning. The assay protocol was completed by alternate spinning without using microvalves or surface modification. Clinical sample tests on prothrombin time measurement were conducted by both the microfluidic disk analyzer and the reference instrument used in medical centers. The test results showed a good correlation and agreement between the two instruments.

  12. Search for UHE point-source emission over various time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    A method has been developed to search for pulsed and/or unpulsed ultra high energy (UHE) emission from point sources over a range of time scales. This method has been applied to data accumulated with the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array for events associated with the directions of Cyg X-3, Her X-1, the Crab nebula, and a collection of 48 secondary source candidates. An examination of time scales ranging from minutes to years has yielded results consistent with background fluctuations.

  13. Search for UHE point-source emission over various time scales

    SciTech Connect

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    A method has been developed to search for pulsed and/or unpulsed ultra high energy (UHE) emission from point sources over a range of time scales. This method has been applied to data accumulated with the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array for events associated with the directions of Cyg X-3, Her X-1, the Crab nebula, and a collection of 48 secondary source candidates. An examination of time scales ranging from minutes to years has yielded results consistent with background fluctuations.

  14. A time-domain CMOS oscillator-based thermostat with digital set-point programming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Shih-Hao

    2013-01-29

    This paper presents a time-domain CMOS oscillator-based thermostat with digital set-point programming [without a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) or external resistor] to achieve on-chip thermal management of modern VLSI systems. A time-domain delay-line-based thermostat with multiplexers (MUXs) was used to substantially reduce the power consumption and chip size, and can benefit from the performance enhancement due to the scaling down of fabrication processes. For further cost reduction and accuracy enhancement, this paper proposes a thermostat using two oscillators that are suitable for time-domain curvature compensation instead of longer linear delay lines. The final time comparison was achieved using a time comparator with a built-in custom hysteresis to generate the corresponding temperature alarm and control. The chip size of the circuit was reduced to 0.12 mm2 in a 0.35-mm TSMC CMOS process. The thermostat operates from 0 to 90 °C, and achieved a fine resolution better than 0.05 °C and an improved inaccuracy of ± 0.6 °C after two-point calibration for eight packaged chips. The power consumption was 30 µW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s.

  15. Consistent multi-time-point brain atrophy estimation from the boundary shift integral.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kelvin K; Ridgway, Gerard R; Ourselin, Sébastien; Fox, Nick C

    2012-02-15

    Brain atrophy measurement is increasingly important in studies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), with particular relevance to trials of potential disease-modifying drugs. Automated registration-based methods such as the boundary shift integral (BSI) have been developed to provide more precise measures of change from a pair of serial MR scans. However, when a method treats one image of the pair (typically the baseline) as the reference to which the other is compared, this systematic asymmetry risks introducing bias into the measurement. Recent concern about potential biases in longitudinal studies has led to several suggestions to use symmetric image registration, though some of these methods are limited to two time-points per subject. Therapeutic trials and natural history studies increasingly involve several serial scans, it would therefore be useful to have a method that can consistently estimate brain atrophy over multiple time-points. Here, we use the log-Euclidean concept of a within-subject average to develop affine registration and differential bias correction methods suitable for any number of time-points, yielding a longitudinally consistent multi-time-point BSI technique. Baseline, 12-month and 24-month MR scans of healthy controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment and AD patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative are used for testing the bias in processing scans with different amounts of atrophy. Four tests are used to assess bias in brain volume loss from BSI: (a) inverse consistency with respect to ordering of pairs of scans 12 months apart; (b) transitivity consistency over three time-points; (c) randomly ordered back-to-back scans, expected to show no consistent change over subjects; and (d) linear regression of the atrophy rates calculated from the baseline and 12-month scans and the baseline and 24-month scans, where any additive bias should be indicated by a non-zero intercept. Results

  16. Improvement in depression scores after 1 hour of light therapy treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gloria M; Nijjar, Gagan Virk; Langenberg, Patricia; Johnson, Mary A; Khabazghazvini, Baharak; Sleemi, Aamar; Vaswani, Dipika; Lapidus, Manana; Manalai, Partam; Tariq, Muhammad; Acharya, Monika; Cabassa, Johanna; Snitker, Soren; Postolache, Teodor T

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible rapid effects of light therapy on depressed mood in patients with seasonal affective disorder. Participants received 1 hour of bright light therapy and 1 hour of placebo dim red light in a randomized order crossover design. Depressed mood was measured at baseline and after each hour of light treatment using two self-report depression scales (Profile of Mood States-Depression-Dejection [POMS-D] subscale and the Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II]). When light effects were grouped for the two sessions, there was significantly greater reduction in self-report depression scores by -1.3 (p = 0.02) on the BDI-II and -1.2 (p = 0.02) on the POMS-D. A significant but modest improvement was detected after a single active light session. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to document an immediate improvement with light treatment using a placebo-controlled design with a clinical sample of depressed individuals.

  17. GPU-accelerated Modeling and Element-free Reverse-time Migration with Gauss Points Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Z.; Jia, X.

    2014-12-01

    Element-free method (EFM) has been applied to seismic modeling and migration. Compared with finite element method (FEM) and finite difference method (FDM), it is much cheaper and more flexible because only the information of the nodes and the boundary of the study area are required in computation. In the EFM, the number of Gauss points should be consistent with the number of model nodes; otherwise the accuracy of the intermediate coefficient matrices would be harmed. Thus when we increase the nodes of velocity model in order to obtain higher resolution, we find that the size of the computer's memory will be a bottleneck. The original EFM can deal with at most 81×81 nodes in the case of 2G memory, as tested by Jia and Hu (2006). In order to solve the problem of storage and computation efficiency, we propose a concept of Gauss points partition (GPP), and utilize the GPUs to improve the computation efficiency. Considering the characteristics of the Gaussian points, the GPP method doesn't influence the propagation of seismic wave in the velocity model. To overcome the time-consuming computation of the stiffness matrix (K) and the mass matrix (M), we also use the GPUs in our computation program. We employ the compressed sparse row (CSR) format to compress the intermediate sparse matrices and try to simplify the operations by solving the linear equations with the CULA Sparse's Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver instead of the linear sparse solver 'PARDISO'. It is observed that our strategy can significantly reduce the computational time of K and Mcompared with the algorithm based on CPU. The model tested is Marmousi model. The length of the model is 7425m and the depth is 2990m. We discretize the model with 595x298 nodes, 300x300 Gauss cells and 3x3 Gauss points in each cell. In contrast to the computational time of the conventional EFM, the GPUs-GPP approach can substantially improve the efficiency. The speedup ratio of time consumption of computing K, M is 120 and the

  18. Analysis of the kinetics of lipid peroxidation in terms of characteristic time-points.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2014-02-01

    Measuring peroxidation of aggregated lipids in model systems (liposomes, micelles, emulsions or microemulsions) as well as in samples of biological origin ex vivo (isolated lipoproteins, blood sera or plasma) is widely used in medical and biological investigations, to evaluate the oxidative stress, antioxidants' efficiency and lipid oxidizability in different pathophysiological states. To avoid possible artifacts, such investigations must be based on the time course of peroxidation (i.e. on kinetic studies). To be able to compare complex kinetic profiles, it is important to characterize them in terms of mechanistically meaningful and experimentally unequivocal parameters. In this review, we characterize the typically observed continuous kinetic profiles in terms of a limited number of characteristic time-points (both commonly used and additional time-points and their combinations) that can be derived from experimental time-dependencies. The meaning of each of the experimentally observed characteristic parameters is presented in terms of rate constants and concentrations, derived on the basis of mechanistic considerations. Theoretical expressions for these characteristic parameters are based on a model that includes both the inhibited peroxidation and the uninhibited peroxidation occurring after consumption of the antioxidant(s). Comparison between theoretically predicted dependencies and experimental data support our treatment considered with special emphasis on transition metals-induced peroxidation of lipoproteins. PMID:24333462

  19. Interior-point methods for estimating seasonal parameters in discrete-time infectious disease models.

    PubMed

    Word, Daniel P; Young, James K; Cummings, Derek A T; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Laird, Carl D

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain a significant health concern around the world. Mathematical modeling of these diseases can help us understand their dynamics and develop more effective control strategies. In this work, we show the capabilities of interior-point methods and nonlinear programming (NLP) formulations to efficiently estimate parameters in multiple discrete-time disease models using measles case count data from three cities. These models include multiplicative measurement noise and incorporate seasonality into multiple model parameters. Our results show that nearly identical patterns are estimated even when assuming seasonality in different model parameters, and that these patterns show strong correlation to school term holidays across very different social settings and holiday schedules. We show that interior-point methods provide a fast and flexible approach to parameterizing models that can be an alternative to more computationally intensive methods. PMID:24167542

  20. Optical detection of melting point depression for silver nanoparticles via in situ real time spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, S. A.; Begou, T.; Collins, R. W.; Marsillac, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle films were deposited by sputtering at room temperature and were annealed while monitoring by real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The nanoparticle dielectric functions (0.75 eV-6.5 eV) obtained by SE were modeled using Lorentz and generalized oscillators for the nanoparticle plasmon polariton (NPP) and interband transitions, respectively. The nanoparticle melting point could be identified from variations in the oscillator parameters during annealing, and this identification was further confirmed after cooling through significant, irreversible changes in these parameters relative to the as-deposited film. The variation in melting point with physical thickness, and thus average nanoparticle diameter, as measured by SE enables calculation of the surface energy density.

  1. Motion data classification on the basis of dynamic time warping with a cloud point distance measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switonski, Adam; Josinski, Henryk; Zghidi, Hafedh; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the problem of classification of model free motion data. The nearest neighbors classifier which is based on comparison performed by Dynamic Time Warping transform with cloud point distance measure is proposed. The classification utilizes both specific gait features reflected by a movements of subsequent skeleton joints and anthropometric data. To validate proposed approach human gait identification challenge problem is taken into consideration. The motion capture database containing data of 30 different humans collected in Human Motion Laboratory of Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology is used. The achieved results are satisfactory, the obtained accuracy of human recognition exceeds 90%. What is more, the applied cloud point distance measure does not depend on calibration process of motion capture system which results in reliable validation.

  2. Interior-point methods for estimating seasonal parameters in discrete-time infectious disease models.

    PubMed

    Word, Daniel P; Young, James K; Cummings, Derek A T; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Laird, Carl D

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain a significant health concern around the world. Mathematical modeling of these diseases can help us understand their dynamics and develop more effective control strategies. In this work, we show the capabilities of interior-point methods and nonlinear programming (NLP) formulations to efficiently estimate parameters in multiple discrete-time disease models using measles case count data from three cities. These models include multiplicative measurement noise and incorporate seasonality into multiple model parameters. Our results show that nearly identical patterns are estimated even when assuming seasonality in different model parameters, and that these patterns show strong correlation to school term holidays across very different social settings and holiday schedules. We show that interior-point methods provide a fast and flexible approach to parameterizing models that can be an alternative to more computationally intensive methods.

  3. Calculation of power spectrums from digital time series with missing data points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, C. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Two algorithms are developed for calculating power spectrums from the autocorrelation function when there are missing data points in the time series. Both methods use an average sampling interval to compute lagged products. One method, the correlation function power spectrum, takes the discrete Fourier transform of the lagged products directly to obtain the spectrum, while the other, the modified Blackman-Tukey power spectrum, takes the Fourier transform of the mean lagged products. Both techniques require fewer calculations than other procedures since only 50% to 80% of the maximum lags need be calculated. The algorithms are compared with the Fourier transform power spectrum and two least squares procedures (all for an arbitrary data spacing). Examples are given showing recovery of frequency components from simulated periodic data where portions of the time series are missing and random noise has been added to both the time points and to values of the function. In addition the methods are compared using real data. All procedures performed equally well in detecting periodicities in the data.

  4. Time reversal ultrasound focusing to a point away from the beacon location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; Sutin, Alexander; Gandhi, Gaurav; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2012-10-01

    In percutaneous procedures there is often a need to focus therapeutic ultrasound to a predefined area without affecting surrounding tissues. Focusing based on Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) principles constitutes a promising approach for generating high intensity ultrasound field tailored to the shape of the predefined area. Conventional TRA technique enables ultrasound focusing only at a site, where there is an ultrasound beacon, e.g. piezo-transducer mounted at the tip of a catheter. We developed a method of steering the focus away from the beacon location. The method is based on the measurements of impulse response (IR) in several reference points and calculating virtual IRs for the points outside the reference beacon location. The IR for the point away from the beacon is constructed based on mathematical extrapolation of the measured reference IRs frequency spectra, particularly phases. The effectiveness of extrapolated TRA focusing is explored experimentally and by computer simulation. Potential applications include ultrasounda-ssisted drug delivery, artery recanalization and tumor ablation.

  5. Point Bar and Overbank Deposit Storage Time Distributions in a Simulated Meandering River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, T. R.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain storage durations are important geologically and for managing pollutants. They provide necessary input data for sediment routing models, but the functions that describe storage are hard to define with field data. Using a meandering river model, a 36ka simulation is analyzed in 20 year time steps. Channel length, and eroded, deposited, and stored sediment volumes stabilize in under 2ka while the region explored by the river expands as time0.3. The simulated channel was 70m (3 pixels) wide and freely migrated within a 30 by 40km reach simulated with constant erodibility, and mean migration rate ±0.06 channel widths per year. No incision or aggradation was permitted. Sediment storage was partitioned by elevation. Point bar deposits are emplaced immediately as the channel moves away and comprise the lower 40% of a vertical section, while the upper 60% of the floodplain consists of vertically accreted 'overbank' deposits that accumulate with decreasing rates as elevation and distance from the channel increase. Point bar deposits have the highest probability of erosion at 80 years, and contribute 2/3 of eroded material despite representing only 40% of the floodplain volume. When eroded, vertical accretion deposits are 1.25 times older than point bar deposits. Apart from these differences, the storage distributions for both deposits are very similar, though there is much more scatter in the point bar distributions. Eroded sediment 2ka in age is well fit with a power law distribution. On average, 10% of eroded material is <80 years old, 30% from 80 - 500 years, 38% from 500 - 2000 years, 15% from 2ka to 10ka and 7% of eroded material is >10ka in age. However, the fraction older than 10ka is widely variable (0% to 30%, σ = 6.8%) in any 20 year interval. The patchiness and variability in the age of eroded sediment observed in these model results may be similar to natural settings and would be difficult to quantify or address with field measurements.

  6. Noncolliding Brownian motion with drift and time-dependent Stieltjes-Wigert determinantal point process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Katori, Makoto

    2012-10-01

    Using the determinantal formula of Biane, Bougerol, and O'Connell, we give multitime joint probability densities to the noncolliding Brownian motion with drift, where the number of particles is finite. We study a special case such that the initial positions of particles are equidistant with a period a and the values of drift coefficients are well-ordered with a scale σ. We show that, at each time t > 0, the single-time probability density of particle system is exactly transformed to the biorthogonal Stieltjes-Wigert matrix model in the Chern-Simons theory introduced by Dolivet and Tierz. Here, one-parameter extensions (θ-extensions) of the Stieltjes-Wigert polynomials, which are themselves q-extensions of the Hermite polynomials, play an essential role. The two parameters a and σ of the process combined with time t are mapped to the parameters q and θ of the biorthogonal polynomials. By the transformation of normalization factor of our probability density, the partition function of the Chern-Simons matrix model is readily obtained. We study the determinantal structure of the matrix model and prove that, at each time t > 0, the present noncolliding Brownian motion with drift is a determinantal point process, in the sense that any correlation function is given by a determinant governed by a single integral kernel called the correlation kernel. Using the obtained correlation kernel, we study time evolution of the noncolliding Brownian motion with drift.

  7. TIMED/SABER observations of global cold point mesopause variability at diurnal and planetary wave scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Sherine Rachel; Kumar, Karanam Kishore

    2011-06-01

    Cold point mesopause is characterized by the coldest point in the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere. TIMED/SABER observations of cold point mesopause and its variability at diurnal and planetary wave scales are discussed in this study. For the first time, the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal modulations of mesopause are quantified on a global scale during all the four seasons, namely, winter, vernal equinox, summer, and autumnal equinox. The composite of diurnal variations of mesopause height and temperature are discussed during each season and using least squares fit, diurnal and semidiurnal tidal amplitudes and phases are obtained. Most of the features exhibited by the diurnal variation of mesopause height are consistent with the present understanding of the migrating tides. The diurnal tidal modulations of mesopause show its peak over equatorial latitude and change its phase around 20° latitude. The phase of the diurnal tidal modulation is consistent during all seasons expect for a phase shift of 4-6 h observed during boreal summer. The similarities/discrepancies between the latitudinal structure of migrating tides and the diurnal variation of mesopause height are discussed. The results reveal that the diurnal tidal modulations of mesopause height show hemispherical asymmetry, which is not reflected in mesopause temperature. The diurnal and semidiurnal amplitudes in mesopause height across the globe are comparable in magnitude and it is found that over equatorial and low latitudes, the variability of mesopause is maximum at these scales as compared to seasonal scales. Quantification of mesopause height at diurnal scales is very important as it also changes the chemistry of that region. In the present study, an attempt is also made to demonstrate the modulation of the mesopause by propagating planetary waves. The results emphatically show that propagating planetary waves do modulate the mesopause height.

  8. Scattering experiments with microwave billiards at an exceptional point under broken time-reversal invariance.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Dietz, B; Harney, H L; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A; Schäfer, F

    2014-03-01

    Scattering experiments with microwave cavities were performed and the effects of broken time-reversal invariance (TRI), induced by means of a magnetized ferrite placed inside the cavity, on an isolated doublet of nearly degenerate resonances were investigated. All elements of the effective Hamiltonian of this two-level system were extracted. As a function of two experimental parameters, the doublet and the associated eigenvectors could be tuned to coalesce at a so-called exceptional point (EP). The behavior of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors when encircling the EP in parameter space was studied, including the geometric amplitude that builds up in the case of broken TRI. A one-dimensional subspace of parameters was found where the differences of the eigenvalues are either real or purely imaginary. There, the Hamiltonians were found to be PT invariant under the combined operation of parity (P) and time reversal (T) in a generalized sense. The EP is the point of transition between both regions. There a spontaneous breaking of PT occurs.

  9. Computing the three-point correlation function of galaxies in O(N^2) time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an algorithm that computes the multipole coefficients of the galaxy three-point correlation function (3PCF) without explicitly considering triplets of galaxies. Rather, centring on each galaxy in the survey, it expands the radially binned density field in spherical harmonics and combines these to form the multipoles without ever requiring the relative angle between a pair about the central. This approach scales with number and number density in the same way as the two-point correlation function, allowing run-times that are comparable, and 500 times faster than a naive triplet count. It is exact in angle and easily handles edge correction. We demonstrate the algorithm on the LasDamas SDSS-DR7 mock catalogues, computing an edge corrected 3PCF out to 90 Mpc h-1 in under an hour on modest computing resources. We expect this algorithm will render it possible to obtain the large-scale 3PCF for upcoming surveys such as Euclid, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument.

  10. Social behavior in a genetic model of dopamine dysfunction at different neurodevelopmental time points

    PubMed Central

    Kabitzke, P. A.; Simpson, E. H.; Kandel, E. R.; Balsam, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in social behavior characterize many neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. In fact, the temporal emergence and trajectory of these deficits can define the disorder, specify their treatment and signal their prognosis. The sophistication of mouse models with neurobiological endophenotypes of many aspects of psychiatric diseases has increased in recent years, with the necessity to evaluate social behavior in these models. We adapted an assay for the multimodal characterization of social behavior at different development time points (juvenile, adolescent and adult) in control mice in different social contexts (specifically, different sex pairings). Although social context did not affect social behavior in juvenile mice, it did have an effect on the quantity and type of social interaction as well as ultrasonic vocalizations in both adolescence and adulthood. We compared social development in control mice to a transgenic mouse model of the increase in postsynaptic striatal D2R activity observed in patients with schizophrenia (D2R-OE mice). Genotypic differences in social interactions emerged in adolescence and appeared to become more pronounced in adulthood. That vocalizations emitted from dyads with a D2R-OE subject were negatively correlated with active social behavior while vocalizations from control dyads were positively correlated with both active and passive social behavior also suggest social deficits. These data show that striatal dopamine dysfunction plays an important role in the development of social behavior and mouse models such as the one studied here provide an opportunity for screening potential therapeutics at different developmental time points. PMID:26176662

  11. Real-Time Single Frequency Precise Point Positioning Using SBAS Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Jia, Chun; Zhao, Lin; Cheng, Jianhua; Liu, Jianxu; Ding, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Real-time single frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is a promising technique for high-precision navigation with sub-meter or even centimeter-level accuracy because of its convenience and low cost. The navigation performance of single frequency PPP heavily depends on the real-time availability and quality of correction products for satellite orbits and satellite clocks. Satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) provides the correction products in real-time, but they are intended to be used for wide area differential positioning at 1 meter level precision. By imposing the constraints for ionosphere error, we have developed a real-time single frequency PPP method by sufficiently utilizing SBAS correction products. The proposed PPP method are tested with static and kinematic data, respectively. The static experimental results show that the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can reach decimeter level, and achieve an improvement of at least 30% when compared with the traditional SBAS method. The positioning convergence of the proposed PPP method can be achieved in 636 epochs at most in static mode. In the kinematic experiment, the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can be improved by at least 20 cm relative to the SBAS method. Furthermore, it has revealed that the proposed PPP method can achieve decimeter level convergence within 500 s in the kinematic mode. PMID:27517930

  12. Real-Time Single Frequency Precise Point Positioning Using SBAS Corrections.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Jia, Chun; Zhao, Lin; Cheng, Jianhua; Liu, Jianxu; Ding, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Real-time single frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is a promising technique for high-precision navigation with sub-meter or even centimeter-level accuracy because of its convenience and low cost. The navigation performance of single frequency PPP heavily depends on the real-time availability and quality of correction products for satellite orbits and satellite clocks. Satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) provides the correction products in real-time, but they are intended to be used for wide area differential positioning at 1 meter level precision. By imposing the constraints for ionosphere error, we have developed a real-time single frequency PPP method by sufficiently utilizing SBAS correction products. The proposed PPP method are tested with static and kinematic data, respectively. The static experimental results show that the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can reach decimeter level, and achieve an improvement of at least 30% when compared with the traditional SBAS method. The positioning convergence of the proposed PPP method can be achieved in 636 epochs at most in static mode. In the kinematic experiment, the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can be improved by at least 20 cm relative to the SBAS method. Furthermore, it has revealed that the proposed PPP method can achieve decimeter level convergence within 500 s in the kinematic mode. PMID:27517930

  13. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  14. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealy, Jennifer; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  15. The time-space relationships among data points from multispectral spatial scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, F.

    1983-01-01

    Multispectral scanner and thematic mapper (TM) data from Landsat satellites are discussed in terms of the perceived 'simultaineity' of the images, which are obtained by scanning techniques. Scanning the scenes ensures that the data points of the images are actually sequential, even if the scan is performed at rates that are fast relative to the motion of the spacecraft. The last datum gathered by the MSS is, in fact, taken 29 sec after the first, witih a 56 m distance being present between pixels. The spacing in uneven from band to band on the TM and analyses of the data to produce an image requires consideration of nonfixed time relationships for different locations on the scan within and among the bands. Additionally, corrective measures must be taken to compensate for instrument jitter and attitude changes.

  16. Implementation of a Point Algorithm for Real-Time Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Motaghedi, Shui; Carson, John

    2007-01-01

    The primal-dual interior-point algorithm implemented in G-OPT is a relatively new and efficient way of solving convex optimization problems. Given a prescribed level of accuracy, the convergence to the optimal solution is guaranteed in a predetermined, finite number of iterations. G-OPT Version 1.0 is a flight software implementation written in C. Onboard application of the software enables autonomous, real-time guidance and control that explicitly incorporates mission constraints such as control authority (e.g. maximum thrust limits), hazard avoidance, and fuel limitations. This software can be used in planetary landing missions (Mars pinpoint landing and lunar landing), as well as in proximity operations around small celestial bodies (moons, asteroids, and comets). It also can be used in any spacecraft mission for thrust allocation in six-degrees-of-freedom control.

  17. Single-point position and transition defects in continuous time quantum walks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of continuous time quantum walks (CTQW) with both position and transition defects defined at a single point in the line. Analytical solutions of both traveling waves and bound states are obtained, which provide valuable insight into the dynamics of CTQW. The number of bound states is found to be critically dependent on the defect parameters, and the localized probability peaks can be readily obtained by projecting the state vector of CTQW on to these bound states. The interference between two bound states are also observed in the case of a transition defect. The spreading of CTQW probability over the line can be finely tuned by varying the position and transition defect parameters, offering the possibility of precision quantum control of the system. PMID:26323855

  18. Undergraduate Consent Form Reading in Relation to Conscientiousness, Procrastination, and the Point-of-Time Effect.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Justin D; Hobbs, William B; Giordano, Peter J; Brunson, Olivia M

    2014-07-01

    Informed consent is central to conducting ethical research with human participants. The present study investigated differences in consent form reading in relation to conscientiousness, procrastination, and the point-of-time (PT) effect among undergraduate participants at a U.S. university. As hypothesized, conscientious participants and those who signed up to participate in a research study more days in advance and for earlier sessions (PT effect) read the consent form more thoroughly. However, procrastination was not related to consent form reading. Most importantly, consent form reading in general was poor, with 80% of participants demonstrating that they had not read the consent form. Conscientious participants were more likely to self-report reading the consent form, irrespective of their measured consent form reading. The article closes with suggestions to improve the process of obtaining informed consent with undergraduate participants. PMID:25746782

  19. Undergraduate Consent Form Reading in Relation to Conscientiousness, Procrastination, and the Point-of-Time Effect.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Justin D; Hobbs, William B; Giordano, Peter J; Brunson, Olivia M

    2014-07-01

    Informed consent is central to conducting ethical research with human participants. The present study investigated differences in consent form reading in relation to conscientiousness, procrastination, and the point-of-time (PT) effect among undergraduate participants at a U.S. university. As hypothesized, conscientious participants and those who signed up to participate in a research study more days in advance and for earlier sessions (PT effect) read the consent form more thoroughly. However, procrastination was not related to consent form reading. Most importantly, consent form reading in general was poor, with 80% of participants demonstrating that they had not read the consent form. Conscientious participants were more likely to self-report reading the consent form, irrespective of their measured consent form reading. The article closes with suggestions to improve the process of obtaining informed consent with undergraduate participants.

  20. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP).

  1. Near-real-time regional troposphere models for the GNSS precise point positioning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, T.; Kaplon, J.; Bosy, J.; Sierny, J.; Wilgan, K.

    2013-05-01

    The GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) technique requires high quality product (orbits and clocks) application, since their error directly affects the quality of positioning. For real-time purposes it is possible to utilize ultra-rapid precise orbits and clocks which are disseminated through the Internet. In order to eliminate as many unknown parameters as possible, one may introduce external information on zenith troposphere delay (ZTD). It is desirable that the a priori model is accurate and reliable, especially for real-time application. One of the open problems in GNSS positioning is troposphere delay modelling on the basis of ground meteorological observations. Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics of Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (IGG WUELS) has developed two independent regional troposphere models for the territory of Poland. The first one is estimated in near-real-time regime using GNSS data from a Polish ground-based augmentation system named ASG-EUPOS established by Polish Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography (GUGiK) in 2008. The second one is based on meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure and humidity) gathered from various meteorological networks operating over the area of Poland and surrounding countries. This paper describes the methodology of both model calculation and verification. It also presents results of applying various ZTD models into kinematic PPP in the post-processing mode using Bernese GPS Software. Positioning results were used to assess the quality of the developed models during changing weather conditions. Finally, the impact of model application to simulated real-time PPP on precision, accuracy and convergence time is discussed.

  2. Real-time Precise Point Positioning with Ambiguity Resolution for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Meng, X.; Teferle, F. N.; Dodson, A. H.; Ge, M.; Shi, C.; Liu, J.

    2009-04-01

    Real-time provision of information on large scale crustal deformation during an earthquake can be crucial in assessing property damage and managing relief operations. Moreover, such a real-time monitoring system may even lead to the accurate prediction of earthquakes in future and help the subsequent studies on the mechanism involved. During the past two decades, Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements have been extensively applied to investigate such processes in the geosciences. Precise point positioning (PPP) using GPS based on single stations can achieve comparable accuracies to conventional relative positioning, when precise satellite orbits and clocks, and Earth rotation products are used. Thus, PPP does not need any reference stations to achieve high positioning accuracy, e.g. at the millimetre level in static and centimetre level in kinematic applications. This has both technical and economic advantages and may be the only feasible option in some specific applications such as Tsunami early warning systems. However, unlike relative positioning, PPP suffers from unresolved integer ambiguities, which prevented further accuracy improvements within short observation periods or in real-time. On account of the great potential of PPP, we developed a prototype real-time PPP system which also employs ambiguity resolution at a single station. This development is based on the PANDA (Positioning And Navigation Data Analyst) software, which was originally developed at Wuhan University in China, and has been significantly refined by the authors. To assess this system, about 30 stations from the EUREF Permanent Network Internet Protocol (EUREF-IP) pilot project are used to produce the real-time satellite clocks, with satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters (ERP) fixed to the predicted part of the IGS (International GNSS Service) ultra-rapid products. This is followed by the estimation of the uncalibrated hardware delays (UHD), which are crucial in resolving the

  3. Impact of telavancin on prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time as determined using point-of-care coagulometers.

    PubMed

    Ero, Michael P; Harvey, Nathaniel R; Harbert, Jack L; Janc, James W; Chin, Kay H; Barriere, Steven L

    2014-01-01

    Telavancin is approved in the United States, Canada, and Europe (At the time of submission, the telavancin European marketing authorization for nosocomial pneumonia was suspended until Theravance provides evidence of a new European Medicines Agency approved supplier) as an antibiotic to treat certain Gram-positive bacterial skin infections. Telavancin has been shown to prolong plasmatic prothrombin (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT) clotting times in clinical diagnostic lab-based assays. In this study, we evaluated the potential for telavancin to prolong whole blood PT/International Normalized Ratio (INR) and aPTT tests on point-of-care (POC) instruments. Whole blood collected from 8 healthy subjects was supplemented with telavancin to final concentrations of 0, 10, 20, and 100 μg/ml. Final concentrations were selected to match trough, twice trough, and peak plasma levels following the approved 10 mg/kg dose. Four widely employed POC coagulation instruments were chosen to be representative of the POC platforms currently in use.. These systems were the Roche Coaguchek XS, the Abbott iSTAT, the ITC Hemochron SIG+, and the Alere INRatio2 POC devices. The PT/INR measured by the Coaguchek XS showed the greatest sensitivity to the presence of telavancin. The PT/INR measured by the Hemochron SIG+ and iSTAT were sensitive to telavancin but to a lesser extent. The INRatio2 was the least sensitive to the presence of telavancin when testing the whole blood PT/INR. Only the Hemochron SIG+ device was capable of measuring aPTT and showed a concentration-dependent increase in aPTT. This study supports the current recommendation that PT and aPTT monitoring be conducted immediately to the next dose of telavancin when coagulation parameters are tested using POC instrumentation. PMID:24132401

  4. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey; Chronis, Themis

    2015-01-01

    Using satellite-based methods that provide accurate 0-1 hour convective initiation (CI) nowcasts, and rely on proven success coupling satellite and radar fields in the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS; operated and developed at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory), to subsequently monitor for first-flash lightning initiation (LI) and later period lightning trends as storms evolve. Enhance IR-based methods within the GOES-R CI Algorithm (that must meet specific thresholds for a given cumulus cloud before the cloud is considered to have an increased likelihood of producing lightning next 90 min) that forecast LI. Integrate GOES-R CI and LI fields with radar thresholds (e.g., first greater than or equal to 40 dBZ echo at the -10 C altitude) and NWP model data within the WDSS-II system for LI-events from new convective storms. Track ongoing lightning using Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data to assess per-storm lightning trends (e.g., as tied to lightning jumps) and outline threat regions. Evaluate the ability to produce LI nowcasts through a "lightning threat" product, and obtain feedback from National Weather Service forecasters on its value as a decision support tool.

  5. Two Point Space-Time Correlation of Density Fluctuations Measured in High Velocity Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    Two-point space-time correlations of air density fluctuations in unheated, fully-expanded free jets at Mach numbers M(sub j) = 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a Rayleigh scattering based diagnostic technique. The molecular scattered light from two small probe volumes of 1.03 mm length was measured for a completely non-intrusive means of determining the turbulent density fluctuations. The time series of density fluctuations were analyzed to estimate the integral length scale L in a moving frame of reference and the convective Mach number M(sub c) at different narrow Strouhal frequency (St) bands. It was observed that M(sub c) and the normalized moving frame length scale L*St/D, where D is the jet diameter, increased with Strouhal frequency before leveling off at the highest resolved frequency. Significant differences were observed between data obtained from the lip shear layer and the centerline of the jet. The wave number frequency transform of the correlation data demonstrated progressive increase in the radiative part of turbulence fluctuations with increasing jet Mach number.

  6. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Karadi, C

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic. 133 refs., 49 figs.

  7. Determining Influenza Virus Shedding at Different Time Points in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Asghar; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Tavassoti Kheiri, Masoumeh; Jamali, Abbas; Jamaati, Azam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Monitoring of influenza virus shedding and optimization of multiplicities of infection (MOI) is important in the investigation of a virus one step growth cycle and for obtaining a high yield of virus in vaccine development and conventional basic diagnostic methods. However, eluted infectious viruses may still be present immediately after virus inoculation and when cells are washed following virus cultivation which may lead to a false positive virus infectivity assay. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we investigated influenza virus progeny production in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with five different MOI at determined time points. The results were analyzed by end point titration tests and immunofluorescence assay. Results: Higher titers of eluted virus were observed following a high MOI inoculation of virus in cell culture. Most probably, this was the result of sialic acid residues from viral hemagglutin in proteins that were cleaved by neuraminidase glycoproteins on the surface of the influenza virus, which promoted viral spread from the host cell to the culture supernatant or during endocytosis, where viruses recycle to the cell surface by recycling endosomes which culminated in virus shedding without replication. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the pattern of influenza virus progeny production was dose-dependent and not uniform. This production was influenced by several factors, particularly MOI. Understanding the exact features of viral particle propagation has a major impact in producing high virus yields in the development of vaccines. Use of lower MOI (0.01) could result in accurate, precise quantitative assays in virus diagnosis and titration methods. PMID:23862114

  8. A Comparison of Real-Time Precise Point Positioning Zenith Total Delay Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, F.; Vaclavovic, P.; Dousa, J.; Teferle, F. N.; Laurichesse, D.; Bingley, R.

    2013-12-01

    The use of observations from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) in operational meteorology is increasing worldwide due to the continuous evolution of GNSS. The assimilation of near real-time (NRT) GNSS-derived zenith total delay (ZTD) estimates into local, regional and global scale numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is now in operation at a number of meteorological institutions. The development of NWP models with high update cycles for now-casting and monitoring of extreme weather events in recent years, requires the estimation of ZTD with minimal latencies, i.e. from 5 to 10 minutes, while maintaining an adequate level of accuracy for these. The availability of real-time (RT) observations and products from the IGS RT service and associated analysis centers make it possible to compute precise point positioning (PPP) solutions in RT, which provide ZTD along with position estimates. This study presents a comparison of the RT ZTD estimates from three different PPP software packages (G-Nut/Tefnut, BNC2.7 and PPP-Wizard) to the state-of-the-art IGS Final Troposphere Product employing PPP in the Bernese GPS Software. Overall, the ZTD time series obtained by the software packages agree fairly well with the estimates following the variations of the other solutions, but showing various biases with the reference. After correction of these the RMS differences are at the order of 0.01 m. The application of PPP ambiguity resolution in one solution or the use of different RT product streams shows little impact on the ZTD estimates.

  9. Size and Life Time Distributions of Bright Points in the Quiet Sun Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, V.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Goode, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of two-hour uninterrupted observations of solar granulation obtained at excellent seeing conditions on August 3, 2010 with the largest ground-based new solar telescope (NST) operating at Big Bear Solar observatory. Adaptive optics corrected data were acquired with a broad-band TiO filter (centered at a wavelength of 705.7 nm). The time cadence was 10s and the pixel size was 0.0375 arcsec. Photospheric bright points (BPs) were automatically detected and traced. We find that NST TiO BPs are co-spatial with those visible in Hinode/SOT G-band images. In cases where Hinode/SOT detects one large BP, NST shows several fully resolved BPs. Extended filigree features running along intergranular lanes appear in NST images clearly fragmented into separate BPs. The distribution function of the NST BPs size is exponential and extends to the diffraction limit of NST (77 km) without any saturation. The life time distribution function follows a power law with an index of -1.9. About 98.6% of all detected BPs live shorter than 120 s, and the most persistent BP lasted for 44 minutes. The size and the maximum intensity of BPs were found to be proportional to the life time. Results are discussed in framework of coronal heating and turbulent dynamo. Left - Hinode G-band image obtained on 2010 August 3 at 12:22:11 UT (pixel size 0.109"). Right - NST TiO image obtained on 2010 August 3 at 12:22:10 UT. Both images cover the same area of 18.8" x 18.8" on the Sun. PDFs of the BPs diameter calculated from NST TiO images (black) and from Hinode/SOT G-band images (by Utz et al. 2009, blue).

  10. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP). PMID:26829639

  11. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP). PMID:26829639

  12. Real Time Precise Point Positioning: Preliminary Results for the Brazilian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Haroldo; Monico, João.; Hirokazu Shimabukuro, Milton; Aquino, Marcio

    2010-05-01

    GNSS positioning can be carried out in relative or absolute approach. In the last years, more attention has been driven to the real time precise point positioning (PPP). To achieve centimeter accuracy with this method in real time it is necessary to have available the satellites precise coordinates as well as satellites clocks corrections. The coordinates can be used from the predicted IGU ephemeris, but the satellites clocks must be estimated in a real time. It can be made from a GNSS network as can be seen from EUREF Permanent Network. The infra-structure to realize the PPP in real time is being available in Brazil through the Brazilian Continuous Monitoring Network (RBMC) together with the Sao Paulo State GNSS network which are transmitting GNSS data using NTRIP (Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol) caster. Based on this information it was proposed a PhD thesis in the Univ. Estadual Paulista (UNESP) aiming to investigate and develop the methodology to estimate the satellites clocks and realize PPP in real time. Then, software is being developed to process GNSS data in the real time PPP mode. A preliminary version of the software was called PPP_RT and is able to process GNSS code and phase data using precise ephemeris and satellites clocks. The PPP processing can be accomplished considering the absolute satellite antenna Phase Center Variation (PCV), Ocean Tide Loading (OTL), Earth Body Tide, among others. The first order ionospheric effects can be eliminated or minimized by ion-free combination or parameterized in the receiver-satellite direction using a stochastic process, e.g. random walk or white noise. In the case of ionosphere estimation, a pseudo-observable is introduced in the mathematical model for each satellite and the initial value can be computed from Klobuchar model or from Global Ionospheric Map (GIM). The adjustment is realized in the recursive mode and the DIA (Detection Identification and Adaptation) is used for quality control. In

  13. The Way Point Planning Tool: Real Time Flight Planning for Airborne Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yubin; Blakeslee, Richard; Goodman, Michael; Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    Airborne real time observation are a major component of NASA's Earth Science research and satellite ground validation studies. For mission scientist, planning a research aircraft mission within the context of meeting the science objective is a complex task because it requires real time situational awareness of the weather conditions that affect the aircraft track. Multiple aircraft are often involved in the NASA field campaigns the coordination of the aircraft with satellite overpasses, other airplanes and the constantly evolving dynamic weather conditions often determine the success of the campaign. A flight planning tool is needed to provide situational awareness information to the mission scientist and help them plan and modify the flight tracks successfully. Scientists at the University of Alabama Huntsville and the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center developed the Waypoint Planning Tool (WPT), an interactive software tool that enables scientist to develop their own flight plans (also known as waypoints), with point and click mouse capabilities on a digital map filled with time raster and vector data. The development of this Waypoint Planning Tool demonstrates the significance of mission support in responding to the challenges presented during NASA field campaigns. Analyses during and after each campaign helped identify both issues and new requirements, initiating the next wave of development. Currently the Waypoint Planning Tool has gone through three rounds of development and analysis processes. The development of this waypoint tool is directly affected by the technology advances on GIS/Mapping technologies. From the standalone Google Earth application and simple KML functionalities to the Google Earth Plugin and Java Web Start/Applet on web platform, as well as to the rising open source GIS tools with new JavaScript frameworks, the Waypoint planning Tool has entered its third phase of technology advancement. The newly innovated, cross-platform, modular designed

  14. Quantum percolation and transition point of a directed discrete-time quantum walk

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, C. M.; Busch, Th.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum percolation describes the problem of a quantum particle moving through a disordered system. While certain similarities to classical percolation exist, the quantum case has additional complexity due to the possibility of Anderson localisation. Here, we consider a directed discrete-time quantum walk as a model to study quantum percolation of a two-state particle on a two-dimensional lattice. Using numerical analysis we determine the fraction of connected edges required (transition point) in the lattice for the two-state particle to percolate with finite (non-zero) probability for three fundamental lattice geometries, finite square lattice, honeycomb lattice, and nanotube structure and show that it tends towards unity for increasing lattice sizes. To support the numerical results we also use a continuum approximation to analytically derive the expression for the percolation probability for the case of the square lattice and show that it agrees with the numerically obtained results for the discrete case. Beyond the fundamental interest to understand the dynamics of a two-state particle on a lattice (network) with disconnected vertices, our study has the potential to shed light on the transport dynamics in various quantum condensed matter systems and the construction of quantum information processing and communication protocols. PMID:25301394

  15. Stochastic modelling for biodosimetry: Predicting the chromosomal response to radiation at different time points after exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ritter, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetic data accumulated from the experiments with peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to densely ionizing radiation clearly demonstrate that for particles with linear energy transfer (LET) >100 keV/ μm the derived relative biological effectiveness (RBE) will strongly depend on the time point chosen for the analysis. A reasonable prediction of radiation-induced chromosome damage and its distribution among cells can be achieved by exploiting Monte Carlo methodology along with the information about the radius of the penetrating ion-track and the LET of the ion beam. In order to examine the relationship between the track structure and the distribution of aberrations induced in human lymphocytes and to clarify the correlation between delays in the cell cycle progression and the aberration burden visible at the first post-irradiation mitosis, we have analyzed chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to Fe-ions with LET values of 335 keV/ μm and formulated a Monte Carlo model which reflects time-delay in mitosis of aberrant cells. Within the model the frequency distributions of aberrations among cells follow the pattern of local energy distribution and are well approximated by a time-dependent compound Poisson statistics. The cell-division cycle of undamaged and aberrant cells and chromosome aberrations are modelled as a renewal process represented by a random sum of (independent and identically distributed) random elements S N = ∑ N i=0 X i . Here N stands for the number of particle traversals of cell nucleus, each leading to a statistically independent formation of X i aberrations. The parameter N is itself a random variable and reflects the cell cycle delay of heavily damaged cells. The probability distribution of S N follows a general law for which the moment generating function satisfies the relation Φ S N = Φ N ( Φ X i ). Formulation of the Monte Carlo model which allows to predict expected fluxes of aberrant and non-aberrant cells has been based

  16. New definitions of pointing stability - ac and dc effects. [constant and time-dependent pointing error effects on image sensor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucke, Robert L.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; San Martin, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    For most imaging sensors, a constant (dc) pointing error is unimportant (unless large), but time-dependent (ac) errors degrade performance by either distorting or smearing the image. When properly quantified, the separation of the root-mean-square effects of random line-of-sight motions into dc and ac components can be used to obtain the minimum necessary line-of-sight stability specifications. The relation between stability requirements and sensor resolution is discussed, with a view to improving communication between the data analyst and the control systems engineer.

