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Sample records for 1-leg hop test

  1. Hops

    MedlinePlus

    ... combination of hops, soya oil, soya lecithin, and Cannabis sativa (Cyclamax) for one month. Menopausal symptoms. Early ... by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking hops, talk to ...

  2. Ability of a new hop test to determine functional deficits after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, Jesper; Thomeé, Roland; Karlsson, Jon

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a new hop test to determine functional deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The test consists of a pre-exhaustion exercise protocol combined with a single-leg hop. Nineteen male patients with ACL reconstruction (mean time after operation 11 months) who exhibited normal single-leg hop symmetry values (> or =90% compared with the non-involved extremity) were tested for one-repetition maximum (1 RM) strength of a knee-extension exercise. The patients then performed single-leg hops following a standardised pre-exhaustion exercise protocol, which consisted of unilateral weight machine knee-extensions until failure at 50% of 1 RM. Although no patients displayed abnormal hop symmetry when non-fatigued, 68% of the patients showed abnormal hop symmetry for the fatigued test condition. Sixty-three per cent exhibited 1 RM strength scores of below 90% of the non-involved leg. Eighty-four percent of the patients exhibited abnormal symmetry in at least one of the tests. Our findings indicate that patients are not fully rehabilitated 11 months after ACL reconstruction. It is concluded that the pre-exhaustion exercise protocol, combined with the single-leg hop test, improved testing sensitivity when evaluating lower-extremity function after ACL reconstruction. For a more comprehensive evaluation of lower-extremity function after ACL reconstruction, it is therefore suggested that functional testing should be performed both under non-fatigued and fatigued test conditions.

  3. Single-leg hop testing following fatiguing exercise: reliability and biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, J; Thomeé, R; Lindén, C; Folkesson, M; Tranberg, R; Karlsson, J

    2006-04-01

    A fatiguing exercise protocol was combined with single-leg hop testing to improve the possibilities of evaluating the effects of training or rehabilitation interventions. In the first test-retest experiment, 11 healthy male subjects performed two trials of single-leg hops under three different test conditions: non-fatigued and following fatiguing exercise, which consisted of unilateral weight machine knee extensions at 80% and 50%, respectively, of 1 repetition maximum (1 RM) strength. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.75 to 0.98 for different hop test conditions, indicating that all tests were reliable. For the second experiment, eight healthy male subjects performed the fatiguing exercise protocol to investigate how fatigue influences lower-extremity joint kinematics and kinetics during single-leg hops. Hip, knee and ankle joint angles, moments and powers, as well as ground-reaction forces were recorded with a six-camera, motion-capture system and a force platform. Recovery of hop performance following the fatiguing exercise was also measured. During the take-off for the single-leg hops, hip and knee flexion angles, generated powers for the knee and ankle joints, and ground-reaction forces decreased for the fatigued hop conditions compared with the non-fatigued condition (P<0.05). Compared with landing during the non-fatigued condition, hip moments and ground-reaction forces were lower for the fatigued hop conditions (P<0.05). The negative joint power was two to three times greater for the knee than for the hip and five to 10 times greater for the knee than for the ankle during landing for all test conditions (P<0.05). Most measured variables had recovered three minutes post-exercise. It is concluded that the fatiguing exercise protocol combined with single-leg hop testing was a reliable method for investigating functional performance under fatigued test conditions. Further, subjects utilized an adapted hop strategy, which employed less hip and

  4. Design, testing, and performance of a hybrid micro vehicle---The Hopping Rotochute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Eric W.

    The Hopping Rotochute is a new hybrid micro vehicle that has been developed to robustly explore environments with rough terrain while minimizing energy consumption over long periods of time. The device consists of a small coaxial rotor system housed inside a lightweight cage. The vehicle traverses an area by intermittently powering a small electric motor which drives the rotor system, allowing the vehicle to hop over obstacles of various shapes and sizes. A movable internal mass controls the direction of travel while the egg-like exterior shape and low mass center allows the vehicle to passively reorient itself to an upright attitude when in contact with the ground. This dissertation presents the design, fabrication, and testing of a radio-controlled Hopping Rotochute prototype as well as an analytical study of the flight performance of the device. The conceptual design iterations are first outlined which were driven by the mission and system requirements assigned to the vehicle. The aerodynamic, mechanical, and electrical design of a prototype is then described, based on the final conceptual design, with particular emphasis on the fundamental trades that must be negotiated for this type of hopping vehicle. The fabrication and testing of this prototype is detailed as well as experimental results obtained from a motion capture system. Basic flight performance of the prototype are reported which demonstrates that the Hopping Rotochute satisfies all appointed system requirements. A dynamic model of the Hopping Rotochute is also developed in this thesis and employed to predict the flight performance of the vehicle. The dynamic model includes aerodynamic loads from the body and rotor system as well as a soft contact model to estimate the forces and moments during ground contact. The experimental methods used to estimate the dynamic model parameters are described while comparisons between measured and simulated motion are presented. Good correlation between these motions

  5. Kinematic and electromyographic analysis in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome during single leg triple hop test.

    PubMed

    Kalytczak, Marcelo Martins; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Bley, André Serra; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Politti, Fabiano

    2016-09-01

    Possible delays in pre-activation or deficiencies in the activity of the dynamic muscle stabilizers of the knee and hip joints are the most common causes of the patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The aim of the study was to compare kinematic variables and electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles between patients with PFPS and health subjects during the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT). This study included 14 female with PFPS (PFPS group) and 14 female healthy with no history of knee pain (Healthy group). Kinematic and EMG data ware collected through participants performed a single session of the SLTHT. The PFPS group exhibited a significant increase (p<0.05) in the EMG activity of the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles, when compared with the healthy group in pre-activity and during the stance phase. This same result was also found for the vastus lateralis muscle (p<0.05) when analyzing the EMG activity during the eccentric phase of the stance phase. In kinematic analysis, no significant differences were found between the groups. These results indicate that biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles mainly during the pre-activation phase and stance phases of the SLTHT are more active in PFPS group among healthy group.

  6. Association of the Single-Limb Hop Test With Isokinetic, Kinematic, and Kinetic Asymmetries in Patients After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Xergia, Sofia A.; Pappas, Evangelos; Georgoulis, Anastasios D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asymmetries persist after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Physical performance tests such as the single-limb hop test have been used extensively to assess return-to-sport criteria, as they reproduce dynamic athletic maneuvers. Hypothesis: The single-limb hop is associated with muscle strength and kinematic and kinetic asymmetries in ACLR patients 6 to 9 months after surgery. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two men with ACLR (mean age, 28.8 ± 11.2 years) at 6 to 9 months (mean, 7.01 ± 0.93 months) after surgery completed isokinetic testing in 3 velocities (120, 180, and 300 deg/s) and a kinetic, kinematic, and functional evaluation of the single-limb hop test. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship between the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI) of the single-limb hop distance and each of the outcome variables. Results: There were significant positive correlations between the LSI of the single-limb hop distance and the LSI of the peak extension torque at 120 deg/s (P = 0.044, r = 0.37) and the peak extension torque at 180 deg/s (P = 0.042, r = 0.38) as well as a negative correlation with the peak flexion torque at 180 deg/s (P = 0.043, r = −0.38). The LSI of the single-limb hop test was not correlated with any kinetic or kinematic variable (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present study demonstrate that distance LSI of the single-limb hop test correlates with isokinetic extension peak torque LSI but not kinetic and kinematic asymmetry. Clinical Relevance: The single-limb hop test can be used as an additional tool for the recognition of muscle strength asymmetries but not for kinetic or kinematic asymmetries 6 to 9 months after ACLR. PMID:26131298

  7. Hopping robot

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Martinez, Michael A.; Kuehl, Michael A.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a hopping robot that includes a misfire tolerant linear actuator suitable for long trips, low energy steering and control, reliable low energy righting, miniature low energy fuel control. The present invention provides a robot with hopping mobility, capable of traversing obstacles significant in size relative to the robot and capable of operation on unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides a hopping robot with misfire-tolerant combustion actuation, and with combustion actuation suitable for use in oxygen-poor environments.

  8. Single-legged hop tests as predictors of self-reported knee function in non-operatively treated individuals with ACL injury

    PubMed Central

    Grindem, Hege; Logerstedt, David; Eitzen, Ingrid; Moksnes, Håvard; Axe, Michael J.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Engebretsen, Lars; Risberg, May Arna

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found significant predictors for functional outcome after ACL reconstruction, however, studies examining predictors for functional outcome in non-operatively treated individuals are lacking. Hypothesis Single-legged hop tests predict self-reported knee function (IKDC2000) in non-operatively treated ACL-injured individuals 1 year after baseline testing. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Ninety-one non-operatively treated subjects with an ACL injury were tested using 4 one-legged hop tests on average 74 ± 30 days after injury in a prospective cohort study. Eighty-one subjects (89 %) completed the IKDC2000 1 year later. Subjects with an IKDC2000 score equal to or higher than the age- and gender-specific 15th percentile score from previously published data on an uninjured population were classified as having self-reported function within normal ranges. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of self-reported knee function. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) from Receiver Operating Characteristic curves was used as a measure of discriminative accuracy. Optimal limb symmetry index (LSI) cutoff for the best single-legged hop test was defined as the LSI with the highest product of sensitivity and specificity. Results Single hop for distance symmetry indexes predicted self-reported knee function at the 1-year follow-up (p=0.036). Combinations of any 2 hop tests (AUC=0.64–0.71) did not give a higher discriminative accuracy than the single hop alone (AUC=0.71). A cutoff of 88 % (LSI) for the single hop revealed a sensitivity of 71.4 % and a specificity of 71.7 %. Conclusion The single hop for distance (LSI) significantly predicted self-reported knee function after 1 year in non-operatively treated ACL-injured subjects. Combinations of 2 single-legged hop tests did not lead to higher discriminative accuracy than the single hop alone. PMID:21828364

  9. COMPARISON OF RANGE OF MOTION, STRENGTH, AND HOP TEST PERFORMANCE OF DANCERS WITH AND WITHOUT A CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Carcia, Christopher R.; Christoforetti, John J.; Martin, RobRoy L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Dancers commonly experience anterior hip pain caused by femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) that interrupts training and performance in dance. A paucity of literature exists to guide appropriate evaluation and management of FAI among dancers. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if dancers with clinical signs of FAI have differences in hip range of motion, strength, and hop test performance compared to healthy dancers. Study Design Quasi-experimental, cohort comparison. Methods Fifteen dancers aged between 18- 21 years with clinical signs of FAI that included anterior hip pain and provocative impingement tests were compared to 13 age-matched dancers for passive hip joint range of motion, isometric hip strength, and performance of the medial triple hop, lateral triple hop, and cross-over hop tests. Results No statistically significant differences in range of motion were noted for flexion (Healthy = 145° + 7°; FAI = 147° + 10°; p=0.59), internal rotation (Healthy = 63° + 7°; FAI = 61° + 11°; p=0.50), and external rotation (Healthy = 37° + 9°; FAI = 34° + 12°; p=0.68) between the two groups. Hip extension strength was significantly less in the dancers with FAI (224 + 55 Newtons) compared to the healthy group (293 ± 58 Newtons; F(1,26) = 10.2; p=0.004). No statistically significant differences were noted for flexion, internal rotation, external rotation, abduction, or adduction isometric strength. The medial triple hop test was significantly less in the FAI group (354 ± 43 cm) compared to the healthy group (410 ± 50 cm; F(1,26) = 10.3; p = 0.004). Similar results were observed for the lateral hop test, as the FAI group (294 ± 38 cm) performed worse than the healthy controls (344 ± 54cm; F(1,26) = 7.8; p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between the FAI group (2.7 ± 0.92 seconds) and the healthy

  10. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress. PMID:24830289

  11. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress.

  12. HIP HOP for HIV Awareness: Using Hip Hop Culture to Promote Community-Level HIV Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Mandy J.; Hallmark, Camden J.; McNeese, Marlene; Blue, Nike; Ross, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine the effectiveness of the HIP HOP for HIV Awareness intervention, an innovative model utilising an exchange of an HIV test for a hip hop concert ticket, in a metropolitan city among African American youth and young adults. A subset of intervention participants participated in standardised testing, sex…

  13. Determinants of the abilities to jump higher and shorten the contact time in a running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball.

    PubMed

    Miura, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Zushi, Koji

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain useful information for developing training techniques for the running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball (lay-up shot jump). The ability to perform the lay-up shot jump and various basic jumps was measured by testing 19 male basketball players. The basic jumps consisted of the 1-legged repeated rebound jump, the 2-legged repeated rebound jump, and the countermovement jump. Jumping height, contact time, and jumping index (jumping height/contact time) were measured and calculated using a contact mat/computer system that recorded the contact and air times. The jumping index indicates power. No significant correlation existed between the jumping height and contact time of the lay-up shot jump, the 2 components of the lay-up shot jump index. As a result, jumping height and contact time were found to be mutually independent abilities. The relationships in contact time between the lay-up shot jump to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the 2-legged repeated rebound jump were correlated on the same significance levels (p < 0.05). A significant correlation for jumping height existed between the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the lay-up shot jump (p < 0.05), although none existed for jumping height between the lay-up shot jump and both the 2-legged repeated rebound jump and countermovement jump. The lay-up shot index correlated more strongly to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump index (p < 0.01) when compared to the 2-legged repeated rebound jump index (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the 1-legged repeated rebound jump is effective in improving both contact time and jumping height in the lay-up shot jump.

  14. Wheeled hopping robot

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2010-08-17

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  15. Hop Cultivars and Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pest management decision making in hops varies among cultivars. Historically, the primary objective of hop breeding programs has been to increase the yield or characteristics associated with either bittering (high alpha-acids) or aroma (unique volatile oil profiles) cultivars. Other factors consid...

  16. Hopping Robot with Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Edward; Marzwell, Nevellie; Fuller, Sawyer; Fionni, Paolo; Tretton, Andy; Burdick, Joel; Schell, Steve

    2003-01-01

    A small prototype mobile robot is capable of (1) hopping to move rapidly or avoid obstacles and then (2) moving relatively slowly and precisely on the ground by use of wheels in the manner of previously reported exploratory robots of the "rover" type. This robot is a descendant of a more primitive hopping robot described in "Minimally Actuated Hopping Robot" (NPO- 20911), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 50. There are many potential applications for robots with hopping and wheeled-locomotion (roving) capabilities in diverse fields of endeavor, including agriculture, search-and-rescue operations, general military operations, removal or safe detonation of land mines, inspection, law enforcement, and scientific exploration on Earth and remote planets. The combination of hopping and roving enables this robot to move rapidly over very rugged terrain, to overcome obstacles several times its height, and then to position itself precisely next to a desired target. Before a long hop, the robot aims itself in the desired hopping azimuth and at a desired takeoff angle above horizontal. The robot approaches the target through a series of hops and short driving operations utilizing the steering wheels for precise positioning.

  17. Electron hopping through proteins

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Ener, Maraia E.; Vlček, Antonín; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Biological redox machines require efficient transfer of electrons and holes for function. Reactions involving multiple tunneling steps, termed “hopping,” often promote charge separation within and between proteins that is essential for energy storage and conversion. Here we show how semiclassical electron transfer theory can be extended to include hopping reactions: graphical representations (called hopping maps) of the dependence of calculated two-step reaction rate constants on driving force are employed to account for flow in a rhenium-labeled azurin mutant as well as in two structurally characterized redox enzymes, DNA photolyase and MauG. Analysis of the 35 Å radical propagation in ribonucleotide reductases using hopping maps shows that all tyrosines and tryptophans on the radical pathway likely are involved in function. We suggest that hopping maps can facilitate the design and construction of artificial photosynthetic systems for the production of fuels and other chemicals. PMID:23420049

  18. Mechanisms of hop inhibition: hop ionophores.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2009-07-22

    In this work, the mechanism of hop inhibition toward (beer spoiling) bacteria is revised. The mode of action of iso-alpha-acids was investigated via bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) measurements and growth challenges of hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of uncouplers of class I and II or a H(+)/Mn(2+) exchanger. The antibacterial action of iso-alpha-acids as proton ionophores could be confirmed by the BLM measurements; however, the reported ionophore properties, as electroneutral H(+)/Mn(2+) exchangers, could not be verified. Potentiometric measurements indicated the manganese-dependent enhancement of transmembrane charge permeation. The origin of high membrane potentials in the presence of manganese, as well as the strongly elevated membrane conductivity with concomitant increase in effectiveness of an uncoupler, suggest a different origin of charge transfer under these conditions. The mode of antibacterial action of hop ionophores can be described as proton ionophores of class I/II, which are capable transporting protons within a wide range of pH due to their inherent complexity of chemical composition. However, growth challenges in the presence of both types of ionophore classes in combination with the measured unusual high BLM potentials in the presence of manganese and at low pH indicate an additional mechanism of inhibition by hop compounds. The latter may be due to the nature/properties of hop compounds, which are known to be highly reactive substances. As a consequence, hop resistance of bacteria can be described as multiple resistance to a heterogeneous mixture of compounds comprising different known and yet unknown charge transport mechanisms, which were dependent on several factors, for example, compound concentrations, cation composition, and pH value. Thus, only specialists such as some L. brevis strains, which can cope with unusually low intracellular manganese levels, can survive hop stress. Accordingly, cross

  19. Degradation of hop bitter acids by fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Huszcza, Ewa Bartmanska, Agnieszka; Aniol, Miroslaw; Maczka, Wanda; Zolnierczyk, Anna; Wawrzenczyk, Czeslaw

    2008-07-01

    Nine fungal strains related to: Trametes versicolor, Nigrospora oryzae, Inonotus radiatus, Crumenulopsis sororia, Coryneum betulinum, Cryptosporiopsis radicicola, Fusarium equiseti, Rhodotorula glutinis and Candida parapsilosis were tested for their ability to degrade humulones and lupulones. The best results were obtained for T. versicolor culture, in which humulones and lupulones were fully degraded after 4 days of incubation in the dark or after 36 h in the light. The experiments were performed on a commercial hop extract and on sterilized spent hops.

  20. The lunar hopping transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degner, R.; Kaplan, M. H.; Manning, J.; Meetin, R.; Pasternack, S.; Peterson, S.; Seifert, H.

    1971-01-01

    Research on several aspects of lunar transport using the hopping mode is reported. Hopping exploits the weak lunar gravity, permits fuel economy because of partial recompression of propellant gas on landing, and does not require a continuous smooth surface for operation. Three questions critical to the design of a lunar hopping vehicle are addressed directly in this report: (1) the tolerance of a human pilot for repeated accelerations; (2) means for controlling vehicle attitude during ballistic flight; and (3) means of propulsion. In addition, a small scale terrestrial demonstrator built to confirm feasibility of the proposed operational mode is described, along with results of preliminary study of unmanned hoppers for moon exploration.

  1. Surface Hopping by Consensus.

    PubMed

    Martens, Craig C

    2016-07-01

    We present a new stochastic surface hopping method for modeling molecular dynamics with electronic transitions. The approach, consensus surface hopping (CSH), is a numerical framework for solving the semiclassical limit Liouville equation describing nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces using ensembles of trajectories. In contrast to existing techniques based on propagating independent classical trajectories that undergo stochastic hops between the electronic states, the present method determines the probabilities of transition of each trajectory collectively with input from the entire ensemble. The full coherent dynamics of the coupled system arise naturally at the ensemble level and ad hoc corrections, such as momentum rescaling to impose strict trajectory energy conservation and artificial decoherence to avoid the overcoherence of the quantum states associated with independent trajectories, are avoided. PMID:27345103

  2. GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND CENTER, REDSTONE TEST STAND FOREGROUND RIGHT, SATURN I C TEST STAND BACKGROUND LEFT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. Leg stiffness: comparison between unilateral and bilateral hopping tasks.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Torsten; Sterzing, Thorsten; Wulf, Mathias; Horstmann, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Leg stiffness is a predictor of athletic performance and injury and typically evaluated during bilateral hopping. The contribution of each limb to bilateral leg stiffness, however, is not well understood. This study investigated leg stiffness during unilateral and bilateral hopping to address the following research questions: (1) does the magnitude and variability of leg stiffness differ between dominant and non-dominant legs? (2) Does unilateral leg stiffness differ from bilateral leg stiffness? and (3) Is bilateral leg stiffness determined by unilateral leg stiffness? Thirty-two physically active males performed repeated hopping tests on a force platform for each of the three conditions: bilateral hopping, unilateral hopping on the dominant leg, and unilateral hopping on the non-dominant leg. Leg stiffness was estimated as the ratio of the peak vertical force and the maximum displacement using a simple 1-D mass-spring model. Neither the magnitude nor variability of leg stiffness differed between dominant and non-dominant limbs. Unilateral leg stiffness was 24% lower than bilateral stiffness and showed less variability between consecutive hops and subjects. Unilateral leg stiffness explained 76% of the variance in bilateral leg stiffness. We conclude that leg stiffness estimates during unilateral hopping are preferable for intervention studies because of their low variability. PMID:24290613

  4. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  5. Stability of lower limb minimal perceptible difference in floor height during hopping stretch-shortening cycles.

    PubMed

    Travers, Mervyn J; Debenham, James; Gibson, William; Campbell, Amity; Allison, Garry T

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate a novel proprioceptive test, the minimal perceptible difference (MPD) test, that assessed participants' ability to perceive floor height changes whilst hopping. Sixteen healthy volunteers performed multiple trials of five hops on a custom built sleigh apparatus that permitted a floor height change (range 3 -48 mm) or no change, as dictated by a structured searching algorithm. Minimum detected surface height change was recorded for eight different hopping conditions (factors-technique: alternate/bilateral hopping; side: dominant/non-dominant; direction of change: up/down) over two separate testing occasions. Within day and between day reliability were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and 95% confidence intervals. The only factor which significantly influenced the sensitivity of subjects to detect changes in floor height was the hopping technique (bilateral or alternate). The mean MPD was significantly lower (p < 0.0001) for the bilateral hopping technique (MPDmean = 15.7 mm) when compared to the alternate hopping technique (MPDmean = 26.6 mm). All bilateral hopping techniques yielded moderate to high ICC for within (0.60-0.79) and between day (0.67-0.88) reliability. The results suggest that the bilateral hopping MPD assessment is a reliable, functional assessment of proprioception sensitivity during repeated stretch-shortening cycles that may better reflect human gait than established static assessment. Increased sensitivity to detection during bilateral hopping may reflect strategy dependent utility of proprioceptive information. PMID:24045537

  6. Relationships between Xanthohumol and Polyphenol Content in Hop Leaves and Hop Cones with Regard to Water Supply and Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Čeh, Barbara; Kač, Milica; Košir, Iztok J.; Abram, Veronika

    2007-01-01

    The effect of water supply – especially of drought stress – on the content of some secondary metabolites in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) was studied. The experiment took place in 2006. Some relevant data from 2005 were included for comparison. Leaves and cones of nine hop cultivars grown under field conditions as well as in a pot experiment under three water regimes were analyzed. The cultivars ranged from those most grown in Slovenia to promising crossbreed being tested. Leaves were sampled from July 18, 2006 to August 18, 2006, while cones were picked in the time of technological maturity. Standard analytical methods were applied to determine the contents of xanthohumol, polyphenols and α-acids in hop leaves and hop cones. The contents of the secondary metabolites in question depended more on the cultivar under investigation than on the water supply, at least as far the growing conditions for a relatively normal development of the plant were met.

  7. Star-Hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, Robert A.

    1997-07-01

    Introduction; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. How to use this book and what you are going to see; 2. How the sky works, determining your field of view, observing tips and how to navigate in the night sky; 3. January - Taurus and Orion: the bull and hunter; 4. February - Canis Minor, Canis Major, and Puppis: dog days in February and Jason's Argo; 5. March - Cancer, Leo, and Corvus: a crab, the king of the beasts, and a crow; 6. April - Ursa Major: a dipper round tripper; 7. May - Coma Berenices and Virgo: the sparkling hair of Berenice and the wheat maiden and her bushel of galaxies; 8. June - Libra and Lupus: the balance scales and the wolf; 9. July - Scorpius, Sagittarius, and Scutum: the scorpion, archer, and shield of John Sobieski; 10. August - Draco: following the trail of the dragon; 11. September - Cygnus, Lyra, Vulpecula, and Sagitta: the swan, lyre, fox, and arrow; 12. October - Andromeda and Perseus: the chained lady and her rescuer; 13. November - Cepheus and Cassiopeia: the king and queen of Joppa; 14. December - Pisces, Triangulum, and Aries: of fishes, a triangle, and a ram; 15. Messier Marathon, a sundown to sunup hop across the skies; Appendix A: Classification tables; Appendix B: The constellations; Appendix C: The Greek alphabet; Appendix D: Decimalization of the day; Glossary; Bibliography; Index.

  8. Extreme Kinematics in Selected Hip Hop Dance Sequences.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Woo, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Hip hop dance has many styles including breakdance (breaking), house, popping and locking, funk, streetdance, krumping, Memphis jookin', and voguing. These movements combine the complexity of dance choreography with the challenges of gymnastics and acrobatic movements. Despite high injury rates in hip hop dance, particularly in breakdance, to date there are no published biomechanical studies in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare representative hip hop steps found in breakdance (toprock and breaking) and house and provide descriptive statistics of the angular displacements that occurred in these sequences. Six expert female hip hop dancers performed three choreographed dance sequences, top rock, breaking, and house, to standardized music-based tempos. Hip, knee, and ankle kinematics were collected during sequences that were 18 to 30 sec long. Hip, knee, and ankle three-dimensional peak joint angles were compared in repeated measures ANOVAs with post hoc tests where appropriate (p<0.01). Peak angles of the breaking sequence, which included floorwork, exceeded the other two sequences in the majority of planes and joints. Hip hop maximal joint angles exceeded reported activities of daily living and high injury sports such as gymnastics. Hip hop dancers work at weight-bearing joint end ranges where muscles are at a functional disadvantage. These results may explain why lower extremity injury rates are high in this population. PMID:26395613

  9. Extreme Kinematics in Selected Hip Hop Dance Sequences.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Woo, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Hip hop dance has many styles including breakdance (breaking), house, popping and locking, funk, streetdance, krumping, Memphis jookin', and voguing. These movements combine the complexity of dance choreography with the challenges of gymnastics and acrobatic movements. Despite high injury rates in hip hop dance, particularly in breakdance, to date there are no published biomechanical studies in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare representative hip hop steps found in breakdance (toprock and breaking) and house and provide descriptive statistics of the angular displacements that occurred in these sequences. Six expert female hip hop dancers performed three choreographed dance sequences, top rock, breaking, and house, to standardized music-based tempos. Hip, knee, and ankle kinematics were collected during sequences that were 18 to 30 sec long. Hip, knee, and ankle three-dimensional peak joint angles were compared in repeated measures ANOVAs with post hoc tests where appropriate (p<0.01). Peak angles of the breaking sequence, which included floorwork, exceeded the other two sequences in the majority of planes and joints. Hip hop maximal joint angles exceeded reported activities of daily living and high injury sports such as gymnastics. Hip hop dancers work at weight-bearing joint end ranges where muscles are at a functional disadvantage. These results may explain why lower extremity injury rates are high in this population.

  10. Signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Americo, Tatiana A.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Linden, Rafael . E-mail: rlinden@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-06-29

    The co-chaperone hop/STI-1 is a ligand of the cell surface prion protein (PrP{sup C}), and their interaction leads to signaling and biological effects. Among these, hop/STI-1 induces proliferation of A172 glioblastoma cells, dependent on both PrP{sup C} and activation of the Erk pathway. We tested whether clathrin-mediated endocytosis affects signaling induced by hop/STI-1. Both hyperosmolarity induced by sucrose and monodansyl-cadaverine blocked Erk activity induced by hop/STI-1, without affecting the high basal Akt activity typical of A172. The endocytosis inhibitors also affected the sub-cellular distribution of phosphorylated Erk, consistent with blockade of the latter's activity. The data indicate that signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis. These findings are consistent with a role of sub-cellular trafficking in signal transduction following engagement by PrP{sup C} by ligands such as hop/STI-1, and may help help unravel both the functions of the prion protein, as well as possible loss-of-function components of prion diseases.

  11. ECM resistance in the HF band by use of adaptive reaction and frequency hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, G.; Iselt, P.; Mueller, G.

    1988-12-01

    In shortwave communications, change of frequency either by adaptive reaction or by frequency hopping as a means of protection against jamming must be adapted to the particular transmission characteristics of shortwaves. Adaptive reaction to a new frequency is a technique used for maximizing the throughput and optimizing reliability, and is an Electronic Counter Counter Measure (ECCM) against conventional jamming systems. As a result of the analysis and reaction times of follower jammers, frequency hoppers with 10 to 20 hops/s can provide adequate protection against electronic counter measures (ECM) also in the 90's. In this case, effective error correction techniques are required because of the high proportion of disturbed hop channels. Hopping systems with hop rates of more than 100 or 1000 hops/s are discussed. An HF communication system with adaptive reaction and frequency hopping of up to 20 hops/s is presented. Results are presented of field trials with adaptive reaction and frequency hopping with a dwell time of 160 ms corresponding to 6 hops/s. A test system with reproducible channel characteristics of the HF channel is described.

  12. Optimization of conditions for supercritical fluid extraction of flavonoids from hops (Humulus lupulus L.)*

    PubMed Central

    He, Guo-qing; Xiong, Hao-ping; Chen, Qi-he; Ruan, Hui; Wang, Zhao-yue; Traoré, Lonseny

    2005-01-01

    Waste hops are good sources of flavonoids. Extraction of flavonoids from waste hops (SC-CO2 extracted hops) using supercritical fluids technology was investigated. Various temperatures, pressures and concentrations of ethanol (modifier) and the ratio (w/w) of solvent to material were tested in this study. The results of single factor and orthogonal experiments showed that at 50 °C, 25 MPa, the ratio of solvent to material (50%), ethanol concentration (80%) resulted in maximum extraction yield flavonoids (7.8 mg/g). HPLC-MS analysis of the extracts indicated that flavonoids obtained were xanthohumol, the principal prenylflavonoid in hops. PMID:16187413

  13. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  14. Long range hopping mobility platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a mesoscale hopping mobility platform (Hopper) to overcome the longstanding problems of mobility and power in small scale unmanned vehicles. The system provides mobility in situations such as negotiating tall obstacles and rough terrain that are prohibitive for other small ground base vehicles. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (DARPA) provided the funding for the hopper project.

  15. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  16. Pre-landing wrist muscle activity in hopping toads.

    PubMed

    Ekstrom, Laura J; Gillis, Gary B

    2015-08-01

    Coordinated landing requires preparation. Muscles in the limbs important for decelerating the body should be activated prior to impact so that joints may be stiffened and limbs stabilized during landing. Moreover, because landings vary in impact force and timing, muscle recruitment patterns should be modulated accordingly. In toads, which land using their forelimbs, previous work has demonstrated such modulation in muscles acting at the elbow, but not at the shoulder. In this study, we used electromyography and high-speed video to test the hypothesis that antagonistic muscles acting at the wrists of toads are activated in advance of impact, and that these activation patterns are tuned to the timing and force of impact. We recorded from two wrist extensors: extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and extensor digitorum communis longus (EDCL), and two wrist flexors: flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL). Each muscle was recorded in 4-5 animals (≥15 hops per animal). In all muscles, activation intensity was consistently greatest shortly before impact, suggesting the importance of these muscles during landing. Pre-landing recruitment intensity regularly increased with aerial phase duration (i.e. hop distance) in all muscles except PL. In addition, onset timing in both wrist flexors was also modulated with hop distance, with later onset times being associated with longer hops. Thus, activation patterns in major flexors and extensors of the wrist are tuned to hop distance with respect to recruitment intensity, onset timing or both.

  17. Optimum Detection of Frequency-Hopped Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Unjeng; Levitt, Barry; Polydoros, Andreas; Simon, Marvin K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper derives and analyzes optimum and near-optimum structures for detecting frequency-hopped (FH) signals with arbitrary modulation in additive white Gaussian noise. The principalmodulation formats considered are M-ary frequency-shift-keying (MFSK) with fast frequency hopping(FFH) wherein a single tone is transmitted per hop, and slow frequency hopping (SFH) with multipleMFSK tones (data symbols) per hop. The SFH detection category has not previously been addressedin the open literature and its analysis is generally more complex than FFH.

  18. A novel approach for identification of biologically active phenolic compounds in complex matrices using hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer: A promising tool for testing antimicrobial activity of hops.

    PubMed

    Dušek, Martin; Jandovská, Vladimíra; Čermák, Pavel; Mikyška, Alexandr; Olšovská, Jana

    2016-08-15

    The phenolic compounds, secondary metabolites of hops represent a large family of compounds that could be subsequently divided into smaller groups based on the similarities between their chemical structures. The antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties of hops are well known, but there is a lack of information about antimicrobial activities of individual hop compounds. This study was carried out with an objective to identify compounds present in hops that have potential antibacterial activity. In the first stage of experiment, the active compounds with potential anti-microbial activity had to be extracted from hop cones. Therefore, minced hop cones were applied on solid growth medium inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus. The active substances that migrated into the medium created an inhibition zone. In the second stage of experiment, the inhibition zones were cut out from Petri dishes, active compounds were extracted from these zones and consequently analyzed using LC-HRMS. These complex assays were developed and optimized. The data were acquired by using a quadrupole-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer by targeted-MS2 experiment in both ionization modes. The MS method has been developed as a screening method with a subsequent fragmentation of compound of interest on the base of inclusion mass list. The unknown compounds extracted from inhibition zones have been identified either by searching against a database or their structure has been elucidated on the basis of their fragmentation spectra. On the basis of this experiment the list of active compounds with potential anti-microbial activities was enhanced.

  19. A novel approach for identification of biologically active phenolic compounds in complex matrices using hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer: A promising tool for testing antimicrobial activity of hops.

    PubMed

    Dušek, Martin; Jandovská, Vladimíra; Čermák, Pavel; Mikyška, Alexandr; Olšovská, Jana

    2016-08-15

    The phenolic compounds, secondary metabolites of hops represent a large family of compounds that could be subsequently divided into smaller groups based on the similarities between their chemical structures. The antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties of hops are well known, but there is a lack of information about antimicrobial activities of individual hop compounds. This study was carried out with an objective to identify compounds present in hops that have potential antibacterial activity. In the first stage of experiment, the active compounds with potential anti-microbial activity had to be extracted from hop cones. Therefore, minced hop cones were applied on solid growth medium inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus. The active substances that migrated into the medium created an inhibition zone. In the second stage of experiment, the inhibition zones were cut out from Petri dishes, active compounds were extracted from these zones and consequently analyzed using LC-HRMS. These complex assays were developed and optimized. The data were acquired by using a quadrupole-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer by targeted-MS2 experiment in both ionization modes. The MS method has been developed as a screening method with a subsequent fragmentation of compound of interest on the base of inclusion mass list. The unknown compounds extracted from inhibition zones have been identified either by searching against a database or their structure has been elucidated on the basis of their fragmentation spectra. On the basis of this experiment the list of active compounds with potential anti-microbial activities was enhanced. PMID:27260455

  20. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping.

    PubMed

    Kannas, Theodoros M; Kellis, Eleftherios; Amiridis, Ioannis G

    2011-12-01

    Kannas, TM, Kellis, E, and Amiridis, IG. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3334-3341, 2011-The need for the generation of higher joint power output during performance of dynamic activities led us to investigate the force-length relationship of the plantar flexors during consecutive stretch-shortening cycles of hopping. The hypothesis of this study was that hopping (consecutive jumps with the knee as straight as possible) on an inclined (15°) surface might lead to a better jumping performance compared with hopping on a plane surface (0°). Twelve active men performed 3 sets of 10 consecutive hops on both an incline and plane surface. Ground reaction forces; ankle and knee joint kinematics; electromyographic (EMG) activity from the medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA); and architectural data from the MG were recorded. The results showed that participants jumped significantly higher (p < 0.05) when hopping on an inclined surface (30.32 ± 8.18 cm) compared with hopping on a plane surface (27.52 ± 4.97 cm). No differences in temporal characteristics between the 2 types of jumps were observed. Incline hopping induced significantly greater ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension at takeoff compared with plane hopping (p < 0.05). The fascicle length of the MG was greater at initial contact with the ground during incline hopping (p < 0.05). Moreover, the EMG activities of Sol and TA during the propulsion phase were significantly higher during incline compared with that during plane hopping (p < 0.05). It does not seem unreasonable to suggest that, if the aim of hopping plyometrics is to improve plantar flexor explosivity, incline hopping might be a more effective exercise than hopping on a plane surface.

  1. Resonant Mode-hopping Micromixing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Chao, Shih-Hui; Holl, Mark R; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2007-07-20

    A common micromixer design strategy is to generate interleaved flow topologies to enhance diffusion. However, problems with these designs include complicated structures and dead volumes within the flow fields. We present an active micromixer using a resonating piezoceramic/silicon composite diaphragm to generate acoustic streaming flow topologies. Circulation patterns are observed experimentally and correlate to the resonant mode shapes of the diaphragm. The dead volumes in the flow field are eliminated by rapidly switching from one discrete resonant mode to another (i.e., resonant mode-hop). Mixer performance is characterized by mixing buffer with a fluorescence tracer containing fluorescein. Movies of the mixing process are analyzed by converting fluorescent images to two-dimensional fluorescein concentration distributions. The results demonstrate that mode-hopping operation rapidly homogenized chamber contents, circumventing diffusion-isolated zones. PMID:19551159

  2. Molecular mechanisms of Tetranychus urticae chemical adaptation in hop fields

    PubMed Central

    Piraneo, Tara G.; Bull, Jon; Morales, Mariany A.; Lavine, Laura C.; Walsh, Douglas B.; Zhu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch is a major pest that feeds on >1,100 plant species. Many perennial crops including hop (Humulus lupulus) are routinely plagued by T. urticae infestations. Hop is a specialty crop in Pacific Northwest states, where 99% of all U.S. hops are produced. To suppress T. urticae, growers often apply various acaricides. Unfortunately T. urticae has been documented to quickly develop resistance to these acaricides which directly cause control failures. Here, we investigated resistance ratios and distribution of multiple resistance-associated mutations in field collected T. urticae samples compared with a susceptible population. Our research revealed that a mutation in the cytochrome b gene (G126S) in 35% tested T. urticae populations and a mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (F1538I) in 66.7% populations may contribute resistance to bifenazate and bifenthrin, respectively. No mutations were detected in Glutamate-gated chloride channel subunits tested, suggesting target site insensitivity may not be important in our hop T. urticae resistance to abamectin. However, P450-mediated detoxification was observed and is a putative mechanism for abamectin resistance. Molecular mechanisms of T. urticae chemical adaptation in hopyards is imperative new information that will help growers develop effective and sustainable management strategies. PMID:26621458

  3. Molecular mechanisms of Tetranychus urticae chemical adaptation in hop fields.

    PubMed

    Piraneo, Tara G; Bull, Jon; Morales, Mariany A; Lavine, Laura C; Walsh, Douglas B; Zhu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch is a major pest that feeds on >1,100 plant species. Many perennial crops including hop (Humulus lupulus) are routinely plagued by T. urticae infestations. Hop is a specialty crop in Pacific Northwest states, where 99% of all U.S. hops are produced. To suppress T. urticae, growers often apply various acaricides. Unfortunately T. urticae has been documented to quickly develop resistance to these acaricides which directly cause control failures. Here, we investigated resistance ratios and distribution of multiple resistance-associated mutations in field collected T. urticae samples compared with a susceptible population. Our research revealed that a mutation in the cytochrome b gene (G126S) in 35% tested T. urticae populations and a mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (F1538I) in 66.7% populations may contribute resistance to bifenazate and bifenthrin, respectively. No mutations were detected in Glutamate-gated chloride channel subunits tested, suggesting target site insensitivity may not be important in our hop T. urticae resistance to abamectin. However, P450-mediated detoxification was observed and is a putative mechanism for abamectin resistance. Molecular mechanisms of T. urticae chemical adaptation in hopyards is imperative new information that will help growers develop effective and sustainable management strategies. PMID:26621458

  4. Cover Story: The Miseducation of Hip-Hop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    2000-01-01

    Some higher education officials believe that hip-hop music is eating away at the morals, and ultimately the classroom experience, of today's college students. Discusses why the gap exists between student and faculty attitudes toward hip-hop, how hip-hop music represents blackness, how people perceive hip-hop youth, the positive side of hip-hop,…

  5. Free energy basin-hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland-Cash, K. H.; Wales, D. J.; Chakrabarti, D.

    2015-04-01

    A global optimisation scheme is presented using basin-hopping with the acceptance criterion based on approximate free energy for the corresponding local minima of the potential energy. The method is illustrated for atomic and colloidal clusters and peptides to examine how the predicted global free energy minimum changes with temperature. Using estimates for the local free energies based on harmonic vibrational densities of states provides a computationally effective framework for predicting trends in structure at finite temperature. The resulting scheme represents a powerful tool for exploration of energy landscapes throughout molecular science.

  6. Grand and Semigrand Canonical Basin-Hopping

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce grand and semigrand canonical global optimization approaches using basin-hopping with an acceptance criterion based on the local contribution of each potential energy minimum to the (semi)grand potential. The method is tested using local harmonic vibrational densities of states for atomic clusters as a function of temperature and chemical potential. The predicted global minima switch from dissociated states to clusters for larger values of the chemical potential and lower temperatures, in agreement with the predictions of a model fitted to heat capacity data for selected clusters. Semigrand canonical optimization allows us to identify particularly stable compositions in multicomponent nanoalloys as a function of increasing temperature, whereas the grand canonical potential can produce a useful survey of favorable structures as a byproduct of the global optimization search. PMID:26669731

  7. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  8. Standardization of Weed Pollen Extracts, Japanese Hop and Mugwort, in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Choi, Soo-Young; Park, Kyung Hee; Park, Hye Jung; Hong, Chein-Soo; Lee, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Japanese hop (Humulus spp.) and mugwort (Artemisia spp.) are notable causes of autumn pollinosis in East Asia. However, Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts, which are widely used for the diagnosis, have not been standardized. This study was performed to standardize Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts. Materials and Methods Allergen extracts were prepared in a standardized way using locally collected Humulus japonicus and purchased Artemisia vulgaris pollens. The immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivities of prepared extracts were compared with commercial extracts via IgE immunoblotting and inhibition analyses. Intradermal skin tests were performed to determine the bioequivalent allergy unit (BAU). Results The IgE reactive components of the extracts via IgE immunoblotting were similar to those of commercial extracts. A 11-kDa allergen showed the strongest IgE reactivity in Japanese hop, as did a 28-kDa allergen in mugwort pollen extracts. Allergenic potencies of the investigatory Japanese hop and mugwort extracts were essentially indistinguishable from the commercial ones. Sums of erythema of 50 mm by the intradermal skin test (ΣED50) were calculated to be 14.4th and 13.6th three-fold dilutions for Japanese hop and mugwort extracts, respectively. Therefore, the allergenic activity of the prepared extracts was 90827.4 BAU/mg for Japanese hop and 34412 BAU/mg for mugwort. Conclusion We produced Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts using a standardized method. Standardized Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts will facilitate the production of improved diagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents. PMID:26847293

  9. Characterization of a Highly Hop-Resistant Lactobacillus brevis Strain Lacking Hop Transport

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Gänzle, Michael G.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to hops is a prerequisite for lactic acid bacteria to spoil beer. In this study we analyzed mechanisms of hop resistance of Lactobacillus brevis at the metabolism, membrane physiology, and cell wall composition levels. The beer-spoiling organism L. brevis TMW 1.465 was adapted to high concentrations of hop compounds and compared to a nonadapted strain. Upon adaptation to hops the metabolism changed to minimize ethanol stress. Fructose was used predominantly as a carbon source by the nonadapted strain but served as an electron acceptor upon adaptation to hops, with concomitant formation of acetate instead of ethanol. Furthermore, hop adaptation resulted in higher levels of lipoteichoic acids (LTA) incorporated into the cell wall and altered composition and fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The putative transport protein HitA and enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway were overexpressed upon hop adaptation. HorA was not expressed, and the transport of hop compounds from the membrane to the extracellular space did not account for increased resistance to hops upon adaptation. Accordingly, hop resistance is a multifactorial dynamic property, which can develop during adaptation. During hop adaptation, arginine catabolism contributes to energy and generation of the proton motive force until a small fraction of the population has established structural improvements. This acquired hop resistance is energy independent and involves an altered cell wall composition. LTA shields the organism from accompanying stresses and provides a reservoir of divalent cations, which are otherwise scarce as a result of their complexation by hop acids. Some of the mechanisms involved in hop resistance overlap with mechanisms of pH resistance and ethanol tolerance and as a result enable beer spoilage by L. brevis. PMID:17021196

  10. Membrane-Bound ATPase Contributes to Hop Resistance of Lactobacillus brevis

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kanta; van Veen, H. W.; Saito, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Konings, Wil N.

    2002-01-01

    The activity of the membrane-bound H+-ATPase of the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus brevis ABBC45 increased upon adaptation to bacteriostatic hop compounds. The ATPase activity was optimal around pH 5.6 and increased up to fourfold when L. brevis was exposed to 666 μM hop compounds. The extent of activation depended on the concentration of hop compounds and was maximal at the highest concentration tested. The ATPase activity was strongly inhibited by N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a known inhibitor of FoF1-ATPase. Western blots of membrane proteins of L. brevis with antisera raised against the α- and β-subunits of FoF1-ATPase from Enterococcus hirae showed that there was increased expression of the ATPase after hop adaptation. The expression levels, as well as the ATPase activity, decreased to the initial nonadapted levels when the hop-adapted cells were cultured further without hop compounds. These observations strongly indicate that proton pumping by the membrane-bound ATPase contributes considerably to the resistance of L. brevis to hop compounds. PMID:12406727

  11. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT).

    PubMed

    Howard, E L; Whittock, S P; Jakše, J; Carling, J; Matthews, P D; Probasco, G; Henning, J A; Darby, P; Cerenak, A; Javornik, B; Kilian, A; Koutoulis, A

    2011-05-01

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. However, use of molecular marker technology is limited due to expense, time inefficiency, laborious methodology and dependence on DNA sequence information. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of quality polymorphic markers without reliance on DNA sequence information. This study is the first to utilise DArT for hop genotyping, identifying 730 polymorphic markers from 92 hop accessions. The marker quality was high and similar to the quality of DArT markers previously generated for other species; although percentage polymorphism and polymorphism information content (PIC) were lower than in previous studies deploying other marker systems in hop. Genetic relationships in hop illustrated by DArT in this study coincide with knowledge generated using alternate methods. Several statistical analyses separated the hop accessions into genetically differentiated North American and European groupings, with hybrids between the two groups clearly distinguishable. Levels of genetic diversity were similar in the North American and European groups, but higher in the hybrid group. The markers produced from this time and cost-efficient genotyping tool will be a valuable resource for numerous applications in hop breeding and genetics studies, such as mapping, marker-assisted selection, genetic identity testing, guidance in the maintenance of genetic diversity and the directed breeding of superior cultivars. PMID:21243330

  12. The effects of beta acids from hops (Humulus lupulus L.)on mortality of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta acids from hop plants (Humulus lupulus L.) reduce feeding and oviposition behaviors and increase mortality in certain phytophagous mites. These compounds were tested for their effects on Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman) mortality. The effects of hops beta acids (HBA) on honey bee (Apis ...

  13. Improved sampling and validation of frozen Gaussian approximation with surface hopping algorithm for nonadiabatic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhou, Zhennan

    2016-09-01

    In the spirit of the fewest switches surface hopping, the frozen Gaussian approximation with surface hopping (FGA-SH) method samples a path integral representation of the non-adiabatic dynamics in the semiclassical regime. An improved sampling scheme is developed in this work for FGA-SH based on birth and death branching processes. The algorithm is validated for the standard test examples of non-adiabatic dynamics.