  17. The strongly attached point topology of the abstract boundary for space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Richard A.; Scott, Susan M.

    2014-06-01

    The abstract boundary construction of Scott and Szekeres provides a ‘boundary’ for any n-dimensional, paracompact, connected, Hausdorff, C∞ manifold. Singularities may then be defined as objects within this boundary. In a previous paper (Barry R A and Scott S M 2011 Class. Quantum Grav. 28 165003), a topology referred to as the attached point topology was defined for a manifold and its abstract boundary, thereby providing us with a description of how the abstract boundary is related to the underlying manifold. In this paper, a second topology, referred to as the strongly attached point topology, is presented for the abstract boundary construction. Whereas the abstract boundary was effectively disconnected from the manifold in the attached point topology, it is very much connected in the strongly attached point topology. A number of other interesting properties of the strongly attached point topology are considered, each of which support the idea that it is a very natural and appropriate topology for a manifold and its abstract boundary.

  18. Inference of fitness values and putative appearance time points for evolvable self-replicating molecules from time series of occurrence frequencies in an evolution reactor.

    PubMed

    Aita, Takuyo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2016-07-21

    We have established a translation-coupled RNA replication system within a cell-like compartment, and conducted an experimental evolution of the RNA molecules in the system. Then, we obtained a time series of occurrence frequencies of 91 individual genotypes through random sampling and next-generation sequencing. The time series showed a complex clonal interference and a polymorphic population called the "quasispecies". By fitting a deterministic kinetic model of evolvable simple self-replicators to the time series, we estimated the fitness value and "putative appearance time point" for each of the 91 major genotypes identified, where the putative appearance time point is defined as a certain time point at which a certain mutant genotype is supposed to appear in the deterministic kinetic model. As a result, the kinetic model was well fitted and additionally we confirmed that the estimated fitness values for 11 genotypes were considerably close to the experimentally measured ones (Ichihashi et al., 2015). In this sequel paper, with the theoretical basis of the deterministic kinetic model, we present the details of inference of the fitness values and putative appearance time points for the 91 genotypes. It may be possible to apply this methodology to other self-replicating molecules, viruses and bacteria. PMID:27091052

  19. FUSING POINT AND AREAL LEVEL SPACE-TIME DATA WITH APPLICATION TO WET DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Motivated by the problem of predicting annual wet chemical deposition in the eastern United States, this paper develops a framework for joint modeling of point and grid referenced spatio-temporal data. The proposed hierarchical model is able to provide accurate spatial interpolat...

  20. Change over Time in First Graders' Strategic Use of Information at Point of Difficulty in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Lea M.; Kim, Hwewon; Nelson, Kathryn S.; Fried, Mary D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe young students' actions at point of difficulty in reading and examine changes in their strategic use of sources of information. We examined errors from running records of first graders who entered Reading Recovery (RR) in the fall and ended the year reading at the first-grade level compared with RR first graders who did…

  1. Different RAN Components Relate to Reading at Different Points in Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Kaizer, Eleni L.

    2014-01-01

    The present 10-year longitudinal study examined how rapid automatized naming (RAN) components--articulation time and pause time--relate to reading fluency. Seventy-five Greek-speaking children were followed from Grade 1 to Grade 10 and were assessed five times (in Grades 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10) on RAN (digits and objects) and reading fluency (word…

  2. Side Effects in Time Discounting Procedures: Fixed Alternatives Become the Reference Point

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Typical research on intertemporal choice utilizes a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) paradigm requiring participants to choose between a smaller sooner and larger later payoff. In the adjusting-amount procedure (AAP) one of the alternatives is fixed and the other is adjusted according to particular choices made by the participant. Such a method makes the alternatives unequal in status and is speculated to make the fixed alternative a reference point for choices, thereby affecting the decision made. The current study shows that fixing different alternatives in the AAP influences discount rates in intertemporal choices. Specifically, individuals’ (N = 283) choices were affected to just the same extent by merely fixing an alternative as when choices were preceded by scenarios explicitly imposing reference points. PMID:27768759

  3. Real-time 2D floating-point fast Fourier transforms for seeker simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Richard; Lord, Eric; Shand, David J.

    2002-07-01

    The floating point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is one of the most useful basic functions available to the image and signal processing engineer allowing many complex and detailed special functions to be implemented more simply in the frequency domain. In the Hardware-in-the-Loop field an image transformed using FFT would allow the designer to think about accurate frequency based simulation of seeker lens effects, motion blur, detector transfer functions and much more. Unfortunately, the transform requires many hundreds of thousands or millions of floating point operations on a single modest sized image making it impractical for realtime Hardware-in-the-Loop systems. .until now. This paper outlines the development, by Nallatech, of an FPGA based IEEE floating point core. It traces the subsequent use of this core to develop a full 256 X 256 FFT and filter process implemented on COTS hardware at frame rates up to 150Hz. This transform can be demonstrated to model optical transfer functions at a far greater accuracy than the current spatial models. Other applications and extensions of this technique will be discussed such as filtering for image tracking algorithms and in the simulation of radar processing in the frequency domain.

  4. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... NAAQS maintenance area, the State may request that obligations under the applicable requirements of § 51.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  5. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  6. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  7. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... requirement to submit a maintenance plan for purposes of paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  8. High-resolution real-time dual-view imaging with multiple point of view microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mangeol, Pierre; Peterman, Erwin J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Most methods to observe three-dimensional processes in living samples are based on imaging a single plane that is sequentially scanned through the sample. Sequential scanning is inherently slow, which can make it difficult to capture objects moving quickly in three dimensions. Here we present a novel method, multiple point-of-view microscopy (MPoVM), that allows simultaneous capturing of the front and side views of a sample with high resolution. MPoVM can be implemented in most fluorescence microscopes, offering new opportunities in the study of dynamic biological processes in three dimensions. PMID:27699125

  9. High-resolution real-time dual-view imaging with multiple point of view microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mangeol, Pierre; Peterman, Erwin J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Most methods to observe three-dimensional processes in living samples are based on imaging a single plane that is sequentially scanned through the sample. Sequential scanning is inherently slow, which can make it difficult to capture objects moving quickly in three dimensions. Here we present a novel method, multiple point-of-view microscopy (MPoVM), that allows simultaneous capturing of the front and side views of a sample with high resolution. MPoVM can be implemented in most fluorescence microscopes, offering new opportunities in the study of dynamic biological processes in three dimensions.

  10. The Use and Abuse of Part-Time Faculty: The Part-Timers' Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Wendy L.

    Problems faced by part-time faculty members are identified, and suggestions to avoid mistreatment of these teachers are offered. Disadvantages of part-time teaching include the lack of equitable pay and benefits. Since most institutions have a standard pay rate for part-timers, it is suggested that teaching excellence be recognized by creating…

  11. Time to Learn. Research Points. Volume 5, Issue 2, Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Elizabeth S.

    2007-01-01

    Calls for more school instructional time are coming from multiple quarters. Academic standards and frequent assessments have changed the nature, but not the length, of the instructional day. Schools find themselves "robbing Peter to pay Paul," taking time from the arts, recess, and physical education to give to reading and math, subjects that…

  12. Point process time-frequency analysis of dynamic respiratory patterns during meditation practice.

    PubMed

    Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heart beats. We propose a robust algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat intervals and respiratory recordings under dynamic breathing patterns. The blood volume pressure-derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PIs) are modeled as an inverse Gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PIs and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated via a frequency domain transfer function evaluated at instantaneous respiratory frequency where high coherence between respiration and PIs is observed. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. The presented analysis confirms the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states, reporting statistically significant increase in RSA gain as measured by our paradigm.

  13. Point process time-frequency analysis of respiratory sinus arrhythmia under altered respiration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heartbeat. We propose an algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat interval and respiratory recordings under dynamic respiration conditions. The blood volume pressure derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PI) are modeled as an inverse gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PI and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated by a frequency domain transfer function approach. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. Experimental results confirm the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states.

  14. A hierarchical model combining distance sampling and time removal to estimate detection probability during avian point counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amundson, Courtney L.; Royle, J. Andrew; Handel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Imperfect detection during animal surveys biases estimates of abundance and can lead to improper conclusions regarding distribution and population trends. Farnsworth et al. (2005) developed a combined distance-sampling and time-removal model for point-transect surveys that addresses both availability (the probability that an animal is available for detection; e.g., that a bird sings) and perceptibility (the probability that an observer detects an animal, given that it is available for detection). We developed a hierarchical extension of the combined model that provides an integrated analysis framework for a collection of survey points at which both distance from the observer and time of initial detection are recorded. Implemented in a Bayesian framework, this extension facilitates evaluating covariates on abundance and detection probability, incorporating excess zero counts (i.e. zero-inflation), accounting for spatial autocorrelation, and estimating population density. Species-specific characteristics, such as behavioral displays and territorial dispersion, may lead to different patterns of availability and perceptibility, which may, in turn, influence the performance of such hierarchical models. Therefore, we first test our proposed model using simulated data under different scenarios of availability and perceptibility. We then illustrate its performance with empirical point-transect data for a songbird that consistently produces loud, frequent, primarily auditory signals, the Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla); and for 2 ptarmigan species (Lagopus spp.) that produce more intermittent, subtle, and primarily visual cues. Data were collected by multiple observers along point transects across a broad landscape in southwest Alaska, so we evaluated point-level covariates on perceptibility (observer and habitat), availability (date within season and time of day), and abundance (habitat, elevation, and slope), and included a nested point

  15. Atmospheric plume progression as a function of time and distance from the release point for radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Hayes, James C.; Miley, Harry S.

    2015-10-01

    The International Monitoring System contains up to 80 stations around the world that have aerosol and xenon monitoring systems designed to detect releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere from nuclear tests. A rule of thumb description of plume concentration and duration versus time and distance from the release point is useful when designing and deploying new sample collection systems. This paper uses plume development from atmospheric transport modeling to provide a power-law rule describing atmospheric dilution factors as a function of distance from the release point.

  16. A new universal equation for the time of transfer between two points of the central gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdaev, M. N.

    2011-10-01

    The paper presents the derivation of two new equations for calculating the time of transfer between two points of the central gravitational field: for hyperbolic orbits and the universal equation for elliptical and hyperbolic orbits. In the paper we have used as an independent variable, instead of the linear elements (semimajor axis, focal parameter of orbit or a chord connecting the ends of boundary radii of transfer), the angular parameter—the angle between the radius vector of an initial point of transfer and the vector of initial velocity of transfer. Paper's material is a continuation of that presented in the "Space research" Journal, vol. 2, March-April, 2009.

  17. Timing readout in paper device for quantitative point-of-use hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme-based bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Fan, Jinlong; Nie, Jinfang; Le, Shangwang; Zhu, Wenyuan; Gao, Dong; Yang, Jiani; Zhang, Songbai; Li, Jianping

    2015-11-15

    This work describes a quantitative point-of-use hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme-based assay that integrates a simple timing detection motif with low-cost, portable microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs). The timing readout is based on the selective DNAzyme-mediated wettability change of paper from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity. Its utility is well demonstrated with sensitive, specific detection of K(+) ion as a model analyte in artificial samples as well as real human serum samples. This new method only requires a ubiquitous cheap timer (or a cell phone with a timing function) to provide quantitative results. It could offer new opportunities for the development of more peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme-based bioassays that are simple, affordable, portable, and operable by minimally-trained users for broad point-of-use applications especially in resource-poor settings. PMID:26042873

  18. [Multiple time scales analysis of spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss within watershed].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-bing; Chen, Xing-wei; Chen, Ying

    2015-07-01

    Identification of the critical source areas of non-point source pollution is an important means to control the non-point source pollution within the watershed. In order to further reveal the impact of multiple time scales on the spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss, a SWAT model of Shanmei Reservoir watershed was developed. Based on the simulation of total nitrogen (TN) loss intensity of all 38 subbasins, spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen loss and critical source areas were analyzed at three time scales of yearly average, monthly average and rainstorms flood process, respectively. Furthermore, multiple linear correlation analysis was conducted to analyze the contribution of natural environment and anthropogenic disturbance on nitrogen loss. The results showed that there were significant spatial differences of TN loss in Shanmei Reservoir watershed at different time scales, and the spatial differentiation degree of nitrogen loss was in the order of monthly average > yearly average > rainstorms flood process. TN loss load mainly came from upland Taoxi subbasin, which was identified as the critical source area. At different time scales, land use types (such as farmland and forest) were always the dominant factor affecting the spatial distribution of nitrogen loss, while the effect of precipitation and runoff on the nitrogen loss was only taken in no fertilization month and several processes of storm flood at no fertilization date. This was mainly due to the significant spatial variation of land use and fertilization, as well as the low spatial variability of precipitation and runoff. PMID:26710649

  19. [Multiple time scales analysis of spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss within watershed].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-bing; Chen, Xing-wei; Chen, Ying

    2015-07-01

    Identification of the critical source areas of non-point source pollution is an important means to control the non-point source pollution within the watershed. In order to further reveal the impact of multiple time scales on the spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss, a SWAT model of Shanmei Reservoir watershed was developed. Based on the simulation of total nitrogen (TN) loss intensity of all 38 subbasins, spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen loss and critical source areas were analyzed at three time scales of yearly average, monthly average and rainstorms flood process, respectively. Furthermore, multiple linear correlation analysis was conducted to analyze the contribution of natural environment and anthropogenic disturbance on nitrogen loss. The results showed that there were significant spatial differences of TN loss in Shanmei Reservoir watershed at different time scales, and the spatial differentiation degree of nitrogen loss was in the order of monthly average > yearly average > rainstorms flood process. TN loss load mainly came from upland Taoxi subbasin, which was identified as the critical source area. At different time scales, land use types (such as farmland and forest) were always the dominant factor affecting the spatial distribution of nitrogen loss, while the effect of precipitation and runoff on the nitrogen loss was only taken in no fertilization month and several processes of storm flood at no fertilization date. This was mainly due to the significant spatial variation of land use and fertilization, as well as the low spatial variability of precipitation and runoff.

  20. Joint transfer of time and frequency signals and multi-point synchronization via fiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Cheng; Wei, Chen; Qin, Liu; Dan, Xu; Fei, Yang; You-Zhen, Gui; Hai-Wen, Cai

    2016-01-01

    A system of jointly transferring time signals with a rate of 1 pulse per second (PPS) and frequency signals of 10 MHz via a dense wavelength division multiplex-based (DWDM) fiber is demonstrated in this paper. The noises of the fiber links are suppressed and compensated for by a controlled fiber delay line. A method of calibrating and characterizing time is described. The 1PPS is synchronized by feed-forward calibrating the fiber delays precisely. The system is experimentally examined via a 110 km spooled fiber in laboratory. The frequency stabilities of the user end with compensation are 1.8×10-14 at 1 s and 2.0×10-17 at 104 s average time. The calculated uncertainty of time synchronization is 13.1 ps, whereas the direct measurement of the uncertainty is 12 ps. Next, the frequency and 1PPS are transferred via a metropolitan area optical fiber network from one central site to two remote sites with distances of 14 km and 110 km. The frequency stabilities of 14 km link reach 3.0×10-14 averaged in 1 s and 1.4×10-17 in 104 s respectively; and the stabilities of 110 km link are 8.3×10-14 and 1.7×10-17, respectively. The accuracies of synchronization are estimated to be 12.3 ps for the 14 km link and 13.1 ps for the 110 km link, respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405227).

  1. Self-action of a point charge in a wormhole space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Khusnutdinov, Nail R.; Bakhmatov, Ilya V.

    2007-12-15

    We consider the self-energy and the self-force for an electrically charged particle at rest in the wormhole space-time. We develop a general approach to finding the self-force and apply it to the two specific profiles of the wormhole throat with singular and with smooth curvature. The self-force for these two profiles is found in manifest form; it turns out to be an attractive force. We also find an expression for the self-force in the case of arbitrary symmetric throat profile. Far from the throat the self-force is always attractive.

  2. Solar glare hazard analysis tool on account of determined points of time

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K; Sims, Cianan Alexander

    2014-09-23

    Technologies pertaining to determining when glare will be perceived by a hypothetical observer from a glare source and the intensity of glare that will be perceived by the hypothetical observer from the glare source are described herein. A first location of a potential source of solar glare is received, and a second location of the hypothetical observer is received. Based upon such locations, including respective elevations, and known positions of the sun over time, a determination as to when the hypothetical observer will perceive glare from the potential source of solar glare is made. Subsequently, an amount of irradiance entering the eye of the hypothetical observer is calculated to assess potential ocular hazards.

  3. Real-Time Point Positioning Performance Evaluation of Single-Frequency Receivers Using NASA's Global Differential GPS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Iijima, Byron; Meyer, Robert; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Accad, Elie

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of a single-frequency receiver using the 1-Hz differential corrections as provided by NASA's global differential GPS system. While the dual-frequency user has the ability to eliminate the ionosphere error by taking a linear combination of observables, the single-frequency user must remove or calibrate this error by other means. To remove the ionosphere error we take advantage of the fact that the magnitude of the group delay in range observable and the carrier phase advance have the same magnitude but are opposite in sign. A way to calibrate this error is to use a real-time database of grid points computed by JPL's RTI (Real-Time Ionosphere) software. In both cases we evaluate the positional accuracy of a kinematic carrier phase based point positioning method on a global extent.

  4. The relative timing between eye and hand in rapid sequential pointing is affected by time pressure, but not by advance knowledge.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, F J A; van Polanen, V; Savelsbergh, G J P; Bennett, S J

    2011-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of timing constraints and advance knowledge on eye-hand coordination strategy in a sequential pointing task. Participants were required to point at two successively appearing targets on a screen while the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and the trial order were manipulated, such that timing constraints were high (ISI = 300 ms) or low (ISI = 450 ms) and advance knowledge of the target location was present (fixed order) or absent (random order). Analysis of eye and finger onset and completion times per segment of the sequence indicated that oculo-manual behaviour was in general characterized by eye movements preceding the finger, as well as 'gaze anchoring' (i.e. eye fixation of the first target until completion of the finger movement towards that target). Advance knowledge of future target locations lead to shorter latency times of eye and hand, and smaller eye-hand lead times, which in combination resulted in shorter total movement times. There was, however, no effect of advance knowledge on the duration of gaze anchoring. In contrast, gaze anchoring did change as a function of the interval between successive stimuli and was shorter with a 300 ms ISI versus 450 ms ISI. Further correlation analysis provided some indication that shorter residual latency is associated with shorter pointing duration, without affecting accuracy. These results are consistent with a neural mechanism governing the coupling of eye and arm movements, which has been suggested to reside in the superior colliculus. The temporal coordination resulting from this coupling is a function of the time pressure on the visuo-manual system resulting from the appearance of external stimuli. PMID:21744087

  5. Improved tumor contrast achieved by single time point dual-reporter fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a method to quantify biomarker expression that uses an exogenous dual-reporter imaging approach to improve tumor signal detection. The uptake of two fluorophores, one nonspecific and one targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), were imaged at 1 h in three types of xenograft tumors spanning a range of EGFR expression levels (n=6 in each group). Using this dual-reporter imaging methodology, tumor contrast-to-noise ratio was amplified by >6 times at 1 h postinjection and >2 times at 24 h. Furthermore, by as early as 20 min postinjection, the dual-reporter imaging signal in the tumor correlated significantly with a validated marker of receptor density (P<0.05, r=0.93). Dual-reporter imaging can improve sensitivity and specificity over conventional fluorescence imaging in applications such as fluorescence-guided surgery and directly approximates the receptor status of the tumor, a measure that could be used to inform choices of biological therapies.

  6. An engineering time-domain model for curve squeal: Tangential point-contact model and Green's functions approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenzerovic, I.; Kropp, W.; Pieringer, A.

    2016-08-01

    Curve squeal is a strong tonal sound that may arise when a railway vehicle negotiates a tight curve. In contrast to frequency-domain models, time-domain models are able to capture the nonlinear and transient nature of curve squeal. However, these models are computationally expensive due to requirements for fine spatial and time discretization. In this paper, a computationally efficient engineering model for curve squeal in the time-domain is proposed. It is based on a steady-state point-contact model for the tangential wheel/rail contact and a Green's functions approach for wheel and rail dynamics. The squeal model also includes a simple model of sound radiation from the railway wheel from the literature. A validation of the tangential point-contact model against Kalker's transient variational contact model reveals that the point-contact model performs well within the squeal model up to at least 5 kHz. The proposed squeal model is applied to investigate the influence of lateral creepage, friction and wheel/rail contact position on squeal occurrence and amplitude. The study indicates a significant influence of the wheel/rail contact position on squeal frequencies and amplitudes. Friction and lateral creepage show an influence on squeal occurrence and amplitudes, but this is only secondary to the influence of the contact position.

  7. Spinodals and critical point using short-time dynamics for a simple model of liquid.

    PubMed

    Loscar, Ernesto S; Ferrara, C Gastón; Grigera, Tomás S

    2016-04-01

    We have applied the short-time dynamics method to the gas-liquid transition to detect the supercooled gas instability (gas spinodal) and the superheated liquid instability (liquid spinodal). Using Monte Carlo simulation, we have obtained the two spinodals for a wide range of pressure in sub-critical and critical conditions and estimated the critical temperature and pressure. Our method is faster than previous approaches and allows studying spinodals without needing equilibration of the system in the metastable region. It is thus free of the extrapolation problems present in other methods, and in principle could be applied to systems such as glass-forming liquids, where equilibration is very difficult even far from the spinodal. We have also done molecular dynamics simulations, where we find the method again able to detect the both spinodals. Our results are compared with different previous results in the literature and show a good agreement.

  8. Multiple Time Courses of Vestibular Set-Point Adaptation Revealed by Sustained Magnetic Field Stimulation of the Labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Jareonsettasin, Prem; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Ward, Bryan K; Roberts, Dale C; Schubert, Michael C; Zee, David S

    2016-05-23

    A major focus in neurobiology is how the brain adapts its motor behavior to changes in its internal and external environments [1, 2]. Much is known about adaptively optimizing the amplitude and direction of eye and limb movements, for example, but little is known about another essential form of learning, "set-point" adaptation. Set-point adaptation balances tonic activity so that reciprocally acting, agonist and antagonist muscles have a stable platform from which to launch accurate movements. Here, we use the vestibulo-ocular reflex-a simple behavior that stabilizes the position of the eye while the head is moving-to investigate how tonic activity is adapted toward a new set point to prevent eye drift when the head is still [3, 4]. Set-point adaptation was elicited with magneto-hydrodynamic vestibular stimulation (MVS) by placing normal humans in a 7T MRI for 90 min. MVS is ideal for prolonged labyrinthine activation because it mimics constant head acceleration and induces a sustained nystagmus similar to natural vestibular lesions [5, 6]. The MVS-induced nystagmus diminished slowly but incompletely over multiple timescales. We propose a new adaptation hypothesis, using a cascade of imperfect mathematical integrators, that reproduces the response to MVS (and more natural chair rotations), including the gradual decrease in nystagmus as the set point changes over progressively longer time courses. MVS set-point adaptation is a biological model with applications to basic neurophysiological research into all types of movements [7], functional brain imaging [8], and treatment of vestibular and higher-level attentional disorders by introducing new biases to counteract pathological ones [9]. PMID:27185559

  9. Immunoendocrine responses of male spinal cord injured athletes to 1-hour self-paced exercise: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allgrove, Judith E; Chapman, Mark; Christides, Tatiana; Smith, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a 1 h, self-paced handcycling time trial on blood leukocytes, mucosal immunity, and markers of stress in paraplegic athletes. Nine male paraplegic athletes (spinal injury level thoracic 4-lumbar 2) performed 1 h of handcycling exercise on a standard 400 m athletics track. Heart rate (HR) was measured continuously during exercise, and a retrospective rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was obtained immediately after. Venous blood and saliva samples were collected immediately before exercise (Pre-Ex), after exercise (End-Ex), and 1 h postexercise (1-h Post). The athletes completed mean +/- standard error of mean 22.4 +/- 1.1 km cycling at HR 165 +/- 2 beats/min, RPE 15 +/- 1, and blood lactate 7.9 +/- 2.5 mmol/L. Total leukocytes increased 72% and neutrophils increased 74% End-Ex; both remained elevated at 1-h Post (both p < 0.05). Lymphocytes increased 53% and natural killer cells increased 175% End-Ex (both p < 0.05), but returned to near baseline levels 1-h Post. Increases (p < 0.05) were observed End-Ex in alpha-amylase activity (p < 0.05), which returned to baseline at 1-h Post, but there was no significant change in saliva flow rate, salivary immunoglobulin A, or cortisol. These data confirm that 1 h of handcycling exercise elevated circulating leukocytes but had a minimal effect on mucosal immunity. These changes appear to be associated with alpha-amylase rather than cortisol.

  10. The two chromosomes of Vibrio cholerae are initiated at different time points in the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Tue; Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Skovgaard, Ole

    2007-01-01

    The bacterium Vibrio cholerae, the cause of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, has its genome divided between two chromosomes, a feature uncommon for bacteria. The two chromosomes are of different sizes and different initiator molecules control their replication independently. Using novel methods for analysing flow cytometry data and marker frequency analysis, we show that the small chromosome II is replicated late in the C period of the cell cycle, where most of chromosome I has been replicated. Owing to the delay in initiation of chromosome II, the two chromosomes terminate replication at approximately the same time and the average number of replication origins per cell is higher for chromosome I than for chromosome II. Analysis of cell-cycle parameters shows that chromosome replication and segregation is exceptionally fast in V. cholerae. The divided genome and delayed replication of chromosome II may reduce the metabolic burden and complexity of chromosome replication by postponing DNA synthesis to the last part of the cell cycle and reducing the need for overlapping replication cycles during rapid proliferation. PMID:17557077

  11. Adaptive marker-free registration using a multiple point strategy for real-time and robust endoscope electromagnetic navigation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Wan, Ying; He, Xiangjian; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-02-01

    Registration of pre-clinical images to physical space is indispensable for computer-assisted endoscopic interventions in operating rooms. Electromagnetically navigated endoscopic interventions are increasingly performed at current diagnoses and treatments. Such interventions use an electromagnetic tracker with a miniature sensor that is usually attached at an endoscope distal tip to real time track endoscope movements in a pre-clinical image space. Spatial alignment between the electromagnetic tracker (or sensor) and pre-clinical images must be performed to navigate the endoscope to target regions. This paper proposes an adaptive marker-free registration method that uses a multiple point selection strategy. This method seeks to address an assumption that the endoscope is operated along the centerline of an intraluminal organ which is easily violated during interventions. We introduce an adaptive strategy that generates multiple points in terms of sensor measurements and endoscope tip center calibration. From these generated points, we adaptively choose the optimal point, which is the closest to its assigned the centerline of the hollow organ, to perform registration. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed adaptive strategy significantly reduced the target registration error from 5.32 to 2.59 mm in static phantoms validation, as well as from at least 7.58 mm to 4.71 mm in dynamic phantom validation compared to current available methods.

  12. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time using a point-of-care analyser (Abaxis VSpro®) in Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus).

    PubMed

    Nevitt, B N; Chinnadurai, S K; Watson, M K; Langan, J N; Adkesson, M J

    2016-10-01

    There are few reports of coagulation times in marsupial species. Blood samples collected from 14 Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) under anaesthesia during routine health assessments were analysed for prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) using a point-of-care analyser (POC) (Abaxis VSPro®). The wallabies had an aPTT mean of 78.09 s and median of 78.1 s. The PT for all wallabies was greater than 35 s, exceeding the longest time measured on the POC. Although PT was significantly longer, aPTT was similar to the manufacturer's domestic canine reference range. PMID:27671083

  13. A comparison of nutritional status in three time points of liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Zaina, F E; Lopes, R W; Souza, M R D

    2004-05-01

    Patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) often experience dietary restrictions that may influence their nutritional status. With the objective of comparing the status of liver transplant patients pre- versus in the early and late postoperative periods, a retrospective study evaluated 33 adults (63.6% men and 36.4% women) mean age 47 years for body mass index (BMI), current body weight/ideal body weight (%CBW/IBW), current body weight/usual body weight (%CBW/UBW), adequacy of tricipital skin fold (%TSF), generalized adipose reserve (%F), adequacy of mid-upper arm muscle circumference (%MMC), and serum albumin. The elapsed time between nutritional evaluation and LT was 446 days for the pre-LT group, 31 for the early post-LT group, and 244 for the late post-LT group; 30.3% were Child C and 63.6% B in the pre-LT phase. The median value to %TST in pre-LT, early LT, and late LT were 91.7%, 70.8%, and 78.0%, respectively. The analysis of mean value of %F was 25.9% in the pretransplant, 23.3% in early postoperative, and 25.3% in late postoperative stages %MMC was 85.5% for pretransplant patients, it was 86.6% in the early versus 89.9% in the late stages. While BMI was 24.9 kg/m(2) in the preoperative 22.9 kg/m(2) in early, and 24.2 kg/m(2) in late phases. Similarly, concerning %CBW/UBW the mean values were 96.2% in the preoperative group, 64.1% in early, and 101.9% in late groups. The %CBW/IBW mean values were 113.9% in the pre- versus 104.6% in the early and 111.2% in the late periods. The values of serum albumin and %CBW/UBW were statistically different for Child B,C as well as when the patients were not classified by the Child criteria. There was a deterioration in status from pretransplant period to early postoperative with improvement in the late period.

  14. Real time, TV-based, point-image quantizer and sorter

    DOEpatents

    Case, Arthur L.; Davidson, Jackson B.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for improving the vertical resolution in a television-based, two-dimensional readout for radiation detection systems such as are used to determine the location of light or nuclear radiation impinging a target area viewed by a television camera, where it is desired to store the data indicative of the centroid location of such images. In the example embodiment, impinging nuclear radiation detected in the form of a scintillation occurring in a crystal is stored as a charge image on a television camera tube target. The target is scanned in a raster and the image position is stored according to a corresponding vertical scan number and horizontal position number along the scan. To determine the centroid location of an image that may overlap a number of horizontal scan lines along the vertical axis of the raster, digital logic circuits are provided with at least four series-connected shift registers, each having 512 bit positions according to a selected 512 horizontal increment of resolutions along a scan line. The registers are shifted by clock pulses at a rate of 512 pulses per scan line. When an image or portion thereof is detected along a scan, its horizontal center location is determined and the present front bit is set in the first shift register and shifted through the registers one at a time for each horizontal scan. Each register is compared bit-by-bit with the preceding register to detect coincident set bit positions until the last scan line detecting a portion of the image is determined. Depending on the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the image is shifted, circuitry is provided to store the vertical center position of the event according to the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the event is shifted. Interpolation circuitry is provided to determine if the event centroid is between adjacent scan lines and stored in a vertical address accordingly. The horizontal location of the event

  15. An Efficient Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (RT-PPP) Solution for Offshore Surveys in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Nurhan Çelik, Rahmi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the international global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) service (IGS) has launched the real-time service (IGS-RTS). The IGS-RTS has shown promise accuracy in precise point positioning applications. Currently, the precise point positioning technique is used extensively in marine applications. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the real-time precise point positioning (RT-PPP) solution using the IGS-RTS for offshore surveys in Turkey. Dual-frequency GPS data is collected onboard a vessel and then processed using the Bernese 5.2 PPP module. The IGS-RTS precise orbit and clock products are used in order to account for the satellite orbit and clock products. To investigate the accuracy of the RT-PPP technique, the positioning accuracy is assessed and compared with the traditional double-difference solution. It is shown that the RT-PPP solution has good agreement with the double-difference solution. Also, the proposed solution efficiently fulfills the international maritime organization (IMO) standards for the offshore surveys.

  16. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of this part, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of this part, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1265 - How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of this part, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions. (c) If you operate...

  19. Recurrence network-based time series analysis for identifying tipping points in Plio-Pleistocene African climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, J. F.; Donner, R. V.; Trauth, M. H.; Marwan, N.; Schellnhuber, H. J.; Kurths, J.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of paleoclimate time series is usually affected by severe methodological problems, resulting primarily from non-equidistant sampling and uncertain age models. As an alternative to existing methods of time series analysis, the statistical properties of recurrence networks are promising candidates for characterizing a system's nonlinear dynamics and quantifying structural changes in its reconstructed phase space as time evolves. The results of recurrence network analysis are robust under changes in the age model and are not directly affected by non-equidistant sampling of the data. Specifically, we investigate three marine records of African climate variability during the Plio-Pleistocene. We detect several statistically significant dynamical transitions or tipping points and show that the obtained results are qualitatively robust under changes of the relevant parameters of our method, including detrending, size of the running window used for analysis, and embedding delay. Finally, relating the identified tipping points in paleoclimate-variability to speciation and extinction events in the available fossil record of human ancestors contributes to the understanding of climatic mechanisms driving human evolution in Africa during the past 5 million years.

  20. Literature values of terminal half-lives of clozapine are dependent on the time of the last data point.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jim; Mosier, Karen E

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of clozapine is a subject of intensive research because of its narrow therapeutic window and susceptibility to drug-drug interactions. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar for half-life values of clozapine in humans. Twenty-one publications were found to contain terminal half-life information of clozapine in humans along with the time of the last plasma sample. Average values of the terminal half-lives of clozapine were calculated to be 10.2, 13.2, 14.2, 18.3 and 29.2 hours with a last data point at 12, 24, 48, 72 and 120 hours, respectively. This confirms the notion that one would arrive at longer terminal half-lives when longer blood sampling times are used in pharmacokinetic studies on clozapine. "Terminal half-lives" of therapeutic agent are routinely computed and reported in literature. For drugs with a third deep compartment such as clozapine, one should remember to consider the time of the last data point when comparing the "terminal" half-life.

  1. Prospective validation of a 1-hour algorithm to rule-out and rule-in acute myocardial infarction using a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay

    PubMed Central

    Reichlin, Tobias; Twerenbold, Raphael; Wildi, Karin; Gimenez, Maria Rubini; Bergsma, Nathalie; Haaf, Philip; Druey, Sophie; Puelacher, Christian; Moehring, Berit; Freese, Michael; Stelzig, Claudia; Krivoshei, Lian; Hillinger, Petra; Jäger, Cedric; Herrmann, Thomas; Kreutzinger, Philip; Radosavac, Milos; Weidmann, Zoraida Moreno; Pershyna, Kateryna; Honegger, Ursina; Wagener, Max; Vuillomenet, Thierry; Campodarve, Isabel; Bingisser, Roland; Miró, Òscar; Rentsch, Katharina; Bassetti, Stefano; Osswald, Stefan; Mueller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to prospectively validate a novel 1-hour algorithm using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement for early rule-out and rule-in of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: In a multicentre study, we enrolled 1320 patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected acute MI. The high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, incorporating baseline values as well as absolute changes within the first hour, was validated against the final diagnosis. The final diagnosis was then adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists using all available information, including coronary angiography, echocardiography, follow-up data and serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels. Results: Acute MI was the final diagnosis in 17.3% of patients. With application of the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 1-hour algorithm, 786 (59.5%) patients were classified as “rule-out,” 216 (16.4%) were classified as “rule-in” and 318 (24.1%) were classified to the “observational zone.” The sensitivity and the negative predictive value for acute MI in the rule-out zone were 99.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 97.6%–99.9%) and 99.9% (95% CI 99.3%–100%), respectively. The specificity and the positive predictive value for acute MI in the rule-in zone were 95.7% (95% CI 94.3%–96.8%) and 78.2% (95% CI 72.1%–83.6%), respectively. The 1-hour algorithm provided higher negative and positive predictive values than the standard interpretation of highsensitivity cardiac troponin T using a single cut-off level (both p < 0.05). Cumulative 30-day mortality was 0.0%, 1.6% and 1.9% in patients classified in the rule-out, observational and rule-in groups, respectively (p = 0.001). Interpretation: This rapid strategy incorporating high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T baseline values and absolute changes within the first hour substantially accelerated the management of suspected acute MI by allowing safe rule-out as well as accurate

  2. Does Delayed-Time-Point Imaging Improve 18F-FDG-PET in Patients With MALT Lymphoma?

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhoefer, Marius E.; Giraudo, Chiara; Senn, Daniela; Hartenbach, Markus; Weber, Michael; Rausch, Ivo; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Herold, Christian J.; Hacker, Marcus; Pones, Matthias; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Müllauer, Leonhard; Dolak, Werner; Lukas, Julius; Raderer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether in patients with extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT), delayed–time-point 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) performs better than standard–time-point 18F-FDG-PET. Materials and Methods Patients with untreated histologically verified MALT lymphoma, who were undergoing pretherapeutic 18F-FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) and consecutive 18F-FDG-PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using a single 18F-FDG injection, in the course of a larger-scale prospective trial, were included. Region-based sensitivity and specificity, and patient-based sensitivity of the respective 18F-FDG-PET scans at time points 1 (45–60 minutes after tracer injection, TP1) and 2 (100–150 minutes after tracer injection, TP2), relative to the reference standard, were calculated. Lesion-to-liver and lesion-to-blood SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake values) ratios were also assessed. Results 18F-FDG-PET at TP1 was true positive in 15 o f 23 involved regions, and 18F-FDG-PET at TP2 was true-positive in 20 of 23 involved regions; no false-positive regions were noted. Accordingly, region-based sensitivities and specificities were 65.2% (confidence interval [CI], 45.73%–84.67%) and 100% (CI, 100%-100%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP1; and 87.0% (CI, 73.26%–100%) and 100% (CI, 100%-100%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP2, respectively. FDG-PET at TP1 detected lymphoma in at least one nodal or extranodal region in 7 of 13 patients, and 18F-FDG-PET at TP2 in 10 of 13 patients; accordingly, patient-based sensitivity was 53.8% (CI, 26.7%–80.9%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP1, and 76.9% (CI, 54.0%–99.8%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP2. Lesion-to-liver and lesion-to-blood maximum standardized uptake value ratios were significantly lower at TP1 (ratios, 1.05 ± 0.40 and 1.52 ± 0.62) than at TP2 (ratios, 1.67 ± 0.74 and 2.56 ± 1.10; P = 0.003 and P = 0.001). Conclusions Delayed–time-point imaging

  3. The effects of arm movement on reaction time in patients with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Marzieh; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Maroufi, Nader; Ahmadi, Amir; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Emrani, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myofascial pain syndrome is a significant source of mechanical pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of arm movement on reaction time in females with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. Methods: In this interventional study, a convenience sample of fifteen women with one active MTP, fifteen women with one latent MTP in the upper trapezius, and fifteen normal healthy women were participated. Participants were asked to stand for 10 seconds in an erect standing position. Muscle reaction times were recorded including anterior deltoid (AD), cervical paraspinal (CP) lumbar paraspinal (LP), both of upper trapezius (UT), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and medial head of gastrocnemius (GcM). Participants were asked to flex their arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA Test. Results: There was significant differences in motor time and reaction time between active and control groups (p< 0.05) except for GcM. There was no significant difference in motor time between active and passive groups except for UT without MTP and SCM (p< 0.05). Also, there were no significant differences in motor times between latent MTP and control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in premotor times between the three groups. Conclusion: The present study shows that patients with active MTP need more time to react to stimulus, but patients with latent MTP are similar to healthy subjects in the reaction time. Patients with active MTP had less compatibility with environmental stimulations, and they responded to a specific stimulation with variability in Surface Electromyography (SEMG). PMID:26913258

  4. A Time Scheduling Model of Logistics Service Supply Chain Based on the Customer Order Decoupling Point: A Perspective from the Constant Service Operation Time

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  5. A time scheduling model of logistics service supply chain based on the customer order decoupling point: a perspective from the constant service operation time.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC.

  6. A time scheduling model of logistics service supply chain based on the customer order decoupling point: a perspective from the constant service operation time.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  7. Disease progression subtype discovery from longitudinal EMR data with a majority of missing values and unknown initial time points.

    PubMed

    Huopaniemi, Ilkka; Nadkarni, Girish; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Lotay, Vaneet; Ellis, Steve; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin P

    2014-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) contain a longitudinal collection of laboratory data that contains valuable phenotypic information on disease progression of a large collection of patients. These data can be potentially used in medical research or patient care; finding disease progression subtypes is a particularly important application. There are, however, two significant difficulties in utilizing this data for statistical analysis: (a) a large proportion of data is missing and (b) patients are in very different stages of disease progression and there are no well-defined start points of the time series. We present a Bayesian machine learning model that overcomes these difficulties. The method can use highly incomplete time-series measurement of varying lengths, it aligns together similar trajectories in different phases and is capable of finding consistent disease progression subtypes. We demonstrate the method on finding chronic kidney disease progression subtypes.

  8. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI. PMID:27408892

  9. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI.

  10. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI. PMID:27408892

  11. Beach response dynamics of a littoral cell using a 17-year single-point time series of sand thickness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, P.L.; Hubbard, D.M.; Dugan, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    A 17-year time series of near-daily sand thickness measurements at a single intertidal location was compared with 5. years of semi-annual 3-dimensional beach surveys at the same beach, and at two other beaches within the same littoral cell. The daily single point measurements correlated extremely well with the mean beach elevation and shoreline position of ten high-spatial resolution beach surveys. Correlations were statistically significant at all spatial scales, even for beach surveys 10s of kilometers downcoast, and therefore variability at the single point monitoring site was representative of regional coastal behavior, allowing us to examine nearly two decades of continuous coastal evolution. The annual cycle of beach oscillations dominated the signal, typical of this region, with additional, less intense spectral peaks associated with seasonal wave energy fluctuations (~. 45 to 90. days), as well as full lunar (~. 29. days) and semi-lunar (~. 13. days; spring-neap cycle) tidal cycles. Sand thickness variability was statistically linked to wave energy with a 2. month peak lag, as well as the average of the previous 7-8. months of wave energy. Longer term anomalies in sand thickness were also apparent on time scales up to 15. months. Our analyses suggest that spatially-limited morphological data sets can be extremely valuable (with robust validation) for understanding the details of beach response to wave energy over timescales that are not resolved by typical survey intervals, as well as the regional behavior of coastal systems. ?? 2011.

  12. Location and release time identification of pollution point source in river networks based on the Backward Probability Method.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Alireza; Mazaheri, Mehdi; Mohammad Vali Samani, Jamal

    2016-09-15

    The pollution of rivers due to accidental spills is a major threat to environment and human health. To protect river systems from accidental spills, it is essential to introduce a reliable tool for identification process. Backward Probability Method (BPM) is one of the most recommended tools that is able to introduce information related to the prior location and the release time of the pollution. This method was originally developed and employed in groundwater pollution source identification problems. One of the objectives of this study is to apply this method in identifying the pollution source location and release time in surface waters, mainly in rivers. To accomplish this task, a numerical model is developed based on the adjoint analysis. Then the developed model is verified using analytical solution and some real data. The second objective of this study is to extend the method to pollution source identification in river networks. In this regard, a hypothetical test case is considered. In the later simulations, all of the suspected points are identified, using only one backward simulation. The results demonstrated that all suspected points, determined by the BPM could be a possible pollution source. The proposed approach is accurate and computationally efficient and does not need any simplification in river geometry and flow. Due to this simplicity, it is highly recommended for practical purposes.

  13. Location and release time identification of pollution point source in river networks based on the Backward Probability Method.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Alireza; Mazaheri, Mehdi; Mohammad Vali Samani, Jamal

    2016-09-15

    The pollution of rivers due to accidental spills is a major threat to environment and human health. To protect river systems from accidental spills, it is essential to introduce a reliable tool for identification process. Backward Probability Method (BPM) is one of the most recommended tools that is able to introduce information related to the prior location and the release time of the pollution. This method was originally developed and employed in groundwater pollution source identification problems. One of the objectives of this study is to apply this method in identifying the pollution source location and release time in surface waters, mainly in rivers. To accomplish this task, a numerical model is developed based on the adjoint analysis. Then the developed model is verified using analytical solution and some real data. The second objective of this study is to extend the method to pollution source identification in river networks. In this regard, a hypothetical test case is considered. In the later simulations, all of the suspected points are identified, using only one backward simulation. The results demonstrated that all suspected points, determined by the BPM could be a possible pollution source. The proposed approach is accurate and computationally efficient and does not need any simplification in river geometry and flow. Due to this simplicity, it is highly recommended for practical purposes. PMID:27219462

  14. ICESat Laser Altimeter Pointing, Ranging and Timing Calibration from Integrated Residual Analysis: A Summary of Early Mission Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutchke, Scott B.; Rowlands, David D.; Harding, David J.; Bufton, Jack L.; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Williams, Teresa A.

    2003-01-01

    On January 12, 2003 the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) was successfUlly placed into orbit. The ICESat mission carries the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), which consists of three near-infrared lasers that operate at 40 short pulses per second. The instrument has collected precise elevation measurements of the ice sheets, sea ice roughness and thickness, ocean and land surface elevations and surface reflectivity. The accurate geolocation of GLAS's surface returns, the spots from which the laser energy reflects on the Earth's surface, is a critical issue in the scientific application of these data Pointing, ranging, timing and orbit errors must be compensated to accurately geolocate the laser altimeter surface returns. Towards this end, the laser range observations can be fully exploited in an integrated residual analysis to accurately calibrate these geolocation/instrument parameters. Early mission ICESat data have been simultaneously processed as direct altimetry from ocean sweeps along with dynamic crossovers resulting in a preliminary calibration of laser pointing, ranging and timing. The calibration methodology and early mission analysis results are summarized in this paper along with future calibration activities

  15. Skilled players' and novices' difficulty anticipating left- vs. right-handed opponents' action intentions varies across different points in time.

    PubMed

    Loffing, Florian; Hagemann, Norbert; Schorer, Jörg; Baker, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    A left-handers' performance advantage in interactive sports is assumed to result from their relative rarity compared to right-handers. Part of this advantage may be explained by athletes facing difficulties anticipating left-handers' action intentions, particularly when anticipation is based on kinematic cues available at an early stage of an opponent's movement. Here we tested whether the type of volleyball attack is predicted better against right- vs. left-handed opponents' movements and whether such handedness effects are evident at earlier time points in skilled players than novices. In a video-based experiment volleyball players and novices predicted the type of shot (i.e., smash vs. lob) of left- and right-handed volleyball attacks occluded at six different time points. Overall, right-handed attacks were better anticipated than left-handed attacks, volleyball players outperformed novices, and performance improved in later occlusion conditions. Moreover, in skilled players the handedness effect was most pronounced when attacks were occluded 480 ms prior to hand-ball-contact, whereas in novices it was most evident 240 ms prior to hand-ball-contact. Our findings provide further evidence of the effect of an opponent's handedness on action outcome anticipation and suggest that its occurrence in the course of an opponent's unfolding action likely depends on an observers' domain-specific skill.

  16. Long-time behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function at low densities and near the critical point of simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Dib, R F A; Ould-Kaddour, F; Levesque, D

    2006-07-01

    Numerous theoretical and numerical works have been devoted to the study of the algebraic decrease at large times of the velocity autocorrelation function of particles in a fluid. The derivation of this behavior, the so-called long-time tail, generally based on linearized hydrodynamics, makes no reference to any specific characteristic of the particle interactions. However, in the literature doubts have been expressed about the possibility that by numerical simulations the long-time tail can be observed in the whole fluid phase domain of systems in which the particles interact by soft-core and attractive pair potentials. In this work, extensive and accurate molecular-dynamics simulations establish that the predicted long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function exists in a low-density fluid of particles interacting by a soft-repulsive potential and near the liquid-gas critical point of a Lennard-Jones system. These results contribute to the confirmation that the algebraic decay of the velocity autocorrelation function is universal in these fluid systems.

  17. Real-time dynamics induced by quenches across the quantum critical points in gapless Fermi systems with a magnetic impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleine, Christian; Mußhoff, Julian; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2014-12-01

    The energy-dependent scattering of fermions from a localized orbital at an energy-dependent rate Γ (ɛ ) ∝|ɛ| r gives rise to quantum critical points (QCPs) in the pseudogap single-impurity Anderson model separating a local moment phase with an unscreened spin moment from a strong-coupling phase which slightly deviates from the screened phase of standard Kondo problem. Using the time-dependent numerical renormalization group (TD-NRG) approach we show that local dynamic properties always equilibrate towards a steady-state value even for quenches across the QCP but with systematic deviations from the thermal equilibrium depending on the distance to the critical coupling. Local nonequilibrium properties are presented for interaction quenches and hybridization quenches. We augment our numerical data by an analytical calculation that becomes exact at short times and find excellent agreement between the numerics and the analytical theory. For interaction quenches within the screened phase we find a universal function for the time-dependent local double occupancy. We trace back the discrepancy between our results and the data obtained by a time-dependent Gutzwiller variational approach to restrictions of the wave-function ansatz in the Gutzwiller theory: while the NRG ground states properly account for the formation of an extended spin moment which decouples from the system in the unscreened phase, the Gutzwiller ansatz only allows the formation of the spin moment on the local impurity orbital.

  18. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G.; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Bastin, Mark E.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39+5 weeks, range 37+2–41+6). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development. PMID:27242423

  19. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Bastin, Mark E; Boardman, James P

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39(+5) weeks, range 37(+2)-41(+6)). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development.

  20. Clinical impact of time-of-flight and point response modeling in PET reconstructions: a lesion detection study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua; Casey, Michael; Townsend, David; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling have been shown to improve PET reconstructions, but the impact on physicians in the clinical setting has not been thoroughly investigated. A lesion detection and localization study was performed using simulated lesions in real patient images. Four reconstruction schemes were considered: ordinary Poisson OSEM (OP) alone and combined with TOF, PSF, and TOF + PSF. The images were presented to physicians experienced in reading PET images, and the performance of each was quantified using localization receiver operating characteristic. Numerical observers (non-prewhitening and Hotelling) were used to identify optimal reconstruction parameters, and observer SNR was compared to the performance of the physicians. The numerical models showed good agreement with human performance, and best performance was achieved by both when using TOF + PSF. These findings suggest a large potential benefit of TOF + PSF for oncology PET studies, especially in the detection of small, low-intensity, focal disease in larger patients.

  1. Defect states and exceptional point splitting in the band gaps of one-dimensional parity-time lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2015-08-24

    We investigated defect states in band gaps of one-dimensional photonic lattices with delicate modulations of gain and loss that respect parity-time-symmetry (PT-symmetry), viz. n(z) = n*(-z). For the sake of generality, we employ not only periodic structures but also quasiperiodic structures, e.g. Fibonacci sequences, to construct aperiodic PT lattices. Differed from lossless systems for which the defect state is related to only one exceptional point (EP) of the S-matrix, we observed the splitting of one EP into a pair after the introduction of judiciously designed gain and loss in those PT systems, where the defect state enters a non-threshold broken symmetry phase bounded by the EP pair. Some interesting properties associated with defect states and EP splitting are demonstrated, such as enhanced spectral localization, double optical phase abrupt change, and wavelength sensitive reversion of unidirectional transparency. PMID:26368199

  2. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  3. A space-time point process model for analyzing and predicting case patterns of diarrheal disease in northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jaeil; Johnson, Timothy D; Bhavnani, Darlene; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2014-06-01

    We consider modeling case-patterns under a complex spatial and longitudinal sampling design as conducted via a serial case-control study of diarrheal disease in northwestern Ecuador. We build a two-stage space-time model to understand the role of spatially and temporally referenced covariates that reflect social and natural environments in the sampled region, after accounting for unmeasured residual heterogeneities. All diarrheal case events are collected from 21 sampled communities in Esmeraldes province in Ecuador, during seven sampling cycles from 2003 to 2008. The region of interest comprises 158 communities along a river basin. Prediction of case counts at unsampled communities at a future time is of interest along with estimation of risk-related parameters. We propose a computationally feasible two-stage Bayesian approach to estimate the risk-related parameters and conduct predictive inference. We first apply the log Gaussian Cox process (LGCP), commonly used to model spatial clustering of point patterns, to accommodate temporal variation within the sampled communities. Prediction of the number of cases at unsampled communities at a future time is obtained by a disease mapping model conditional on the expected case counts from Stage I.

  4. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM).

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  5. Reducing start-up time and minimizing energy losses of Microbial Fuel Cells using Maximum Power Point Tracking strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molognoni, Daniele; Puig, Sebastià; Balaguer, M. Dolors; Liberale, Alessandro; Capodaglio, Andrea G.; Callegari, Arianna; Colprim, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are considered to be an environmental friendly energy conversion technology. The main limitations that delay their industrialization include low current and power densities achievable and long start-up times. Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) has been proposed as a method to enhance MFCs electrical performances. However, the specialized literature is still lacking of experimental works on scaled-up reactors and/or real wastewater utilization. This study evaluates the impact of a MPPT system applied to MFCs treating swine wastewater in terms of start-up time and long-term performance. For this purpose, two replicate cells were compared, one with applied MPPT control and one working with fixed resistance. Both MFCs were continuously fed with swine wastewater to validate the control system under real and dynamic conditions. The study demonstrated that the automatic resistance control was able to reduce the start-up time of about one month. Moreover, MPPT system increased of 40% the Coulombic efficiency at steady-state conditions, reduced energy losses associated with anode and cathode reactions and limited methanogenic activity in the anode chamber. A power density of 5.0 ± 0.2 W m-3 NAC was achieved feeding the system at an organic loading rate of 10 kg COD m-3 d-1.

  6. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM).

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission.

  7. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission.

  8. Effects of time and point-of-use devices on arsenic levels in Southeastern Michigan drinking water, USA.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Melissa J; Meliker, Jaymie R; Nriagu, Jerome O

    2006-10-01

    Health effects associated with chronic, low-level exposures to arsenic in drinking water (<100 microg/L) remain unclear, in part due to uncertainties in assessing exposure. Drinking water concentrations have been used to assess past exposure to arsenic in epidemiological studies, under the assumption that a single measurement can be used to estimate historical exposure. This study aims to better understand (1) temporal variability in arsenic concentrations in drinking water and (2) the impact of point-of-use (POU) treatment devices on arsenic exposure measurements, and on reliability of the exposure measurement for population-level studies. Multiple drinking water samples were collected at two points in time (an average of fourteen months apart) for 261 individuals enrolled in a case-control study of arsenic exposure and bladder cancer in Michigan. Sources of drinking water included private wells (n = 221), public water supplies (n = 33), and bottled water (n = 7); mean arsenic concentration was highest in private wells (7.28 microg/L) and lowest in bottled water samples (0.28 microg/L). Arsenic concentrations in primary drinking water samples were highly correlated (r = 0.88, p < 0.0001, n = 196), with 3% of the water sources exceeding the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) in one sample but not in the other sample. Measurement reproducibility did not vary by type of POU device (e.g., softener, filter, reverse osmosis system). Arsenic concentrations did differ, however, between samples treated with POU devices and untreated samples taken on the same day. Substantial differences in arsenic concentrations were consistently observed for reverse osmosis systems; other POU devices had variable effects on arsenic concentrations. These results indicate that while a single residential arsenic measurement may be used to represent exposure in this region, researchers must obtain information on changes in water source and POU

  9. Atmospheric plume progression as a function of time and distance from the release point for radioactive isotopes.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Paul W; Bowyer, Ted W; Cameron, Ian M; Hayes, James C; Miley, Harry S

    2015-10-01

    The radionuclide network of the International Monitoring System comprises up to 80 stations around the world that have aerosol and xenon monitoring systems designed to detect releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere from nuclear explosions. A rule of thumb description of plume concentration and duration versus time and distance from the release point is useful when designing and deploying new sample collection systems. This paper uses plume development from atmospheric transport modeling to provide a power-law rule describing atmospheric dilution factors as a function of distance from the release point. Consider the plume center-line concentration seen by a ground-level sampler as a function of time based on a short-duration ground-level release of a nondepositing radioactive tracer. The concentration C (Bq m(-3)) near the ground varies with distance from the source with the relationship C=R×A(D,C) ×e (-λ(-1.552+0.0405×D)) × 5.37×10(-8) × D(-2.35) where R is the release magnitude (Bq), D is the separation distance (km) from the ground level release to the measurement location, λ is the decay constant (h(-1)) for the radionuclide of interest and AD,C is an attenuation factor that depends on the length of the sample collection period. This relationship is based on the median concentration for 10 release locations with different geographic characteristics and 365 days of releases at each location, and it has an R(2) of 0.99 for 32 distances from 100 to 3000 km. In addition, 90 percent of the modeled plumes fall within approximately one order of magnitude of this curve for all distances.

  10. A multiscale maximum entropy moment closure for locally regulated space-time point process models of population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Raghib, Michael; Hill, Nicholas A; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of structure in biological populations challenges fundamental assumptions at the heart of continuum models of population dynamics based only on mean densities (local or global). Individual-based models (IBMs) were introduced during the last decade in an attempt to overcome this limitation by following explicitly each individual in the population. Although the IBM approach has been quite useful, the capability to follow each individual usually comes at the expense of analytical tract ability, which limits the generality of the statements that can be made. For the specific case of spatial structure in populations of sessile (and identical) organisms, space-time point processes with local regulation seem to cover the middle ground between analytical tract ability and a higher degree of biological realism. This approach has shown that simplified representations of fecundity, local dispersal and density-dependent mortality weighted by the local competitive environment are sufficient to generate spatial patterns that mimic field observations. Continuum approximations of these stochastic processes try to distill their fundamental properties, and they keep track of not only mean densities, but also higher order spatial correlations. However, due to the non-linearities involved they result in infinite hierarchies of moment equations. This leads to the problem of finding a 'moment closure'; that is, an appropriate order of (lower order) truncation, together with a method of expressing the highest order density not explicitly modelled in the truncated hierarchy in terms of the lower order densities. We use the principle of constrained maximum entropy to derive a closure relationship for truncation at second order using normalisation and the product densities of first and second orders as constraints, and apply it to one such hierarchy. The resulting 'maxent' closure is similar to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, or 'power-3' closure, but it is

  11. Adaptive error detection for HDR/PDR brachytherapy: Guidance for decision making during real-time in vivo point dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kertzscher, Gustavo Andersen, Claus E.; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents an adaptive error detection algorithm (AEDA) for real-timein vivo point dosimetry during high dose rate (HDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BT) where the error identification, in contrast to existing approaches, does not depend on an a priori reconstruction of the dosimeter position. Instead, the treatment is judged based on dose rate comparisons between measurements and calculations of the most viable dosimeter position provided by the AEDA in a data driven approach. As a result, the AEDA compensates for false error cases related to systematic effects of the dosimeter position reconstruction. Given its nearly exclusive dependence on stable dosimeter positioning, the AEDA allows for a substantially simplified and time efficient real-time in vivo BT dosimetry implementation. Methods: In the event of a measured potential treatment error, the AEDA proposes the most viable dosimeter position out of alternatives to the original reconstruction by means of a data driven matching procedure between dose rate distributions. If measured dose rates do not differ significantly from the most viable alternative, the initial error indication may be attributed to a mispositioned or misreconstructed dosimeter (false error). However, if the error declaration persists, no viable dosimeter position can be found to explain the error, hence the discrepancy is more likely to originate from a misplaced or misreconstructed source applicator or from erroneously connected source guide tubes (true error). Results: The AEDA applied on twoin vivo dosimetry implementations for pulsed dose rate BT demonstrated that the AEDA correctly described effects responsible for initial error indications. The AEDA was able to correctly identify the major part of all permutations of simulated guide tube swap errors and simulated shifts of individual needles from the original reconstruction. Unidentified errors corresponded to scenarios where the dosimeter position was

  12. CONSORT: Effects of adding adefovirdipivoxil to peginterferon alfa-2a at different time points on HBeAg-positivepatients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ka; Cao, Hong; Liang, Jiayi; Shu, Xin; Sun, Haixia; Li, Gang; Xu, Qihuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy and safety of the addition of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) (started at different time points) to pegylated interferon alpha-2a (PEG-INF-α2a) and PEG-INF-α2a monotherapy. This prospective, randomized study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of PEG-INF-α2a and ADV at different time points.120 patients were randomized into groups that received PEG-INF-α2a as monotherapy (group A) or in combination with ADV started at week 0 (group B), 12 (group C), or 24 (group D). All patients were followed for 48 weeks. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed. Methods: Patients in group a received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a by subcutaneous injection once weekly for 48 weeks. Patients in the ADV add-on group received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a subcutaneously once weekly and received 10 mg of ADV administered once daily for 48 weeks. HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBeAg, and hepatitis B e antibody levels were determined. Responses were determined at week 12 (ADV add-on), the end of treatment for PEG-INF-α2a (48weeks) and ADV (EOT) and at the end of 96 weeks of follow-up (EOF). Results: The rate of HBV DNA loss were higher in the combination groups than group A at the week 12, week 48, the EOT and EOF (P < 0.05). The rates of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss were similar among the treatment groups (P>0.05). The alanineaminotransferase (ALT) normalization rate was higher in the combination group than group A only at the EOT (P = 0.007). By the EOF, the patients with ADV added at week 12 achieved higher rates of HBV DNA loss (71.9%), HBeAg seroconversion (50.0%), HBsAg loss (15.6%), and ALT normalization (78.1%). Conclusions: PEG-INF-α2a plus ADV combination therapy is safe and superior to PEG-INF-α2amonotherapyfor decreasing serum HBV DNA and normalizing the ALT level but has no significant impact on the rate of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss. Adding ADV at week 12 may be an

  13. Why timing matters in a coastal sea: Trends, variability and tipping points in the Strait of Georgia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riche, O.; Johannessen, S. C.; Macdonald, R. W.

    2014-03-01

    too short to produce a confident assessment. The timing of geochemical cycles in the Strait of Georgia is delicately poised, with, for example, deep-water oxygen reaching a hypoxic tolerance threshold in the spring, just before deep-water renewal replenishes the oxygen from outside. However, long-term trends in oxygen, temperature and timing of biological activity may lead to the crossing of crucial biological tipping points within this century. Timing is particularly important for monitoring. Relatively long records for basic water properties like temperature and salinity are accompanied by much shorter records for biogeochemical properties like dissolved O2, pH, nutrients and vertical flux, making it difficult to assemble a clear picture of the sorts of changes that may be occurring in the latter. A confident assessment of the ecological resilience of the Strait of Georgia will require longer time series of biological and geochemical properties that are collected with consideration for the strong seasonal variability.

  14. Effect of time-of-flight and point spread function modeling on detectability of myocardial defects in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Nappi, Carmela

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A study was designed to investigate the impact of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling on the detectability of myocardial defects. Methods: Clinical FDG-PET data were used to generate populations of defect-present and defect-absent images. Defects were incorporated at three contrast levels, and images were reconstructed by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) iterative methods including ordinary Poisson, alone and with PSF, TOF, and PSF+TOF. Channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was the surrogate for human observer performance. Results: For three iterations, 12 subsets, and no postreconstruction smoothing, TOF improved overall defect detection SNR by 8.6% as compared to its non-TOF counterpart for all the defect contrasts. Due to the slow convergence of PSF reconstruction, PSF yielded 4.4% less SNR than non-PSF. For reconstruction parameters (iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing kernel size) optimizing observer SNR, PSF showed larger improvement for faint defects. The combination of TOF and PSF improved mean detection SNR as compared to non-TOF and non-PSF counterparts by 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. Conclusions: For typical reconstruction protocol used in clinical practice, i.e., less than five iterations, TOF improved defect detectability. In contrast, PSF generally yielded less detectability. For large number of iterations, TOF+PSF yields the best observer performance.

  15. The effects of cuing in time-shared tasks. [for aircraft flight route-way-point information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chechile, R. A.; Sadoski, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two divided-attention experiments involving the editing of route-way-point displays on an avionics computer unit are reported. Two side tasks were required of the subjects, and either no cue, verbal cues appearing on the CRT, or symbolic cues (lights on the keyboard adjacent to keys to be used) were given to facilitate the primary editing task. Forty female and 30 male undergraduates were trained in the separate and combined tasks and divided randomly into groups of 25 for the cuing tests. A second test with three 10-subject groups was conducted at least one month later to investigate the efficacy of cuing for infrequently used procedures. It is found that only symbolic cuing significantly improved primary-task performance, increasing editing accuracy in the repetitive tests and reducing editing time in the delayed tests. Verbal cuing, probably because it requires additional cognitive effort, has no significant beneficial effect. These results are considered important for designing instruments for work environments requiring the performance of concurrent tasks, and as aircraft cockpits.

  16. Quantum critical point of Dirac fermions studied using efficient continuous-time projector quantum Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Iazzi, Mauro; Corboz, Philippe; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Quantum phase transition (QPT) of Dirac fermions is a fascinating topic both in condensed matter and in high energy physics. Besides its immediate connection to fundamental problems like mass generation and exotic phases of matter, it provides a common playground where state of the art numerical simulations can be crosschecked with various effective field theory predictions, thus deepen our understanding of both fields. The universality class of the QPT is fundamentally different from the usual bosonic field theory because of the coupling to the gapless fermionic mode at the critical point. We study lattice models with spinless and multi-flavor Dirac fermions using the newly developed efficient continuous-time projector quantum Monte Carlo method. Besides eliminating the Trotter error, the method also enables us to directly calculate derivative observables in a continuous range of interaction strengths, thus greatly enhancing the resolution of the quantum critical region. Compatible results are also obtained from infinite projected entangled-pair states calculations. We compare these numerical results with predictions of the Gross-Neveu theory and discuss their physical implications.

  17. Mild mental retardation in Gothenburg children born between 1966-70. Changes between two points of time.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, G; Lewerth, A; Olsson, E; Westerberg, B

    1987-01-01

    Changes between two points of time in prevalence rates and distribution of IQ values in mentally retarded children resident in Gothenburg, Sweden, and born between 1966-70 were analysed. The children at the first census date in 1978 were aged 8-12 years and at the second in 1984 aged 14-18 years. The population-based prevalence rates were 3.7 per 1,000 in 1978 and 3.9 in 1984 for mild mental retardation (MMR; IQ 50-70) and 3.0 and 3.3 respectively for severe mental retardation (SMR; IQ less than 50). The majority (82%) of the MMR children remained on the same intellectual and educational level. The changes that occurred were mainly downwards. Thirteen of the 91 MMR children in the 1978 series demonstrated IQ values below 50 by 1984. Ten of these 13 children had a clear biomedical origin for their retardation, e.g. six with cerebral palsy syndromes. The IQ level of three MMR children had improved to 71-85. Nineteen newcomers were identified as MMR. 14 of these had IQ test scores above 70 in 1978 including one with cerebral palsy and 5 with minimal brain dysfunction syndromes. The prevalence of children registered in the Board for Provisions and Services to the Mentally Retarded, all IQ categories included, increased from 6.7 per 1,000 in 1978 to 8.1 in 1984. One third of this increase was due to the greater recording of youths with an IQ above 75.

  18. Change Points in the Population Trends of Aerial-Insectivorous Birds in North America: Synchronized in Time across Species and Regions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam C; Hudson, Marie-Anne R; Downes, Constance M; Francis, Charles M

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of aerial insectivorous birds are in steep decline. Aerial insectivores (AI) are a group of bird species that feed almost exclusively on insects in flight, and include swallows, swifts, nightjars, and flycatchers. The causes of the declines are not well understood. Indeed, it is not clear when the declines began, or whether the declines are shared across all species in the group (e.g., caused by changes in flying insect populations) or specific to each species (e.g., caused by changes in species' breeding habitat). A recent study suggested that population trends of aerial insectivores changed for the worse in the 1980s. If there was such a change point in trends of the group, understanding its timing and geographic pattern could help identify potential causes of the decline. We used a hierarchical Bayesian, penalized regression spline, change point model to estimate group-level change points in the trends of 22 species of AI, across 153 geographic strata of North America. We found evidence for group-level change points in 85% of the strata. Change points for flycatchers (FC) were distinct from those for swallows, swifts and nightjars (SSN) across North America, except in the Northeast, where all AI shared the same group-level change points. During the 1980s, there was a negative change point across most of North America, in the trends of SSN. For FC, the group-level change points were more geographically variable, and in many regions there were two: a positive change point followed by a negative change point. This group-level synchrony in AI population trends is likely evidence of a response to a common environmental factor(s) with similar effects on many species across broad spatial extents. The timing and geographic patterns of the change points that we identify here should provide a spring-board for research into the causes behind aerial insectivore declines. PMID:26147572

  19. Change Points in the Population Trends of Aerial-Insectivorous Birds in North America: Synchronized in Time across Species and Regions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam C.; Hudson, Marie-Anne R.; Downes, Constance M.; Francis, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of aerial insectivorous birds are in steep decline. Aerial insectivores (AI) are a group of bird species that feed almost exclusively on insects in flight, and include swallows, swifts, nightjars, and flycatchers. The causes of the declines are not well understood. Indeed, it is not clear when the declines began, or whether the declines are shared across all species in the group (e.g., caused by changes in flying insect populations) or specific to each species (e.g., caused by changes in species’ breeding habitat). A recent study suggested that population trends of aerial insectivores changed for the worse in the 1980s. If there was such a change point in trends of the group, understanding its timing and geographic pattern could help identify potential causes of the decline. We used a hierarchical Bayesian, penalized regression spline, change point model to estimate group-level change points in the trends of 22 species of AI, across 153 geographic strata of North America. We found evidence for group-level change points in 85% of the strata. Change points for flycatchers (FC) were distinct from those for swallows, swifts and nightjars (SSN) across North America, except in the Northeast, where all AI shared the same group-level change points. During the 1980s, there was a negative change point across most of North America, in the trends of SSN. For FC, the group-level change points were more geographically variable, and in many regions there were two: a positive change point followed by a negative change point. This group-level synchrony in AI population trends is likely evidence of a response to a common environmental factor(s) with similar effects on many species across broad spatial extents. The timing and geographic patterns of the change points that we identify here should provide a spring-board for research into the causes behind aerial insectivore declines. PMID:26147572

  20. Change Points in the Population Trends of Aerial-Insectivorous Birds in North America: Synchronized in Time across Species and Regions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam C; Hudson, Marie-Anne R; Downes, Constance M; Francis, Charles M

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of aerial insectivorous birds are in steep decline. Aerial insectivores (AI) are a group of bird species that feed almost exclusively on insects in flight, and include swallows, swifts, nightjars, and flycatchers. The causes of the declines are not well understood. Indeed, it is not clear when the declines began, or whether the declines are shared across all species in the group (e.g., caused by changes in flying insect populations) or specific to each species (e.g., caused by changes in species' breeding habitat). A recent study suggested that population trends of aerial insectivores changed for the worse in the 1980s. If there was such a change point in trends of the group, understanding its timing and geographic pattern could help identify potential causes of the decline. We used a hierarchical Bayesian, penalized regression spline, change point model to estimate group-level change points in the trends of 22 species of AI, across 153 geographic strata of North America. We found evidence for group-level change points in 85% of the strata. Change points for flycatchers (FC) were distinct from those for swallows, swifts and nightjars (SSN) across North America, except in the Northeast, where all AI shared the same group-level change points. During the 1980s, there was a negative change point across most of North America, in the trends of SSN. For FC, the group-level change points were more geographically variable, and in many regions there were two: a positive change point followed by a negative change point. This group-level synchrony in AI population trends is likely evidence of a response to a common environmental factor(s) with similar effects on many species across broad spatial extents. The timing and geographic patterns of the change points that we identify here should provide a spring-board for research into the causes behind aerial insectivore declines.

  1. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: A conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Albertson, John D.

    2015-08-01

    Emerging mobile fugitive emissions detection and measurement approaches require robust inverse source algorithms to be effective. Two Gaussian plume inverse approaches are described for estimating emission rates from ground-level point sources observed from remote vantage points. The techniques were tested using data from 41 controlled methane release experiments (14 studies) and further investigated using 7 field studies executed downwind of oil and gas well pads in Wyoming. Analyzed measurements were acquired from stationary observation locations 18-106 m downwind of the emission sources. From the fluctuating wind direction, the lateral plume geometry is reconstructed using a derived relationship between the wind direction and crosswind plume position. The crosswind plume spread is determined with both modeled and reconstructed Gaussian plume approaches and estimates of source emission rates are found through inversion. The source emission rates were compared to a simple point source Gaussian emission estimation approach that is part of Draft EPA Method OTM 33A. Compared to the known release rates, the modeled, reconstructed, and point source Gaussian controlled release results yield average percent errors of -5%, -2%, and 6% with standard deviations of 29%, 25%, and 37%, respectively. Compared to each other, the three methods agree within 30% for 78% of all 48 observations (41 CR and 7 Wyoming).

  2. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: a conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a technique for determining the trace gas emission rate from a point source. The technique was tested using data from controlled methane release experiments and from measurement downwind of a natural gas production facility in Wyoming. Concentration measuremen...

  3. Real-time attitude commanding to detect coverage gaps and generate high resolution point clouds for RSO shape characterization with a laser rangefinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M.; Beck, J.; Udrea, B.

    This paper expands on previous studies by the authors into 3D imaging with a single-beam laser rangefinder (LRF) by implementing real-time attitude maneuvers of a chaser satellite flying in relative orbit around a resident space object (RSO). Point clouds generated with an LRF are much sparser than those generated with an imaging LIDAR, making it difficult to autonomously distinguish between gaps in coverage and truly empty space. Furthermore, if both the attitude and the shape of the target RSO are unknown, it is particularly difficult to register a collection of LRF strike points together and detect gaps in strike point coverage in realtime. This paper presents the incorporation of a narrow field of-view (NFOV) camera that detects the strike point on the RSO and supplements LRF distance measurements with image data. This data is used to generate attitude command profiles that efficiently fill LRF coverage gaps and generate high density point clouds, thus maximizing coverage of an unknown RSO. Results obtained so far point the way to a real-time implementation of the algorithm. A method to detect and close gaps in LRF strike point coverage is presented first. Coverage gap detection is achieved using Voronoi diagrams, where Voronoi cells are centered at the LRF strike points. A three-part algorithm is used that 1) creates a 3D panoramic map from “ stitched” NFOV camera images; 2) correlates the areas of sparse LRF coverage to the map; and 3) generates attitude commands to close the coverage gaps. The map provides a consistent and reliable method to register positions of strike points relative to each other and to the NFOV image of the RSO without a priori knowledge of the RSO attitude. Using this algorithm, gaps and sparse areas in LRF coverage are covered with strike points, allowing for the generation of a higher-resolution point cloud than that obtained with preprogrammed attitude profiles. Attitude maneuvers can now be designed on-line in real-ti- e such

  4. Effects of Varying Epoch Lengths, Wear Time Algorithms, and Activity Cut-Points on Estimates of Child Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity from Accelerometer Data

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Jorge A.; Haydel, K. Farish; Davila, Tania; Desai, Manisha; Haskell, William L.; Matheson, Donna; Robinson, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of accelerometer epoch lengths, wear time (WT) algorithms, and activity cut-points on estimates of WT, sedentary behavior (SB), and physical activity (PA). Methods 268 7–11 year-olds with BMI ≥ 85th percentile for age and sex wore accelerometers on their right hips for 4–7 days. Data were processed and analyzed at epoch lengths of 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-seconds. For each epoch length, WT minutes/day was determined using three common WT algorithms, and minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) PA were determined using five common activity cut-points. ANOVA tested differences in WT, SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA when using the different epoch lengths, WT algorithms, and activity cut-points. Results WT minutes/day varied significantly by epoch length when using the NHANES WT algorithm (p < .0001), but did not vary significantly by epoch length when using the ≥ 20 minute consecutive zero or Choi WT algorithms. Minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA varied significantly by epoch length for all sets of activity cut-points tested with all three WT algorithms (all p < .0001). Across all epoch lengths, minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA also varied significantly across all sets of activity cut-points with all three WT algorithms (all p < .0001). Conclusions The common practice of converting WT algorithms and activity cut-point definitions to match different epoch lengths may introduce significant errors. Estimates of SB and PA from studies that process and analyze data using different epoch lengths, WT algorithms, and/or activity cut-points are not comparable, potentially leading to very different results, interpretations, and conclusions, misleading research and public policy. PMID:26938240

  5. A comparison of inner ear imaging features at different time points of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honglei; Ou, Yongkang; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Ya; Xiong, Hao; Xu, Yaodong

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that about half of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) show high signals in the affected inner ear on three-dimensional, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI). These signals may reflect minor hemorrhage or an increased concentration of protein in the inner ear, which has passed through blood vessels with increased permeability. Our objective was to compare the positive ratio of the high signal in affected inner ears at different time points to determine the suitable imaging time point for 3D-FLAIR MRI in SSNHL. 3D-FLAIR MRI images were taken at three times, precontrast and approximately 10 min and 4 h after intravenous injection of a single dose of gadodiamide (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg), in 46 patients with SNHL. We compared the positive findings of the high signals in the inner ear of patients with SNHL as well as the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between the affected cochleae and unaffected cochleae at three time points. The positive ratios of the high signals in the affected inner ear at the time points of precontrast and 10 min and 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection were 26.1, 32.6, and 41.3%, respectively. The high signal intensity ratios of affected inner ears at the three time points were 1.28, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively. The difference between the positive ratios precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection was statistically significant (P = 0.006); the differences between the positive ratios at 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection and precontrast and between the ratios at 4 h and 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection were not statistically significant. The time effects of the median value of SIR were not significant (P = 0.064). We do not recommend 4 h after intravenous Gd injection as a time point to image the inner ear in SNHL. We believe that imaging precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection are suitable time points.

  6. YO{exclamation_point} - A Time-of-Arrival Receiver for Removal of Femtosecond Helicity-Correlated Beam Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Musson, J.; Allison, T.; Freyberger, A.; Kuhn, J.; Quinn, B.

    2004-11-10

    The G0 parity violation experiment at Jefferson Lab is based on time-of-flight measurements, and is sensitive to timing effects between the two electron helicity states of the beam. Photon counters triggered by time-of-arrival at the target mandate that timing must be independent of delays associated with different orbits taken by the two helicity states. In addition, the standard 499 MHz beam structure is altered such that 1 of every 16 microbunches are filled, resulting in an arrival frequency of 31.1875 (31) MHz, and an average current of 40 {mu}A. Helicity correction involves identifying and tracking the 31 MHz sub-harmonic, applying a fast/fine phase correction, and finally producing a clean 31 MHz trigger and a 499 MHz clock train. These signals are phase-matched to the beam arrival at the target on the order of femtoseconds. The 10 kHz output bandwidth is sufficiently greater than the 30 Hz helicity flip settling time (500 {mu}s). This permits the system to correct each helicity bin for any orbit-induced timing inequalities. A sampling phase detection scheme is used in order to eliminate the unavoidable 2n/n phase shifts associated with frequency dividers. Conventional receiver architecture and DSP techniques are combined for maximum sensitivity, bandwidth, and flexibility. Results of bench tests, commissioning and production data will be presented.

  7. Points of Transition: Understanding the Constructed Identities of L2 Learners/Users across Time and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adawu, Anthony; Martin-Beltran, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    Using sociocultural and poststructuralist theoretical lenses, this study examines the narrative construction of language-learner identity across time and space. We applied cross-narrative methodologies to analyze language-learning autobiographies and interview data from three English users who had recently transitioned to a U.S. context for…

  8. Higher-order time-symmetry-breaking phase transition due to meeting of an exceptional point and a Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Garmon, Savannah; Kanki, Kazuki; Petrosky, Tomio

    2016-08-01

    We have theoretically investigated the time-symmetry-breaking phase-transition process for two discrete states coupled with a one-dimensional continuum by solving the nonlinear eigenvalue problem for the effective Hamiltonian associated with the discrete spectrum. We obtain the effective Hamiltonian with use of the Feshbach-Brillouin-Wigner projection method. Strong energy dependence of the self-energy appearing in the effective Hamiltonian plays a key role in the time-symmetry-breaking phase transition: As a result of competition in the decay process between the Van Hove singularity and the Fano resonance, the phase transition becomes a higher-order transition when both the two discrete states are located near the continuum threshold.

  9. Real-time adaptive optics testbed to investigate point-ahead angle in pre-compensation of Earth-to-GEO optical communication.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Nina; Berlich, René; Minardi, Stefano; Barth, Alexander; Mauch, Steffen; Mocci, Jacopo; Goy, Matthias; Appelfelder, Michael; Beckert, Erik; Reinlein, Claudia

    2016-06-13

    We explore adaptive optics (AO) pre-compensation for optical communication between Earth and geostationary (GEO) satellites in a laboratory experiment. Thus, we built a rapid control prototyping breadboard with an adjustable point-ahead angle where downlink and uplink can operate both at 1064 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. With our real-time system, beam wander resulting from artificial turbulence was reduced such that the beam hits the satellite at least 66% of the time as compared to merely 3% without correction. A seven-fold increase of the average Strehl ratio to (28 ± 15)% at 18 μrad point-ahead angle leads to a considerable reduction of the calculated fading probability. These results make AO pre-compensation a viable technique to enhance Earth-to-GEO optical communication.

  10. Real-time adaptive optics testbed to investigate point-ahead angle in pre-compensation of Earth-to-GEO optical communication.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Nina; Berlich, René; Minardi, Stefano; Barth, Alexander; Mauch, Steffen; Mocci, Jacopo; Goy, Matthias; Appelfelder, Michael; Beckert, Erik; Reinlein, Claudia

    2016-06-13

    We explore adaptive optics (AO) pre-compensation for optical communication between Earth and geostationary (GEO) satellites in a laboratory experiment. Thus, we built a rapid control prototyping breadboard with an adjustable point-ahead angle where downlink and uplink can operate both at 1064 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. With our real-time system, beam wander resulting from artificial turbulence was reduced such that the beam hits the satellite at least 66% of the time as compared to merely 3% without correction. A seven-fold increase of the average Strehl ratio to (28 ± 15)% at 18 μrad point-ahead angle leads to a considerable reduction of the calculated fading probability. These results make AO pre-compensation a viable technique to enhance Earth-to-GEO optical communication. PMID:27410333

  11. Agent-based modeling for real-time decision-support for point-of-distribution managers during influenza mass vaccination.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Jay V; Mraz, Tom

    2008-11-06

    This project examines the use of an agent-based modeling tool and development environment to provide real-time decision support and resource allocation for managers and staff of point-of-distribution (POD) locations conducting mass vaccination for epidemic influenza. The simulation testing environment allows depicting the physical POD environment, staffing location and behaviors, patient flow, and resource monitoring and distribution. Various POD optimizations are analyzed and discussed in light of recent public health recommended layouts and resource deployment.

  12. A Remark on the Heat Equation with a Point Perturbation, the Feynman-Kac Formula with Local Time and Derivative Pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albeverio, Sergio; Fassari, Silvestro; Rinaldi, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the probabilistic representation of the solutions of the heat equation perturbed by a repulsive point interaction in terms of a perturbation of Brownian motion, via a Feynman-Kac formula involving a local time functional. An application to option pricing is given, interpolating between the extreme cases of classical Black-Scholes options and knockouts having the barrier situated exactly at the exercise price.

  13. Pb enamel biomarker: Deposition of pre- and postnatal Pb isotope injection in reconstructed time points along rat enamel transect

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, A.L.; Kleinman, M.T.; Ericson, J.E. . E-mail: jeericso@uci.edu

    2005-10-01

    Exposure to lead (Pb) as well as other heavy metals in the environment is still a matter of public health concern. The development of the enamel biomarker for heavy metal exposure assessment is designed to improve studies of dose-effect relationships to developmental anomalies, particularly embryonic dysfunctions, and to provide a time-specific recount of past exposures. The work presented in this paper demonstrates maternal transfer across the placental barrier of the enriched isotope {sup 206}Pb tracer to the enamel of the rat pup. Likewise, injections of {sup 204}Pb-enriched tracer in the neonate rat resulted in deposition of the tracer in the enamel histology as measured by secondary ion microprobe spectrometry. Through enamel, we were able to observe biological removal and assimilation of prenatal and postnatal tracers, respectively. This research demonstrates that enamel can be used as a biomarker of exposure to Pb and may illustrate the toxicokinetics of incorporating Pb into fetal and neonatal steady-state system processes. The biomarker technique, when completely developed, may be applied to cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological research.

  14. Non-stationary corona around multi-point system in atmospheric electric field: II. Altitude and time variation of electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazelyan, E. M.; Raizer, Yu. P.; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2014-03-01

    The vertical electric field profile during thunderstorms was studied numerically and analytically above the plane ground surface with irregularities that generated ions when the surface electric field was sufficient for ion emission. The computer model of a plane emitting ions into the atmosphere simulated a limiting case of a non-stationary glow corona occurring near the tips of a multi-point ground system in a time-varying thundercloud electric field. The evolution of electric field profiles for various rates of change of thundercloud electric field was analyzed and the peculiarities of electric field measurements during thunderstorms were considered. A computer model was developed to estimate the temporal evolution of electric field above a multi-point coronating system. Conditions under which the electric field evolution above a multi-electrode system is similar to that above a plane emitting surface were determined. The evolution of the surface electric field below coronating points in a multi-electrode system was calculated. Conditions when the surface electric field tends to the thundercloud electric field necessary for corona onset in a multi-point system were obtained.

  15. Identification of polybrominated diphenyl ether metabolites based on calculated boiling points from COSMO-RS, experimental retention times, and mass spectral fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Scott; Gross, Michael S; Olson, James R; Zurek, Eva; Aga, Diana S

    2015-02-17

    The COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used to predict the boiling points of several polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methylated derivatives (MeO-BDEs) of monohydroxylated BDE (OH-BDE) metabolites. The linear correlation obtained by plotting theoretical boiling points calculated by COSMO-RS against experimentally determined retention times from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry facilitated the identification of PBDEs and OH-BDEs. This paper demonstrates the applicability of COSMO-RS in identifying unknown PBDE metabolites of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100). Metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-100 were formed through individual incubations of each PBDE with recombinant cytochrome P450 2B6. Using calculated boiling points and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns of the MeO-BDE positional isomers, the identities of the unknown monohydroxylated metabolites were proposed to be 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-66) from BDE-47, and 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-119) and 4-hydroxy-2,2',3,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-91) from BDE-100. The collective use of boiling points predicted with COSMO-RS, and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns provided a valuable tool toward the identification of isobaric compounds. PMID:25565148

  16. Identification of polybrominated diphenyl ether metabolites based on calculated boiling points from COSMO-RS, experimental retention times, and mass spectral fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Scott; Gross, Michael S; Olson, James R; Zurek, Eva; Aga, Diana S

    2015-02-17

    The COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used to predict the boiling points of several polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methylated derivatives (MeO-BDEs) of monohydroxylated BDE (OH-BDE) metabolites. The linear correlation obtained by plotting theoretical boiling points calculated by COSMO-RS against experimentally determined retention times from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry facilitated the identification of PBDEs and OH-BDEs. This paper demonstrates the applicability of COSMO-RS in identifying unknown PBDE metabolites of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100). Metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-100 were formed through individual incubations of each PBDE with recombinant cytochrome P450 2B6. Using calculated boiling points and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns of the MeO-BDE positional isomers, the identities of the unknown monohydroxylated metabolites were proposed to be 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-66) from BDE-47, and 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-119) and 4-hydroxy-2,2',3,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-91) from BDE-100. The collective use of boiling points predicted with COSMO-RS, and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns provided a valuable tool toward the identification of isobaric compounds.