  14. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  15. Single switch surface hopping for a model of pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Caroline; Swart, Torben

    2008-07-01

    The single switch trajectory surface hopping algorithm is tested for numerical simulations of a two-state three-mode model for the internal conversion of pyrazine through a conical intersection of potential energy surfaces. The algorithm is compared to two other surface hopping approaches, namely, Tully's method of the fewest switches [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)] and the method by Voronin et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 6057 (1998)]. The single switch algorithm achieves the most accurate results. Replacing its deterministic nonadiabatic branching condition by a probabilistic accept-reject criterion, one obtains the method of Voronin et al. without momentum adjustment. This probabilistic version of the single switch approach outperforms the considered algorithms in terms of accuracy, memory requirement, and runtime.

  16. Dielectric relaxation and hopping conduction in reduced graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guidan; Yu, Ji; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2016-06-01

    Graphite oxide reduced by sodium borohydride was characterised and its electrical conduction investigated with impedance spectroscopy. Thermal dependence of electrical modulus (instead of permittivity, its inverse) was calculated from complex impedance spectra, an approach that prevents any peak in dielectric loss (imaginary component) from being swarmed by large dc conductivity. Two loss peaks appeared at each tested frequency, in a sample of either degree of reduction. The set of weaker peak should arise from the relaxation of some polar bonds, as proposed earlier by us. The stronger loss peaks may correspond to the hopping of conduction electrons; variable range hopping is also consistent with the observed thermal dependence of conductivity. However, nearer ambient temperature there is a change in mechanism, to band transport, with an activation energy of fairly similar values as derived from both loss peaks and conductivity.

  17. Hopping conduction via ionic liquid induced silicon surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Reich, K. V.; Sammon, M.; Shklovskii, B. I.; Goldman, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    In order to clarify the physics of the gating of solids by ionic liquids (ILs) we have gated lightly doped p -Si, which is so well studied that it can be called the "hydrogen atom of solid state physics" and can be used as a test bed for ionic liquids. We explore the case where the concentration of induced holes at the Si surface is below 1012cm-2 , hundreds of times smaller than record values. We find that in this case an excess negative ion binds a hole on the interface between the IL and Si becoming a surface acceptor. We study the surface conductance of holes hopping between such nearest neighbor acceptors. Analyzing the acceptor concentration dependence of this conductivity, we find that the localization length of a hole is in reasonable agreement with our direct variational calculation of its binding energy. The observed hopping conductivity resembles that of well studied Na+ implanted Si MOSFETs.

  18. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) extract inhibits obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet over the long term.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-14

    Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are traditionally used to add bitterness and flavour to beer. Although the isomerised hop extracts produced by the brewing process have been thought to ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism, the influence of untreated hop extracts on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is unclear. The present study examined the anti-obesity effects of a hop extract in male C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet, or HF diet plus 2 or 5 % hop extract for 20 weeks. The oral glucose tolerance test was performed at week 19. Furthermore, water excretion was evaluated in water-loaded Balb/c male mice. The effects of the extract on lipid accumulation and PPARγ expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes were examined. The hop extract inhibited the increase in body and adipose tissue weight, adipose cell diameter and liver lipids induced by the HF diet. Furthermore, it improved glucose intolerance. The extract enhanced water excretion in water-loaded mice. Various fractions of the hop extract inhibited lipid accumulation and PPARγ expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hop extracts might be useful for preventing obesity and glucose intolerance caused by a HF diet.

  19. Identification of sex in hop (Humulus lupulus) using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Polley, A; Ganal, M W; Seigner, E

    1997-06-01

    The rapid identification of sex in the dioecious hop (Humulus lupulus) is important for the breeding of this cultivated plant because only unfertilized flowers of the female plants are used as an ingredient in the production of beer. It is thought that a sex-chromosome mechanism controls the development of male or female plants. We have compared pools of male and female plants derived from a hop cross to identify molecular markers associated with the Y or male-specific chromosome. Of 900 functional RAPD primers, 32 revealed fragments specific for male plants that were absent in female plants of this cross. Subsequently, the 32 positive primers were tested on unrelated male and female plants. Three of these 32 primers were specific for the Y chromosome in all lines. The Y-specific product derived from one of these primers (OPJ9) was of low copy in hybridization experiments and predominantly present in male plants. Primers developed from the DNA sequence of this product provide a marker for rapid sex identification in crosses of hop by means of PCR. PMID:18464833

  20. The 1963 Hip-Hop Machine: Hip-Hop Pedagogy as Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an alternative invention strategy for research-based argumentative writing. Investigates the coincidental usage of the term "whatever" in hip-hop, theory, and composition studies. Presents a "whatever-pedagogy" identified as "hip-hop pedagogy," a writing practice that models itself after digital sampling's rhetorical strategy of…

  1. Landau-Zener type surface hopping algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2014-06-01

    A class of surface hopping algorithms is studied comparing two recent Landau-Zener (LZ) formulas for the probability of nonadiabatic transitions. One of the formulas requires a diabatic representation of the potential matrix while the other one depends only on the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. For each classical trajectory, the nonadiabatic transitions take place only when the surface gap attains a local minimum. Numerical experiments are performed with deterministically branching trajectories and with probabilistic surface hopping. The deterministic and the probabilistic approach confirm the affinity of both the LZ probabilities, as well as the good approximation of the reference solution computed by solving the Schrödinger equation via a grid based pseudo-spectral method. Visualizations of position expectations and superimposed surface hopping trajectories with reference position densities illustrate the effective dynamics of the investigated algorithms.

  2. Leg stiffness adjustment during hopping at different intensities and frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mrdakovic, Vladimir; Ilic, Dusko; Vulovic, Radun; Matic, Milan; Jankovic, Nenad; Filipovic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Understanding leg and joint stiffness adjustment during maximum hopping may provide important information for developing more effective training methods. It has been reported that ankle stiffness has major influence on stable spring-mass dynamics during submaximal hopping, and that knee stiffness is a major determinant for hopping performance during maximal hopping task. Furthermore, there are no reports on how the height of the previous hop could affect overall stiffness modulation of the subsequent maximum one. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether and how the jump height of the previous hop affects leg and joint stiffness for subsequent maximum hop. Ten participants completed trials in which they repeatedly hopped as high as possible (MX task) and trials in which they were instructed to perform several maximum hops with 3 preferred (optimal) height hops between each of them (P3MX task). Both hopping tasks were performed at 2.2 Hz hopping frequency and at the participant's preferred (freely chosen) frequency as well. By comparing results of those hopping tasks, we found that ankle stiffness at 2.2 Hz ( p = 0.041) and knee stiffness at preferred frequency ( p = 0.045) was significantly greater for MX versus P3MX tasks. Leg stiffness for 2.2 Hz hopping is greater than for the preferred frequency. Ankle stiffness is greater for 2.2 Hz than for preferred frequencies; opposite stands for knee stiffness. The results of this study suggest that preparatory hop height can be considered as an important factor for modulation of maximum hop. PMID:25308379

  3. HPLC Analysis of [Alpha]- and [Beta]-Acids in Hops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danenhower, Travis M.; Force, Leyna J.; Petersen, Kenneth J.; Betts, Thomas A.; Baker, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    Hops have been used for centuries to impart aroma and bitterness to beer. The cones of the female hop plant contain both essential oils, which include many of the fragrant components of hops, and a collection of compounds known as [alpha]- and [beta]-acids that are the precursors to bittering agents. In order for brewers to predict the ultimate…

  4. Genomics of the hop psuedo-autosomal regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop is one of the few crop species with female and male plants with sex being determined by either XX or XY chromosomes. Hop cones are only produced in female hops with or without fertilization. This has lead to most genomic research being directed toward female plants. Very little work has been don...

  5. Hip-Hopping across China: Intercultural Formulations of Local Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Catrice

    2012-01-01

    The linguistic dimensions of globalized hip-hop cannot be understood simply as a byproduct of English as an American export. As hip-hop mobilizes, it is common (and arguably necessary) for global hip-hop communities to struggle through purposeful, semiotically rooted dialectics over what constitutes "authentic" and respectable forms of local…

  6. Revolutionizing Environmental Education through Indigenous Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorlewski, Julie; Porfilio, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    Based upon the life histories of six Indigenous hip hop artists of the Beat Nation artist collective, this essay captures how Indigenous hip hop has the potential to revolutionize environmental education. Hip hop provides Indigenous youth an emancipatory space to raise their opposition to neocolonial controls of Indigenous territories that…

  7. Injury incidence in hip hop dance.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, S; Bronner, S; Woo, H

    2012-06-01

    Hip hop dance has rapidly become a popular international art form. There is limited information on injury patterns in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine injury incidence and patterns among three groups of hip hop dancers. Three hundred and twelve intermediate, advanced, and expert hip hop dancers were recruited at battles, dance conferences, clubs, and on dance related web sites within the United States and internationally. A Web-based survey was conducted over a 6-month period. Inclusion criteria included intermediate and advanced level dancers over the age of 13. Dancers were divided into three main categories: Breakers, Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Separate analysis of variances were used to compare injury pattern differences between groups. Two hundred and thirty-two dancers reported a total of 738 injuries. Five hundred and six of these (sustained by 205 dancers) were time-loss (TL) injuries. Annual injury incidence was 237% (162% involving TL). Lower extremity injuries were 52% and upper extremity injuries 32% of total injuries. Breakers had a higher injury incidence compared with Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Hip hop dancers report injury rates that are higher than other dance forms but similar to gymnastics. These dancers should be educated concerning injury prevention, biomechanics, and use of protective equipment.

  8. Communication: Fully coherent quantum state hopping.

    PubMed

    Martens, Craig C

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, we describe a new and fully coherent stochastic surface hopping method for simulating mixed quantum-classical systems. We illustrate the approach on the simple but unforgiving problem of quantum evolution of a two-state quantum system in the limit of unperturbed pure state dynamics and for dissipative evolution in the presence of both stationary and nonstationary random environments. We formulate our approach in the Liouville representation and describe the density matrix elements by ensembles of trajectories. Population dynamics are represented by stochastic surface hops for trajectories representing diagonal density matrix elements. These are combined with an unconventional coherent stochastic hopping algorithm for trajectories representing off-diagonal quantum coherences. The latter generalizes the binary (0,1) "probability" of a trajectory to be associated with a given state to allow integers that can be negative or greater than unity in magnitude. Unlike existing surface hopping methods, the dynamics of the ensembles are fully entangled, correctly capturing the coherent and nonlocal structure of quantum mechanics.

  9. Multimodal Hip Hop Productions as Media Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat

    2012-01-01

    This study draws on ethnographic data from a year-long multimodal media production (MMP) course and the experience of an African American female adolescent who used the production of multimodal Hip Hop texts to express her creativity and growing socially conscious view of the world. The study demonstrates how students made meaning multimodally and…

  10. The Philippine "Hip Hop Stick Dance"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a dance that blends the traditional cultural heritage of the Philippines with modern music and moves. "Hip Hop Stick Dance" incorporates Tinikling (the Philippine national dance) and Arnis (a Filipino style of martial arts) to create a contemporary combination of rhythm, dance, and fitness. It was designed to introduce…

  11. The Rap on Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekarski, Bill

    2004-01-01

    From its humble origins some 30 years ago in New York's bombed-out, poverty-ravaged South Bronx, hip-hop has risen to become a dominant cultural force both here and abroad. Strictly defined, the term refers to the entire cultural constellation that accompanies rap music, which in 2001 surpassed country music as the most popular musical genre in…

  12. Communication: Fully coherent quantum state hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Craig C.

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, we describe a new and fully coherent stochastic surface hopping method for simulating mixed quantum-classical systems. We illustrate the approach on the simple but unforgiving problem of quantum evolution of a two-state quantum system in the limit of unperturbed pure state dynamics and for dissipative evolution in the presence of both stationary and nonstationary random environments. We formulate our approach in the Liouville representation and describe the density matrix elements by ensembles of trajectories. Population dynamics are represented by stochastic surface hops for trajectories representing diagonal density matrix elements. These are combined with an unconventional coherent stochastic hopping algorithm for trajectories representing off-diagonal quantum coherences. The latter generalizes the binary (0,1) “probability” of a trajectory to be associated with a given state to allow integers that can be negative or greater than unity in magnitude. Unlike existing surface hopping methods, the dynamics of the ensembles are fully entangled, correctly capturing the coherent and nonlocal structure of quantum mechanics.

  13. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 enzymes by hops (Humulus lupulus) and hop prenylphenols

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Dejan; Chen, Shao-Nong; Huang, Ke; Li, Guannan; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    As hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used in the brewing of beer and by menopausal women as estrogenic dietary supplements, the potential for hop extracts and hop constituents to cause drug-botanical interactions by inhibiting human cytochrome P450 enzymes was investigated. Inhibition of major human cytochrome P450 enzymes by a standardized hop extract and isolated hop prenylated phenols was evaluated using a fast and efficient assay based on ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The hop extract at 5 μg/mL inhibited CYP2C8 (93%), CYP2C9 (88%), CYP2C19 (70%), and CYP1A2 (27%) with IC50 values of 0.8, 0.9, 3.3, and 9.4 μg/mL, respectively, but time-dependent inactivation was observed only for CYP1A2. Isoxanthohumol from hops was the most potent inhibitor of CYP2C8 with an IC50 of 0.2 μM, whereas 8-prenylnaringenin was the most potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 with IC50 values of 1.1 μM, 1.1 μM and 0.4 μM, respectively. Extracts of hops contain prenylated compounds such as the flavanones isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin and the chalcone xanthohumol that can inhibit CYP450s, especially the CYP2C family, which may affect the efficacy and safety of some CYP2C substrate drugs when co-administered. PMID:24342125

  14. Featherless Dinosaurs and the Hip-Hop Simulacrum: Reconsidering Hip-Hop's Appropriateness for the Music Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    This article offers considerations for music teachers interested in including hip-hop music in their classrooms but who might feel concerned with or overwhelmed by issues of appropriateness. Two concerns related to hip-hop music are examined: language and negative social themes. Commercial interests in hip-hop music have created a simulacrum (or…

  15. The Formation of "Hip-Hop Academicus"--How American Scholars Talk about the Academisation of Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Social activism and education have been associated with hip-hop since it emerged in New York City 38 years ago. Therefore, it might not be surprising that universities have become interested in hip-hop. This article aims to highlight this "hip-hop academisation" and analyse the discursive mechanisms that manifest in these academisation…

  16. The extract from hop cones (Humulus lupulus) as a modulator of oxidative stress in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Jędrejek, Dariusz; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    The plant Humulus lupulus is known as the raw material of the brewing industry. Hop cones, rich in polyphenolic compounds and acyl phloroglucides, are widely used to preserve beer and to give it a characteristic aroma and flavor. Hop cones have long been used for medicinal purposes. In particular, hop preparations were mainly recommended for the treatment of sleeping disorders. The antioxidative action of hop cones, however, is poorly understood. The aim of our present study was to investigate in vitro changes in human blood platelets induced by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-), the compound of particular importance for vascular thrombosis and inflammatory process) in the presence of hop cone extract (Humulus lupulus). The antioxidative action of the extract was also compared with the properties of a well-characterized antioxidative commercial monomeric polyphenol, resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) in a model system in vitro. Various biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress, such as carbonyl groups, 3-nitrotyrosine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were estimated. The 3-nitrotyrosine formation and carbonyl group generation was assessed by the use of a competition ELISA test and ELISA test, respectively. Tested plant extract (12.5-50 µg/ml), like resveratrol, significantly inhibited protein carbonylation and nitration in the blood platelets treated with ONOO(-) (0.1 mM). The extract from hop cones, like resveratrol, also caused a distinct reduction of platelet lipid peroxidation induced by ONOO(-). The present results indicate that the hope cone extract has in vitro protective effects against ONOO(-), such as induced oxidative/nitrative damage to the human platelet proteins and lipids. However, in comparative studies the extract was not found to be a more effective antioxidant than the solution of pure resveratrol.

  17. Long-Term Oral Administration of Hop Flower Extracts Mitigates Alzheimer Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaoka, Norio; Sakamoto, Megumi; Kanemori, Shoko; Kan, Michiru; Tsukano, Chihiro; Takemoto, Yoshiji; Kakizuka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Coincident with the expanding population of aged people, the incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is rapidly increasing in most advanced countries. At present, no effective prophylactics are available. Among several pathological mechanisms proposed for AD, the “amyloid hypothesis” has been most widely accepted, in which accumulation or deposition of Aβ is considered to be the initial event. Thus, prevention of Aβ production would be an ideal strategy for the treatment or prevention of AD. Aβ is produced via the proteolytic cleavage of its precursor protein, APP (amyloid precursor protein), by two different enzymes, β and γ-secretases. Indeed, inhibitors against either or both enzymes have been developed and tested for clinical efficacy. Based on the “amyloid hypothesis”, we developed a luciferase-based screening method to monitor γ-secretase activity, screened more than 1,600 plant extracts, most of which have long been used in Chinese medicine, and observed that Hop extracts significantly inhibit Aβ production in cultured cells. A major component of the inhibitory activity was purified, and its chemical identity was determined by NMR to be Garcinielliptone HC. In vivo, oral administration of Hop extracts to AD model mice decreased Aβ depositions in the cerebral cortex of the parietal lobe, hippocampus, and artery walls (amyloid angiopathy) in the brains. In a Morris water maze test, AD model mice that had daily consumed Hop extracts in their drinking water showed significant mitigation of memory impairment at ages of 9 and 12 months. Moreover, in the open field test oral administration of Hop extracts also prevented an emotional disturbance that appeared in the AD mice at 18 months. Despite lifelong consumption of Hop extracts, no deleterious side effects were observed at any age. These results support the “amyloid hypothesis”, and indicate that Hop extract is a promising candidate for an effective prophylactic for AD. PMID:24489866

  18. Time synchronization of a frequency-hopped MFSK communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.; Polydoros, A.; Huth, G. K.

    1981-01-01

    In a frequency-hopped (FH) multiple-frequency-shift-keyed (MFSK) communication system, frequency hopping causes the necessary frequency transitions for time synchronization estimation rather than the data sequence as in the conventional (nonfrequency-hopped) system. Making use of this observation, this paper presents a fine synchronization (i.e., time errors of less than a hop duration) technique for estimation of FH timing. The performance degradation due to imperfect FH time synchronization is found in terms of the effect on bit error probability as a function of full-band or partial-band noise jamming levels and of the number of hops used in the FH timing estimate.

  19. New polymorphic dinucleotide and trinucleotide microsatellite loci for hop Humulus lupulus L.

    PubMed

    Jakse, J; Luthar, Z; Javornik, B

    2008-07-01

    One hundred and thirty-five microsatellite markers were developed for hop Humulus lupulus L. from di- and trinucleotide-enriched libraries. Seventy-eight primers showed amplification in two tested genotypes. Twenty-four loci were further characterized on a population of 34 hop samples and the number of alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity ranged from two to 20 (9.7 on average), from 0.0294 to 0.9412 (0.6234 on average) and from 0.0294 to 0.9170 (0.6720 on average), respectively. These microsatellite markers will be further used for studying population structures and relationships and for identifying important qualitative and quantitative loci of hop. PMID:21585887

  20. Phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms in polymer nanofiber network

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jeng-Ting; Lu, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Shiau-Bin; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Yeh, Jui-Ming

    2015-12-07

    Network formation by nanofiber crosslinking is usually in polymer materials as application in organic semiconductor devices. Electron hopping transport mechanisms depend on polymer morphology in network. Conducting polymers morphology in a random network structure is modeled by a quasi-one-dimensional system coupled of chains or fibers. We observe the varying hopping conduction mechanisms in the polyaniline nanofibers of the random network structure. The average diameter d of the nanofibers is varied from approximately 10 to 100 nm. The different dominant hopping mechanisms including Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping (VRH), Mott VRH, and nearest-neighbor hopping are dependent on temperature range and d in crossover changes. The result of this study is first presented in a phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms based on the theories of the random network model. The hopping conduction mechanism is unlike in normal semiconductor materials.

  1. Phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms in polymer nanofiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jeng-Ting; Lu, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Shiau-Bin; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Yeh, Jui-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Network formation by nanofiber crosslinking is usually in polymer materials as application in organic semiconductor devices. Electron hopping transport mechanisms depend on polymer morphology in network. Conducting polymers morphology in a random network structure is modeled by a quasi-one-dimensional system coupled of chains or fibers. We observe the varying hopping conduction mechanisms in the polyaniline nanofibers of the random network structure. The average diameter d of the nanofibers is varied from approximately 10 to 100 nm. The different dominant hopping mechanisms including Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping (VRH), Mott VRH, and nearest-neighbor hopping are dependent on temperature range and d in crossover changes. The result of this study is first presented in a phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms based on the theories of the random network model. The hopping conduction mechanism is unlike in normal semiconductor materials.

  2. Pre- and post-infection activity of fungicides in control of hop downy mildew

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimum timing and use of fungicides for disease control are improved by an understanding of the characteristics of fungicide physical mode of action, although this information is lacking for hop downy mildew. Control of downy mildew on leaves was similar among fungicides tested when applied prevent...

  3. An Efficient Next Hop Selection Algorithm for Multi-Hop Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahitafti, Vahid; Ngadi, Md Asri; Mohamad Sharif, Johan bin; Abdullahi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Body Area Networks (BANs) consist of various sensors which gather patient’s vital signs and deliver them to doctors. One of the most significant challenges faced, is the design of an energy-efficient next hop selection algorithm to satisfy Quality of Service (QoS) requirements for different healthcare applications. In this paper, a novel efficient next hop selection algorithm is proposed in multi-hop BANs. This algorithm uses the minimum hop count and a link cost function jointly in each node to choose the best next hop node. The link cost function includes the residual energy, free buffer size, and the link reliability of the neighboring nodes, which is used to balance the energy consumption and to satisfy QoS requirements in terms of end to end delay and reliability. Extensive simulation experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm using the NS-2 simulator. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm provides significant improvement in terms of energy consumption, number of packets forwarded, end to end delay and packet delivery ratio compared to the existing routing protocol. PMID:26771586

  4. Metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids.

    PubMed

    Cattoor, Ko; Dresel, Michael; De Bock, Lies; Boussery, Koen; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Keukeleire, Denis; Deforce, Dieter; Hofmann, Thomas; Heyerick, Arne

    2013-08-21

    In this study, in vitro metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids was investigated. Besides their well-known use as bitter compounds in beer, in several studies, bioactive properties have been related to these types of molecules. However, scientific data on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion aspects of these compounds are limited. More specific, in this study, α-acids, β-acids, and iso-α-acids were incubated with rabbit microsomes, and fractions were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for identification of oxidative biotransformation products. Metabolism of β-acids was mainly characterized by conversion into hulupones and the formation of a series of tricyclic oxygenated products. The most important metabolites of α-acids were identified as humulinones and hulupones. Iso-α-acids were found to be primarly metabolized into cis- and trans-humulinic acids, next to oxidized alloiso-α-acids. Interestingly, the phase I metabolites were highly similar to the oxidative degradation products in beer. These findings show a first insight into the metabolites of hop-derived bitter acids and could have important practical implications in the bioavailability aspects of these compounds, following ingestion of hop-based food products and nutraceuticals.

  5. Communication: Global flux surface hopping in Liouville space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linjun; Sifain, Andrew E.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed substantial progress in the surface hopping (SH) formulation of non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. A generalization of the traditional fewest switches SH (FSSH), global flux SH (GFSH) utilizes the gross population flow between states to derive SH probabilities. The Liouville space formulation of FSSH puts state populations and coherences on equal footing, by shifting the hopping dynamics from Hilbert to Liouville space. Both ideas have shown superior results relative to the standard FSSH in Hilbert space, which has been the most popular approach over the past two and a half decades. By merging the two ideas, we develop GFSH in Liouville space. The new method is nearly as straightforward as the standard FSSH, and carries comparable computational expense. Tested with a representative super-exchange model, it gives the best performance among all existing techniques in the FSSH series. The obtained numerical results match almost perfectly the exact quantum mechanical solutions. Moreover, the results are nearly invariant under the choice of a basis state representation for SH, in contrast to the earlier techniques which exhibit notable basis set dependence. Unique to the developed approach, this property is particularly encouraging, because exact quantum dynamics is representation independent. GFSH in Liouville space significantly improves accuracy and applicability of SH for a broad range of chemical and physical processes.

  6. Communication: Global flux surface hopping in Liouville space

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linjun E-mail: prezhdo@usc.edu; Prezhdo, Oleg V. E-mail: prezhdo@usc.edu; Sifain, Andrew E.

    2015-11-21

    Recent years have witnessed substantial progress in the surface hopping (SH) formulation of non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. A generalization of the traditional fewest switches SH (FSSH), global flux SH (GFSH) utilizes the gross population flow between states to derive SH probabilities. The Liouville space formulation of FSSH puts state populations and coherences on equal footing, by shifting the hopping dynamics from Hilbert to Liouville space. Both ideas have shown superior results relative to the standard FSSH in Hilbert space, which has been the most popular approach over the past two and a half decades. By merging the two ideas, we develop GFSH in Liouville space. The new method is nearly as straightforward as the standard FSSH, and carries comparable computational expense. Tested with a representative super-exchange model, it gives the best performance among all existing techniques in the FSSH series. The obtained numerical results match almost perfectly the exact quantum mechanical solutions. Moreover, the results are nearly invariant under the choice of a basis state representation for SH, in contrast to the earlier techniques which exhibit notable basis set dependence. Unique to the developed approach, this property is particularly encouraging, because exact quantum dynamics is representation independent. GFSH in Liouville space significantly improves accuracy and applicability of SH for a broad range of chemical and physical processes.

  7. Mechanisms of Hop Inhibition Include the Transmembrane Redox Reaction▿

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under “highly reducing” conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and “antioxidative” hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of

  8. Mechanisms of hop inhibition include the transmembrane redox reaction.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under "highly reducing" conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and "antioxidative" hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of hop

  9. Localization in one-dimensional lattices with non-nearest-neighbor hopping: Generalized Anderson and Aubry-André models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, J.; Priour, D. J., Jr.; Wang, B.; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-02-01

    We study the quantum localization phenomena of noninteracting particles in one-dimensional lattices based on tight-binding models with various forms of hopping terms beyond the nearest neighbor, which are generalizations of the famous Aubry-André and noninteracting Anderson models. For the case with deterministic disordered potential induced by a secondary incommensurate lattice (i.e., the Aubry-André model), we identify a class of self-dual models, for which the boundary between localized and extended eigenstates are determined analytically by employing a generalized Aubry-André transformation. We also numerically investigate the localization properties of nondual models with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, Gaussian, and power-law decay hopping terms. We find that even for these nondual models, the numerically obtained mobility edges can be well approximated by the analytically obtained condition for localization transition in the self-dual models, as long as the decay of the hopping rate with respect to distance is sufficiently fast. For the disordered potential with genuinely random character, we examine scenarios with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, exponential, Gaussian, and power-law decay hopping terms numerically. We find that the higher-order hopping terms can remove the symmetry in the localization length about the energy band center compared to the Anderson model. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that for the power-law decay case, there exists a critical exponent below which mobility edges can be found. Our theoretical results could, in principle, be directly tested in shallow atomic optical lattice systems enabling non-nearest-neighbor hopping.

  10. Rethinking Pedagogy in Urban Spaces: Implementing Hip-Hop Pedagogy in the Urban Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjapong, Edmund S.; Emdin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of research regarding Hip-Hop Based Education (HHBE) fails to provide insight on how to incorporate elements of Hip-Hop into daily teaching practices; rather Hip-Hop based educators focus mainly on incorporating Hip-Hop culture into curricula. This study explores the benefits of using two specific Hip-Hop pedagogical practices…

  11. Multiphonon hopping of carriers in CuO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serin, T.; Yildiz, A.; Şahin, Ş. H.; Serin, N.

    2011-10-01

    We have performed a detailed study of the electrical conduction process in CuO thin films deposited by the sol-gel dip coating technique in a temperature range 280-420 K. The electrical conduction is analyzed within the framework of various hopping conduction models. Multiphonon hopping conduction mechanism is found to dominate the electrical transport in the entire temperature region. Our results are consistent with this model of hopping conduction mechanisms with weak carrier-lattice coupling.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Prenylated Hop Phenols in Women Following Oral Administration of a Standardized Extract of Hops

    PubMed Central

    van Breemen, Richard B.; Yuan, Yang; Banuvar, Suzanne; Shulman, Lee P.; Qiu, Xi; Alvarenga, René F. Ramos; Chen, Shao-Nong; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Krause, Elizabeth; Viana, Marlos; Nikolic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    SCOPE Women seeking alternatives to hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms often try botanical dietary supplements containing extracts of hops (Humulus lupulus L.). Hops contain 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), a potent phytoestrogen, the related flavanones 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) and isoxanthohumol (IX), and the prenylated chalcone xanthohumol (XN). METHODS AND RESULTS After chemically and biologically standardizing an extract of spent hops to these marker compounds, an escalating dose study was carried out in menopausal women to evaluate safety and pharmacokinetics. 8-PN, 6-PN, IX, and XN, sex hormones, and prothrombin time (PT/INR) were determined in blood samples and/or 24-h urine samples. There was no effect on sex hormones or blood clotting. The maximum serum concentrations of the prenylated phenols were dose-dependent and were reached from 2 to 7 h, indicating slow absorption. The marker compounds formed glucuronides that were found in serum and urine. Secondary peaks at 5 h in the serum concentration-time curves indicated enterohepatic recirculation. The serum concentration-time curves indicated demethylation of IX to form 8-PN and cyclization of XN to IX. Slow absorption and enterohepatic recirculation contributed to half-lives exceeding 20 h. CONCLUSION This human study indicated long half-lives of the estrogenic and proestrogenic prenylated phenols in hops but no acute toxicity. PMID:25045111

  13. Hip-Hop Is the Healer: Sense of Belonging and Diversity among Hip-Hop Collegians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulé, V. Thandi

    2016-01-01

    Sense of belonging is recognized as a factor contributing to persistence to graduation. Furthermore, interactional diversity is associated with learning and civic outcomes--touted higher education goals. Hip-hop culture, one of the most influential cultural creations of the mid-20th century, has succeeded in attracting devotees from diverse…

  14. Analysis of the Trajectory Surface Hopping Method from the Markov State Model Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, Alexey V.; Trivedi, Dhara; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the applicability of the seminal fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) method of Tully to modeling quantum transitions between electronic states that are not coupled directly, in the processes such as Auger recombination. We address the known deficiency of the method to describe such transitions by introducing an alternative definition for the surface hopping probabilities, as derived from the Markov state model perspective. We show that the resulting transition probabilities simplify to the quantum state populations derived from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, reducing to the rapidly switching surface hopping approach of Tully and Preston. The resulting surface hopping scheme is simple and appeals to the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. The computational approach is similar to the FSSH method of Tully, yet it leads to a notably different performance. We demonstrate that the method is particularly accurate when applied to superexchange modeling. We further show improved accuracy of the method, when applied to one of the standard test problems. Finally, we adapt the derived scheme to atomistic simulation, combine it with the time-domain density functional theory, and show that it provides the Auger energy transfer timescales which are in good agreement with experiment, significantly improving upon other considered techniques.

  15. Collision-based mechanics of bipedal hopping.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Anne K; Lee, David V; McGowan, Craig P

    2013-08-23

    The muscle work required to sustain steady-speed locomotion depends largely upon the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass and the degree to which this energy can be stored and returned elastically. Previous studies have found that large bipedal hoppers can elastically store and return a large fraction of the energy required to hop, whereas small bipedal hoppers can only elastically store and return a relatively small fraction. Here, we consider the extent to which large and small bipedal hoppers (tammar wallabies, approx. 7 kg, and desert kangaroo rats, approx. 0.1 kg) reduce the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass by reducing collisions. We hypothesize that kangaroo rats will reduce collisions to a greater extent than wallabies since kangaroo rats cannot elastically store and return as high a fraction of the mechanical energy of hopping as wallabies. We find that kangaroo rats use a significantly smaller collision angle than wallabies by employing ground reaction force vectors that are more vertical and center of mass velocity vectors that are more horizontal and thereby reduce their mechanical cost of transport. A collision-based approach paired with tendon morphometry may reveal this effect more generally among bipedal runners and quadrupedal trotters.

  16. Christian Hip Hop as Pedagogy: A South African Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on interviews with creators of Christian hip hop music in South Africa, this article demonstrates that this genre of popular music and youth culture is utilised as a form of pedagogy to transmit religious beliefs and values to contemporary youth. The pedagogical aspects of hip hop have been recognised in research on the topic, but the…

  17. [Hopping and superexchange mechanisms of charge transport to DNA].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2003-01-01

    A theory for charge transport in nucleobase sequences was constructed in which the hole migration proceeds via hopping between guanines. Each hop over the adenine-thymine (A-T) bridge connecting neighboring guanines occurs by means of the superexchange mechanism. The experimental data and theoretical results for various types of nucleobase sequences are compared.

  18. Being Hip-Hop: Beyond Skills and Songs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I offer four principles relevant to hip-hop cultures (keep it real, flip the script, make some noise, and stay fresh) and explore how these principles might affect music classrooms. I argue that a music classroom that works to keep it real, flip the script, make some noise, and stay fresh might go beyond teaching hip-hop skills…

  19. Optimum Detection Of Slow-Frequency-Hopping Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, Barry K.; Cheng, Unjeng

    1994-01-01

    Two papers present theoretical analyses of various schemes for coherent and noncoherent detection of M-ary-frequency-shift-keyed (MFSK) signals with slow frequency hopping. Special attention focused on continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) subset of SFH/MFSK signals, for which frequency modulation such carrier phase remains continuous (albeit unknown) during each hop.

  20. Hop powdery mildew control through alteration of spring pruning practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1997, Podosphaera macularis, the causal agent of hop powdery mildew, has become a recurrent threat to hops in the Pacific Northwest because of the potential to reduce cone yield and quality. Disease management practices often involve preventative fungicide applications, but alternative approac...

  1. The Merits of Multi-Hop Communication in Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, J.

    2000-01-01

    The physics of communication give an advantage to multi-hop systems, because the ratio of power received to power transmitted on a telecommunications link over a fixed distance S increases by a factor of n(sup 2) if the link is divided in to n equal hops of length S/n.

  2. Towards a Pedagogy of Hip Hop in Urban Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Thurman

    2011-01-01

    This article draws from a qualitative study often Black male K-12 teachers from the Hip Hop Generation who are closely connected to Hip Hop culture and have been effective in addressing the academic and social needs of Black boys. Through an analysis of their social, educational and cultural experiences, this article highlights three organizing…

  3. Hip Hop as Empowerment: Voices in El Alto, Bolivia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarifa, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    In response to neoliberal policies that have been in place since 1985, Bolivian young people have increasingly used hip hop music as a means of protest and to reclaim social and political participation. Hip hop in Latin America tells the story of the struggles that marginalized people have suffered, and speaks to the effects of international…

  4. Hip Hop Is Now: An Evolving Youth Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carl; Taylor, Virgil

    2007-01-01

    Emerging from Rap music, Hip Hop has become a lifestyle to many modern youth around the world. Embodying both creativity and controversy, Hip Hop mirrors the values, violence, and hypocrisy of modern culture. The authors dispel some of the simplistic views that surround this evolving youth movement embraced by millions of young people who are…

  5. Framing Hip Hop: New Methodologies for New Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the central impulse behind early advocacy for ethnographic approaches to hip hop--that critics should try as much as possible to limit their own certainties around what hip hop can and might mean. While ethnographic approaches can engender the kinds of personal dislocations that allow for this negotiation, they do not…

  6. Chicano Hip-Hop as Interethnic Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Pancho

    2008-01-01

    The critical study of rap music and hip-hop culture has the potential to expand Americans understanding of race and culture in the United States. Hip-hop culture as a multiracial, multiethnic phenomenon reveals the ways in which race relations over the past thirty years have become increasingly complex. The theories and concepts that they use to…

  7. Toward Hip-Hop Pedagogies for Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Music education scholarship in the areas of popular, vernacular, and participatory musicianship has grown in the past decades; however, music education research concerned specifically with hip-hop has been relatively scarce. Because hip-hop music can differ tremendously from the traditional western genres with which many music educators are most…

  8. Hip-Hop, the "Obama Effect," and Urban Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher; Lee, Okhee

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: With the ever increasing diversity of schools, and the persistent need to develop teaching strategies for the students who attend today's urban schools, hip-hop culture has been proposed to be a means through which urban youth can find success in school. As a result, studies of the role of hip-hop in urban education have grown…

  9. Framing and Reviewing Hip-Hop Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop has become relevant to the field of education because of its implications for understanding language, learning, identity, curriculum, and other areas. This integrative review provides historical context and cohesion for the burgeoning and discursive body of hip-hop scholarship by framing it according to three heuristic categories and…

  10. Transport of hop aroma compounds across Caco-2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, A; Metzger, M; Walles, H; Buettner, A

    2014-11-01

    Although being reported and used as a sedative remedy for several years, the bioactive principle of hop preparations is still not decisively clarified. Understanding absorption and transformation processes of potential physiologically active constituents is essential to evaluate the likeliness of biological effects on humans. Therefore, single hop aroma compounds as well as digestive transformation products thereof have been investigated in view of their human intestinal absorption, applying Caco-2 transport experiments as well as investigations on potential biotransformation processes. Selective and sensitive identification and quantification were thereby achieved by application of two-dimensional high resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in conjunction with stable isotope dilution analysis, leading to the determination of apparent permeability values by different mathematical approaches considering sink and non-sink conditions. Overall, calculated permeability values ranged from 2.6 × 10(-6) to 1.8 × 10(-4) cm s(-1) with all mathematical approaches, indicating high absorption potential and almost complete bioavailability for all tested compounds with hydroxyl-functionalities. Considering this high permeability together with the high lipophilicity of these substances, a passive transcellular uptake route can be speculated. Investigated sesquiterpenes and β-myrcene showed flat absorption profiles while the investigated esters showed decreasing profiles. In view of the lipophilic and volatile nature of the investigated substances, special attention was paid to recovery and mass balance determination. Furthermore, in the course of the transport experiments of 1-octen-3-ol and 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, additional biotransformation products were observed, namely 3-octanone and 3-methyl-2-butenal, respectively. The absence of these additional substances in control experiments strongly indicates an intestinal first-pass metabolism of the

  11. Hip Hop Culture's OGs: A Narrative Inquiry into the Intersection of Hip Hop Culture, Black Males and Their Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Ian P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a critical race lens, this narrative study employs a focus group design to explore the intersections between black males, hip hop culture and schooling experiences. To provide a sociocultural grounding, this study first reviews the research literature around hip hop culture.s sociocultural development and its impact as a culture force that…

  12. Hip-Hop Is My Passport! Using Hip-Hop and Digital Literacies to Understand Global Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Akesha Monique

    2013-01-01

    Hip-hop has exploded around the world among youth. It is not simply an American source of entertainment; it is a global cultural movement that provides a voice for youth worldwide who have not been able to express their "cultural world" through mainstream media. The emerging field of critical hip-hop pedagogy has produced little…

  13. Real-time on-board airborne demonstration of high-speed on-board data processing for science instruments (HOPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Ng, Tak-Kwong; Davis, Mitchell J.; Adams, James K.; Bowen, Stephen C.; Fay, James J.; Hutchinson, Mark A.

    2015-05-01

    The project called High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS) has been funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program since April, 2012. The HOPS team recently completed two flight campaigns during the summer of 2014 on two different aircrafts with two different science instruments. The first flight campaign was in July, 2014 based at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in Hampton, VA on the NASA's HU-25 aircraft. The science instrument that flew with HOPS was Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) funded by NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). The second campaign was in August, 2014 based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) in Palmdale, CA on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft. HOPS flew with the Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) instrument developed by Excelis Inc. The goal of the campaigns was to perform an end-to-end demonstration of the capabilities of the HOPS prototype system (HOPS COTS) while running the most computationally intensive part of the ASCENDS algorithm real-time on-board. The comparison of the two flight campaigns and the results of the functionality tests of the HOPS COTS are presented in this paper.

  14. Real-Time On-Board Airborne Demonstration of High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Ng, Tak-Kwong; Davis, Mitchell J.; Adams, James K.; Bowen, Stephen C.; Fay, James J.; Hutchinson, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The project called High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS) has been funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program since April, 2012. The HOPS team recently completed two flight campaigns during the summer of 2014 on two different aircrafts with two different science instruments. The first flight campaign was in July, 2014 based at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in Hampton, VA on the NASA's HU-25 aircraft. The science instrument that flew with HOPS was Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) funded by NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). The second campaign was in August, 2014 based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) in Palmdale, CA on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft. HOPS flew with the Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) instrument developed by Excelis Inc. The goal of the campaigns was to perform an end-to-end demonstration of the capabilities of the HOPS prototype system (HOPS COTS) while running the most computationally intensive part of the ASCENDS algorithm real-time on-board. The comparison of the two flight campaigns and the results of the functionality tests of the HOPS COTS are presented in this paper.

  15. Communication devices for network-hopping communications and methods of network-hopping communications

    DOEpatents

    Buttles, John W.

    2011-12-20

    Wireless communication devices include a software-defined radio coupled to processing circuitry. The processing circuitry is configured to execute computer programming code. Storage media is coupled to the processing circuitry and includes computer programming code configured to cause the processing circuitry to configure and reconfigure the software-defined radio to operate on each of a plurality of communication networks according to a selected sequence. Methods for communicating with a wireless device and methods of wireless network-hopping are also disclosed.

  16. Communication devices for network-hopping communications and methods of network-hopping communications

    DOEpatents

    Buttles, John W

    2013-04-23

    Wireless communication devices include a software-defined radio coupled to processing circuitry. The system controller is configured to execute computer programming code. Storage media is coupled to the system controller and includes computer programming code configured to cause the system controller to configure and reconfigure the software-defined radio to operate on each of a plurality of communication networks according to a selected sequence. Methods for communicating with a wireless device and methods of wireless network-hopping are also disclosed.

  17. Capturing dynamic cation hopping in cubic pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks Hinojosa, Beverly; Asthagiri, Aravind; Nino, Juan C.

    2011-08-01

    In direct contrast to recent reports, density functional theory predicts that the most stable structure of Bi2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is a cubic Fd3¯m space group by accounting for atomic displacements. The displaced Bi occupies the 96g(x,x,z) Wyckoff position with six equivalent sites, which create multiple local minima. Using nudged elastic band method, the transition states of Bi cation hopping between equivalent minima were investigated and an energy barrier between 0.11 and 0.21 eV was determined. Energy barriers associated with the motion of Bi between equivalent sites within the 96g Wyckoff position suggest the presence of dielectric relaxation in Bi2Ti2O7.

  18. Hierarchical Observing Protocol (HOP) for Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowell, E.; Koehn, B. W.; Wasserman, L. H.; Muinonen, K.

    1997-07-01

    From the standpoint of orbit improvement, we seek to answer two questions: (1) When is it best or necessary to make astrometric observations of a given asteroid? (2) Which are the best asteroids to observe at a given time? Answering these questions allows one to address a third: (3) How should we best marshal and optimize the use of limited resources in making astrometric observations of asteroids? Such issues are increasing in importance as the number of observers and astrometric data mushroom. We have developed two tools necessary for implementing HOP: (1) Observability of a chosen asteroid over a chosen time interval (consult the WWW at http://asteroid.lowell.edu/cgi-bin/koehn/obs), and (2) Observing strategy required to achieve the numbering of a chosen asteroid (http://asteroid.lowell.edu/cgi-bin/koehn/obsstrat). We find that four ``rules of thumb" can be used as precepts for HOP: The first concerns the numberability of asteroids, the second the rate of increase of ephemeris uncertainty of newly discovered asteroids, the third adduces that the improvement in an asteroid's orbit is proportional to the improvement in its ephemeris uncertainty that results from making an accurate observation, and the fourth states that peaks in ephemeris uncertainty generally occur near opposition. We give examples of the use of .../obs and .../obstrat, which indicate that, during the discovery apparition, observations are needed at time intervals that increase geometrically (generally, by a factor of 3 to 5), and subsequently that one or two nights' observation per apparition suffice for an asteroid to be numbered after two or three apparitions (NEAs), three or four apparitions (MBAs), or six or more apparitions (transneptunians). We plan to create a web site for observers to make ranked lists of astrometric targets for their own locations/instrumentation, and we show how observations can be coordinated so as to assure that important targets are observed in a timely manner and

  19. Isoxanthohumol--Biologically active hop flavonoid.

    PubMed

    Żołnierczyk, Anna Katarzyna; Mączka, Wanda Krystyna; Grabarczyk, Małgorzata; Wińska, Katarzyna; Woźniak, Edyta; Anioł, Mirosław

    2015-06-01

    Isoxanthohumol (IXN), apart from xanthohumol (XN) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN), is one of the most important prenylflavonoids found in hops. Another natural source of this compound is a shrub Sophora flavescens, used in traditional Chinese medicine. Main dietary source of IXN is beer, and the compound is produced from XN during wort boiling. In the human body, the compound is O-demethylated to 8PN, the strongest known phytoestrogen. This process takes place in the liver and in the intestine, where it is mediated by local microflora. It has been reported in some studies that even though beer contains small amounts of hops and its preparations, these compounds may affect the functioning of the human body. IXN exhibits an antiproliferative activity against human cell lines typical for breast cancer (MCF-7), ovarian cancer (A-2780), prostate cancer (DU145 and PC-3), and colon cancer (HT-29 and SW620) cells. It strongly inhibits the activation of the following carcinogens: 2-amino-3-methylimidazol-[4,5-f]quinoline and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) via human cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2). It also inhibits the production of prostate specific antigen (PSA). IXN significantly reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the case of invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It interferes with JAK/STAT signaling pathway and inhibits the expression of pro1inflammatory genes in the monoblastic leukemia cell line (MonoMac6). It activates apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). In addition, IXN shows an antiviral activity towards herpes viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). PMID:25771121

  20. Power-Hop: A Pervasive Observation for Real Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Papalexakis, Evangelos; Hooi, Bryan; Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Faloutsos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks have been shown to exhibit universal properties, with one of the most consistent patterns being the scale-free degree distribution, but are there regularities obeyed by the r-hop neighborhood in real networks? We answer this question by identifying another power-law pattern that describes the relationship between the fractions of node pairs C(r) within r hops and the hop count r. This scale-free distribution is pervasive and describes a large variety of networks, ranging from social and urban to technological and biological networks. In particular, inspired by the definition of the fractal correlation dimension D2 on a point-set, we consider the hop-count r to be the underlying distance metric between two vertices of the network, and we examine the scaling of C(r) with r. We find that this relationship follows a power-law in real networks within the range 2 ≤ r ≤ d, where d is the effective diameter of the network, that is, the 90-th percentile distance. We term this relationship as power-hop and the corresponding power-law exponent as power-hop exponent h. We provide theoretical justification for this pattern under successful existing network models, while we analyze a large set of real and synthetic network datasets and we show the pervasiveness of the power-hop. PMID:26974560

  1. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  2. Power-Hop: A Pervasive Observation for Real Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Papalexakis, Evangelos; Hooi, Bryan; Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Faloutsos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks have been shown to exhibit universal properties, with one of the most consistent patterns being the scale-free degree distribution, but are there regularities obeyed by the r-hop neighborhood in real networks? We answer this question by identifying another power-law pattern that describes the relationship between the fractions of node pairs C(r) within r hops and the hop count r. This scale-free distribution is pervasive and describes a large variety of networks, ranging from social and urban to technological and biological networks. In particular, inspired by the definition of the fractal correlation dimension D2 on a point-set, we consider the hop-count r to be the underlying distance metric between two vertices of the network, and we examine the scaling of C(r) with r. We find that this relationship follows a power-law in real networks within the range 2 ≤ r ≤ d, where d is the effective diameter of the network, that is, the 90-th percentile distance. We term this relationship as power-hop and the corresponding power-law exponent as power-hop exponent h. We provide theoretical justification for this pattern under successful existing network models, while we analyze a large set of real and synthetic network datasets and we show the pervasiveness of the power-hop. PMID:26974560

  3. Scaffold hopping in drug discovery using inductive logic programming.

    PubMed

    Tsunoyama, Kazuhisa; Amini, Ata; Sternberg, Michael J E; Muggleton, Stephen H

    2008-05-01

    In chemoinformatics, searching for compounds which are structurally diverse and share a biological activity is called scaffold hopping. Scaffold hopping is important since it can be used to obtain alternative structures when the compound under development has unexpected side-effects. Pharmaceutical companies use scaffold hopping when they wish to circumvent prior patents for targets of interest. We propose a new method for scaffold hopping using inductive logic programming (ILP). ILP uses the observed spatial relationships between pharmacophore types in pretested active and inactive compounds and learns human-readable rules describing the diverse structures of active compounds. The ILP-based scaffold hopping method is compared to two previous algorithms (chemically advanced template search, CATS, and CATS3D) on 10 data sets with diverse scaffolds. The comparison shows that the ILP-based method is significantly better than random selection while the other two algorithms are not. In addition, the ILP-based method retrieves new active scaffolds which were not found by CATS and CATS3D. The results show that the ILP-based method is at least as good as the other methods in this study. ILP produces human-readable rules, which makes it possible to identify the three-dimensional features that lead to scaffold hopping. A minor variant of a rule learnt by ILP for scaffold hopping was subsequently found to cover an inhibitor identified by an independent study. This provides a successful result in a blind trial of the effectiveness of ILP to generate rules for scaffold hopping. We conclude that ILP provides a valuable new approach for scaffold hopping.