  17. Application of a develop end point detector as a timely and cost-effective alternative to using an SEM for CD measurement in production photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikov, Dimitri L.; Goldman, Mark; Hester, Dee; Kukas, Alan W.; Takemoto, Clifford H.; Goetz, Ken; Zhang, Hua; Karklin, Linard

    1996-05-01

    This paper focuses on the use of a track-mounted, in-situ develop end point (EP) to reduce CD measurement via scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the production environment. Commonly, a few wafers are selected from a lot and examined to ensure conformance with desired CDs. Typically, the wafer's image linewidth is measured. If required, a corresponding adjustment is made to the stepper's exposure energy in order to obtain the targeted CD. While this methodology works, it does have its shortcomings such as: incomplete determination of wafer-to-wafer variations, the impossibility of detecting random 'problem' wafers, and the additional backlog CD measurement adds to the SEM station -- which generally results in production bottlenecks. The use of a track-mounted, in-situ develop end point detector facilitates rapid and accurate measurement of photoresist characteristics. Due to the direct correlation between develop end point time and CDs, a detector can be used to signal out-of- spec conditions. The nature of the data collected and analyzed by the detector allows exposure and other process variations to be revealed. In addition to providing this 'watchdog' function, some detectors can be programmed to automatically correct out-of-spec CDs by varying the development cycle time. Use of an in-situ detector, as described, will have a direct bearing on reducing the use of high-cost SEMs in the production environment as well as minimizing the number of scrapped wafers.

  18. A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutations based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqi; Fu, Rongxin; Xie, Liping; Li, Qi; Zhou, Wenhan; Wang, Ruliang; Ye, Jiancheng; Wang, Dong; Xue, Ning; Lin, Xue; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoliang

    2015-10-01

    A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutation-related diseases was developed based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation. The main components of the device included a Peltier cooler and a mini PC board for image processing. Heat from the hot side of the Peltier cooler causes the fluid in a copper chamber to evaporate, and the vapor condenses on the surface of a microarray chip placed on the cold side of the cooler. The high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation relative to the analytes on the microarray chip was explored. Combined with rolling circle amplification, the device visualizes less-to-more hydrophilic transitions caused by gene trapping and DNA amplification. A lung cancer gene point mutation was analysed, proving the high selectivity and multiplex analysis capability of this low-cost device. PMID:26266399

  19. A Four-Point Screening Method for Assessing Molecular Mechanism of Action (MMOA) Identifies Tideglusib as a Time-Dependent Inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Swinney, Zachary T.; Haubrich, Brad A.; Xia, Shuangluo; Ramesha, Chakk; Gomez, Stephen R.; Guyett, Paul; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo; Swinney, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background New therapeutics are needed for neglected tropical diseases including Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a progressive and fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. There is a need for simple, efficient, cost effective methods to identify new molecules with unique molecular mechanisms of action (MMOAs). The mechanistic features of a binding mode, such as competition with endogenous substrates and time-dependence can affect the observed inhibitory IC50, and differentiate molecules and their therapeutic usefulness. Simple screening methods to determine time-dependence and competition can be used to differentiate compounds with different MMOAs in order to identify new therapeutic opportunities. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report a four point screening methodology to evaluate the time-dependence and competition for inhibition of GSK3β protein kinase isolated from T. brucei. Using this method, we identified tideglusib as a time-dependent inhibitor whose mechanism of action is time-dependent, ATP competitive upon initial binding, which transitions to ATP non-competitive with time. The enzyme activity was not recovered following 100-fold dilution of the buffer consistent with an irreversible mechanism of action. This is in contrast to the T. brucei GSK3β inhibitor GW8510, whose inhibition was competitive with ATP, not time-dependent at all measured time points and reversible in dilution experiments. The activity of tideglusib against T. brucei parasites was confirmed by inhibition of parasite proliferation (GI50 of 2.3 μM). Conclusions/Significance Altogether this work demonstrates a straightforward method for determining molecular mechanisms of action and its application for mechanistic differentiation of two potent TbGSK3β inhibitors. The four point MMOA method identified tideglusib as a mechanistically differentiated TbGSK3β inhibitor. Tideglusib was shown to inhibit parasite

  20. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  1. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability.

  2. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability. PMID:26914799

  3. Persistent high grade flurodeoxyglucose uptake in lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum on dual time point imaging and with ambient warming.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, K K; Sudhakar, N; Shibu, D K; Kurup, E R R; Shinto, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum (LHIS) is a relatively uncommon disorder of the heart characterized by benign fatty infiltration of the interatrial septum that usually spares the fossa ovalis. LHIS showing flurodeoxyglucose uptake has been reported, and is presumed to be due to activated brown adipose tissue (BAT). We here report a case of a patient who had isolated mediastinal uptake in interatrial septum, mimicking metastasis. Rescanning with external warming to deactivate BAT and a delayed time point image was done, which showed persistent and progressively increasing metabolic uptake respectively, suggesting that LHIS uptake might be unrelated to activated BAT or inflammation.

  4. Persistent High Grade Flurodeoxyglucose Uptake in Lipomatous Hypertrophy of the Interatrial Septum on Dual Time Point Imaging and with Ambient Warming

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, K. K.; Sudhakar, N.; Shibu, D. K.; Kurup, E. R. R.; Shinto, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum (LHIS) is a relatively uncommon disorder of the heart characterized by benign fatty infiltration of the interatrial septum that usually spares the fossa ovalis. LHIS showing flurodeoxyglucose uptake has been reported, and is presumed to be due to activated brown adipose tissue (BAT). We here report a case of a patient who had isolated mediastinal uptake in interatrial septum, mimicking metastasis. Rescanning with external warming to deactivate BAT and a delayed time point image was done, which showed persistent and progressively increasing metabolic uptake respectively, suggesting that LHIS uptake might be unrelated to activated BAT or inflammation. PMID:25191115

  5. Study of thermal behavior of vitamin D3 by pyrolysis-GC-MS in combination with boiling point-retention time correlation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu'an; Liu, Baoxia; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Rongjie; Xie, Bing

    2005-01-01

    The thermal behavior of vitamin D3 was studied based on pyrolysis-GC-MS technique. It was pyrolyzed at 600 degrees C, 750 degrees C, 900 degrees C, respectively. The pyrolysis product were separated With an HP-5 column and identified by the NIST mass spectral search program in combination with the correlation of boiling point and retention time (BP-RT). There are totally 50 components, including mono aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were determined. It is shown that the contents of the PAHs are increasing with the increasing of the pyrolysis temperature. The contents of the determined components vary from 0.04% to 37.08%.

  6. Simple and Fast Continuous Estimation Method of Respiratory Frequency During Sleep using the Number of Extreme Points of Heart Rate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is reported that frequency component of approximately 0.25Hz of heart rate time series (RSA) is corresponding to the respiratory frequency. In this paper, we proposed that continuous estimation method of respiratory fequency during sleep using the number of extreme points of heart rate time series in real time. Equation for calculation of the method is very simple and the method can continuously calculate frequency by window width of about 18 beats. To evaluate accuracy of proposal method, RSA frequency was calculated using proposal method from the heart rate time series during supine rest. Result, minimum error rate was observed when RSA had time lag for about 11s and error rate was about 13.8%. Result of estimating RSA frequency time series during sleep, it varied regularly during non-REM and varied irregularly during REM. This result is similar as report of previous study about respiratory variability during sleep. Therefore, it is considered that proposal method possible to apply respiratory monitoring system during sleep.

  7. A physical model study of the travel times and reflection points of SH-waves reflected from transversely isotropic media with tilted symmetry axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li-Chung; Chang, Young-Fo; Chang, Chih-Hsiung; Chung, Chia-Lung

    2012-05-01

    In reflection seismology, detailed knowledge of how seismic waves propagate in anisotropic media is important for locating reservoirs accurately. The SH-wave possesses a pure mode polarization which does not convert to P- and SV-waves when reflecting from a horizontal interface, and vice versa. The simplicity of the SH-wave thus provides an easy way to view the details of SH-wave propagation in anisotropic media. In this study, we attempt to inspect the theoretical reflection moveouts of SH-waves reflected from transversely isotropic (TI) layers with tilted symmetry axes and to verify the reflection point, which could be shifted away from the common midpoint (CMP), by numerical calculations and physical modelling. In travel time-offset analyses, the moveout curves of SH-waves reflected from horizontal TI media (TIM) with different tilted angles of symmetry axes are computed by the TI modified hyperbolic equation and Fermat's principle, respectively. It turns out that both the computed moveout curves are similar and fit well to the observed physical data. The reflection points of SH-waves for a CMP gather computed by Fermat's principle show that they are close to the CMP for TIM with the vertical and horizontal symmetry axes, but they shift away from the CMP for the other tilted angles of symmetry axes. The shifts of the reflection points of the SH-waves from the CMP were verified by physical modelling.

  8. A physical model study of the travel times and conversion point locations of P-SV converted waves in vertical transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C.

    2013-12-01

    In exploration seismology, subsurface medium commonly exhibits anisotropy, characterized by a vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) model. Due to the need of exploring small reservoirs in complex structures, the seismic exploration is extended to deal with anisotropic media. The P-S converted wave seismic exploration is a relatively inexpensive, broadly applicable, and effective way to obtain the S-wave information of the medium. In anisotropic traveltime analysis, the moveout curve of horizontal P-SV event can help to determine the ratio of the P- and SV-wave vertical velocities, the normal moveout (NMO) velocity of SV-waves, and the anisotropy parameters. The P-SV conversion point (CP) location is of great importance to P-SV data binning, NMO corrections and common conversion point (CCP) stacking, and the anisotropy has a more significant effect on the conversion point location than on the moveout. In this study, we attempt to inspect the theoretical non-hyperbolic moveout and CP equations for the P-SV waves reflected from a VTI layer by numerical calculations and physical modeling. We are also interested in visualizing the variations of the conversion point locations from a designed VTI medium. In traveltime analysis, the theoretical moveout curve is accurate up to offsets about one and a half times the reflector depth (x/z=1.5). However, the moveout curve computed by Fermat's principle fits well to the physical data. The CP locations of P-SV waves are similar to those calculated by Fermat's principle and theoretical CP equation, which are verified by the physical modeling.

  9. Validation of end-point and real-time PCR methods for the rapid detection of soy allergen in processed products.

    PubMed

    Espineira, Montserrat; Herrero, Beatriz; Vieites, Juan M; Santaclara, Francisco J

    2010-04-01

    This work describes the development and validation of two PCR methods, end-point and real-time PCR, for the detection of soy protein in a wide rage of foodstuffs. These techniques are reliable and sensitive, allowing detection of trace amounts of soybean in processed products. TaqMan real-time PCR was the simpler and more rapid process, with a higher potential for automation and, therefore, currently the most suitable screening method. To verify correct operation of the proposed methodology, ELISA was used for quantitative determination of soy protein. In addition, 35 meat, fish and bakery processed products, which could potentially contain soy but was not declared on the label, were tested for the presence of soy DNA using the proposed methods. The methodologies will be valuable in issues regarding the presence of soy protein in processed products, especially in verifying labelling and security regulations to protect consumer's rights.

  10. Investigating flow patterns and related dynamics in multi-instability turbulent plasmas using a three-point cross-phase time delay estimation velocimetry scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-04-01

    Complexities of flow patterns in the azimuthal cross-section of a cylindrical magnetized helicon plasma and the corresponding plasma dynamics are investigated by means of a novel scheme for time delay estimation velocimetry. The advantage of this introduced method is the capability of calculating the time-averaged 2D velocity fields of propagating wave-like structures and patterns in complex spatiotemporal data. It is able to distinguish and visualize the details of simultaneously present superimposed entangled dynamics and it can be applied to fluid-like systems exhibiting frequently repeating patterns (e.g., waves in plasmas, waves in fluids, dynamics in planetary atmospheres, etc.). The velocity calculations are based on time delay estimation obtained from cross-phase analysis of time series. Each velocity vector is unambiguously calculated from three time series measured at three different non-collinear spatial points. This method, when applied to fast imaging, has been crucial to understand the rich plasma dynamics in the azimuthal cross-section of a cylindrical linear magnetized helicon plasma. The capabilities and the limitations of this velocimetry method are discussed and demonstrated for two completely different plasma regimes, i.e., for quasi-coherent wave dynamics and for complex broadband wave dynamics involving simultaneously present multiple instabilities.

  11. Development and evaluation of NucliSens basic kit NASBA for diagnosis of parainfluenza virus infection with 'end-point' and 'real-time' detection.

    PubMed

    Hibbitts, Sam; Rahman, Amanna; John, Rhiannon; Westmoreland, Diana; Fox, Julie D

    2003-03-01

    New methods for the detection of human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) were developed. These were based on nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and utilised the NucliSens Basic Kit. Primers and probes were selected from the haemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN) gene of HPIV1, HPIV2 and HPIV3, and from the phosphoprotein (P) of HPIV4a and -4b. Synthetic RNA, titrated control virus stocks and respiratory specimens (n=44) were utilised to evaluate performance of the assays. Detection of NASBA products was by probe hybridisation and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) ('end-point' detection) or using molecular beacons ('real-time' detection). The assays using ECL detection proved to be both sensitive and specific. Typically, less than or equal to 100 RNA copies or one TCID(50) input was detectable with no cross-reaction between the specific HPIV assays and other respiratory viruses. Results for clinical samples were concordant with those obtained by 'conventional' procedures by classical viral diagnostic methods. 'Real-time' detection utilised probes specific for either HPIV1 or HPIV3 with similar performance characteristics to the assays with 'end-point' detection. The feasibility of multiplexing targets together was confirmed using a combined HPIV1 and HPIV3 assay with good results for ECL and molecular beacon detection on control material and clinical samples.

  12. Dual time point imaging fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for evaluation of large loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Skougaard, Kristin; Gehl, Julie; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy is a local anticancer treatment very efficient for treatment of small cutaneous metastases. The method is now being investigated for large cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer that are often confluent masses of malignant tumour with various degrees of inflammation. To this end 18-Flourine-Flourodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) could be a method for response evaluation. However, a standard FDG-PET/CT scan cannot differentiate inflammatory tissue from malignant tissue. Dual point time imaging (DTPI) FDG-PET has the potential of doing so. The purpose of this study was to investigate if DTPI FDG-PET/CT could assess response to electrochemotherapy and to assess the optimal timing of imaging. Patients and methods Within a phase II clinical trial 11 patients with cutaneous recurrences had FDG-PET/CT scans at three time points: 60 min, 120 min and 180 min after FDG injection. The scans were performed before and 3 weeks after electrochemotherapy. Results A significant reduction in maximum standard uptake value at 60 min post injection was seen after treatment. Furthermore a change in the FDG uptake pattern was observed; from increasing uptake in up to 180 min post injection before treatment to stabilization of FDG uptake at 120 min post injection after treatment. The change in FDG uptake pattern over time lead to change of response in three target lesions; two lesions changed from stable metabolic disease to partial metabolic response and one lesion changed from partial metabolic response to stable metabolic disease. To ensure detection of the change in uptake pattern, scanning 60 and 180 min post injection seems optimal. Conclusions The present study shows that FDG-PET/CT 60 and 180 min after tracer injection is a promising tool for response evaluation of cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy. PMID:24294180

  13. Effect of Time (Within and Between Days), and Dairy Production Factors on the Impedance Value at 24 Acupuncture Points in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Bosma, Roel H.; Kalkers-van de Ven, Shirley C.G.; den Boer, Mauk M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary: Whether electro-acupuncture can contribute to reduced antibiotic use in dairy farming depends, among other things, on effects of time and production factors on the impedance values (IVs) at acupuncture points (APs). We measured the IV at 24 APs located left (L) and right (R) of the bladder (BL) and stomach (ST) meridians. The effect of time of measurement (assessed on six cows in one herd) was confirmed for seven APs, and of production factors (analyzed using 108 cows in three herds) for seven APs. We recommend BL19R, BL20R and BL46-02L as reference values, and BL14L, BL16L and BL17L for diagnostics, and ten other APs for further study. Abstract: This study evaluated the effect of hour and day of measurement, and of production factors on the impedance values (IVs) at 24 acupuncture points (APs). This is a first step in assessing whether electro-acupuncture can contribute to reduced antibiotic use in dairy farming. The APs studied were left (L) and right (R) points of the bladder (BL) and stomach (ST) meridians. The effect of time was measured in a 3x3 Latin square on six cows in one herd. The effect of production factors was analyzed using 108 cows from three herds for two months. The effect of time excludes BL 14R, 16R, 21R, 22R, 30R, 46-02R, 43-01L and 30L, and ST18 bilaterally for diagnostic use. The contribution of parity, age or lactation period to monthly models of BL21R, 18R and 15R, and ST18R exclude these for diagnostic use. Of the remaining APs, BL19R, BL20R and BL46-02L showed stable IVs and are recommended for reference measurements. APs BL14L, BL16L and BL17L are recommended for diagnostics, and BL 16R, 17R, 18R, 23R, 30R, 15L, 20L, 22L and 29L need further study. Factors contributing to the variation in the IV of several APs were: milk robot, number of inseminations, body condition score, days of the preceding lactation, kg milk and kg milk fat of current and preceding month and preceding year, and milk cell count and urea content

  14. Impact of the single point of access referral system to reduce waiting times and improve clinical outcomes in an assistive technology service.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Jonathan; Gibson, Colin

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of a single point referral system that prioritises clients depending on case complexity and overcomes the need for re-admittance to a waiting list via a review system has been shown to significantly reduce maximum waiting times for a Posture and Mobility (Special Seating) Service from 102.0 ± 24.33 weeks to 19.2 ± 8.57 weeks (p = 0.015). Using this service model linear regression revealed a statistically significant improvement in the performance outcome of prescribed seating solutions with shorter Episode of Care completion times (p = 0.023). In addition, the number of Episodes of Care completed per annum was significantly related to the Episode of Care completion time (p = 0.019). In conclusion, it is recommended that it may be advantageous to apply this service model to other assistive technology services in order to reduce waiting times and to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:27098983

  15. Dynamics of pulsed laser ablation plasmas in high-density CO2 near the critical point investigated by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Kato, Toru; Himeno, Shohei; Kato, Satoshi; Stauss, Sven; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) plasmas generated in high-density gases and liquids are promising for the synthesis of nanomaterials. However, the characteristics of such plasmas are still not well understood. In order to improve the understandings of PLA plasmas in high-density fluids including gases, liquids, and supercritical fluids (SCFs), we have investigated the dynamics of PLA plasmas in high-density carbon dioxide (CO2) . We report on experimental results of time-resolved shadowgraph imaging, from the generation of plasma plume to the extinction of cavitation bubbles. Shadowgraph images revealed that the PLA plasma dynamics showed two distinct behaviors. These are divided by gas-liquid coexistence curve and the so-called Widom line, which separates gas-like and liquid-like SCF domains. Furthermore, cavitation bubble observed in liquid CO2 near the critical point showed peculiar characteristics, the formation of an inner bubble and an outer shell structure, which so far has never been reported. The experiments indicate that thermophysical properties of PLA plasmas can be tuned by controlling solvent temperature and pressure around the critical point, which may be useful for materials processing. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (No. 21110002) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  16. An Estimation of the Likelihood of Significant Eruptions During 2000-2009 Using Poisson Statistics on Two-Point Moving Averages of the Volcanic Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1750, the number of cataclysmic volcanic eruptions (volcanic explosivity index (VEI)>=4) per decade spans 2-11, with 96 percent located in the tropics and extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere. A two-point moving average of the volcanic time series has higher values since the 1860's than before, being 8.00 in the 1910's (the highest value) and 6.50 in the 1980's, the highest since the 1910's peak. Because of the usual behavior of the first difference of the two-point moving averages, one infers that its value for the 1990's will measure approximately 6.50 +/- 1, implying that approximately 7 +/- 4 cataclysmic volcanic eruptions should be expected during the present decade (2000-2009). Because cataclysmic volcanic eruptions (especially those having VEI>=5) nearly always have been associated with short-term episodes of global cooling, the occurrence of even one might confuse our ability to assess the effects of global warming. Poisson probability distributions reveal that the probability of one or more events with a VEI>=4 within the next ten years is >99 percent. It is approximately 49 percent for an event with a VEI>=5, and 18 percent for an event with a VEI>=6. Hence, the likelihood that a climatically significant volcanic eruption will occur within the next ten years appears reasonably high.

  17. Aluminum Fixed Point: Impact of the Time Spent in the Liquid Phase on the Liquid-Solid Transition and Obviousness of the Pollution of the Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaot, E.; Martin, C.

    2011-08-01

    In order to improve the uncertainty on the aluminum fixed point, a study was launched by Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-CNAM in the frame of the EURAMET Project 732 "Toward more accurate temperature fixed points" (coordinating laboratory: France, 17 partner countries). An earlier study completed in this laboratory showed that in regular realization of the melting-freezing plateaus, there is no diffusion of impurities in the thickness of the ingot, or the diffusion is excessively slow and cannot allow a uniform distribution of the impurities. On the other hand, it is frequently noticed that the experimental conditions before the freezing plateau have an impact on its characteristics (value, slope,…). Up to now, no systematic study was performed on the influence of this parameter. So, the objective of the task started recently in this laboratory is to investigate the influence of the time spent in the liquid phase on the phase transition. As a final result, it is demonstrated that in order to reach the equilibrium of the concentration of impurities, it is necessary to ensure that the metal remains in the liquid phase at least 24 h before initiating the freeze. At the end of the process, the aluminum ingot was chemically analyzed. The analyses reveal large contaminations of the surface of the ingot (sodium, sulfur, and phosphorus). One of the important outputs of this study is that the conditions of usage of the cells should be given important attention since large contaminations can be brought by the furnace.

  18. Self-Organizing Hierarchical Particle Swarm Optimization with Time-Varying Acceleration Coefficients for Economic Dispatch with Valve Point Effects and Multifuel Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polprasert, Jirawadee; Ongsakul, Weerakorn; Dieu, Vo Ngoc

    2011-06-01

    This paper proposes a self-organizing hierarchical particle swarm optimization (SPSO) with time-varying acceleration coefficients (TVAC) for solving economic dispatch (ED) problem with non-smooth functions including multiple fuel options (MFO) and valve-point loading effects (VPLE). The proposed SPSO with TVAC is the new approach optimizer and good performance for solving ED problems. It can handle the premature convergence of the problem by re-initialization of velocity whenever particles are stagnated in the search space. To properly control both local and global explorations of the swarm during the optimization process, the performance of TVAC is included. The proposed method is tested in different ED problems with non-smooth cost functions and the obtained results are compared to those from many other methods in the literature. The results have revealed that the proposed SPSO with TVAC is effective in finding higher quality solutions for non-smooth ED problems than many other methods.

  19. Real-time predictions of drug release and end point detection of a coating operation by in-line near infrared measurements.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Boiret, Mathieu; Genty, Muriel; Chaminade, Pierre; Pean, Jean Manuel

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this work was to carry out real-time near infrared (NIR) predictions of drug release from sustained release coated tablets and to determine end point of coating operation. In-line measurements were ensured by implementation of a NIR probe inside a pan coater. Tablets were coated using a functional aqueous dispersion of ethylcellulose blended with PVA-PEG graft copolymer to obtain a controlled drug release dosage form over 16h. Samples were collected at regular intervals and subjected to a standardized curing step. Percentages of released drug at 4h, 8h and 12h were selected to describe the controlled drug release of cured tablets. These dissolution criteria were used as reference values to calibrate NIR spectral information and to develop three partial least squares regressions. Low predictive errors of 1.7%, 1.9% and 1.5%, respectively, were obtained. The coating operation was stopped while desired dissolution criteria were achieved, corresponding to a coating level around 10%. The present study demonstrated that real-time NIR measurements could be performed on non-finished drug products to predict dissolution properties of cured coated tablets. This novel and innovative approach fulfils the expectations of ICH Q8 guideline on pharmaceutical development, in terms of process understanding and process analytical technology (PAT) control strategy. This approach should be however adapted to curing operation to allow a real-time release testing.

  20. Association of a multibiomarker disease activity score at multiple time-points with radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial

    PubMed Central

    Hambardzumyan, Karen; Bolce, Rebecca J; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Forslind, Kristina; Wallman, Johan K; Cruickshank, Scott E; Sasso, Eric H; Chernoff, David; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), predictive biomarkers for subsequent radiographic progression (RP) could improve therapeutic choices for individual patients. We previously showed that the multibiomarker disease activity (MBDA) score in patients with newly diagnosed RA identified patients at risk for RP. We evaluated the MBDA score at multiple time-points as a predictor of RP during 2 years of follow-up. Methods A subset of patients with RA (N=220) from the Swedish Farmacotherapy (SWEFOT) trial were analysed for MBDA score, disease activity score of 28 joints (DAS28), C reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at baseline (BL), month 3 and year 1, for predicting RP based on modified Sharp/van der Heijde scores at BL, year 1 and year 2. Results Patients with persistently low MBDA (<30) scores or those with a decrease from moderate (30–44) to low MBDA scores, did not develop RP during 2 years of follow-up. The highest risk for RP during 2 years of follow-up (42%) was observed among patients with persistently high (>44) MBDA scores. Among methotrexate non-responders with a high MBDA score at BL or month 3, significantly more of those who received triple therapy had RP at year 2 compared with those who received antitumour necrosis factor therapy. Conclusions Measuring the MBDA score both before and during treatment in RA was useful for the assessment of individual patient risk for RP during 2 years of follow-up. In comparison with low CRP, ESR or DAS28, a low MBDA score at any time-point was associated with numerically lower proportions of RP. Trial registration number NCT00764725. PMID:26958364

  1. Impact of Different Initial Epinephrine Treatment Time Points on the Early Postresuscitative Hemodynamic Status of Children With Traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan-Ren; Syue, Yuan-Jhen; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Lu, Huai-En; Chang, Chin-Fu; Chang, Chih-Yu; Chen, Cheng Hsu; Chen, Wen-Liang; Li, Chao-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The postresuscitative hemodynamic status of children with traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) might be impacted by the early administration of epinephrine, but this topic has not been well addressed. The aim of this study was to analyze the early postresuscitative hemodynamics, survival, and neurologic outcome according to different time points of first epinephrine treatment among children with traumatic OHCA. Information on 388 children who presented to the emergency departments of 3 medical centers and who were treated with epinephrine for traumatic OHCA during the study period (2003–2012) was retrospectively collected. The early postresuscitative hemodynamic features (cardiac functions, end-organ perfusion, and consciousness), survival, and neurologic outcome according to different time points of first epinephrine treatment (early: <15, intermediate: 15–30, and late: >30 minutes after collapse) were analyzed. Among 165 children who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation, 38 children (9.8%) survived to discharge and 12 children (3.1%) had good neurologic outcomes. Early epinephrine increased the postresuscitative heart rate and blood pressure in the first 30 minutes, but ultimately impaired end-organ perfusion (decreased urine output and initial creatinine clearance) (all P < 0.05). Early epinephrine treatment increased the chance of achieving sustained return of spontaneous circulation, but did not increase the rates of survival and good neurologic outcome. Early epinephrine temporarily increased heart rate and blood pressure in the first 30 minutes of the postresuscitative period, but impaired end-organ perfusion. Most importantly, the rates of survival and good neurologic outcome were not significantly increased by early epinephrine administration. PMID:27015217

  2. Assessing the influence of land use and land cover datasets with different points in time and levels of detail on watershed modeling in the North River Watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinliang; Zhou, Pei; Zhou, Zengrong; Huang, Yaling

    2012-12-27

    Land use and land cover (LULC) information is an important component influencing watershed modeling with regards to hydrology and water quality in the river basin. In this study, the sensitivity of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to LULC datasets with three points in time and three levels of detail was assessed in a coastal subtropical watershed located in Southeast China. The results showed good agreement between observed and simulated values for both monthly and daily streamflow and monthly NH(4)+-N and TP loads. Three LULC datasets in 2002, 2007 and 2010 had relatively little influence on simulated monthly and daily streamflow, whereas they exhibited greater effects on simulated monthly NH(4)+-N and TP loads. When using the two LULC datasets in 2007 and 2010 compared with that in 2002, the relative differences in predicted monthly NH(4)+-N and TP loads were -11.0 to -7.8% and -4.8 to -9.0%, respectively. There were no significant differences in simulated monthly and daily streamflow when using the three LULC datasets with ten, five and three categories. When using LULC datasets from ten categories compared to five and three categories, the relative differences in predicted monthly NH(4)+-N and TP loads were -6.6 to -6.5% and -13.3 to -7.3%, respectively. Overall, the sensitivity of the SWAT model to LULC datasets with different points in time and levels of detail was lower in monthly and daily streamflow simulation than in monthly NH(4)+-N and TP loads prediction. This research provided helpful insights into the influence of LULC datasets on watershed modeling.

  3. Real-time estimation of prostate tumor rotation and translation with a kV imaging system based on an iterative closest point algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; O'Brien, Ricky T; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that during cancer radiotherapy a small translation or rotation of the tumor can lead to errors in dose delivery. Current best practice in radiotherapy accounts for tumor translations, but is unable to address rotation due to a lack of a reliable real-time estimate. We have developed a method based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm that can compute rotation from kilovoltage x-ray images acquired during radiation treatment delivery. A total of 11 748 kilovoltage (kV) images acquired from ten patients (one fraction for each patient) were used to evaluate our tumor rotation algorithm. For each kV image, the three dimensional coordinates of three fiducial markers inside the prostate were calculated. The three dimensional coordinates were used as input to the ICP algorithm to calculate the real-time tumor rotation and translation around three axes. The results show that the root mean square error was improved for real-time calculation of tumor displacement from a mean of 0.97 mm with the stand alone translation to a mean of 0.16 mm by adding real-time rotation and translation displacement with the ICP algorithm. The standard deviation (SD) of rotation for the ten patients was 2.3°, 0.89° and 0.72° for rotation around the right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively. The correlation between all six degrees of freedom showed that the highest correlation belonged to the AP and SI translation with a correlation of 0.67. The second highest correlation in our study was between the rotation around RL and rotation around AP, with a correlation of -0.33. Our real-time algorithm for calculation of rotation also confirms previous studies that have shown the maximum SD belongs to AP translation and rotation around RL. ICP is a reliable and fast algorithm for estimating real-time tumor rotation which could create a pathway to investigational clinical treatment studies requiring real-time

  4. Time-lapse analysis of methane quantity in Mary Lee group of coal seams using filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karacan, C. Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic approach presented in this paper is the first time in literature that history matching, TIs of GIPs and filter simulations are used for degasification performance evaluation and for assessing GIP for mining safety. Results from this study showed that using production history matching of coalbed methane wells to determine time-lapsed reservoir data could be used to compute spatial GIP and representative GIP TIs generated through Voronoi decomposition. Furthermore, performing filter simulations using point-wise data and TIs could be used to predict methane quantity in coal seams subjected to degasification. During the course of the study, it was shown that the material balance of gas produced by wellbores and the GIP reductions in coal seams predicted using filter simulations compared very well, showing the success of filter simulations for continuous variables in this case study. Quantitative results from filter simulations of GIP within the studied area briefly showed that GIP was reduced from an initial ∼73 Bcf (median) to ∼46 Bcf (2011), representing a 37 % decrease and varying spatially through degasification. It is forecasted that there will be an additional ∼2 Bcf reduction in methane quantity between 2011 and 2015. This study and presented results showed that the applied methodology and utilized techniques can be used to map GIP and its change within coal seams after degasification, which can further be used for ventilation design for methane control in coal mines.

  5. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Haixia; Xue, Zhixiao; Yin, Huijuan; Niu, Qing; Chen, Hongli

    2015-12-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  6. Survival of time-evolved quantum correlations depending on whether quenching is across a critical point in an X Y spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R.

    2016-04-01

    The time dynamics of quantum correlations in the quantum transverse anisotropic X Y spin chain of infinite length is studied at zero and finite temperatures. The evolution occurs due to the instantaneous quenching of the coupling constant between the nearest-neighbor spins of the model, which is performed either within the same phase or across the quantum phase-transition point connecting the order-disorder phases of the model. We characterize the time-evolved quantum correlations, viz., entanglement and quantum discord, which exhibit varying behavior depending on the initial state and the quenching scheme. We show that the system is endowed with enhanced nearest-neighbor bipartite quantum correlations compared to that of the initial state, when quenched from the ordered to the deep disordered phase. However, nearest-neighbor quantum correlations are almost washed out when the system is quenched from the disordered to the ordered phase with the initial state being at the zero temperature. We also identify the condition for the occurrence of enhanced bipartite correlations when the system is quenched within the same phase. Moreover, we investigate the bipartite quantum correlations when the initial state is a thermal equilibrium state with finite temperature, which reveals the effects of thermal fluctuation on the phenomena observed at zero temperature. Finally, an analogous analysis is carried out for zero-temperature next-nearest-neighbor quantum correlations.

  7. Model-based testing for space-time interaction using point processes: An application to psychiatric hospital admissions in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sebastian; Warnke, Ingeborg; Rössler, Wulf; Held, Leonhard

    2016-05-01

    Spatio-temporal interaction is inherent to cases of infectious diseases and occurrences of earthquakes, whereas the spread of other events, such as cancer or crime, is less evident. Statistical significance tests of space-time clustering usually assess the correlation between the spatial and temporal (transformed) distances of the events. Although appealing through simplicity, these classical tests do not adjust for the underlying population nor can they account for a distance decay of interaction. We propose to use the framework of an endemic-epidemic point process model to jointly estimate a background event rate explained by seasonal and areal characteristics, as well as a superposed epidemic component representing the hypothesis of interest. We illustrate this new model-based test for space-time interaction by analysing psychiatric inpatient admissions in Zurich, Switzerland (2007-2012). Several socio-economic factors were found to be associated with the admission rate, but there was no evidence of general clustering of the cases. PMID:27246269

  8. A field study on the significance of vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) at the optimal time point in broiler flocks with maternally derived IBDV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Block, Hermann; Meyer-Block, Karen; Rebeski, Dierk E; Scharr, Heike; de Wit, Sjaak; Rohn, Karl; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2007-10-01

    The right strategy for infectious bursal disease (IBD) control and its success rate under field conditions depends on hygiene management, IBD field pressure, level and variation in maternally derived IBD antibodies, and the IBD vaccine strains to be used. Usually, standard vaccination programmes are used, which are not always adapted to the specific conditions on the farm and to the immune status of chickens. Employing the "Deventer formula" may help to estimate the optimal time for vaccination for a specific flock based on the maternally derived antibody level, its variation, the genetic background of the chicken, and the IBD vaccine strain. Two field studies with 16 or 20 commercial broiler flocks were conducted, applying an intermediate IBD vaccine before, at the best, and after the estimated optimal vaccination time estimated by the "Deventer formula". These studies showed that flocks IBD-vaccinated between 1 day before, at, or up to 3 days after the estimated optimal time point developed detectable humoral immunity up to 14 days post vaccination. If birds had been vaccinated more than 1 day before the calculated optimal vaccination date, the humoral immune response was delayed or non-detectable until slaughter. The induction of humoral immunity correlated with the incidence of bursa lesions and IBDV detection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. As indicated in this study, under field conditions bursa lesions may develop later than predicted based on experimental experiences. The late incidence of bursa lesions after vaccination may be confused with field virus-induced lesions, in which case sequencing may offer a valuable tool for differentiation. PMID:17899465

  9. Time-integrated passive sampling as a complement to conventional point-in-time sampling for investigating drinking-water quality, McKenzie River Basin, Oregon, 2007 and 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Alvarez, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Eugene Water & Electric Board (EWEB) supplies drinking water to approximately 200,000 people in Eugene, Oregon. The sole source of this water is the McKenzie River, which has consistently excellent water quality relative to established drinking-water standards. To ensure that this quality is maintained as land use in the source basin changes and water demands increase, EWEB has developed a proactive management strategy that includes a combination of conventional point-in-time discrete water sampling and time‑integrated passive sampling with a combination of chemical analyses and bioassays to explore water quality and identify where vulnerabilities may lie. In this report, we present the results from six passive‑sampling deployments at six sites in the basin, including the intake and outflow from the EWEB drinking‑water treatment plant (DWTP). This is the first known use of passive samplers to investigate both the source and finished water of a municipal DWTP. Results indicate that low concentrations of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organohalogen compounds are consistently present in source waters, and that many of these compounds are also present in finished drinking water. The nature and patterns of compounds detected suggest that land-surface runoff and atmospheric deposition act as ongoing sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, some currently used pesticides, and several legacy organochlorine pesticides. Comparison of results from point-in-time and time-integrated sampling indicate that these two methods are complementary and, when used together, provide a clearer understanding of contaminant sources than either method alone.

  10. Tipping Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.

    2007-12-01

    A climate tipping point, at least as I have used the phrase, refers to a situation in which a changing climate forcing has reached a point such that little additional forcing (or global temperature change) is needed to cause large, relatively rapid, climate change. Present examples include potential loss of all Arctic sea ice and instability of the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Tipping points are characterized by ready feedbacks that amplify the effect of forcings. The notion that these may be runaway feedbacks is a misconception. However, present "unrealized" global warming, due to the climate system's thermal inertia, exacerbates the difficulty of avoiding global warming tipping points. I argue that prompt efforts to slow CO2 emissions and absolutely reduce non-CO2 forcings are both essential if we are to avoid tipping points that would be disastrous for humanity and creation, the planet as civilization knows it.

  11. Aluminium assay and evaluation of the local reaction at several time points after intramuscular administration of aluminium containing vaccines in the Cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Verdier, François; Burnett, Roger; Michelet-Habchi, Claire; Moretto, Philippe; Fievet-Groyne, Françoise; Sauzeat, Elisabeth

    2005-02-01

    Aluminium hydroxide and aluminium phosphate have been widely used as vaccine adjuvants with a good safety record for several decades. The recent observation in human deltoid muscle of macrophage aggregates containing aluminium hydroxide spicules and termed Macrophagic Myofasciitis (MMF) has encouraged research on aluminium salts. This study was conducted in order to further investigate the clearance of aluminium at the vaccine injection site and the features of induced histopathological lesions. Two groups of 12 monkeys were immunised in the quadriceps muscle with Diphtheria-Tetanus vaccines, which were adjuvanted with either aluminium hydroxide or aluminium phosphate. Three, six or twelve months after vaccination, four monkeys from each group were sacrificed and histopathological examination and aluminium assays were performed on quadriceps muscle sections. Histopathological lesions, similar to the MMF described in humans, were observed and were still present 3 months after aluminium phosphate and 12 months after aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccine administration. An increase in aluminium concentration, more marked in the area of the lesions, was also observed at the 3- and 6-month time points. These findings were localised at the injection site and no similar changes were observed in the distal or proximal muscle fragments. We conclude from this study that aluminium adjuvanted vaccines administered by the intramuscular route trigger histopathological changes restricted to the area around the injection site which persist for several months but are not associated with abnormal clinical signs. PMID:15661384

  12. Sequence polymorphism in an insect RNA virus field population: A snapshot from a single point in space and time reveals stochastic differences among and within individual hosts.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Drake C; Krugner, Rodrigo; Nouri, Shahideh; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Falk, Bryce W; Sisterson, Mark S

    2016-11-01

    Population structure of Homalodisca coagulata Virus-1 (HoCV-1) among and within field-collected insects sampled from a single point in space and time was examined. Polymorphism in complete consensus sequences among single-insect isolates was dominated by synonymous substitutions. The mutant spectrum of the C2 helicase region within each single-insect isolate was unique and dominated by nonsynonymous singletons. Bootstrapping was used to correct the within-isolate nonsynonymous:synonymous arithmetic ratio (N:S) for RT-PCR error, yielding an N:S value ~one log-unit greater than that of consensus sequences. Probability of all possible single-base substitutions for the C2 region predicted N:S values within 95% confidence limits of the corrected within-isolate N:S when the only constraint imposed was viral polymerase error bias for transitions over transversions. These results indicate that bottlenecks coupled with strong negative/purifying selection drive consensus sequences toward neutral sequence space, and that most polymorphism within single-insect isolates is composed of newly-minted mutations sampled prior to selection.

  13. Real-time PCR array chip with capillary-driven sample loading and reactor sealing for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Naveen; Liu, Hao-Bing; Dai, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qinghui; M Hui, Kam; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2009-10-01

    A major challenge for the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) community is to develop point-of-care diagnostic chips that do not use instruments. Such instruments include pumping or liquid handling devices for distribution of patient's nucleic-acid test sample among an array of reactors and microvalves or mechanical parts to seal these reactors. In this paper, we report the development of a primer pair pre-loaded PCR array chip, in which the loading of the PCR mixture into an array of reactors and subsequent sealing of the reactors were realized by a novel capillary-based microfluidics with a manual two-step pipetting operations. The chip is capable of performing simultaneous (parallel) analyses of multiple gene targets and its performance was tested by amplifying twelve different gene targets against cDNA template from human hepatocellular carcinoma using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye. The versatility and reproducibility of the PCR-array chip are demonstrated by real-time PCR amplification of the BNI-1 fragment of SARS cDNA cloned in a plasmid vector. The reactor-to-reactor diffusion of the pre-loaded primer pairs in the chip is investigated to eliminate the possibility of primer cross-contamination. Key technical issues such as PCR mixture loss in gas-permeable PDMS chip layer and bubble generation due to different PDMS-glass bonding methods are investigated.

  14. [Determination of the critical time point for efficacy of L-arginine infusion therapy in a case of MELAS with frequent stroke-like episodes].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Akira; Sano, Hitomi; Kawamura, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is the most representative subtype of mitochondrial diseases. Administration of L-arginine (L-Arg) or a precursor of nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as a promising medication for MELAS because one of the pathophysiological mechanisms is supposedly a decreased capacity for NO-dependent vasodilation. We experienced a girl with MELAS and frequent stroke-like episodes who was treated with L-Arg infusion. We evaluated the efficacy of L-Arg infusion therapy based on whether her headache and nausea were disappeared and neurological symptoms were improved within 24 hours of L-Arg administration. L-Arg infusions were effective in all four episodes when the treatment was started within 4 hours of the onset of stroke-like episodes. On the other hand, the infusion was effective in only one out of five episodes when the medication was delayed by more than 4 hours after the onset. Furthermore, the early administration of L-Arg resulted in better outcomes regarding new lesions determined by brain MRI. Our data suggest that L-Arg infusion may be most effective when it is started within 4 hours of the onset of neurological symptoms in the acute phase of MELAS. The study of a large number of episodes in many patients will be needed to determine the critical time point of L-Arg administration after the onset of the acute phase of MELAS.

  15. Reply to ``Comment on `Importance of electron time-of-flight measurements in momentum imaging of saddle-point electron emission' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irby, Victor D.

    2001-05-01

    As pointed out in the preceding Comment, computer simulations presented by Irby [Phys. Rev. A 60, 1135 (1999)] analyzed the effect of using constant rather than kinematically dependent values of the electron time of flight in assessment of ejected-electron momentum from recorded micro channel plate detector-impact positions. The article raised questions of possible error in the analysis used recently by Abdallah et al. [Phys. Rev. A 56, 2000 (1997)]. In this reply, we present the results of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer simulations, which show that the error due to the assumptions used in the analysis by Abdallah et al. are indeed quite miniscule. However, and equally as important, our simulations also confirm experimental projectile-charge dependent shifts reported earlier by Irby et al. [Phys. Rev. A 37, 3612 (1988)] and Gay et al. [J. Phys. B 23, L823 (1990)] in which conclusions opposite that of Abdallah et al. were reached. While still confirming the earlier experimental results, the simulations, on the other hand, support the conclusions of Abdallah et al. and not the conclusions of Irby et al. and Gay et al.