  4. Let Me Blow Your Mind: Hip Hop Feminist Futures in Theory and Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Treva B.

    2015-01-01

    This essay brings together key theoretical interventions in hip-hop feminism to explore the continued, but undervalued, significance of hip-hop feminism in urban education. More specifically, the essay challenges narrow conceptualizations of the "hip hop subject" as Black and male by using hip-hop feminist theory to incorporate the lived…

  5. QoS over Real-Time Wireless Multi-hop Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicignano, Domenico; Tardioli, Danilo; Villarroel, José Luis

    This paper proposes a way to incorporate multimedia traffic in a real-time wireless communication network without jeopardizing the hard real-time traffic. This idea has been implemented and analyzed as an extension of the real-time multi-hop protocol (RT-WMP), a novel protocol that supports hard real-time traffic in relatively small ad-hoc networks. The protocol allows merging the real-time traffic coming from cooperative multitask robot teams and human communication such as video and voice. The quality of service (QoS) extension takes advantage of the bandwidth left free by the RT-WMP when it is not working in the worst-case situation. Real tests involving multi-robot data exchange and multimedia communication show that the extension can be perfectly integrated in the protocol and offers a suitable QoS transmission mechanism for real-time multi-hop networks.

  6. Correlated barrier hopping of CuO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshy, Jiji; Soosen, Samuel. M.; Chandran, Anoop; George, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ac conduction mechanism in copper oxide nanoparticles with 8 nm size, synthesized by a precipitation method was studied by analyzing ac conductivity in the frequency range of 50 Hz-1 MHz and in the temperature range of 373-573 K. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed for the structural and morphological characterization of CuO nanoparticles. The experimental and theoretical investigations suggested that the ac conduction mechanism in CuO nanoparticles can be successfully explained by a correlated barrier hopping model, which provided reasonable values for the maximum barrier height and characteristic relaxation time. It was also found that bipolaron hopping become prominent up to a particular temperature and beyond that single polaron hopping predominates. Physical parameters such as hopping distance and density of defect states were also calculated. Photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of a surface defect in CuO nanoparticles.

  7. 59. View of lined canal east of bellmouth near hop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. View of lined canal east of bellmouth near hop barn, looking southwest. Photo by Robin Lee Tedder, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  8. Understanding the Surface Hopping View of Electronic Transitions and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Jain, Amber; Landry, Brian; Petit, Andrew; Ouyang, Wenjun; Bellonzi, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    We present a current, up-to-date review of the surface hopping methodology for solving nonadiabatic problems, 25 years after Tully published the fewest switches surface hopping algorithm. After reviewing the original motivation for and failures of the algorithm, we give a detailed examination of modern advances, focusing on both theoretical and practical issues. We highlight how one can partially derive surface hopping from the Schrödinger equation in the adiabatic basis, how one can change basis within the surface hopping algorithm, and how one should understand and apply the notions of decoherence and wavepacket bifurcation. The question of time reversibility and detailed balance is also examined at length. Recent applications to photoexcited conjugated polymers are discussed briefly.

  9. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling.

  10. Single switch surface hopping for molecular dynamics with transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermanian Kammerer, Clotilde; Lasser, Caroline

    2008-04-01

    A trajectory surface hopping algorithm is proposed, which stems from a mathematically rigorous analysis of propagation through conical intersections of potential energy surfaces. Since nonadiabatic transitions are only performed when a classical trajectory attains one of its local minimal surface gaps, the algorithm is called single switch surface hopping. Numerical experiments for a two mode Jahn-Teller system are presented, which illustrate the asymptotic justification of the method as well as its good performance in the physically relevant parameter range.

  11. Proton hopping: a proposed mechanism for myelinated axon nerve impulses.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Myelinated axon nerve impulses travel 100 times more rapidly than impulses in non-myelinated axons. Increased speed is currently believed to be due to 'hopping' or 'saltatory propagation' along the axon, but the mechanism by which impulses flow has never been adequately explained. We have used modeling approaches to simulate a role for proton hopping in the space between the plasma membrane and myelin sheath as the mechanism of nerve action-potential flow.

  12. Leg exoskeleton reduces the metabolic cost of human hopping.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Alena M; Herr, Hugh M

    2009-09-01

    During bouncing gaits such as hopping and running, leg muscles generate force to enable elastic energy storage and return primarily from tendons and, thus, demand metabolic energy. In an effort to reduce metabolic demand, we designed two elastic leg exoskeletons that act in parallel with the wearer's legs; one exoskeleton consisted of a multiple leaf (MLE) and the other of a single leaf (SLE) set of fiberglass springs. We hypothesized that hoppers, hopping on both legs, would adjust their leg stiffness while wearing an exoskeleton so that the combination of the hopper and exoskeleton would behave as a linear spring-mass system with the same total stiffness as during normal hopping. We also hypothesized that decreased leg force generation while wearing an exoskeleton would reduce the metabolic power required for hopping. Nine subjects hopped in place at 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, and 2.6 Hz with and without an exoskeleton while we measured ground reaction forces, exoskeletal compression, and metabolic rates. While wearing an exoskeleton, hoppers adjusted their leg stiffness to maintain linear spring-mass mechanics and a total stiffness similar to normal hopping. Without accounting for the added weight of each exoskeleton, wearing the MLE reduced net metabolic power by an average of 6% and wearing the SLE reduced net metabolic power by an average of 24% compared with hopping normally at frequencies between 2.0 and 2.6 Hz. Thus, when hoppers used external parallel springs, they likely decreased the mechanical work performed by the legs and substantially reduced metabolic demand compared with hopping without wearing an exoskeleton.

  13. Gold Binding by Native and Chemically Modified Hops Biomasses

    DOE PAGES

    López, M. Laura; Gardea-Torresdey, J. L.; Peralta-Videa, J. R.; de la Rosa, G.; Armendáriz, V.; Herrera, I.; Troiani, H.; Henning, J.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy metals from mining, smelting operations and other industrial processing facilities pollute wastewaters worldwide. Extraction of metals from industrial effluents has been widely studied due to the economic advantages and the relative ease of technical implementation. Consequently, the search for new and improved methodologies for the recovery of gold has increased. In this particular research, the use of cone hops biomass ( Humulus lupulus ) was investigated as a new option for gold recovery. The results showed that the gold binding to native hops biomass was pH dependent from pH 2 to pH 6, with a maximum percentage bindingmore » at pH 3. Time dependency studies demonstrated that Au(III) binding to native and modified cone hops biomasses was found to be time independent at pH 2 while at pH 5, it was time dependent. Capacity experiments demonstrated that at pH 2, esterified hops biomass bound 33.4 mg Au/g of biomass, while native and hydrolyzed hops biomasses bound 28.2 and 12.0 mg Au/g of biomass, respectively. However, at pH 5 the binding capacities were 38.9, 37.8 and 11.4 mg of Au per gram of native, esterified and hydrolyzed hops biomasses, respectively.« less

  14. The Hip-Hop club scene: Gender, grinding and sex.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Weinstein, Hannah; Parker, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Hip-Hop culture is a key social medium through which many young men and women from communities of colour in the USA construct their gender. In this study, we focused on the Hip-Hop club scene in New York City with the intention of unpacking narratives of gender dynamics from the perspective of young men and women, and how these relate to their sexual experiences. We conducted a three-year ethnographic study that included ethnographic observations of Hip-Hop clubs and their social scene, and in-depth interviews with young men and young women aged 15-21. This paper describes how young people negotiate gender relations on the dance floor of Hip-Hop clubs. The Hip-Hop club scene represents a context or setting where young men's masculinities are contested by the social environment, where women challenge hypermasculine privilege and where young people can set the stage for what happens next in their sexual and emotional interactions. Hip-Hop culture therefore provides a window into the gender and sexual scripts of many urban minority youth. A fuller understanding of these patterns can offer key insights into the social construction of sexual risk, as well as the possibilities for sexual health promotion, among young people in urban minority populations.

  15. Accurate water maser positions from HOPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew J.; Purcell, Cormac R.; Longmore, Steven N.; Breen, Shari L.; Green, James A.; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jordan, Christopher H.; Macpherson, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    We report on high spatial resolution water maser observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, towards water maser sites previously identified in the H2O southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS). Of the 540 masers identified in the single-dish observations of Walsh et al., we detect emission in all but 31 fields. We report on 2790 spectral features (maser spots), with brightnesses ranging from 0.06 to 576 Jy and with velocities ranging from -238.5 to +300.5 km s-1. These spectral features are grouped into 631 maser sites. We have compared the positions of these sites to the literature to associate the sites with astrophysical objects. We identify 433 (69 per cent) with star formation, 121 (19 per cent) with evolved stars and 77 (12 per cent) as unknown. We find that maser sites associated with evolved stars tend to have more maser spots and have smaller angular sizes than those associated with star formation. We present evidence that maser sites associated with evolved stars show an increased likelihood of having a velocity range between 15 and 35 km s-1 compared to other maser sites. Of the 31 non-detections, we conclude they were not detected due to intrinsic variability and confirm previous results showing that such variable masers tend to be weaker and have simpler spectra with fewer peaks.

  16. Trapping hop looper moths, Hypena humuli Harris (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), in hop yards in Washington State with acetic acid and 3-methyl-1-butanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop looper moths, Hypena humuli Harris, in commercial hop yards (Humulus lupulus L.) were captured in traps baited with a combination of acetic acid plus 3-methyl-1-butanol (AAMB). The two chemicals were synergistic in attracting hop looper moths; in a comparison of the lure chemicals, most moths we...

  17. Molecular characterization of Hop mosaic virus: its serological and molecular relationships to Hop latent virus.

    PubMed

    Hataya, T; Arimoto, R; Suda, N; Uyeda, I

    2001-10-01

    The 3'-terminal sequence of hop mosaic virus (HpMV) genomic RNA was determined. A cDNA of approximately 1.8 kbp was amplified from the HpMV genome by 3' RACE using a degenerate primer, which was designed to anneal to the overlapping region of open reading frames (ORFs) 2 and 3 of eight carlavirus genomes. The sequence contained three ORFs, encoding proteins of 7-, 34-, and 11-kDa, which corresponded to ORFs 4, 5, and 6 of the carlavirus genome, respectively. The amino acid sequence of ORF 5, encoding the coat protein (CP) of HpMV, shows the highest identity (67%) to that of Hop latent virus (HpLV). The HpMV CP N-terminal sequence differs from that of HpLV, but the central and C-terminal sequences of the CP of both viruses are similar. The sequence similarity possibly causes the cross-reaction of heterologous antibodies of HpMV and HpLV. Phylogenetic analyses based on the CP amino acid and 3' non-coding region sequences indicate close relationships among HpMV, HpLV, and Potato virus M. We report here the first molecular characterization of HpMV genomic RNA. PMID:11722015

  18. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states.

    PubMed

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-21

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states. PMID:27334155

  19. Adaptations in single-leg hop biomechanics following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Orishimo, Karl F; Kremenic, Ian J; Mullaney, Michael J; McHugh, Malachy P; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    When a patient performs a clinically normal hop test based on distance, it cannot be assumed that the biomechanics are similar between limbs. The objective was to compare takeoff and landing biomechanics between legs in patients who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded as 13 patients performed the single-leg hop on each leg. Distance hopped, joint range of motion, peak joint kinetics and the peak total extensor moment were compared between legs during both takeoff and landing. Average hop distance ratio (involved/noninvolved) was 93 ± 4%. Compared to the noninvolved side, knee motion during takeoff on the involved side was significantly reduced (P = 0.008). Peak moments and powers on the involved side were lower at the knee and higher at the ankle and hip compared with the noninvolved side (Side by Joint P = 0.011; P = 0.003, respectively). The peak total extensor moment was not different between legs (P = 0.305) despite a decrease in knee moment and increases in ankle and hip moments (Side by Joint P = 0.015). During landing, knee motion was reduced (P = 0.043), and peak power absorbed was decreased at the knee and hip and increased at the ankle on the involved side compared to the noninvolved side (P = 0.003). The compensations by other joints may indicate protective adaptations to avoid overloading the reconstructed knee.

  20. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-01

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states.

  1. Age-related fascicle-tendon interaction in repetitive hopping.

    PubMed

    Hoffrén, Merja; Ishikawa, Masaki; Avela, Janne; Komi, Paavo V

    2012-12-01

    Increasing age can influence the interaction of muscle fascicles and tendon during dynamic movements. The object of the present study was to examine occurrence and possible reasons for the age-specific behavior of fascicles and tendons and their interaction during hopping with different intensities. Nine young and 24 elderly subjects performed repetitive hopping with maximal effort as well as with 50, 65, 75 and 90 % intensities. During hopping joint kinematics and ground reaction, forces were measured together with recordings of ultrasound images of both the fascicle and the muscle-tendon junction part of the gastrocnemius medialis (GaM) muscle. The results showed that fascicle behavior during the braking phase of hopping was clearly age specific in nature with more fascicle shortening in the young (p < 0.001). In addition, the fascicle shortening increased in young subjects with increasing intensity (p < 0.05). At the instant of ground contact, the elderly subjects demonstrated decreased fascicle length with increasing hopping intensity (p < 0.01). Thereafter in the braking phase, the elderly showed much smaller changes in fascicle length as compared to the young. In contrast to the fascicles, the GaM outer tendon did not show major age-specific differences in stretching and shortening amplitudes during hopping although the peak tendon forces were clearly lower in the elderly (p < 0.001). These results suggest that GaM outer tendon behavior is not influenced greatly with increasing age. It is further suggested that when aging modifies the fascicle-tendon interaction, it is primarily due to the age-specific difference in the fascicle level. This notion poses a question that as compared to the young, the elderly individuals may have a different fascicle behavior for optimal SSC locomotion such as hopping.

  2. Multi-hop teleportation based on W state and EPR pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Tao, Zhan; Xu-Tao, Yu; Pei-Ying, Xiong; Zai-Chen, Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Multi-hop teleportation has significant value due to long-distance delivery of quantum information. Many studies about multi-hop teleportation are based on Bell pairs, partially entangled pairs or W state. The possibility of multi-hop teleportation constituted by partially entangled pairs relates to the number of nodes. The possibility of multi-hop teleportation constituted by double W states is after n-hop teleportation. In this paper, a multi-hop teleportation scheme based on W state and EPR pairs is presented and proved. The successful possibility of quantum information transmitted hop by hop through intermediate nodes is deduced. The possibility of successful transmission is after n-hop teleportation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61571105), the Prospective Future Network Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BY2013095-1-18), and the Independent Project of State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves, China (Grant No. Z201504).

  3. From "They" Science to "Our" Science: Hip Hop Epistemology in STEAM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolberry, Maurice E.

    Hip hop has moved from being considered a type of music into being understood as a culture in which a prominent type of music originates. Hip hop culture has a philosophy and epistemological constructs as well. This study analyzed those constructs to determine how conceptions of science factor in hip hop worldviews. Pedagogical models in culturally responsive teaching and Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) education were also examined to discern their philosophical connections with hip hop culture. These connections were used to create two theoretical models. The first one, Hip Hop Science, described how scientific thought functions in hip hop culture. The second model, Hip Hop STEAM Pedagogy, proposes how hip hop culture can inform STEAM teaching practices. The study began by using Critical Race Theory to create a theoretical framework proposing how the two theoretical models could be derived from the philosophical and pedagogical concepts. Content analysis and narrative inquiry were used to analyze data collected from scholarly texts, hip hop songs, and interviews with hip hop-responsive educators. The data from these sources were used initially to assess the adequacy of the proposed theoretical framework, and subsequently to improve its viability. Four overlapping themes emerged from the data analyses, including hip hop-resistance to formal education; how hip hop culture informs pedagogical practice in hip hop-responsive classrooms; conceptions of knowledge and reality that shape how hip hoppers conduct scientific inquiry; and hip hop-based philosophies of effective teaching for hip hoppers as a marginalized cultural group. The findings indicate that there are unique connections between hip hop epistemology, sciencemindedness, and pedagogical practices in STEAM education. The revised theoretical framework clarified the nature of these connections, and supported claims from prior research that hip hop culture provides viable sites of

  4. Microsatellite variability among wild and cultivated hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Jakse, Jernej; Satovic, Zlatko; Javornik, Branka

    2004-10-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) is a dioecious perennial plant native to the northern hemisphere cultivated for its use in the brewing industry. To investigate the genetic diversity present in wild hop accessions in comparison with cultivated hops, microsatellite marker variation was assessed at four loci in 124 accessions of wild (from Europe, Asia and from North America) and cultivated (varieties and breeding lines) hops. A total of 63 alleles were identified, with an average of 15.7 alleles per locus and an average PIC of 0.64 over four loci. The average number of alleles per locus in groups of accessions ranged from 5.75 to 8.30, with the highest number detected in groups of wild hops either of European (EU) or North American (NA) origin. Accessions from NA revealed the highest number of unique alleles indicating the high diversity present in this gene pool. Cluster analysis based on the D(D) or D(sw) distance matrix divided accessions into 10 different clusters, which reflect the relationship among geographically diverse wild accessions and hop cultivars. The highest genetic differences were found between NA wild accessions, forming one distant cluster, and all the other accessions. The differentiation between European wild and cultivated accessions was revealed by PCoA based on the D(D) distance matrix and by AMOVA results. Cultivated hops differ significantly from wild ones, although most of the variability was found within groups. The molecular variances within groups of cultivated and wild hops were homogeneous, suggesting that a similar level of molecular variability is found in both groups of accessions. The analysis of allele polymorphism and of allele sequences showed that hop germplasm can be differentiated to NA and EU geographic types according to the differences of allele sizes at three loci or by the specific microsatellite repeat type at one locus. The analysis also indicates the different evolutionary dynamics and complex mutations of microsatellite

  5. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  6. Cultivated Grapevines Represent a Symptomless Reservoir for the Transmission of Hop Stunt Viroid to Hop Crops: 15 Years of Evolutionary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi-Ito, Yoko; Li, Shi-Fang; Tagawa, Masaya; Araki, Hiroyuki; Goshono, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Shingen; Tanaka, Mayumi; Narita, Masako; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Liu, Sheng-Xue; Shikata, Eishiro; Sano, Teruo

    2009-01-01

    Hop stunt was a mysterious disorder that first emerged in the 1940s in commercial hops in Japan. To investigate the origin of this disorder, we infected hops with natural Hop stunt viroid (HpSVd) isolates derived from four host species (hop, grapevine, plum and citrus), which except for hop represent possible sources of the ancestral viroid. These plants were maintained for 15 years, then analyzed the HpSVd variants present. Here we show that the variant originally found in cultivated grapevines gave rise to various combinations of mutations at positions 25, 26, 54, 193, and 281. However, upon prolonged infection, these variants underwent convergent evolution resulting in a limited number of adapted mutants. Some of them showed nucleotide sequences identical to those currently responsible for hop stunt epidemics in commercial hops in Japan, China, and the United States. Therefore, these results indicate that we have successfully reproduced the original process by which a natural HpSVd variant naturally introduced into cultivated hops was able to mutate into the HpSVd variants that are currently present in commercial hops. Furthermore, and importantly, we have identified cultivated grapevines as a symptomless reservoir in which HSVd can evolve and be transmitted to hop crops to cause epidemics. PMID:20041179

  7. Experimental verification of hopping mechanism using permanent magnets for an asteroid rover at drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurisu, Masamitsu; Yano, Hajime; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo; Kubota, Takashi; Adachi, Tadashi; Kuroda, Yoji

    Verification of the hopping mechanism using permanent magnets by microgravity experiments at ZARM drop tower will be presented in this report. The mechanism, which is called HMPM (Hopping Mechanism with Permanent Magnets) was developed for a small asteroid exploration rover to replace with conventional locomotion mechanism such as wheels and crawlers. The main part of HMPM consists of three permanent magnets which are two stationary magnets and one movable magnet aligned between them. HMPM itself hops by utilizing the impact force generated when the movable magnet sticks to one of the stationary magnets. The features of HMPM are that the large impact force can be generated in spite of low-power consumption, and that it can be easily miniaturized and modularized. On the other hand, the weak point of HMPM is that the performance of the mechanism cannot be controlled directly, since the performance is decided by its design. Therefore, it is significant to evaluate the performance of HMPM before it is mounted on a flight model of rover. On the microgravity experiments at the drop tower, an imitation rover with 0.8kg weight is tested to hop with the operation of a prototype HMPM mounted on the rover. The prototype module weighs only 0.03kg with dimension 0.033 m in width, 0.046 m in height, and 0.012 m in depth, except the drive circuit and power source. Experimental results show the availability of HMPM. Also, the hopping performance of HMPM which is evaluated from the motion of rover recorded by cameras equipped inside the dropping capsule is compared with the estimated performance derived from the theoretical model. From the investigation, validity of the evaluation method based on the theoretical model is discussed. In order that the potential ability of HMPM is fully derived, optimal design of HMPM will require the evaluation method. The experiments at ZARM drop tower were accomplished based on the agreement on the Hayabusa-2 project by DLR-JAXA. And we received

  8. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract and 6-Prenylnaringenin Induce P450 1A1 Catalyzed Estrogen 2-Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Dunlap, Tareisha L; Howell, Caitlin E; Mbachu, Obinna C; Rue, Emily A; Phansalkar, Rasika; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F; Dietz, Birgit M; Bolton, Judy L

    2016-07-18

    Humulus lupulus L. (hops) is a popular botanical dietary supplement used by women as a sleep aid and for postmenopausal symptom relief. In addition to its efficacy for menopausal symptoms, hops can also modulate the chemical estrogen carcinogenesis pathway and potentially protect women from breast cancer. In the present study, an enriched hop extract and the key bioactive compounds [6-prenylnarigenin (6-PN), 8-prenylnarigenin (8-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XH)] were tested for their effects on estrogen metabolism in breast cells (MCF-10A and MCF-7). The methoxyestrones (2-/4-MeOE1) were analyzed as biomarkers for the nontoxic P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation and the genotoxic P450 1B1 catalyzed 4-hydroxylation pathways, respectively. The results indicated that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially induced the 2-hydroxylation pathway in both cell lines. 8-PN only showed slight up-regulation of metabolism in MCF-7 cells, whereas IX and XH did not have significant effects in either cell line. To further explore the influence of hops and its bioactive marker compounds on P450 1A1/1B1, mRNA expression and ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity were measured. The results correlated with the metabolism data and showed that hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhanced P450 1A1 mRNA expression and increased P450 1A1/1B1 activity. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by the isolated compounds was tested using xenobiotic response element (XRE) luciferase construct transfected cells. 6-PN was found to be an AhR agonist that significantly induced XRE activation and inhibited 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced XRE activity. 6-PN mediated induction of EROD activity was also inhibited by the AhR antagonist CH223191. These data show that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhance the nontoxic estrogen 2-hydroxylation pathway through AhR mediated up-regulation of P450 1A1, which further emphasizes the importance of

  9. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract and 6-Prenylnaringenin Induce P450 1A1 Catalyzed Estrogen 2-Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Humulus lupulus L. (hops) is a popular botanical dietary supplement used by women as a sleep aid and for postmenopausal symptom relief. In addition to its efficacy for menopausal symptoms, hops can also modulate the chemical estrogen carcinogenesis pathway and potentially protect women from breast cancer. In the present study, an enriched hop extract and the key bioactive compounds [6-prenylnarigenin (6-PN), 8-prenylnarigenin (8-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XH)] were tested for their effects on estrogen metabolism in breast cells (MCF-10A and MCF-7). The methoxyestrones (2-/4-MeOE1) were analyzed as biomarkers for the nontoxic P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation and the genotoxic P450 1B1 catalyzed 4-hydroxylation pathways, respectively. The results indicated that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially induced the 2-hydroxylation pathway in both cell lines. 8-PN only showed slight up-regulation of metabolism in MCF-7 cells, whereas IX and XH did not have significant effects in either cell line. To further explore the influence of hops and its bioactive marker compounds on P450 1A1/1B1, mRNA expression and ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity were measured. The results correlated with the metabolism data and showed that hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhanced P450 1A1 mRNA expression and increased P450 1A1/1B1 activity. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by the isolated compounds was tested using xenobiotic response element (XRE) luciferase construct transfected cells. 6-PN was found to be an AhR agonist that significantly induced XRE activation and inhibited 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced XRE activity. 6-PN mediated induction of EROD activity was also inhibited by the AhR antagonist CH223191. These data show that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhance the nontoxic estrogen 2-hydroxylation pathway through AhR mediated up-regulation of P450 1A1, which further emphasizes the importance of

  10. Carbon films embedded by nickel nanoparticles: fluctuation in hopping rate and variable-range hopping with respect to annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalouji, Vali; Elahi, Smohammad; Solaymani, Shahram; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Elahi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the electrical properties of carbon-nickel films annealed at different temperatures (573, 773, 1073 and 1273 K) in the temperature range 15-300 K were investigated. The films were grown by radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering on quartz substrates at room temperature. The multiphonon hopping conduction mechanism is found to dominate the electrical transport in the temperature range 150-300 K. It can be seen that the room-temperature hopping rate (ΓRT) at 773 K has maximum value of 56.8 × 105 s-1. Our results of conductivity measurements at high temperature are in good agreement with strong carrier-lattice coupling model; on the other hand, the conductivity in the range 15-50 K is well described in terms of variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism. The localized state density around Fermi level N( E F) and the average hopping energy W hop at low temperature for the films annealed at 773 K have maximum value of 2.23 × 1023 (cm-3 eV-1) and minimum value of 9.74 × 10-4 eV, respectively.

  11. Orbital magnetoconductance in the variable-range-hopping regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivan, U.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Imry, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The orbital magnetoconductance (MC) in the variable-range-hopping (VRH) regime is evaluated by use of a model which approximately takes into account the interference among random paths in the hopping process. Instead of logarithmic averaging the MC is obtained by the critical percolating resistor method. The small-field MC is quadratic in H; it is positive deep in the VRH regime and changes sign when the zero-field conductivity is high enough. This behavior (except for the sign change) and the relevant magnetic field scale are in agreement with recent experiments. The calculated MC is always positive for strong fields and is predicted to saturate at sufficiently large fields.

  12. Communication: Optimal parameters for basin-hopping global optimization based on Tsallis statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, C.; Wales, D. J.

    2014-08-01

    A fundamental problem associated with global optimization is the large free energy barrier for the corresponding solid-solid phase transitions for systems with multi-funnel energy landscapes. To address this issue we consider the Tsallis weight instead of the Boltzmann weight to define the acceptance ratio for basin-hopping global optimization. Benchmarks for atomic clusters show that using the optimal Tsallis weight can improve the efficiency by roughly a factor of two. We present a theory that connects the optimal parameters for the Tsallis weighting, and demonstrate that the predictions are verified for each of the test cases.

  13. Communication: Optimal parameters for basin-hopping global optimization based on Tsallis statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C. Wales, D. J.

    2014-08-21

    A fundamental problem associated with global optimization is the large free energy barrier for the corresponding solid-solid phase transitions for systems with multi-funnel energy landscapes. To address this issue we consider the Tsallis weight instead of the Boltzmann weight to define the acceptance ratio for basin-hopping global optimization. Benchmarks for atomic clusters show that using the optimal Tsallis weight can improve the efficiency by roughly a factor of two. We present a theory that connects the optimal parameters for the Tsallis weighting, and demonstrate that the predictions are verified for each of the test cases.

  14. Starting with Style: Toward a Second Wave of Hip-Hop Education Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2015-01-01

    One fundamental breakthrough in the field of hip-hop education in recent years is the shift from understanding hip-hop solely as content to understanding hip-hop also as aesthetic form. In this article, I chart the roots of this shift across disciplines and focus on what it might mean for the future of hip-hop education, pedagogy, and research in…

  15. Effect of light on hopping conduction in kesterite CZTS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghediya, Prashant R.; Chaudhuri, Tapas K.; Ray, Jaymin R.

    2016-05-01

    Mott variable range hopping conduction in dip-coated CZTS thin films has been studied in the temperature range of 77 to 150 K in dark and under different light intensities. The films were basically p-type and photoconducting. Various hopping parameters such as, Mott characteristic temperature, density of states at Fermi level, hopping distance and hopping energy of the CZTS films were investigated for different light intensities.

  16. Repetitive Hops Induce Postactivation Potentiation in Triceps Surae as well as an Increase in the Jump Height of Subsequent Maximal Drop Jumps

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Julian; Kramer, Andreas; Gruber, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) has been defined as the increase in twitch torque after a conditioning contraction. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of hops as conditioning contractions to induce PAP and increase performance in subsequent maximal drop jumps. In addition, we wanted to test if and how PAP can contribute to increases in drop jump rebound height. Twelve participants performed 10 maximal two-legged hops as conditioning contractions. Twitch peak torques of triceps surae muscles were recorded before and after the conditioning hops. Then, subjects performed drop jumps with and without 10 conditioning hops before each drop jump. Recordings included ground reaction forces, ankle and knee angles and electromyographic activity in five leg muscles. In addition, efferent motoneuronal output during ground contact was estimated with V-wave stimulation. The analyses showed that after the conditioning hops, twitch peak torques of triceps surae muscles were 32% higher compared to baseline values (P < 0.01). Drop jumps performed after conditioning hops were significantly higher (12%, P < 0.05), but V-waves and EMG activity remained unchanged. The amount of PAP and the change in drop jump rebound height were positively correlated (r2 = 0.26, P < 0.05). These results provide evidence for PAP in triceps surae muscles induced by a bout of hops and indicate that PAP can contribute to the observed performance enhancements in subsequent drop jumps. The lack of change in EMG activity and V-wave amplitude suggests that the underlying mechanisms are more likely intramuscular than neural in origin. PMID:24147061

  17. Behind Beats and Rhymes: Working Class from a Hampton Roads Hip Hop Homeplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Aisha S.

    2009-01-01

    The film documentary titled "Hip Hop: beyond beats and rhymes" captures ongoing conversations among scholars, cultural critics, and hip hop insiders about the state of African Americans by interrogating distinct expressive forms associated with hip hop culture. Durham draws from two scenes to describe her memories as the researched underclass and…

  18. "Deeper than Rap": Gifted Males and Their Relationship with Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, J. Sean; Grantham, Tarek C.

    2012-01-01

    One would be hard-pressed to deny the impact that hip hop is having on gifted students. More specifically, because hip hop is a creative and exciting male-dominated culture, gifted males gravitate to hip hop culture. From the perspective of two Black men from two different generations, this article was inspired by discussions about the role of hip…

  19. Precision QTL mapping of downy mildew resistance in Hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop Downy mildew (DM) is an obligate parasite causing severe losses in hop if not controlled. Resistance to this pathogen is a primary goal for hop breeding programs. The objective of this study was to identify QTLs linked to DM resistance. Next-generation-sequencing was performed on a mapping po...

  20. Flipping the Misogynist Script: Gender, Agency, Hip Hop and Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Evan S.

    2014-01-01

    Excluding Hip Hop culture and rap music from music education misses opportunities for addressing key aspects of popular culture, society, and students' lives. This article addresses intersections of Hip Hop, gender, and music education to forward potential Hip Hop praxis. After tracing related scholarship, I discuss and problematize…

  1. Wish to Live: The Hip-Hop Feminism Pedagogy Reader. Educational Psychology. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ruth Nicole, Ed.; Kwakye, Chamara Jewel, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Wish To Live: The Hip-hop Feminism Pedagogy Reader" moves beyond the traditional understanding of the four elements of hip-hop culture--rapping, breakdancing, graffiti art, and deejaying--to articulate how hip-hop feminist scholarship can inform educational practices and spark, transform, encourage, and sustain local and global youth community…

  2. Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Marc Lamont

    2009-01-01

    For over a decade, educators have looked to capitalize on the appeal of hip-hop culture, sampling its language, techniques, and styles as a way of reaching out to students. But beyond a fashionable hipness, what does hip-hop have to offer our schools? In this revelatory new book, Marc Lamont Hill shows how a serious engagement with hip-hop culture…

  3. Analytical methods for quantitation of prenylated flavonoids from hops.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The female flowers of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used as a flavoring agent in the brewing industry. There is growing interest in possible health benefits of hops, particularly as estrogenic and chemopreventive agents. Among the possible active constituents, most of the attention has focused on prenylated flavonoids, which can chemically be classified as prenylated chalcones and prenylated flavanones. Among chalcones, xanthohumol (XN) and desmethylxanthohumol (DMX) have been the most studied, while among flavanones, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) have received the most attention. Because of the interest in medicinal properties of prenylated flavonoids, there is demand for accurate, reproducible and sensitive analytical methods to quantify these compounds in various matrices. Such methods are needed, for example, for quality control and standardization of hop extracts, measurement of the content of prenylated flavonoids in beer, and to determine pharmacokinetic properties of prenylated flavonoids in animals and humans. This review summarizes currently available analytical methods for quantitative analysis of the major prenylated flavonoids, with an emphasis on the LC-MS and LC-MS-MS methods and their recent applications to biomedical research on hops. This review covers all methods in which prenylated flavonoids have been measured, either as the primary analytes or as a part of a larger group of analytes. The review also discusses methodological issues relating to the quantitative analysis of these compounds regardless of the chosen analytical approach. PMID:24077106

  4. Design and Synthesis of Inhibitors of Noroviruses by Scaffold Hopping

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Dengfeng; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara Rao; Alliston, Kevin R.; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Groutas, William C.

    2011-01-01

    A scaffold hopping strategy was employed to identify new chemotypes that inhibit noroviruses. The replacement of the cyclosulfamide scaffold by an array of heterocyclic scaffolds lead to the identification of additional series of compounds that possessed anti-norovirus activity in a cell-based replicon system. PMID:21893416

  5. Hopping Diffusion of Nanoparticles Subjected to Topological Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li-Heng; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We describe a novel hopping mechanism for diffusion of large non-sticky nanoparticles subjected to topological constraints in polymer solids (networks and gels) and entangled polymer liquids (melts and solutions). Probe particles with size larger than the mesh size of unentangled polymer networks (tube diameter of entangled polymer liquids) are trapped by the network (entanglement) cages at time scales longer than the relaxation time of the network (entanglement) strand. At long time scales, however, these particles can move further by hopping between neighboring confinement cages. This hopping is controlled by fluctuations of surrounding confinement cages, which could be large enough to allow particles to slip through. The terminal particle diffusion coefficient dominated by this hopping diffusion is appreciable for particles with size slightly larger than the network mesh size (tube diameter). Very large particles in polymer solids will be permanently trapped by local network cages, whereas they can still move in polymer liquids by waiting for entanglement cages to rearrange on the relaxation time scale of the liquids. We would like to acknowledge the financial support of NSF CHE-0911588, DMR-0907515, DMR-1121107, DMR-1122483, and CBET-0609087, NIH R01HL077546 and P50HL107168, and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation under grant RUBIN09XX0.

  6. Hopping locomotion at different gravity: metabolism and mechanics in humans.

    PubMed

    Pavei, Gaspare; Minetti, Alberto E

    2016-05-15

    Previous literature on the effects of low gravity on the mechanics and energetics of human locomotion already dealt with walking, running, and skipping. The aim of the present study is to obtain a comprehensive view on that subject by including measurements of human hopping in simulated low gravity, a gait often adopted in many Apollo Missions and documented in NASA footage. Six subjects hopped at different speeds at terrestrial, Martian, and Lunar gravity on a treadmill while oxygen consumption and 3D body kinematic were sampled. Results clearly indicate that hopping is too metabolically expensive to be a sustainable locomotion on Earth but, similarly to skipping (and running), its economy greatly (more than ×10) increases at lower gravity. On the Moon, the metabolic cost of hopping becomes even lower than that of walking, skipping, and running, but the general finding is that gaits with very different economy on Earth share almost the same economy on the Moon. The mechanical reasons for such a decrease in cost are discussed in the paper. The present data, together with previous findings, will allow also to predict the aerobic traverse range/duration of astronauts when getting far from their base station on low gravity planets. PMID:26635350

  7. Chicano Hip-Hop as Interethnic Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Pancho

    2008-01-01

    Hip-hop is an interethnic contact zone that allows for the creation of new expressive cultures and new identities for young people. Its openness derives in part from the wide range of expression and interpretation allowed in 182 "McFarland" African musics. Moving beyond the often stifling options offered by an earlier generation that focused on…

  8. Chaperones get in touch: the Hip-Hop connection.

    PubMed

    Frydman, J; Höhfeld, J

    1997-03-01

    Recent findings emphasize that different molecular chaperones cooperate during intracellular protein biogenesis. Mechanistic aspects of chaperone cooperation are now emerging from studies on the regulation of certain signal transduction pathways mediated by Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the eukaryotic cytosol. Efficient cooperation appears to be achieved through a defined regulation of Hsc70 activity by the chaperone cofactors Hip and Hop.

  9. Critical Hip Hop Pedagogy as a Form of Liberatory Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akom, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This article uses Paulo Freire's problem-posing method, youth participatory action research, and case study methodology to introduce an alternative instructional strategy called Critical Hip Hop Pedagogy (CHHP). This approach attempts to address deep-rooted ideologies to social inequities by creating a space in teacher education courses for…

  10. AFLP Discrimination of Wild American and Cultivated Hop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop breeding historically relied upon relatively simple selection techniques within established breeding lines. Relying on a narrow genetic base to address production problems may lead to a genetic bottleneck in breeding germplasm, and may limit a breeder's ability to select for new traits. The obje...

  11. Analytical methods for quantitation of prenylated flavonoids from hops

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The female flowers of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used as a flavoring agent in the brewing industry. There is growing interest in possible health benefits of hops, particularly as estrogenic and chemopreventive agents. Among the possible active constituents, most of the attention has focused on prenylated flavonoids, which can chemically be classified as prenylated chalcones and prenylated flavanones. Among chalcones, xanthohumol (XN) and desmethylxanthohumol (DMX) have been the most studied, while among flavanones, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) have received the most attention. Because of the interest in medicinal properties of prenylated flavonoids, there is demand for accurate, reproducible and sensitive analytical methods to quantify these compounds in various matrices. Such methods are needed, for example, for quality control and standardization of hop extracts, measurement of the content of prenylated flavonoids in beer, and to determine pharmacokinetic properties of prenylated flavonoids in animals and humans. This review summarizes currently available analytical methods for quantitative analysis of the major prenylated flavonoids, with an emphasis on the LC-MS and LC-MS-MS methods and their recent applications to biomedical research on hops. This review covers all methods in which prenylated flavonoids have been measured, either as the primary analytes or as a part of a larger group of analytes. The review also discusses methodological issues relating to the quantitative analysis of these compounds regardless of the chosen analytical approach. PMID:24077106

  12. Crossing the Lexicon: Anglicisms in the German Hip Hop Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garley, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of English on German has been an ongoing subject of intense popular and academic interest in the German sphere. In order to better understand this language contact situation, this research project investigates anglicisms--instances of English language material in a German language context--in the German hip hop community, where the…

  13. Examining Hip-Hop as Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jung; Pulido, Isaura

    2015-01-01

    Culturally relevant pedagogy is a framework that conceptualizes the process of student learning as contingent upon educators' deep understanding of students' cultural backgrounds to co-construct knowledge and develop academic skills. Concurrently, there are a growing number of studies that explore hip-hop as a culturally relevant curriculum for…

  14. Young Children Manifest Spiritualities in Their Hip-Hop Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Nadjwa E. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author combines multicultural feminist critical theories with the voices of Black and Latina/Latino young spiritual children to extend culturally responsive teaching. The author illuminates how children use their hip-hop writing to construct themselves as people who communicate with God, choose spiritual content for their…

  15. Decoherence and mode-hopping in spin-torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muduli, Pranaba

    2013-03-01

    A Spin Torque Oscillator (STO) is a nano-sized magneto-resistive device that can produce microwave signals in the GHz range as a result of spin transfer torque- a phenomena which is receiving increasing importance in contemporary spintronics research both for fundamental spin physics as well as a number of possible microwave applications e.g., oscillator, detectors and modulators. A very important question, both for fundamental physics as well for applications, is what limits the coherence time of the STO. This is a subject of significant interest recently. Until now theoretical studies have investigated decoherence through thermal noise assuming that only a single mode is excited. On the other hand, experiments clearly show both the existence of multiple modes and persistent mode-hopping between several modes. The impact on coherence time of such mode-hopping has been largely unexplored and a theoretical study of its origin is entirely lacking. In this work, we will present first ever systematic experimental investigations of mode hopping, and its impact on the coherence time in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator. We will discuss micromagnetic simulations and a theoretical treatment to show that the non-conservative fields due to finite damping-either positive or negative (spin torque) -couple individual modes and, in the presence of thermal noise, govern the experimentally observed mode-hopping. Using quantitative analysis of both coherence and dwell times, we will show that mode-hopping could be a limiting factor for STO coherence. Finally we show how our theoretical treatment can be extended to the case of a metallic nanocontact based STO, where anomalous temperature dependence of linewidth is found as result of the mode coupling. and Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016, India

  16. Communication: Proper treatment of classically forbidden electronic transitions significantly improves detailed balance in surface hopping.

    PubMed

    Sifain, Andrew E; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-06-01

    Surface hopping is the most popular method for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. Many have reported that it does not rigorously attain detailed balance at thermal equilibrium, but does so approximately. We show that convergence to the Boltzmann populations is significantly improved when the nuclear velocity is reversed after a classically forbidden hop. The proposed prescription significantly reduces the total number of classically forbidden hops encountered along a trajectory, suggesting that some randomization in nuclear velocity is needed when classically forbidden hops constitute a large fraction of attempted hops. Our results are verified computationally using two- and three-level quantum subsystems, coupled to a classical bath undergoing Langevin dynamics. PMID:27276938

  17. Monitoring of insecticide resistance in damson hop aphid, Phorodon humuli Schrank (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from German hop gardens.

    PubMed

    Weichel, Lars; Nauen, Ralf

    2003-09-01

    The damson hop aphid, Phorodon humuli (Schrank) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is one of the most important sucking pests of many hop-growing areas world-wide. In this study we determined the efficacy of several insecticides against strains collected throughout the year 2001. All strains were collected in different hop gardens in the Hallertau (Bavaria), Germany, the largest hop-growing area of the world. First of all we established a leaf dip bioassay, carried out using six-well tissue culture plates and appropriate for monitoring susceptibility against imidacloprid, oxydemeton-methyl, cyfluthrin, amitraz, pymetrozine and pirimicarb. Four of these compounds, imidacloprid, cyfluthrin, pymetrozine and amitraz, are currently registered for the control of sucking pests in German hop gardens and are useful against P. humuli. The leaf-dip bioassay system turned out to be very reliable and robust. Ten P. humuli strains were collected in May 2001 and maintained in the laboratory to assess their resistance to the different insecticides in comparison with two laboratory reference strains (H2 and H5). Using diagnostic concentrations, resistance monitoring for imidacloprid and cyfluthrin was investigated during July and August 2001 on 53 populations from 30 sites around the Hallertau, an area of ca 2500 km2. Resistance to diagnostic concentrations (LC95 for reference strains) of imidacloprid, amitraz and pymetrozine was not detected in any strain received in 2001, but late-season (August) populations seemed to respond more heterogeneously than those collected mid-season (July). Overall composite mean mortalities to diagnostic concentrations of imidacloprid (13 mg litre(-1)) in collections from May, July and August were 95 (+/-2.5), 98 (+/-2.3) and 87 (+/-5.9)%, respectively. Moderate resistance to pyrethroids was observed in all strains collected in May and August using a diagnostic concentrations of 10 mg litre(-1) cyfluthrin (LC95 of the susceptible reference strain H5). Slight to

  18. Tuning the hopping conductivity of WO3 films by ion bombardment at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, B.; Merz, M.; Widmayer, P.; Ziemann, P.

    2001-10-01

    WO3 films, either prepared by sputtering or evaporation under high or ultrahigh vacuum conditions, were irradiated with He+ and Ar+ ions (energy range 300-350 keV) at ambient and low temperatures (77-100 K). The resulting ion induced changes of the optical absorption as well as of the electrical conductivity could be determined on one and the same sample, which enables the variable range hopping (VRH) model to be tested under the assumption that the density of irradiation induced color centers is proportional to the electronic density of states contributing to the hopping conductivity. It is found that the data obtained at 300 K for He+ and Ar+ bombardment can be described within the VRH model by one common conductivity versus absorption curve, even though the effectiveness per projectile of the heavier ion for coloration as well as for increasing the conductivity is much higher. This is different at low temperatures. While the ion induced coloration is practically independent of the irradiation temperature for both projectiles, the effectiveness per projectile to enhance the conductivity is interchanged. This is attributed to the additional damage produced by the heavier ion at low temperatures resulting in strongly impeded hopping processes. Consistent with the VRH model, the temperature dependence of the conductivity of ion bombarded WO3 films follow the Mott "T-1/4" law, if the ion induced conductivity is not too high. For very high ion fluences clear deviations from the VRH model are observed for the conductivity versus absorption curves accompanied by a shift of the above power laws from T-1/4 towards T-1/2.

  19. The impact of hop bitter acid and polyphenol profiles on the perceived bitterness of beer.

    PubMed

    Oladokun, Olayide; Tarrega, Amparo; James, Sue; Smart, Katherine; Hort, Joanne; Cook, David

    2016-08-15

    Thirty-four commercial lager beers were analysed for their hop bitter acid, phenolic acid and polyphenol contents. Based on analytical data, it was evident that the beers had been produced using a range of different raw materials and hopping practices. Principal Components Analysis was used to select a sub-set of 10 beers that contained diverse concentrations of the analysed bitter compounds. These beers were appraised sensorially to determine the impacts of varying hop acid and polyphenolic profiles on perceived bitterness character. Beers high in polyphenol and hop acid contents were perceived as having 'harsh' and 'progressive' bitterness, whilst beers that had evidently been conventionally hopped were 'sharp' and 'instant' in their bitterness. Beers containing light-stable hop products (tetrahydro-iso-α-acids) were perceived as 'diminishing', 'rounded' and 'acidic' in bitterness. The hopping strategy adopted by brewers impacts on the nature, temporal profile and intensity of bitterness perception in beer.

  20. The impact of hop bitter acid and polyphenol profiles on the perceived bitterness of beer.

    PubMed

    Oladokun, Olayide; Tarrega, Amparo; James, Sue; Smart, Katherine; Hort, Joanne; Cook, David

    2016-08-15

    Thirty-four commercial lager beers were analysed for their hop bitter acid, phenolic acid and polyphenol contents. Based on analytical data, it was evident that the beers had been produced using a range of different raw materials and hopping practices. Principal Components Analysis was used to select a sub-set of 10 beers that contained diverse concentrations of the analysed bitter compounds. These beers were appraised sensorially to determine the impacts of varying hop acid and polyphenolic profiles on perceived bitterness character. Beers high in polyphenol and hop acid contents were perceived as having 'harsh' and 'progressive' bitterness, whilst beers that had evidently been conventionally hopped were 'sharp' and 'instant' in their bitterness. Beers containing light-stable hop products (tetrahydro-iso-α-acids) were perceived as 'diminishing', 'rounded' and 'acidic' in bitterness. The hopping strategy adopted by brewers impacts on the nature, temporal profile and intensity of bitterness perception in beer. PMID:27006233

  1. Pagan Biology at the Halloween Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Send your pupils into the autumn term half-term holiday with a task that requires them to explore more about the biology associated with Halloween. This article offers a fun approach, with a pub quiz format based on bats, skeletons, pumpkins and witches, that is suitable for lessons following the end-of-topic test, for STEM clubs or for PTA…

  2. Determination of stilbenes in hop pellets from different cultivars.

    PubMed

    Jerkovic, Vesna; Callemien, Delphine; Collin, Sonia

    2005-05-18

    About 30% of the polyphenols in wort and beer derive from hop, but little is yet known about their nutritional impact. The recent discovery of trans-resveratrol and piceid isomers in hop opens new doors to understanding beer health benefits. In the present work, resveratrol was quantified by HPLC-APCI-MS/MS in pellets from 9 different cultivars. Concentrations ranging from 4 to 9 mg/kg trans-piceid, from 2 to 6 mg/kg cis-piceid, and up to 1 mg/kg trans-resveratrol were detected. As previously shown for total polyphenols and flavonoids, the lower the alpha-acid content, the higher the total stilbene content. PMID:15884861

  3. Nanowire-based thermoelectric ratchet in the hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosisio, Riccardo; Fleury, Geneviève; Pichard, Jean-Louis; Gorini, Cosimo

    2016-04-01

    We study a thermoelectric ratchet consisting of an array of disordered nanowires arranged in parallel on top of an insulating substrate and contacted asymmetrically to two electrodes. Transport is investigated in the Mott hopping regime, when localized electrons can propagate through the nanowires via thermally assisted hops. When the electronic temperature in the nanowires is different from the phononic one in the substrate, we show that a finite electrical current is generated even in the absence of driving forces between the electrodes. We discuss the device performance both as an energy harvester, when an excess heat from the substrate is converted into useful power, and as a refrigerator, when an external power is supplied to cool down the substrate.

  4. Mixed quantum-classical equilibrium in global flux surface hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Sifain, Andrew E.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-06-14

    Global flux surface hopping (GFSH) generalizes fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH)—one of the most popular approaches to nonadiabatic molecular dynamics—for processes exhibiting superexchange. We show that GFSH satisfies detailed balance and leads to thermodynamic equilibrium with accuracy similar to FSSH. This feature is particularly important when studying electron-vibrational relaxation and phonon-assisted transport. By studying the dynamics in a three-level quantum system coupled to a classical atom in contact with a classical bath, we demonstrate that both FSSH and GFSH achieve the Boltzmann state populations. Thermal equilibrium is attained significantly faster with GFSH, since it accurately represents the superexchange process. GFSH converges closer to the Boltzmann averages than FSSH and exhibits significantly smaller statistical errors.

  5. Stationary Currents in Particle Systems with Constrained Hopping Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Colangeli, Matteo; Muntean, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    We study the effect on the stationary currents of constraints affecting the hopping rates in stochastic particle systems. In the framework of zero range processes with drift within a finite volume, we discuss how the current is reduced by the presence of the constraint and deduce exact formulae, fully explicit in some cases. The model discussed here has been introduced by Cirillo et al. (Does communication enhance pedestrians transport in the dark? To appear in C. R. Mécanique 344 (2016), 19-23) and is relevant for the description of pedestrian motion in elongated dark corridors, where the constraint on the hopping rates can be related to limitations on the interaction distance among pedestrians, but finds also applications in the modeling of various transport phenomena.

  6. CATCHR, HOPS and CORVET tethering complexes share a similar architecture.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hui-Ting; Dukovski, Danijela; Chambers, Melissa G; Reinisch, Karin M; Walz, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GARP complex and the Cog1-4 subcomplex of the COG complex, both members of the complexes associated with tethering containing helical rods (CATCHR) family of multisubunit tethering complexes, share the same subunit organization. We also show that HOPS, a tethering complex acting in the endolysosomal pathway, shares a similar architecture, thus suggesting that multisubunit tethering complexes use related structural frameworks. PMID:27428774

  7. Effect of fatigue on single-leg hop landing biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Orishimo, Karl F; Kremenic, Ian J

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to measure adaptations in landing strategy during single-leg hops following thigh muscle fatigue. Kinetic, kinematic, and electromyographic data were recorded as thirteen healthy male subjects performed a single-leg hop in both the unfatigued and fatigued states. To sufficiently fatigue the thigh muscles, subjects performed at least two sets of 50 step-ups. Fatigue was assessed by measuring horizontal hopping ability following the protocol. Joint motion and loading, as well as muscle activation patterns, were compared between fatigued and unfatigued conditions. Fatigue significantly increased knee motion (p = 0.012) and shifted the ankle into a more dorsiflexed position (p = 0.029). Hip flexion was also reduced following fatigue (p = 0.042). Peak extension moment tended to decrease at the knee and increase at the ankle and hip (p = 0.014). Ankle plantar flexion moment at the time of peak total support moment increased from 0.8 (N x m)/kg (SD, 0.6 [N x m]/kg) to 1.5 (N x m)/kg (SD, 0.8 [N x m]/kg) (p = 0.006). Decreased knee moment and increased knee flexion during landings following fatigue indicated that the control of knee motion was compromised despite increased activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris (p = 0.014, p = 0.014, and p = 0.017, respectively). Performance at the ankle increased to compensate for weakness in the knee musculature and to maintain lower extremity stability during landing. Investigating the biomechanical adaptations that occur in healthy subjects as a result of muscle fatigue may give insight into the compensatory mechanisms and loading patterns occurring in patients with knee pathology. Changes in single-leg hop landing performance could be used to demonstrate functional improvement in patients due to training or physical therapy.

  8. Exotic paired phases in ladders with spin-dependent hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2011-03-15

    Fermions in two dimensions, when subject to anisotropic spin-dependent hopping, can potentially give rise to unusual paired states in unpolarized mixtures that can behave as non-Fermi liquids. One possibility is a fully paired state with a gap for fermion excitations in which the Cooper pairs remain uncondensed. Such a ''Cooper-pair Bose-metal'' phase would be expected to have a singular Bose surface in momentum space. As demonstrated in the context of two-dimensional bosons hopping with a frustrating ring-exchange interaction, an analogous Bose-metal phase has a set of quasi-one-dimensional descendant states when put on a ladder geometry. Here we present a density matrix renormalization group study of the attractive Hubbard model with spin-dependent hopping on a two-leg ladder geometry. In our setup, one spin species moves preferentially along the leg direction, while the other does so along the rung direction. We find compelling evidence for the existence of a novel Cooper-pair Bose-metal phase in a region of the phase diagram at intermediate coupling. We further explore the phase diagram of this model as a function of hopping anisotropy, density, and interaction strength, finding a conventional superfluid phase as well as a phase of paired Cooper pairs with d-wave symmetry, similar to the one found in models of hard-core bosons with ring exchange. We argue that simulating this model with cold Fermi gases on spin-dependent optical lattices is a promising direction for realizing exotic quantum states.

  9. HPLC Analysis of alpha and beta Acids in Hops

    SciTech Connect

    Danenhower, Travis; Force, Leyna; Petersen, Kenneth; Betts, Thomas; Baker, Gary A

    2008-01-01

    Early in brewing history, a variety of herbs and spices (such as coriander, rosemary, yarrow, and bog myrtle) were used to flavor beer (1). It is evident, from the Bavarian Purity Law of 1516, that a major shift in beer flavoring occurred around the middle of the second millennium. This law declared that only three ingredients could be used to brew beer: barley, water, and hops (1), thus eliminating other spices from German beer. (The importance of yeast had not yet been uncovered.)

  10. Hip-Hop(e): The Cultural Practice and Critical Pedagogy of International Hip-Hop. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 56

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfilio, Brad J., Ed.; Viola, Michael J., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Illuminating hip-hop as an important cultural practice and a global social movement, this collaborative project highlights the emancipatory messages and cultural work generated by the organic intellectuals of global hip-hop. Contributors describe the social realities--globalization, migration, poverty, criminalization, and racism--youth are…

  11. Variable-Range Hopping through Marginally Localized Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sumilan; Altman, Ehud

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the effect of coupling Anderson localized particles in one dimension to a system of marginally localized phonons having a symmetry protected delocalized mode at zero frequency. This situation is naturally realized for electrons coupled to phonons in a disordered nanowire as well as for ultracold fermions coupled to phonons of a superfluid in a one-dimensional disordered trap. To determine if the coupled system can be many-body localized we analyze the phonon-mediated hopping transport for both the weak and strong coupling regimes. We show that the usual variable-range hopping mechanism involving a low-order phonon process is ineffective at low temperature due to discreteness of the bath at the required energy. Instead, the system thermalizes through a many-body process involving exchange of a diverging number n ∝-log T of phonons in the low temperature limit. This effect leads to a highly singular prefactor to Mott's well-known formula and strongly suppresses the variable range hopping rate. Finally, we comment on possible implications of this physics in higher dimensional electron-phonon coupled systems.

  12. Iterative quantum-classical path integral with dynamically consistent state hopping.

    PubMed

    Walters, Peter L; Makri, Nancy

    2016-01-28

    We investigate the convergence of iterative quantum-classical path integral calculations in sluggish environments strongly coupled to a quantum system. The number of classical trajectories, thus the computational cost, grows rapidly (exponentially, unless filtering techniques are employed) with the memory length included in the calculation. We argue that the choice of the (single) trajectory branch during the time preceding the memory interval can significantly affect the memory length required for convergence. At short times, the trajectory branch associated with the reactant state improves convergence by eliminating spurious memory. We also introduce an instantaneous population-based probabilistic scheme which introduces state-to-state hops in the retained pre-memory trajectory branch, and which is designed to choose primarily the trajectory branch associated with the reactant at early times, but to favor the product state more as the reaction progresses to completion. Test calculations show that the dynamically consistent state hopping scheme leads to accelerated convergence and a dramatic reduction of computational effort. PMID:26827203

  13. Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (hop): beyond interactions with chaperones and prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Baindur-Hudson, Swati; Edkins, Adrienne L; Blatch, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop), also known as stress-inducible protein 1 (STI1), has received considerable attention for diverse cellular functions in both healthy and diseased states. There is extensive evidence that intracellular Hop is a co-chaperone of the major chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, playing an important role in the productive folding of Hsp90 client proteins. Consequently, Hop is implicated in a number of key signalling pathways, including aberrant pathways leading to cancer. However, Hop is also secreted and it is now well established that Hop also serves as a receptor for the prion protein, PrP(C). The intracellular and extracellular forms of Hop most likely represent two different isoforms, although the molecular determinants of these divergent functions are yet to be identified. There is also a growing body of research that reports the involvement of Hop in cellular activities that appear independent of either chaperones or PrP(C). While Hop has been shown to have various cellular functions, its biological function remains elusive. However, recent knockout studies in mammals suggest that Hop has an important role in embryonic development. This review provides a critical overview of the latest molecular, cellular and biological research on Hop, critically evaluating its function in healthy systems and how this function is adapted in diseases states.

  14. Polaron hopping in olivine phosphates studied by nuclear resonant scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Sally June

    Valence fluctuations of Fe2+ and Fe3+ were studied in a solid solution of LixFePO4 by nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron x rays while the sample was heated in a diamond-anvil pressure cell. The spectra acquired at different temperatures and pressures were analyzed for the frequencies of valence changes using the Blume-Tjon model of a system with a fluctuating Hamiltonian. These frequencies were analyzed to obtain activation energies and an activation volume for polaron hopping. There was a large suppression of hopping frequency with pressure, giving an anomalously large activation volume. This large, positive value is typical of ion diffusion, which indicates correlated motions of polarons, and Li+ ions that alter the dynamics of both. In a parallel study of NaxFePO4, the interplay between sodium ordering and electron mobility was investigated using a combination of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and nuclear resonant scattering. Conventional Mossbauer spectra were collected while the sample was heated in a resistive furnace. An analysis of the temperature evolution of the spectral shapes was used to identify the onset of fast electron hopping and determine the polaron hopping rate. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out in the same temperature range. Reitveld analysis of the diffraction patterns was used to determine the temperature of sodium redistribution on the lattice. The diffraction analysis also provides new information about the phase stability of the system. The temperature evolution of the iron site occupancies from the Mossbauer measurements, combined with the synchrotron diffraction results give strong evidence for a relationship between the onset of fast electron dynamics and the redistribution of sodium in the lattice. Measurements of activation barriers for polaron hopping gave fundamental insights about the correlation between electronic carriers and mobile ions. This work established that polaron-ion interactions

  15. Identification of the antibiotic hops component, colupulone, as an inducer of hepatic cytochrome P-4503A in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Mannering, G J; Shoeman, J A; Deloria, L B

    1992-01-01

    A higher level of cytochrome P-450 (P450)-dependent ethylmorphine (EM) N-demethylase activity was observed in hepatic microsomes from mice fed a natural-ingredient diet ("crude diet") than in those from mice fed a semi-purified diet ("purified diet"). This led to the testing of individual ingredients of the crude diet as inducers of the P-450 system. Brewers yeast proved to be the most significant inductive component of the crude diet. Further investigation revealed that hop components (lupulones) absorbed on yeast during the brewing process were responsible for the induction of the P-450 system. The induction of P-450 and several P-450-dependent monooxygenase activities (EM N-demethylation, aniline hydroxylation, benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation) by colupulone with respect to dose and time course were investigated. The very large increase in EM N-demethylase activity elicited by colupulone suggested that P-4503A had been induced. Western blot technology verified this speculation. Western blot analysis of microsomal protein from mice fed hops, brewers yeast, or the residue of a hexane extract of hops supported the conclusion that all of these substances induced P-4503A. These substances were also relatively good inducers of P-4502B, but not as inductive of this isozyme as the crude diet. This is interpreted to mean that not all of the inductive properties of the crude diet are due to hop components. These studies question the use of crude commercial diets in studies of P-450 systems. They may also challenge some current definitions of "constitutive" and "induced" P-450s.

  16. Fast Proton Hopping Detection in Ice Ih by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Presiado, Itay; Lal, Jyotsana; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Huppert, Dan I

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was employed on samples of HCl-doped polycrystalline ice I{sub h}. The analysis of the scattering signal provides the excess proton hopping time, {tau}{sub hop}, in the temperature range of 140-195 K. The hopping time strongly depends on the temperature of the sample, and the activation energy of a hopping step is 17 kJ/mol. The values of {tau}{sub hop} of the current experiment are in good agreement with calculated values derived from previous photochemical experiments,(1) in which we found that the proton hopping time at T > 242 K is on the order of 200 fs, roughly 10 times shorter than in liquid water at room temperature.

  17. Fast proton hopping detection in ice I{sub h} by quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Presiado, I.; Lal, J.; Mamontov, E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Huppert, D.

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was employed on samples of HCl-doped polycrystalline ice I{sub h}. The analysis of the scattering signal provides the excess proton hopping time, {tau}{sub hop}, in the temperature range of 140-195 K. The hopping time strongly depends on the temperature of the sample, and the activation energy of a hopping step is 17 kJ/mol. The values of {tau}{sub hop} of the current experiment are in good agreement with calculated values derived from previous photochemical experiments, in which we found that the proton hopping time at T > 242 K is on the order of 200 fs, roughly 10 times shorter than in liquid water at room temperature.

  18. Antifeedant activity of xanthohumol and supercritical carbon dioxide extract of spent hops against stored product pests.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, J; Hurej, M; Rój, E; Popłoński, J; Kośny, L; Huszcza, E

    2015-08-01

    Xanthohumol, a prenylated flavonoid from hops, and a supercritical carbon dioxide extract of spent hops were studied for their antifeedant activity against stored product insect pests: Sitophilus granarius L., Tribolium confusum Duv. and Trogoderma granarium Everts. Xanthohumol exhibited medium deterrent activity against the adults of S. granarius L. and larvae of T. confusum Duv. The spent hops extract was more active than xanthohumol towards the adults of T. confusum Duv. The potential application of the crude spent hops extract as a feeding deterrent against the stored product pests is proposed.

  19. Hip-hop as a resource for understanding the urban context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bryan

    2010-06-01

    This review explores Edmin's "Science education for the hip-hop generation" by documenting how he frames hip-hop as a means to access urban student culture. He argues that hip-hop is more than a mere music genre, but rather a culture that provides young people with ways of connecting to the world. Two primary ideas emerged as central to his work. First, he contends that students develop communal relationships and collective identities based on the common experiences expressed in hip-hop. Second, he identifies how the conscious recognition of institutional oppression serves a central feature in urban schools. Emdin's rich, and personal call for a greater understanding of hip-hop culture provides the text with an unmatched strength. He skillfully uses personal narratives from his own experience as well as quotes and references from hip-hop songs to make the nuances of hip hop transparent to science educators. Conversely, the limitation of this text is found in its unfulfilled promise to provide pragmatic examples of how to engage in a hip-hop based science education. Emdin's work is ultimately valuable as it extends our current knowledge about urban students and hip-hop in meaningful ways.

  20. Disposition of hop prenylflavonoids in human breast tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bolca, Selin; Li, Jinghu; Nikolic, Dejan; Roche, Nathalie; Blondeel, Phillip; Possemiers, Sam; De Keukeleire, Denis; Bracke, Marc; Heyerick, Arne; van Breemen, Richard B.; Depypere, Herman

    2013-01-01

    Hop-derived products may contain xanthohumol (XN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN). To evaluate the potential health effects of these prenylflavonoids on breast tissue, their concentration, nature of metabolites, and biodistribution were assessed and compared to 17β-estradiol (E2) exposure. In this dietary intervention study, women were randomly allocated to hop (n=11; 2.04 mg XN, 1.20 mg IX, and 0.1 mg 8-PN per supplement) or control (n=10). After a run-in of ≥4d, 3 supplements were taken daily during 5d preceding an aesthetic breast reduction. Blood and breast biopsies were analyzed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Upon hop administration, XN and IX concentrations ranged between 0.72–17.65 nmol/L and 3.30–31.50 nmol/L, and between 0.26– 5.14 pmol/g and 1.16–83.67 pmol/g in hydrolyzed serum and breast tissue, respectively. 8-PN however, was only detected in samples of moderate and strong 8-PN producers (0.43–7.06 nmol/L and 0.78–4.83 pmol/g). Phase I metabolism appeared to be minor (~10%), whereas extensive glucuronidation was observed (>90%). Total prenylflavonoids showed a breast adipose/glandular tissue distribution of 38/62 and their derived E2-equivalents were negligible compared to E2 in adipose (384.6±118.8 fmol/g, P=0.009) and glandular (241.6±93.1 fmol/g, P<0.001) tissue, respectively. Consequently, low doses of prenylflavonoids are unlikely to elicit estrogenic responses in breast tissue. PMID:20486208

  1. Semiclassical quantization of nonadiabatic systems with hopping periodic orbits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-02-21

    We present a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems consisting of fast and slow degrees of freedom (DOFs) by extending Gutzwiller's trace formula to a nonadiabatic form. The quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow DOF, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels. In addition to the semiclassical quantization condition, we also discuss chaotic dynamics involved in the classical limit of nonadiabatic dynamics.

  2. Hopping Magnetotransport in the δ-DOPING Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F.

    We review the observations on hopping transport in planar arrays of Si donor atoms in GaAs epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that properly designed δ-doping layers permit one to unambigously identify interference effects that result from the coherent superposition of the tunneling amplitudes along alternative paths in the plane. Magnetic flux through the area generated by the paths destroys the interference and leads to negative magnetoresistance. We discuss the observed non-monotonic variation of the resistance.

  3. Structure and Charge Hopping Dynamics in Green Rust

    SciTech Connect

    Wander, Matthew C; Rosso, Kevin M; Schoonen, Martin A

    2007-08-02

    Green rust is a family of mixed-valent iron phases formed by a number of abiotic and biotic processes under alkaline suboxic conditions. Due to its high Fe2+ content, green rust is a potentially important phase for pollution remediation by serving as a powerful electron donor for reductive transformation. However, mechanisms of oxidation of this material are poorly understood. An essential component of the green rust structure is a mixed-valent brucite-like Fe(OH)2 sheet comprised of a two dimensional network of edge-sharing iron octahedra. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra show a characteristic signature for intermediate valence on the iron atoms in this sheet, indicative of a Fe2+-Fe3+ valence interchange reaction faster than approximately 107 s-1. Using Fe(OH)2 as structural analogue for reduced green rust, we performed Hartree-Fock calculations on periodic slab models and cluster representations to determine the structure and hopping mobility of Fe3+ hole polarons in this material, providing a first principles assessment of the Fe2+-Fe3+ valence interchange reaction rate. The calculations show that among three possible symmetry unique iron-to-iron hops within a sheet, a hop to next-nearest neighbors at an intermediate distance of 5.6 Å is the fastest. The predicted rate is on the order of 1012 s-1 consistent the Mössbauer-based constraint. All other possibilities, including hopping across interlayer spaces, are predicted to be slower than 107 s-1. Collectively, the findings suggest the possibility of hole self-diffusion along sheets as a mechanism for regeneration of lattice Fe2+ sites, consistent with previous experimental observations of edge-inward progressive oxidation of green rust.

  4. Hopping conduction in single ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Ze; Zhou, Feng; Lu, Li; Jin, Aizi; Gu, Changzhi

    2005-06-01

    ZnO nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The dc electrical conductivity of a single ZnO nanowire was investigated over a wide temperature range from 300 to 6 K. It is found that the temperature dependence of conductivity follows the relation \\ln \\rho \\sim T^{-1/2} . The conductivity data suggest that the dominant conduction mechanism is Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping conduction. The strong electron-electron interaction in the nanowire is also proved by the I-V and d I/d V curves, on which there emerges a Coulomb gap-like structure at low temperatures.

  5. Semiclassical quantization of nonadiabatic systems with hopping periodic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    We present a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems consisting of fast and slow degrees of freedom (DOFs) by extending Gutzwiller's trace formula to a nonadiabatic form. The quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow DOF, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels. In addition to the semiclassical quantization condition, we also discuss chaotic dynamics involved in the classical limit of nonadiabatic dynamics.

  6. Compressive detection of frequency-hopping spread spectrum signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Marcellin, Michael W.; Goodman, Nathan A.; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, compressive detection strategies for FHSS signals are introduced. Rapid switching of the carrier frequency among many channels using a pseudorandom sequence makes detection of FHSS signals challenging. The conventional approach to detect these signals is to rapidly scan small segments of the spectrum sequentially. However, such a scanner has the inherent risk of never overlapping with the transmitted signal depending on factors such as rate of hopping and scanning. In this paper, we propose compressive detection strategies that sample the full spectrum in a compressive manner. Theory and simulations are presented to illustrate the benefits of the proposed framework.

  7. Compressive sensing of frequency-hopping spread spectrum signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Kim, Yookyung; Goodman, Nathan A.; Ashok, Amit; Bilgin, Ali

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, compressive sensing strategies for interception of Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) signals are introduced. Rapid switching of the carrier among many frequency channels using a pseudorandom sequence (unknown to the eavesdropper) makes FHSS signals dicult to intercept. The conventional approach to intercept FHSS signals necessitates capturing of all frequency channels and, thus, requires the Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) to sample at very high rates. Using the fact that the FHSS signals have sparse instanta- neous spectra, we propose compressive sensing strategies for their interception. The proposed techniques are validated using Gaussian Frequency-Shift Keying (GFSK) modulated FHSS signals as dened by the Bluetooth specication.

  8. Semiclassical quantization of nonadiabatic systems with hopping periodic orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Mikiya Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-02-21

    We present a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum–classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems consisting of fast and slow degrees of freedom (DOFs) by extending Gutzwiller’s trace formula to a nonadiabatic form. The quantum–classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow DOF, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels. In addition to the semiclassical quantization condition, we also discuss chaotic dynamics involved in the classical limit of nonadiabatic dynamics.

  9. The analysis of a coherent frequency hopped spread spectrum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chun-Meng; Milstein, Laurence B.

    A digital joint phase/timing tracking loop for a coherent frequency-hopped spread-spectrum system is analyzed for both training mode and tracking performance. Under minor assumptions, the phase error is modeled as a homogeneous finite Markov chain. The length of the training period, the approximate probability of entering the tracking range, the steady-state average error probability, and the mean-time to loss-of-lock are derived. The effects of both nonzero RF phase error and cubic channel phase response are presented. It is shown that the performance of the system can be designed to be close to that of a perfectly synchronized system.

  10. Frequency synchronization of a frequency-hopped MFSK communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Polydoros, A.; Simon, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the performance of fine-frequency synchronization. The performance degradation due to imperfect frequency synchronization is found in terms of the effect on bit error probability as a function of full-band or partial-band noise jamming levels and of the number of frequency hops used in the estimator. The effect of imperfect fine-time synchronization is also included in the calculation of fine-frequency synchronization performance to obtain the overall performance degradation due to synchronization errors.

  11. High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments: HOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The project called High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS) has been funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program during April, 2012 â€" April, 2015. HOPS is an enabler for science missions with extremely high data processing rates. In this three-year effort of HOPS, Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) and 3-D Winds were of interest in particular. As for ASCENDS, HOPS replaces time domain data processing with frequency domain processing while making the real-time on-board data processing possible. As for 3-D Winds, HOPS offers real-time high-resolution wind profiling with 4,096-point fast Fourier transform (FFT). HOPS is adaptable with quick turn-around time. Since HOPS offers reusable user-friendly computational elements, its FPGA IP Core can be modified for a shorter development period if the algorithm changes. The FPGA and memory bandwidth of HOPS is 20 GB/sec while the typical maximum processor-to-SDRAM bandwidth of the commercial radiation tolerant high-end processors is about 130-150 MB/sec. The inter-board communication bandwidth of HOPS is 4 GB/sec while the effective processor-to-cPCI bandwidth of commercial radiation tolerant high-end boards is about 50-75 MB/sec. Also, HOPS offers VHDL cores for the easy and efficient implementation of ASCENDS and 3-D Winds, and other similar algorithms. A general overview of the 3-year development of HOPS is the goal of this presentation.

  12. The Pseudomonas syringae effector protein HopZ1a suppresses effector-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Guevara, Carlos M; Tornero, Pablo; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2010-09-01

    *The Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae type III effector HopZ1a is a member of the HopZ effector family of cysteine-proteases that triggers immunity in Arabidopsis. This immunity is dependent on HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity, and independent of known resistance genes. We have previously shown that HopZ1a-triggered immunity is partially additive to that triggered by AvrRpt2. These partially additive effects could be caused by at least two mechanisms: their signalling pathways share a common element(s), or one effector interferes with the response triggered by the other. *Here, we investigate the molecular basis for the partially additive effect displayed by AvrRpt2- and HopZ1a-triggered immunities, by analysing competitive indices, hypersensitive response and symptom induction, PR-1 accumulation, expression of PR genes, and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) induction. *Partially additive effects between these defence responses require HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity, and also take place between HopZ1a and AvrRps4 or AvrRpm1-triggered responses. We establish that HopZ1a-triggered immunity is independent of salicylic acid (SA), EDS1, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET)-dependent pathways, and show that HopZ1a suppresses the induction of PR-1 and PR-5 associated with P. syringae pv tomato (Pto)-triggered effector-triggered immunity (ETI)-like defences, AvrRpt2-triggered immunity, and Pto or Pto (avrRpt2) activation of SAR, and that suppression requires HopZ1a cysteine-protease activity. *Our results indicate that HopZ1a triggers an unusual resistance independent of known pathways and suppresses SA and EDS1-dependent resistance.

  13. Analysis of the structure and function of the transcriptional coregulator HOP.

    PubMed

    Kook, Hyun; Yung, Wendy W; Simpson, Raina J; Kee, Hae Jin; Shin, Sera; Lowry, Jason A; Loughlin, Fionna E; Yin, Zhan; Epstein, Jonathan A; Mackay, Joel P

    2006-09-01

    Homeodomain-only protein (HOP) is an 8-kDa transcriptional corepressor that is essential for the normal development of the mammalian heart. Previous studies have shown that HOP, which consists entirely of a putative homeodomain, acts downstream of Nkx2.5 and associates with the serum response factor (SRF), repressing transcription from SRF-responsive genes. HOP is also able to recruit histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, consistent with its ability to repress transcription. Unlike other classic homeodomain proteins, HOP does not appear to interact with DNA, although it has been unclear if this is because of an overall divergent structure or because of specific amino acid differences between HOP and other homeodomains. To work toward an understanding of HOP function, we have determined the 3D structure of full-length HOP and used a range of biochemical assays to define the parts of the protein that are functionally important for its repression activity. We show that HOP forms a classical homeodomain fold but that it cannot recognize double stranded DNA, a result that emphasizes the importance of caution in predicting protein function from sequence homology alone. We also demonstrate that two distinct regions on the surface of HOP are required for its ability to repress an SRF-driven reporter gene, and it is likely that these motifs direct interactions between HOP and partner proteins such as SRF- and HDAC-containing complexes. Our results demonstrate that the homeodomain fold has been co-opted during evolution for functions other than sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that HOP functions as an adaptor protein to mediate transcriptional repression. PMID:16939210

  14. Model for using hip-hop music for small group HIV/AIDS prevention counseling with African American adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Stephens, T; Braithwaite, R L; Taylor, S E

    1998-10-01

    Currently little attention has been directed, with the exception of peer education efforts, to constructively develop new and innovative ways to promote HIV/AIDS primary prevention among African American (AA) adolescents and young adults. With this in mind, the aim of this conceptual effort is to present a HIV/AIDS preventive counseling protocol developed for use with AA young adults that makes use of hip-hop music, a form of music popularized by young AAs. The author contend that an increased understanding of the relationships that many AA young adults have with hip-hop music may be used by disease prevention personnel to educate these populations about protective factors for HIV. Making use of hip-hop music is one strategy for integrating counseling in prevention and health maintenance. The overall implications of using hip-hop music in health promotion are unlimited. First, this method makes use of cultural relevant materials to address the educational and health needs of the target community. Second, it is grounded in an approach that serves to stimulate cooperative learning based on peer developed content. Moreover, the use of this medium can be applied to other health promotion activities such as violence/harm reduction and substance abuse prevention, upon reviews of songs for appropriate content. The authors contend that such an approach holds heuristic value in dealing with HIV/AIDS prevention among AA young adults. Additional testing of the intervention is warranted in the refinement of this innovative intervention.

  15. Correlation between hip function and knee kinematics evaluated by three-dimensional motion analysis during lateral and medial side-hopping

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiromitsu; Takiguchi, Kohei; Shibata, Yohei; Okubo, Satoshi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the limb during side-hopping and hip/knee interaction during this motion have not been clarified. The purposes of this study were to examine the biomechanical parameters of the knee during side hop and analyze its relationship with clinical measurements of hip function. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven male college rugby players were included. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess motion characteristics of the knee during side hop. In addition, hip range of motion and muscle strength were evaluated. Subsequently, the relationship between knee motion and the clinical parameters of the hip was analyzed. [Results] In the lateral touchdown phase, the knee was positioned in an abducted and externally rotated position, and increasing abduction moment was applied to the knee. An analysis of the interaction between knee motion and hip function showed that range of motion for hip internal rotation was significantly correlated with external rotation angle and external rotation/abduction moments of the knee during the lateral touchdown phase. [Conclusion] Range of motion for hip internal rotation should be taken into consideration for identifying the biomechanical characteristics in the side hop test results. PMID:27799670

  16. Developmental sequences for hopping as assessment instruments: a generalizability analysis.

    PubMed

    Painter, M A

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the generalizability with which undergraduate kinesiology and elementary education students can rate children's hopping performances according to prelongitudinally validated developmental sequences for the arms, legs, and total body. Twenty observers were assigned to one of four training groups (n = 5): (a) kinesiology students/total-body sequence, (b) kinesiology students/component sequences, (c) elementary education students/total-body sequence, and (d) elementary education students/component sequences. The observers rated five trials of videotaped hopping performances by 10 boys and 10 girls between the ages of 3.5 and 9.0 years. The results suggested that when kinesiology students receive 2 hours of training, one observer can reliably assess leg action in one trial (.80) and arm action in five trials (.80). In contrast, one elementary education student can reliably assess leg action within five trials (.80), but the average score of two observers assessing three trials each is needed to assess arm action (.81). Reliable assessment of total-body action requires two observers for both the kinesiology students (four trials each = .80) and the elementary education students (two trials each = .84).

  17. HOPS 383: AN OUTBURSTING CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Safron, Emily J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Booker, Joseph; Fischer, William J.; Furlan, Elise; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Stanke, Thomas; Billot, Nicolas; Tobin, John J.; Ali, Babar; Allen, Lori E.; Watson, Dan M.; Wilson, T. L.

    2015-02-10

    We report the dramatic mid-infrared brightening between 2004 and 2006 of Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) 383, a deeply embedded protostar adjacent to NGC 1977 in Orion. By 2008, the source became a factor of 35 brighter at 24 μm with a brightness increase also apparent at 4.5 μm. The outburst is also detected in the submillimeter by comparing APEX/SABOCA to SCUBA data, and a scattered-light nebula appeared in NEWFIRM K{sub s} imaging. The post-outburst spectral energy distribution indicates a Class 0 source with a dense envelope and a luminosity between 6 and 14 L{sub ⊙}. Post-outburst time-series mid- and far-infrared photometry show no long-term fading and variability at the 18% level between 2009 and 2012. HOPS 383 is the first outbursting Class 0 object discovered, pointing to the importance of episodic accretion at early stages in the star formation process. Its dramatic rise and lack of fading over a 6 year period hint that it may be similar to FU Ori outbursts, although the luminosity appears to be significantly smaller than the canonical luminosities of such objects.

  18. Hops for Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms: Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Fatemeh; Mobedi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is a critical stage of women's life associated with various complaints and distresses. Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as hot flushes, night sweats, sleep disturbances, and fatigue, are the most common menopause symptoms affecting about 50% to 80% of middle-aged women. Obviously, these symptoms, resulting from estrogen deficiency during menopause, can exert negative effects on women's health and quality of life and thus require to be managed through approaches such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Many herbal treatments for menopause symptoms contain and its components such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-PN, isoxanthohumol and xanthohumol. Recent in-vivo studies have highlighted the ability of 8-prenylnaringenin to reduce serum-luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), to increase serum prolactin levels and uterine weight, and to induce vaginal hyperplastic epithelium. Previous research has shown that hops extract can strongly bind to both estrogen receptors, stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells, and upregulate presenelin-2 and progesterone receptor mRNA in Ishikawa cells. Numerous clinical trials have documented significant reductions in the frequency of hot flushes following the administration of hop-containing preparations. Nevertheless, further clinical trials with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted to confirm such benefits.

  19. Sequential vortex hopping in an array of artificial pinning centers

    SciTech Connect

    Keay, J. C.

    2010-02-24

    We use low-temperature magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to study the hopping motion of vortices in an array of artificial pinning centers (APCs). The array consists of nanoscale holes etched in a niobium thin film by Ar-ion sputtering through an anodic aluminum-oxide template. Variable-temperature magnetometry shows a transition temperature of 7.1 K and an enhancement of the magnetization up to the third matching field at 5 K. Using MFM with attractive and repulsive tip-vortex interaction, we measure the vortex-pinning strength and investigate the motion of individual vortices in the APC array. The depinning force for individual vortices at low field ranged from 0.7 to 1.2 pN. The motion of individual vortices was found to be reproducible and consistent with movement between adjacent holes in the film. The movements are repeatable but the sequence of hops depends on the scan direction. This asymmetry in the motion indicates nonuniform local pinning, a consequence of array disorder and hole-size variation.

  20. Hops for Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Fatemeh; Mobedi, Hamid; Roozbeh, Nasibeh

    2016-08-01

    Menopause is a critical stage of women's life associated with various complaints and distresses. Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as hot flushes, night sweats, sleep disturbances, and fatigue, are the most common menopause symptoms affecting about 50% to 80% of middle-aged women. Obviously, these symptoms, resulting from estrogen deficiency during menopause, can exert negative effects on women's health and quality of life and thus require to be managed through approaches such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Many herbal treatments for menopause symptoms contain and its components such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-PN, isoxanthohumol and xanthohumol. Recent in-vivo studies have highlighted the ability of 8-prenylnaringenin to reduce serum-luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), to increase serum prolactin levels and uterine weight, and to induce vaginal hyperplastic epithelium. Previous research has shown that hops extract can strongly bind to both estrogen receptors, stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells, and upregulate presenelin-2 and progesterone receptor mRNA in Ishikawa cells. Numerous clinical trials have documented significant reductions in the frequency of hot flushes following the administration of hop-containing preparations. Nevertheless, further clinical trials with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted to confirm such benefits. PMID:27617238

  1. Hops for Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms: Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Fatemeh; Mobedi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is a critical stage of women's life associated with various complaints and distresses. Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as hot flushes, night sweats, sleep disturbances, and fatigue, are the most common menopause symptoms affecting about 50% to 80% of middle-aged women. Obviously, these symptoms, resulting from estrogen deficiency during menopause, can exert negative effects on women's health and quality of life and thus require to be managed through approaches such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Many herbal treatments for menopause symptoms contain and its components such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-PN, isoxanthohumol and xanthohumol. Recent in-vivo studies have highlighted the ability of 8-prenylnaringenin to reduce serum-luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), to increase serum prolactin levels and uterine weight, and to induce vaginal hyperplastic epithelium. Previous research has shown that hops extract can strongly bind to both estrogen receptors, stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells, and upregulate presenelin-2 and progesterone receptor mRNA in Ishikawa cells. Numerous clinical trials have documented significant reductions in the frequency of hot flushes following the administration of hop-containing preparations. Nevertheless, further clinical trials with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted to confirm such benefits. PMID:27617238

  2. Robust hopping based on virtual pendulum posture control.

    PubMed

    Sharbafi, Maziar A; Maufroy, Christophe; Ahmadabadi, Majid Nili; Yazdanpanah, Mohammad J; Seyfarth, Andre

    2013-09-01

    A new control approach to achieve robust hopping against perturbations in the sagittal plane is presented in this paper. In perturbed hopping, vertical body alignment has a significant role for stability. Our approach is based on the virtual pendulum concept, recently proposed, based on experimental findings in human and animal locomotion. In this concept, the ground reaction forces are pointed to a virtual support point, named virtual pivot point (VPP), during motion. This concept is employed in designing the controller to balance the trunk during the stance phase. New strategies for leg angle and length adjustment besides the virtual pendulum posture control are proposed as a unified controller. This method is investigated by applying it on an extension of the spring loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model. Trunk, leg mass and damping are added to the SLIP model in order to make the model more realistic. The stability is analyzed by Poincaré map analysis. With fixed VPP position, stability, disturbance rejection and moderate robustness are achieved, but with a low convergence speed. To improve the performance and attain higher robustness, an event-based control of the VPP position is introduced, using feedback of the system states at apexes. Discrete linear quartic regulator is used to design the feedback controller. Considerable enhancements with respect to stability, convergence speed and robustness against perturbations and parameter changes are achieved.

  3. Helicobacter pylori hopQ alleles (type I and II) in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEYLABADLO, HAMED EBRAHIMZADEH; YEKANI, MINA; GHOTASLOU, REZA

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) outer membrane protein (HopQ) of is one of the proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to have a role in the virulence of H. pylori. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between H. pylori virulence types I and II hopQ genotypes and patients with different gastrointestinal diseases. A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was used to determine the presence of type I and type II hopQ genes in 88 H. pylori strains isolated from H. pylori-infected patients. Of the total 88 H. pylori isolates, type I and type II hopQ alleles were detected in 52 (59.1%) and 36 (40.9%), respectively. A significant association was found between type I hopQ gene and gastric cancer [odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3–4.1] and gastric ulcers (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.4–4.3). A significant association was also identified between the type II hopQ gene and gastric cancer (odds ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1–3.0). The association between hopQ type I and hopQ type II genotypes and clinical status suggest that these genes may be helpful in the universal prediction of specific disease risks. PMID:27123254

  4. A Multicomponent UV Analysis of ["alpha"]- and ["beta"]-Acids in Hops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egts, Haley; Durben, Dan J.; Dixson, John A.; Zehfus, Micheal H.

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of ["alpha"]- and ["beta"]-acids (humulones and lupulones) in a hops sample using a multicomponent UV spectroscopic analysis of a methanolic hop extract. When compared with standard methods, this lab can be considered "greener" because it uses smaller volumes of safer solvents (methanol instead of…

  5. Polish Hip Hop as a Form of Multiliteracies and Situated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrence, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnographic study was to examine Hip Hop in Poland through the lens of multiliteracies and situated learning. This analysis is concerned with the transmission of Hip Hop to and within Wroclaw, Poland, and its acculturation and assimilation in Wroclaw, Poland. Further, this study seeks to illustrate how professional Polish Hip…

  6. Day Care Hopping: Stabilizing Day Care Options for Low-Income Mothers through Subsidies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drentea, Patricia; Durham, Suzanne; Mwaria, Mercie; Norman, Emily; Xi, Juan

    2004-01-01

    We examined how to allocate a subsidy to low-income women that would stabilize children in day care at a Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA). The subsidy is to alleviate day care hopping (i.e. when parents move from day care to day care) leaving unpaid tuitions at each place. Day care hopping is really a survival strategy for the working…

  7. Effects of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract on volatile fatty acid production by rumen bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To determine the effects of hops extract, on in vitro volatile fatty acid (VFA) production by bovine rumen microorganisms. Methods and Results: When mixed rumen microbes were suspended in media containing carbohydrates, the initial rates of VFA production were suppressed by beta-acid rich hops...

  8. Trends in German Hip Hop Music and Its Usefulness for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    German hip hop music has proved productive, especially since 2000 when rap in Germany experienced something like a first crisis. As a response, German hip hop artists and record labels have ventured off in several different directions including other musical genres, different topics, and new approaches to German rap. This article discusses the…

  9. Deal with It We Must: Education, Social Justice, and the Curriculum of Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baszile, Denise Taliaferro

    2009-01-01

    Although hip hop culture has been one of the most significant urban youth movements over the last three decades, it has only recently gained attention within the educational literature as a force to be reckoned with. And even then, much of the literature seeks to understand how hip hop can be used to engage students in the official school…

  10. Hegemony, Hope, and the Harlem Renaissance: Taking Hip Hop Culture Seriously

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Robert J., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Adult education instructors and administrators, who typically are not members of the hip hop generation, often have little knowledge and understanding of rap music (also known as gangsta rap) and hip hop culture, and consequently do not take the black popular cultural phenomenon seriously as it relates to adult education. Adult educators,…

  11. Student Perceptions of the Hip Hop Culture's Influence on the Undergraduate Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessel, Roger D.; Wallaert, Kerry A.

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine how identification and engagement with the hip hop culture influenced the educational experiences of undergraduate students at a Midwestern, predominately White university by interviewing 11 students who self-identified as being immersed in the hip hop culture. Through a qualitative, phenomenological investigation,…

  12. Dynamic jamming effects on code synchronization of frequency-hop spread-spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grouw, M. G.; Wickert, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    A general scheme for the code synchronization of Frequency-Hop Spread-Spectrum (FHSS) is presented. Synchronization performance is observed in the presence of channel dynamics and is characterized by mean synchronization time and mean time to loss of lock. A fixed-threshold multiple-dwell synchronization scheme is shown to adequately mitigate the effects of random hop jamming.

  13. Characterisation of the Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-Hsp90 organising protein (PfHop).

    PubMed

    Gitau, Grace W; Mandal, Pradipta; Blatch, Gregory L; Przyborski, Jude; Shonhai, Addmore

    2012-03-01

    Malaria is caused by Plasmodium species, whose transmission to vertebrate hosts is facilitated by mosquito vectors. The transition from the cold blooded mosquito vector to the host represents physiological stress to the parasite, and additionally malaria blood stage infection is characterised by intense fever periods. In recent years, it has become clear that heat shock proteins play an essential role during the parasite's life cycle. Plasmodium falciparum expresses two prominent heat shock proteins: heat shock protein 70 (PfHsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (PfHsp90). Both of these proteins have been implicated in the development and pathogenesis of malaria. In eukaryotes, Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins are functionally linked by an essential adaptor protein known as the Hsp70-Hsp90 organising protein (Hop). In this study, recombinant P. falciparum Hop (PfHop) was heterologously produced in E. coli and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Using specific anti-PfHop antisera, the expression and localisation of PfHop in P. falciparum was investigated. PfHop was shown to co-localise with PfHsp70 and PfHsp90 in parasites at the trophozoite stage. Gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that PfHop was present in a complex together with PfHsp70 and PfHsp90. The association of PfHop with both PfHsp70 and PfHsp90 suggests that this protein may mediate the functional interaction between the two chaperones.

  14. Hip-Hop Culture in College Students' Lives: Elements, Embodiment, and Higher Edutainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2011-01-01

    College campuses have become rich sites of hip-hop culture and knowledge production. Despite the attention that campus personnel and researchers have paid to student life, the field of higher education has often misunderstood the ways that hip-hop culture exists in college students' lives. Based upon in-depth interviews, observations of…

  15. Representin': Drawing from Hip-Hop and Urban Youth Culture to Inform Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Jason G.