  16. Arrests for child pornography production: data at two time points from a national sample of U.S. law enforcement agencies.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Janis; Finkelhor, David; Mitchell, Kimberly J; Jones, Lisa M

    2011-08-01

    This study collected information on arrests for child pornography (CP) production at two points (2000-2001 and 2006) from a national sample of more than 2,500 law enforcement agencies. In addition to providing descriptive data about an understudied crime, the authors examined whether trends in arrests suggested increasing CP production, shifts in victim populations, and challenges to law enforcement. Arrests for CP production more than doubled from an estimated 402 in 2000-2001 to an estimated 859 in 2006. Findings suggest the increase was related to increased law enforcement activity rather than to growth in the population of CP producers. Adolescent victims increased, but there was no increase in the proportion of arrest cases involving very young victims or violent images. Producers distributed images in 23% of arrest cases, a proportion that did not change over time. This suggests that much CP production may be primarily for private use. Proactive law enforcement operations increased, as did other features consistent with a robust law enforcement response.

  17. Differential Diagnosis of Malaria on Truelab Uno®, a Portable, Real-Time, MicroPCR Device for Point-Of-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Chandrasekhar Bhaskaran; Manjula, Jagannath; Subramani, Pradeep Annamalai; Nagendrappa, Prakash B.; Manoj, Mulakkapurath Narayanan; Malpani, Sukriti; Pullela, Phani Kumar; Subbarao, Pillarisetti Venkata; Ramamoorthy, Siva; Ghosh, Susanta K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensitive and specific detection of malarial parasites is crucial in controlling the significant malaria burden in the developing world. Also important is being able to identify life threatening Plasmodium falciparum malaria quickly and accurately to reduce malaria related mortality. Existing methods such as microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have major shortcomings. Here, we describe a new real-time PCR-based diagnostic test device at point-of-care service for resource-limited settings. Methods Truenat® Malaria, a chip-based microPCR test, was developed by bigtec Labs, Bangalore, India, for differential identification of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax parasites. The Truenat Malaria tests runs on bigtec’s Truelab Uno® microPCR device, a handheld, battery operated, and easy-to-use real-time microPCR device. The performance of Truenat® Malaria was evaluated versus the WHO nested PCR protocol. The Truenat® Malaria was further evaluated in a triple-blinded study design using a sample panel of 281 specimens created from the clinical samples characterized by expert microscopy and a rapid diagnostic test kit by the National Institute of Malaria Research (NIMR). A comparative evaluation was done on the Truelab Uno® and a commercial real-time PCR system. Results The limit of detection of the Truenat Malaria assay was found to be <5 parasites/μl for both P. falciparum and P. vivax. The Truenat® Malaria test was found to have sensitivity and specificity of 100% each, compared to the WHO nested PCR protocol based on the evaluation of 100 samples. The sensitivity using expert microscopy as the reference standard was determined to be around 99.3% (95% CI: 95.5–99.9) at the species level. Mixed infections were identified more accurately by Truenat Malaria (32 samples identified as mixed) versus expert microscopy and RDTs which detected 4 and 5 mixed samples, respectively. Conclusion The Truenat® Malaria microPCR test is a valuable

  18. Tipping Point

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash format. Almost weekly, we see ...

  19. Point-of-care detection and real-time monitoring of intravenously delivered drugs via tubing with an integrated SERS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsin-Yu; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate an approach for detection, identification, and kinetic monitoring of drugs flowing within tubing, through the use of a plasmonic nanodome array (PNA) surface. The PNA structures are fabricated using a low-cost nanoreplica molding process upon a flexible plastic substrate that is subsequently integrated with a flow cell that connects in series with ordinary intravenous (IV) drug delivery tubing. To investigate the potential clinical applications for point-of-care detection and real-time monitoring, we perform SERS detection of ten pharmaceutical compounds (hydrocodone, levorphanol, morphine, oxycodone, methadone, phenobarbital, dopamine, diltiazem, promethazine, and mitoxantrone). We demonstrate dose-dependent SERS signal magnitude, resulting in detection limits (ng ml-1) well below typical administered dosages (mg ml-1). Further, we show that the detected drugs are not permanently attached to the PNA surface, and thus our approach is capable of performing continuous monitoring of drug delivery as materials flow through IV tubing that is connected in series with the sensor. Finally, we demonstrate the potential co-detection of multiple drugs when they are mixed together, and show excellent reproducibility and stability of SERS measurements for periods extending at least five days. The capabilities reported here demonstrate the potential to use PNA SERS surfaces for enhancing the safety of IV drug delivery.We demonstrate an approach for detection, identification, and kinetic monitoring of drugs flowing within tubing, through the use of a plasmonic nanodome array (PNA) surface. The PNA structures are fabricated using a low-cost nanoreplica molding process upon a flexible plastic substrate that is subsequently integrated with a flow cell that connects in series with ordinary intravenous (IV) drug delivery tubing. To investigate the potential clinical applications for point-of-care detection and real-time monitoring, we perform SERS detection of ten

  20. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  1. Estimated times to exhaustion and power outputs at the gas exchange threshold, physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold, and respiratory compensation point.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Zuniga, Jorge M; Camic, Clayton L; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the power outputs and estimated times to exhaustion (T(lim)) at the gas exchange threshold (GET), physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold (PWC(RPE)), and respiratory compensation point (RCP). Three male and 5 female subjects (mean ± SD: age, 22.4 ± 2.8 years) performed an incremental test to exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer to determine peak oxygen consumption rate, GET, and RCP. The PWC(RPE) was determined from ratings of perceived exertion data recorded during 3 continuous workbouts to exhaustion. The estimated T(lim) values for each subject at GET, PWC(RPE), and RCP were determined from power curve analyses (T(lim) = ax(b)). The results indicated that the PWC(RPE) (176 ± 55 W) was not significantly different from RCP (181 ± 54 W); however, GET (155 ± 42 W) was significantly less than PWC(RPE) and RCP. The estimated T(lim) for the GET (26.1 ± 9.8 min) was significantly greater than PWC(RPE) (14.6 ± 5.6 min) and RCP (11.2 ± 3.1 min). The PWC(RPE) occurred at a mean power output that was 13.5% greater than the GET and, therefore, it is likely that the perception of effort is not driven by the same mechanism that underlies the GET (i.e., lactate buffering). Furthermore, the PWC(RPE) and RCP were not significantly different and, therefore, these thresholds may be associated with the same mechanisms of fatigue, such as increased levels of interstitial and (or) arterial [K⁺]. PMID:22716291

  2. Point-of-Care Autofluorescence Imaging for Real-Time Sampling and Treatment Guidance of Bioburden in Chronic Wounds: First-in-Human Results

    PubMed Central

    DaCosta, Ralph S.; Kulbatski, Iris; Lindvere-Teene, Liis; Starr, Danielle; Blackmore, Kristina; Silver, Jason I.; Opoku, Julie; Wu, Yichao Charlie; Medeiros, Philip J.; Xu, Wei; Xu, Lizhen; Wilson, Brian C.; Rosen, Cheryl; Linden, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditionally, chronic wound infection is diagnosed by visual inspection under white light and microbiological sampling, which are subjective and suboptimal, respectively, thereby delaying diagnosis and treatment. To address this, we developed a novel handheld, fluorescence imaging device (PRODIGI) that enables non-contact, real-time, high-resolution visualization and differentiation of key pathogenic bacteria through their endogenous autofluorescence, as well as connective tissues in wounds. Methods and Findings This was a two-part Phase I, single center, non-randomized trial of chronic wound patients (male and female, ≥18 years; UHN REB #09-0015-A for part 1; UHN REB #12-5003 for part 2; clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01378728 for part 1 and NCT01651845 for part 2). Part 1 (28 patients; 54% diabetic foot ulcers, 46% non-diabetic wounds) established the feasibility of autofluorescence imaging to accurately guide wound sampling, validated against blinded, gold standard swab-based microbiology. Part 2 (12 patients; 83.3% diabetic foot ulcers, 16.7% non-diabetic wounds) established the feasibility of autofluorescence imaging to guide wound treatment and quantitatively assess treatment response. We showed that PRODIGI can be used to guide and improve microbiological sampling and debridement of wounds in situ, enabling diagnosis, treatment guidance and response assessment in patients with chronic wounds. PRODIGI is safe, easy to use and integrates into the clinical workflow. Clinically significant bacterial burden can be detected in seconds, quantitatively tracked over days-to-months and their biodistribution mapped within the wound bed, periphery, and other remote areas. Conclusions PRODIGI represents a technological advancement in wound sampling and treatment guidance for clinical wound care at the point-of-care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01651845; ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01378728 PMID:25790480

  3. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-inoculation at different time points influences the outcome of C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong-Hua; Wang, Ji-Chun; Liu, Jun; Du, Yun-Ting; Cui, Li-Wang; Cao, Ya-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine. We performed a series of co-infection experiments with BCG-Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi Landau, 1965 AS using C57BL/6 mice to analyse whether BCG can affect the development of protective immunity to infection with Plasmodium spp. and the mechanism of this protection. We divided mice into four groups: BCG-inoculation 4 weeks prior to P. c. chabaudi AS infection (B-4w-Pc); simultaneous BCG-inoculation and P. c. chabaudi AS infection (Pc+B); BCG-inoculation 3 days post P. c. chabaudi AS (Pc-3-B) infection; and mono-P. c. chabaudi AS infection as control (Pc). The parasitemia level in the B-4w-Pc group was noticeably higher than control group at 6-19 days post infection (dpi). Compared with the control group, the proportion of CD4(+)CD69(+) T cells was significantly reduced 5, 8 and 12 dpi, but the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs was significantly increased in the B-4w-Pc group on 5 and 8 dpi. The B-4w-Pc group also demonstrated reduced levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α on 5 and 8 dpi and significantly elevated level of IL-10 on 12 dpi. There were significantly fewer mDCs (CD11c(+)CD11b(+)) and pDCs (CD11c(+)B220(+)) in the B-4w-Pc group than the control group at all the time points post infection and the expression of MHC II was noticeably reduced on day 8 pi. Our findings confirmed that BCG inoculation prior to Plasmodium infection resulted in excessive activation and proliferation of Tregs and upregulation of anti-inflammatory mediators, which inhibited establishment of a Th1-dominant immune response during the early stages of Plasmodium infection by inhibiting dendritive cells response. BCG inoculation prior to P. c. chabaudi AS infection may contribute to overgrowth of parasites as well as mortality in mice.

  4. Unpredictable points and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmet, Marat; Fen, Mehmet Onur

    2016-11-01

    It is revealed that a special kind of Poisson stable point, which we call an unpredictable point, gives rise to the existence of chaos in the quasi-minimal set. The existing definitions of chaos are formulated in sets of motions. This is the first time in the literature that description of chaos is initiated from a single motion. The theoretical results are exemplified by means of the symbolic dynamics.

  5. The time-space relationship of the data point (Pixels) of the thematic mapper and multispectral scanner or the myth of simultaneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified explanation of the time space relationships among scanner pixels is presented. The examples of the multispectral scanner (MSS) on Landsats 1, 2, and 3 and the thematic mapper (TM) of Landsat D are used to describe the concept and degree of nonsimultaneity of scanning system data. The time aspects of scanner data acquisition and those parts of the MSS and TM systems related to that phenomena are addressed.

  6. A biospectroscopic analysis of human prostate tissue obtained from different time periods points to a trans-generational alteration in spectral phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Theophilou, Georgios; Lima, Kássio M. G.; Briggs, Matthew; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L.; Stringfellow, Helen F.; Martin, Francis L.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly-diagnosed malignancy in males worldwide; however, there is marked geographic variation in incidence that may be associated with a Westernised lifestyle. We set out to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) or Raman spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis or variable selection techniques employing genetic algorithm or successive projection algorithm could be utilised to explore differences between prostate tissues from differing years. In total, 156 prostate tissues from transurethral resection of the prostate procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia from 1983 to 2013 were collected. These were distributed to form seven categories: 1983–1984 (n = 20), 1988–1989 (n = 25), 1993–1994 (n = 21), 1998–1999 (n = 21), 2003–2004 (n = 21), 2008–2009 (n = 20) and 2012–2013 (n = 21). Ten-μm-thick tissue sections were floated onto Low-E (IR-reflective) slides for ATR-FTIR or Raman spectroscopy. The prostate tissue spectral phenotype altered in a temporal fashion. Examination of the two categories that are at least one generation (30 years) apart indicated highly-significant segregation, especially in spectral regions containing DNA and RNA bands (≈1,000–1,490 cm−1). This may point towards alterations that have occurred through genotoxicity or through epigenetic modifications. Immunohistochemical studies for global DNA methylation supported this. This study points to a trans-generational phenotypic change in human prostate. PMID:26310632

  7. From the wrong point of view! Athletes' ability to identify structured playing patterns suffers from the misalignment of tactic boards during time-outs in professional basketball.

    PubMed

    Schul, Karsten; Memmert, Daniel; Weigelt, Matthias; Jansen, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In professional basketball, coaches commonly use time-outs to instruct players on the upcoming playing pattern. In an explorative study a total of 154 time-outs in professional basketball were analyzed and the data revealed that coaches usually present these playing patterns from their own viewing perspective on the tactic board. This habit leads to a misalignment of the instructed playing pattern with the viewing perspective of players, so that they have to mentally rotate the pattern's spatial-temporal information before they can execute the action on the court. In an experimental study thirty-two basketball experts and forty-eight novices watched video clips of different playing patterns, which were presented from their own or from a coaches' viewing perspective. Identification performance suffered significantly for experts and novices when the upcoming pattern was presented upside down. It is suggested that basketball coaches should align their tactic boards with the viewing perspective of their athletes during time-outs.

  8. Pointing to others: How the target gender influences pointing performance.

    PubMed

    Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Jacquemot, Charlotte; Cruveiller, Virginie; Dupoux, Emmanuel; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Pointing is a communicative gesture that allows individuals to share information about surrounding objects with other humans. Patients with heterotopagnosia are specifically impaired in pointing to other humans' body parts but not in pointing to themselves or to objects. Here, we describe a female patient with heterotopagnosia who was more accurate in pointing to men's body parts than to women's body parts. We replicated this gender effect in healthy participants with faster reaction times for pointing to men's body parts than to women's body parts. We discuss the role of gender stereotypes in explaining why it is more difficult to point to women than to men. PMID:27593456

  9. Label-free microfluidic free-flow isoelectric focusing, pH gradient sensing and near real-time isoelectric point determination of biomolecules and blood plasma fractions.

    PubMed

    Poehler, Elisabeth; Herzog, Christin; Lotter, Carsten; Pfeiffer, Simon A; Aigner, Daniel; Mayr, Torsten; Nagl, Stefan

    2015-11-21

    We demonstrate the fabrication, characterization and application of microfluidic chips capable of continuous electrophoretic separation via free flow isoelectric focussing (FFIEF). By integration of a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent pH sensor layer under the whole separation bed, on-line observation of the pH gradient and determination of biomolecular isoelectric points (pI) was achieved within a few seconds. Using an optical setup for imaging of the intrinsic fluorescence of biomolecules at 266 nm excitation, labelling steps could be avoided and the native biomolecules could be separated, collected and analysed for their pI. The fabricated microchip was successfully used for the monitoring of the separation and simultaneous observation of the pH gradient during the isoelectric focussing of the proteins α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, blood plasma proteins and the antibiotics ampicillin and ofloxacin. The obtained pIs are in good agreement with literature data, demonstrating the applicability of the system. Mass spectra from the separated antibiotics taken after 15 minutes of continuous separation from different fractions at the end of the microchip validated the separation via microfluidic isoelectric focussing and indicate the possibility of further on- or off-chip processing steps. PMID:26501586

  10. Rapid, point-of-care extraction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proviral DNA from whole blood for detection by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Jangam, Sujit R; Yamada, Douglas H; McFall, Sally M; Kelso, David M

    2009-08-01

    PCR detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA is the method recommended for use for the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants in limited-resource settings. Currently, testing must be performed in central laboratories, which are usually located some distance from health care facilities. While the collection and transportation of samples, such as dried blood spots, has improved test accessibility, the results are often not returned for several weeks. To enable PCR to be performed at the point of care while the mothers wait, we have developed a vertical filtration method that uses a separation membrane and an absorbent pad to extract cellular DNA from whole blood in less than 2 min. Cells are trapped in the separation membrane as the specimen is collected, and then a lysis buffer is added. The membrane retains the DNA, while the buffer washes away PCR inhibitors, which get wicked into the absorbent blotter pad. The membrane containing the entrapped DNA is then added to the PCR mixture without further purification. The method demonstrates a high degree of reproducibility and analytical sensitivity and allows the quantification of as few as 20 copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA from 100 microl of blood. In a blinded study with 182 longitudinal samples from infants (ages, 0 to 72 weeks) obtained from the Women and Infants Transmission Study, our assay demonstrated a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100%. PMID:19644129

  11. Major Molecular Response Achievement in CML Patients Can Be Predicted by BCR-ABL1/ABL1 or BCR-ABL1/GUS Ratio at an Earlier Time Point of Follow-Up than Currently Recommended

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Sarah; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Heiblig, Maël; Tigaud, Isabelle; Gazzo, Sophie; Belhabri, Amine; Souche, Denis; Michallet, Mauricette; Magaud, Jean-Pierre; Hayette, Sandrine; Nicolini, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that early molecular response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors is strongly predictive of outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia patients and that early response landmarks may identify patients at higher risk for transformation who would benefit from an early switch to second-line therapy. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the control gene GUS to identify relevant thresholds for known therapeutic decision levels (BCR-ABL1/ABL1IS  = 10% and 0.1%). We then defined the most relevant cut-offs for early molecular response markers (transcript level at 3 months, halving time and log reduction between diagnosis and 3 months of treatment) using GUS or ABL1. We demonstrated that, although both control genes could be used (in an equivalent way) to accurately assess early molecular response, the BCR-ABL1/GUS level at diagnosis is impacted by the higher GUS copy number over-expressed in CML cells, thus negatively impacting its ability to completely replace ABL1 at diagnosis. Furthermore, we pointed out, for the first time, that it would be helpful to monitor BCR-ABL1 levels at an earlier time point than that currently performed, in order to assess response to first-line tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and consider a potential switch of therapy as early as possible. We evaluated this optimal time point as being 19 days after the start of treatment in our cohort. PMID:25203717

  12. Comparison between a Broad-Range Real-Time and a Broad-Range End-Point PCR Assays for the Detection of Bacterial 16S rRNA in Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Meddeb, Mariam; Koebel, Christelle; Jaulhac, Benoît; Schramm, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Broad range PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene is widely used to test clinical samples for the presence of bacterial DNA. End-point 16S PCR is both time-consuming and at high risk of cross-contamination. Prior to the replacement of the 16S end-point PCR assay routinely used in our clinical laboratory by a new 16S real-time PCR assay, we aimed to compare the performances of both techniques for the direct diagnosis of bacterial infections in clinical samples. In this prospective study, 129 clinical samples were included for direct comparison of both techniques. The sensitivity of 16S real-time PCR assay (76%) was significantly higher than that of end-point 16S PCR assay (41%) (p<0.01). Specificities of both PCR assays did not differ significantly (p=0.43). The 16S real-time PCR assay yielded an etiological diagnosis in 19% of culture-negative samples. It constitutes a reliable and complementary diagnostic tool to the bacterial culture.

  13. The evolution of ROAN 2016 - Radio surveillance of meteors and determination of reflection points through calculation of the radio path, based on times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, T.; Georgescu, A.; Lesanu, C.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the activity calendar describing the steps until the finalization of the Allsky project in December 2016. It presents also the new developed technology for detection and localization of meteors' ionic traces, which is based on information time-stamped on the radio carrier. The year 2016 is the final one for our project, during which our target is the creation of 25 integrated stations (radio and video, Allsky MK3 type) and to install the ROAN radio beacon. Its location will be the operation base initially, before being moved to an eastern spot, near the Ukrainian border. The novelty of it all is brought by the newly patented technology of time-stamping.

  14. From the wrong point of view! Athletes' ability to identify structured playing patterns suffers from the misalignment of tactic boards during time-outs in professional basketball.

    PubMed

    Schul, Karsten; Memmert, Daniel; Weigelt, Matthias; Jansen, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In professional basketball, coaches commonly use time-outs to instruct players on the upcoming playing pattern. In an explorative study a total of 154 time-outs in professional basketball were analyzed and the data revealed that coaches usually present these playing patterns from their own viewing perspective on the tactic board. This habit leads to a misalignment of the instructed playing pattern with the viewing perspective of players, so that they have to mentally rotate the pattern's spatial-temporal information before they can execute the action on the court. In an experimental study thirty-two basketball experts and forty-eight novices watched video clips of different playing patterns, which were presented from their own or from a coaches' viewing perspective. Identification performance suffered significantly for experts and novices when the upcoming pattern was presented upside down. It is suggested that basketball coaches should align their tactic boards with the viewing perspective of their athletes during time-outs. PMID:25549511

  15. The reliability of point-of-care prothrombin time testing. A comparison of CoaguChek S and XS INR measurements with hospital laboratory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ryan, F; O'Shea, S; Byrne, S

    2010-02-01

    The development of point-of-care (POC) testing devices enables patients to test their own international normalized ratio (INR) at home. However, previous studies have shown that when compared with clinical laboratory values, statistically significant differences may occur between the two methods of INR measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the CoaguChek S and XS POC meters relative to clinical laboratory measurements. As part of a randomized, crossover patient self-testing (PST) study at Cork University Hospital, patients were randomized to 6 months PST or 6 months routine care by the anticoagulation management service. During the PST arm of the study, patients measured their INR at home using the CoaguChek S or XS POC meter. External quality control was performed at enrollment, 2 months and 4 months by comparing the POC measured INR with the laboratory determined value. One hundred and fifty-one patients provided 673 paired samples. Good correlation was shown between the two methods of determination (r = 0.91), however, statistically significant differences did occur. A Bland-Altman plot illustrated good agreement of INR values between 2.0 and 3.5 INR units but there was increasing disagreement as the INR rose above 3.5. Eighty-seven per cent of all dual measurements were within the recommended 0.5 INR units of each other. This study adds to the growing evidence that POC testing is a reliable and safe alternative to hospital laboratory monitoring but highlights the importance of external quality control when these devices are used for monitoring oral anticoagulation.

  16. Estimation of an early meaningful time point of bone parameter changes in application to an osteoporotic rat model with in vivo microcomputed tomography measurements.

    PubMed

    Keiler, Annekathrin Martina; Zierau, Oliver; Vollmer, Günter; Scharnweber, Dieter; Bernhardt, Ricardo

    2012-07-01

    The commonly used preclinical animal model of postmenopausal osteoporosis is the mature ovariectomized rat, whereby cessation of ovarian oestrogen production consequently results in bone volume reduction. The study aim was to precisely define the time course of structural changes resulting from ovariectomy and thereby reduce the time animals have to be treated to judge the effects of osteoporosis treatment. For this purpose, we assessed architectural changes by microcomputed tomography (μCT) during 10 weeks following ovariectomy or sham surgery at two-week intervals. Moreover, the trabecular microarchitecture of the lumbar vertebrae was assessed after necropsy. Besides this, serum biomarkers of bone turnover were determined. These data were in a new approach additionally correlated to femur mRNA expression profiles. We selected the osteoblast marker genes osteocalcin and type I collagen as well as the two osteoclast marker genes cathepsin k and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5. The gene expression analysis suggested an activation of osteoblasts as well as octeoclasts. The significantly induced serum levels of osteocalcin and collagen degradation fragments also revealed this higher rate of bone turnover. Our results indicate that as soon as four weeks after ovariectomy the bone volume fraction exhibited a decline of 30% and 50% of the connectivity density. In addition, significant decreases of trabecular number and thickness as well as of the bone volume fraction were only observed in vertebrae of ovariectomized animals. Interestingly, changes of trabecular morphology were also found in the sham animals as a consequence of senescence.

  17. Methods of a large prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end-point study comparing morning versus evening dosing in hypertensive patients: the Treatment In Morning versus Evening (TIME) study

    PubMed Central

    Rorie, David A; Rogers, Amy; Mackenzie, Isla S; Ford, Ian; Webb, David J; Willams, Bryan; Brown, Morris; Poulter, Neil; Findlay, Evelyn; Saywood, Wendy; MacDonald, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nocturnal blood pressure (BP) appears to be a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than daytime BP. The BP lowering effects of most antihypertensive therapies are often greater in the first 12 h compared to the next 12 h. The Treatment In Morning versus Evening (TIME) study aims to establish whether evening dosing is more cardioprotective than morning dosing. Methods and analysis The TIME study uses the prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end-point (PROBE) design. TIME recruits participants by advertising in the community, from primary and secondary care, and from databases of consented patients in the UK. Participants must be aged over 18 years, prescribed at least one antihypertensive drug taken once a day, and have a valid email address. After the participants have self-enrolled and consented on the secure TIME website (http://www.timestudy.co.uk) they are randomised to take their antihypertensive medication in the morning or the evening. Participant follow-ups are conducted after 1 month and then every 3 months by automated email. The trial is expected to run for 5 years, randomising 10 269 participants, with average participant follow-up being 4 years. The primary end point is hospitalisation for the composite end point of non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), non-fatal stroke (cerebrovascular accident; CVA) or any vascular death determined by record-linkage. Secondary end points are: each component of the primary end point, hospitalisation for non-fatal stroke, hospitalisation for non-fatal MI, cardiovascular death, all-cause mortality, hospitalisation or death from congestive heart failure. The primary outcome will be a comparison of time to first event comparing morning versus evening dosing using an intention-to-treat analysis. The sample size is calculated for a two-sided test to detect 20% superiority at 80% power. Ethics and dissemination TIME has ethical approval in the UK, and results will be published in a

  18. Time-resolved measurement of photon emission during fast crack propagation in three-point bending fracture of silica glass and soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Tadashi Sato, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Kouichi

    2014-03-10

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of photon emission (PE) and fast crack propagation upon bending fracture were conducted in silica glass and soda lime glass. Observation of fracture surfaces revealed that macroscopic crack propagation behavior was similar between the silica glass and soda lime glass when fracture loads for these specimens were comparable and cracks propagated without branching. However, a large difference in the PE characteristics was found between the two glasses. In silica glass, PE (645–655 nm) was observed during the entire crack propagation process, whereas intense PE (430–490 nm and 500–600 nm) was observed during the initial stages of propagation. In contrast, only weak PE was detected in soda lime glass. These results show that there is a large difference in the atomic processes involved in fast crack propagation between these glasses, and that PE can be used to study brittle fracture on the atomic scale.

  19. Spatio-temporal statistical model for the optimal combination of precipitation measured at different time scales for estimating unobserved point values and disaggregating to finer timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bàrdossy, Andràs; Pegram, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    Precipitation observations are unique in space and time, so if not observed, the values can only be estimated. Many applications, such as the calculation of water balances, calibration of hydrological models or the provision of unbiased ground truth for remote sensing require full datasets. Thus a reliable estimation of the missing observations is of great importance. The problem is exacerbated by the ubiquitous decimation of gauge networks. We consider 2 problems as examples of the methodology: (i) infilling monthly data where some days are missing in the monthly records and (ii) infilling missing hourly values in daily records with the assistance of some nearby pluviometers. The key is that we need estimates of the distributions of the infilled values, not just their expectations, as we have found that the traditional 'best' values bias the spatial estimates. We first performed monthly precipitation interpolation using 311 full records, 31 stations of which were randomly decimated to artificially create incomplete records as inequality constraints. Interpolation was carried out (i) without using these 31 in any way and (ii) using them as inequality constraints, in the sense that we determine a lower limit by aggregating the surviving data in a decimated record. We compare the errors if (i) the 31 stations with incomplete records are not considered against (ii) the errors if the incomplete records are considered as inequalities, and found that the partially decimated data add considerable value, as compared to neglecting them. In a second application we performed a disaggregation in time. We take a set of complete hourly pluviometer data, then aggregate some stations to days. These then have their hourly missing data reconstructed and we evaluate the success of the procedure by cross-validation. In this application the daily sums for a location are considered as a constraint and the disaggregated daily data are compared to their observed hourly precipitation. The

  20. Development of a real-time performance predictor and an investigation of a return to point vehicle for high altitude ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Joseph P., Jr.

    Scope and method of study. The goal of this study was twofold: First, to gain a better understanding of the governing dynamics in near-space missions and to investigate the feasibility of a low cost autonomous parafoil for control during the descent phase. A study of balloon expansion and drag was conducted to investigate the ascent phase of a flight. The next phase of the project created of a custom prediction program used in real-time to accurately predict the landing location of payloads well before they actually landed. The program was designed to detect and adjust the major dynamic parameters as seen during the flight, and then to use this information to increase the accuracy of predictions. The second goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of using a low cost autonomous parafoil to increase the control over a desired landing zone. This study was conducted in two phases: The first phase tested the autopilot on a ground vehicle to gain confidence in the system. The second phase tested autopilot on an actual parafoil. Findings and conclusions. The major findings for this project are: An increase in understanding of the balloon dynamics in the ascent phase was required in order to correctly predict the reaction of the system. In the process of gaining this understanding, two major items were found: First, near-space balloons can be modeled as zero-pressure balloons and thus their expansion is governed by the Ideal Gas Law. Second, the assumed drag model for near-space missions in the size range of 10 to 20 lbs and 600 cu ft of Helium was grossly misunderstood. While the system does transition from a high to low drag coefficient, it does so at a much slower rate than that a classical sphere. The method of detecting and correcting parameters in real-time lead to a major increase in accuracy in the predicted landing zone just after burst. Typically, the system has an accuracy of 2 miles or better, two minutes after burst has occurred. The second part

  1. Evaluation of point mutation detection in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with isoniazid resistance using real-time PCR and TaqMan probe assay.

    PubMed

    Riahi, F; Derakhshan, M; Mosavat, A; Soleimanpour, S; Rezaee, S A

    2015-03-01

    Rapid methods for diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) drug resistance and choosing appropriate antibiotic treatment are pivotal. Thirty isoniazid (INH)-resistant and 30 INH-susceptible Mtb isolates were evaluated using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method followed by multiplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) for detection of mutation in 315 codon of katG gene and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for detection of mutation in -15 (C>T) in the regulatory zone of mabA-inhA were carried out using the TaqMan method. Primers and probe were used for IS6110 region of Mtb as an internal amplification control. The sensitivity and specificity of the RT-PCR TaqMan probe for detection of Mtb complex were 100 %. Detection of INH-resistant Mtb using the ARMS method for KatG had 69 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity. The sensitivity and specificity of SNP in mabA-inhA fragment for detection of INH-resistant Mtb were 53 and 100 %, respectively. Furthermore, considering both regions, the sensitivity of RT-PCR has increased to 75 %. This study revealed that the qPCR-TaqMan method can be used as a standard tool for diagnosis of Mtb. Moreover, ARMS and SNP RT-PCR TaqMan methods can be used as rapid screening methods for detection of INH-resistant Mtb.

  2. Space-time design of the tangled C-points and optical vortex chain and loop reactions in paraxial dynamic elliptic speckle fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskin, Marat S.; Vasil'ev, Vasil I.

    2013-04-01

    The unique effect of ‘optical damage’ in photorefractive LiNbO3:Fe crystals produces a developing speckle field in the propagating beam of a He-Ne laser (0.63 μm). Elliptic developing speckle fields were created and investigated thoroughly by means of the Stokes polarimetry and monstardom (Dennis 2008 Opt. Lett. 33 2572). The ergodicity of elliptic speckle fields under the index (star, monstar, lemon) and contour (elliptic, hyperbolic) classifications was revealed experimentally by our measurements for developing speckle fields, measurements for static elliptic speckle fields, as well as theory (Flossmann et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 203902). Both hyperbolic (H) and elliptic (E) diabolos were fixed. All the probable topological structures for the neighbour diabolos in the developing elliptic speckle field were measured. All the measured nucleation/annihilation events occur as H(S)+H(M) reactions. The evolution of the singularities occurs separately in the speckle-field areas with fixed handedness and is realized through minimizing the changes needed for the developing speckle fields at each moment. The general regularities of the elliptic speckle-field development were revealed and confirmed. They occur through the time-limited loop and continuous chain reactions in both single and multiple speckles in 1:4 proportion. Strict morphological scenarios for their evolution were found. Applications of the methods of dynamical singular optics are discussed.

  3. Antibacterial effects on dry-fast and traditional water-based surgical scrubbing methods: a two-time points experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Hwa; Chou, Chuan-Yu; Huang, Jui-Chen; Tang, Ya-Fen; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Chien, Li-Yu

    2014-06-01

    This study determined the in-use effects of dry-fast and traditional hand-washing surgical scrubs among operating room staff members. This is a static group comparison study with purposive sampling. A total of 156 staff members were recruited in an operating room in a medical center located in southern Taiwan. The participants were divided into traditional and dry-fast hand-washing groups. Microbial counts were measured right after the two groups finished surgical scrubbing and at the completion of surgery. The results showed that the use of dry-fast antisepsis has a better persistent effect (P = 0.001), more nurses chose dry-fast antisepsis than surgeons (P = 0.012), and the post-operation number of colonies for nurses was significantly higher than that for surgeons (P = 0.003). Operating room nurses are long-term and frequent users of antibacterial agents, and their requirement of skin protection is higher. The dry-fast technique has the advantage of being less irritating to the skin and less time consuming; therefore, brush-free and dry-fast antisepsis is recommended. PMID:23992610

  4. Near Real-time Immuno-optical Sensor for Diagnosing Single Point Mutation (A model System: Sensor for Factor V Leiden Diagnosis)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung A.; Ren, Yongjie; Sharma, Vivek R.; Peiper, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Factor V leiden (FVL) is an abnormality of factor V (FV), a blood coagulation factor. It is a hereditary blood coagulation disorder with a high frequency (3–7% of general population). The most common type of FVL is caused by a single amino acid mutation and, therefore, its diagnosis is currently done only by DNA analysis, which takes a long time and is expensive. We have developed a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective, sandwich immuno-optical sensing method. To produce monoclonal antibodies against FV or FVL, having minimal cross-reactivity with the other molecule, a 20 amino acid sequence (20-mer) of FV or FVL at around the mutation site was utilized. The antibodies were screened first with the 20-mers and then with native FV or FVL molecules and they showed some cross reactivity. Using two antibodies having strongest affinity to either FV or FVL molecule, a FV and a FVL preferred sensors, were produced. After verifying that the levels of the antibody affinity to the two different molecules remained constant with changes in analyte concentration, a two-sensor system is developed to quantify FV and FVL in plasma samples. The system quantified the levels of FV and FVL at the maximum error of 0.5 μg/ml-plasma, in their physiological concentration range of 0–12 μg/ml-plasma. The levels of both molecules may provide us whether the patient has FVL or not but also the seriousness level of the disease (homozygous and different level of heterozygous). PMID:19318242

  5. Real Time PCR Using Molecular Beacons : A New Tool to Identify Point Mutations and to Analyze Gene Expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, R; Tyagi, S; Smith, I

    2001-01-01

    Molecular beacons are a novel family of hybridization probes, which emit fluorescence upon interaction with their target. They are hairpin-shaped oligonucleotides with a central part complementary to the target, flanked by two 5 6 base pair (bp) inverted repeats, which can form a stable stem. A fluorescent moiety is covalently linked to the 5' end of the molecule, whereas the quenching moiety, 4-(4'-dimethylaminophenylazo)benzoic acid (DABCYL), is covalently linked to the 3' end. The stem keeps the two moieties in close proximity to each other, causing the fluorescence of the fluorophore to be quenched by energy transfer. When molecular beacons bind to their target, they undergo a conformational change that results in the restoration of fluorescence of the internally quenched fluorophore (1) (Fig. 1). Molecular beacons are extremely specific, and can clearly discriminate between targets differing only by a single nucleotide (2,3). When present in a PCR reaction where their target is the amplification product, molecular beacons can form a stable hybrid with the amplicon during the annealing step. The intensity of fluorescence at the annealing step in each amplification cycle is a direct measure of amplicon concentration (2,4) (Fig. 2). Another interesting feature of molecular beacons is that they can be coupled to a variety of differently colored fluorophores. This allows multiplex PCR reactions where different DNA fragments can be amplified and detected simultaneously in the same tube (2,3). Fig. 1. Operation of molecular beacons. On their own, these molecules are nonfluorescent, because the stem hybrid keeps the fluorophore (◯) close to the quencher (•). When the probe sequence in the loop hybridizes to its target, forming a rigid double helix, a conformational reorganization occurs that separates the quencher from the fluorophore, restoring fluorescence (1). Fig. 2. Real time measurement of amplicon synthesis during PCR using molecular beacons. (A) Four PCR

  6. The dynamics of income and neighborhood context for population health: do long-term measures of socioeconomic status explain more of the black/white health disparity than single-point-in-time measures?

    PubMed

    Do, D Phuong

    2009-04-01

    Socioeconomic status, though a robust and strong predictor of health, has generally been unable to fully explain the health gap between blacks and whites in the United States. However, at both the individual and neighborhood levels, socioeconomic status is often treated as a static factor with only single-point-in-time measurements. These cross-sectional measures fail to account for possible heterogeneous histories within groups who may share similar characteristics at a given point in time. As such, ignoring the dynamic nature of socioeconomic status may lead to the underestimation of its importance in explaining health and racial health disparities. In this study, I use national longitudinal data to investigate the relationship between neighborhood poverty and respondent-rated health, focusing on whether the addition of a temporal dimension reveals a stronger relationship between neighborhood poverty and health, and a greater explanatory power for the health gap between blacks and whites. Results indicate that long-term neighborhood measures are stronger predictors of health outcomes and explain a greater amount of the black/white health gap than single-point measures.

  7. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Dang, R. S.; Ando, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  8. Approaching real-time molecular diagnostics: single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) detection for the analysis of low abundant point mutations in K-ras oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Wabuyele, Musundi B; Farquar, Hannah; Stryjewski, Wieslaw; Hammer, Robert P; Soper, Steven A; Cheng, Yu-Wei; Barany, Francis

    2003-06-11

    The aim of this study was to develop new strategies for analyzing molecular signatures of disease states approaching real-time using single pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) to rapidly detect point mutations in unamplified genomic DNA. In addition, the detection process was required to discriminate between normal and mutant (minority) DNAs in heterogeneous populations. The discrimination was carried out using allele-specific primers, which flanked the point mutation in the target gene and were ligated using a thermostable ligase enzyme only when the genomic DNA carried this mutation. The allele-specific primers also carried complementary stem structures with end-labels (donor/acceptor fluorescent dyes, Cy5/Cy5.5, respectively), which formed a molecular beacon following ligation. We coupled ligase detection reaction (LDR) with spFRET to identify a single base mutation in codon 12 of a K-ras oncogene that has high diagnostic value for colorectal cancers. A simple diode laser-based fluorescence system capable of interrogating single fluorescent molecules undergoing FRET was used to detect photon bursts generated from the molecular beacon probes formed upon ligation. LDR-spFRET provided the necessary specificity and sensitivity to detect single-point mutations in as little as 600 copies of human genomic DNA directly without PCR at a level of 1 mutant per 1000 wild type sequences using 20 LDR thermal cycles. We also demonstrate the ability to rapidly discriminate single base differences in the K-ras gene in less than 5 min at a frequency of 1 mutant DNA per 10 normals using only a single LDR thermal cycle of genomic DNA (600 copies). Real-time LDR-spFRET detection of point mutations in the K-ras gene was accomplished in PMMA microfluidic devices using sheath flows.

  9. GLAS Spacecraft Pointing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, George H.; Gold, Kenn; Ondrey, Michael; Kubitschek, Dan; Axelrad, Penina; Komjathy, Attila

    1998-01-01

    Science requirements for the GLAS mission demand that the laser altimeter be pointed to within 50 m of the location of the previous repeat ground track. The satellite will be flown in a repeat orbit of 182 days. Operationally, the required pointing information will be determined on the ground using the nominal ground track, to which pointing is desired, and the current propagated orbit of the satellite as inputs to the roll computation algorithm developed by CCAR. The roll profile will be used to generate a set of fit coefficients which can be uploaded on a daily basis and used by the on-board attitude control system. In addition, an algorithm has been developed for computation of the associated command quaternions which will be necessary when pointing at targets of opportunity. It may be desirable in the future to perform the roll calculation in an autonomous real-time mode on-board the spacecraft. GPS can provide near real-time tracking of the satellite, and the nominal ground track can be stored in the on-board computer. It will be necessary to choose the spacing of this nominal ground track to meet storage requirements in the on-board environment. Several methods for generating the roll profile from a sparse reference ground track are presented.

  10. Effect of Receiver Choosing on Point Positions Determination in Network RTK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, Sercan; Inal, Cevat

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the developments in GNSS technique allow to determinate point positioning in real time. Initially, point positioning was determined by RTK (Real Time Kinematic) based on a reference station. But, to avoid systematic errors in this method, distance between the reference points and rover receiver must be shorter than10 km. To overcome this restriction in RTK method, the idea of setting more than one reference point had been suggested and, CORS (Continuously Operations Reference Systems) was put into practice. Today, countries like ABD, Germany, Japan etc. have set CORS network. CORS-TR network which has 146 reference points has also been established in 2009 in Turkey. In CORS-TR network, active CORS approach was adopted. In Turkey, CORS-TR reference stations covering whole country are interconnected and, the positions of these stations and atmospheric corrections are continuously calculated. In this study, in a selected point, RTK measurements based on CORS-TR, were made with different receivers (JAVAD TRIUMPH-1, TOPCON Hiper V, MAGELLAN PRoMark 500, PENTAX SMT888-3G, SATLAB SL-600) and with different correction techniques (VRS, FKP, MAC). In the measurements, epoch interval was taken as 5 seconds and measurement time as 1 hour. According to each receiver and each correction technique, means and differences between maximum and minimum values of measured coordinates, root mean squares in the directions of coordinate axis and 2D and 3D positioning precisions were calculated, the results were evaluated by statistical methods and the obtained graphics were interpreted. After evaluation of the measurements and calculations, for each receiver and each correction technique; the coordinate differences between maximum and minimum values were measured to be less than 8 cm, root mean squares in coordinate axis directions less than ±1.5 cm, 2D point positioning precisions less than ±1.5 cm and 3D point positioning precisions less than ±1.5 cm. In the measurement

  11. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  12. Floating point coprocessor upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, T.

    1987-04-01

    A method was developed to increase the throughput of the Hewlett Packard, 98635A floating point processor equipped, model 236C computer. The increase was carried out in three phases each with a clock and or chip change during the modification. Two programs were written to test the results and evaluate the increases in performance made to the computer. The first one shows reduction in processing times of 34.3%, while the other recorded 34.6%.

  13. Resonant frequency analysis of a Lamé-mode resonator on a quartz plate by the finite-difference time-domain method using the staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takashi; Hasegawa, Koji; Hirayama, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method using a staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities (SGCV) was formulated for elastic waves propagating in anisotropic solids and for a rectangular SGCV. Resonant frequency analysis of Lamé-mode resonators on a quartz plate was carried out to confirm the accuracy and validity of the proposed method. The resonant frequencies for the fundamental and higher-order Lamé-modes calculated by the proposed method agreed very well with their theoretical values.