    2009-01-01

    The potential of drawing from urban youth culture, and hip-hop more specifically, to serve as a bridge to the standard curriculum has been well documented. However, the richness and potential benefits of hip-hop are more far-reaching and present significant implications for teacher education and professional development efforts as well. This…

  16. We Can Relate: Hip-Hop Culture, Critical Pedagogy, and the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovall, David

    2006-01-01

    This article seeks to locate hip-hop in the realm of popular culture in education. Through the use of song lyrics, the author suggests the use of rap music to provide context for the humanities and social sciences in secondary curriculum. Using a theoretical and practical lens, the article argues for the use of hip-hop and other elements of…

  17. Supporting Communication and Argumentation in Urban Science Education: Hip-Hop, the Battle, and the Cypher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on an exploration of communication and argumentation in urban science classrooms, and provides a description of the role that Hip-hop based education plays in supporting these major components of science education. The paper is intended to both support, and critique conventional uses of hip-hop based education, and provide…

  18. Language, Localization, and the Real: Hip-Hop and the Global Spread of Authenticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennycook, Alastair

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the relationship between the call for authenticity, its relocalization in other contexts, and the use of English. Hip-hop forces us to confront some of the conflictual discourses of authenticity and locality, from those that insist that African American hip-hop is the only real variety and that all other forms are…

  19. Empowerment in Context: Lessons from Hip-Hop Culture for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Raphael, Jr.; Deepak, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Hip-hop culture can be used as a conduit to enhanced cultural competence and practice skills through the individual and community empowerment framework. This framework is introduced as a tool for direct practice that allows social workers to understand the competing messages within hip-hop culture and how they may impact youths by promoting or…

  20. Affiliation and Alienation: Hip-Hop, Rap, and Urban Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The critiques of rap artists and other participants in hip-hop culture provide data for teachers and researchers to investigate the attitudes of US urban youth towards schooling. This study explores the complex relationships between hip-hop and science education by examining how rap lyrics project beliefs about schooling, the relevance of existing…

  1. Sampling Practices and Social Spaces: Exploring a Hip-Hop Approach to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2010-01-01

    Much more than a musical genre, hip-hop culture exists as an animating force in the lives of many young adults. This article looks beyond the moral concerns often associated with rap music to explore how hip-hop as a larger set of expressions and practices implicates the educational experiences, activities, and approaches for students. The article…

  2. Hip-Hop, Social Justice, and Environmental Education: Toward a Critical Ecological Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cermak, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    This essay describes an educational initiative that used environmentally themed (green) hip-hop to stimulate learning in an environmental science classroom. Students were then challenged to compose their own green hip-hop and their lyrics demonstrated skills that have thematic consistency around what is called a Critical Ecological Literacy (CEL).…

  3. Teaching Controversal Topics in Contemporary German Culture through Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the rich cultural resources embedded with German hip-hop music and its potential impact on the foreign language classroom. In particular, this article suggests methods and materials for integrating German hip-hop music in the discussion of recent controversial cultural events and attitudes in German after the "Wende."

  4. Hip-Hop and a Hybrid Text in a Postsecondary English Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Deborah M.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the epistemology present in hip-hop music and its reflection in the writing of one African American student in a postsecondary transitional English class. An integration of hip-hop and academic literacy practices in the student's essay challenges the supremacy of a "standard" academic English and deficit perspectives about…

  5. Wounded Healing: Forming a Storytelling Community in Hip-Hop Lit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Marc Lamont

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Over the past 5 years, there has been a growing body of scholarship that examines the intersections of hip-hop culture and classroom pedagogy. Although recent scholarship has persuasively demonstrated the classroom potential of hip-hop texts for promoting student engagement, scaffolding sanctioned forms of knowledge, and…

  6. Proust, Hip-Hop, and Death in First-Year Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirc, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    Hip-hop as content in a first-year writing course offers students a powerful way to connect with their worlds. This article draws on Marcel Proust as a kind of rhyme to legitimate hip-hop as a substantive expressive medium to achieve artistry in writing.

  7. Hip-Hop's Influence on the Identity Development of Black Female College Students: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Wilma J.; West, Nicole M.; Jackson, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    This article explores unique issues regarding the effects of hip-hop culture on the identity development of young Black female college students. Through the lenses of womanist and Black feminist perspectives, the intersecting impact of race and gender are reviewed within the context of the competing influences of hip-hop on Black female identity.…

  8. How Hip-Hop Musicians Learn: Strategies in Informal Creative Music Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan; Folkestad, Goran

    2004-01-01

    The study of informal musical learning outside institutional settings, such as schools, has proved to contribute important knowledge to aspects of music education. Hip-hop, as an example of informal musical learning, has so far been quite an unexplored field for research. The present study investigates music creation within two hip-hop groups (…

  9. Spring-like leg behaviour, musculoskeletal mechanics and control in maximum and submaximum height human hopping

    PubMed Central

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Richard Casius, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how humans regulate their ‘leg stiffness’ in hopping, and to determine whether this regulation is intended to minimize energy expenditure. ‘Leg stiffness’ is the slope of the relationship between ground reaction force and displacement of the centre of mass (CM). Variations in leg stiffness were achieved in six subjects by having them hop at maximum and submaximum heights at a frequency of 1.7 Hz. Kinematics, ground reaction forces and electromyograms were measured. Leg stiffness decreased with hopping height, from 350 N m−1 kg−1 at 26 cm to 150 N m−1 kg−1 at 14 cm. Subjects reduced hopping height primarily by reducing the amplitude of muscle activation. Experimental results were reproduced with a model of the musculoskeletal system comprising four body segments and nine Hill-type muscles, with muscle stimulation STIM(t) as only input. Correspondence between simulated hops and experimental hops was poor when STIM(t) was optimized to minimize mechanical energy expenditure, but good when an objective function was used that penalized jerk of CM motion, suggesting that hopping subjects are not minimizing energy expenditure. Instead, we speculated, subjects are using a simple control strategy that results in smooth movements and a decrease in leg stiffness with hopping height. PMID:21502123

  10. A Study on Transmission Characteristics of Large Scale Multi-hop Wireless LAN using L2 Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Michifumi; Kurono, Masahiro; Takada, Jun-Ichi

    Transmission characteristics of multi-hop wireless LAN (IEEE 802.11g) are degraded according to the number of hops due to the nature of multiple access control. To decrease the number of hops in the multi-hop network, a connecting node selection method according to the depth of hop is evaluated. To prevent packet congestion due to the flooding packet using the L3 routing method, L2 routing method using only data link layer information such as received power is also evaluated. The maximum number of hops, which indicates the minimum throughput and maximum response time in the multi-hop network, is effectively decreased even under the condition of high repeater-node density by using the number of hops together with the received power as the metrics, in comparison with the conventional metric of received power only.

  11. Structural elucidation of humulone autoxidation products and analysis of their occurrence in stored hops.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Kawachi, Yasuji; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2014-06-27

    The transformation of α-acids [in hops (Humulus lupulus L.)] to iso-α-acids (in beer) during the brewing process is well known, but the occurrence and structure of the oxidized α-acids during hop storage are not well documented. Because an understanding of these oxidized compounds is essential to optimize the effects of oxidized hops on the quality of beer, we investigated the autoxidation products of humulone (a representative congener of α-acids) using a simplified autoxidation model. Among the oxidation products, tricyclooxyisohumulones A (1) and B (2), tricycloperoxyisohumulone A (3), deisopropyltricycloisohumulone (4), and the hemiacetal 5 of tricycloperoxyhumulone A (5') were isolated, and their structures were elucidated for the first time. The occurrence of compounds 1-4 in stored hops was verified using LC/MS/MS analysis. We also monitored the levels of compounds 1-4 during hop storage using LC/MS/MS analysis. PMID:24875004

  12. Research on ADV-Hop localization algorithm in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijun; Xu, Xiulan; Zhang, Zhaohui; Sun, Meiling

    2008-10-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have wide applicability to many important applications including environmental monitoring, military applications and disaster management, etc. In many applications, sensors are assumed to know their absolute locations. Some localization methods of WSN have been proposed. In these methods, nodes equipped with GPS to get precise location information, namely the anchor nodes, are employed to derive the locations of other nodes. Most of the recent work focuses on increasing the accuracy in position estimation. In this paper, aiming at the high communication cost and average positioning error of DV-hop algorithm, an advanced algorithm which is called ADV-hop algorithm is proposed. Simulations are made by the network simulator NS2. The simulation results show that ADV-hop algorithm has lower communication cost and smaller average positioning error than DV-hop algorithm, which makes ADV-hop algorithm more suitable for the node location of WSN.

  13. Lateral Hopping of CO on Ag(110) by Multiple Overtone Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Arafune, Ryuichi; Jung, Jaehoon; Kawai, Maki; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-02-01

    A novel type of action spectrum representing multiple overtone excitations of the v (M -C ) mode was observed for lateral hopping of a CO molecule on Ag(110) induced by inelastically tunneled electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The yield of CO hopping shows sharp increases at 261 ±4 mV , corresponding to the C-O internal stretching mode, and at 61 ±2 , 90 ±2 , and 148 ±7 mV , even in the absence of corresponding fundamental vibrational modes. The mechanism of lateral CO hopping on Ag(110) was explained by the multistep excitation of overtone modes of v (M -C ) based on the numerical fitting of the action spectra, the nonlinear dependence of the hopping rate on the tunneling current, and the hopping barrier obtained from thermal diffusion experiments.

  14. Leg stiffness of older and younger individuals over a range of hopping frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiichi; Mochimaru, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare spring-mass behavior between older and younger individuals at a range of hopping frequencies. A total of 14 elderly and 14 young subjects performed in-place hopping in time with a metronome at frequencies of 2.2, 2.6, and 3.0 Hz. Using a spring-mass model, leg stiffness was calculated as the ratio of maximum ground reaction force to maximum center of mass displacement at the middle of the stance phase during ground contact. The lower extremities of both groups behaved like a simple spring-mass system at all three hopping frequencies. Further, statistical analysis revealed the existence of a significant interaction between hopping frequency and age group on leg stiffness. These results suggest that the sensitivity of leg stiffness to accommodate for variations in hopping frequency is likely to differ between elderly and young individuals. PMID:25716326

  15. Potential use ofGarcinia kola as hop substitute in lager beer brewing.

    PubMed

    Aniche, G N; Uwakwe, G U

    1990-09-01

    The chemical, brewing and anti-microbial properties of a tropical seed,Garcinia kola, were compared with traditional hops. Treatment ofGarcinia kola with methanolic lead acetate produced a yellow precipitate from which organic acids (alpha acids) were contirmed to be present by thin-layer chromatography. Hops, however, had a higher concentration of organic acids thanGarcinia kola. Laboratory brewing trials withGarcinia kola and hops gave beers with simillar chemical properties. Organoleptically,Garcinia kola beer was as acceptable to tasters as hopped beer except that it had an improved bitterness.Garcinia kola and hop extracts exerted similar anti-microbial effects on two beer spollage micro-organisms (Lactobacillus delbruckii andCandida vini).

  16. "Spot and hop": internal referencing for surface plasmon resonance imaging using a three-dimensional microfluidic flow cell array.

    PubMed

    Eddings, Mark A; Eckman, Josh W; Arana, Carlos A; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Connolly, John E; Gale, Bruce K; Myszka, David G

    2009-02-15

    We have developed a novel referencing technique for surface plasmon resonance imaging systems referred to as "spot and hop." The technique enables internal referencing for individual flow cells in a parallel processing microfluidic network. Internal referencing provides the ability to correct for nonspecific binding and instrument drift, significantly improving data quality at each region of interest. The performance of a 48-flow-cell device was demonstrated through a series of studies, including "rise and fall" time, ligand preconcentration, ligand immobilization, analyte binding, and regeneration tests. Interfacing parallel processing fluidics with imaging systems will significantly expand the throughput and applications of array-based optical biosensors while retaining high data quality.

  17. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    PubMed

    Morimoto-Kobayashi, Yumie; Ohara, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Chika; Kitao, Sayoko; Wang, Guanying; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Katayama, Mikio; Nagai, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB) appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA). Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional foods or

  18. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto-Kobayashi, Yumie; Ohara, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Chika; Kitao, Sayoko; Wang, Guanying; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Katayama, Mikio; Nagai, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB) appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA). Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional foods or

  19. RNAi knockdown of Hop (Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein) decreases invasion via MMP-2 down regulation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Naomi; Larkin, AnneMarie; Swan, Niall; Conlon, Kevin; Dowling, Paul; McDermott, Ray; Clynes, Martin

    2011-07-28

    We previously identified Hop as over expressed in invasive pancreatic cancer cell lines and malignant tissues of pancreatic cancer patients, suggesting an important role for Hop in the biology of invasive pancreatic cancer. Hop is a co-chaperone protein that binds to both Hsp70/Hsp90. We hypothesised that by targeting Hop, signalling pathways modulating invasion and client protein stabilisation involving Hsp90-dependent complexes may be altered. In this study, we show that Hop knockdown by small interfering (si)RNA reduces the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, resulting in decreased expression of the downstream target gene, matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2). Hop in conditioned media co-immunoprecipitates with MMP-2, implicating a possible extracellular function for Hop. Knockdown of Hop expression also reduced expression levels of Hsp90 client proteins, HER2, Bcr-Abl, c-MET and v-Src. Furthermore, Hop is strongly expressed in high grade PanINs compared to lower PanIN grades, displaying differential localisation in invasive ductal pancreatic cancer, indicating that the localisation of Hop is an important factor in pancreatic tumours. Our data suggests that the attenuation of Hop expression inactivates key signal transduction proteins which may decrease the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells possibly through the modulation of Hsp90 activity. Therefore, targeting Hop in pancreatic cancer may constitute a viable strategy for targeted cancer therapy.

  20. Bringing Back Sweet (and Not so Sweet) Memories: The Cultural Politics of Memory, Hip-Hop, and Generational Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Marc Lamont

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the salience of collective "memory" and "remembering" among a group of students in Hip-Hop Lit, a hip-hop centered English literature course that I co-taught at "Howard High School," an urban high school in the Northeastern United States. Specifically, this article examines the memory work that occurred within Hip-Hop Lit in…

  1. Hopping transport in hostile reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Missel, Andrew R; Dahmen, Karin A

    2009-02-01

    We investigate transport in a disordered reaction-diffusion model consisting of particles which are allowed to diffuse, compete with one another (2A-->A) , give birth in small areas called "oases" (A-->2A) , and die in the "desert" outside the oases (A-->0) . This model has previously been used to study bacterial populations in the laboratory and is related to a model of plankton populations in the oceans. We first consider the nature of transport between two oases: In the limit of high growth rate, this is effectively a first passage process, and we are able to determine the first passage time probability density function in the limit of large oasis separation. This result is then used along with the theory of hopping conduction in doped semiconductors to estimate the time taken by a population to cross a large system.

  2. Hopping transport in hostile reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missel, Andrew R.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2009-02-01

    We investigate transport in a disordered reaction-diffusion model consisting of particles which are allowed to diffuse, compete with one another (2A→A) , give birth in small areas called “oases” (A→2A) , and die in the “desert” outside the oases (A→0) . This model has previously been used to study bacterial populations in the laboratory and is related to a model of plankton populations in the oceans. We first consider the nature of transport between two oases: In the limit of high growth rate, this is effectively a first passage process, and we are able to determine the first passage time probability density function in the limit of large oasis separation. This result is then used along with the theory of hopping conduction in doped semiconductors to estimate the time taken by a population to cross a large system.

  3. Giant magnetoresistance in the variable-range hopping regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, L. B.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2013-09-15

    We predict the universal power-law dependence of the localization length on the magnetic field in the strongly localized regime. This effect is due to the orbital quantum interference. Physically, this dependence shows up in an anomalously large negative magnetoresistance in the hopping regime. The reason for the universality is that the problem of the electron tunneling in a random media belongs to the same universality class as the directed polymer problem even in the case of wave functions of random sign. We present numerical simulations that prove this conjecture. We discuss the existing experiments that show anomalously large magnetoresistance. We also discuss the role of localized spins in real materials and the spin polarizing effect of the magnetic field.

  4. Systematic network coding for two-hop lossy transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Blostein, Steven; Chan, Wai-Yip

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we consider network transmissions over a single or multiple parallel two-hop lossy paths. These scenarios occur in applications such as sensor networks or WiFi offloading. Random linear network coding (RLNC), where previously received packets are re-encoded at intermediate nodes and forwarded, is known to be a capacity-achieving approach for these networks. However, a major drawback of RLNC is its high encoding and decoding complexity. In this work, a systematic network coding method is proposed. We show through both analysis and simulation that the proposed method achieves higher end-to-end rate as well as lower computational cost than RLNC for finite field sizes and finite-sized packet transmissions.

  5. Understanding hopping transport and thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihnatsenka, S.; Crispin, X.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the conductivity σ and the Seebeck coefficient S for the phonon-assisted hopping transport in conducting polymers poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) or PEDOT, experimentally studied by Bubnova et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 16456 (2012)], 10.1021/ja305188r. We use the Monte Carlo technique as well as the semianalytical approach based on the transport energy concept. We demonstrate that both approaches show a good qualitative agreement for the concentration dependence of σ and S . At the same time, we find that the semianalytical approach is not in a position to describe the temperature dependence of the conductivity. We find that both Gaussian and exponential density of states (DOS) reproduce rather well the experimental data for the concentration dependence of σ and S giving similar fitting parameters of the theory. The obtained parameters correspond to a hopping model of localized quasiparticles extending over 2-3 monomer units with typical jumps over a distance of 3-4 units. The energetic disorder (broadening of the DOS) is estimated to be 0.1 eV. Using the Monte Carlo calculation we reproduce the activation behavior of the conductivity with the calculated activation energy close to the experimentally observed one. We find that for a low carrier concentration a number of free carriers contributing to the transport deviates strongly from the measured oxidation level. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed. We also study the effect of the dimensionality on the charge transport by calculating the Seebeck coefficient and the conductivity for the cases of three-, two-, and one-dimensional motion.

  6. Coupled catastrophes: sudden shifts cascade and hop among interdependent systems.

    PubMed

    Brummitt, Charles D; Barnett, George; D'Souza, Raissa M

    2015-11-01

    An important challenge in several disciplines is to understand how sudden changes can propagate among coupled systems. Examples include the synchronization of business cycles, population collapse in patchy ecosystems, markets shifting to a new technology platform, collapses in prices and in confidence in financial markets, and protests erupting in multiple countries. A number of mathematical models of these phenomena have multiple equilibria separated by saddle-node bifurcations. We study this behaviour in its normal form as fast-slow ordinary differential equations. In our model, a system consists of multiple subsystems, such as countries in the global economy or patches of an ecosystem. Each subsystem is described by a scalar quantity, such as economic output or population, that undergoes sudden changes via saddle-node bifurcations. The subsystems are coupled via their scalar quantity (e.g. trade couples economic output; diffusion couples populations); that coupling moves the locations of their bifurcations. The model demonstrates two ways in which sudden changes can propagate: they can cascade (one causing the next), or they can hop over subsystems. The latter is absent from classic models of cascades. For an application, we study the Arab Spring protests. After connecting the model to sociological theories that have bistability, we use socioeconomic data to estimate relative proximities to tipping points and Facebook data to estimate couplings among countries. We find that although protests tend to spread locally, they also seem to 'hop' over countries, like in the stylized model; this result highlights a new class of temporal motifs in longitudinal network datasets.

  7. Coupled catastrophes: sudden shifts cascade and hop among interdependent systems.

    PubMed

    Brummitt, Charles D; Barnett, George; D'Souza, Raissa M

    2015-11-01

    An important challenge in several disciplines is to understand how sudden changes can propagate among coupled systems. Examples include the synchronization of business cycles, population collapse in patchy ecosystems, markets shifting to a new technology platform, collapses in prices and in confidence in financial markets, and protests erupting in multiple countries. A number of mathematical models of these phenomena have multiple equilibria separated by saddle-node bifurcations. We study this behaviour in its normal form as fast-slow ordinary differential equations. In our model, a system consists of multiple subsystems, such as countries in the global economy or patches of an ecosystem. Each subsystem is described by a scalar quantity, such as economic output or population, that undergoes sudden changes via saddle-node bifurcations. The subsystems are coupled via their scalar quantity (e.g. trade couples economic output; diffusion couples populations); that coupling moves the locations of their bifurcations. The model demonstrates two ways in which sudden changes can propagate: they can cascade (one causing the next), or they can hop over subsystems. The latter is absent from classic models of cascades. For an application, we study the Arab Spring protests. After connecting the model to sociological theories that have bistability, we use socioeconomic data to estimate relative proximities to tipping points and Facebook data to estimate couplings among countries. We find that although protests tend to spread locally, they also seem to 'hop' over countries, like in the stylized model; this result highlights a new class of temporal motifs in longitudinal network datasets. PMID:26559684

  8. Coupled catastrophes: sudden shifts cascade and hop among interdependent systems

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, George; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge in several disciplines is to understand how sudden changes can propagate among coupled systems. Examples include the synchronization of business cycles, population collapse in patchy ecosystems, markets shifting to a new technology platform, collapses in prices and in confidence in financial markets, and protests erupting in multiple countries. A number of mathematical models of these phenomena have multiple equilibria separated by saddle-node bifurcations. We study this behaviour in its normal form as fast–slow ordinary differential equations. In our model, a system consists of multiple subsystems, such as countries in the global economy or patches of an ecosystem. Each subsystem is described by a scalar quantity, such as economic output or population, that undergoes sudden changes via saddle-node bifurcations. The subsystems are coupled via their scalar quantity (e.g. trade couples economic output; diffusion couples populations); that coupling moves the locations of their bifurcations. The model demonstrates two ways in which sudden changes can propagate: they can cascade (one causing the next), or they can hop over subsystems. The latter is absent from classic models of cascades. For an application, we study the Arab Spring protests. After connecting the model to sociological theories that have bistability, we use socioeconomic data to estimate relative proximities to tipping points and Facebook data to estimate couplings among countries. We find that although protests tend to spread locally, they also seem to ‘hop' over countries, like in the stylized model; this result highlights a new class of temporal motifs in longitudinal network datasets. PMID:26559684

  9. Leg stiffness adjustment for a range of hopping frequencies in humans.

    PubMed

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Inoue, Koh; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Omuro, Kohei; Sakamoto, Masanori; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-10

    The purpose of the present study was to determine how humans adjust leg stiffness over a range of hopping frequencies. Ten male subjects performed in place hopping on two legs, at three frequencies (1.5, 2.2, and 3.0Hz). Leg stiffness, joint stiffness and touchdown joint angles were calculated from kinetic and/or kinematics data. Electromyographic activity (EMG) was recorded from six leg muscles. Leg stiffness increased with an increase in hopping frequency. Hip and knee stiffnesses were significantly greater at 3.0Hz than at 1.5Hz. There was no significant difference in ankle stiffness among the three hopping frequencies. Although there were significant differences in EMG activity among the three hopping frequencies, the largest was the 1.5Hz, followed by the 2.2Hz and then 3.0Hz. The subjects landed with a straighter leg (both hip and knee were extended more) with increased hopping frequency. These results suggest that over the range of hopping frequencies we evaluated, humans adjust leg stiffness by altering hip and knee stiffness. This is accomplished by extending the touchdown joint angles rather than by altering neural activity.

  10. RILP interacts with HOPS complex via VPS41 subunit to regulate endocytic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaosi; Yang, Ting; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Yun, Ye; Sun, Lixiang; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Akazawa, Chihiro; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2014-01-01

    The HOPS complex serves as a tethering complex with GEF activity for Ypt7p in yeast to regulate late endosomal membrane maturation. While the role of HOPS complex is well established in yeast cells, its functional and mechanistic aspects in mammalian cells are less well defined. In this study, we report that RILP, a downstream effector of Rab7, interacts with HOPS complex and recruits HOPS subunits to the late endosomal compartment. Structurally, the amino-terminal portion of RILP interacts with HOPS complex. Unexpectedly, this interaction is independent of Rab7. VPS41 subunit of HOPS complex was defined to be the major partner for interacting with RILP. The carboxyl-terminal region of VPS41 was mapped to be responsible for the interaction. Functionally, either depletion of VPS41 by shRNA or overexpression of VPS41 C-terminal half retarded EGF-induced degradation of EGFR. These results suggest that interaction of RILP with HOPS complex via VPS41 plays a role in endocytic trafficking of EGFR. PMID:25445562

  11. Cytotoxic effect of commercial Humulus lupulus L. (hop) preparations – In comparison to its metabolomic fingerprint

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed A.; Wessjohann, Ludger A.

    2012-01-01

    Hops (Humulus lupulus L. Cannabaceae) is an economically important crop, that has drawn more attention in recent years due to its potential pharmaceutical applications. Bitter acids (prenylated polyketides) and prenylflavonoids are the primary phytochemical components that account for hops resins medicinal value. We have previously reported on utilizing untargeted NMR and MS metabolomics for analysis of 13 hops cultivars, revealing for differences in α- versus β-bitter acids composition in derived resins. In this study, effect of ratios of bitter α- to β-acids in hop resins to cytotoxicity of hop resins was investigated. In vitro cell culture assays revealed that β-acids were more effective than α-acids in growth inhibition of PC3 and HT29 cancer cell lines. Nevertheless, hop resins enriched in β-acids showed comparable growth inhibition patterns to α-enriched resins and suggesting that bioactivity may not be easily predicted by metabolomics and/or gross metabolic profiling in hops. PMID:25685448

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics for rapid, quantitative analysis of bitter acids in hops (Humulus lupulus).

    PubMed

    Killeen, Daniel P; Andersen, David H; Beatson, Ron A; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2014-12-31

    Hops, Humulus lupulus, are grown worldwide for use in the brewing industry to impart characteristic flavor and aroma to finished beer. Breeders produce many varietal crosses with the aim of improving and diversifying commercial hops varieties. The large number of crosses critical to a successful breeding program imposes high demands on the supporting chemical analytical laboratories. With the aim of reducing the analysis time associated with hops breeding, quantitative partial least-squares regression (PLS-R) models have been produced, relating reference data acquired by the industrial standard HPLC and UV methods, to vibrational spectra of the same, chemically diverse hops sample set. These models, produced from rapidly acquired infrared (IR), near-infrared (NIR), and Raman spectra, were appraised using standard statistical metrics. Results demonstrated that all three spectroscopic methods could be used for screening hops for α-acid, total bitter acids, and cohumulone concentrations in powdered hops. Models generated from Raman and IR spectra also showed potential for use in screening hops varieties for xanthohumol concentrations. NIR analysis was performed using both a standard benchtop spectrometer and a portable NIR spectrometer, with comparable results obtained by both instruments. Finally, some important vibrational features of cohumulone, colupulone, and xanthohumol were assigned using DFT calculations, which allow more insightful interpretation of PLS-R latent variable plots.

  13. Hopping of an impurity defect in ion crystals in linear traps

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J.; Haljan, P. C.

    2011-06-15

    Laser-cooled arrays or crystals of {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions containing a single impurity, {sup 172}Yb{sup +} isotope, are confined in a linear radio-frequency Paul trap. Site-to-site hopping of the impurity ion, distinguished by a lack of fluorescence, is studied as a function of the {sup 171}Yb{sup +} laser-cooling parameters and as a function of the anisotropy of the trapping potential. Imaging of the independently resolved crystal sites permits the extraction of the impurity's hopping trajectory, from which the dwell times at a given site can be obtained as well as the spatial distribution of hopping rate and hopping destination. The onset of rapid hopping is found to occur at average thermal energies approaching a significant fraction of the Coulomb potential energy. Furthermore, the hopping rate is enhanced at trap anisotropies near the critical value for the structural phase transition to a two-dimensional zigzag phase. Finally, the hopping mobility of the impurity ion is observed to be highest near the center of the crystal, which may have an intrinsic cause related to the crystal structure and dynamics near the zigzag transition.

  14. Terpene Biosynthesis in Glandular Trichomes of Hop12[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guodong; Tian, Li; Aziz, Naveed; Broun, Pierre; Dai, Xinbin; He, Ji; King, Andrew; Zhao, Patrick X.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L. Cannabaceae) is an economically important crop for the brewing industry, where it is used to impart flavor and aroma to beer, and has also drawn attention in recent years due to its potential pharmaceutical applications. Essential oils (mono- and sesquiterpenes), bitter acids (prenylated polyketides), and prenylflavonoids are the primary phytochemical components that account for these traits, and all accumulate at high concentrations in glandular trichomes of hop cones. To understand the molecular basis for terpene accumulation in hop trichomes, a trichome cDNA library was constructed and 9,816 cleansed expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences were obtained from random sequencing of 16,152 cDNA clones. The ESTs were assembled into 3,619 unigenes (1,101 contigs and 2,518 singletons). Putative functions were assigned to the unigenes based on their homology to annotated sequences in the GenBank database. Two mono- and two sesquiterpene synthases identified from the EST collection were expressed in Escherichia coli. Hop MONOTERPENE SYNTHASE2 formed the linear monterpene myrcene from geranyl pyrophosphate, whereas hop SESQUITERPENE SYNTHASE1 (HlSTS1) formed both caryophyllene and humulene from farnesyl pyrophosphate. Together, these enzymes account for the production of the major terpene constituents of the hop trichomes. HlSTS2 formed the minor sesquiterpene constituent germacrene A, which was converted to β-elemene on chromatography at elevated temperature. We discuss potential functions for other genes expressed at high levels in developing hop trichomes. PMID:18775972

  15. Animal galloping and human hopping: an energetics and biomechanics laboratory exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lindstedt, Stan L.; Mineo, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates fundamental principles of mammalian locomotion. It provides opportunities to interrogate aspects of locomotion from biomechanics to energetics to body size scaling. It has the added benefit of having results with robust signal to noise so that students will have success even if not “meticulous” in attention to detail. First, using respirometry, students measure the energetic cost of hopping at a “preferred” hop frequency. This is followed by hopping at an imposed frequency half of the preferred. By measuring the O2 uptake and work done with each hop, students calculate mechanical efficiency. Lessons learned from this laboratory include 1) that the metabolic cost per hop at half of the preferred frequency is nearly double the cost at the preferred frequency; 2) that when a person is forced to hop at half of their preferred frequency, the mechanical efficiency is nearly that predicted for muscle but is much higher at the preferred frequency; 3) that the preferred hop frequency is strongly body size dependent; and 4) that the hop frequency of a human is nearly identical to the galloping frequency predicted for a quadruped of our size. Together, these exercises demonstrate that humans store and recover elastic recoil potential energy when hopping but that energetic savings are highly frequency dependent. This stride frequency is dependent on body size such that frequency is likely chosen to maximize this function. Finally, by requiring students to make quantitative solutions using appropriate units and dimensions of the physical variables, these exercises sharpen analytic and quantitative skills. PMID:24292916

  16. A dynamic test of lower extremity function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Juris, P M; Phillips, E M; Dalpe, C; Edwards, C; Gotlin, R S; Kane, D J

    1997-10-01

    It is essential to assess the functional status of patients with surgically reconstructed and rehabilitated anterior cruciate ligaments prior to discharge. This study established a testing paradigm for functional force production and absorption. Data were obtained from 100 healthy subjects for maximal hops, controlled leaps, and hopping and leaping symmetry. Only 10% of symptomatic patients met maximal hopping criteria, while 15% achieved controlled leaping norms. Ninety-five percent of these patients failed to reach both hopping and leaping symmetry norms. Asymptomatic patients were 63% successful in meeting hopping criteria, and 57% were successful in meeting leaping criteria. Hop symmetry and leap symmetry were achieved at rates of 70% and 60%, respectively. The performance of both groups fell significantly below that of normal subjects (p < .05). Data suggest that this protocol does accurately assess functional and dysfunctional knees, and that force absorption may be more critical than force production in the determination of functional capacity.

  17. Communication: The correct interpretation of surface hopping trajectories: How to calculate electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Brian R.; Falk, Martin J.; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2013-12-07

    In a recent paper, we presented a road map for how Tully's fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) algorithm can be derived, under certain circumstances, from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation. In this communication, we now demonstrate how this new interpretation of surface hopping can yield significantly enhanced results for electronic properties in nonadiabatic calculations. Specifically, we calculate diabatic populations for the spin-boson problem using FSSH trajectories. We show that, for some Hamiltonians, without changing the FSSH algorithm at all but rather simply reinterpreting the ensemble of surface hopping trajectories, we recover excellent results and remove any and all ambiguity about the initial condition problem.

  18. The creation of proton hopping from a drug-receptor encounter.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Hall, Lowell H

    2013-12-01

    We extend recent modeling studies of proton hopping, used to describe the functioning of membrane channels and axon nerve conduction, to offer an explanation of the initiation of the nerve impulse at an effector-ligand encounter. This encounter is proposed to create a hydronium ion in the vicinity of the effector and ligand, which leads to a continuous flow of protons, called proton hopping, through water adjacent to this encounter. This proton hopping is proposed to be the message carried from the encounter to the axon of a particular nerve system associated with that particular effector-ligand system.

  19. A mutation in ribosomal protein L9 affects ribosomal hopping during translation of gene 60 from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, K L; Nichols, L M; Gesteland, R F; Weiss, R B

    1994-01-01

    Ribosomes hop over a 50-nt coding gap during translation of gene 60 mRNA from bacteriophage T4. This event occurs with near-unitary efficiency when gene 60-lacZ fusions are expressed in Escherichia coli. One of the components necessary for this hop is an RNA hairpin structure containing the 5' junction of the 50-nt coding gap. A mutant E. coli was isolated and found to significantly increase hopping when carrying gene 60-lacZ constructs with altered hairpins. The mutation, hop-1, changed Ser93 to Phe in rplI, the gene coding for ribosomal large-subunit protein L9. Ribosomal hopping on a synthetic sequence in the absence of a hairpin was also increased by this mutation. These data suggest that hop-1 may substitute for the function of the hairpin during ribosomal hopping. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7809071

  20. Experimental verification of an all-optical dual-hop 10  Gbit/s free-space optics link under turbulence regimes.

    PubMed

    Libich, Jiri; Komanec, Matej; Zvanovec, Stanislav; Pesek, Petr; Popoola, Wasiu O; Ghassemlooy, Zabih

    2015-02-01

    This Letter presents original measurement results from an all-optical 10 Gbit/s free-space optics (FSO) relay link involving two FSO links and an all-optical switch. Considering the fact that reported analyses of relay links are dominated by analytical findings, the experimental results represent a vital resource for evaluating the performance of relay FSO links in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. Bit-error-rate (BER) performance of the relay system is tested for single and dual-hop links under several turbulence regimes. Furthermore, results from this measurement are used to ascertain real parameters of the outdoor links and to improve the accuracy of simulation results. Results show that using a dual-hop FSO link against a single FSO link could result in up to four orders of magnitude improvement in BER in the presence of atmospheric turbulence.

  1. Memory effects, two color percolation, and the temperature dependence of Mott variable-range hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agam, Oded; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2014-06-01

    There are three basic processes that determine hopping transport: (a) hopping between normally empty sites (i.e., having exponentially small occupation numbers at equilibrium), (b) hopping between normally occupied sites, and (c) transitions between normally occupied and unoccupied sites. In conventional theories all these processes are considered Markovian and the correlations of occupation numbers of different sites are believed to be small (i.e., not exponential in temperature). We show that, contrary to this belief, memory effects suppress the processes of type (c) and manifest themselves in a subleading exponential temperature dependence of the variable-range hopping conductivity. This temperature dependence originates from the property that sites of type (a) and (b) form two independent resistor networks that are weakly coupled to each other by processes of type (c). This leads to a two-color percolation problem which we solve in the critical region.

  2. Phase-space surface hopping: nonadiabatic dynamics in a superadiabatic basis.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, Neil

    2009-03-28

    In this paper, we construct a phase-space surface hopping algorithm for use in systems that exhibit strong nonadiabatic coupling. The algorithm is derived from a representation of the electronic basis which is a function of the nuclear phase-space coordinates rather than the nuclear position coordinates. This phase-space adiabatic basis can be understood in the context of Berry's superadiabatic basis formalism as the first-order superadiabatic correction to the conventional position-space adiabatic basis. This superadiabatic representation leads to nuclear dynamics described not by Newton's equations of motion but by generalized Hamilton's equations of motion. The phase-space surface hopping algorithm captures physical effects that cannot be described by traditional algorithms. For a simple model problem, we show that phase-space surface hopping is more accurate than position-space surface hopping, especially when the nonadiabatic coupling is strong.

  3. (Questions)n on phloem biology. 2. Mass flow, molecular hopping, distribution patterns and macromolecular signalling.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Aart J E; Furch, Alexandra C U; Hafke, Jens B; Knoblauch, Michael; Patrick, John W

    2011-10-01

    This review speculates on correlations between mass flow in sieve tubes and the distribution of photoassimilates and macromolecular signals. Since micro- (low-molecular compounds) and macromolecules are withdrawn from, and released into, the sieve-tube sap at various rates, distribution patterns of these compounds do not strictly obey mass-flow predictions. Due to serial release and retrieval transport steps executed by sieve tube plasma membranes, micromolecules are proposed to "hop" between sieve element/companion cell complexes and phloem parenchyma cells under source-limiting conditions (apoplasmic hopping). Under sink-limiting conditions, micromolecules escape from sieve tubes via pore-plasmodesma units and are temporarily stored. It is speculated that macromolecules "hop" between sieve elements and companion cells using plasmodesmal trafficking mechanisms (symplasmic hopping). We explore how differential tagging may influence distribution patterns of macromolecules and how their bidirectional movement could arise. Effects of exudation techniques on the macromolecular composition of sieve-tube sap are discussed. PMID:21889037

  4. You know what it is: learning words through listening to hip-hop.

    PubMed

    Chesley, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Music listeners have difficulty correctly understanding and remembering song lyrics. However, results from the present study support the hypothesis that young adults can learn African-American English (AAE) vocabulary from listening to hip-hop music. Non-African-American participants first gave free-response definitions to AAE vocabulary items, after which they answered demographic questions as well as questions addressing their social networks, their musical preferences, and their knowledge of popular culture. Results from the survey show a positive association between the number of hip-hop artists listened to and AAE comprehension vocabulary scores. Additionally, participants were more likely to know an AAE vocabulary item if the hip-hop artists they listen to use the word in their song lyrics. Together, these results suggest that young adults can acquire vocabulary through exposure to hip-hop music, a finding relevant for research on vocabulary acquisition, the construction of adolescent and adult identities, and the adoption of lexical innovations.

  5. Scaffold Hopping Toward Agomelatine: Novel 3, 4-Dihydroisoquinoline Compounds as Potential Antidepressant Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Ang, Wei; Long, Haiyue; Chang, Ying; Li, Zicheng; Zhou, Liangxue; Yang, Tao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Youfu

    2016-10-01

    A scaffold-hopping strategy toward Agomelatine based on in silico screening and knowledge analysis was employed to design novel antidepressant agents. A series of 3, 4-dihydroisoquinoline compounds were selected for chemical synthesis and biological assessment. Three compounds (6a-1, 6a-2, 6a-9) demonstrated protective effects on corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Compound 6a-1 also displayed low inhibitory effects on the growth of HEK293 and L02 normal cells and it was further evaluated for its potential antidepressant effects in vivo. The forced swim test (FST) results revealed that compound 6a-1 remarkably reduced the immobility time of rats and the open field test (OFT) results indicated a better general locomotor activity of the rats treated with compound 6a-1 than those with Agomelatine or Fluoxetine. Mechanism studies implied that compound 6a-1 can significantly reduce PC12 cell apoptosis by up-regulation of GSH and down-regulation of ROS in corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Meanwhile, the down-regulation of calcium ion concentration and up-regulation of BDNF level in PC12 cells may account for the neuroprotective effects. Furthermore, compound 6a-1 can increase cell survival and cell proliferation, promote cell maturation in the rat hippocampus after chronic treatment. The acute toxicity data in vivo indicated compound 6a-1 exhibited less hepatotoxicity than Agomelatine.

  6. Lower eccentric hamstring strength and single leg hop for distance predict hamstring injury in PETE students.

    PubMed

    Goossens, L; Witvrouw, E; Vanden Bossche, L; De Clercq, D

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring injuries have not been under research in physical education teacher education (PETE) students so far. Within the frame of the development of an injury prevention program, for this study we conducted an analysis of modifiable risk factors for hamstring injuries in PETE students. Hamstring injuries of 102 freshmen bachelor PETE students were registered prospectively during one academic year. Eighty-one students completed maximum muscle strength tests of hip extensors, hamstrings, quadriceps (isometric) and hamstrings (eccentric) at the start of the academic year. Sixty-nine of the latter completed a single leg hop for distance (SLHD). Risk factors for hamstring injuries were statistically detected using logistic regression. Sixteen hamstring injuries (0.16 injuries/student/academic year; 0.46 injuries/1000 h) occurred to 10 participants. Eight cases were included in the risk factor analysis. Lower eccentric hamstring strength (odds ratio (ODD) = 0.977; p = 0.043), higher isometric/eccentric hamstring strength ratio (ODD = 970.500; p = 0.019) and lower score on the SLHD (ODD = 0.884; p = 0.005) were significant risk factors for hamstring injury. A combination of eccentric hamstring strength test and SLHD could give a good risk analysis of hamstring injuries in PETE students. This might offer great perspectives for easily applicable screening in a clinical setting. PMID:25189278

  7. Lower eccentric hamstring strength and single leg hop for distance predict hamstring injury in PETE students.

    PubMed

    Goossens, L; Witvrouw, E; Vanden Bossche, L; De Clercq, D

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring injuries have not been under research in physical education teacher education (PETE) students so far. Within the frame of the development of an injury prevention program, for this study we conducted an analysis of modifiable risk factors for hamstring injuries in PETE students. Hamstring injuries of 102 freshmen bachelor PETE students were registered prospectively during one academic year. Eighty-one students completed maximum muscle strength tests of hip extensors, hamstrings, quadriceps (isometric) and hamstrings (eccentric) at the start of the academic year. Sixty-nine of the latter completed a single leg hop for distance (SLHD). Risk factors for hamstring injuries were statistically detected using logistic regression. Sixteen hamstring injuries (0.16 injuries/student/academic year; 0.46 injuries/1000 h) occurred to 10 participants. Eight cases were included in the risk factor analysis. Lower eccentric hamstring strength (odds ratio (ODD) = 0.977; p = 0.043), higher isometric/eccentric hamstring strength ratio (ODD = 970.500; p = 0.019) and lower score on the SLHD (ODD = 0.884; p = 0.005) were significant risk factors for hamstring injury. A combination of eccentric hamstring strength test and SLHD could give a good risk analysis of hamstring injuries in PETE students. This might offer great perspectives for easily applicable screening in a clinical setting.

  8. Scaffold Hopping Toward Agomelatine: Novel 3, 4-Dihydroisoquinoline Compounds as Potential Antidepressant Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Ang, Wei; Long, Haiyue; Chang, Ying; Li, Zicheng; Zhou, Liangxue; Yang, Tao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Youfu

    2016-01-01

    A scaffold-hopping strategy toward Agomelatine based on in silico screening and knowledge analysis was employed to design novel antidepressant agents. A series of 3, 4-dihydroisoquinoline compounds were selected for chemical synthesis and biological assessment. Three compounds (6a-1, 6a-2, 6a-9) demonstrated protective effects on corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Compound 6a-1 also displayed low inhibitory effects on the growth of HEK293 and L02 normal cells and it was further evaluated for its potential antidepressant effects in vivo. The forced swim test (FST) results revealed that compound 6a-1 remarkably reduced the immobility time of rats and the open field test (OFT) results indicated a better general locomotor activity of the rats treated with compound 6a-1 than those with Agomelatine or Fluoxetine. Mechanism studies implied that compound 6a-1 can significantly reduce PC12 cell apoptosis by up-regulation of GSH and down-regulation of ROS in corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Meanwhile, the down-regulation of calcium ion concentration and up-regulation of BDNF level in PC12 cells may account for the neuroprotective effects. Furthermore, compound 6a-1 can increase cell survival and cell proliferation, promote cell maturation in the rat hippocampus after chronic treatment. The acute toxicity data in vivo indicated compound 6a-1 exhibited less hepatotoxicity than Agomelatine. PMID:27698414

  9. Fluctuating in the hopping rate of CuO thin films with respect to substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serin, N.; Yildiz, A.; Çam, E.; Uzun, Ş.; Serin, T.

    2012-10-01

    Electrical transport properties in CuO thin films processed using d.c. magnetron sputtering technique is investigated to understand the correlation between the processing conditions and electrical properties. It is identified that the temperature dependent conductivity of the investigated films is controlled by the multi-phonon hopping conduction mechanism. A detailed analysis in terms of carrier hopping parameters is used to correlate electrical transport properties with the d.c. magnetron sputtering conditions.

  10. Quantitative genetic parameters for yield, plant growth and cone chemical traits in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most traits targeted in the genetic improvement of hop are quantitative in nature. Improvement based on selection of these traits requires a comprehensive understanding of their inheritance. This study estimated quantitative genetic parameters for 20 traits related to three key objectives for the genetic improvement of hop: cone chemistry, cone yield and agronomic characteristics. Results Significant heritable genetic variation was identified for α-acid and β-acid, as well as their components and relative proportions. Estimates of narrow-sense heritability for these traits (h 2  = 0.15 to 0.29) were lower than those reported in previous hop studies, but were based on a broader suite of families (108 from European, North American and hybrid origins). Narrow-sense heritabilities are reported for hop growth traits for the first time (h 2  = 0.04 to 0.20), relating to important agronomic characteristics such as emergence, height and lateral morphology. Cone chemistry and growth traits were significantly genetically correlated, such that families with more vigorous vegetative growth were associated with lower α-acid and β-acid levels. This trend may reflect the underlying population structure of founder genotypes (European and North American origins) as well as past selection in the Australian environment. Although male and female hop plants are thought to be indistinguishable until flowering, sex was found to influence variation in many growth traits, with male and female plants displaying differences in vegetative morphology from emergence to cone maturity. Conclusions This study reveals important insights into the genetic control of quantitative hop traits. The information gained will provide hop breeders with a greater understanding of the additive genetic factors which affect selection of cone chemistry, yield and agronomic characteristics in hop, aiding in the future development of improved cultivars. PMID:24524684

  11. Characterisation of the Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-Hsp90 organising protein (PfHop).

    PubMed

    Gitau, Grace W; Mandal, Pradipta; Blatch, Gregory L; Przyborski, Jude; Shonhai, Addmore

    2012-03-01

    Malaria is caused by Plasmodium species, whose transmission to vertebrate hosts is facilitated by mosquito vectors. The transition from the cold blooded mosquito vector to the host represents physiological stress to the parasite, and additionally malaria blood stage infection is characterised by intense fever periods. In recent years, it has become clear that heat shock proteins play an essential role during the parasite's life cycle. Plasmodium falciparum expresses two prominent heat shock proteins: heat shock protein 70 (PfHsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (PfHsp90). Both of these proteins have been implicated in the development and pathogenesis of malaria. In eukaryotes, Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins are functionally linked by an essential adaptor protein known as the Hsp70-Hsp90 organising protein (Hop). In this study, recombinant P. falciparum Hop (PfHop) was heterologously produced in E. coli and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Using specific anti-PfHop antisera, the expression and localisation of PfHop in P. falciparum was investigated. PfHop was shown to co-localise with PfHsp70 and PfHsp90 in parasites at the trophozoite stage. Gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that PfHop was present in a complex together with PfHsp70 and PfHsp90. The association of PfHop with both PfHsp70 and PfHsp90 suggests that this protein may mediate the functional interaction between the two chaperones. PMID:22005844

  12. Study of one-dimensional electron hopping and its effects on ESR line shape

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jau; Dikshit, S.N.; Norris, J.R. |

    1997-08-01

    Random hopping processes between discrete sites along a finite open chain or around a closed finite loop are examined. Closed form formulae are prescribed for the dependence of the ESR (electron spin resonance) line shape on the chain length and hopping rate. Significant differences between the closed loop and open chain are demonstrated. Deviation at short time from the results of diffusion in a continuum is presented.

  13. Neural control of leg stiffness during hopping in boys and men.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J L; Smith, P M

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether boys and men utilise different control strategies whilst hopping. Eleven boys (11-12yr old) and ten men completed hopping at 1.5Hz, 3.0Hz and at their preferred frequency. A footswitch measured contact and flight times, from which leg stiffness was calculated. Simultaneously, surface electromyograms (EMGs) of selected lower limb muscles were recorded and quantified for each 30ms period during the first 120ms post-ground contact. At 1.5Hz there were no differences between the groups in relative stiffness or muscle activity. At 3.0Hz men had significantly shorter contact times (P=0.013), longer flight times (P=0.002), greater relative stiffness (P=0.01) and significantly greater soleus (P=0.012) and vastus lateralis (P<0.001) activity during the initial 30ms post-ground contact. At the preferred frequency men hopped significantly faster than the boys (P=0.007), with greater leg stiffness (P<0.01) and with more extensor activity in most time periods. Boys and men demonstrated similar control strategies when hopping at a slow frequency, but when hopping frequency increased men were able to better increase feedforward and reflex muscle activity to hop with greater relative stiffness.