  14. The Point of No Return

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Bartlett (1958) described the point of no return as a point of irrevocable commitment to action, which was preceded by a period of gradually increasing commitment. As such, the point of no return reflects a fundamental limit on the ability to control thought and action. I review the literature on the point of no return, taking three perspectives. First, I consider the point of no return from the perspective of the controlled act, as a locus in the architecture and anatomy of the underlying processes. I review experiments from the stop-signal paradigm that suggest that the point of no return is located late in the response system. Then I consider the point of no return from the perspective of the act of control that tries to change the controlled act before it becomes irrevocable. From this perspective, the point of no return is a point in time that provides enough “lead time” for the act of control to take effect. I review experiments that measure the response time to the stop signal as the lead time required for response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm. Finally, I consider the point of no return in hierarchically controlled tasks, in which there may be many points of no return at different levels of the hierarchy. I review experiments on skilled typing that suggest different points of no return for the commands that determine what is typed and the countermands that inhibit typing, with increasing commitment to action the lower the level in the hierarchy. I end by considering the point of no return in perception and thought as well as action. PMID:25633089

  15. At the Tipping Point

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2011-02-28

    There comes a time in every field of science when things suddenly change. While it might not be immediately apparent that things are different, a tipping point has occurred. Biology is now at such a point. The reason is the introduction of high-throughput genomics-based technologies. I am not talking about the consequences of the sequencing of the human genome (and every other genome within reach). The change is due to new technologies that generate an enormous amount of data about the molecular composition of cells. These include proteomics, transcriptional profiling by sequencing, and the ability to globally measure microRNAs and post-translational modifications of proteins. These mountains of digital data can be mapped to a common frame of reference: the organism’s genome. With the new high-throughput technologies, we can generate tens of thousands of data points from each sample. Data are now measured in terabytes and the time necessary to analyze data can now require years. Obviously, we can’t wait to interpret the data fully before the next experiment. In fact, we might never be able to even look at all of it, much less understand it. This volume of data requires sophisticated computational and statistical methods for its analysis and is forcing biologists to approach data interpretation as a collaborative venture.

  16. Recent Advances in Point-of-Care Diagnostics for Cardiac Markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    National and international cardiology guidelines have recommended a 1-hour turnaround time for reporting results of cardiac troponin to emergency department personnel, measured from the time of blood collection to reporting. Use of point-of-care testing (POCT) can reduce turnaround times for cardiac markers, but current devices are not as precise or sensitive as central laboratory assays. The gap is growing as manufacturers of mainframe immunoassay instruments have or will release troponin assays that are even higher than those currently available. These assays have analytical sensitivity that enables detection of nearly 100% of all healthy subjects which is not possible for current POCT assays. Use of high sensitivity troponin results in a lower value for the 99th percentile of a healthy population. Clinically, this enables for the detection of more cases of myocardial injury. In order to compete analytically, next generation POCT assays will to make technologic advancements, such as the use of microfluidic to better control sample delivery, nanoparticles or nanotubes to increase the surface-to-volume ratios for analytes and antibodies, and novel detection schemes such as chemiluminescence and electrochemical detectors to enhance analytical sensitivity. Multi-marker analysis using POCT is also on the horizon for tests that complement cardiac troponin.

  17. Polymeric LabChip Real-Time PCR as a Point-of-Care-Potential Diagnostic Tool for Rapid Detection of Influenza A/H1N1 Virus in Human Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ok; Kim, Je-Hyoung; Ryu, Ho-Sun; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Sun-Jin; Kim, Deog-Joong; Suh, In Bum; Choi, Du Young; In, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sung-Woo; Park, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    It is clinically important to be able to detect influenza A/H1N1 virus using a fast, portable, and accurate system that has high specificity and sensitivity. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to develop a highly specific primer set that recognizes only influenza A viral genes and a rapid real-time PCR system that can detect even a single copy of the viral gene. In this study, we developed and validated a novel fluidic chip-type real-time PCR (LabChip real-time PCR) system that is sensitive and specific for the detection of influenza A/H1N1, including the pandemic influenza strain A/H1N1 of 2009. This LabChip real-time PCR system has several remarkable features: (1) It allows rapid quantitative analysis, requiring only 15 min to perform 30 cycles of real-time PCR. (2) It is portable, with a weight of only 5.5 kg. (3) The reaction cost is low, since it uses disposable plastic chips. (4) Its high efficiency is equivalent to that of commercially available tube-type real-time PCR systems. The developed disposable LabChip is an economic, heat-transferable, light-transparent, and easy-to-fabricate polymeric chip compared to conventional silicon- or glass-based labchip. In addition, our LabChip has large surface-to-volume ratios in micro channels that are required for overcoming time consumed for temperature control during real-time PCR. The efficiency of the LabChip real-time PCR system was confirmed using novel primer sets specifically targeted to the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of influenza A/H1N1 and clinical specimens. Eighty-five human clinical swab samples were tested using the LabChip real-time PCR. The results demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity, showing 72 positive and 13 negative cases. These results were identical to those from a tube-type real-time PCR system. This indicates that the novel LabChip real-time PCR may be an ultra-fast, quantitative, point-of-care-potential diagnostic tool for influenza A/H1N1 with a high sensitivity and specificity

  18. Relationships among rat ultrasonic vocalizations, behavioral measures of striatal dopamine loss, and striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity at acute and chronic time points following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Grant, Laura M; Barnett, David G; Doll, Emerald J; Leverson, Glen; Ciucci, Michelle

    2015-09-15

    Voice deficits in Parkinson disease (PD) emerge early in the disease process, but do not improve with standard treatments targeting dopamine. Experimental work in the rat shows that severe and chronic unilateral nigrostriatal dopamine depletion with 6-OHDA results in decreased intensity, bandwidth, and complexity of ultrasonic vocalizations. However, it is unclear if mild/acute dopamine depletion, paralleling earlier stages of PD, results in vocalization deficits, or to what degree vocalization parameters are correlated with other dopamine-dependent indicators of lesion severity or percent of tyrosine hydroxylase (%TH) loss. Here, we assayed ultrasonic vocalizations, forelimb asymmetry, and apomorphine rotations in rats with a range of unilateral dopamine loss resulting from 6-OHDA or vehicle control infusions to the medial forebrain bundle at acute (72 h) and chronic (4 weeks) time points post-infusion. The %TH loss was evaluated at 4 weeks. At 72 h, forelimb asymmetry and %TH loss were significantly correlated, while at 4 weeks, all measures of lesion severity were significantly correlated with each other. Call complexity was significantly correlated with all measures of lesion severity at 72 h but only with %TH loss at 4 weeks. Bandwidth was correlated with forelimb asymmetry at both time points. Duration was significantly correlated with all dopamine depletion measures at 4 weeks. Notably, not all parameters were affected universally or equally across time. These results suggest that vocalization deficits may be a sensitive index of acute and mild catecholamine loss and further underscores the need to characterize the neural mechanisms underlying vocal deficits in PD.

  19. 49 CFR 71.2 - Annual advancement of standard time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., requires that the standard time of each State observing Daylight Saving Time shall be advanced 1 hour... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual advancement of standard time. 71.2 Section 71.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES §...

  20. 49 CFR 71.2 - Annual advancement of standard time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., requires that the standard time of each State observing Daylight Saving Time shall be advanced 1 hour... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual advancement of standard time. 71.2 Section 71.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES §...

  1. 49 CFR 71.2 - Annual advancement of standard time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., requires that the standard time of each State observing Daylight Saving Time shall be advanced 1 hour... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual advancement of standard time. 71.2 Section 71.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES §...

  2. 49 CFR 71.2 - Annual advancement of standard time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., requires that the standard time of each State observing Daylight Saving Time shall be advanced 1 hour... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Annual advancement of standard time. 71.2 Section 71.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES §...

  3. 49 CFR 71.2 - Annual advancement of standard time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., requires that the standard time of each State observing Daylight Saving Time shall be advanced 1 hour... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Annual advancement of standard time. 71.2 Section 71.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES §...

  4. Melting point, boiling point, and symmetry.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, R; Yalkowsky, S H

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between the melting point of a compound and its chemical structure remains poorly understood. The melting point of a compound can be related to certain of its other physical chemical properties. The boiling point of a compound can be determined from additive constitutive properties, but the melting point can be estimated only with the aid of nonadditive constitutive parameters. The melting point of some non-hydrogen-bonding, rigid compounds can be estimated by the equation MP = 0.772 * BP + 110.8 * SIGMAL + 11.56 * ORTHO + 31.9 * EXPAN - 240.7 where MP is the melting point of the compound in Kelvin, BP is the boiling point, SIGMAL is the logarithm of the symmetry number, EXPAN is the cube of the eccentricity of the compound, and ORTHO indicates the number of groups that are ortho to another group.

  5. Two alternative multiplex PCRs for the identification of the seven species of anglerfish (Lophius spp.) using an end-point or a melting curve analysis real-time protocol.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Armani, Andrea; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius spp.) is consumed worldwide and is an important economic resource though its seven species are often fraudulently interchanged due to their different commercial value, especially when sold in the form of fillets or pieces. Molecular analysis is the only possible mean to verify traceability and counteract fraud. We developed two multiplex PCRs, one end-point and one real-time with melting curve post-amplification analysis, which can even be run with the simplest two-channel thermocyclers. The two methods were tested on seventy-five reference samples. Their specificity was checked in twenty more species of those most commonly available on the market and in other species of the Lophiidae family. Both methods, the choice of which depends on the equipment and budget of the lab, provide a rapid and easy-to-read response, improving both the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of existing methods for identifying Lophius species. PMID:25053020

  6. Characterization of plant materials by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry: high-resolution mass spectrometry, time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry, and Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of spruce needles

    SciTech Connect

    Schulten, H.F.; Simmleit, N.; Mueller, R.

    1989-02-01

    In the course of a forest damage research project spruce needles are analyzed, without pretreatment except drying and milling, by in-source pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry. The mass signals are assigned by using high-resolution mass measurements and thermal degradation products identified by Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography. It is demonstrated that the thermal degradation products characterize the main chemical constituents of spruce needs such as polysaccharides and lignin. Furthermore, thermostable constituents such as lipids, steroids, and flavons are detected. The thermal degradation process is studied by temperature-programmed microfurnace pyrolysis in combination with time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry. The integrated interpretation of results achieved by the presented methods can be applied for the universal characterization of complex and in particular nonsoluble, polydisperse biological and geochemical materials.

  7. Two alternative multiplex PCRs for the identification of the seven species of anglerfish (Lophius spp.) using an end-point or a melting curve analysis real-time protocol.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Armani, Andrea; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius spp.) is consumed worldwide and is an important economic resource though its seven species are often fraudulently interchanged due to their different commercial value, especially when sold in the form of fillets or pieces. Molecular analysis is the only possible mean to verify traceability and counteract fraud. We developed two multiplex PCRs, one end-point and one real-time with melting curve post-amplification analysis, which can even be run with the simplest two-channel thermocyclers. The two methods were tested on seventy-five reference samples. Their specificity was checked in twenty more species of those most commonly available on the market and in other species of the Lophiidae family. Both methods, the choice of which depends on the equipment and budget of the lab, provide a rapid and easy-to-read response, improving both the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of existing methods for identifying Lophius species.

  8. Characterizing configurations of fire ignition points through spatiotemporal point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, C.; Costafreda-Aumedes, S.; Vega-Garcia, C.

    2014-04-01

    Human-caused forest fires are usually regarded as unpredictable but often exhibit trends towards clustering in certain locations and periods. Characterizing such configurations is crucial for understanding spatiotemporal fire dynamics and implementing preventive actions. Our objectives were to analyse the spatiotemporal point configuration and to test for spatiotemporal interaction. We characterized the spatiotemporal structure of 984 fire ignition points in a study area of Galicia, Spain, during 2007-2011 by the K-Ripley's function. Our results suggest the presence of spatiotemporal structures for time lags of less than two years and ignition point distances in the range 0-12 km. Ignition centre points at time lags of less than 100 days are aggregated for any inter-event distance. This cluster structure loses strength as the time lag increases, and at time lags of more than 365 days this cluster structure is not significant for any lag distance. Our results also suggest spatiotemporal interdependencies at time lags of less than 100 days and inter-event distances of less than 10 km. At time lags of up to 365 days spatiotemporal components are independent for any point distance. These results suggest that risk conditions occur locally and are short-lived in this study area.

  9. Vernal Point and Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez-Campos, Teodosio; Chavez S, Nadia; Chavez-Sumarriva, Israel

    2014-05-01

    The time scale was based on the internationally recognized formal chronostratigraphical /geochronological subdivisions of time: The Phanerozoic Eonathem/Eon; the Cenozoic Erathem/Era; the Quaternary System/Period; the Pleistocene and Holocene Series/Epoch. The Quaternary was divided into: (1) The Pleistocene that was characterized by cycles of glaciations (intervals between 40,000 and 100,000 years). (2) The Holocene that was an interglacial period that began about 12,000 years ago. It was believed that the Milankovitch cycles (eccentricity, axial tilt and the precession of the equinoxes) were responsible for the glacial and interglacial Holocene periods. The magnetostratigraphic units have been widely used for global correlations valid for Quaternary. The gravitational influence of the sun and moon on the equatorial bulges of the mantle of the rotating earth causes the precession of the earth. The retrograde motion of the vernal point through the zodiacal band is 26,000 years. The Vernal point passes through each constellation in an average of 2000 years and this period of time was correlated to Bond events that were North Atlantic climate fluctuations occurring every ≡1,470 ± 500 years throughout the Holocene. The vernal point retrogrades one precessional degree approximately in 72 years (Gleissberg-cycle) and approximately enters into the Aquarius constellation on March 20, 1940. On earth this entry was verify through: a) stability of the magnetic equator in the south central zone of Peru and in the north zone of Bolivia, b) the greater intensity of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in Peru and Bolivia since 1940. With the completion of the Holocene and the beginning of the Anthropocene (widely popularized by Paul Crutzen) it was proposed the date of March 20, 1940 as the beginning of the Anthropocene. The date proposed was correlated to the work presented in IUGG (Italy 2007) with the title "Cusco base meridian for the study of geophysical data"; Cusco was

  10. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  11. 46 CFR 386.1 - Hours of admission to property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Regimental leave periods and indoctrination training for the fourth class year. The closing of property shall... athletic facilities for authorized activities. During normal working hours, property shall be closed to...

  12. 46 CFR 386.1 - Hours of admission to property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Regimental leave periods and indoctrination training for the fourth class year. The closing of property shall... athletic facilities for authorized activities. During normal working hours, property shall be closed to...

  13. 46 CFR 386.1 - Hours of admission to property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regimental leave periods and indoctrination training for the fourth class year. The closing of property shall... athletic facilities for authorized activities. During normal working hours, property shall be closed to...

  14. 46 CFR 386.1 - Hours of admission to property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regimental leave periods and indoctrination training for the fourth class year. The closing of property shall... athletic facilities for authorized activities. During normal working hours, property shall be closed to...

  15. 46 CFR 386.1 - Hours of admission to property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Regimental leave periods and indoctrination training for the fourth class year. The closing of property shall... athletic facilities for authorized activities. During normal working hours, property shall be closed to...

  16. Floating Point Control Library

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  17. SPS antenna pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pointing control of a microwave antenna of the Satellite Power System was investigated emphasizing: (1) the SPS antenna pointing error sensing method; (2) a rigid body pointing control design; and (3) approaches for modeling the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector. Accuracy requirements for the antenna pointing control consist of a mechanical pointing control accuracy of three arc-minutes and an electronic phased array pointing accuracy of three arc-seconds. Results based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc-minute overall pointing control accuracy can be achieved in practice.

  18. Tipping point leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point. PMID:12687920

  19. Deconfined quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Senthil, T; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Balents, Leon; Sachdev, Subir; Fisher, Matthew P A

    2004-03-01

    The theory of second-order phase transitions is one of the foundations of modern statistical mechanics and condensed-matter theory. A central concept is the observable order parameter, whose nonzero average value characterizes one or more phases. At large distances and long times, fluctuations of the order parameter(s) are described by a continuum field theory, and these dominate the physics near such phase transitions. We show that near second-order quantum phase transitions, subtle quantum interference effects can invalidate this paradigm, and we present a theory of quantum critical points in a variety of experimentally relevant two-dimensional antiferromagnets. The critical points separate phases characterized by conventional "confining" order parameters. Nevertheless, the critical theory contains an emergent gauge field and "deconfined" degrees of freedom associated with fractionalization of the order parameters. We propose that this paradigm for quantum criticality may be the key to resolving a number of experimental puzzles in correlated electron systems and offer a new perspective on the properties of complex materials.

  20. Repelling Point Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    There is a body of conventional wisdom that holds that a solvable quantum problem, by virtue of its solvability, is pathological and thus irrelevant. It has been difficult to refute this view owing to the paucity of theoretical constructs and experimental results. Recent experiments involving equivalent ions trapped in a spatial conformation of extreme anisotropic confinement (longitudinal extension tens, hundreds or even thousands of times transverse extension) have modified the view of relevancy, and it is now possible to consider systems previously thought pathological, in particular point Bosons that repel in one dimension. It has been difficult for the experimentalists to utilize existing theory, mainly due to long-standing theoretical misunderstanding of the relevance of the permutation group, in particular the non-commutativity of translations (periodicity) and transpositions (permutation). This misunderstanding is most easily rectified in the case of repelling Bosons.

  1. Point by Point: Adding up Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchionda, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Students often view their course grades as a mysterious equation of teacher-given grades, teacher-given grace, and some other ethereal components based on luck. However, giving students the power to earn points based on numerous daily/weekly assignments and attendance makes the grading process objective and personal, freeing the instructor to…

  2. Local hyperthermia with MR-guided focused ultrasound: spiral trajectory of the focal point optimized for temperature uniformity in the target region.

    PubMed

    Salomir, R; Palussière, J; Vimeux, F C; de Zwart, J A; Quesson, B; Gauchet, M; Lelong, P; Pergrale, J; Grenier, N; Moonen, C T

    2000-10-01

    The objective of hyperthermia treatment is to deliver a similar therapeutic thermal dose throughout the target volume within a minimum amount of time. We describe a noninvasive approach to this goal based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) with a spherical transducer that can be moved along two directions inside the bed of a clinical MR imager and that has an adjustable focal length in the third dimension. Absorption of FUS gives rise to a highly localized thermal buildup, which then spreads by heat diffusion and blood perfusion. A uniform temperature within a large target volume can be obtained using a double spiral trajectory of the transducer focal point together with constant and maximum FUS power. Differences between the real and target temperatures during the first spiral are evaluated in real time with temperature MRI and corrected for during the second spiral trajectory employing FUS focal point velocity modulation. Once a uniform temperature distribution is reached within the entire volume, FUS heating is applied only at the region's boundaries to maintain the raised temperature levels. Heat conduction, together with the design and timing of the trajectories, therefore ensures a similar thermal dose for the entire target region. Good agreement is obtained between theory and experimental results in vitro on gel phantoms, ex vivo on meat samples, and in vivo on rabbit thigh muscle. Edema in muscle was visible 1 hour after hyperthermia as a spatially uniform rise of the signal intensity in T(2)-weighted images. PMID:11042639

  3. Oil point pressure of Indian almond kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aregbesola, O.; Olatunde, G.; Esuola, S.; Owolarafe, O.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of preprocessing conditions such as moisture content, heating temperature, heating time and particle size on oil point pressure of Indian almond kernel was investigated. Results showed that oil point pressure was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by above mentioned parameters. It was also observed that oil point pressure reduced with increase in heating temperature and heating time for both coarse and fine particles. Furthermore, an increase in moisture content resulted in increased oil point pressure for coarse particles while there was a reduction in oil point pressure with increase in moisture content for fine particles.

  4. Point specificity in acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The existence of point specificity in acupuncture is controversial, because many acupuncture studies using this principle to select control points have found that sham acupoints have similar effects to those of verum acupoints. Furthermore, the results of pain-related studies based on visual analogue scales have not supported the concept of point specificity. In contrast, hemodynamic, functional magnetic resonance imaging and neurophysiological studies evaluating the responses to stimulation of multiple points on the body surface have shown that point-specific actions are present. This review article focuses on clinical and laboratory studies supporting the existence of point specificity in acupuncture and also addresses studies that do not support this concept. Further research is needed to elucidate the point-specific actions of acupuncture. PMID:22373514

  5. Myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Elizabeth Demers; Lavelle, William; Smith, Howard S

    2007-03-01

    Painful conditions of the musculoskeletal system, including myofascial pain syndrome, constitute some of the most important chronic problems encountered in a clinical practice. A myofascial trigger points is a hyperirritable spot, usually within a taut band of skeletal muscle, which is painful on compression and can give rise to characteristic referred pain, motor dysfunction, and autonomic phenomena. Trigger points may be relieved through noninvasive measures, such as spray and stretch, transcutaneous electrical stimulation, physical therapy, and massage. Invasive treatments for myofascial trigger points include injections with local anesthetics, corticosteroids, or botulism toxin or dry needling. The etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of myofascial trigger points are addressed in this article.

  6. Value Added: the Case for Point-of-View Camera use in Orthopedic Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geb W.; Taylor, Leah; Liu, Xiaoxing; Anthony, Chris A.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Orthopedic surgical education is evolving as educators search for new ways to enhance surgical skills training. Orthopedic educators should seek new methods and technologies to augment and add value to real-time orthopedic surgical experience. This paper describes a protocol whereby we have started to capture and evaluate specific orthopedic milestone procedures with a GoPro® point-of-view video camera and a dedicated video reviewing website as a way of supplementing the current paradigm in surgical skills training. We report our experience regarding the details and feasibility of this protocol. Methods Upon identification of a patient undergoing surgical fixation of a hip or ankle fracture, an orthopedic resident places a GoPro® point-of-view camera on his or her forehead. All fluoroscopic images acquired during the case are saved and later incorporated into a video on the reviewing website. Surgical videos are uploaded to a secure server and are accessible for later review and assessment via a custom-built website. An electronic survey of resident participants was performed utilizing Qualtrics software. Results are reported using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 51 surgical videos involving 23 different residents have been captured to date. This includes 20 intertrochanteric hip fracture cases and 31 ankle fracture cases. The average duration of each surgical video was 1 hour and 16 minutes (range 40 minutes to 2 hours and 19 minutes). Of 24 orthopedic resident surgeons surveyed, 88% thought capturing a video portfolio of orthopedic milestones would benefit their education Conclusions There is a growing demand in orthopedic surgical education to extract more value from each surgical experience. While further work in development and refinement of such assessments is necessary, we feel that intraoperative video, particularly when captured and presented in a non-threatening, user friendly manner, can add significant value to the

  7. Short-Term Thermal-Humidity Shock Affects Point-of-Care Glucose Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Mandy; Curtis, Corbin M.; Ferguson, William J.; Vy, John H.; Truong, Anh-Thu; Sumner, Stephanie L.; Kost, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of short-term (≤1 hour) static high temperature and humidity stresses on the performance of point-of-care (POC) glucose test strips and meters. Glucose meters are used by medical responders and patients in a variety of settings including hospitals, clinics, homes, and the field. Reagent test strips and instruments are potentially exposed to austere environmental conditions. Glucose test strips and meters were exposed to a mean relative humidity of 83.0% (SD = 8.0%) and temperature of 42°C (107.6°F, SD = 3.2) in a Tenney BTRC environmental chamber. Stressed and unstressed glucose reagent strips and meters were tested with spiked blood samples (n = 40 measurements per time point for each of 4 trials) after 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exposure. Wilcoxon’s signed rank test was applied to compare measurements test strip and meter measurements to isolate and characterize the magnitude of meter versus test strip effects individually. Stressed POC meters and test strips produced elevated glucose results, with stressed meter bias as high as 20 mg/dL (17.7% error), and stressed test strip bias as high as 13 mg/dL (12.2% error). The aggregate stress effect on meter and test strips yielded a positive bias as high as 33 mg/dL (30.1% error) after 15 minutes of exposure. Short-term exposure (15 minutes) to high temperature and humidity can significantly affect the performance of POC glucose test strips and meters, with measurement biases that potentially affect clinical decision making and patient safety. PMID:24876542

  8. Real-Time Tele-Mentored Low Cost “Point-of-Care US” in the Hands of Paediatricians in the Emergency Department: Diagnostic Accuracy Compared to Expert Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Zennaro, Floriana; Neri, Elena; Nappi, Federico; Grosso, Daniele; Triunfo, Riccardo; Cabras, Francesco; Frexia, Francesca; Norbedo, Stefania; Guastalla, Pierpaolo; Gregori, Massino; Cattaruzzi, Elisabetta; Sanabor, Daniela; Barbi, Egidio; Lazzerini, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of point-of-care ultrasonography (POC US) in paediatrics is increasing. This study investigated the diagnostic accuracy of POC US in children accessing the emergency department (ED) when performed by paediatricians under the remote guidance of radiologists (TELE POC). Methods Children aged 0 to 18 years accessing the ED of a third level research hospital with eight possible clinical scenarios and without emergency/severity signs at the triage underwent three subsequent US tests: by a paediatrician guided remotely by a radiologist (TELE POC); by the same radiologist (UNBLIND RAD); by an independent blinded radiologist (BLIND RAD). Tele-radiology was implemented using low cost “commercial off-the-shelf” (COTS) equipment and open-source software. Data were prospectively collected on predefined templates. Results Fifty-two children were enrolled, for a total of 170 ultrasound findings. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of TELE POC were: 93.8, 99.7, 96.8, 99.4 when compared to UNBLIND RAD and 88.2, 99.7, 96.8, 98.7 when compared to BLIND RAD. The inter-observers agreement between the paediatricians and either the unblind or blind radiologist was excellent (k = 0.93). The mean duration of TELE POC was 6.3 minutes (95% CI 4.1 to 8.5). Technical difficulties occurred in two (3.8%) cases. Quality of the transmission was rated as fair, good, very good and excellent in 7.7%, 15.4%, 42.3% and 34.6% of cases respectively, while in no case was it rated as poor. Conclusions POC US performed by paediatricians in ED guided via tele-radiology by an expert radiologist (TELE POC) produced reliable and timely diagnoses. Findings of this study, especially for the rarer conditions under evaluation, need further confirmation. Future research should investigate the overall benefits and the cost savings of using tele-ultrasound to perform US “at children’s bedsides”, under remote guidance of expert radiologists. PMID:27749905

  9. Ferulic Acid Administered at Various Time Points Protects against Cerebral Infarction by Activating p38 MAPK/p90RSK/CREB/Bcl-2 Anti-Apoptotic Signaling in the Subacute Phase of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Yi; Tang, Nou-Ying; Kao, Shung-Te; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ferulic acid (FA) administered at various time points before or after 30 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) followed by 7 d of reperfusion and to examine the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in the cortical penumbra. Methods FA was intravenously administered to rats at a dose of 100 mg/kg 24 h before ischemia (B-FA), 2 h before ischemia (P-FA), immediately after ischemic insult (I-FA), 2 h after reperfusion (R-FA), or 24 h after reperfusion (D-FA). Results Our study results indicated that P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA effectively reduced cerebral infarct areas and neurological deficits. P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA significantly downregulated glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), mitochondrial Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and effectively restored the phospho-p38 MAPK (p-p38 MAPK)/p38 MAPK ratio, phospho-90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p-p90RSK) expression, phospho-Bad (p-Bad) expression, the phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB)/CREB ratio, the cytosolic and mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratios, and the cytosolic Bcl-xL/Bax ratio in the cortical penumbra 7 d after reperfusion. SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, administered 30 min prior to ischemia abrogated the downregulating effects of I-FA on cerebral infarction, and mitochondrial Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and the upregulating effects of I-FA on the p-p38 MAPK/p38 MAPK ratio, p-p90RSK expression, p-Bad expression, and the p-CREB/CREB, and cytosolic and mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratios. Conclusions Our study results thus indicate that P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA effectively suppress reactive astrocytosis and exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral infarction by activating p38 MAPK signaling. The regulating effects of P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA on Bax-induced apoptosis result from activation of the p38 MAPK/p90RSK/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling pathway, and eventually contribute to

  10. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  11. Equation predicts diesel cloud points

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.Y.; Ker, V.S.F.; Miranda, R.D.; Wesch, J.C.

    1988-03-28

    Diesel fuel cloud points can be predicted by an empirical equation developed by NOCA/Husky Research Corp. The equation can accurately predict cloud points from feedstock and product data readily available in the refinery. The applicability of the equation to a full range of summer, winter, and arctic diesel blends was proven by studies conducted on data from four Canadian refineries that process a wide variety of conventional crude oils and synthetic crude from bitumen. Results of the studies show that the variance between equation predicted and measured cloud point values are within acceptable reproducibility of measured data. Considerable time can be saved in the refinery when the equation is used for optimizing diesel fuel blend formulations. Applicability ranges from daily blending calculations, to use in linear programs for long-term planning for distillate utilization.

  12. Nickel Curie Point Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient…

  13. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  14. Characterization of MIPAS elevation pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Grabowski, U.; de Laurentis, M.; Mantovani, R.; Milz, M.; Ridolfi, M.

    2006-12-01

    Sufficient knowledge of the pointing is essential for analyses of limb emission measurements. The scientific retrieval processor for MIPAS operated at IMK allows to retrieve pointing information in terms of tangent altitudes along with temperature. The retrieved tangent altitudes are independent of the engineering Line-Of-Sight (LOS) information delivered with the ESA Level 1b product. The difference of pointing retrieved from the reprocessed high resolution MIPAS spectra and the engineering pointing information was examined with respect to spatial/temporal behaviour. Among others the following characteristics of MIPAS pointing could be identified: Generally the engineering tangent altitudes are too high by 0-1.8 km with conspicuous variations in this range over time. Prior to December of 2003 there was a drift of about 50-100 m/h, which was due to a slow change in the satellite attitude. A correction of this attitude is done twice a day, which led to discontinuities in the order of up to 2 km in the tangent altitudes. There is a systematic difference in the mispointing between the poles which amounts to 1.5-2 km, i.e. there is a conspicuous orbit-periodic feature. The analysis of the correlation between the instrument's viewing angle azimuth and differential mispointing supports the hypotheses that a major part of this latter phenomenon can be attributed to an uncorrected roll angle of the satellite/instrument system of approximately 54 mdeg. Complementary to this, ESA operational LOS calibration results were used to characterize MIPAS pointing. For this purpose MIPAS is used as a radiometer while the passage of infrared bright stars through the instrument's field of view is recorded. Deviation from expected time of passage gives information about mispointing. A pronounced seasonal variation of the LOS is seen before a correction of on-board software took place in December of 2003. Further a pitch bias of 24 mdeg with respect to the platform attitude information

  15. Exceptional points in coupled dissipative dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Son, Woo-Sik; Hwang, Dong-Uk; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Sang Wook

    2015-05-01

    We study the transient behavior in coupled dissipative dynamical systems based on the linear analysis around the steady state. We find that the transient time is minimized at a specific set of system parameters and show that at this parameter set, two eigenvalues and two eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix coalesce at the same time; this degenerate point is called the exceptional point. For the case of coupled limit-cycle oscillators, we investigate the transient behavior into the amplitude death state, and clarify that the exceptional point is associated with a critical point of frequency locking, as well as the transition of the envelope oscillation.

  16. Time Course and Predictors of Neurological Deterioration after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Aaron S.; Gilmore, Emily; Choi, H. Alex; Mayer, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neurological deterioration (ND) is a devastating complication following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) but little is known about time course and predictors. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of placebo patients in ICH trials. We performed CT scans within 3 hours of symptoms and at 24- and 72-hours; and clinical evaluations at baseline, 1-hour, and days 1, 2, 3, and 15. Timing of ND was predefined: hyperacute (within 1 hour), acute (1-24 hours), subacute (1-3 days), and delayed (3-15 days). Results We enrolled 376 patients and 176 (47%) had ND within 15 days. In multivariate analyses of ND by category, hyperacute ND was associated with hematoma expansion (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and baseline ICH volume (OR 1.04 per mL, 95% CI 1.02-1.06) ; acute ND with hematoma expansion (OR 7.59, 95% CI 3.91-14.74), baseline ICH volume (OR 1.02 per mL, 95% CI 1.01-1.04), admission GCS (OR 0.77 per point, 95% CI 0.65-0.91) and interventricular hemorrhage (IVH) (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.05-4.35); subacute ND with 72-hour edema (OR 1.03 per mL, 95% CI 1.02-1.05) and fever (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.01-6.14); and delayed ND with age (OR 1.11 per year, 95% CI 1.04-1.18), troponin (OR 4.30 per point, 95% CI 1.71-10.77) and infections (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.11-12.23). Patients with ND had worse 90-day modified Rankin scores (5 vs. 3, p<0.001). Conclusions Neurological deterioration occurs frequently and predicts poor outcomes. Our results implicate hematoma expansion and IVH in early ND, and cerebral edema, fever, and medical complications in later ND. PMID:25657190

  17. Critical-point nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.M.

    2004-10-01

    It has been suggested that a change of nuclear shape may be described in terms of a phase transition and that specific nuclei may lie close to the critical point of the transition. Analytical descriptions of such critical-point nuclei have been introduced recently and they are described briefly. The results of extensive searches for possible examples of critical-point behavior are presented. Alternative pictures, such as describing bands in the candidate nuclei using simple {Delta}K = 0 and {Delta}K = 2 rotational-coupling models, are discussed, and the limitations of the different approaches highlighted. A possible critical-point description of the transition from a vibrational to rotational pairing phase is suggested.

  18. Arctic climate tipping points.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points.

  19. Triple Point Topological Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ziming; Winkler, Georg W.; Wu, QuanSheng; Li, Ju; Soluyanov, Alexey A.

    2016-07-01

    Topologically protected fermionic quasiparticles appear in metals, where band degeneracies occur at the Fermi level, dictated by the band structure topology. While in some metals these quasiparticles are direct analogues of elementary fermionic particles of the relativistic quantum field theory, other metals can have symmetries that give rise to quasiparticles, fundamentally different from those known in high-energy physics. Here, we report on a new type of topological quasiparticles—triple point fermions—realized in metals with symmorphic crystal structure, which host crossings of three bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level protected by point group symmetries. We find two topologically different types of triple point fermions, both distinct from any other topological quasiparticles reported to date. We provide examples of existing materials that host triple point fermions of both types and discuss a variety of physical phenomena associated with these quasiparticles, such as the occurrence of topological surface Fermi arcs, transport anomalies, and topological Lifshitz transitions.

  20. Reference Point Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  1. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  2. Human grasp point selection.

    PubMed

    Kleinholdermann, Urs; Franz, Volker H; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2013-07-25

    When we grasp an object, our visuomotor system has to solve an intricate problem: how to find the best out of an infinity of possible contact points of the fingers with the object? The contact point selection model (CoPS) we present here solves this problem and predicts human grasp point selection in precision grip grasping by combining a few basic rules that have been identified in human and robotic grasping. Usually, not all of the rules can be perfectly satisfied. Therefore, we assessed their relative importance by creating simple stimuli that put them into conflict with each other in pairs. Based on these conflict experiments we made model-based grasp point predictions for another experiment with a novel set of complexly shaped objects. The results show that our model predicts the human choice of grasp points very well, and that observers' preferences for their natural grasp angles is as important as physical stability constraints. Incorporating a human grasp point selection model like the one presented here could markedly improve current approaches to cortically guided arm and hand prostheses by making movements more natural while also allowing for a more efficient use of the available information.

  3. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income.

  4. Hyperbolic Weyl Point in Reciprocal Chiral Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Lin, Qian; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-01

    We report the existence of Weyl points in a class of noncentral symmetric metamaterials, which has time reversal symmetry, but does not have inversion symmetry due to chiral coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This class of metamaterial exhibits either type-I or type-II Weyl points depending on its nonlocal response. We also provide a physical realization of such metamaterial consisting of an array of metal wires in the shape of elliptical helices which exhibits type-II Weyl points.

  5. Hyperbolic Weyl Point in Reciprocal Chiral Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Lin, Qian; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-29

    We report the existence of Weyl points in a class of noncentral symmetric metamaterials, which has time reversal symmetry, but does not have inversion symmetry due to chiral coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This class of metamaterial exhibits either type-I or type-II Weyl points depending on its nonlocal response. We also provide a physical realization of such metamaterial consisting of an array of metal wires in the shape of elliptical helices which exhibits type-II Weyl points.

  6. Change Point Detection in Correlation Networks.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Ian; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2016-01-07

    Many systems of interacting elements can be conceptualized as networks, where network nodes represent the elements and network ties represent interactions between the elements. In systems where the underlying network evolves, it is useful to determine the points in time where the network structure changes significantly as these may correspond to functional change points. We propose a method for detecting change points in correlation networks that, unlike previous change point detection methods designed for time series data, requires minimal distributional assumptions. We investigate the difficulty of change point detection near the boundaries of the time series in correlation networks and study the power of our method and competing methods through simulation. We also show the generalizable nature of the method by applying it to stock price data as well as fMRI data.

  7. Critical points of metal vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new method is proposed for calculating the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid (insulator–metal) phase transition in vapors of metals with multielectron valence shells. The method is based on a model developed earlier for the vapors of alkali metals, atomic hydrogen, and exciton gas, proceeding from the assumption that the cohesion determining the basic characteristics of metals under normal conditions is also responsible for their properties in the vicinity of the critical point. It is proposed to calculate the cohesion of multielectron atoms using well-known scaling relations for the binding energy, which are constructed for most metals in the periodic table by processing the results of many numerical calculations. The adopted model allows the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid phase transition in metal vapors to be calculated using published data on the properties of metals under normal conditions. The parameters of critical points have been calculated for a large number of metals and show satisfactory agreement with experimental data for alkali metals and with available estimates for all other metals. Binodals of metals have been calculated for the first time.

  8. NSDC Policy Points. Volume 1, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Staff Development Council, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "NSDC Policy Points" is a newsletter published by the National Staff Development Council (NSDC). This issue of "NSDC Policy Points" features schools that practice effective professional development. Included in this newsletter are: (1) Surprise, Arizona: Coaches support classroom improvements; (2) Loveland, Colorado: Redefining time use to…

  9. A holographic critical point

    SciTech Connect

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Rosen, Christopher; Gubser, Steven S.

    2011-04-15

    We numerically construct a family of five-dimensional black holes exhibiting a line of first-order phase transitions terminating at a critical point at finite chemical potential and temperature. These black holes are constructed so that the equation of state and baryon susceptibilities approximately match QCD lattice data at vanishing chemical potential. The critical end point in the particular model we consider has temperature 143 MeV and chemical potential 783 MeV. Critical exponents are calculated, with results that are consistent with mean-field scaling relations.

  10. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  11. Some Points about the Present Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaluza, Henryk

    1981-01-01

    Describes uses of English present simple tense as a definite, one point tense which can be expanded by context into segments of definite or indefinite present time, as well as into future and past references. (Author/BK)

  12. MountPointAttributes

    2001-06-16

    MountPointAttributes is a software component that provides client code with a technique to raise the local namespace of a file to a global namespace. Its abstractions and mechanisms allow the client code to gather global properties of a file and to use them in devising an effective storage access strategy on this file.

  13. EndPoints 2000

    2009-08-13

    The application leads the user through a logical framework to determine the minimum effort and cost necessary to reach the desired end state for each space, system, and facility. Endpoints are used to plan the project work, track and manage the determination, management, verification, and closure of D&D endpoints, consistent with DOE End Point guidance documents.

  14. Ideal Point Discriminant Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A new method of multiple discriminant analysis allows a mixture of continuous and discrete predictors. It handles conditional, joint, or separate sampling. Subjects and criterion groups are represented as points in a multidimensional Euclidean space. Advantages of the method, deriving from Akaike Information Criterion model evaluation, are…

  15. Optical Pointing Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.; Metz, Brandon C.

    2010-01-01

    The optical pointing sensor provides a means of directly measuring the relative positions of JPL s Formation Control Testbed (FCT) vehicles without communication. This innovation is a steerable infrared (IR) rangefinder that gives measurements in terms of range and bearing to a passive retroreflector.

  16. EcoTipping Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Gerald G.; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Contrary to what we often hear and teach, there is good news to be found on the environmental front. Environmental success stories show us not only that sustainability is possible, but also how people have made it happen. We can make these stories and their lessons accessible to students with help from the EcoTipping Points Project, which has…

  17. The Lagrange Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of all five Lagrange points by methods accessible to sixth-form students, and provides a further opportunity to match Newtonian gravity with centripetal force. The predictive powers of good scientific theories are also discussed with regard to the philosophy of science. Methods for calculating the positions of the…

  18. Noncommutative Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.

    2008-02-15

    We construct a perturbative solution to classical noncommutative gauge theory on R{sup 3} minus the origin using the Groenewald-Moyal star product. The result describes a noncommutative point charge. Applying it to the quantum mechanics of the noncommutative hydrogen atom gives shifts in the 1S hyperfine splitting which are first order in the noncommutativity parameter.

  19. Characterization of MIPAS elevation pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Grabowski, U.; de Laurentis, M.; Mantovani, R.; Milz, M.; Ridolfi, M.

    2007-03-01

    Sufficient knowledge of the pointing is essential for analyses of limb emission measurements. The scientific retrieval processor for MIPAS on ENVISAT operated at IMK allows the retrieval of pointing information in terms of tangent altitudes along with temperature. The retrieved tangent altitudes are independent of systematic offsets in the engineering Line-Of-Sight (LOS) information delivered with the ESA Level 1b product. The difference of pointing retrieved from the reprocessed high resolution MIPAS spectra and the engineering pointing information was examined with respect to spatial/temporal behaviour. Among others the following characteristics of MIPAS pointing could be identified: Generally the engineering tangent altitudes are too high by 0-1.8 km with conspicuous variations in this range over time. Prior to December of 2003 there was a drift of about 50-100 m/h, which was due to a slow change in the satellite attitude. A correction of this attitude is done twice a day, which leads to discontinuities in the order of 1-1.5 km in the tangent altitudes. Occasionally discontinuities up to 2.5 km are found, as already reported from MIPAS and SCIAMACHY observations. After an update of the orbit position software in December 2003 values of drift and jumps are much reduced. There is a systematic difference in the mispointing between the poles which amounts to 1.5-2 km, i.e. there is a conspicuous orbit-periodic feature. The analysis of the correlation between the instrument's viewing angle azimuth and differential mispointing supports the hypotheses that a major part of this latter phenomenon can be attributed to an error in the roll angle of the satellite/instrument system of approximately 42 mdeg. One conclusion is that ESA level 2 data should be compared to other data exclusively on tangent pressure levels. Complementary to IMK data, ESA operational LOS calibration results were used to characterize MIPAS pointing. For this purpose MIPAS is used as a radiometer

  20. Topological photonic crystal with equifrequency Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on general symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of four symmetry-related (consequently equifrequency) Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We further propose an experimentally feasible way to modify double-gyroid photonic crystals to realize four equifrequency Weyl points, which is explicitly confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Remarkably, photonic crystals with equifrequency Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications including angular selectivity, frequency selectivity, invisibility cloaking, and three-dimensional imaging.

  1. Topological photonic crystal with ideal Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of symmetry-related Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We propose to realize these ``ideal'' Weyl points in modified double-gyroid photonic crystals, which is confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Photonic crystals with ideal Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications such as angular and frequency selectivity, broadband invisibility cloaking, and broadband 3D-imaging.

  2. Proximal Point Methods Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boikanyo, Oganeditse A.; Moroşanu, Gheorghe

    2011-09-01

    The proximal point methods have been widely used in the last decades to approximate the solutions of nonlinear equations associated with monotone operators. Inspired by the iterative procedure defined by B. Martinet (1970), R.T. Rockafellar introduced in 1976 the so-called proximal point algorithm (PPA) for a general maximal monotone operator. The sequence generated by this iterative method is weakly convergent under appropriate conditions, but not necessarily strongly convergent, as proved by O. Güler (1991). This fact explains the introduction of different modified versions of the PPA which generate strongly convergent sequences under appropriate conditions, including the contraction-PPA defined by H.K. Xu in 2002. Here we discuss Xu's modified PPA as well as some of its generalizations. Special attention is paid to the computational errors, in particular the original Rockafellar summability assumption is replaced by the condition that the error sequence converges to zero strongly.

  3. Quantum Change Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentís, Gael; Bagan, Emilio; Calsamiglia, John; Chiribella, Giulio; Muñoz-Tapia, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Sudden changes are ubiquitous in nature. Identifying them is crucial for a number of applications in biology, medicine, and social sciences. Here we take the problem of detecting sudden changes to the quantum domain. We consider a source that emits quantum particles in a default state, until a point where a mutation occurs that causes the source to switch to another state. The problem is then to find out where the change occurred. We determine the maximum probability of correctly identifying the change point, allowing for collective measurements on the whole sequence of particles emitted by the source. Then, we devise online strategies where the particles are measured individually and an answer is provided as soon as a new particle is received. We show that these online strategies substantially underperform the optimal quantum measurement, indicating that quantum sudden changes, although happening locally, are better detected globally.