  14. Random free energy barrier hopping model for ac conduction in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murti, Ram; Tripathi, S. K.; Goyal, Navdeep; Prakash, Satya

    2016-03-01

    The random free energy barrier hopping model is proposed to explain the ac conductivity (σac) of chalcogenide glasses. The Coulomb correlation is consistently accounted for in the polarizability and defect distribution functions and the relaxation time is augmented to include the overlapping of hopping particle wave functions. It is observed that ac and dc conduction in chalcogenides are due to same mechanism and Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule is the consequence of temperature dependence of hopping barriers. The exponential parameter s is calculated and it is found that s is subjected to sample preparation and measurement conditions and its value can be less than or greater than one. The calculated results for a - Se, As2S3, As2Se3 and As2Te3 are found in close agreement with the experimental data. The bipolaron and single polaron hopping contributions dominates at lower and higher temperatures respectively and in addition to high energy optical phonons, low energy optical and high energy acoustic phonons also contribute to the hopping process. The variations of hopping distance with temperature is also studied. The estimated defect number density and static barrier heights are compared with other existing calculations.

  15. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing. PMID:23791780

  16. Energy efficient hopping with Hill-type muscle properties on segmented legs.

    PubMed

    Rosendo, Andre; Iida, Fumiya

    2016-04-12

    The intrinsic muscular properties of biological muscles are the main source of stabilization during locomotion, and superior biological performance is obtained with low energy costs. Man-made actuators struggle to reach the same energy efficiency seen in biological muscles. Here, we compare muscle properties within a one-dimensional and a two-segmented hopping leg. Different force-length-velocity relations (constant, linear, and Hill) were adopted for these two proposed models, and the stable maximum hopping heights from both cases were used to estimate the cost of hopping. We then performed a fine-grained analysis during landing and takeoff of the best performing cases, and concluded that the force-velocity Hill-type model is, at maximum hopping height, the most efficient for both linear and segmented models. While hopping at the same height the force-velocity Hill-type relation outperformed the linear relation as well. Finally, knee angles between 60° and 90° presented a lower energy expenditure than other morphologies for both Hill-type and constant relations during maximum hopping height. This work compares different muscular properties in terms of energy efficiency within different geometries, and these results can be applied to decrease energy costs of current actuators and robots during locomotion.

  17. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing.

  18. Efficient extraction of high-quality total RNA from various hop tissues (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    De Keukeleire, Jelle; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Heyerick, Arne; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2006-01-01

    The isolation of high-quality RNA is a prerequisite for gene expression studies. RNA quality is of special relevance if PCR-based strategies such as cDNA-AFLP or RT-PCR are followed. Our molecular investigations of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) focus on genes that determine the biosynthesis of prenylflavonoids with interesting biological activities which accumulate in the lupulin glands. However, optimized protocols for RNA extraction from hop cones are not available. In this study, the RNeasy midi kit protocol was modified to isolate high amounts of total RNA from fresh and freeze-dried hop tissues, specifically leaves, female inflorescences, and lupulin-enriched hop cone fractions. The main difficulties in obtaining high RNA yields were related to specific features of hop, including the abundance of secondary metabolites and their accumulation in the sticky lupulin glands. The introduction of a number of modifications into the RNeasy midi kit protocol resulted in RNA of high quality, as assessed by spectrophotometry and electrophoresis in agarose gels. The protocol developed is currently being used to produce cDNA-AFLP fingerprints of hop cones and leaves for genetic screening. Furthermore, the method could provide RNA for further molecular studies, including Northern blot hybridizations and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions. PMID:16971305

  19. EST Analysis of Hop Glandular Trichomes Identifies an O-Methyltransferase That Catalyzes the Biosynthesis of Xanthohumol[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Jana; Culley, Lana K.; Lu, Yuping; Liu, Enwu; Matthews, Paul D.; Stevens, Jan F.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2008-01-01

    The glandular trichomes (lupulin glands) of hop (Humulus lupulus) synthesize essential oils and terpenophenolic resins, including the bioactive prenylflavonoid xanthohumol. To dissect the biosynthetic processes occurring in lupulin glands, we sequenced 10,581 ESTs from four trichome-derived cDNA libraries. ESTs representing enzymes of terpenoid biosynthesis, including all of the steps of the methyl 4-erythritol phosphate pathway, were abundant in the EST data set, as were ESTs for the known type III polyketide synthases of bitter acid and xanthohumol biosynthesis. The xanthohumol biosynthetic pathway involves a key O-methylation step. Four S-adenosyl-l-methionine–dependent O-methyltransferases (OMTs) with similarity to known flavonoid-methylating enzymes were present in the EST data set. OMT1, which was the most highly expressed OMT based on EST abundance and RT-PCR analysis, performs the final reaction in xanthohumol biosynthesis by methylating desmethylxanthohumol to form xanthohumol. OMT2 accepted a broad range of substrates, including desmethylxanthohumol, but did not form xanthohumol. Mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed it methylated xanthohumol to 4-O-methylxanthohumol, which is not known from hop. OMT3 was inactive with all substrates tested. The lupulin gland-specific EST data set expands the genomic resources for H. lupulus and provides further insight into the metabolic specialization of glandular trichomes. PMID:18223037

  20. Solution Structure and DNA-binding Properties of the Winged Helix Domain of the Meiotic Recombination HOP2 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Moktan, Hem; Guiraldelli, Michel F.; Eyster, Craig A.; Zhao, Weixing; Lee, Chih-Ying; Mather, Timothy; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Sung, Patrick; Zhou, Donghua H.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2014-01-01

    The HOP2 protein is required for efficient double-strand break repair which ensures the proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes and normal meiotic progression. We previously showed that in vitro HOP2 shows two distinctive activities: when it is incorporated into a HOP2-MND1 heterodimer, it stimulates DMC1 and RAD51 recombination activities, and the purified HOP2 alone is proficient in promoting strand invasion. The structural and biochemical basis of HOP2 action in recombination are poorly understood; therefore, they are the focus of this work. Herein, we present the solution structure of the amino-terminal portion of mouse HOP2, which contains a typical winged helix DNA-binding domain. Together with NMR spectral changes in the presence of double-stranded DNA, protein docking on DNA, and mutation analysis to identify the amino acids involved in DNA coordination, our results on the three-dimensional structure of HOP2 provide key information on the fundamental structural and biochemical requirements directing the interaction of HOP2 with DNA. These results, in combination with mutational experiments showing the role of a coiled-coil structural feature involved in HOP2 self-association, allow us to explain important aspects of the function of HOP2 in recombination. PMID:24711446

  1. Power and delay optimisation in multi-hop wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Li; Shihada, Basem

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we study the optimisation problem of transmission power and delay in a multi-hop wireless network consisting of multiple nodes. The goal is to determine the optimal policy of transmission rates at various buffer and channel states in order to minimise the power consumption and the queueing delay of the whole network. With the assumptions of interference-free links and independently and identically distributed (i.i.d.) channel states, we formulate this problem using a semi-open Jackson network model for data transmission and a Markov model for channel states transition. We derive a difference equation of the system performance under any two different policies. The necessary and sufficient condition of optimal policy is obtained. We also prove that the system performance is monotonic with respect to (w.r.t.) the transmission rate and the optimal transmission rate can be either maximal or minimal. That is, the 'bang-bang' control is an optimal control. This optimality structure greatly reduces the problem complexity. Furthermore, we develop an iterative algorithm to find the optimal solution. Finally, we conduct the simulation experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. We hope our work can shed some insights on solving this complicated optimisation problem.

  2. Scaffold hopping approach on the route to selective tankyrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liscio, Paride; Carotti, Andrea; Asciutti, Stefania; Ferri, Martina; Pires, Maira M.; Valloscuro, Sara; Ziff, Jacob; Clark, Neil R.; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Pellicciari, Roberto; Camaioni, Emidio

    2015-01-01

    A virtual screening procedure was applied to identify new tankyrase inhibitors. Through pharmacophore screening of a compounds collection from the SPECS database, the methoxy[l]benzothieno[2,3-c]quinolin-6(5H)-one scaffold was identified as nicotinamide mimetic able to inhibit tankyrase activity at low micromolar concentration. In order to improve potency and selectivity, tandem structure-based and scaffold hopping approaches were carried out over the new scaffold leading to the discovery of the 2-(phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one as powerful chemotype suitable for tankyrase inhibition. The best compound 2-(4-tert-butyl-phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one (23) displayed nanomolar potencies (IC50s TNKS-1 = 21 nM and TNKS-2= 29 nM) and high selectivity when profiled against several other PARPs. Furthermore, a striking Wnt signaling, as well as cell growth inhibition, was observed assaying 23 in DLD-1 cancer cells. PMID:25299683

  3. Scaffold hopping approach on the route to selective tankyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liscio, Paride; Carotti, Andrea; Asciutti, Stefania; Ferri, Martina; Pires, Maira M; Valloscuro, Sara; Ziff, Jacob; Clark, Neil R; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Aaronson, Stuart A; Pellicciari, Roberto; Camaioni, Emidio

    2014-11-24

    A virtual screening procedure was applied to identify new tankyrase inhibitors. Through pharmacophore screening of a compounds collection from the SPECS database, the methoxy[l]benzothieno[2,3-c]quinolin-6(5H)-one scaffold was identified as nicotinamide mimetic able to inhibit tankyrase activity at low micromolar concentration. In order to improve potency and selectivity, tandem structure-based and scaffold hopping approaches were carried out over the new scaffold leading to the discovery of the 2-(phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one as powerful chemotype suitable for tankyrase inhibition. The best compound 2-(4-tert-butyl-phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one (23) displayed nanomolar potencies (IC50s TNKS-1 = 21 nM and TNKS-2 = 29 nM) and high selectivity when profiled against several other PARPs. Furthermore, a striking Wnt signaling, as well as cell growth inhibition, was observed assaying 23 in DLD-1 cancer cells.

  4. Impulsive movements lead to high hops on sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-03-01

    Various animals exhibit locomotive behaviors (like sprinting and hopping) involving transient bursts of actuation coupled to the ground through internal elastic elements. The performance of such maneuvers is subject to reaction forces on the feet from the environment. On substrates like dry granular media, the laws that govern these forces are not fully understood, and can vary with foot size and shape, material compaction (measured by the volume fraction ϕ) and intrusion kinematics. To gain insight into how such interactions affect jumps on granular media, we study the performance of an actuated spring mass robot. We compare performance between two jump strategies: a single-cycle sine-wave actuation (a ``single jump'') and this actuation preceded by an impulsive preload (a ``preload jump''). We vary ϕ for both strategies, and find that ϕ significantly affects performance: we observe a 200% increase in the single jump height with only a 5% increase in volume fraction using a 7.62 cm diameter flat foot. The preload jump outperforms the single jump height by 150% for all ϕ. We hypothesize that this increase in performance results from higher intrusion velocities and accelerations associated with the preload. NSF POLS CAREER, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, and ARO.

  5. Pinned vortex hopping in a neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, B.; Melatos, A.

    2016-09-01

    The motion of superfluid vortices in a neutron star crust is at the heart of most theories of pulsar glitches. Pinning of vortices to ions can decouple the superfluid from the crust and create a reservoir of angular momentum. Sudden large-scale unpinning can lead to an observable glitch. In this paper, we investigate the scattering of a free vortex off a pinning potential and calculate its mean free path, in order to assess whether unpinned vortices can skip multiple pinning sites and come close enough to their neighbours to trigger avalanches, or whether they simply hop from one pinning site to its neighbour, giving rise to a more gradual creep. We find that there is a significant range of parameter space in which avalanches can be triggered, thus supporting the hypothesis that they may lie at the origin of pulsar glitches. For realistic values of the pinning force and superfluid drag parameters, we find that avalanches are more likely in the higher density regions of the crust where pinning is stronger. Physical differences in stellar parameters, such as mass and temperature, may lead to a switch between creep-like motion and avalanches, explaining the different characteristics of glitching pulsars.

  6. Screening of Electric field in a Variable Range Hopping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigodin, Vladimir; Epstein, Arthur

    2003-03-01

    Recent report of a field effect in conducting polymers [1] initiated a large interest. The "field effect" can not be explained only by electrochemical dedoping of polymers. Also the field effect is impossible to understand within a model of homogeneous conductor because of the atomic scale of Debye radius. We discuss the penetration of electric field in a system in which charge transport is provided by variable range hopping (VRH). The majority of carriers are localized and contribute to the dielectric constant. An exponentially small fraction of carriers are mobile and screens the external field. Our estimate shows that the screening length for conducting polymers can be essentially larger than in metals but is still not enough to explain the experimental data. A combination of different factors including the inhomogeneous (granular) structure of conducting polymers may control the observable phenomena. J. Lu et al., J. Appl. Phys. XX, in press (2002); A.J. Epstein et al., Current Appl. Lett. 2, 339 (2002); M. Ishihara and H. Okuzaki, Synth. Met. XX, in press (2003).

  7. Surface hopping investigation of benzophenone excited state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Favero, Lucilla; Granucci, Giovanni; Persico, Maurizio

    2016-04-21

    We present a simulation of the photodynamics of benzophenone for the first 20 ps after n →π* excitation, performed by trajectory surface hopping calculations with on-the-fly semiempirical determination of potential energy surfaces and electronic wavefunctions. Both the dynamic and spin-orbit couplings are taken into account, and time-resolved fluorescence emission is also simulated. The computed decay time of the S1 state is in agreement with experimental observations. The direct S1→ T1 intersystem crossing (ISC) accounts for about 2/3 of the S1 decay rate. The remaining 1/3 goes through T2 or higher triplets. The nonadiabatic transitions within the triplet manifold are much faster than ISC and keep the population of T1 at about 3/4 of the total triplet population, and that of the other states (mainly T2) at 1/4. Two internal coordinates are vibrationally active immediately after n →π* excitation: one is the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching and the other one is a combination of the conrotatory torsion of phenyl rings and of bending involving the carbonyl C atom. The period of the torsion-bending mode coincides with oscillations in the time-resolved photoelectron spectra of Spighi et al. and substantially confirms their assignment. PMID:27031566

  8. Evaluation of genetic variability of wild hops (Humulus lupulus L.) in Canada and the Caucasus region by chemical and molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Nesvadba, Vladimír; Krofta, Karel; Henychova, Alena; Marzoev, Arkady Inalovic; Richards, Ken

    2010-07-01

    Wild hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are potential new germplasms to expand the variability of genetic resources for hop breeding. We evaluated Canadian (62 plants) and Caucasian (58 plants) wild hops by their chemical characteristics and with molecular genetic analyses using sequence-tagged site and simple sequence repeat markers, in comparison with European (104 plants) and North American (27 plants) wild hops. The contents of alpha and beta acids varied from 0.36% to 5.11% and from 0.43% to 6.66% in Canadian wild hops, and from 0.85% to 3.65% and from 1.22% to 4.81% in Caucasian wild hops, respectively. The contents of cohumulone and colupulone distinctly differed between European and North American wild hops: the cohumulone level in alpha acids was in the range 46.1%-68.4% among North American wild hops and in the range 13.6%-30.6% among European wild hops. The high content of myrcene and the low contents of humulene, farnesene, and selinenes were typical for wild hops from Canada, in contrast to wild hops from the Caucasus region. We compared the chemical characteristics with molecular genetic data. Chemical characteristics differentiated wild hops into North American and Eurasian groups. Molecular genetic analysis was able to separate Caucasian wild hops from European wild hops. We proved a hop phylogeny by means of wide molecular analysis. PMID:20616876

  9. Hip-Hop as a Resource for Understanding the Urban Context: A Review of Christopher Edmin's--Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    This review explores Edmin's "Science education for the hip-hop generation" by documenting how he frames hip-hop as a means to access urban student culture. He argues that hip-hop is more than a mere music genre, but rather a culture that provides young people with ways of connecting to the world. Two primary ideas emerged as central to his work.…

  10. Hip-Hop High School: A Study of the Attitudes, Beliefs and Perceptions of Suburban High School Faculty towards Representation of the Hip-Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Ronald K.

    2011-01-01

    Research historically has demonstrated that a generational disconnect between the popular cultures from which students and teachers define normative behavior can impact classroom management and student learning. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes, beliefs and perceptions of high school faculty toward the hip-hop culture and its…

  11. Increase in cone biomass and terpenophenolics in hops ( Humulus lupulus L.) by treatment with prohexadione-calcium.

    PubMed

    Kavalier, Adam R; Pitra, Nicholi J; Koelling, Jared M; Coles, Mark C; Kennelly, Edward J; Matthews, Paul D

    2011-06-22

    Humulus lupulus L. (hop), a specialty crop bred for flavor characteristics of the inflorescence, is an essential ingredient in beer. Hop inflorescences, commonly known as hop cones, contain terpenophenolic compounds, which are important for beer flavoring and of interest in biomedical research. Hop breeders focus their efforts on increasing cone biomass and terpenophenolic content. As an alternative to traditional breeding, hops were treated with prohexadione-calcium (Pro-Ca), a growth inhibitor previously shown to have positive agronomic effects in several crops. Application of Pro-Ca to hop plants during cone maturation induced increases in cone biomass production by 1.5-19.6% and increased terpenophenolic content by 9.1-87.3%; however, some treatments also induced significant decreases in terpenophenolic content. Induced changes in cone biomass production and terpenophenolic accumulation were most dependent on cultivar and the developmental stage at which plants were treated. PMID:21598976

  12. The effects of beta acids from hops (Humulus lupulus) on mortality of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae).

    PubMed

    Degrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Ahumada, Fabiana; Probasco, Gene; Schantz, Lloyd

    2012-12-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) beta acids (HBA) were tested for miticidal effects on varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman, a parasitic mite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.). When varroa were placed on bees that had topical applications of 1 % HBA, there was 100 % mite mortality. Bee mortality was unaffected. Cardboard strips saturated with HBA and placed in colonies resulted in mite drop that was significantly greater than in untreated hives. HBA was detected on about 60 % of the bees in colonies during the first 48 h after application. Mite drop in colonies lasted for about 7 days with the highest drop occurring in the first 2-3 days after treatment. There was a reduction in the percentages of bees with HBA and in the amounts on their bodies after 7 days. Bee and queen mortality in the colonies were not affected by HBA treatments. When cardboard strips saturated with HBA were put in packages of bees, more than 90 % of the mites were killed without an increase in bee mortality. HBA might have potential to control varroa when establishing colonies from packages or during broodless periods.

  13. Longitudinal hopping in intervehicle communication: Theory and simulations on modeled and empirical trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, Christian; Treiber, Martin; Kesting, Arne

    2008-09-01

    Intervehicle communication enables vehicles to exchange messages within a limited broadcast range and thus self-organize into dynamical and geographically embedded wireless ad hoc networks. We study the longitudinal hopping mode in which messages are transported using equipped vehicles driving in the same direction as a relay. Given a finite communication range, we investigate the conditions where messages can percolate through the network, i.e., a linked chain of relay vehicles exists between the sender and receiver. We simulate message propagation in different traffic scenarios and for different fractions of equipped vehicles. Simulations are done with both, modeled and empirical traffic data. These results are used to test the limits of applicability of an analytical model assuming a Poissonian distance distribution between the relays. We found a good agreement for homogeneous traffic scenarios and sufficiently low percentages of equipped vehicles. For higher percentages, the observed connectivity was higher than that of the model while in stop-and-go traffic situations it was lower. We explain these results in terms of correlations of the distances between the relay vehicles. Finally, we introduce variable transmission ranges and found that this additional stochastic component generally increased connectivity compared to a deterministic transmission with the same mean.

  14. Short-Term Effects of Patellar Kinesio Taping on Pain and Hop Function in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Scott R.; Brody, Lori Thein; Rosenthal, Michael; Wise, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the most prevalent orthopaedic condition among physically active individuals, contributing to an estimated 30% to 40% of all sports medicine visits. Techniques using Kinesio Tape (KT) have become increasingly popular; however, there has been scant research supporting its use on patients with PFPS. Hypothesis: The use of patellar KT to treat patients with PFPS will provide a statistically significant improvement in short-term pain and single-leg hop measures as compared with sham placement of KT. Study Design: Nonrandomized controlled clinical trial with repeated-measures design. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Forty-nine subjects (41 females, 8 males) between the ages of 12 and 24 years with PFPS participated in this study. Each subject underwent patellar kinesio taping with both experimental and sham applications while completing 4 functional tasks and the single-leg triple jump test (STJT). The treatment outcome was analyzed using separate paired t tests to measure improvement on a numeric pain rating scale. A 2-way, 2 × 2 analysis of variance was used to analyze the relationship between taping condition (experimental vs sham) and side (involved vs uninvolved) for STJT scores. Results: Separate paired t tests found step-up, step-down, and STJT pain improvement statistically significant between taping conditions. The 2-factor analysis of variance yielded a significant main effect for taping condition, but the main effect for side was not significant. The interaction between taping condition and side was significant. This showed there was little change in STJT distance between repeated measures performed on the untaped, noninvolved leg. However, subjects’ STJT distances were significantly greater for the experimental KT application than the sham application for the involved side. Conclusion: Patellar kinesio taping provided an immediate and statistically significant improvement in pain and single-leg hop

  15. The bacterial effector HopM1 suppresses PAMP-triggered oxidative burst and stomatal immunity.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Bourdais, Gildas; He, Sheng Yang; Robatzek, Silke

    2014-04-01

    Successful pathogens counter immunity at multiple levels, mostly through the action of effectors. Pseudomonas syringae secretes c. 30 effectors, some of which have been shown to inhibit plant immunity triggered upon perception of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). One of these is HopM1, which impairs late immune responses through targeting the vesicle trafficking-related AtMIN7 for degradation. Here, we report that in planta expressed HopM1 suppresses two early PAMP-triggered responses, the oxidative burst and stomatal immunity, both of which seem to require proteasomal function but are independent of AtMIN7. Notably, a 14-3-3 protein, GRF8/AtMIN10, was found previously to be a target of HopM1 in vivo, and expression of HopM1 mimics the effect of chemically and genetically disrupting 14-3-3 function. Our data further show that the function of 14-3-3 proteins is required for PAMP-triggered oxidative burst and stomatal immunity, and chemical-mediated disruption of the 14-3-3 interactions with their client proteins restores virulence of a HopM1-deficient P. syringae mutant, providing a link between HopM1 and the involvement of 14-3-3 proteins in plant immunity. Taken together, these results unveil the impact of HopM1 on the PAMP-triggered oxidative burst and stomatal immunity in an AtMIN7-independent manner, most likely acting at the function of (a) 14-3-3 protein(s). PMID:24372399

  16. Differential regulation of detoxification enzymes in hepatic and mammary tissue by hops (Humulus lupulus) in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Birgit M.; Hagos, Ghenet K.; Eskra, Jillian N.; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Nikolic, Dejan; Guo, Jian; Wright, Brian; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Hops contain the phytoestrogen, 8-prenylnaringenin, and the cytoprotective compound, xanthohumol (XH). XH induces the detoxification enzyme, NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) in vitro; however, the tissue distribution of XH and 8-prenylnaringenin and their tissue specific activity have not been analyzed. Methods and results A standardized hop extract (p.o.) and XH (s.c.) were administered to Sprague-Dawley rats over four days. LC-MS-MS analysis of plasma, liver and mammary gland revealed that XH accumulated in liver and mammary glands. Compared with the low level in the original extract, 8-prenylnaringenin was enriched in the tissues. Hops and XH induced NQO1 in the liver, while only hops reduced NQO1 activity in the mammary gland. Mechanistic studies revealed that hops modulated NQO1 through three mechanisms. In liver cells, 1) XH modified Keap1 leading to Nrf2 translocation and antioxidant response element (ARE) activation; 2) hop-mediated ARE induction was partially mediated through phosphorylation of Nrf2 by PKC; 3) in breast cells, 8-prenylnaringenin reduced NQO1 likely through binding to ERα, recruiting Nrf2, and downregulating ARE-regulated genes. Conclusions XH and 8-prenylnaringenin in dietary hops are bioavailable to the target tissues. While hops and XH might be cytoprotective in the liver, 8-prenylnaringenin seems responsible for hop-mediated NQO1 reduction in the mammary gland. PMID:23512484

  17. Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopAF1 suppresses plant immunity by targeting methionine recycling to block ethylene induction

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Erica J.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Finkel, Omri M.; Wan, Li; Kieber, Joseph J.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    HopAF1 is a type III effector protein of unknown function encoded in the genomes of several strains of Pseudomonas syringae and other plant pathogens. Structural modeling predicted that HopAF1 is closely related to deamidase proteins. Deamidation is the irreversible substitution of an amide group with a carboxylate group. Several bacterial virulence factors are deamidases that manipulate the activity of specific host protein substrates. We identified Arabidopsis methylthioadenosine nucleosidase proteins MTN1 and MTN2 as putative targets of HopAF1 deamidation. MTNs are enzymes in the Yang cycle, which is essential for the high levels of ethylene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We hypothesized that HopAF1 inhibits the host defense response by manipulating MTN activity and consequently ethylene levels. We determined that bacterially delivered HopAF1 inhibits ethylene biosynthesis induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and that Arabidopsis mtn1 mtn2 mutant plants phenocopy the effect of HopAF1. Furthermore, we identified two conserved asparagines in MTN1 and MTN2 from Arabidopsis that confer loss of function phenotypes when deamidated via site-specific mutation. These residues are potential targets of HopAF1 deamidation. HopAF1-mediated manipulation of Yang cycle MTN proteins is likely an evolutionarily conserved mechanism whereby HopAF1 orthologs from multiple plant pathogens contribute to disease in a large variety of plant hosts. PMID:27274076

  18. Age-related muscle activation profiles and joint stiffness regulation in repetitive hopping.

    PubMed

    Hoffrén, Merja; Ishikawa, Masaki; Rantalainen, Timo; Avela, Janne; Komi, Paavo V

    2011-06-01

    It is well documented that increasing effort during exercise is characterized by an increase in electromyographic activity of the relevant muscles. How aging influences this relationship is a matter of great interest. In the present study, nine young and 24 elderly subjects did repetitive hopping with maximal effort as well as with 50%, 65%, 75% and 90% intensities. During hopping joint kinematics were measured together with electromyographic activity (EMG) from the soleus, gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis and tibialis anterior muscles. The results showed that agonist activation increased in both age groups with increasing intensity. The highest jumping efficiency (EMG ratio of the braking phase to the push off-phase activation) was achieved with moderate hopping intensities (65-75%) in both the young and in the elderly. Age-comparison showed that elderly subjects had high agonist preactivation but thereafter lower activation during the braking phase. Antagonist coactivation was minimal and did not show age- or intensity-specificity. The elderly had more flexed knees at the instant of ground contact. When intensity increased, the elderly also plantarflexed their ankles more before ground contact. Ankle joint stiffness was lower in elderly subjects only in high hopping intensities (90% and Max). These results confirm that age-specific agonist muscle activation profiles exist during hopping even when exercise intensities are matched on the relative scale. The results suggest further that the elderly can adjust their reduced neuromuscular capacity to match the demands set by different exercise intensities.

  19. Cascading multi-hop reservation and transmission in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Cho, Ho-Shin

    2014-01-01

    The long propagation delay in an underwater acoustic channel makes designing an underwater media access control (MAC) protocol more challenging. In particular, handshaking-based MAC protocols widely used in terrestrial radio channels have been known to be inappropriate in underwater acoustic channels, because of the inordinately large latency involved in exchanging control packets. Furthermore, in the case of multi-hop relaying in a hop-by-hop handshaking manner, the end-to-end delay significantly increases. In this paper, we propose a new MAC protocol named cascading multi-hop reservation and transmission (CMRT). In CMRT, intermediate nodes between a source and a destination may start handshaking in advance for the next-hop relaying before handshaking for the previous node is completed. By this concurrent relaying, control packet exchange and data delivery cascade down to the destination. In addition, to improve channel utilization, CMRT adopts a packet-train method where multiple data packets are sent together by handshaking once. Thus, CMRT reduces the time taken for control packet exchange and accordingly increases the throughput. The performance of CMRT is evaluated and compared with that of two conventional MAC protocols (multiple-access collision avoidance for underwater (MACA-U) and MACA-U with packet trains (MACA-UPT)). The results show that CMRT outperforms other MAC protocols in terms of both throughput and end-to-end delay.

  20. Pch2 is a hexameric ring ATPase that remodels the chromosome axis protein Hop1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ortega, Joaquin; Alani, Eric E.

    2014-01-01

    In budding yeast the pachytene checkpoint 2 (Pch2) protein regulates meiotic chromosome axis structure by maintaining the domain-like organization of the synaptonemal complex proteins homolog pairing 1 (Hop1) and molecular zipper 1 (Zip1). Pch2 has also been shown to modulate meiotic double-strand break repair outcomes to favor recombination between homologs, play an important role in the progression of meiotic recombination, and maintain ribosomal DNA stability. Pch2 homologs are present in fruit flies, worms, and mammals, however the molecular mechanism of Pch2 function is unknown. In this study we provide a unique and detailed biochemical analysis of Pch2. We find that purified Pch2 is an AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) protein that oligomerizes into single hexameric rings in the presence of nucleotides. In addition, we show Pch2 binds to Hop1, a critical axial component of the synaptonemal complex that establishes interhomolog repair bias, in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Importantly, we demonstrate that Pch2 displaces Hop1 from large DNA substrates and that both ATP binding and hydrolysis by Pch2 are required for Pch2–Hop1 transactions. Based on these and previous cell biological observations, we suggest that Pch2 impacts meiotic chromosome function by directly regulating Hop1 localization. PMID:24367111

  1. Responses of Plasma Acetate Metabolism to Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Goto, Kunio; Chiba, Sota; Sano, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    An isotope dilution method using [1-13C]sodium (Na) acetate was conducted to determine the effect of feeding hop (Humulus lupulus L.) residues on plasma acetate metabolism in six adult crossbred sheep. The sheep were fed 63 g/kg BW0.75/d of either mixed hay (MH-diet) of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) at a 60:40 ratio or MH-diet and hop-residues (Hop-diet) at 85:15 ratio with a crossover design for each of 3 week period. The isotope dilution method using single injection of [1-13C]Na acetate was performed thrice; before feeding (BF), 2 h after feeding (2F) and 4 h after feeding (4F), on the 21st day of each dietary treatment. Plasma acetate concentration tended to increase (P= 0.06) and turnover rate was numerically higher (P= 0.16) for MH-diet than Hop-diet. Plasma glucose, NEFA, VFA and lactic acid concentrations were similar between dietary treatments. In both the diets, although plasma concentration of acetate did not change, turnover rate increased significantly (P= 0.02) 2F than BF. Hop-residues did not show any negative impacts on acetate metabolism as well as physiology of animals in the present experimental conditions, hence thereby it could be used as an alternative to MH-diet for rearing sheep. PMID:19365576

  2. Biological and chemical standardization of a hop (Humulus lupulus) botanical dietary supplement.

    PubMed

    Krause, Elizabeth; Yuan, Yang; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dong, Huali; Dietz, Birgit M; Nikolic, Dejan; Pauli, Guido F; Bolton, Judy L; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-06-01

    Concerned about the safety of conventional estrogen replacement therapy, women are using botanical dietary supplements as alternatives for the management of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. Before botanical dietary supplements can be evaluated clinically for safety and efficacy, botanically authenticated and standardized forms are required. To address the demand for a standardized, estrogenic botanical dietary supplement, an extract of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) was developed. Although valued in the brewing of beer, hop extracts are used as anxiolytics and hypnotics and have well-established estrogenic constituents. Starting with a hop cultivar used in the brewing industry, spent hops (the residue remaining after extraction of bitter acids) were formulated into a botanical dietary supplement that was then chemically and biologically standardized. Biological standardization utilized the estrogen-dependent induction of alkaline phosphatase in the Ishikawa cell line. Chemical standardization was based on the prenylated phenols in hops that included estrogenic 8-prenylnaringenin, its isomer 6-prenylnaringenin, and pro-estrogenic isoxanthohumol and its isomeric chalcone xanthohumol, all of which were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The product of this process was a reproducible botanical extract suitable for subsequent investigations of safety and efficacy.

  3. Biological and Chemical Standardization of a Hop (Humulus lupulus) Botanical Dietary Supplement

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Elizabeth; Yuan, Yang; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dong, Huali; Dietz, Birgit M.; Nikolic, Dejan; Pauli, Guido F.; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Concerned about the safety of conventional estrogen replacement therapy, women are using botanical dietary supplements as alternatives for the management of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. Before botanical dietary supplements can be evaluated clinically for safety and efficacy, botanically authenticated and standardized forms are required. To address the demand for a standardized, estrogenic botanical dietary supplement, an extract of hops (Humulus lupulus, L.) was developed. Although valued in the brewing of beer, hop extracts are used as anxiolytics and hypnotics and have well established estrogenic constituents. Starting with a hop cultivar used in the brewing industry, spent hops (the residue remaining after extraction of bitter acids) were formulated into a botanical dietary supplement that was then chemically and biologically standardized. Biological standardization utilized the estrogen dependent induction of alkaline phosphatase in the Ishikawa cell line. Chemical standardization was based on the prenylated phenols in hops that included estrogenic 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), its isomer 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN), and pro-estrogenic isoxanthohumol (IX) and its isomeric chalcone xanthohumol (XN), all of which were measured using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). The product of this process was a reproducible botanical extract suitable for subsequent investigations of safety and efficacy. PMID:24861737

  4. Gastric Cancer and Helicobacter pylori: Impact of hopQII Gene.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, E; Kahrizi, D; Moradi, M T; Sohrabi, M; Yari, K

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium found usually in the stomach and use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors. The HopQII is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQII allele and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQII+ and hopQII- genotypes was determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotype hopQII+. PMID:26950460

  5. Cascading multi-hop reservation and transmission in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Cho, Ho-Shin

    2014-01-01

    The long propagation delay in an underwater acoustic channel makes designing an underwater media access control (MAC) protocol more challenging. In particular, handshaking-based MAC protocols widely used in terrestrial radio channels have been known to be inappropriate in underwater acoustic channels, because of the inordinately large latency involved in exchanging control packets. Furthermore, in the case of multi-hop relaying in a hop-by-hop handshaking manner, the end-to-end delay significantly increases. In this paper, we propose a new MAC protocol named cascading multi-hop reservation and transmission (CMRT). In CMRT, intermediate nodes between a source and a destination may start handshaking in advance for the next-hop relaying before handshaking for the previous node is completed. By this concurrent relaying, control packet exchange and data delivery cascade down to the destination. In addition, to improve channel utilization, CMRT adopts a packet-train method where multiple data packets are sent together by handshaking once. Thus, CMRT reduces the time taken for control packet exchange and accordingly increases the throughput. The performance of CMRT is evaluated and compared with that of two conventional MAC protocols (multiple-access collision avoidance for underwater (MACA-U) and MACA-U with packet trains (MACA-UPT)). The results show that CMRT outperforms other MAC protocols in terms of both throughput and end-to-end delay. PMID:25275349

  6. Identification of critical chemical features for Aurora kinase-B inhibitors using Hip-Hop, virtual screening and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Thangapandian, Sundarapandian; John, Shalini; Lee, Keun Woo

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to find the selective chemical features for Aurora kinase-B inhibitors using the potent methods like Hip-Hop, virtual screening, homology modeling, molecular dynamics and docking. The best hypothesis, Hypo1 was validated toward a wide range of test set containing the selective inhibitors of Aurora kinase-B. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics studies were carried out to perform the molecular docking studies. The best hypothesis Hypo1 was used as a 3D query to screen the chemical databases. The screened molecules from the databases were sorted based on ADME and drug like properties. The selective hit compounds were docked and the hydrogen bond interactions with the critical amino acids present in Aurora kinase-B were compared with the chemical features present in the Hypo1. Finally, we suggest that the chemical features present in the Hypo1 are vital for a molecule to inhibit the Aurora kinase-B activity.

  7. The interplay of crack hopping, delamination and interface failure in drying nanoparticle films

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Sharp, James S.; Smith, Mike I.

    2016-01-01

    Films formed through the drying of nanoparticle suspensions release the build-up of strain through a variety of different mechanisms including shear banding, crack formation and delamination. Here we show that important connections exist between these different phenomena: delamination depends on the dynamics of crack hopping, which in turn is influenced by the presence of shear bands. We also show that delamination does not occur uniformly across the film. As cracks hop they locally initiate the delamination of the film which warps with a timescale much longer than that associated with the hopping of cracks. The motion of a small region of the delamination front, where the shear component of interfacial crack propagation is believed to be enhanced, results in the deposition of a complex zig-zag pattern on the supporting substrate. PMID:27558989

  8. The interplay of crack hopping, delamination and interface failure in drying nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Sharp, James S.; Smith, Mike I.

    2016-08-01

    Films formed through the drying of nanoparticle suspensions release the build-up of strain through a variety of different mechanisms including shear banding, crack formation and delamination. Here we show that important connections exist between these different phenomena: delamination depends on the dynamics of crack hopping, which in turn is influenced by the presence of shear bands. We also show that delamination does not occur uniformly across the film. As cracks hop they locally initiate the delamination of the film which warps with a timescale much longer than that associated with the hopping of cracks. The motion of a small region of the delamination front, where the shear component of interfacial crack propagation is believed to be enhanced, results in the deposition of a complex zig-zag pattern on the supporting substrate.

  9. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S R K; Amo, A; Sagnes, I; Le Gratiet, L; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Bloch, J

    2016-01-01

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons-mixed light-matter quasiparticles-can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems. PMID:27307038

  10. Bridge-mediated hopping or superexchange electron-transfer processes in bis(triarylamine) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Christoph; Nöll, Gilbert; Schelter, Jürgen

    2002-09-01

    Hopping and superexchange are generally considered to be alternative electron-transfer mechanisms in molecular systems. In this work we used mixed-valence radical cations as model systems for the investigation of electron-transfer pathways. We show that substituents attached to a conjugated bridge connecting two triarylamine redox centres have a marked influence on the near-infrared absorption spectra of the corresponding cations. Spectral analysis, followed by evaluation of the electron-transfer parameters using the Generalized Mulliken-Hush theory and simulation of the potential energy surfaces, indicate that hopping and superexchange are not alternatives, but are both present in the radical cation with a dimethoxybenzene bridge. We found that the type of electron-transfer mechanism depends on the bridge-reorganization energy as well as on the bridge-state energy. Because superexchange and hopping follow different distance laws, our findings have implications for the design of new molecular and polymeric electron-transfer materials.

  11. Effects of long-range hopping and interactions on quantum walks in ordered and disordered lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattaraj, T.; Krems, R. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of long-range hopping and long-range interparticle interactions on the quantum walk of hard-core bosons in ideal and disordered one-dimensional lattices. We find that the range of hopping has a much more significant effect on the particle correlation dynamics than the range of interactions. We illustrate that long-range hopping makes the correlation diagrams asymmetric with respect to the sign of the interaction. We examine the relative role of repulsive and attractive interactions on the dynamics of scattering by isolated impurities and Anderson localization in disordered lattices. We show that weakly repulsive interactions increase the probability of tunneling through isolated impurities and decrease the localization.

  12. Hidden String Order in a Hole Superconductor with Extended Correlated Hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhajlany, Ravindra W.; Grzybowski, Przemysław R.; Stasińska, Julia; Lewenstein, Maciej; Dutta, Omjyoti

    2016-06-01

    Ultracold fermions in one-dimensional, spin-dependent nonoverlapping optical lattices are described by a nonstandard Hubbard model with next-nearest-neighbor correlated hopping. In the limit of a kinetically constraining value of the correlated hopping equal to the normal hopping, we map the invariant subspaces of the Hamiltonian exactly to free spinless fermion chains of varying lengths. As a result, the system exactly manifests spin-charge separation and we obtain the system properties for arbitrary filling: ground state collective order characterized by a spin gap, which can be ascribed to an unconventional critical hole superconductor associated with finite long range nonlocal string order. We study the system numerically away from the integrable point and show the persistence of both long range string order and spin gap for appropriate parameters as well as a transition to a ferromagnetic state.

  13. The influence of pruning and harvest timing on hop aroma, cone appearance, and yield.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroo; Inui, Takako; Oka, Kaneo; Fukui, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    Humulus lupulus (hop) cone is a key ingredient of beer, which determines its taste and aroma. Thus, it is necessary to control its cultivation conditions to acquire suitable quality. Here, cultivation conditions, such as pruning, blooming, and harvest timings, were modified for the Saaz hop variety in the Saaz region of Czech Republic. We investigated the correlation between the abovementioned cultivation factors and hop aroma characteristics, chemical components, appearance, yield, and beer quality in four locations and in three years. Harvest timing had a significant impact on the amount of essential oils, especially monoterpenes. Among them, linalool, geraniol and myrcene, which contribute beer hoppy aroma, increased with delay in harvest timing. These impacts caused by harvest timing were confirmed in all 4 locations and in all 3years. Our findings suggest that harvest timing influences the intensity and quality of beer hoppy aroma. PMID:26920261

  14. Occurrence of resveratrol and piceid in American and European hop cones.

    PubMed

    Jerkovic, Vesna; Collin, Sonia

    2007-10-17

    The recent discovery in hops of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside, trans-piceid, both famous in wine for their potential role in the "French paradox", opens new doors to understanding hop health benefits. In the present work, trans-resveratrol and trans-piceid were quantified by HPLC-APCI-MS/MS in 40 American and European hop cone samples from harvests of 2004, 2005, and 2006. Their content varies greatly, in the range 0.5-12 mg/kg. All German varieties revealed low amounts of stilbenes. The highest concentrations were found in Cascade (2004) and Willamette (2004 and 2006), two American low-alpha-acid varieties. Yet, probably because trans-resveratrol is a phytoalexin, a strong influence of harvest year was also observed. PMID:17883256

  15. Surface hopping, transition state theory, and decoherence. II. Thermal rate constants and detailed balance

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amber; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2015-10-07

    We investigate a simple approach to compute a non-adiabatic thermal rate constant using the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) dynamics. We study the effects of both decoherence (using our augmented-FSSH (A-FSSH) algorithm) and forbidden hops over a large range of parameters, including high and low friction regimes, and weak and strong electronic coupling regimes. Furthermore, when possible, we benchmark our results against exact hierarchy equations of motion results, where we usually find a maximum error of roughly a factor of two (at reasonably large temperatures). In agreement with Hammes-Schiffer and Tully, we find that a merger of transition state theory and surface hopping can be both accurate and efficient when performed correctly. We further show that detailed balance is followed approximately by A-FSSH dynamics.

  16. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Amo, A.; Sagnes, I.; Le Gratiet, L.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons—mixed light-matter quasiparticles—can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems. PMID:27307038

  17. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S R K; Amo, A; Sagnes, I; Le Gratiet, L; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Bloch, J

    2016-06-16

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons-mixed light-matter quasiparticles-can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems.

  18. Enhancement of hopping conductivity by spontaneous fractal ordering of low-energy sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianran; Skinner, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Variable-range hopping conductivity has long been understood in terms of a canonical prescription for relating the single-particle density of states to the temperature-dependent conductivity. Here we demonstrate that this prescription breaks down in situations where a large and long-ranged random potential develops. In particular, we examine a canonical model of a completely compensated semiconductor, and we show that at low temperatures hopping proceeds along self-organized, low-dimensional subspaces having fractal dimension d =2 . We derive and study numerically the spatial structure of these subspaces, as well as the conductivity and density of states that result from them. One of our prominent findings is that fractal ordering of low energy sites greatly enhances the hopping conductivity and allows Efros-Shklovskii type conductivity to persist up to unexpectedly high temperatures.

  19. The interplay of crack hopping, delamination and interface failure in drying nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Sharp, James S; Smith, Mike I

    2016-01-01

    Films formed through the drying of nanoparticle suspensions release the build-up of strain through a variety of different mechanisms including shear banding, crack formation and delamination. Here we show that important connections exist between these different phenomena: delamination depends on the dynamics of crack hopping, which in turn is influenced by the presence of shear bands. We also show that delamination does not occur uniformly across the film. As cracks hop they locally initiate the delamination of the film which warps with a timescale much longer than that associated with the hopping of cracks. The motion of a small region of the delamination front, where the shear component of interfacial crack propagation is believed to be enhanced, results in the deposition of a complex zig-zag pattern on the supporting substrate. PMID:27558989

  20. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures.

  1. Temperature-Dependent Exciton Hopping in an Array of Inhomogeneously Broadened Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Jun; Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2012-07-01

    The dynamics of exciton hopping in an array of inhomogeneously broadened CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) ensembles is examined by measuring time- and spectrally resolved fluorescence intensities. We have found a decrease in the fluorescence decay time as well as a dynamic redshift of the fluorescence spectrum originating from exciton transfer. Both show the characteristic temperature dependence reflecting the peculiar exciton dynamics in the QD ensemble. We propose a model of coupled QD arrays where inhomogeneous distribution and dark QDs that are related to a long-lasting off-state of blinking QDs are taken into account. Experimental results together with numerical calculations based on this model suggest that at low temperatures, an exciton transfers to a local low-energy site and tends to be trapped, whereas at high temperatures, thermally activated hopping of the exciton occurs repeatedly. Furthermore, we show that the decay time decrease of the QD array is attributable to exciton hopping to dark QDs.

  2. Hidden String Order in a Hole Superconductor with Extended Correlated Hopping.

    PubMed

    Chhajlany, Ravindra W; Grzybowski, Przemysław R; Stasińska, Julia; Lewenstein, Maciej; Dutta, Omjyoti

    2016-06-01

    Ultracold fermions in one-dimensional, spin-dependent nonoverlapping optical lattices are described by a nonstandard Hubbard model with next-nearest-neighbor correlated hopping. In the limit of a kinetically constraining value of the correlated hopping equal to the normal hopping, we map the invariant subspaces of the Hamiltonian exactly to free spinless fermion chains of varying lengths. As a result, the system exactly manifests spin-charge separation and we obtain the system properties for arbitrary filling: ground state collective order characterized by a spin gap, which can be ascribed to an unconventional critical hole superconductor associated with finite long range nonlocal string order. We study the system numerically away from the integrable point and show the persistence of both long range string order and spin gap for appropriate parameters as well as a transition to a ferromagnetic state.

  3. Subunit Organisation of In Vitro Reconstituted HOPS and CORVET Multisubunit Membrane Tethering Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhong; Johnston, Wayne; Kovtun, Oleksiy; Mureev, Sergey; Bröcker, Cornelia; Ungermann, Christian; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical and structural analysis of macromolecular protein assemblies remains challenging due to technical difficulties in recombinant expression, engineering and reconstitution of multisubunit complexes. Here we use a recently developed cell-free protein expression system based on the protozoan Leishmania tarentolae to produce in vitro all six subunits of the 600 kDa HOPS and CORVET membrane tethering complexes. We demonstrate that both subcomplexes and the entire HOPS complex can be reconstituted in vitro resulting in a comprehensive subunit interaction map. To our knowledge this is the largest eukaryotic protein complex in vitro reconstituted to date. Using the truncation and interaction analysis, we demonstrate that the complex is assembled through short hydrophobic sequences located in the C-terminus of the individual Vps subunits. Based on this data we propose a model of the HOPS and CORVET complex assembly that reconciles the available biochemical and structural data. PMID:24312556

  4. Mechanism of gene-regulating protein's diffusion along DNA: hopping vs. sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Mei; Cox, Edward; Austin, Robert

    2006-03-01

    It has been a long controversy as whether non-energy-driven proteins diffuse along DNA in the form of hopping or sliding. In the hopping model, the protein jumps on and off DNA frequently while diffusing, switching between 1D and 3D diffusions, and in the sliding model the protein diffuses along DNA basepair by basepair, staying in continuous contact with the DNA. We have investigated the diffusion mechanisms of LacI repressor protein along nonspecific sequences of DNA using single molecule imaging measurements. By studying the standard deviation (SD) of the diffusing LacI’s point spread functions, we observed that the SD values in both the longitudinal and transverse directions to DNA elongation to be significantly higher than what can be accounted for by the sliding model. We will show that the large SD values agree with the hopping model.

  5. Regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Horlemann, C; Schwekendiek, A; Höhnle, M; Weber, G

    2003-10-01

    An efficient procedure for direct organogenesis and regeneration of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) was established. For the first time Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of hop (cv. "Tettnanger") was achieved. Shoot internodes from in vitro cultures were identified as the most suitable type of explant for regeneration. Using this type of explant, a shoot-inducing medium was developed that supported direct organogenesis of approximately 50% of the explants. Plantlets were successfully rooted and transferred to the greenhouse. Overall, in less than 6 months hop cultures propagated in vitro were regenerated to plants in the greenhouse. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation was performed with the reporter gene GUS (beta-glucuronidase). The presence and function of transgenes in plants growing in the greenhouse was verified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and enzyme assay for GUS activity, respectively. We have obtained 21 transgenic plants from 1,440 explants initially transformed, yielding an overall transformation efficiency of 1.5%. PMID:12898178

  6. Spin dynamics of hopping electrons in quantum wires: Algebraic decay and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Glazov, M. M.

    2016-09-01

    We study theoretically the spin decoherence and intrinsic spin noise in semiconductor quantum wires caused by an interplay of electrons hopping between the localized states and the hyperfine interaction of electron and nuclear spins. At a sufficiently low density of localization sites the hopping rates have an exponentially broad distribution. It allows the description of the spin dynamics in terms of closely situated "pairs" of sites and single "reaching" states, from which the series of hops result in electrons localized inside a "pair." The developed analytical model and numerical simulations demonstrate disorder-dependent algebraic tails in the spin decay and power-law singularities features in the low-frequency part of the spin-noise spectrum.

  7. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  8. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures. PMID:27076196

  9. Decoding Hip-Hop's Cultural Impact: Scholars Are Poised to Take a Close Look at the Influence of Hip-Hop on the Social Identity, Values of Today's Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    As a cultural movement, hip-hop manages to get billed as both a positive and negative influence on young people, especially on Black and Latino youth. On one hand, there are African American activists, artists and entrepreneurs, such as Russell Simmons, who seek to build a progressive political movement among young hip-hop fans and who have had…

  10. Crystal structure of the effector protein HopA1 from Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Park, Yangshin; Shin, Inchul; Rhee, Sangkee

    2015-03-01

    Plants have evolved to protect themselves against pathogen attack; in these competitions, many Gram-negative bacteria translocate pathogen-originated proteins known as effectors directly into plant cells to interfere with cellular processes. Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is a plant defense mechanism in which plant resistance proteins recognize the presence of effectors and initiate immune responses. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) in Arabidopsis thaliana serves as a central node protein for basal immune resistance and ETI by interacting dynamically with other immune regulatory or resistance proteins. Recently, the effector HopA1 from Pseudomonas syringae was shown to affect these EDS1 complexes by binding EDS1 directly and activating the immune response signaling pathway. Here, we report the crystal structure of the effector HopA1 from P. syringae pv. syringae strain 61 and tomato strain DC3000. HopA1, a sequence-unrelated protein to EDS1, has an α+β fold in which the central antiparallel β-sheet is flanked by helices. A similar structural domain, an α/β fold, is one of the two domains in both EDS1 and the EDS1-interacting protein SAG101, and plays a crucial role in forming the EDS1 complex. Further analyses suggest structural similarity and differences between HopA1 and the α/β fold of SAG101, as well as between two HopA1s from different pathovars. Our structural analysis provides a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of the effect of HopA1 on plant immunity.

  11. The Draft Genome of Hop (Humulus lupulus), an Essence for Brewing.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Satoshi; Takagi, Hiroki; Shiraishi, Akira; Murata, Jun; Toyonaga, Hiromi; Patzak, Josef; Takagi, Motoshige; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Uemura, Aiko; Mitsuoka, Chikako; Yoshida, Kentaro; Krofta, Karel; Satake, Honoo; Terauchi, Ryohei; Ono, Eiichiro

    2015-03-01

    The female flower of hop (Humulus lupulus var. lupulus) is an essential ingredient that gives characteristic aroma, bitterness and durability/stability to beer. However, the molecular genetic basis for identifying DNA markers in hop for breeding and to study its domestication has been poorly established. Here, we provide draft genomes for two hop cultivars [cv. Saazer (SZ) and cv. Shinshu Wase (SW)] and a Japanese wild hop [H. lupulus var. cordifolius; also known as Karahanasou (KR)]. Sequencing and de novo assembly of genomic DNA from heterozygous SW plants generated scaffolds with a total size of 2.05 Gb, corresponding to approximately 80% of the estimated genome size of hop (2.57 Gb). The scaffolds contained 41,228 putative protein-encoding genes. The genome sequences for SZ and KR were constructed by aligning their short sequence reads to the SW reference genome and then replacing the nucleotides at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. De novo RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of SW revealed the developmental regulation of genes involved in specialized metabolic processes that impact taste and flavor in beer. Application of a novel bioinformatics tool, phylogenetic comparative RNA-Seq (PCP-Seq), which is based on read depth of genomic DNAs and RNAs, enabled the identification of genes related to the biosynthesis of aromas and flavors that are enriched in SW compared to KR. Our results not only suggest the significance of historical human selection process for enhancing aroma and bitterness biosyntheses in hop cultivars, but also serve as crucial information for breeding varieties with high quality and yield.

  12. The Draft Genome of Hop (Humulus lupulus), an Essence for Brewing.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Satoshi; Takagi, Hiroki; Shiraishi, Akira; Murata, Jun; Toyonaga, Hiromi; Patzak, Josef; Takagi, Motoshige; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Uemura, Aiko; Mitsuoka, Chikako; Yoshida, Kentaro; Krofta, Karel; Satake, Honoo; Terauchi, Ryohei; Ono, Eiichiro

    2015-03-01

    The female flower of hop (Humulus lupulus var. lupulus) is an essential ingredient that gives characteristic aroma, bitterness and durability/stability to beer. However, the molecular genetic basis for identifying DNA markers in hop for breeding and to study its domestication has been poorly established. Here, we provide draft genomes for two hop cultivars [cv. Saazer (SZ) and cv. Shinshu Wase (SW)] and a Japanese wild hop [H. lupulus var. cordifolius; also known as Karahanasou (KR)]. Sequencing and de novo assembly of genomic DNA from heterozygous SW plants generated scaffolds with a total size of 2.05 Gb, corresponding to approximately 80% of the estimated genome size of hop (2.57 Gb). The scaffolds contained 41,228 putative protein-encoding genes. The genome sequences for SZ and KR were constructed by aligning their short sequence reads to the SW reference genome and then replacing the nucleotides at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. De novo RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of SW revealed the developmental regulation of genes involved in specialized metabolic processes that impact taste and flavor in beer. Application of a novel bioinformatics tool, phylogenetic comparative RNA-Seq (PCP-Seq), which is based on read depth of genomic DNAs and RNAs, enabled the identification of genes related to the biosynthesis of aromas and flavors that are enriched in SW compared to KR. Our results not only suggest the significance of historical human selection process for enhancing aroma and bitterness biosyntheses in hop cultivars, but also serve as crucial information for breeding varieties with high quality and yield. PMID:25416290

  13. The phylogenetic position of the musky rat-kangaroo and the evolution of bipedal hopping in kangaroos (Macropodidae: Diprotodontia).

    PubMed

    Burk, A; Westerman, M; Springer, M

    1998-09-01

    Kangaroos and their relatives (family Macropodidae) are divided into the subfamilies Macropodinae (kangaroos, wallabies, pademelons) and Potoroinae (rat-kangaroos, potoroos, bettongs). The musky rat-kangaroo, Hypsiprymnodon moschatus, is traditionally allied with other potoroines, based primarily on the basis of osteological characters and aspects of the female reproductive system. Unlike other macropodids, however, which are capable of bipedal hopping, Hypsiprymnodon is a quadrupedal bounder and lacks several derived features of the pes and tarsus that are presumably adaptations for bipedal hopping. Other derived features, such as a complex stomach, loss of P2 with the eruption of P3, and reduction of litter size to one, are also lacking in Hypsiprymnodon but occur in all other macropodids. Thus, available evidence suggests that Hypsiprymnodon either is part of a monophyletic Potoroinae or is a sister taxon to other living macropodids. To test these hypotheses, we sequenced 1,170 bp base pairs of the mitochondrial genome for 16 macropodids. Maximum parsimony, minimum evolution, maximum likelihood, and quartet puzzling all support the hypothesis that macropodines and potoroines are united to the exclusion of Hypsiprymnodon. This hypothesis implies that characters such as bipedal hopping evolved only once in macropodid evolution. Aside from Hypsiprymnodon, the remaining macropodids separate into the traditional Macropodinae and Potoroinae. Macropodines further separate into two clades: one containing the New Guinean forest wallabies Dorcopsis and Dorcopsulus, and one consisting of the genera Macropus, Setonix, Thylogale, Onychogalea, Wallabia, Dendrolagus, Peradorcas, and Lagorchestes. Among potoroines, there is moderate support for the association of Bettongia and Aepyprymnus to the exclusion of Potorous. Divergence times were estimated by using 12S ribosomal RNA transversions. At the base of the macropodid radiation, Hypsiprymnodon diverged from other macropodids

  14. Numerical studies of variable-range hopping in one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. S.; Fogler, M. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report on our recent numerical study [1] of hopping transport in disordered one-dimensional systems. A fast new algorithm, based on Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm, is devised to find the lowest-resistance path through the hopping network at arbitrary electric field. Probability distribution functions of individual resistances on the path and the net resistance are calculated and fitted to compact analytic formulas. Qualitative differences between statistics of resistance fluctuations in Ohmic and non-Ohmic regimes are elucidated. The results are compared with prior theoretical and experimental work on the subject.[6pt] [1] A. S. Rodin and M. M. Fogler, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155435 (2009).

  15. Multi-hop optical label switching with coherent detected spectral amplitude code labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongsheng

    Based on label stacking principles and coherent detection, we present a two-hop, coherent detected spectral amplitude code (SAC) labeled system to accomplish ultrafast packet forwarding for packet-switched metropolitan area networks. An optical switching network with two forwarding nodes, two 156 Mb/s SAC labels, and 40 Gb/s differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK) payloads is demonstrated by computer simulation. The bit error rate (BER) performances of coherent detected SAC labels and high speed payload over 160 km fiber after two hops transmission are accessed, respectively.

  16. Hopping conduction in In-doped CuO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, A.; Horzum, Ş.; Serin, N.; Serin, T.

    2014-11-01

    Electrical transport properties of undoped and In-doped CuO thin films (1, 5 and 10 at. %) are investigated by mean of resistivity in the temperature range of 115-300 K. Electrical transport mechanism of films is explained on the basis of the variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction. Upon doping, appreciable changes are found in resistivity. Temperature dependent resistivity shows a complex correlation with increasing In concentration. This situation is well explained by fluctuations in the hopping distance and the density of states at the Fermi level.

  17. Widely tunable mode-hop free external cavity quantum cascade laser for high resolution spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, G.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Maulini, R.; Bulliard, J. M.; Faist, J.

    2005-10-01

    An external cavity (EC) quantum cascade laser (QCL) configuration with the thermoelectrically cooled gain medium fabricated using a bound-to-continuum design and operating in continuous wave at ˜5.2 μm is reported. The EC architecture employs a piezo-activated cavity mode tracking system for mode-hop free operation suitable for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multiple species trace-gas detection. The performance of the EC-QCL exhibits coarse single mode tuning over 35 cm-1 and a continuous mode-hop free fine tuning range of ˜1.2 cm-1.

  18. Intra-molecular electron transfer and electric conductance via sequential hopping: Unified theoretical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Yuri A.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2005-10-01

    The relation between intra-molecular electron transfer in the donor-bridge-acceptor system and zero-bias conductance of the same bridge in the metal-molecule-metal junction is analyzed for the sequential hopping regime of both processes. The electron transfer rate and molecular conductance are expressed in terms of rates characterizing each individual step of electron motion. Based on the results obtained, we derive the analytical expression that relates these two quantities in the general case of the energy landscape governing hopping transport.

  19. Simulating QCD at nonzero baryon density to all orders in the hopping parameter expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, Gert; Seiler, Erhard; Sexty, Dénes; Stamatescu, Ion-Olimpiu

    2014-12-01

    Progress in simulating QCD at nonzero baryon density requires, among other things, substantial numerical effort. Here we propose two different expansions to all orders in the hopping parameter, preserving the full Yang-Mills action, which are much cheaper to simulate. We carry out simulations using complex Langevin dynamics, both in the hopping expansions and in the full theory, for two flavors of Wilson fermions, and agreement is seen at sufficiently high order in the expansion. These results provide support for the use of complex Langevin dynamics to study QCD at nonzero density, both in the full and the expanded theory, and for the convergence of the latter.

  20. Polaron hopping in some biomolecular solids and their charge transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Solanki, G K; Amin, Anand; Padhiyar, Ashvin; Ray, A K; Oza, A T

    2008-12-01

    The solid state spectroscopy of charge transfer complexes of biomolecules such as fatty acids, tripalmitin, lysozyme. folic acid, beta-carotene, cytochrome c, valinomycin and gramicidin has been carried out. The absorption coefficient is related with electronic conductivity. A half-power beta density is found common among these macromolecular solids, indicating photon-induced polaron hopping or hopping of a charge carrier between two branches of a polariton. Band gap vs full width at half-maximum of the mid-IR peak also reveals a linear relation.

  1. In and out of love with hip-hop: saliency of sexual scripts for young adult African American women in hip-hop and Black-oriented television.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M Nicole; Butler, Ebony O; Long, Amanda M; Fisher, Felicia D

    2016-10-01

    Hip-hop media and Black-oriented reality television are powerful mechanisms for conveying and promoting stereotypes of Black women. Black women's sexuality is frequently presented as highly-salient in each medium. However, little is known about the impact of those images on Black women's sexuality and identity. The current study uses focus-group methodology to engage young adult Black in critical discussion of two predominant sexual scripts found in hip-hop music and Black-oriented reality television - the Freak and the Gold Digger. Analyses revealed shared and distinct aspects of each sexual script represented in both media and the impact of those scripts on participants' experiences. Implications for future research are discussed.

  2. In and out of love with hip-hop: saliency of sexual scripts for young adult African American women in hip-hop and Black-oriented television.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M Nicole; Butler, Ebony O; Long, Amanda M; Fisher, Felicia D

    2016-10-01

    Hip-hop media and Black-oriented reality television are powerful mechanisms for conveying and promoting stereotypes of Black women. Black women's sexuality is frequently presented as highly-salient in each medium. However, little is known about the impact of those images on Black women's sexuality and identity. The current study uses focus-group methodology to engage young adult Black in critical discussion of two predominant sexual scripts found in hip-hop music and Black-oriented reality television - the Freak and the Gold Digger. Analyses revealed shared and distinct aspects of each sexual script represented in both media and the impact of those scripts on participants' experiences. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27188876

  3. 77 FR 70447 - Medicare Program; Semi-Annual Meeting of the Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient Payment (HOP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient Payment (HOP Panel)--March 11 and 12, 2013 AGENCY: Centers for...-annual meeting of the Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient Payment (HOP, the Panel), (the Ambulatory... their associated weights, and hospital outpatient therapeutic supervision issues. DATES: Meeting...

  4. Using Hip-Hop Culture as a Bridge to Canonical Poetry Texts in an Urban Secondary English Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan-Andrade, Jeff; Morrell, Ernest

    This paper argues that hip-hop music is an effective way to reach previously marginalized urban youth and to teach them critical and analytical skills necessary for succeeding in school. It suggests that students learn more effectively when motivated, and hip-hop music is a tremendous motivating force for urban youth. It is also a legitimate voice…

  5. 75 FR 59260 - HOP Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission HOP Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing... the above-referenced proceeding of HOP Energy, LLC's application for market-based rate authority,...

  6. An Educational Exploration of Homophobia and Sexism in Rap and Hip Hop: Homo-Thugs and Divas in da House

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the author explores the connections between hip hop and rap, sexism and homophobia, and children and teens. He describes the implications or potential consequences of sexism and homophobia within the music and media culture of hip hop and rap (with the focus on how it affects young viewers and fans in terms of gender [identity]…

  7. "They Wasn't Makin' My Kinda Music": A Hip-Hop Musician's Perspective on School, Schooling, and School Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on a hip-hop perspective of school, schooling, and school music. The study involves applications of ethnographic (including autoethnographic) techniques within the framework of a holistic multiple case study. One case is an adult amateur hip-hop musician named Terrence (pseudonym), and the other is myself (a traditionally…

  8. Hip-Hop Feminism: A Standpoint to Enhance the Positive Self-Identity of Black College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Wilma J.

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of hip-hop among young Black college women, coupled with the deluge of negative and positive messages in this culture regarding these women's identity, signals an opportunity for the arrival of a contemporary, culturally relevant epistemology--hip-hop feminism. Through the lens of Black feminist theory, this article explores hip-hop…

  9. Involvement of Vacuolar Sequestration and Active Transport in Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Hop Iso-α-Acids▿ † ¶

    PubMed Central

    Hazelwood, Lucie A.; Walsh, Michael C.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop α-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-α-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-α-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-α-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-α-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-α-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-α-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-α-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-α-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators. PMID:19915041

  10. Involvement of vacuolar sequestration and active transport in tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hop iso-alpha-acids.

    PubMed

    Hazelwood, Lucie A; Walsh, Michael C; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop alpha-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-alpha-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-alpha-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-alpha-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-alpha-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-alpha-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-alpha-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-alpha-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-alpha-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators.

  11. Dialoguing, Cultural Capital, and Student Engagement: Toward a Hip Hop Pedagogy in the High School and University Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2009-01-01

    Hip hop culture is typically excluded from conventional educational spaces within the U.S. Drawing on the experiences of an educator who works with urban high school students and university level pre- and in-service educators, this article examines the role of hip hop culture for student engagement in two settings--an alternative high school…

  12. "Dear Tupac, You Speak to Me": Recruiting Hip Hop as Curriculum at a School for Pregnant and Parenting Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallman, Heidi L.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a rich representation of how in-school practices that recruit students' "out-of-school" literacies, such as hip hop, can be used as critical bridges in students' learning. Hip hop, conceptualized in this article as an "out-of-school" literacy, works as a vehicle for curricular change at Eastview School for Pregnant and…

  13. Development of biological control of Tetranychus urticae (Acari:Tetranychidae) and Phorodon humuli (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in Oregon Hop yards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal development of biological control of arthropod pests in perennial cropping systems is largely unreported. In this study, the development of biological control of twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch and hop aphid, Phorodon humuli (Schrank) in a new planting of hop in Oregon...

  14. Hop/STI1 modulates retinal proliferation and cell death independent of PrP{sup C}

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda-Carvalho, Maithe; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S.; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana B. . E-mail: chiarini@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-09-21

    Hop/STI1 is a co-chaperone adaptor protein for Hsp70/Hsp90 complexes. Hop/STI1 is found extracellularly and modulates cell death and differentiation through interaction with the prion protein (PrP{sup C}). Here, we investigated the expression of hop/STI1 and its role upon cell proliferation and cell death in the developing retina. Hop/STI1 is more expressed in developing rat retina than in the mature tissue. Hop/STI1 blocks retinal cell death in the neuroblastic layer (NBL) in a PrP{sup C} dependent manner, but failed to protect ganglion cells against axotomy-induced cell death. An antibody raised against hop/STI1 ({alpha}-STI1) blocked both ganglion cell and NBL cell death independent of PrP{sup C}. cAMP/PKA, ERK, PI3K and PKC signaling pathways were not involved in these effects. Hop/STI1 treatment reduced proliferation, while {alpha}-STI1 increased proliferation in the developing retina, both independent of PrP{sup C}. We conclude that hop/STI1 can modulate both proliferation and cell death in the developing retina independent of PrP{sup C}.

  15. The Habc Domain of the SNARE Vam3 Interacts with the HOPS Tethering Complex to Facilitate Vacuole Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lürick, Anna; Kuhlee, Anne; Bröcker, Cornelia; Kümmel, Daniel; Raunser, Stefan; Ungermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion at vacuoles requires a consecutive action of the HOPS tethering complex, which is recruited by the Rab GTPase Ypt7, and vacuolar SNAREs to drive membrane fusion. It is assumed that the Sec1/Munc18-like Vps33 within the HOPS complex is largely responsible for SNARE chaperoning. Here, we present direct evidence for HOPS binding to SNAREs and the Habc domain of the Vam3 SNARE protein, which may explain its function during fusion. We show that HOPS interacts strongly with the Vam3 Habc domain, assembled Q-SNAREs, and the R-SNARE Ykt6, but not the Q-SNARE Vti1 or the Vam3 SNARE domain. Electron microscopy combined with Nanogold labeling reveals that the binding sites for vacuolar SNAREs and the Habc domain are located in the large head of the HOPS complex, where Vps16 and Vps33 have been identified before. Competition experiments suggest that HOPS bound to the Habc domain can still interact with assembled Q-SNAREs, whereas Q-SNARE binding prevents recognition of the Habc domain. In agreement, membranes carrying Vam3ΔHabc fuse poorly unless an excess of HOPS is provided. These data suggest that the Habc domain of Vam3 facilitates the assembly of the HOPS/SNARE machinery at fusion sites and thus supports efficient membrane fusion. PMID:25564619

  16. I Feel What He Was Doin': Responding to Justice-Oriented Teaching through Hip-Hop Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2011-01-01

    This study illustrates a set of learning activities designed from two hip-hop aesthetics and explores their use among a classroom of African American preservice teachers who graduated from urban school districts. Based on the two hip-hop aesthetics of kinetic consumption and autonomy/distance, the specific goal of these learning activities is to…

  17. The Tale of the Talent Night Rap: Hip-Hop Culture in Schools and the Challenge of Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Bronwen E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of calls to integrate Hip-Hop culture into school curricula is growing, little attention is being paid to the reluctance of teachers and administrators to forge relationships between the cultures of school and of youth. This article explores some of the difficulties inherent in the relationships between Hip Hop and schooling,…

  18. "You Don't Have to Claim Her": Reconstructing Black Femininity through Critical Hip-Hop Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Lauren Leigh

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which females who identify with hip-hop often develop and construct their identities in relation to media representations of blackness and femininity in hip-hop music and culture. In order for educators to support female students in constructing identities of empowerment and agency, they should be willing and able…

  19. Fresh Faces, New Places: Moving beyond Teacher-Researcher Perspectives in Hip-Hop-Based Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Decoteau J.; Hall, H. Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in critical and culturally relevant theory, hip-hop-based education (HHBE) research documents the use of hip-hop in educational settings. Despite the richness of the emerging field, overreliance on teacher-researcher perspectives leaves much to be desired. Little is known of the extent and ways HHBE is used by nonresearching K-12…

  20. Culturally Relevant Teaching: Hip-Hop Pedagogy in Urban Schools. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 396

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prier, Darius D.

    2012-01-01

    "Culturally Relevant Teaching" centers hip-hop culture as a culturally relevant form of critical pedagogy in urban pre-service teacher education programs. In this important book, Darius D. Prier explores how hip-hop artists construct a sense of democratic education and pedagogy with transformative possibilities in their schools and communities. In…

  1. Characterization of prenylflavonoids and hop bitter acids in various classes of Czech beers and hop extracts using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ceslová, Lenka; Holcapek, Michal; Fidler, Martin; Drsticková, Jitka; Lísa, Miroslav

    2009-10-23

    Hops contain a wide range of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant properties divided in various chemical classes. These compounds are detected in hop extracts and also in beer as its main product. Based on the careful optimization of column type, column packing, mobile phase composition and gradient steepness, two high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) methods have been developed. The first method using Purospher Star RP-8e column and the gradient of aqueous acetonitrile containing 0.3% formic acid is optimized for the separation of low polar polyphenolic compounds, while the second one with Zorbax SB-CN column is used for more polar hops and beer components. In this work, more compounds are detected in comparison to previous reports. In total, 49 low polar and 37 polar compounds are detected in studied samples and their molecular weights are determined based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectra. Some compounds are identified based on the interpretation of their full scan and tandem APCI mass spectra, retention behavior and UV spectra, while the full structure elucidation of other species still requires further research. The quantitation of xanthohumol related prenylflavonoids and bitter acids is done with two detection techniques (APCI-MS and UV detection) providing comparable results. Both compound classes (i.e., prenylflavonoids and bitter acids) are separated and quantitated in a single HPLC run, where numerous other polyphenolics are detected as well.

  2. Surface hopping outperforms secular Redfield theory when reorganization energies range from small to moderate (and nuclei are classical)

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Brian R. Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2015-03-14

    We evaluate the accuracy of Tully’s surface hopping algorithm for the spin-boson model in the limit of small to moderate reorganization energy. We calculate transition rates between diabatic surfaces in the exciton basis and compare against exact results from the hierarchical equations of motion; we also compare against approximate rates from the secular Redfield equation and Ehrenfest dynamics. We show that decoherence-corrected surface hopping performs very well in this regime, agreeing with secular Redfield theory for very weak system-bath coupling and outperforming secular Redfield theory for moderate system-bath coupling. Surface hopping can also be extended beyond the Markovian limits of standard Redfield theory. Given previous work [B. R. Landry and J. E. Subotnik, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A513 (2012)] that establishes the accuracy of decoherence-corrected surface-hopping in the Marcus regime, this work suggests that surface hopping may well have a very wide range of applicability.

  3. Hip-Hop--What's in It for the Academy? Self-Understanding, Pedagogy and Aesthetical Learning Processes in Everyday Cultural Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Söderman, Johan; Sernhede, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Since hip-hop first appeared in New York over 35 years ago, it has been associated with social activism and education. Accordingly, it is not surprising that academic institutions in universities and K-12 schools are interested in hip-hop. In this article, we will highlight the "hip-hop academisation" and map out a new direction in a…

  4. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) is a new natural host of Hop stunt viroid.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Amine; Hamdi, Imen; Ellouze, Olfa; Ghrab, Mohamed; Fkahfakh, Hatem; Drira, Noureddine

    2013-10-01

    Besides hop, Hop stunt viroid (HpSVd) infects many woody species including grapevine, citrus, peach, plum, apricot, almond, pomegranate, mulberry and jujube. Here, we report the first detection of HpSVd in pistachio (Pistacia vera L.). Samples corresponding to 16 pistachio cultivars were obtained from a nearby almond collection. From these samples, low molecular weight RNAs were extracted for double polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, northern-blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. HpSVd was detected in 4 of the 16 pistachio cultivars in the first year and in 6 in the second, being also detected in the almond collection. Examination of the nucleotide sequences of pistachio and almond isolates revealed 13 new sequence variants. Sequences from pistachio shared 92-96 % similarity with the first reported HpSVd sequence (GenBank X00009), and multiple alignment and phylogenetic analyses showed that one pistachio isolate (HpSVdPis67Jabari) clustered with the plum group, whereas all the others clustered with the hop, and the recombinants plum-citrus and plum-Hop/cit3 groups. By identifying pistachio as a new natural host, we confirm that HpSVd is an ubiquitous and genetically variable viroid that infects many different fruit trees cultivated worldwide.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Carnation Mottle Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong

    2015-01-01

    The Carnation mottle virus (CarMV) is a single positive-strand RNA virus belonging to the genus Carmovirus. The major natural host for CarMV is the carnation. In this study, using transcriptome data, we provide for the first time a nearly complete genome sequence of CarMV infecting hop plants. PMID:25977420

  6. Characterization of the Migration of Hop Volatiles into Different Crown Cork Liner Polymers and Can Coatings.

    PubMed

    Wietstock, Philip C; Glattfelder, Richard; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Methner, Frank-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Absorption of hop volatiles by crown cork liner polymers and can coatings was investigated in beer during storage. All hop volatiles measured were prone to migrate into the closures, and the absorption kinetics was demonstrated to fit Fick's second law of diffusion well for a plane sheet. The extent and rate of diffusion were significantly dissimilar and were greatly dependent upon the nature of the volatile. Diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.32 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (limonene) to 0.26 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (α-humulene). The maximum amounts absorbed into the material at equilibrium were in the following order: limonene > α-humulene > trans-caryophyllene > myrcene ≫ linalool > α-terpineol > geraniol. With the application of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) liners with oxygen-scavenging functionality, oxygen-barrier liners made up from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or liner polymers from a different manufacturer had no significant effect on the composition of hop volatiles in beers after prolonged storage of 55 days; however, significantly higher amounts of myrcene and limonene were found in the oxygen-barrier-type crown cork, while all other closures behaved similarly. Can coatings were demonstrated to absorb hop volatiles in a similar pattern as crown corks but to a lesser extent. Consequently, significantly higher percentages of myrcene were found in the beers. PMID:26996287

  7. The interday reliability of ankle, knee, leg, and vertical musculoskeletal stiffness during hopping and overground running.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Corey W; Bradshaw, Elizabeth J; Kemp, Justin; Clark, Ross A

    2013-08-01

    A number of methods are used to measure lower extremity musculoskeletal stiffness, but there is a paucity of research examining the reliability of these techniques. Therefore, we investigated the reliability of vertical, leg, knee, and ankle stiffness during overground running and hopping in 20 active men. Participants were required to run on a 10 m overground runway at 3.83 m/s (actual; 3.35 ± 0.12 m/s) and to hop in place at 2.2 Hz (actual; 2.37 ± 0.03 Hz), and at a self-selected frequency (actual; 2.05 ± 0.12 Hz) and at 2.2 Hz (actual; 2.39 ± 0.04 Hz). Reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient, coefficient of variation, mean differences, and Cohen's effect sizes. There was good reliability for vertical stiffness, moderate reliability for leg stiffness, and poor reliability for knee and ankle stiffness during the running task. Similar results were observed during the 2.2 Hz hopping tasks, with good reliability displayed for vertical stiffness and poor reliability for ankle and knee stiffness. In conclusion, our results suggest that vertical stiffness is a reliable measure when running at 3.83 m/s and hopping at 2.2 Hz.

  8. [Combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA; a model with nearest interactions].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the earlier developed combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA, a model with all nearest interactions between nucleobases is proposed. It is shown that the transfer rates for various types of nucleotide sequences calculated within this model are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Hopping isn't always about the legs: forelimb muscle activity patterns during toad locomotion.

    PubMed

    Akella, Trupti; Gillis, Gary B

    2011-01-01

    Although toads are not known for their jumping ability, they are excellent at landing, using their forelimbs to stabilize and decelerate the body as they transition between hops. Forelimb muscles must play important roles during this landing behavior, but to date our understanding of forelimb muscle function during jumping in anurans, particularly after takeoff, is quite limited. Here, we use simultaneous high-speed video and electromyography to characterize the timing and intensity of electrical activity patterns of six muscles that act at the shoulder or elbow joints in the cane toad, Bufo marinus. In particular, we aim to address the importance of these muscles with respect to various potential roles during hopping (e.g. contributing to propulsion during takeoff, resisting impact forces during landing). Five of the six recorded muscles exhibited their highest average intensities during the aerial phase of the hop, with the most intense activity present near forelimb touchdown. In contrast, no muscles exhibited high levels of activity in the initial phase of takeoff. We interpret these data to indicate that the forelimb muscles studied here are likely unimportant in augmenting force production during takeoff, but are critical for both mid-air forelimb positioning and resisting the forces associated with impact. The onset timing of elbow extensors seems to occur at a nearly fixed interval before impact, regardless of hop length, suggesting that these muscles are particularly tuned to resisting impact.

  10. High-Speed Hopping: Time-Resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Daphniids, also known as water fleas, are small, freshwater crustaceans that live in a low-to-intermediate Reynolds number regime. These plankters are equipped with a pair of branched, setae-bearing antennae that they beat to impulsively propel themselves, or ``hop,'' through the water. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. We present time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of swimming by Daphnia magna. The body kinematics and flow physics of the daphniid hop are quantified. It is shown that the flow generated by each stroking antenna resembles an asymmetric viscous vortex ring. It is proposed that the flow produced by the daphniid hop can be modeled as a double Stokeslet consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width. The flow physics are discussed in the context of other species operating in the same Reynolds number range of 10 to 100: sea butterfly swimming and flight by the smallest flying insects.

  11. Slouching toward Bork: The Culture Wars and Self-Criticism in Hip-Hop Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogbar, Jeffrey O. G.

    1999-01-01

    Examined the marginalized voices of hip-hop artists in the culture war debates of the 1990s. Explores the efficacy of those voices and reveals how they differ from the typical parameter of public debate. Discusses the attacks on rap by right wing thinkers, such as Newt Gingrich and Robert Bork. (SLD)

  12. Becoming Black: Rap and Hip Hop, Race, Gender, Identity, and the Politics of ESL Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Awad El Karim M.

    1999-01-01

    Examines how a group of continental Francophone African youth at a French high school in Ottawa, Canada "become Black" as they enter a world that already constructs them as Black. These students learn Black English, which they access in hip-hop culture and linguistic styles. Discusses the impact of becoming Black on English-as-a-Second-Language…

  13. Xanthohumol and related prenylflavonoids from hops and beer: to your good health!

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jan F; Page, Jonathan E

    2004-05-01

    Xanthohumol (3'-[3,3-dimethyl allyl]-2',4',4-trihydroxy-6'-methoxychalcone) is the principal prenylated flavonoid of the female inflorescences of the hop plant ('hops'), an ingredient of beer. Human exposure to xanthohumol and related prenylflavonoids, such as 8-prenylnaringenin and isoxanthohumol, is primarily through beer consumption. Xanthohumol has been characterized a 'broad-spectrum' cancer chemopreventive agent in in vitro studies, while 8-prenylnaringenin enjoys fame as the most potent phytoestrogen known to date. These biological activities suggest that prenylflavonoids from hops have potential for application in cancer prevention programs and in prevention or treatment of (post-)menopausal 'hot flashes' and osteoporosis. Xanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin are metabolized into many flavonoid derivatives with modified 3,3-dimethyl allyl (prenyl) moieties. Xanthohumol is formed in lupulin glands by a specialized branch of flavonoid biosynthesis that involves prenylation and O-methylation of the polyketide intermediate chalconaringenin. Although a lupulin gland-specific chalcone synthase is known, the aromatic prenyltransferase and O-methyltransferase participating in xanthohumol have not been identified. The prenylflavonoid pathway is a possible target for breeding or biotechnological modification of hops with the aim of increasing xanthohumol levels for beer brewing and 8-prenylnaringenin levels for pharmaceutical production.

  14. Hopping and the Stokes-Einstein relation breakdown in simple glass formers.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Jin, Yuliang; Parisi, Giorgio; Zamponi, Francesco

    2014-10-21

    One of the most actively debated issues in the study of the glass transition is whether a mean-field description is a reasonable starting point for understanding experimental glass formers. Although the mean-field theory of the glass transition--like that of other statistical systems--is exact when the spatial dimension d → ∞, the evolution of systems properties with d may not be smooth. Finite-dimensional effects could dramatically change what happens in physical dimensions,d = 2, 3. For standard phase transitions finite-dimensional effects are typically captured by renormalization group methods, but for glasses the corrections are much more subtle and only partially understood. Here, we investigate hopping between localized cages formed by neighboring particles in a model that allows to cleanly isolate that effect. By bringing together results from replica theory, cavity reconstruction, void percolation, and molecular dynamics, we obtain insights into how hopping induces a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation and modifies the mean-field scenario in experimental systems. Although hopping is found to supersede the dynamical glass transition, it nonetheless leaves a sizable part of the critical regime untouched. By providing a constructive framework for identifying and quantifying the role of hopping, we thus take an important step toward describing dynamic facilitation in the framework of the mean-field theory of glasses. PMID:25288722

  15. 75 FR 70236 - Hop Beta Acids; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption, Solicitation of Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... treat up to 181,000 honey bee colonies in the Pacific North West (PNW) to control varroa mites. The... exemption regional request for use of hop beta acids in honey bee hives to control varroa mites. Information... effect on honey bee populations. The parasitic mite is considered the primary pest of honeybees and...

  16. Youth Perspectives on the Intersections of Violence, Gender, and Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Diana; Weinstein, Hannah; Munoz-Laboy, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Youth's perceptions of violence within their social environments can provide relevant insights into the gender-based interpersonal violence epidemic in inner-city communities. To explore this issue, we examined two sets of narratives with young men and women, aged 15 to 21, involved in hip-hop culture in New York City. In the analysis, we reveal…

  17. Estimation of the Mutual Time Delay of Signals with Pseudorandom Frequency Hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, R. A.; Morozov, O. A.; Fidelman, V. R.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a method for determining the mutual time delay during the propagation of signals with pseudorandom frequency hopping in different channels. A modified algorithm for calculating the uncertainty function, which permits calculation parallelization, is used to compensate for the influence of the Doppler effect during the signal recording. The results of studying the efficiency of the proposed method are presented.

  18. Word Up: Using Spoken Word and Hip Hop Subject Matter in Pre-College Writing Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirc, Geoffrey; Sutton, Terri

    2009-01-01

    In June 2008, the Department of English at the University of Minnesota partnered with the Minnesota Spoken Word Association to inaugurate an outreach literacy program for local high-school students and teachers. The four-day institute, named "In Da Tradition," used spoken word and hip hop to teach academic and creative writing to core-city…

  19. Critical Multimodal Hip Hop Production: A Social Justice Approach to African American Language and Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat; Hayes, Nini, Visaya; Way, Kate

    2013-01-01

    This article features key findings from a study that highlights the transformative impact of a pedagogical approach that employs Critical Multimodal Hip Hop Production (CMHHP). The study took place in an extended day program in a northern California public middle school among a group of 30, urban, African American, Chicano/a/Latino/a, and Asian…

  20. Peers as Teachers in Physical Education Hip Hop Classes in Finnish High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurmi, Anna-Maria; Kokkonen, Marja

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, theoretically rooted in peer-assisted learning (PAL), ten female high school students, acting as peer teachers, taught hip hop dance in a voluntary physical education course. The data, derived from questionnaires and interviews with the peer teachers, were analysed using content analysis. The results showed that the peer…

  1. Edge states in a honeycomb lattice: effects of anisotropic hopping and mixed edges

    SciTech Connect

    Dahal, Hari P; Balatsky, Alexander V; Sinistsyn, N A; Hu, Zi - Xiang; Yang, Kun

    2008-01-01

    We study the edge states in graphene in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the lattice. Most of the work done so far discusses the edge states in either zigzag or armchair edge graphene considering an isotropic electron hopping. In practice, graphene can have a mixture of armchair and zigzag edges and the electron hopping can be anisotropic, which is the subject of this article. We predict that the mixed edges smear the enhanced local density of states (LDOS) at E=0 of the zigzag edge and, on the other hand, the anisotropic hopping gives rise to the enhanced LDOS at E=0 in the armchair edge. The behavior of the LDOS can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments. We suggest that care must be taken while interpreting the STM data, because the clear distinction between the zigzag edge (enhanced LDOS at E=0) and armchair edge (suppressed LDOS at E=0) can be lost if the hopping is not isotropic and if the edges are mixed.

  2. Development of partial ontogenic resistance to powdery mildew in Hop cones and its management implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of processes leading to crop damage is central to devising rational approaches to disease management. Multiple experiments established that infection of hop cones by Podosphaera macularis was most severe if inoculation occurred within 15 to 21 days after bloom. This period of infection was...

  3. Immunomodulation by the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ Type III Effector Family in Aribidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae employs a type III secretion system to inject 20-30 different type III effector (T3SE) proteins into plant host cells. A major role of T3SEs is to suppress plant immune responses and promote bacterial infection. The YopJ/HopZ acetyltransferases are a superfamily of T3SEs found i...

  4. You Know What It Is: Learning Words through Listening to Hip-Hop

    PubMed Central

    Chesley, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Music listeners have difficulty correctly understanding and remembering song lyrics. However, results from the present study support the hypothesis that young adults can learn African-American English (AAE) vocabulary from listening to hip-hop music. Non-African-American participants first gave free-response definitions to AAE vocabulary items, after which they answered demographic questions as well as questions addressing their social networks, their musical preferences, and their knowledge of popular culture. Results from the survey show a positive association between the number of hip-hop artists listened to and AAE comprehension vocabulary scores. Additionally, participants were more likely to know an AAE vocabulary item if the hip-hop artists they listen to use the word in their song lyrics. Together, these results suggest that young adults can acquire vocabulary through exposure to hip-hop music, a finding relevant for research on vocabulary acquisition, the construction of adolescent and adult identities, and the adoption of lexical innovations. PMID:22205942

  5. Xanthohumol and related prenylflavonoids from hops and beer: to your good health!

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jan F; Page, Jonathan E

    2004-05-01

    Xanthohumol (3'-[3,3-dimethyl allyl]-2',4',4-trihydroxy-6'-methoxychalcone) is the principal prenylated flavonoid of the female inflorescences of the hop plant ('hops'), an ingredient of beer. Human exposure to xanthohumol and related prenylflavonoids, such as 8-prenylnaringenin and isoxanthohumol, is primarily through beer consumption. Xanthohumol has been characterized a 'broad-spectrum' cancer chemopreventive agent in in vitro studies, while 8-prenylnaringenin enjoys fame as the most potent phytoestrogen known to date. These biological activities suggest that prenylflavonoids from hops have potential for application in cancer prevention programs and in prevention or treatment of (post-)menopausal 'hot flashes' and osteoporosis. Xanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin are metabolized into many flavonoid derivatives with modified 3,3-dimethyl allyl (prenyl) moieties. Xanthohumol is formed in lupulin glands by a specialized branch of flavonoid biosynthesis that involves prenylation and O-methylation of the polyketide intermediate chalconaringenin. Although a lupulin gland-specific chalcone synthase is known, the aromatic prenyltransferase and O-methyltransferase participating in xanthohumol have not been identified. The prenylflavonoid pathway is a possible target for breeding or biotechnological modification of hops with the aim of increasing xanthohumol levels for beer brewing and 8-prenylnaringenin levels for pharmaceutical production. PMID:15231405

  6. [MOLECULAR-GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF chs_H1 GENE IN UKRAINIAN HOP VARIETIES].

    PubMed

    Venzer, A M; Volkova, N E; Sivolap, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphism of chs_H1 gene encoding the "true" chalcone synthase was determined by alignment of sequences. The polymorphism associates with single nucleotide changes, insertions or deletions (indels) in the promoter, exons, intron, 3'-untranslated region. The molecular-genetic polymorphism in gene chs_H1 different regions of hop varieties of Polessye Agriculture Institute' breeding NAAS was analyzed. PMID:26638493

  7. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of...

  8. Black wilt of hop (Humulus lupulus) caused by Diplodia seriata in New York State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August 2012, wilted hop bines were observed in a yard near Seneca Castle, New York, affecting 10 to 20% of the plants. Affected bines had a dark stem discoloration and wilted leaves, which remained attached after bines were killed. Dark brown to black erumpent pycnidia were aggregated in the cor...

  9. "Writing in the Margins": Brazilian Hip-Hop as an Educational Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Derek

    2004-01-01

    Hip-hop culture's force as part of globalization in the fields of economics, popular aesthetics, and identity politics has been well documented. However, its articulation to educational practices has received less attention. This article draws upon fieldwork conducted in 1999 and 2002 in a youth correctional facility to analyze how state…

  10. Learning Processes and Social Mobilization in a Swedish Metropolitan Hip-Hop Collective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Dennis; Sernhede, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Based on ethnographic research on the encounter between local culture and schools in multicultural suburban areas, this article explores possibilities suggested by autonomous learning activities in a hip-hop collective that may have a potential to break urban segregation patterns. The collective's artistic production raises questions that have not…

  11. From Haydn to Hip-Hop: Meeting Students' Needs in an Urban Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagi, Robert

    2010-01-01

    When an inner-city Arizona music teacher found himself faced with too many orchestra students and not enough instruments, he took a risky but rewarding left turn--into rap music. In this article, the author describes how he teaches his hip-hop class, the challenges in creating and teaching the class, and the positive results. (Contains 21…

  12. Sampling Memories: Using Hip-Hop Aesthetics to Learn from Urban Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2012-01-01

    This article theorizes and charts the implementation of a learning activity designed from the hip-hop aesthetic of sampling. The purpose of this learning activity was to enable recent urban school graduates to reflect upon their previous schooling experiences as a platform for future learning in higher education. This article illustrates what…

  13. Media/Visual Literacy Art Education: Sexism in Hip-Hop Music Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2007-01-01

    Media programs like hip-hop music videos are powerful aesthetic agents that inspire teenagers. Thus, they have tremendous influence on young people's identity formation, lifestyle choices, and knowledge construction which are manifested in the ways teens dress, express themselves, behave, and interact with each other. However, because of the…

  14. "Folkbildning" through Hip-Hop: How the Ideals of Three Rappers Parallel a Scandinavian Educational Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how the rappers' talk about hip-hop and its connection to pedagogy and social activism parallel the Scandinavian tradition of folkbildning. Scandinavian folkbildning can be seen as a movement to provide voluntary education for the general population. It can also be the name of the process of learning in which…

  15. Hip-Hop, Digital Media, and the Changing Face of Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a true story about Dwayne Carter Jr., a rapper most music educators probably don't know but one who is beloved throughout the world as "Lil Wayne." Critics overwhelmingly proclaimed Lil Wayne the top rapper in the hip-hop game, and the album and his work leading up to it were universally regarded as some of…

  16. Structure and DNA-binding of meiosis-specific protein Hop2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua; Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Here we report structure elucidation of the DNA binding domain of homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2), which is important to gene diversity when sperms and eggs are produced. Together with another protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. However, the structural and biochemical bases for the function of Hop2 and Mnd1 have not been well understood. As a first step toward such understanding, we recently solved the structure for the N-terminus of Hop2 (1-84) using solution NMR. This fragment shows a typical winged-head conformation with recognized DNA binding activity. DNA interacting sites were then investigated by chemical shift perturbations in a titration experiment. Information of these sites was used to guide protein-DNA docking with MD simulation, revealing that helix 3 is stably lodged in the DNA major groove and that wing 1 (connecting strands 2 and 3) transiently comes in contact with the minor groove in nanosecond time scale. Mutagenesis analysis further confirmed the DNA binding sites in this fragment of the protein.

  17. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  18. Medical-School Curriculum Goes Interactive, Online, ... and Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that Canadian medical students, inspired by an online community and an obscure heart condition, have ditched their books and transformed their class notes into a pulsating, hip-hop music video. "Diagnosis Wenckebach"--the name comes from a type of abnormal heart rhythm--was created as just one of many innovative study tools by…

  19. Global Ill-Literacies: Hip Hop Cultures, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alim, H. Samy

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the emergence of what the author refers to as "global ill-literacies," that is, the hybrid, transcultural linguistic and literacy practices of Hip Hop youth in local and global contexts, as well as the pedagogical possibilities that scholars open up as they engage these forms. By reviewing a broad but focused range of…

  20. Characterization of resistance to powdery mildew in the Hop cultivars Newport and Comet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop powdery mildew, caused by Podosphaera macularis, is an important disease in the Northwestern U.S. Outbreaks of powdery mildew on cultivars previously resistant to the disease have been reported increasingly with the emergence of virulent pathogen strains capable of overcoming a commonly deployed...