  4. Investigation of Livingstone's curious point.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vaughan

    2007-12-01

    The explorer and missionary David Livingstone was identified after death by the appearances of his humerus which had been damaged in an encounter with a lion. In his writings Livingstone suggested that the consequences of the lion's attack were not as bad as he might have expected. He wondered if this was due to the fact that he was wearing a tartan jacket when he was attacked and suggested that this curious point should be investigated. This paper looks at some of the dyes used in tartans of the time and investigates their effect on the bacteria that might be present in the mouths of lions.

  5. Optimal time-points for minimal residual disease monitoring change on the basis of the method used in patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a comparison between multiparameter flow cytometry and Wilms' tumor 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giovanni; Carella, Angelo Michele; Minervini, Maria Marta; di Nardo, Francesco; Waure, Chiara de; Greco, Michele Mario; Merla, Emanuela; Cillis, Giovanni Pio de; Di Renzo, Nicola; Melpignano, Angela; Capalbo, Silvana; Palumbo, Gaetano; Pisapia, Giovanni; Cascavilla, Nicola

    2015-02-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) of 30 adult AML patients was monitored by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) and WT1 expression before and after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Diagnostic performance of pre-transplant MRD measured by MFC was higher than that obtained by WT1 expression. Comparable results were displayed at day +30 post-transplant, while better values by WT1 compared to MFC were found at day +90. Positive MRD by MFC predicted a shorter disease free survival (DFS) before and 1 month after transplant (p=0.006 and p=0.005), while only high WT1 levels at 1 month from the transplant significantly impacted on DFS (p=0.010). Our results support the idea that MRD monitoring by MFC should be suggested before and 30 days after the transplant, while WT1 expression should be preferred after this procedure. The assessment of MRD at day +30 from allo-SCT is recommended as post transplant check-point for the predictive role displayed, independently of the method used.

  6. Best-practices approach to determination of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at specific time points: Combination of ante-mortem alcohol pharmacokinetic modeling and post-mortem alcohol generation and transport considerations.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Maskrey, Joshua R; Fung, Ernest S; Woods, Tyler A; Stabryla, Lisa M; Scott, Paul K; Finley, Brent L

    2016-07-01

    Alcohol concentrations in biological matrices offer information regarding an individual's intoxication level at a given time. In forensic cases, the alcohol concentration in the blood (BAC) at the time of death is sometimes used interchangeably with the BAC measured post-mortem, without consideration for alcohol concentration changes in the body after death. However, post-mortem factors must be taken into account for accurate forensic determination of BAC prior to death to avoid incorrect conclusions. The main objective of this work was to describe best practices for relating ante-mortem and post-mortem alcohol concentrations, using a combination of modeling, empirical data and other qualitative considerations. The Widmark modeling approach is a best practices method for superimposing multiple alcohol doses ingested at various times with alcohol elimination rate adjustments based on individual body factors. We combined the selected ante-mortem model with a suggestion for an approach used to roughly estimate changes in BAC post-mortem, and then analyzed the available data on post-mortem alcohol production in human bodies and potential markers for alcohol production through decomposition and putrefaction. Hypothetical cases provide best practice approaches as an example for determining alcohol concentration in biological matrices ante-mortem, as well as potential issues encountered with quantitative post-mortem approaches. This study provides information for standardizing BAC determination in forensic toxicology, while minimizing real world case uncertainties.

  7. Biosynthesis of collagen I, II, RUNX2 and lubricin at different time points of chondrogenic differentiation in a 3D in vitro model of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Lo Furno, Debora; Avola, Rosanna; Mangano, Sebastiano; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera

    2014-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to identify the most appropriate time for differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to chondrocytes, through the self-assembly process. For this purpose, the expression of some chondrocyte markers, such as collagen type I, collagen type II, RUNX2 and lubricin was investigated at different times (7, 14, 21 and 28 days) of chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, by using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The second aim of the study was to demonstrate that the expression of lubricin, such as the expression of collagen type II, could be a possible biomarker for the detection of chondrocytes well-being and viability in the natural self-assembling constructs, called 'cell pellets'. Histology (hematoxylin and eosin) and histochemistry (alcian blue staining) methods were used to assess the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. The results showed that after 21 days the differentiated chondrocytes, when compared with MSCs cultured without chondrogenic medium (CD44, CD90 and CD105 positive; CD45, CD14 and CD34 negative), were able to produce significant quantities of collagen type I, collagen type II, and lubricin, suggesting hyaline cartilage formation. During the differentiation phase, the cells showed a reduced expression of RUNX2, a protein expressed by osteoblasts. Our studies demonstrated that 21 days is the optimum time for the implantation of chondrocytes differentiated from adipose tissue-derived MSCs. This information could be useful for the future development of cell-based repair therapies for degenerative diseases of articular cartilage.

  8. Short-Term Thermal-Humidity Shock Affects Point-of-Care Glucose Testing: Implications for Health Professionals and Patients.

    PubMed

    Lam, Mandy; Louie, Richard F; Curtis, Corbin M; Ferguson, William J; Vy, John H; Truong, Anh-Thu; Sumner, Stephanie L; Kost, Gerald J

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of short-term (≤1 hour) static high temperature and humidity stresses on the performance of point-of-care (POC) glucose test strips and meters. Glucose meters are used by medical responders and patients in a variety of settings including hospitals, clinics, homes, and the field. Reagent test strips and instruments are potentially exposed to austere environmental conditions. Glucose test strips and meters were exposed to a mean relative humidity of 83.0% (SD = 8.0%) and temperature of 42°C (107.6°F, SD = 3.2) in a Tenney BTRC environmental chamber. Stressed and unstressed glucose reagent strips and meters were tested with spiked blood samples (n = 40 measurements per time point for each of 4 trials) after 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exposure. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was applied to compare measurements test strip and meter measurements to isolate and characterize the magnitude of meter versus test strip effects individually. Stressed POC meters and test strips produced elevated glucose results, with stressed meter bias as high as 20 mg/dL (17.7% error), and stressed test strip bias as high as 13 mg/dL (12.2% error). The aggregate stress effect on meter and test strips yielded a positive bias as high as 33 mg/dL (30.1% error) after 15 minutes of exposure. Short-term exposure (15 minutes) to high temperature and humidity can significantly affect the performance of POC glucose test strips and meters, with measurement biases that potentially affect clinical decision making and patient safety. PMID:24876542

  9. Stress-Induced Accumulation of DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a Transcripts Coincides with Critical Time Point for Structural Biomass Prediction in Carrot Primary Cultures (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Campos, M Doroteia; Nogales, Amaia; Cardoso, Hélia G; Kumar, Sarma R; Nobre, Tânia; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Stress-adaptive cell plasticity in target tissues and cells for plant biomass growth is important for yield stability. In vitro systems with reproducible cell plasticity can help to identify relevant metabolic and molecular events during early cell reprogramming. In carrot, regulation of the central root meristem is a critical target for yield-determining secondary growth. Calorespirometry, a tool previously identified as promising for predictive growth phenotyping has been applied to measure the respiration rate in carrot meristem. In a carrot primary culture system (PCS), this tool allowed identifying an early peak related with structural biomass formation during lag phase of growth, around the 4th day of culture. In the present study, we report a dynamic and correlated expression of carrot AOX genes (DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a) during PCS lag phase and during exponential growth. Both genes showed an increase in transcript levels until 36 h after explant inoculation, and a subsequent down-regulation, before the initiation of exponential growth. In PCS growing at two different temperatures (21°C and 28°C), DcAOX1 was also found to be more expressed in the highest temperature. DcAOX genes' were further explored in a plant pot experiment in response to chilling, which confirmed the early AOX transcript increase prior to the induction of a specific anti-freezing gene. Our findings point to DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a as being reasonable candidates for functional marker development related to early cell reprogramming. While the genomic sequence of DcAOX2a was previously described, we characterize here the complete genomic sequence of DcAOX1. PMID:26858746

  10. Stress-Induced Accumulation of DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a Transcripts Coincides with Critical Time Point for Structural Biomass Prediction in Carrot Primary Cultures (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Campos, M Doroteia; Nogales, Amaia; Cardoso, Hélia G; Kumar, Sarma R; Nobre, Tânia; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Stress-adaptive cell plasticity in target tissues and cells for plant biomass growth is important for yield stability. In vitro systems with reproducible cell plasticity can help to identify relevant metabolic and molecular events during early cell reprogramming. In carrot, regulation of the central root meristem is a critical target for yield-determining secondary growth. Calorespirometry, a tool previously identified as promising for predictive growth phenotyping has been applied to measure the respiration rate in carrot meristem. In a carrot primary culture system (PCS), this tool allowed identifying an early peak related with structural biomass formation during lag phase of growth, around the 4th day of culture. In the present study, we report a dynamic and correlated expression of carrot AOX genes (DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a) during PCS lag phase and during exponential growth. Both genes showed an increase in transcript levels until 36 h after explant inoculation, and a subsequent down-regulation, before the initiation of exponential growth. In PCS growing at two different temperatures (21°C and 28°C), DcAOX1 was also found to be more expressed in the highest temperature. DcAOX genes' were further explored in a plant pot experiment in response to chilling, which confirmed the early AOX transcript increase prior to the induction of a specific anti-freezing gene. Our findings point to DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a as being reasonable candidates for functional marker development related to early cell reprogramming. While the genomic sequence of DcAOX2a was previously described, we characterize here the complete genomic sequence of DcAOX1.

  11. Stress-Induced Accumulation of DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a Transcripts Coincides with Critical Time Point for Structural Biomass Prediction in Carrot Primary Cultures (Daucus carota L.)

    PubMed Central

    Campos, M. Doroteia; Nogales, Amaia; Cardoso, Hélia G.; Kumar, Sarma R.; Nobre, Tânia; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Stress-adaptive cell plasticity in target tissues and cells for plant biomass growth is important for yield stability. In vitro systems with reproducible cell plasticity can help to identify relevant metabolic and molecular events during early cell reprogramming. In carrot, regulation of the central root meristem is a critical target for yield-determining secondary growth. Calorespirometry, a tool previously identified as promising for predictive growth phenotyping has been applied to measure the respiration rate in carrot meristem. In a carrot primary culture system (PCS), this tool allowed identifying an early peak related with structural biomass formation during lag phase of growth, around the 4th day of culture. In the present study, we report a dynamic and correlated expression of carrot AOX genes (DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a) during PCS lag phase and during exponential growth. Both genes showed an increase in transcript levels until 36 h after explant inoculation, and a subsequent down-regulation, before the initiation of exponential growth. In PCS growing at two different temperatures (21°C and 28°C), DcAOX1 was also found to be more expressed in the highest temperature. DcAOX genes’ were further explored in a plant pot experiment in response to chilling, which confirmed the early AOX transcript increase prior to the induction of a specific anti-freezing gene. Our findings point to DcAOX1 and DcAOX2a as being reasonable candidates for functional marker development related to early cell reprogramming. While the genomic sequence of DcAOX2a was previously described, we characterize here the complete genomic sequence of DcAOX1. PMID:26858746

  12. Prelinguistic Vocalizations Distinguish Pointing Acts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunloh, Thomas; Liszkowski, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether point-accompanying characteristics, like vocalizations and hand shape, differentiate infants' underlying motives of prelinguistic pointing. We elicited imperative (requestive) and declarative (expressive and informative) pointing acts in experimentally controlled situations, and analyzed accompanying…

  13. Non-Gimbaled Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Jeannine S.

    1997-01-01

    The small satellite community has been interested in accessing fixed ground stations for means of space-to-ground transmissions, although a problem arises from the limited global coverage. There is a growing interest for using the Space Network (SN) or Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) as the primary support for communications because of the coverage it provides. This thesis will address the potential for satellite access of the Space Network with a non-gimbaled antenna configuration and low-power, coded transmission. The non-gimbaled antenna and the TDRS satellites, TDRS-East, TDRS-West, and TDRS-Zone of Exclusion, were configured in an orbital analysis software package called Satellite Tool Kit to emulate the three-dimensional position of the satellites. The access potential, which is the average number of contacts per day and the average time per contact, were obtained through simulations run over a 30-day period to gain all the possible orientations. The orbital altitude was varied from 600 km through 1200 km with the results being a function of orbital inclination angles varying from 20 deg through 100 deg and pointing half-angles of I0 deg through 40 deg. To compare the validity of the simulations, Jet Propulsion Laboratory granted the use of the TOPEX satellite. The TOPEX satellite was configured to emulate a spin-stabilized antenna with its communications antenna stowed in the zenith-pointing direction. This mimicked the antenna pointing spin-stabilized satellite in the simulations. To make valid comparisons, the TOPEX orbital parameters were entered into Satellite Tool Kit and simulated over five test times provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  14. Pointing control for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Briggs, C.

    1988-01-01

    One important aspect of the LDR control problem is the possible excitations of structural modes due to random disturbances, mirror chopping, and slewing maneuvers. An analysis was performed to yield a first order estimate of the effects of such dynamic excitations. The analysis involved a study of slewing jitters, chopping jitters, disturbance responses, and pointing errors, making use of a simplified planar LDR model which describes the LDR dynamics on a plane perpendicular to the primary reflector. Briefly, the results indicate that the command slewing profile plays an important role in minimizing the resultant jitter, even to a level acceptable without any control action. An optimal profile should therefore be studied.

  15. Pointing the SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, J. J.; Moore, E. M.

    2010-12-01

    SOFIA is an airborne, gyroscopically stabilized 2.5m infrared telescope, mounted to a spherical bearing. Unlike its predecessors, SOFIA will work in absolute coordinates, despite its continually changing position and attitude. In order to manage this, SOFIA must relate equatorial and telescope coordinates using a combination of avionics data and star identification, manage field rotation and track sky images. We describe the algorithms and systems required to acquire and maintain the equatorial reference frame, relate it to tracking imagers and the science instrument, set up the oscillating secondary mirror, and aggregate pointings into relocatable nods and dithers.

  16. Instrument Pointing Capabilities: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Murray, Emmanuell; Scharf, Daniel P.; Aung, Mimi; Bayard, David; Brugarolas, Paul; Hadaegh, Fred; Lee, Allan; Milman, Mark; Sirlin, Sam; Kang, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the instrument pointing capabilities of past, present and future space telescopes and interferometers. As an important aspect of this survey, we present a taxonomy for "apples-to-apples" comparisons of pointing performances. First, pointing errors are defined relative to either an inertial frame or a celestial target. Pointing error can then be further sub-divided into DC, that is, steady state, and AC components. We refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to the inertial frame as absolute pointing accuracy, and we refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to a celestial target as relative pointing accuracy. The magnitude of the AC error is referred to as pointing stability. While an AC/DC partition is not new, we leverage previous work by some of the authors to quantitatively clarify and compare varying definitions of jitter and time window averages. With this taxonomy and for sixteen past, present, and future missions, pointing accuracies and stabilities, both required and achieved, are presented. In addition, we describe the attitude control technologies used to and, for future missions, planned to achieve these pointing performances.

  17. Trigger point therapy.

    PubMed

    Janssens, L A

    1992-03-01

    Trigger points (TP) are objectively demonstrable foci in muscles. They are painful on compression and trigger pain in a referred area. This area may be the only locus of complaint in humans. In dogs we cannot prove the existence of referred zones of pain. Therefore, we can only diagnose a TP-induced claudication if we cannot find bone, joint, or neurologic abnormalities, and we do find TP that disappear after treatment together with the original lameness. Several methods have been developed to demonstrate TP existence objectively. These are pressure algometry, pressure threshold measurements, magnetic resonance thermography, and histology. In humans, 71% of the TP described are acupuncture points. TP treatment consists of TP stimulation with non-invasive or invasive methods such as dry needling or injections. In the dog, ten TP are described in two categories of clinical patients. First, those with one or few TP reacting favorably on treatment (+/- 80% success in +/- 2-3 weeks). Second, those with many TPs reacting badly on treatment. Most probably the latter group are fibromyalgia patients.

  18. Relative Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Debra

    2013-05-01

    Relative equilibria of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems with symmetry are critical points of appropriate scalar functions parametrized by the Lie algebra (or its dual) of the symmetry group. Setting aside the structures - symplectic, Poisson, or variational - generating dynamical systems from such functions highlights the common features of their construction and analysis, and supports the construction of analogous functions in non-Hamiltonian settings. If the symmetry group is nonabelian, the functions are invariant only with respect to the isotropy subgroup of the given parameter value. Replacing the parametrized family of functions with a single function on the product manifold and extending the action using the (co)adjoint action on the algebra or its dual yields a fully invariant function. An invariant map can be used to reverse the usual perspective: rather than selecting a parametrized family of functions and finding their critical points, conditions under which functions will be critical on specific orbits, typically distinguished by isotropy class, can be derived. This strategy is illustrated using several well-known mechanical systems - the Lagrange top, the double spherical pendulum, the free rigid body, and the Riemann ellipsoids - and generalizations of these systems.

  19. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. SAME VIEW AT CA-157-2. LOOKING NNE. GIS: N-37' 43 44.3 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  20. 2. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING NNE. GIS N-37 43 44.3 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  1. 30 CFR 723.13 - Point system for penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... points based on the history of previous violations. One point shall be assigned for each past violation... order was issued abated the violation within the time given for abatement. (iii) If the consideration...

  2. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  3. Anesthesiology Point of Care project.

    PubMed

    McDonald, John S; Noback, Carl R; Cheng, Drew; Lee, T K; Nenov, Val

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a dynamic prototype visual communication system for the operating room environs. This has classically been viewed as an isolated and impenetrable workplace. All medical experiences and all teaching remain in a one to one closed loop with no recall or subsequent sharing for the training and education of other colleagues. The "Anesthesia Point of Care" (APOC) concept embraces the sharing of, recording of, and presentation of various physiological and pharmacological events so that real time memory can be shared at a later time for the edification of other colleagues who were not present at the time of the primary learning event. In addition it also provides a remarkably rapid tool for fellow faculty to respond to obvious stress and crisis events that can be broadcast instantly at the time of happening. Finally, it also serves as an efficient and effective means of paging and general communication throughout the daily routines among various healthcare providers in anesthesiology who work as a team unit; these include the staff, residents, CRNAs, physician assistants, and technicians. This system offers a unique opportunity to eventually develop future advanced ideas that can include training exercises, presurgical evaluations, surgical scheduling and improvements in efficiency based upon earlier than expected case completion or conversely later than expected case completion and even as a unique window to development of improved billing itemization and coordination.

  4. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  5. Point Source All Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky as seen by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The measured brightnesses of half a billion stars (points) have been combined into colors representing three distinct wavelengths of infrared light: blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns. This image is centered on the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, toward the constellation of Sagittarius. The reddish stars seemingly hovering in the middle of the Milky Way's disc -- many of them never observed before -- trace the densest dust clouds in our galaxy. The two faint smudges seen in the lower right quadrant are our neighboring galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  6. Hyperbolic Weyl Point in Reciprocal Chiral Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Lin, Qian; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-29

    We report the existence of Weyl points in a class of noncentral symmetric metamaterials, which has time reversal symmetry, but does not have inversion symmetry due to chiral coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This class of metamaterial exhibits either type-I or type-II Weyl points depending on its nonlocal response. We also provide a physical realization of such metamaterial consisting of an array of metal wires in the shape of elliptical helices which exhibits type-II Weyl points. PMID:27517792

  7. Revised Correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC Properties and Coincident TIMED/SABER Mesospheric Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Petelina, S V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002-2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each of 20 coincidences identified within plus or minus 1 degree latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees longitude and less than 1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1,3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs located at higher (and warmer) altitudes appear to be at lower altitudes.

  8. Revised Correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC Properties and Coincident TIMED/SABER Mesospheric Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb-scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. a, A.A. Kutepov, W.D. Pesnell, In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002-2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each of 20 coincidences identified within plus or minus 1 degree latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees longitude and less than 1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1,3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs located at higher (and warmer) altitudes appear to be at lower altitudes.

  9. Curvature-correction-based time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor with an inaccuracy of -0.8 °C-1.2 °C after one-point calibration from -40 °C to 120 °C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Shih-Hao; Lin, Yi

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor featuring on-chip curvature correction and one-point calibration support for thermal management systems. Time-domain inverter-based temperature sensors, which exhibit the advantages of low power and low cost, have been proposed for on-chip thermal monitoring. However, the curvature is large for the thermal transfer curve, which substantially affects the accuracy as the temperature range increases. Another problem is that the inverter is sensitive to process variations, resulting in difficulty for the sensors to achieve an acceptable accuracy for one-point calibration. To overcome these two problems, a temperature-dependent oscillator with curvature correction is proposed to increase the linearity of the oscillatory width, thereby resolving the drawback caused by a costly off-chip second-order master curve fitting. For one-point calibration support, an adjustable-gain time amplifier was adopted to eliminate the effect of process variations, with the assistance of a calibration circuit. The proposed circuit occupied a small area of 0.073 mm(2) and was fabricated in a TSMC CMOS 0.35-μm 2P4M digital process. The linearization of the oscillator and the effect cancellation of process variations enabled the sensor, which featured a fixed resolution of 0.049 °C/LSB, to achieve an optimal inaccuracy of -0.8 °C to 1.2 °C after one-point calibration of 12 test chips from -40 °C to 120 °C. The power consumption was 35 μW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s.

  10. Curvature-correction-based time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor with an inaccuracy of -0.8 °C-1.2 °C after one-point calibration from -40 °C to 120 °C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Shih-Hao; Lin, Yi

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor featuring on-chip curvature correction and one-point calibration support for thermal management systems. Time-domain inverter-based temperature sensors, which exhibit the advantages of low power and low cost, have been proposed for on-chip thermal monitoring. However, the curvature is large for the thermal transfer curve, which substantially affects the accuracy as the temperature range increases. Another problem is that the inverter is sensitive to process variations, resulting in difficulty for the sensors to achieve an acceptable accuracy for one-point calibration. To overcome these two problems, a temperature-dependent oscillator with curvature correction is proposed to increase the linearity of the oscillatory width, thereby resolving the drawback caused by a costly off-chip second-order master curve fitting. For one-point calibration support, an adjustable-gain time amplifier was adopted to eliminate the effect of process variations, with the assistance of a calibration circuit. The proposed circuit occupied a small area of 0.073 mm(2) and was fabricated in a TSMC CMOS 0.35-μm 2P4M digital process. The linearization of the oscillator and the effect cancellation of process variations enabled the sensor, which featured a fixed resolution of 0.049 °C/LSB, to achieve an optimal inaccuracy of -0.8 °C to 1.2 °C after one-point calibration of 12 test chips from -40 °C to 120 °C. The power consumption was 35 μW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s. PMID:24985845

  11. Pointing the Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, William M.

    1984-01-01

    Complying with regulations that require tactile signs to assist disabled persons is not as onerous as it seems. An intelligently developed signage system will reduce the amount of staff time needed to assist disabled people, most of whom prefer to find their own way. (TE)

  12. Chiral exceptional points in metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ming; Chen, Jing; Chong, Y. D.

    2016-09-01

    An exceptional point (EP) is a degeneracy occurring in a non-energy-conserving system, in which two eigenvectors of a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian coalesce. We explore how EPs can be realized in a metamaterial surface, or metasurface, consisting of a pair of lossy coupled linear antennas in each unit cell. EPs appear in the eigenvectors of the transmission matrix by tuning the frequency and the coupling and loss rates of the metasurface. Each EP is associated with the appearance of a circularly polarized transmission eigenstate; hence, within the parameter space of the system, the EPs lie along pairs of curves with distinct chirality. Our results are obtained using finite-difference time-domain simulations, as well as a fitted coupled-mode theory. The coupled-mode theory agrees well with the numerical results and is capable of accurately predicting the EP f curves.

  13. Function Point Analysis Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, R.; Martinez, El; Szafran, J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot is a web application originally designed by one of the NE-C3 branch's engineers, Jamie Szafran, and created specifically for the Software Development team of the Launch Control Systems (LCS) project. The application consists of evaluating the work of each developer to be able to get a real estimate of the hours that is going to be assigned to a specific task of development. The Architect Team had made design change requests for the depot to change the schema of the application's information; that information, changed in the database, needed to be changed in the graphical user interface (GUI) (written in Ruby on Rails (RoR and the web service/server side in Java to match the database changes. These changes were made by two interns from NE-C, Ricardo Muniz from NE-C3, who made all the schema changes for the GUI in RoR and Edwin Martinez, from NE-C2, who made all the changes in the Java side.

  14. Focus point supersymmetry redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Sanford, David

    2012-04-01

    Recent results from Higgs boson and supersymmetry searches at the Large Hadron Collider provide strong new motivations for supersymmetric theories with heavy superpartners. We reconsider focus point supersymmetry (FP SUSY), in which all squarks and sleptons may have multi-TeV masses without introducing fine-tuning in the weak scale with respect to variations in the fundamental SUSY-breaking parameters. We examine both FP SUSY and its familiar special case, the FP region of minimal supergravity, also known as the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (mSUGRA/CMSSM), and show that they are beautifully consistent with all particle, astroparticle, and cosmological data, including Higgs boson mass limits, null results from SUSY searches, electric dipole moments, b→sγ, Bs→μ+μ-, the thermal relic density of neutralinos, and dark matter searches. The observed deviation of the muon’s anomalous magnetic moment from its standard model value may also be explained in FP SUSY, although not in the FP region of mSUGRA/CMSSM. In light of recent data, we advocate refined searches for FP SUSY and related scenarios with heavy squarks and sleptons, and we present a simplified parameter space within mSUGRA/CMSSM to aid such analyses.

  15. ChangePoint

    2006-10-18

    This software allows one to locate the sudden intensity changes in fluorescence time trajectoreis photon by photon. It also automatically calculate the most probable number of intensity levels in the trajectory according to Bayesian statistics measure. This allows an accurate and unbiased analysis and interpretation of experimental data. The code can be applied to analysis of DNA sequencing data, for example, to allow rapid single-molecule and single-base resolution.

  16. What's the Point? The Benefits of Grading without Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brilleslyper, Mike; Ghrist, Michelle; Holcomb, Trae; Schaubroeck, Beth; Warner, Bradley; Williams, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Most instructors desire to create a learning environment conducive to deep learning. However, in courses where grades are based upon the accumulation of points, students may focus on collecting points rather than on learning and achieving the course objectives. We discuss an alternative points-free course design based on the development of clear…

  17. Global gene expression analysis in time series following N-acetyl L-cysteine induced epithelial differentiation of human normal and cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Anna C; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Edlundh-Rose, Esther; Greco, Giulia; Serafino, Annalucia; Krasnowska, Eva K; Lundeberg, Thomas; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Romano, Maria-Concetta; Parasassi, Tiziana; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2005-01-01

    Background Cancer prevention trials using different types of antioxidant supplements have been carried out at several occasions and one of the investigated compounds has been the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Studies at the cellular level have previously demonstrated that a single supplementation of NAC induces a ten-fold more rapid differentiation in normal primary human keratinocytes as well as a reversion of a colon carcinoma cell line from neoplastic proliferation to apical-basolateral differentiation [1]. The investigated cells showed an early change in the organization of the cytoskeleton, several newly established adherens junctions with E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and increased focal adhesions, all features characterizing the differentiation process. Methods In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the proliferation arrest and accelerated differentiation induced by NAC treatment of NHEK and Caco-2 cells in vitro, we performed global gene expression analysis of NAC treated cells in a time series (1, 12 and 24 hours post NAC treatment) using the Affymetrix GeneChip™ Human Genome U95Av2 chip, which contains approximately 12,000 previously characterized sequences. The treated samples were compared to the corresponding untreated culture at the same time point. Results Microarray data analysis revealed an increasing number of differentially expressed transcripts over time upon NAC treatment. The early response (1 hour) was transient, while a constitutive trend was commonly found among genes differentially regulated at later time points (12 and 24 hours). Connections to the induction of differentiation and inhibition of growth were identified for a majority of up- and down-regulated genes. All of the observed transcriptional changes, except for seven genes, were unique to either cell line. Only one gene, ID-1, was mutually regulated at 1 hour post treatment and might represent a common mediator of early NAC action. The detection

  18. Using Covariance Analysis to Assess Pointing Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David; Kang, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    A Pointing Covariance Analysis Tool (PCAT) has been developed for evaluating the expected performance of the pointing control system for NASA s Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). The SIM pointing control system is very complex, consisting of multiple feedback and feedforward loops, and operating with multiple latencies and data rates. The SIM pointing problem is particularly challenging due to the effects of thermomechanical drifts in concert with the long camera exposures needed to image dim stars. Other pointing error sources include sensor noises, mechanical vibrations, and errors in the feedforward signals. PCAT models the effects of finite camera exposures and all other error sources using linear system elements. This allows the pointing analysis to be performed using linear covariance analysis. PCAT propagates the error covariance using a Lyapunov equation associated with time-varying discrete and continuous-time system matrices. Unlike Monte Carlo analysis, which could involve thousands of computational runs for a single assessment, the PCAT analysis performs the same assessment in a single run. This capability facilitates the analysis of parametric studies, design trades, and "what-if" scenarios for quickly evaluating and optimizing the control system architecture and design.

  19. The power of PowerPoint.

    PubMed

    Niamtu, J

    2001-08-01

    Carousel slide presentations have been used for academic and clinical presentations since the late 1950s. However, advances in computer technology have caused a paradigm shift, and digital presentations are quickly becoming standard for clinical presentations. The advantages of digital presentations include cost savings; portability; easy updating capability; Internet access; multimedia functions, such as animation, pictures, video, and sound; and customization to augment audience interest and attention. Microsoft PowerPoint has emerged as the most popular digital presentation software and is currently used by many practitioners with and without significant computer expertise. The user-friendly platform of PowerPoint enables even the novice presenter to incorporate digital presentations into his or her profession. PowerPoint offers many advanced options that, with a minimal investment of time, can be used to create more interactive and professional presentations for lectures, patient education, and marketing. Examples of advanced PowerPoint applications are presented in a stepwise manner to unveil the full power of PowerPoint. By incorporating these techniques, medical practitioners can easily personalize, customize, and enhance their PowerPoint presentations. Complications, pitfalls, and caveats are discussed to detour and prevent misadventures in digital presentations. Relevant Web sites are listed to further update, customize, and communicate PowerPoint techniques. PMID:11496193

  20. The power of PowerPoint.

    PubMed

    Niamtu, J

    2001-08-01

    Carousel slide presentations have been used for academic and clinical presentations since the late 1950s. However, advances in computer technology have caused a paradigm shift, and digital presentations are quickly becoming standard for clinical presentations. The advantages of digital presentations include cost savings; portability; easy updating capability; Internet access; multimedia functions, such as animation, pictures, video, and sound; and customization to augment audience interest and attention. Microsoft PowerPoint has emerged as the most popular digital presentation software and is currently used by many practitioners with and without significant computer expertise. The user-friendly platform of PowerPoint enables even the novice presenter to incorporate digital presentations into his or her profession. PowerPoint offers many advanced options that, with a minimal investment of time, can be used to create more interactive and professional presentations for lectures, patient education, and marketing. Examples of advanced PowerPoint applications are presented in a stepwise manner to unveil the full power of PowerPoint. By incorporating these techniques, medical practitioners can easily personalize, customize, and enhance their PowerPoint presentations. Complications, pitfalls, and caveats are discussed to detour and prevent misadventures in digital presentations. Relevant Web sites are listed to further update, customize, and communicate PowerPoint techniques.

  1. On Pfaffian Random Point Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, V.

    2014-02-01

    We study Pfaffian random point fields by using the Moore-Dyson quaternion determinants. First, we give sufficient conditions that ensure that a self-dual quaternion kernel defines a valid random point field, and then we prove a CLT for Pfaffian point fields. The proofs are based on a new quaternion extension of the Cauchy-Binet determinantal identity. In addition, we derive the Fredholm determinantal formulas for the Pfaffian point fields which use the quaternion determinant.

  2. Time Series ARIMA Models of Undergraduate Grade Point Average.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bruce G.

    The Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) Models, often referred to as Box-Jenkins models, are regression methods for analyzing sequential dependent observations with large amounts of data. The Box-Jenkins approach, a three-stage procedure consisting of identification, estimation and diagnosis, was used to select the most appropriate…

  3. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accomplish this the responsible action officer must ensure that data developed during the review process is... proceed on an action involving another nation or international organization is required on short...

  4. Is It Time to Punt Paper? Point/Counterpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Alice; Krupp, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Digital texts are not new. In 1991, a videodisc-based program called Windows on Science became the first state-adopted electronic textbook in the United States. It was an interactive, multimedia-based program that enhanced the classroom learning experience with video and audio. Unfortunately, technology changed rapidly and videodisc players went…

  5. Turning Points: Priorities for Teacher Education in a Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Rosalie M.

    2009-01-01

    Every generation has its moment, some turning point that will mark its place in the historical record. Such points provide the direction of our history and our future. Turning points are, characteristically, times of turmoil based on a fundamental change in models or events--what Thomas Kuhn called a "paradigm shift." In terms of a democratic…

  6. The Herschel Point Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Schulz, Bernhard; Altieri, Bruno; Calzoletti, Luca; Kiss, Csaba; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Paladini, Roberta; Papageorgiou, Andreas; Pearson, Chris; Rector, John; Shupe, David; Valtchanov, Ivan; Verebélyi, Erika; Xu, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the submillimetre and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinized and still has potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments that scanned >10% of the sky at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns. Some source catalogs have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that would never be analyzed for their full source content. To maximize the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, our international team of instrument experts is in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalog (HPSC) from all scan map observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The extracted point sources will contain individual YSOs of our Galaxy, unresolved YSO clusters in resolved nearby galaxies and unresolved galaxies of the local and distant Universe that are related to star formation. Such a huge dataset will help scientists better understand the evolution from interstellar clouds to individual stars. Furthermore the analysis of stellar clusters and the star formation on galactic scales will add more details to the understanding of star formation laws through time.We present our findings on comparison of different source detection and photometric tools. First results of the extractions are shown along with the description of our pipelines and catalogue entries. We also provide an additional science product, the structure noise map, that is used for the quality assessment of the catalogue in

  7. Functional impact of dendritic branch point morphology

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Michele; Migliore, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical pyramidal cells store multiple features of complex synaptic input in individual dendritic branches and independently regulate the coupling between dendritic and somatic spikes. Branch points in apical trees exhibit wide ranges of sizes and shapes, and the large diameter ratio between trunk and oblique dendrites exacerbates impedance mismatch. The morphological diversity of dendritic bifurcations could thus locally tune neuronal excitability and signal integration. However, these aspects have never been investigated. Here, we first quantified the morphological variability of branch points from two-photon images of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We then investigated the geometrical features affecting spike initiation, propagation, and timing with a computational model validated by glutamate uncaging experiments. The results suggest that even subtle membrane readjustments at branch point could drastically alter the ability of synaptic input to generate, propagate, and time action potentials. PMID:23365251

  8. Ground point filtering of UAV-based photogrammetric point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Niels; Seijmonsbergen, Arie; Masselink, Rens; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have proved invaluable for generating high-resolution and multi-temporal imagery. Based on photographic surveys, 3D surface reconstructions can be derived photogrammetrically so producing point clouds, orthophotos and surface models. For geomorphological or ecological applications it may be necessary to separate ground points from vegetation points. Existing filtering methods are designed for point clouds derived using other methods, e.g. laser scanning. The purpose of this paper is to test three filtering algorithms for the extraction of ground points from point clouds derived from low-altitude aerial photography. Three subareas were selected from a single flight which represent different scenarios: 1) low relief, sparsely vegetated area, 2) low relief, moderately vegetated area, 3) medium relief and moderately vegetated area. The three filtering methods are used to classify ground points in different ways, based on 1) RGB color values from training samples, 2) TIN densification as implemented in LAStools, and 3) an iterative surface lowering algorithm. Ground points are then interpolated into a digital terrain model using inverse distance weighting. The results suggest that different landscapes require different filtering methods for optimal ground point extraction. While iterative surface lowering and TIN densification are fully automated, color-based classification require fine-tuning in order to optimize the filtering results. Finally, we conclude that filtering photogrammetric point clouds could provide a cheap alternative to laser scan surveys for creating digital terrain models in sparsely vegetated areas.

  9. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  10. Point-based manifold harmonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Prabhakaran, Balakrishnan; Guo, Xiaohu

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm to build a set of orthogonal Point-Based Manifold Harmonic Bases (PB-MHB) for spectral analysis over point-sampled manifold surfaces. To ensure that PB-MHB are orthogonal to each other, it is necessary to have symmetrizable discrete Laplace-Beltrami Operator (LBO) over the surfaces. Existing converging discrete LBO for point clouds, as proposed by Belkin et al., is not guaranteed to be symmetrizable. We build a new point-wisely discrete LBO over the point-sampled surface that is guaranteed to be symmetrizable, and prove its convergence. By solving the eigen problem related to the new operator, we define a set of orthogonal bases over the point cloud. Experiments show that the new operator is converging better than other symmetrizable discrete Laplacian operators (such as graph Laplacian) defined on point-sampled surfaces, and can provide orthogonal bases for further spectral geometric analysis and processing tasks.

  11. [Focal point emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Lange, R; Popp, S; Erbguth, F

    2016-06-01

    The number of patients treated in hospital emergency departments in Germany has risen in recent years to approximately 20 million. This escalation also applies to the increasing numbers of patients presenting with neurological symptoms and diseases, which occur in approximately 20 % of emergency patients. In addition to patients with stroke, inflammatory or degenerative central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders who need urgent treatment, more and more patients with nonspecific complaints or conditions attend emergency departments for elective treatment, not least because timely appointments with specialist neurologists in practices could not be obtained. Neurological expertise and presence in emergency departments at the level of specialist standard are therefore indispensable for providing a professional level of treatment, which also corresponds to current legal requirements. The implementation of a generalist emergency physician in Germany, as introduced in some European countries, would mean a retrograde step for neurological expertise in emergency admission management. The discipline of neurology must work together with other emergency disciplines to improve the financing of emergency departments and provide neurologists working there with a substantive curriculum of further and continuing education in emergency-related aspects of neurology. The discipline of neurology has a responsibility to emergency patients within its range of competencies and must, therefore, strengthen and improve its role in healthcare politics and concerning organizational and personnel aspects of neurological emergencies.

  12. Method for making small pointed thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, C. M.

    1968-01-01

    Constantan wire worked to a needle point and covered with a copper coating produces a small, concentric, fast-reaction thermocouple that has the fast response time necessary to measure rapid temperature changes accurately and only slightly alters the environment being measured.

  13. Active Learning: A PowerPoint Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareis, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Individual or group presentations are common assignments in business communication courses, and many students use PowerPoint slides as audiovisual support. Frequently, curriculum constraints don't allow instructors much time to teach effective design and delivery of presentation graphics in their courses; guidelines in the form of minilectures or…

  14. Misuse the Power, Miss the Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses a problem that plagues virtually all academics, as well as most people in business, K-12 education, and many other walks of life. At one time or another most members of post-millennial western society have suffered through that most hideous of well-intentioned experiences, the botched PowerPoint presentation.…

  15. Single Point Responsibility: Is It for You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    1975-01-01

    A construction method in which the successful bidding team has the single point responsibility for fulfilling the contract in every way can provide high quality educational space at less cost and in less time. The advantages and disadvantages are described. (Author/MLF)

  16. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future.

  17. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future. PMID:26759062

  18. Landform skeleton reconstruction from unorganized points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingliang; Tang, Guoan; Liu, Xuejun; Bian, Lu

    2007-11-01

    Landform skeleton are lines that indicate significant topographic features of the terrain. It is widely used in mapping and surveying, hydrology simulation, topography representation and engineering designing. In order to derive the landform skeleton, many kinds of data source have been used, including digitized contour lines, Grid-DEMs and TIN. As time goes by, more and more unorganized points have been acquired, created, maintained and disseminated in many fields. Those unorganized points are the most original and important information which is vital for mapping and surveying. How to extract the feature lines from unorganized points has been the hot-pot in computer design and reverse-engineering. Methods used to extract landform features in existence have shown dependence on data types and thresholds more or less. In the paper, the view sheds principle used to extract the feature points has been put forward and then those points have been organized into feature lines according to related rules. The result has shown that the view sheds principle can extract the features and give the levels of feature points.

  19. Fermat's point from five perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungeun; Flores, Alfinio

    2015-04-01

    The Fermat point of a triangle is the point such that minimizes the sum of the distances from that point to the three vertices. Five approaches to study the Fermat point of a triangle are presented in this article. First, students use a mechanical device using masses, strings and pulleys to study the Fermat point as the one that minimizes the potential energy of the system. Second, students use soap films between parallel planes connecting three pegs. The tension on the film will be minimal when the sum of distances is minimal. Third, students use an empirical approach, measuring distances in an interactive GeoGebra page. Fourth, students use Euclidean geometry arguments for two proofs based on the Torricelli configuration, and one using Viviani's Theorem. And fifth, the kinematic method is used to gain additional insight on the size of the angles between the segments joining the Fermat point with the vertices.

  20. Method of forming pointed structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of forming an array of pointed structures comprises depositing a ferrofluid on a substrate, applying a magnetic field to the ferrofluid to generate an array of surface protrusions, and solidifying the surface protrusions to form the array of pointed structures. The pointed structures may have a tip radius ranging from approximately 10 nm to approximately 25 micron. Solidifying the surface protrusions may be carried out at a temperature ranging from approximately 10 degrees C. to approximately 30 degrees C.

  1. Point contact silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of silicon solar cell has been developed. It is called the point-contact cell because the metal semiconductor contacts are restricted to an array of small points on the back of the cell. The point contact cell has recently demonstrated 22 percent conversion efficiency at one sun and 27.5 percent at 100 suns under an AM1.5 spectrum.

  2. Error Mitigation of Point-to-Point Communication for Fault-Tolerant Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akamine, Robert L.; Hodson, Robert F.; LaMeres, Brock J.; Ray, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Fault tolerant systems require the ability to detect and recover from physical damage caused by the hardware s environment, faulty connectors, and system degradation over time. This ability applies to military, space, and industrial computing applications. The integrity of Point-to-Point (P2P) communication, between two microcontrollers for example, is an essential part of fault tolerant computing systems. In this paper, different methods of fault detection and recovery are presented and analyzed.

  3. Market turning points forecasting using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Limiao; Yan, Sen; Zheng, Xiaolian; Chen, Ben M.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the system adaptation framework we previously proposed, a frequency domain based model is developed in this paper to forecast the major turning points of stock markets. This system adaptation framework has its internal model and adaptive filter to capture the slow and fast dynamics of the market, respectively. The residue of the internal model is found to contain rich information about the market cycles. In order to extract and restore its informative frequency components, we use wavelet multi-resolution analysis with time-varying parameters to decompose this internal residue. An empirical index is then proposed based on the recovered signals to forecast the market turning points. This index is successfully applied to US, UK and China markets, where all major turning points are well forecasted.

  4. Stability problems in point contact solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenbaum, P. E.; Sinton, R. A.; Swanson, R. M.

    Single-crystal silicon point-contact solar cells show a degradation in their efficiency after being exposed to concentrated sunlight. Two mechanisms appear to be responsible: an increase in surface recombination velocity caused by ultraviolet light, possibly due to electron injection from the silicon into the oxide, and a gradual lowering of the effective carrier lifetime that occurs when the cell is under high-level injection for an extended period of time. Point-contact solar cells whose front-side passivation has a phosphorus as well as a thermal oxide diffusion are dramatically more resistant to ultraviolet radiation damage. Modeling results indicate that it is possible to make a point-contact solar cell that is 26.8 percent efficient after massive ultraviolet exposure.

  5. Quantum point contacts as heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgram, Sebastian; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency of macroscopic heat engines is restricted by the second law of thermodynamics. They can reach at most the efficiency of a Carnot engine. In contrast, heat currents in mesoscopic heat engines show fluctuations. Thus, there is a small probability that a mesoscopic heat engine exceeds Carnot's maximum value during a short measurement time. We illustrate this effect using a quantum point contact as a heat engine. When a temperature difference is applied to a quantum point contact, the system may be utilized as a source of electrical power under steady state conditions. We first discuss the optimal working point of such a heat engine that maximizes the generated electrical power and subsequently calculate the statistics for deviations of the efficiency from its most likely value. We find that deviations surpassing the Carnot limit are possible, but unlikely.

  6. NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-point source pollution is a diffuse source that is difficult to measure and is highly variable due to different rain patterns and other climatic conditions. In many areas, however, non-point source pollution is the greatest source of water quality degradation. Presently, stat...

  7. Inertial Pointing and Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Robert (Inventor); Robbins, Fred (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An inertial pointing and control system and method for pointing to a designated target with known coordinates from a platform to provide accurate position, steering, and command information. The system continuously receives GPS signals and corrects Inertial Navigation System (INS) dead reckoning or drift errors. An INS is mounted directly on a pointing instrument rather than in a remote location on the platform for-monitoring the terrestrial position and instrument attitude. and for pointing the instrument at designated celestial targets or ground based landmarks. As a result. the pointing instrument and die INS move independently in inertial space from the platform since the INS is decoupled from the platform. Another important characteristic of the present system is that selected INS measurements are combined with predefined coordinate transformation equations and control logic algorithms under computer control in order to generate inertial pointing commands to the pointing instrument. More specifically. the computer calculates the desired instrument angles (Phi, Theta. Psi). which are then compared to the Euler angles measured by the instrument- mounted INS. and forms the pointing command error angles as a result of the compared difference.

  8. Brocard Point and Euler Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper takes a known point from Brocard geometry, a known result from the geometry of the equilateral triangle, and bring in Euler's [empty set] function. It then demonstrates how to obtain new Brocard Geometric number theory results from them. Furthermore, this paper aims to determine a [triangle]ABC whose Crelle-Brocard Point [omega]…

  9. Planetary system detection by POINTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The final report and semiannual reports 1, 2, and 3 in response to the study of 'Planetary System Detection by POINTS' is presented. The grant covered the period from 15 Jun. 1988 through 31 Dec. 1989. The work during that period comprised the further development and refinement of the POINTS concept. The status of the POINTS development at the end of the Grant period was described by Reasenberg in a paper given at the JPL Workshop on Space Interferometry, 12-13 Mar. 1990, and distributed as CfA Preprint 3138. That paper, 'POINTS: a Small Astrometric Interferometer,' follows as Appendix-A. Our proposal P2276-7-09, dated July 1990, included a more detailed description of the state of the development of POINTS at the end of the tenure of Grant NAGW-1355. That proposal, which resulted in Grant NAGW-2497, is included by reference.

  10. Key points model for polar region currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Yao; Chen, Geng-Xiong; Du, Ai-Min; Wu, Ying-Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Xiao-Can

    2008-03-01

    The equivalent ionospheric electric currents in the polar region mainly consist of the DP1 and DP2 systems. The former involves a westward electrojet around midnight, while the later involves a two-cell system with foci on the morningside and eveningside, respectively. In space weather prediction and nowcasting, sophisticated models of the polar currents are needed, but concise and convenient models are also useful to predict or nowcast the principal characteristics of the current systems, such as intensity and position. In this paper, we propose a "key points model" for outlining the basic features of the polar region current system for different disturbance levels. The "key points model" (or KP model) includes six key points of the current system: the centers of two DP2 cells, the maximum densities of the eastward and westward electrojets, and the maximum densities of the northward and southward currents. Each of six key points is described by three parameters: intensity, local time, and latitude. The AE-dependences of the 18 parameters are deduced from the equivalent current systems for every 5 min during a 2-d period (18-19 March 1978). The KP model reveals systematic variations of the current systems. When AE increases, the currents and the current densities are simultaneously enhanced linearly, and most of the key points concentrate towards midnight. In addition, when AE increases, the key points K2 and K4 for the evening current cell move equatorward, while the key points K1 and K3 for morning cell move poleward.

  11. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 1993 September 15-20 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on September 20. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0 sec .30) and an average value of 250 km (0 sec .35). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0 sec .17) and the largest is 600 km (O sec .69). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this

  12. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 15-20 Sept. 1993 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on 20 Sept. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured FWHM distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0.30 sec) and an average value of 250 km (0.35 sec). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0.17 sec) and the largest is 600 km (O.69 sec). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this area fraction measurement in the context of

  13. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  14. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-01-01

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5. PMID:25737108

  15. Effective dynamics of a classical point charge

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-03-15

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham–Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to quantum anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out. -- Highlights: •Extension of the classical action principle for dissipative systems. •New derivation of the Abraham–Lorentz force for a point charge. •Absence of a runaway solution of the Abraham–Lorentz force. •Acausality in classical electrodynamics. •Renormalization of classical electrodynamics of point charges.

  16. Pivots for Pointing: Visually-Monitored Pointing Has Higher Arm Elevations than Pointing Blindfolded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wnuczko, Marta; Kennedy, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Observers pointing to a target viewed directly may elevate their fingertip close to the line of sight. However, pointing blindfolded, after viewing the target, they may pivot lower, from the shoulder, aligning the arm with the target as if reaching to the target. Indeed, in Experiment 1 participants elevated their arms more in visually monitored…

  17. NOTE: Do acupuncture points exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi; Liu, Chenglin; Dang, Ruishan; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei; Ding, Guanghong

    2009-05-01

    We used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analysis to probe the distribution of four chemical elements in and around acupuncture points, two located in the forearm and two in the lower leg. Three of the four acupuncture points showed significantly elevated concentrations of elements Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in relation to levels in the surrounding tissue, with similar elevation ratios for Cu and Fe. The mapped distribution of these elements implies that each acupuncture point seems to be elliptical with the long axis along the meridian.

  18. Positional nystagmus showing neutral points.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Numata, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We encountered patients who had their static direction-changing positional nystagmus canceled at about 20-30 degrees yaw head rotation from the supine position. This nystagmus was also canceled when the head was rotated 180 degrees from this position. We call these head positions neutral points. At the neutral points, the cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal of the affected ear is positioned vertical to the gravitational plane and no deflection of the cupula occurs. The positional nystagmus observed (except the neutral points) was thought to occur due to a "heavy cupula" or "light cupula", which may be determined by the specific gravity of its endolymph.

  19. Davies Critical Point and Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Hoseong

    2012-04-01

    From the point of view of tunneling, the physical meaning of the Davies critical point of a second-order phase transition in the black hole thermodynamics is clarified. At the critical point, the nonthermal contribution vanishes so that the black hole radiation is entirely thermal. It separates two phases: one with radiation enhanced by the nonthermal contribution, the other suppressed by the nonthermal contribution. We show this in both charged and rotating black holes. The phase transition is also analyzed in the cases in which emissions of charges and angular momenta are incorporated.

  20. A copula model for marked point processes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Liqun; Cook, Richard J; Lee, Ker-Ai

    2013-10-01

    Many chronic diseases feature recurring clinically important events. In addition, however, there often exists a random variable which is realized upon the occurrence of each event reflecting the severity of the event, a cost associated with it, or possibly a short term response indicating the effect of a therapeutic intervention. We describe a novel model for a marked point process which incorporates a dependence between continuous marks and the event process through the use of a copula function. The copula formulation ensures that event times can be modeled by any intensity function for point processes, and any multivariate model can be specified for the continuous marks. The relative efficiency of joint versus separate analyses of the event times and the marks is examined through simulation under random censoring. An application to data from a recent trial in transfusion medicine is given for illustration. PMID:23660874

  1. Ill-Posed Point Neuron Models.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik; Wyller, John

    2016-12-01

    We show that point-neuron models with a Heaviside firing rate function can be ill posed. More specifically, the initial-condition-to-solution map might become discontinuous in finite time. Consequently, if finite precision arithmetic is used, then it is virtually impossible to guarantee the accurate numerical solution of such models. If a smooth firing rate function is employed, then standard ODE theory implies that point-neuron models are well posed. Nevertheless, in the steep firing rate regime, the problem may become close to ill posed, and the error amplification, in finite time, can be very large. This observation is illuminated by numerical experiments. We conclude that, if a steep firing rate function is employed, then minor round-off errors can have a devastating effect on simulations, unless proper error-control schemes are used. PMID:27129667

  2. Effective dynamics of a classical point charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-03-01

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham-Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to quantum anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out.

  3. Pointing Device Performance in Steering Tasks.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Ransalu; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S

    2016-06-01

    Use of touch-screen-based interactions is growing rapidly. Hence, knowing the maneuvering efficacy of touch screens relative to other pointing devices is of great importance in the context of graphical user interfaces. Movement time, accuracy, and user preferences of four pointing device settings were evaluated on a computer with 14 participants aged 20.1 ± 3.13 years. It was found that, depending on the difficulty of the task, the optimal settings differ for ballistic and visual control tasks. With a touch screen, resting the arm increased movement time for steering tasks. When both performance and comfort are considered, whether to use a mouse or a touch screen for person-computer interaction depends on the steering difficulty. Hence, a input device should be chosen based on the application, and should be optimized to match the graphical user interface. PMID:27216944

  4. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E

    2007-02-28

    The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention

  5. How does Fitts' Law fit pointing and dragging?. [of mouse devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillan, Douglas J.; Holden, Kritina; Adam, Susan; Rudisill, Marianne; Magee, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments examined selecting text using a movement sequence of pointing and dragging. Experiment 1 showed that, in the Point-Drag sequence, the pointing time was related to the pointing distance but not to the width of the text to be selected; in contrast, pointing time was related to both the pointing distance and the width of the text in the Point-Click sequence. Experiment 2 demonstrated that both the pointing and dragging times for the Point-Drag sequence were sensitive to the height of the text that was selected. The discussion of the results centers around the application of Fitts' Law to pointing and dragging in a point-drag sequence, proposing that the target for pointing is the leftmost edge of the text to be selected, and the target for dragging is the rightmost edge of the text.

  6. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  7. Detecting determinism from point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  8. Floating-to-Fixed-Point Conversion for Digital Signal Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Daniel; Chillet, Daniel; Sentieys, Olivier

    2006-12-01

    Digital signal processing applications are specified with floating-point data types but they are usually implemented in embedded systems with fixed-point arithmetic to minimise cost and power consumption. Thus, methodologies which establish automatically the fixed-point specification are required to reduce the application time-to-market. In this paper, a new methodology for the floating-to-fixed point conversion is proposed for software implementations. The aim of our approach is to determine the fixed-point specification which minimises the code execution time for a given accuracy constraint. Compared to previous methodologies, our approach takes into account the DSP architecture to optimise the fixed-point formats and the floating-to-fixed-point conversion process is coupled with the code generation process. The fixed-point data types and the position of the scaling operations are optimised to reduce the code execution time. To evaluate the fixed-point computation accuracy, an analytical approach is used to reduce the optimisation time compared to the existing methods based on simulation. The methodology stages are described and several experiment results are presented to underline the efficiency of this approach.

  9. Hermit Points on a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard; Grinstead, Charles; Grindstead, Marshall; Bergstrand, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Suppose that we are given a rectangular box in 3-space. Given any two points on the surface of this box, we can define the surface distance between them to be the length of the shortest path between them on the surface of the box. This paper determines the pairs of points of maximum surface distance for all boxes. It is often the case that these…

  10. The Use and Management of Secondary Teachers' Time after the Education Reform Act 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, R. J.; Neill, S. R. St. J.

    A sample of 348 secondary teachers in England and Wales kept a week's record of their work and completed a questionnaire on time usage. The survey indicated that the total mean time spent on work and work-related activities was 54.4 hours per week. Of this, teachers spent 16.9 hours on teaching, 12.9 hours on preparation, 18.1 hours in…

  11. An Emprical Point Error Model for Tls Derived Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozendi, Mustafa; Akca, Devrim; Topan, Hüseyin

    2016-06-01

    The random error pattern of point clouds has significant effect on the quality of final 3D model. The magnitude and distribution of random errors should be modelled numerically. This work aims at developing such an anisotropic point error model, specifically for the terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) acquired 3D point clouds. A priori precisions of basic TLS observations, which are the range, horizontal angle and vertical angle, are determined by predefined and practical measurement configurations, performed at real-world test environments. A priori precision of horizontal (𝜎𝜃) and vertical (𝜎𝛼) angles are constant for each point of a data set, and can directly be determined through the repetitive scanning of the same environment. In our practical tests, precisions of the horizontal and vertical angles were found as 𝜎𝜃=±36.6𝑐𝑐 and 𝜎𝛼=±17.8𝑐𝑐, respectively. On the other hand, a priori precision of the range observation (𝜎𝜌) is assumed to be a function of range, incidence angle of the incoming laser ray, and reflectivity of object surface. Hence, it is a variable, and computed for each point individually by employing an empirically developed formula varying as 𝜎𝜌=±2-12 𝑚𝑚 for a FARO Focus X330 laser scanner. This procedure was followed by the computation of error ellipsoids of each point using the law of variance-covariance propagation. The direction and size of the error ellipsoids were computed by the principal components transformation. The usability and feasibility of the model was investigated in real world scenarios. These investigations validated the suitability and practicality of the proposed method.

  12. Optimizing robot placement for visit-point tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.K.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    We present a manipulator placement algorithm for minimizing the length of the manipulator motion performing a visit-point task such as spot welding. Given a set of points for the tool of a manipulator to visit, our algorithm finds the shortest robot motion required to visit the points from each possible base configuration. The base configurations resulting in the shortest motion is selected as the optimal robot placement. The shortest robot motion required for visiting multiple points from a given base configuration is computed using a variant of the traveling salesman algorithm in the robot joint space and a point-to-point path planner that plans collision free robot paths between two configurations. Our robot placement algorithm is expected to reduce the robot cycle time during visit- point tasks, as well as speeding up the robot set-up process when building a manufacturing line.

  13. Robot positioning based on point-to-point motion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S.; Cho, H. S.; Koh, K. C.

    2000-03-20

    This paper presents an optimal search method for determining the base location of a robot manipulator so that the robot can have a designated point-to-point (PTP) motion capabilities. Based on the topological characterization of the manipulator workspace and the definitions of various p-connectivity, a computational method is developed for enumerating various PTP motion capabilities into quantitative cost functions. Then an unconstrained search by minimizing the cost function yields the task feasible location of the robot base. This methodology is useful for placement of mobile manipulators and robotic workcell layout design.

  14. Location of end-points in high-precision coulometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, W F; Poe, D P; Diehl, H

    1975-07-01

    A computer has been used to fit a cubic equation to experimental data obtained in the region of the end-point in high-precision coulometric titrations of 4-aminopyridine and tris(hydroxy-methyl) aminomethane. For these weak bases, the two end-points (points of inflexion calculated by setting the second derivative equal to zero) obtained by choosing first time, and secondly pH, as the independent variable, are in good agreement.

  15. Stagnation Point Radiative Heating Relations for Venus Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael E.; Palmer, Grant E.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Improved analytic expressions for calculating the stagnation point radiative heating during entry into the atmosphere of Venus have been developed. These analytic expressions can be incorporated into entry trajectory simulation codes. Together with analytical expressions for convective heating at the stagnation point, the time-integrated total heat load at the stagnation point is used in determining the thickness of protective material required, and hence the mass of the fore body heatshield of uniform thickness.

  16. X -Point Effect on Plasma Blob Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, F.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma blob dynamics on the high-field side in the proximity of a magnetic field null (X point) is investigated in TORPEX. A significant acceleration of the blobs towards the X point is observed. Close to the X point the blobs break apart. The E ×B drifts associated with the blobs are measured, isolating the background drift component from the fluctuating contribution of the blob internal potential dipole. The time evolution of the latter is consistent with the fast blob dynamics. An analytical model based on charge conservation is derived for the potential dipole, including ion polarization, diamagnetic, and parallel currents. In the vicinity of the X point, a crucial role in determining the blob motion is played by the decrease of the poloidal magnetic field intensity. This variation increases the connection length that short circuits the potential dipole of the blob. Good quantitative agreement is found between the model and the experimental data in the initial accelerating phase of the blob dynamics.

  17. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  18. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  19. Statistical properties of several models of fractional random point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjaballah, C.

    2011-08-01

    Statistical properties of several models of fractional random point processes have been analyzed from the counting and time interval statistics points of view. Based on the criterion of the reduced variance, it is seen that such processes exhibit nonclassical properties. The conditions for these processes to be treated as conditional Poisson processes are examined. Numerical simulations illustrate part of the theoretical calculations.

  20. Tipping Points in Texas Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Anticipating geomorphic tipping points requires that we learn from the past. Major geomorphic changes in coastal plain rivers of Texas resulting in river metamorphosis or regime shifts were identified, and the major driving factors determined. Nine fluvial tipping points were identified from contemporary observations, historical records, and Quaternary reconstructions. Two of the tipping points (between general aggrading and degrading valley states) are associated with reversals in a fundamental system control (sea-level). One (stable or aggrading vs. degrading channels) is associated with an abrupt change in sediment supply due to dam construction, and two others (changes from meandering to anastomosing channel patterns, and different anastomosis styles) are similarly related to changes in sediment supply and/or transport capacity, but with additional elements of historical contingency. Three tipping points are related to avulsions. One, from a regime dominated to reoccupation of former channels to one dominated by progradation into flood basins, is driven by progressive long term filling of incised valleys. Another, nodal avulsions, are driven by disturbances associated with tectonics or listric faults. The third, avulsions and related valley metamorphosis in unfilled incised valleys, is due to fundamental dynamical instabilities within the fluvial system. This synthesis and analysis suggests that geomorphic tipping points are sometimes associated with general extrinsic or intrinsic (to the fluvial system) environmental change, independent of any disturbances or instabilities. Others are associated with natural (e.g., tectonic) or human (dams) disturbances, and still others with intrinsic geomorphic instabilities. This suggests that future tipping points will be equally diverse with respect to their drivers.

  1. Point Positioning Service for Natural Hazard Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Sever, Y. E.

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to improve natural hazard monitoring, JPL has invested in updating and enlarging its global real-time GNSS tracking network, and has launched a unique service - real-time precise positioning for natural hazard monitoring, entitled GREAT Alert (GNSS Real-Time Earthquake and Tsunami Alert). GREAT Alert leverages the full technological and operational capability of the JPL's Global Differential GPS System [www.gdgps.net] to offer owners of real-time dual-frequency GNSS receivers: Sub-5 cm (3D RMS) real-time, absolute positioning in ITRF08, regardless of location Under 5 seconds turnaround time Full covariance information Estimates of ancillary parameters (such as troposphere) optionally provided This service enables GNSS networks operators to instantly have access to the most accurate and reliable real-time positioning solutions for their sites, and also to the hundreds of participating sites globally, assuring inter-consistency and uniformity across all solutions. Local authorities with limited technical and financial resources can now access to the best technology, and share environmental data to the benefit of the entire pacific region. We will describe the specialized precise point positioning techniques employed by the GREAT Alert service optimized for natural hazard monitoring, and in particular Earthquake monitoring. We address three fundamental aspects of these applications: 1) small and infrequent motion, 2) the availability of data at a central location, and 3) the need for refined solutions at several time scales

  2. Experiment pointing with magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A need has been identified for a payload auxilliary pointing system onboard the Space Shuttle which provides sub-arcsecond stability in the Shuttle disturbance environment. This paper describes such a pointing system, presently being developed by Sperry Flight Systems for the NASA Langley Research Center. At the core of the design is a non-contacting magnetic suspension which provides a high degree of isolation between payload and carrier. Design concepts and control laws will be discussed. Also, test results from full-scale protoflight hardware and planned system refinements will be presented.

  3. Point estimates for probability moments

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblueth, Emilio

    1975-01-01

    Given a well-behaved real function Y of a real random variable X and the first two or three moments of X, expressions are derived for the moments of Y as linear combinations of powers of the point estimates y(x+) and y(x-), where x+ and x- are specific values of X. Higher-order approximations and approximations for discontinuous Y using more point estimates are also given. Second-moment approximations are generalized to the case when Y is a function of several variables. PMID:16578731

  4. Critical Point in Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S.A.; Morfill, G.E.; Ivlev, A.V.; Thomas, H.M.; Beysens, D.A.; Zappoli, B.; Fortov, V.E.; Lipaev, A.M.; Molotkov, V.I.

    2006-01-13

    The occurrence of liquid-vapor phase transition and the possible existence of a critical point in complex plasmas--systems that consist of charged micrograins in a neutralizing plasma background--is investigated theoretically. An analysis based on the consideration of the intergrain interaction potential suggests that under certain conditions systems near and at the critical point should be observable. Measurements under microgravity conditions would appear to be required. The analysis aims at determining the plasma parameter regime most suitable for planned experimental investigations.

  5. Energy-efficient technologies for point-to-point fiber access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka-Lun; Li, Jie; Chan, Chien Aun; Anthapadmanabhan, N. Prasanth; Chow, Hungkei (Keith)

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the fundamental issues and the technologies to achieve an energy-efficient Gigabit-Ethernet point-to-point (PtP) fiber access network. To minimize the power consumption of PtP fiber access for long-term development, it is essential to optimize each of the network components such as optical transceiver, user network interface, Ethernet aggregator and also their modes of operation. Our analysis shows that the energy consumption of a PtP fiber access network using our proposed technologies can be up to 7.5 times lower than that of the 2010 technologies when a combination of appropriate technologies is applied.

  6. Evolution of fluctuations near QCD critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanov, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    We propose to describe the time evolution of quasistationary fluctuations near QCD critical point by a system of stochastic Boltzmann-Langevin-Vlasov-type equations. We derive the equations and study the system analytically in the linearized regime. Known results for equilibrium stationary fluctuations as well as the critical scaling of diffusion coefficient are reproduced. We apply the approach to the long-standing question of the fate of the critical point fluctuations during the hadronic rescattering stage of the heavy-ion collision after chemical freeze-out. We find that if conserved particle number fluctuations survive the rescattering, so do, under a certain additional condition, the fluctuations of nonconserved quantities, such as mean transverse momentum. We derive a simple analytical formula for the magnitude of this memory effect.

  7. A miniaturized pointing mount for Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, C. G.; Howell, T., Jr.; Nicaise, P. D.; Parker, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A Miniaturized Pointing Mount (MPM) for Spacelab missions is defined and simulation results are described. This mount is proposed to complement the Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS). It uses the same mount isolator concept as the Spacelab IPS but is much more efficient and economical for the accommodation of small shuttle payloads. The MPM is built from star tracker assemblies left over from the Apollo Telescope Mount program thereby assuring low cost and development risk. Simulation results indicate a high level of instrument stability can be expected. The short development time of the MPM would permit it to serve as a precursor to the Spacelab IPS for verifying critical new concepts such as the mount isolation and hold down mechanisms.

  8. 1. DEPENDENCY Both pointed and flat shingles appear to be ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DEPENDENCY Both pointed and flat shingles appear to be original. Original purpose of this building was not recorded at the time of this survey. - Annandale Plantation, Dependency, State Routes 30 & 18 vicinity, Georgetown, Georgetown County, SC

  9. Revised correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC properties and coincident TIMED/SABER mesospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb-scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002--2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each coincidence identified within ±1 degree latitude, ±2 degrees longitude and ≤1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1, 3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs, actually located at higher (and colder) altitudes are detected at lower altitudes. S.V. Petelina, D.A. Degenstein, E.J. Llewellyn, N.D. Lloyd, C.J. Mertens, M.G. Mlynczak, and J.M. Russell III, "Thermal conditions for PMC existence derived from Odin/OSIRIS and TIMED/SABER data", Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L

  10. The educator's point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vargas, M. Eugenia Dengo

    1993-03-01

    The educator's point of view stresses the development potential of education, together with respect for human rights. It is seen that nations need to make clear policy statements in this respect, and the consequent planning and curricular issues, together with some relevant strategies, are indicated.

  11. Point substitutions in Japanese alloalbumins.

    PubMed

    Arai, K; Madison, J; Huss, K; Ishioka, N; Satoh, C; Fujita, M; Neel, J V; Sakurabayashi, I; Putnam, F W

    1989-08-01

    We have completed the structural study of five rare types of inherited albumin variants (alloalbumins) discovered in the Biochemical Genetics Study of 15,581 unrelated children in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We have also identified the structural change in five other alloalbumin specimens detected during clinical electrophoresis of sera from Japanese living near Tokyo. Each of the five albumin variants from Nagasaki and Hiroshima has a single amino acid substitution. All of these substitutions differ, and none has been reported in non-Japanese populations. No instances of proalbumin variants or of albumin B (the most frequent alloalbumins in Caucasians) were detected in the children in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. However, one instance of a variant proalbumin and two examples of albumin B occurred in Japanese from the vicinity of Tokyo. In addition a previously unreported point substitution was found in albumin Tochigi, which is present in two unrelated persons from Tochigi prefecture. Four of the point mutations in the Japanese alloalbumins are in close proximity in a short segment of the polypeptide chain (residues 354-382) in which three additional point substitutions have been reported in diverse populations. These results, combined with earlier data, suggest that point substitutions are grouped in certain segments of the albumin molecule.

  12. Decimal Fractions: An Important Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinie, Sherri L.

    2014-01-01

    How can a simple dot--the decimal point--be the source of such frustration for students and teachers? As the author worked through her own frustrations, she found that her students seemed to fall into groups in terms of misconceptions that they revealed when talking about and working with decimals. When asking students to illustrate their thinking…

  13. High Points of Human Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Curt

    1975-01-01

    Discusses such high points of human genetics as the study of chromosomes, somatic cell hybrids, the population formula: the Hardy-Weinberg Law, biochemical genetics, the single-active X Theory, behavioral genetics and finally how genetics can serve humanity. (BR)

  14. The Mean as Balance Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Robin S.

    2012-01-01

    There are two primary interpretations of the mean: as a leveler of data (Uccellini 1996, pp. 113-114) and as a balance point of a data set. Typically, both interpretations of the mean are ignored in elementary school and middle school curricula. They are replaced with a rote emphasis on calculation using the standard algorithm. When students are…

  15. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  16. 51. LINES AT TIME OFFICE NO. 13 AT CHECKOUT TIME. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. LINES AT TIME OFFICE NO. 13 AT CHECKOUT TIME. SEAPLANE HANGARS (BLDGS. 1-2) IN BACKGROUND. USN PHOTO, JULY 11, 1941. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  17. Transient Point Infiltration In The Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buecker-Gittel, M.; Mohrlok, U.

    The risk assessment of leaking sewer pipes gets more and more important due to urban groundwater management and environmental as well as health safety. This requires the quantification and balancing of transport and transformation processes based on the water flow in the unsaturated zone. The water flow from a single sewer leakage could be described as a point infiltration with time varying hydraulic conditions externally and internally. External variations are caused by the discharge in the sewer pipe as well as the state of the leakage itself. Internal variations are the results of microbiological clogging effects associated with the transformation processes. Technical as well as small scale laboratory experiments were conducted in order to investigate the water transport from an transient point infiltration. From the technical scale experiment there was evidence that the water flow takes place under transient conditions when sewage infiltrates into an unsaturated soil. Whereas the small scale experiments investigated the hydraulics of the water transport and the associated so- lute and particle transport in unsaturated soils in detail. The small scale experiment was a two-dimensional representation of such a point infiltration source where the distributed water transport could be measured by several tensiometers in the soil as well as by a selective measurement of the discharge at the bottom of the experimental setup. Several series of experiments were conducted varying the boundary and initial con- ditions in order to derive the important parameters controlling the infiltration of pure water from the point source. The results showed that there is a significant difference between the infiltration rate in the point source and the discharge rate at the bottom, that could be explained by storage processes due to an outflow resistance at the bottom. This effect is overlayn by a decreasing water content decreases over time correlated with a decreasing infiltration

  18. ZERO-TIME INDICATOR

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1960-08-30

    The travel time of a nuclear shock wave from its point of origin to a location can be determined accurately by an apparatus for noting and comparably recording both zerotime, as indicated by the electromagnetic transient associated with the nuclear detonation, and shock wave arrival time.

  19. Change point analysis of mean annual air temperature in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani, A.

    2015-06-01

    The existence of change point in the mean of air temperature is an important indicator of climate change. In this study, Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric Change Point Models (CPMs) were applied to test whether a change point has occurred in the mean of annual Air Temperature Anomalies Time Series (ATATS) of 27 synoptic stations in different regions of Iran for the period 1956-2010. The Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) was also applied to evaluate the detected change points. The ATATS of all stations except Bandar Anzali and Gorgan stations, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series as an input file for the CPMs and LRT. Both the Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs detected the change point in the ATATS of (a) Tehran Mehrabad, Abadan, Kermanshah, Khoramabad and Yazd in 1992, (b) Mashhad and Tabriz in 1993, (c) Bandar Anzali, Babolsar and Ramsar in 1994, (d) Kerman and Zahedan in 1996 at 5% significance level. The likelihood ratio test shows that the ATATS before and after detected change points in these 12 stations are normally distributed with different means. The Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs suggested different change points for individual stations in Bushehr, Bam, Shahroud, and Gorgan. However, the LRT confirmed the change points in these four stations as 1997, 1996, 1993, and 1996, respectively. No change points were detected in the remaining 11 stations.

  20. Four-point function in the IOP matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ben; Polchinski, Joseph; Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Suh, S. Josephine

    2016-05-01

    The IOP model is a quantum mechanical system of a large- N matrix oscillator and a fundamental oscillator, coupled through a quartic interaction. It was introduced previously as a toy model of the gauge dual of an AdS black hole, and captures a key property that at infinite N the two-point function decays to zero on long time scales. Motivated by recent work on quantum chaos, we sum all planar Feynman diagrams contributing to the four-point function. We find that the IOP model does not satisfy the more refined criteria of exponential growth of the out-of-time-order four-point function.

  1. Ignition timing control

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.E.; Bedross, G.M.

    1993-05-25

    An engine ignition control system for controlling the timing of the spark for initiating burning in the combustion chamber of a four stroke cycle, single cylinder, internal combustion engine is described; said engine having a cylinder, a piston in said cylinder, a crankshaft connected to said piston, said piston being adapted to reciprocate between a top dead center position and a bottom dead center position; a speed sensor means for developing periodic sensor voltage timing pulses, the cycle time between timing pulses being an indication of engine crankshaft speed; means for developing ignition timing pulses, each timing pulse having a leading edge corresponding to a voltage change in a timing voltage pulse and a trailing edge corresponding to an opposite voltage change in a timing voltage pulse; means for developing a spark voltage including an ignition coil and a source of ignition coil current, said spark voltage occurring at a coil primary current interrupt point; means for measuring in real-time, cycle time and a timing pulse time for one engine cycle; and means for computing an optimum delay time from the leading edge of a timing pulse for said one cycle to said interrupt point whereby combustion is initiated at a time in advance of the top dead center position.

  2. Interpretation of human pointing by African elephants: generalisation and rationality.

    PubMed

    Smet, Anna F; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-11-01

    Factors influencing the abilities of different animals to use cooperative social cues from humans are still unclear, in spite of long-standing interest in the topic. One of the few species that have been found successful at using human pointing is the African elephant (Loxodonta africana); despite few opportunities for learning about pointing, elephants follow a pointing gesture in an object-choice task, even when the pointing signal and experimenter's body position are in conflict, and when the gesture itself is visually subtle. Here, we show that the success of captive African elephants at using human pointing is not restricted to situations where the pointing signal is sustained until the time of choice: elephants followed human pointing even when the pointing gesture was withdrawn before they had responded to it. Furthermore, elephants rapidly generalised their response to a type of social cue they were unlikely to have seen before: pointing with the foot. However, unlike young children, they showed no sign of evaluating the 'rationality' of this novel pointing gesture according to its visual context: that is, whether the experimenter's hands were occupied or not.

  3. Active point out-of-plane ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Hyunjae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common intraoperative medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the transducer and the ultrasound image. Point-based phantoms are considered to be accurate, but their calibration framework assumes that the point is in the image plane. In this work, we present the use of an active point phantom and a calibration framework that accounts for the elevational uncertainty of the point. Given the lateral and axial position of the point in the ultrasound image, we approximate a circle in the axial-elevational plane with a radius equal to the axial position. The standard approach transforms all of the imaged points to be a single physical point. In our approach, we minimize the distances between the circular subsets of each image, with them ideally intersecting at a single point. We simulated in noiseless and noisy cases, presenting results on out-of-plane estimation errors, calibration estimation errors, and point reconstruction precision. We also performed an experiment using a robot arm as the tracker, resulting in a point reconstruction precision of 0.64mm.

  4. Point contacts in encapsulated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Handschin, Clevin; Fülöp, Bálint; Csonka, Szabolcs; Makk, Péter; Blanter, Sofya; Weiss, Markus; Schönenberger, Christian; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    We present a method to establish inner point contacts with dimensions as small as 100 nm on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulated graphene heterostructures by pre-patterning the top-hBN in a separate step prior to dry-stacking. 2- and 4-terminal field effect measurements between different lead combinations are in qualitative agreement with an electrostatic model assuming point-like contacts. The measured contact resistances are 0.5–1.5 kΩ per contact, which is quite low for such small contacts. By applying a perpendicular magnetic field, an insulating behaviour in the quantum Hall regime was observed, as expected for inner contacts. The fabricated contacts are compatible with high mobility graphene structures and open up the field for the realization of several electron optical proposals.

  5. EBTR design-point selection

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    The procedure used to select the design point for the ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) study is described. The models used in each phase of the selection process are described, with an emphasis placed on the parametric design curves produced by each model. The tradeoffs related to burn physics, stability/equilibrium, electron-ring physics, and magnetics design are discussed. The resulting design point indicates a plasma with a 35-m major radius and a 1-m minor radium operating at an average core-plasma beta of 0.17, which at approx. 30 keV produces an average neutron wall loading of 1.4 MW/m/sup 2/ while maintaining key magnet (< 10 T) and total power (less than or equal to 4000 MWt) constraints.

  6. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  7. What are cirrus point sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, Carl; Mccarthy, Patrick J.; Reach, William; Strauss, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    Most cirrus point sources are associated with interstellar gas. A subset of these was isolated, together with other sources showing large band 4 to 3 flux density ratios, that are not associated with interstellar gas. Most of the point sources are associated with diffuse cirrus emissions. The sources appear to be distributed randomly on the sky, with the exception of six clusters, one of which is not associated with any known object. Six sources out of seventeen that were observed for redshifted H I at Arecibo were found to be associated with relatively nondescript external galaxies. Most of the sources do not appear on the Palomar Sky Survey. Deep optical observations of eight fields revealed some fairly distant galaxies, one object with a very peculiar optical spectrum, and several blank fields.

  8. Lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Yang, Ying; Han, Zhigang; Li, Jinpeng

    2016-07-01

    A lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer (LRPDI) is proposed for dynamic wavefront measurement. The point diffraction interferometer is integrated on a small substrate with properly designed thin film, which is used for generating the interferogram with high carrier frequency at a CCD target. By lensless imaging, the complex amplitude at the CCD target can be propagated to the conjugated plane of the exit pupil of an incident wavefront, which not only avoids the edge diffraction in the interferogram, but also eliminates systematic error. The accuracy of LRPDI is demonstrated by simulation and experiment, and a precision better than 1/150 wavelength is achieved. The new design with lensless imaging processing is suitable for dynamic wavefront measurement. PMID:27409204

  9. Sensing with Superconducting Point Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors. PMID:22778630

  10. Turning points in reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  11. Viviani Polytopes and Fermat Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Li

    2012-01-01

    Given a set of oriented hyperplanes P = {p1, . . . , pk} in R[superscript n], define v : R[superscript n] [right arrow] R by v(X) = the sum of the signed distances from X to p[subscript 1], . . . , p[subscript k], for any point X [is a member of] R[superscript n]. We give a simple geometric characterization of P for which v is constant, leading to…

  12. The Critical Point Facility (CPF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Critical Point Facility (CPF) is an ESA multiuser facility designed for microgravity research onboard Spacelab. It has been conceived and built to offer investigators opportunities to conduct research on critical point phenomena in microgravity. This facility provides the high precision and stability temperature standards required in this field of research. It has been primarily designed for the purpose of optical investigations of transparent fluids. During a Spacelab mission, the CPF automatically processes several thermostats sequentially, each thermostat corresponding to an experiment. The CPF is now integrated in Spacelab at Kennedy Space Center, in preparation for the International Microgravity Lab. mission. The CPF was designed to submit transparent fluids to an adequate, user defined thermal scenario, and to monitor their behavior by using thermal and optical means. Because they are strongly affected by gravity, a good understanding of critical phenomena in fluids can only be gained in low gravity conditions. Fluids at the critical point become compressed under their own weight. The role played by gravity in the formation of interfaces between distinct phases is not clearly understood.

  13. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, James Eugene; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Whetten, Ernest Blayne

    1998-01-01

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

  14. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

    1998-06-30

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

  15. Random Telegraph Switching in Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. C.; Wybourne, M. N.; Goodnick, S. M.

    1996-03-01

    We have investigated non equilibrium transport through quantum point contacts. At low source- drain bias the devices display well defined quantized conductance plateaus. At higher biases (> 6 mV) regions of instability in the differential conductance are observed. These regions are associated with the onset of conduction when the chemical potential on one side of the contact is lifted above the bottom of the next one-dimensional subband. Time dependent measurements of these regions reveal random telegraph switching (RTS) in the conductance.^1 The RTS has been studied as a function of source-drain bias, gate bias, and temperature. We believe the conductance switching is due to random fluctuations in the height of the barrier forming the point contact. We will discuss possible mechanisms for the barrier height fluctuations. ^1J.C. Smith, C. Berven, M.N. Wybourne and S.M. Goodnick. ``Conductance Instabilities in Quantum Point Contact'' In press, Surface Science. This work was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research N00014-93-1-0618.

  16. Risk characterization framework for noncancer end points.

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, T K; Hetes, R G; Naugle, D F

    1991-01-01

    The nature of both indoor air exposures and noncancer end points present significant issues for risk characterization. Noncancer end points are multidimensional, affecting various organs, and are assumed to have thresholds. Symptoms also vary in severity within a population. In addition to the complexity of noncancer risk assessment, indoor air exposures are typified by the presence of complex mixtures, which further complicates the complex nature of noncancer risk characterization. Most noncancer risk assessment efforts have focused on defining acceptable daily intakes or reference doses (RfD) rather than estimating incidence and severity of the wide range of effects within an exposed population. The risk characterization framework has been developed to accommodate the RfD approach but, more importantly, to address the multidimensional nature of noncancer risk characterization. Newly emerging methods and standard EPA risk assessment guidelines for noncancer effects and complex mixtures were used as guides for developing the framework. Information and data needs have been identified from the framework. Peak, average, and cumulative doses from indoor air exposures are highly dependent on variable indoor air concentrations and affected by time-activity patterns. Susceptibility also plays a significant role in noncancer end points and, unlike susceptibility in cancer risk assessment, is quantifiable. This paper highlights the risk characterization framework for noncancer health risks that we developed in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office. Additionally, a preliminary application of the framework to a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds from indoor sources is illustrated. PMID:1821365

  17. [Differences between myofascial trigger points and tender points].

    PubMed

    Mense, S

    2011-02-01

    The article describes and compares the characteristics of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) of the myofascial pain syndrome and the tender points (TePs) of the fibromyalgia syndrome. Many statements are hypothetical, because not all aspects of the disorders have been clarified in solid studies. Signs and symptoms of MTrPs: (1) palpable nodule, often located close to the muscle belly, (2) often single, (3) allodynia and hyperalgesia at the MTrP, (4) referral of the MTrP pain, (5) normal pain sensitivity outside the MTrPs, (6) local twitch response, (7) local contracture in biopsy material, (8) peripheral mechanism probable. Signs and symptoms of TePs: (1) no palpable nodule, (2) location often close to the muscle attachments, (3) multiple by definition, (4) allodynia and hyperalgesia also outside the TePs, (5) enhanced pain under psychic stress, (6) unspecific histological changes in biopsy material, (7) central nervous mechanism probable. The multitude of differences speak against a common aetiology and pathophysiology.

  18. Registration of point cloud data for HDD stamped base inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sungho; Cho, Hansang

    2015-09-01

    As a part of the HDD manufacturing process, HDD stamped base, an exterior container, is one of the most essential components in which various parts become assembled to compose a hard disk drive (HDD). Height errors that are caused by pressing, breaking or cracking can occur on the base, because it is designed by a stamping method. In order to detect the height errors, the inspection process is essential in the production fields. In the current industry, CMM (Coordinate Measurement Machine) is one of the representative machines that inspect certain regions on the product. The machine probes a designated point by an operator and judges the defect by comparing the height of the point to the originally designed height. However, the method takes much time to inspect each designated point resulting in a total of 17 minutes. In order to reduce the total inspection time, we propose an inspection method using 3D point cloud data acquired from a holographic sensor. To compare the height from acquired 3D point cloud data with the one from the originally designed CAD data, the exact point cloud registration is important. There are differences between 2D image registration and 3D point cloud registration, such as translation on each plane, rotation, tilt, and nonlinear transformations. The relationship between the acquired 3D point cloud data and the originally designed CAD data can be obtained by projective transformation. If the projective transformation matrix between the two is obtained, 3D point cloud data registration can be performed. In order to calculate 3D projective transformation matrix, corresponding points between 3D point cloud data and CAD data are required. To find the corresponding points, we use the height map which is projected from 3D point cloud data onto XY plane. The height map has pixel intensity from the height value of each point. If the height maps from 3D point cloud data and CAD data are matched, corresponding points can be estimated. As one of the

  19. 76 FR 28661 - Interim Final Determination To Defer Sanctions, Sacramento Metro 1-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...,'' ``us'' and ``our'' refer to EPA. I. Background On January 5, 2010 (75 FR 232), we published a finding....S.C. 553(d)(1)). Note that today's action has no impact on the January 5, 2010 (75 FR 232) findings... Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), this action is not a ``significant regulatory...

  20. Intact parathormone measurement 1 hour after total thyroidectomy as a predictor of symptomatic hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Kala, Ferhat; Sarici, Inanc Samil; Ulutas, Kemal Turker; Sevim, Yusuf; Dogu, Alper; Sarigoz, Talha; Tastan, Baki; Topuz, Omer; Ertan, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Postoperative iPTH assay may predict significant hypocalcemia after thyroid surgery. The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of iPTH assay to monitor parathyroid function and to identify the risk of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients underwent thyroid surgery. Materials and methods: One hundred patients participated in the study (7 male and 93 female). Hypocalcemia was defined as a serum calcium concentration less than 8.0 mg/dL and symptoms of hypocalcemia. Concomitant serum calcium and iPTH levels were measured before operation and at 1st h for iPTH, 24th h for calcium after thyroidectomy. Results: Postoperative hypocalcemia was observed in 31 patients. The mean postoperative serum calcium concentration in normocalcemic patients was 8.8 ± 0.5 mg/dL, whereas it was 7.6 ± 0.3 mg/dL in hypocalcemic patients. The mean postoperative 1st hour iPTH of patients in the hypocalcemia group was 9.1 ± 4.9 pg/mL, whereas patients of the normocalcemia group had a mean postoperative iPTH of 35.8 ± 20.2 pg/mL. Conclusion: Postoperative 1st hour iPTH < 8 pg/mL with drop in iPTH level ≥ 81.5% together showed the highest diagnostic accuracy in predicting postoperative hypocalcemia. PMID:26770500