  1. Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D E; Durling, R L

    2005-10-10

    The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

  2. Vulnerability And Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Durling, Jr., R L; Price, D E; Spero, K K

    2005-01-03

    For over ten years, the Counterproliferation Analysis and Planning System (CAPS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a planning tool used by U.S. combatant commands for mission support planning against foreign programs engaged in the manufacture of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). CAPS is endorsed by the Secretary of Defense as the preferred counterproliferation tool to be used by the nation's armed services. A sister system, the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging CAPS expertise designed to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities is presented.

  3. Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Durling, R L; Price, D E; Spero, K K

    2005-06-06

    For over ten years, the Counterproliferation Analysis and Planning System (CAPS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a planning tool used by U.S. combatant commands for mission support planning against foreign programs engaged in the manufacture of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). CAPS is endorsed by the Secretary of Defense as the preferred counterproliferation tool to be used by the nation's armed services. A sister system, the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging CAPS expertise designed to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

  4. Use of the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS) for Emergency Management

    SciTech Connect

    Durling, Jr., R L; Price, D E

    2005-12-16

    The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

  5. Identification of extrachromosomal circular DNA in hop via rolling circle amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a survey looking for viruses affecting hop plants in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, a circular DNA molecule was identified via rolling circle amplification (RCA) and later characterized. The 5.7 kb long molecule only matched in a minor cover to a microsatellite region in the Humulus lupulus...

  6. Meta-analysis reveals a critical period for management of powdery mildew on Hop cones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results of 28 field trials conducted over a 12-year period investigating management of hop powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera macularis were quantitatively summarized by meta-analysis to compare product efficacy and use patterns by mode of action as defined by Fungicide Resistance Action Committe...

  7. Towards an Efficient Flooding Scheme Exploiting 2-Hop Backward Information in MANETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trong Duc; Choo, Hyunseung

    Flooding is an indispensable operation for providing control or routing functionalities to mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). Previously, many flooding schemes have been studied with the intention of curtailing the problems of severe redundancies, contention, and collisions in traditional implementations. A recent approach with relatively high efficiency is 1HI by Liu et al., which uses only 1-hop neighbor information. The scheme achieves local optimality in terms of the number of retransmission nodes with time complexity &Theta(n log n), where n is the number of neighbors of a node; however, this method tends to make many redundant transmissions. In this paper, we present a novel flooding algorithm, 2HBI (2-hop backward information), that efficiently reduces the number of retransmission nodes and solves the broadcast storm problem in ad hoc networks using our proposed concept, “2-hop backward information.” The most significant feature of the proposed algorithm is that it does not require any extra communication overhead other than the exchange of 1-hop HELLO messages but maintains high deliverability. Comprehensive computer simulations show that the proposed scheme significantly reduces redundant transmissions in 1HI and in pure flooding, up to 38% and 91%, respectively; accordingly it alleviates contention and collisions in networks.

  8. SPE-39 Family Proteins Interact with the HOPS Complex and Function in Lysosomal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-dan; Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Fiza, Babar; Doucette, Michele M.; Heilman, Craig J.; Levey, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast and animal homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complexes contain conserved subunits, but HOPS-mediated traffic in animals might require additional proteins. Here, we demonstrate that SPE-39 homologues, which are found only in animals, are present in RAB5-, RAB7-, and RAB11-positive endosomes where they play a conserved role in lysosomal delivery and probably function via their interaction with the core HOPS complex. Although Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 mutants were initially identified as having abnormal vesicular biogenesis during spermatogenesis, we show that these mutants also have disrupted processing of endocytosed proteins in oocytes and coelomocytes. C. elegans SPE-39 interacts in vitro with both VPS33A and VPS33B, whereas RNA interference of VPS33B causes spe-39–like spermatogenesis defects. The human SPE-39 orthologue C14orf133 also interacts with VPS33 homologues and both coimmunoprecipitates and cosediments with other HOPS subunits. SPE-39 knockdown in cultured human cells altered the morphology of syntaxin 7-, syntaxin 8-, and syntaxin 13-positive endosomes. These effects occurred concomitantly with delayed mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cathepsin D delivery and degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor receptors. Our findings establish that SPE-39 proteins are a previously unrecognized regulator of lysosomal delivery and that C. elegans spermatogenesis is an experimental system useful for identifying conserved regulators of metazoan lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:19109425

  9. Pedagogical Ideas on Sonic, Mediated, and Virtual Musical Landscapes: Teaching Hip Hop in a University Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhokai, Niyati

    2012-01-01

    Based on the experience of teaching the history of American hip hop music to a classroom of Canadian university students, the author considers the disjuncture between the cultural orientations of herself and her students. The author considers teaching methods to solve the place-based disjuncture that often occurs when teaching genres such as hip…

  10. Characterization of the Migration of Hop Volatiles into Different Crown Cork Liner Polymers and Can Coatings.

    PubMed

    Wietstock, Philip C; Glattfelder, Richard; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Methner, Frank-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Absorption of hop volatiles by crown cork liner polymers and can coatings was investigated in beer during storage. All hop volatiles measured were prone to migrate into the closures, and the absorption kinetics was demonstrated to fit Fick's second law of diffusion well for a plane sheet. The extent and rate of diffusion were significantly dissimilar and were greatly dependent upon the nature of the volatile. Diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.32 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (limonene) to 0.26 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (α-humulene). The maximum amounts absorbed into the material at equilibrium were in the following order: limonene > α-humulene > trans-caryophyllene > myrcene ≫ linalool > α-terpineol > geraniol. With the application of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) liners with oxygen-scavenging functionality, oxygen-barrier liners made up from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or liner polymers from a different manufacturer had no significant effect on the composition of hop volatiles in beers after prolonged storage of 55 days; however, significantly higher amounts of myrcene and limonene were found in the oxygen-barrier-type crown cork, while all other closures behaved similarly. Can coatings were demonstrated to absorb hop volatiles in a similar pattern as crown corks but to a lesser extent. Consequently, significantly higher percentages of myrcene were found in the beers.

  11. Powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera macularis on hop (Humulus lupulus) in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2015, a grower in western North Carolina detected powdery mildew in a small hop yard. Characteristic colonies of the pathogen where observed on cultivars Cashmere, Cascade, and Chinook. Leaves with powdery mildew were collected from cultivar Cashmere for confirmation of the pathogen identi...

  12. Dynamic control of muscle stiffness and H reflex modulation during hopping and jumping in man.

    PubMed Central

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Simonsen, E B; Voigt, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The objective of the study was to evaluate the functional effects of reflexes on muscle mechanics during natural voluntary movements. The excitability of the H (Hoffmann) reflex was used as a measure of the excitability of the central component of the stretch reflex. 2. We recorded EMG, ground reaction forces and the H reflex in the soleus muscle in humans while landing from a downward jump, during drop jumping and during hopping. The movements were also recorded by high-speed cinematography. 3. The EMG pattern was adapted to the motor task. When landing the EMG in the soleus muscle and in the anterior tibial muscle showed preinnervation and alternating activity after touch down. When hopping there was little preinnervation in the soleus muscle, and the activity was initiated about 45 ms after touch down by a peak and continued unbroken until lift off. In the drop jumps the EMG pattern depended on the jumping style used by the subject. 4. The H reflex in the soleus muscle was strongly modulated in a manner appropriate to the requirements of the motor task. During landing from a downward jump the H reflex was low at touch down whereas while hopping it was high at touch down. During drop jumping it was variable and influenced by the jumping technique. 5. Muscle stiffness in the ankle joint was negative after touch down when landing, but always positive when hopping. 6. It is suggested that during landing the alternating EMG pattern after touch down was programmed and little influenced by reflexes. During hopping reflexes could contribute to the initial peak and the EMG during lift off. 7. The programmed EMG activity and the suppression of the H reflex while landing probably contribute to the development of the negative stiffness and change the muscles from a spring to a damping unit. PMID:1890636

  13. Generalized trajectory surface-hopping method for internal conversion and intersystem crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2014-09-01

    Trajectory-based fewest-switches surface-hopping (FSSH) dynamics simulations have become a popular and reliable theoretical tool to simulate nonadiabatic photophysical and photochemical processes. Most available FSSH methods model internal conversion. We present a generalized trajectory surface-hopping (GTSH) method for simulating both internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes on an equal footing. We consider hops between adiabatic eigenstates of the non-relativistic electronic Hamiltonian (pure spin states), which is appropriate for sufficiently small spin-orbit coupling. This choice allows us to make maximum use of existing electronic structure programs and to minimize the changes to available implementations of the traditional FSSH method. The GTSH method is formulated within the quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular mechanics framework, but can of course also be applied at the pure QM level. The algorithm implemented in the GTSH code is specified step by step. As an initial GTSH application, we report simulations of the nonadiabatic processes in the lowest four electronic states (S0, S1, T1, and T2) of acrolein both in vacuo and in acetonitrile solution, in which the acrolein molecule is treated at the ab initio complete-active-space self-consistent-field level. These dynamics simulations provide detailed mechanistic insight by identifying and characterizing two nonadiabatic routes to the lowest triplet state, namely, direct S1 → T1 hopping as major pathway and sequential S1 → T2 → T1 hopping as minor pathway, with the T2 state acting as a relay state. They illustrate the potential of the GTSH approach to explore photoinduced processes in complex systems, in which intersystem crossing plays an important role.

  14. Assessment of genetic variation and differentiation of hop genotypes by microsatellite and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Jakse, J; Kindlhofer, K; Javornik, B

    2001-10-01

    Microsatellites have many desirable marker properties and have been increasingly used in crop plants in genetic diversity studies. Here we report on the characterisation of microsatellite markers and on their use for the determination of genetic identities and the assessment of genetic variability among accessions from a germplasm collection of hop. Thirty-two polymorphic alleles were found in the 55 diploid genotypes, with an average number of eight alleles (3.4 effective alleles) for four microsatellite loci. Calculated polymorphic information content values classified three loci as informative markers and two loci as suitable for mapping. The average observed heterozygosity was 0.7 and the common probability of identical genotypes was 3.271 x 10(-4). An additional locus, amplified by one primer pair, was confirmed by segregation analysis of two crosses. The locus discovered was heterozygous, with a null allele in the segregating population. The same range of alleles was detected in nine triploid and five tetraploid hop genotypes. Cultivar heterozygosity varied among all 69 accessions, with only one cultivar being homozygous at four loci. Microsatellite allele polymorphisms distinguished 81% of all genotypes; the same allelic profile was found mainly in clonally selected cultivars. Cultivar-specific alleles were found in some genotypes, as well as a specific distribution of alleles in geographically distinct hop germplasms. The genetic relationship among 41 hop accessions was compared on the basis of microsatellite and AFLP polymorphisms. Genetic similarity dendrograms showed low correlation between the two marker systems. The microsatellite dendrogram grouped genetically related accessions reasonably well, while the AFLP dendrogram showed good clustering of closely related accessions and, additionally, separated two geographically distinct hop germplasms. The results of microsatellite and AFLP analysis are discussed from the point of view of the applicability of

  15. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector–dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles. PMID:25995379

  16. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-07-15

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector-dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles.

  17. Systematic assessment of scaffold hopping versus activity cliff formation across bioactive compound classes following a molecular hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation define opposite ends of the activity landscape feature spectrum. To rationalize these events at the level of scaffolds, active compounds involved in scaffold hopping were required to contain topologically distinct scaffolds but have only limited differences in potency, whereas compounds involved in activity cliffs were required to share the same scaffold but have large differences in potency. A systematic search was carried out for compounds involved in scaffold hopping and/or activity cliff formation. Results obtained for compound data sets covering more than 300 human targets revealed clear trends. If scaffolds represented multiple but fewer than 10 active compounds, nearly 90% of all scaffolds were exclusively involved in hopping events. With increasing compound coverage, the fraction of scaffolds involved in both scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation significantly increased to more than 50%. However, ∼40% of the scaffolds representing large numbers of active compounds continued to be exclusively involved in scaffold hopping. More than 200 scaffolds with broad target coverage were identified that consistently represented potent compounds and yielded an abundance of scaffold hops in the low-nanomolar range. These and other subsets of scaffolds we characterized are of prime interest for structure-activity relationship (SAR) exploration and compound design. Therefore, the complete scaffold classification generated in the course of our analysis is made freely available.

  18. Mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by hop bitter acids (beer aroma) through induction of apoptosis mediated by Fas and caspase cascades.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jen; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2004-01-14

    The bitter acids of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) mainly consist of alpha-acids, beta-acids, and their oxidation products that contribute the unique aroma of the beer beverage. Hop bitter acids displayed a strong growth inhibitory effect against human leukemia HL-60 cells, with an estimated IC(50) value of 8.67 microg/mL, but were less effective against human histolytic lymphoma U937 cells. Induction of apoptosis was confirmed in HL-60 cells by DNA fragmentation and the appearance of a sub-G1 DNA peak, which were preceded by dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, and subsequent induction of pro-caspase-9 and -3 processing. Cleavages of PARP and DFF-45 were accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and -3 triggered by hop bitter acids in HL-60 cells. The change in the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), and Bax in response to hop bitter acids was studied, and the Bcl-2 protein level slightly decreased; however, the Bcl-X(L) protein level was obviously decreased, whereas the Bax protein level was dramatically increased, indicating that the control of Bcl-2 family proteins by hop bitter acids might participate in the disruption of mitochondrial integrity. In addition, the results showed that hop bitter acids promoted the up-regulation of Fas and FasL prior to the processing and activation of pro-caspase-8 and cleavage of Bid, suggesting the involvement of a Fas-mediated pathway in hop bitter acids-induced cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that a certain intimate link might exist between receptor- and mitochondria-mediated death signalings that committed to cell death induced by hop bitter acids. The induction of apoptosis by hop bitter acids may offer a pivotal mechanism for their chemopreventive action.

  19. Comparison of the carboxy-terminal DP-repeat region in the co-chaperones Hop and Hip.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Huffman, Holly; Smith, David F

    2003-01-01

    Functional steroid receptor complexes are assembled and maintained by an ordered pathway of interactions involving multiple components of the cellular chaperone machinery. Two of these components, Hop and Hip, serve as co-chaperones to the major heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, and participate in intermediate stages of receptor assembly. In an effort to better understand the functions of Hop and Hip in the assembly process, we focused on a region of similarity located near the C-terminus of each co-chaperone. Contained within this region is a repeated sequence motif we have termed the DP repeat. Earlier mutagenesis studies implicated the DP repeat of either Hop or Hip in Hsp70 binding and in normal assembly of the co-chaperones with progesterone receptor (PR) complexes. We report here that the DP repeat lies within a protease-resistant domain that extends to or is near the C-terminus of both co-chaperones. Point mutations in the DP repeats render the C-terminal regions hypersensitive to proteolysis. In addition, a Hop DP mutant displays altered proteolytic digestion patterns, which suggest that the DP-repeat region influences the folding of other Hop domains. Although the respective DP regions of Hop and Hip share sequence and structural similarities, they are not functionally interchangeable. Moreover, a double-point mutation within the second DP-repeat unit of Hop that converts this to the sequence found in Hip disrupts Hop function; however, the corresponding mutation in Hip does not alter its function. We conclude that the DP repeats are important structural elements within a C-terminal domain, which is important for Hop and Hip function.

  20. New treatment strategy for cupulolithiasis associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the lateral canal: the head-tilt hopping exercise.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    This study was performed to determine whether a novel treatment was effective against cupulolithiasis associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the lateral semicircular canal, which is characterized by apogeotropic direction-changing nystagmus. We herein describe our head-tilt hopping (HtH) exercise, which is designed to release otoconial debris strongly adhered to the cupula. The subjects were trained to hop while tilting their heads laterally. They completed 3 to 5 exercise sessions per day over a 4-week period. Each session ended with a 20-hop trial. The HtH exercises were performed by 27 patients with intractable lateral canal BPPV who exhibited positional vertigo and persistent nystagmus beating toward the uppermost ear for more than 4 weeks, despite performing therapeutic head shaking in the horizontal plane maneuver. All the patients were subjected to the supine roll test before and immediately after the first trial as well as after 1 and 4 weeks of the program to evaluate the effect of the treatment on their apogeotropic nystagmus. Nystagmus of 9 (33.3 %) patients disappeared immediately after the first training session. After 1 and 4 weeks of the training, the number of patients that had experienced either of these improvements had increased to 15 (55.6 %) and 19 (70.4 %) subjects, respectively. These results suggest that HtH exercises aimed at releasing otoconial debris from the cupula are feasible as a new therapy for cupulolithiasis associated with intractable lateral canal BPPV. However, further studies for comparison with control are required to confirm these preliminary results.

  1. Probing radiation damage by alternated current conductivity as a method to characterize electron hopping conduction in DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Paulo J.; Coelho, Margarida; Dionísio, Madalena; António Ribeiro, Paulo; Raposo, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Analysis of AC electrical conductivity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) thin films, irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light, revealed that electrical conduction arises from DNA chain electron hopping between base-pairs and phosphate groups. The hopping distance calculated from correlated barrier hopping model equals the distance between DNA base-pairs, which is consistent with the loss of conductivity with irradiation time arising from a decrease in phosphates groups. In the high frequency regime, at a given frequency, real part of conductivity strongly depends on irradiation time particularly for low dose levels suggesting the use of DNA based films for UV radiation sensors.

  2. Probing radiation damage by alternated current conductivity as a method to characterize electron hopping conduction in DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Paulo J.; Coelho, Margarida; Antonio Ribeiro, Paulo; Raposo, Maria; Dionisio, Madalena

    2012-09-17

    Analysis of AC electrical conductivity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) thin films, irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light, revealed that electrical conduction arises from DNA chain electron hopping between base-pairs and phosphate groups. The hopping distance calculated from correlated barrier hopping model equals the distance between DNA base-pairs, which is consistent with the loss of conductivity with irradiation time arising from a decrease in phosphates groups. In the high frequency regime, at a given frequency, real part of conductivity strongly depends on irradiation time particularly for low dose levels suggesting the use of DNA based films for UV radiation sensors.

  3. Hopping energy and percolation-type transport in p-GaAs low densities near the 2D metal-insulator transition at zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlimi, S.; El kaaouachi, A.; Narjis, A.; Limouny, L.; Sybous, A.; Errai, M.

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the temperature dependence of resistivity of a high mobility two-dimensional holes system grown on the (311) GaAs surface in the absence of the magnetic field near the metal-insulator transition. The Coulomb hopping was found in a wide range of temperature and carrier density. Quantitative analysis of our results suggests that a crossover from Efros-Shklovskii to Mott variable range hopping due to screening phenomenon when the hopping distance increases. We found that using the 2D single particle hopping amplitude CES gives unreasonably high localization lengths. Therefore, we believe that electrical transport is dominated by correlated hopping and the hopping amplitude must be renormalized by a reduction factor A≈1.6. The localization length appears to diverge in a power-law fashion near the transition point. The analysis of the hopping gives results consistent with the prediction of the critical point from a recent study of percolation and other experiences.

  4. Charge Diffusion in Semiconducting Polymers: Analytical Relation between Polymer Rigidity and Time Scales for Intrachain and Interchain Hopping.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Paola; Troisi, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    We study the charge diffusion of semiconducting polymer bulk using simplified coarse grained models to investigate the relation between charge diffusion coefficient and the characteristics time of intrachain and interchain hopping, τ1 and τ2. We consider the process of charge diffusion in several standard models of polymer chains (rigid chain, Gaussian chain, worm-like chain), and we achieve an analytical expression for the diffusion coefficient in terms of the characteristic times and the geometric parameters defining the chain models. The diffusion depends only on the intrachain hopping for the rigid chain and on the geometric average of intrachain and interchain hopping times for the Gaussian chain (the least rigid model), with an analytical interpolation available between two limits. The model highlights the importance of large persistence lengths for improved transport properties. In all cases, it is incorrect to consider the slower interchain hopping as the rate-determining step for the charge transport. PMID:26277956

  5. Targeted analysis of polyphenol metabolism during development of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) cones following treatment with prohexadione-calcium.

    PubMed

    Kavalier, Adam R; Ma, Chunhui; Figueroa, Mario; Kincaid, Dwight; Matthews, Paul D; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-02-15

    Hops (Humulus lupulus), a main ingredient in beer, are valued as a source of bitter flavour and biologically active polyphenols. We treated immature hop cones with prohexadione-calcium (Pro-Ca), a flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H) inhibitor, to perturb the flavonoid pathway, and conducted a targeted analysis of 29 compounds from the phenolic acid, flavonoid, and terpenophenolic pathways, using photodiode array (UHPLC-PDA), and time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) analysis. Hop cones were analysed over four stages of development spanning 22days following Pro-Ca treatment. The content of terpenophenolics as well as metabolic precursors upstream from F3H significantly increased, and levels of flavonoid products downstream from F3H decreased. The methods developed here serve to compliment flavour analysis of polyphenol rich foods, and our results suggest ways to improve upon traditional agricultural methods to produce hops with altered chemical profiles.

  6. Linear center-of-mass dynamics emerge from non-linear leg-spring properties in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Riese, Sebastian; Seyfarth, Andre; Grimmer, Sten

    2013-09-01

    Given the almost linear relationship between ground-reaction force and leg length, bouncy gaits are commonly described using spring-mass models with constant leg-spring parameters. In biological systems, however, spring-like properties of limbs may change over time. Therefore, it was investigated how much variation of leg-spring parameters is present during vertical human hopping. In order to do so, rest-length and stiffness profiles were estimated from ground-reaction forces and center-of-mass dynamics measured in human hopping. Trials included five hopping frequencies ranging from 1.2 to 3.6 Hz. Results show that, even though stiffness and rest length vary during stance, for most frequencies the center-of-mass dynamics still resemble those of a linear spring-mass hopper. Rest-length and stiffness profiles differ for slow and fast hopping. Furthermore, at 1.2 Hz two distinct control schemes were observed.

  7. Differences between direct current and alternating current capacitance nonlinearities in high-k dielectrics and their relation to hopping conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Khaldi, O.; Kassmi, M.; Gonon, P. Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Jomni, F.

    2014-08-28

    Capacitance nonlinearities were studied in atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} films using two types of signals: a pure ac voltage of large magnitude (ac nonlinearities) and a small ac voltage superimposed to a large dc voltage (dc nonlinearities). In theory, ac and dc nonlinearities should be of the same order of magnitude. However, in practice, ac nonlinearities are found to be an order of magnitude higher than dc nonlinearities. Besides capacitance nonlinearities, hopping conduction is studied using low-frequency impedance measurements and is discussed through the correlated barrier hopping model. The link between hopping and nonlinearity is established. The ac nonlinearities are ascribed to the polarization of isolated defect pairs, while dc nonlinearities are attributed to electrode polarization which originates from defect percolation paths. Both the ac and dc capacitance nonlinearities display an exponential variation with voltage, which results from field-induced lowering of the hopping barrier energy.

  8. Laser-field-induced surface-hopping method for the simulation and control of ultrafast photodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitric, Roland; Petersen, Jens; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta

    2009-05-15

    We present the semiclassical laser-field-induced surface-hopping method for the simulation and control of coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in complex molecular systems including all degrees of freedom. Our approach is based on the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics. The combination of the molecular dynamics 'on the fly' employing quantum initial conditions with the surface-hopping procedure allows for the treatment of the electronic transitions induced by the laser field. Our semiclassical approach reproduced accurately exact quantum dynamics in a two-electronic-state model system. We demonstrate the scope of our method on the example of the optimal pump-dump control of the trans-cis isomerization of a prototypical Schiff base molecular switch. Our results show that selective photochemistry can be achieved by shaped laser pulses which open new dynamical pathways by suppressing the isomerization through the conical intersections between electronic states.

  9. Electron flow through biological molecules: Does hole hopping protect proteins from oxidative damage?

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2016-01-01

    Biological electron transfers often occur between metal-containing cofactors that are separated by very large molecular distances. Employing photosensitizer-modified iron and copper proteins, we have shown that single-step electron tunneling can occur on nanosecond to microsecond timescales at distances between 15 and 20 angstroms. We also have shown that charge transport can occur over even longer distances by hole hopping (multistep tunneling) through intervening tyrosines and tryptophans. In this Perspective, we advance the hypothesis that such hole hopping through Tyr/Trp chains could protect oxygenase, dioxygenase, and peroxidase enzymes from oxidative damage. In support of this view, by examining the structures of P450 (CYP102A) and 2OG-Fe (TauD) enzymes, we have identified candidate Tyr/Trp chains that could transfer holes from uncoupled high-potential intermediates to reductants in contact with protein surface sites. PMID:26537399

  10. Conductivity analysis of epoxy/carbon nanotubes composites by dipole relaxation and hopping models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Airton; Pezzin, Sergio H.; Farias, Heric Denis; Becker, Daniela; Bello, Roger H.; Coelho, Luiz A. F.

    2016-10-01

    In this study it was used a numerical technique of successive approximations to estimate parameters of a conductivity model that includes the hopping process and the dipole relaxation for the purpose of describing the behavior of the conductivity measured on nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes in epoxy resin in the range of frequency of 100 Hz to 40 MHz. Two relaxation bands were detected, one with a response below 10 kHz and one above 10 MHz. For the first band, it was observed that the nanocomposites become more conductive, and its conductivity less temperature dependent, as the nanotube content increases. The second band is characterized by a large spread in relaxation time. The results show that the percolation threshold is below 0.15 vol% and that 'ac' hopping is the main transport process above 100 kHz, becoming dominant with respect to percolation at higher temperatures (>340 K).

  11. Anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic semiconductors in the hopping transport regime.

    PubMed

    Burkov, A A; Balents, Leon

    2003-08-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As in the regime when conduction is due to phonon-assisted hopping of holes between localized states in the impurity band. We show that the microscopic origin of the anomalous Hall conductivity in this system can be attributed to a phase that a hole gains when hopping around closed-loop paths in the presence of spin-orbit interactions and background magnetization of the localized Mn moments. Mapping the problem to a random resistor network, we derive an analytic expression for the macroscopic anomalous Hall conductivity sigma(AH)(xy). We show that sigma(AH)(xy) is proportional to the first derivative of the density of states varrho(epsilon) and thus can be expected to change sign as a function of impurity band filling. We also show that sigma(AH)(xy) depends on temperature as the longitudinal conductivity sigma(xx) within logarithmic accuracy.

  12. Jamming effects on code synchronization of burst-mode frequency-hop spread-spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grouw, Mike G.; Wicker, Mark A.

    The authors characterize the performance of a multiple-dwell FHSS (frequency-hopping spread-spectrum) code synchronization scheme in the presence of channel dynamics. Random hop jamming is assumed. The coarse acquisition system uses both passive and active correlation to implement a serial search of the code-uncertainty region. The in-lock monitoring is accomplished using a two-dwell active correlator with a relatively long integration time. Both burst- and continuous-mode communications links are considered. Appropriate performance parameters are developed, and design considerations are discussed. Performance curves are given for the various cases considered. Although a fixed-threshold multiple-dwell synchronization scheme adequately mitigates the effects of dynamic jamming in a continuous-mode communications link, it is shown to be inadequate for a burst-mode communications link.

  13. Mode-hop-free photonic crystal laser fabricated by holographic exposure technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Wang, Baojun; Liang, Song; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2014-05-15

    A mode-hop-free single-mode laser with a two-dimensional photonic crystal was demonstrated. In the device, the photonic crystal was realized by double holographic exposure technology. This novel procedure simplifies the fabrication of such structures greatly. The design of a reverse junction in the photonic crystal layer induces a partial gain coupling into the laser, which could break the symmetry of the transmission spectrum and realize stable single-mode lasing of the laser. The fabricated device has a high single-mode stability and side-mode suppression ratio of over 45 dB without mode hop at a relatively wide injected current range. The measurement results indicate that the laser with a simple fabrication process is promising as a stable single-mode and high-power light source in optical communication systems.

  14. Variable range hopping conduction in n-CdSe samples at very low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errai, M.; El Kaaouachi, A.; El Idrissi, H.

    2015-12-01

    We reanalyzed experimental data already published in Friedman J R, Zhang Y, Dai P, et al. Phys Rev B, 1996, 53(15): 9528. Variable range hopping (VRH) conduction in the insulating three-dimensional n-CdSe samples has been studied over the entire temperature range from 0.03 to 1 K. In the absence of a magnetic field, the low temperature conductivity σ of the three samples (A, B and C) obeys the Mott VRH conduction with an appropriate temperature dependence in the prefactor (σ = σ0 exp[-(T0/T)]p with p ≈ 0.25). This behavior can be explained by a VRH model where the transport occurs by hopping between localized states in the vicinity of the Fermi level, EF, without creation of the Coulomb gap (CG). On the contrary, no Efros-Shklovskii VRH is observed, suggesting that the density is constant in the vicinity of the EF.

  15. On the accuracy of surface hopping dynamics in condensed phase non-adiabatic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Reichman, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We perform extensive benchmark comparisons of surface hopping dynamics with numerically exact calculations for the spin-boson model over a wide range of energetic and coupling parameters as well as temperature. We find that deviations from golden-rule scaling in the Marcus regime are generally small and depend sensitively on the energetic bias between electronic states. Fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) is found to be surprisingly accurate over a large swath of parameter space. The inclusion of decoherence corrections via the augmented FSSH algorithm improves the accuracy of dynamical behavior compared to exact simulations, but the effects are generally not dramatic, at least for the case of an environment modeled with the commonly used Debye spectral density.

  16. SHARC: ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Surface Hopping in the Adiabatic Representation Including Arbitrary Couplings.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martin; Marquetand, Philipp; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Sola, Ignacio; González, Leticia

    2011-05-10

    We present a semiclassical surface-hopping method which is able to treat arbitrary couplings in molecular systems including all degrees of freedom. A reformulation of the standard surface-hopping scheme in terms of a unitary transformation matrix allows for the description of interactions like spin-orbit coupling or transitions induced by laser fields. The accuracy of our method is demonstrated in two systems. The first one, consisting of two model electronic states, validates the semiclassical approach in the presence of an electric field. In the second one, the dynamics in the IBr molecule in the presence of spin-orbit coupling after laser excitation is investigated. Due to an avoided crossing that originates from spin-orbit coupling, IBr dissociates into two channels: I + Br((2)P3/2) and I + Br*((2)P1/2). In both systems, the obtained results are in very good agreement with those calculated from exact quantum dynamical simulations.

  17. A Secure Routing Using Reliable 1-Hop Broadcast in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seungjin; Yoo, Seong-Moo

    Among many ways to achieve security in wireless mobile ad hoc networks, the approach taken in this paper is to ensure that all nodes in the network receive critical information on security such as public keys. To achieve this, a reliable global broadcasting of the information must be accomplished, which in turn, relies on a reliable 1-hop broadcasting in which a message from the source node is guaranteed to be delivered to all nodes within the source node's transmission range. This paper presents a MAC protocol that guarantees a reliable and efficient 1-hop broadcast. The unique feature of the proposed algorithm is that each node is able to dynamically adjust its transmission range depending on the node density around it. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Point-contact spectroscopy of hopping transport : efffects of a magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, V. I.; Zyuzin, A. A.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Aharony, A.; Galperin, Y. M.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Russian Acad. Sci.; Ben Gurion Univ.; Univ. Oslo

    2007-01-01

    The conductance of a point contact between two hopping insulators is expected to be dominated by the individual localized states in its vicinity. Here, we study the additional effects due to an external magnetic field. Combined with the measured conductance, the measured magnetoresistance provides detailed information on these states (e.g., their localization length, the energy difference, and the hopping distance between them). We also calculate the statistics of this magnetoresistance, which can be collected by changing the gate voltage in a single device. Since the conductance is dominated by the quantum interference of particular mesoscopic structures near the point contact, it is predicted to exhibit Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, which yield information on the geometry of these structures. These oscillations also depend on local spin accumulation and correlations, which can be modified by the external field. Finally, we also estimate the mesoscopic Hall voltage due to these structures.

  19. The HOPS/Class C Vps Complex Tethers High-Curvature Membranes via a Direct Protein-Membrane Interaction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Membrane tethering is a physical association of two membranes before their fusion. Many membrane tethering factors have been identified, but the interactions that mediate inter-membrane associations remain largely a matter of conjecture. Previously, we reported that the homotypic fusion and protein sorting/Class C vacuolar protein sorting (HOPS/Class C Vps) complex, which has two binding sites for the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p, can tether two low-curvature liposomes when both membranes bear Ypt7p. Here, we show that HOPS tethers highly curved liposomes to Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes even when the high-curvature liposomes are protein-free. Phosphorylation of the curvature-sensing amphipathic lipid-packing sensor (ALPS) motif from the Vps41p HOPS subunit abrogates tethering of high-curvature liposomes. A HOPS complex without its Vps39p subunit, which contains one of the Ypt7p binding sites in HOPS, lacks tethering activity, though it binds high-curvature liposomes and Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes. Thus, HOPS tethers highly curved membranes via a direct protein-membrane interaction. Such high-curvature membranes are found at the sites of vacuole tethering and fusion. There, vacuole membranes bend sharply, generating large areas of vacuole-vacuole contact. We propose that HOPS localizes via the Vps41p ALPS motif to these high-curvature regions. There, HOPS binds via Vps39p to Ypt7p in an apposed vacuole membrane. PMID:27307091

  20. Experimental Transmission of Pospiviroid Populations to Weed Species Characteristic of Potato and Hop Fields▿

    PubMed Central

    Matoušek, J.; Orctová, L.; Ptáček, J.; Patzak, J.; Dědič, P.; Steger, G.; Riesner, D.

    2007-01-01

    Weed plants characteristic for potato and hop fields have not been considered in the past as potential hosts that could transmit and lead to spreading of potato spindle tuber (PSTVd) and hop stunt (HSVd) viroids, respectively. To gain insight into this problem, we biolistically inoculated these weed plants with viroid populations either as RNA or as cDNA. New potential viroid host species, collected in central Europe, were discovered. From 12 weed species characteristic for potato fields, high viroid levels, detectable by molecular hybridization, were maintained after both RNA and DNA transfers in Chamomilla reculita and Anthemis arvensis. Low viroid levels, detectable by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) only, were maintained after plant inoculations with cDNA in Veronica argensis and Amaranthus retroflexus. In these two species PSTVd concentrations were 105 and 103 times, respectively, lower than in tomato as estimated by real-time PCR. From 14 weeds characteristic for hop fields, high HSVd levels were detected in Galinsoga ciliata after both RNA and DNA transfers. HSVd was found, however, not to be transmissible by seeds of this weed species. Traces of HSVd were detectable by RT-PCR in HSVd-cDNA-inoculated Amaranthus retroflexus. Characteristic monomeric (+)-circular and linear viroid RNAs were present in extracts from weed species propagating viroids to high levels, indicating regular replication, processing, and circularization of viroid RNA in these weed species. Sequence analyses of PSTVd progenies propagated in C. reculita and A. arvensis showed a wide spectrum of variants related to various strains, from mild to lethal variants; the sequence variants isolated from A. retroflexus and V. argensis exhibited similarity or identity to the superlethal AS1 viroid variant. All HSVd clones from G. ciliata corresponded to a HSVdg variant, which is strongly pathogenic for European hops. PMID:17715233

  1. PARALLEL HOP: A SCALABLE HALO FINDER FOR MASSIVE COSMOLOGICAL DATA SETS

    SciTech Connect

    Skory, Stephen; Turk, Matthew J.; Norman, Michael L.; Coil, Alison L. E-mail: mjturk@ucsd.ed E-mail: acoil@ucsd.ed

    2010-11-15

    Modern N-body cosmological simulations contain billions (10{sup 9}) of dark matter particles. These simulations require hundreds to thousands of gigabytes of memory and employ hundreds to tens of thousands of processing cores on many compute nodes. In order to study the distribution of dark matter in a cosmological simulation, the dark matter halos must be identified using a halo finder, which establishes the halo membership of every particle in the simulation. The resources required for halo finding are similar to the requirements for the simulation itself. In particular, simulations have become too extensive to use commonly employed halo finders, such that the computational requirements to identify halos must now be spread across multiple nodes and cores. Here, we present a scalable-parallel halo finding method called Parallel HOP for large-scale cosmological simulation data. Based on the halo finder HOP, it utilizes message passing interface and domain decomposition to distribute the halo finding workload across multiple compute nodes, enabling analysis of much larger data sets than is possible with the strictly serial or previous parallel implementations of HOP. We provide a reference implementation of this method as a part of the toolkit {sup yt}, an analysis toolkit for adaptive mesh refinement data that include complementary analysis modules. Additionally, we discuss a suite of benchmarks that demonstrate that this method scales well up to several hundred tasks and data sets in excess of 2000{sup 3} particles. The Parallel HOP method and our implementation can be readily applied to any kind of N-body simulation data and is therefore widely applicable.

  2. Role of plasmids in Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 hop tolerance and beer spoilage.

    PubMed

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Baecker, Nina; Pittet, Vanessa; Ziola, Barry

    2015-02-01

    Specific isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can grow in the harsh beer environment, thus posing a threat to brew quality and the economic success of breweries worldwide. Plasmid-localized genes, such as horA, horC, and hitA, have been suggested to confer hop tolerance, a trait required for LAB survival in beer. The presence and expression of these genes among LAB, however, do not universally correlate with the ability to grow in beer. Genome sequencing of the virulent beer spoilage organism Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 revealed the presence of eight plasmids, with plasmids 1, 2, and 3 containing horA, horC, and hitA, respectively. To investigate the roles that these and the other five plasmids play in L. brevis BSO 464 growth in beer, plasmid curing with novobiocin was used to derive 10 plasmid variants. Multiplex PCRs were utilized to determine the presence or absence of each plasmid, and how plasmid loss affected hop tolerance and growth in degassed (noncarbonated) beer was assessed. Loss of three of the eight plasmids was found to affect hop tolerance and growth in beer. Loss of plasmid 2 (horC and 28 other genes) had the most dramatic effect, with loss of plasmid 4 (120 genes) and plasmid 8 (47 genes) having significant, but smaller, impacts. These results support the contention that genes on mobile genetic elements are essential for bacterial growth in beer and that beer spoilage ability is not dependent solely on the three previously described hop tolerance genes or on the chromosome of a beer spoilage LAB isolate.

  3. A variable-frequency local oscillator for the frequency-hopping technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stitt, G. R.; Johnson, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The frequency hopping technique described elsewhere requires the use of a local oscillator whose output frequency may be rapidly and accurately changed by a fixed frequency increment. Such a device, capable of producing 16 different frequencies separated by 50 kHz over the range of 35.02 to 35.77 MHz, has been built for the Urbana MST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) radar facility. The design and construction of that device is described and illustrated.

  4. Hip-hop solutions of the 2N-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrabés, Esther; Cors, Josep Maria; Pinyol, Conxita; Soler, Jaume

    2006-05-01

    Hip-hop solutions of the 2N-body problem with equal masses are shown to exist using an analytic continuation argument. These solutions are close to planar regular 2N-gon relative equilibria with small vertical oscillations. For fixed N, an infinity of these solutions are three-dimensional choreographies, with all the bodies moving along the same closed curve in the inertial frame.

  5. Hop bitter acids exhibit anti-fibrogenic effects on hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saugspier, Michael; Dorn, Christoph; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Gehrig, Manfred; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-04-01

    Female inflorescences of the hop plant Humulus lupulus L. contain a variety of secondary metabolites with bitter acids (BA) as quantitatively dominating secondary metabolites. The use of hops in beer brewing has a long history due to the antibacterial effects of the BA and their typical bitter taste. Furthermore, hop cones are used in traditional medicine and for pharmaceutical purposes. Recent studies indicate that BA may affect activity of the transcription factor NFκB. NFκB plays a key role in the activation process of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which is the key event of hepatic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BA on HSC (activation) and their potential to inhibit molecular processes involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. HSC were isolated from murine and human liver tissue and incubated with a characterized fraction of bitter acids purified from a CO(2) hop extract. At a concentration of 25μg/ml BA started to induce LDH leakage. Already at lower concentrations BA lead to a dose dependent inhibition of HSC proliferation and inhibited IκB-α-phosphorylation, nuclear p65 translocation and binding activity in a dose dependent way (up to 10μg/ml). Accordingly, the same BA-doses inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory and NFκB regulated genes as MCP-1 and RANTES, but did not affect expression of genes not related to NFκB signaling. In addition to the effect on activated HSC, BA inhibited the in vitro activation process of freshly isolated HSC as evidenced by delayed expression of collagen I and α-SMA mRNA and protein. Together, these findings indicate that BA inhibit NFκB activation, and herewith the activation and development of profibrogenic phenotype of HSC. Thus, bitter acids appear as potential functional nutrients for the prevention or treatment hepatic fibrosis in chronic liver disease.

  6. On the reaction of lupulones, hops β-acids, with 1-hydroxyethyl radical.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Natália E C; do Nascimento, Eduardo S P; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2012-10-24

    Lupulones, hops β-acids, are one of the main constituents of the hops resin and have an important contribution to the overall bacteriostatic activity of hops during beer brewing. The use of lupulones as natural alternatives to antibiotics is increasing in the food industry and also in bioethanol production. However, lupulones are easy oxidizable and have been shown to be very reactive toward 1-hydroxyethyl radical with apparent bimolecular rate constants close to diffusion control k = 2.9 × 10(8) and 2.6 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1) at 25.0 ± 0.2 °C in ethanol-water solution (10% of ethanol (v/v)) as probed by EPR and ESI-IT-MS/MS spin-trapping competitive kinetics, respectively. The free energy change for an electron-transfer mechanism is ΔG° = 106 kJ/mol as calculated from the oxidation peak potential experimentally determined for lupulones (1.1 V vs NHE) by cyclic voltammetry and the reported reduction potential for 1-hydroxyethyl radical. The major reaction products identified by LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS and ultrahigh-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (orbitrap FT-MS) are hydroxylated lupulone derivatives and 1-hydroxyethyl radical adducts. The lack of pH dependence for the reaction rate constant, the calculated free energy change for electron transfer, and the main reaction products strongly suggest the prenyl side chains at the hops β-acids as the reaction centers rather than the β,β'-triketone moiety.

  7. Locomotion in Extinct Giant Kangaroos: Were Sthenurines Hop-Less Monsters?

    PubMed Central

    Janis, Christine M.; Buttrill, Karalyn; Figueirido, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Sthenurine kangaroos (Marsupialia, Diprotodontia, Macropodoidea) were an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These “short-faced browsers” first appeared in the middle Miocene, and radiated in the Plio-Pleistocene into a diversity of mostly large-bodied forms, more robust than extant forms in their build. The largest (Procoptodon goliah) had an estimated body mass of 240 kg, almost three times the size of the largest living kangaroos, and there is speculation whether a kangaroo of this size would be biomechanically capable of hopping locomotion. Previously described aspects of sthenurine anatomy (specialized forelimbs, rigid lumbar spine) would limit their ability to perform the characteristic kangaroo pentapedal walking (using the tail as a fifth limb), an essential gait at slower speeds as slow hopping is energetically unfeasible. Analysis of limb bone measurements of sthenurines in comparison with extant macropodoids shows a number of anatomical differences, especially in the large species. The scaling of long bone robusticity indicates that sthenurines are following the “normal” allometric trend for macropodoids, while the large extant kangaroos are relatively gracile. Other morphological differences are indicative of adaptations for a novel type of locomotor behavior in sthenurines: they lacked many specialized features for rapid hopping, and they also had anatomy indicative of supporting their body with an upright trunk (e.g., dorsally tipped ischiae), and of supporting their weight on one leg at a time (e.g., larger hips and knees, stabilized ankle joint). We propose that sthenurines adopted a bipedal striding gait (a gait occasionally observed in extant tree-kangaroos): in the smaller and earlier forms, this gait may have been employed as an alternative to pentapedal locomotion at slower speeds, while in the larger Pleistocene forms this gait may have enabled them to evolve to body sizes where hopping was

  8. Locomotion in extinct giant kangaroos: were sthenurines hop-less monsters?

    PubMed

    Janis, Christine M; Buttrill, Karalyn; Figueirido, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Sthenurine kangaroos (Marsupialia, Diprotodontia, Macropodoidea) were an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These "short-faced browsers" first appeared in the middle Miocene, and radiated in the Plio-Pleistocene into a diversity of mostly large-bodied forms, more robust than extant forms in their build. The largest (Procoptodon goliah) had an estimated body mass of 240 kg, almost three times the size of the largest living kangaroos, and there is speculation whether a kangaroo of this size would be biomechanically capable of hopping locomotion. Previously described aspects of sthenurine anatomy (specialized forelimbs, rigid lumbar spine) would limit their ability to perform the characteristic kangaroo pentapedal walking (using the tail as a fifth limb), an essential gait at slower speeds as slow hopping is energetically unfeasible. Analysis of limb bone measurements of sthenurines in comparison with extant macropodoids shows a number of anatomical differences, especially in the large species. The scaling of long bone robusticity indicates that sthenurines are following the "normal" allometric trend for macropodoids, while the large extant kangaroos are relatively gracile. Other morphological differences are indicative of adaptations for a novel type of locomotor behavior in sthenurines: they lacked many specialized features for rapid hopping, and they also had anatomy indicative of supporting their body with an upright trunk (e.g., dorsally tipped ischiae), and of supporting their weight on one leg at a time (e.g., larger hips and knees, stabilized ankle joint). We propose that sthenurines adopted a bipedal striding gait (a gait occasionally observed in extant tree-kangaroos): in the smaller and earlier forms, this gait may have been employed as an alternative to pentapedal locomotion at slower speeds, while in the larger Pleistocene forms this gait may have enabled them to evolve to body sizes where hopping was no longer

  9. Locomotion in extinct giant kangaroos: were sthenurines hop-less monsters?

    PubMed

    Janis, Christine M; Buttrill, Karalyn; Figueirido, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Sthenurine kangaroos (Marsupialia, Diprotodontia, Macropodoidea) were an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These "short-faced browsers" first appeared in the middle Miocene, and radiated in the Plio-Pleistocene into a diversity of mostly large-bodied forms, more robust than extant forms in their build. The largest (Procoptodon goliah) had an estimated body mass of 240 kg, almost three times the size of the largest living kangaroos, and there is speculation whether a kangaroo of this size would be biomechanically capable of hopping locomotion. Previously described aspects of sthenurine anatomy (specialized forelimbs, rigid lumbar spine) would limit their ability to perform the characteristic kangaroo pentapedal walking (using the tail as a fifth limb), an essential gait at slower speeds as slow hopping is energetically unfeasible. Analysis of limb bone measurements of sthenurines in comparison with extant macropodoids shows a number of anatomical differences, especially in the large species. The scaling of long bone robusticity indicates that sthenurines are following the "normal" allometric trend for macropodoids, while the large extant kangaroos are relatively gracile. Other morphological differences are indicative of adaptations for a novel type of locomotor behavior in sthenurines: they lacked many specialized features for rapid hopping, and they also had anatomy indicative of supporting their body with an upright trunk (e.g., dorsally tipped ischiae), and of supporting their weight on one leg at a time (e.g., larger hips and knees, stabilized ankle joint). We propose that sthenurines adopted a bipedal striding gait (a gait occasionally observed in extant tree-kangaroos): in the smaller and earlier forms, this gait may have been employed as an alternative to pentapedal locomotion at slower speeds, while in the larger Pleistocene forms this gait may have enabled them to evolve to body sizes where hopping was no longer

  10. Slopes, nearly constant loss, universality, and hopping rates for dispersive ionic conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, J. Ross; Ahmad, Mohamad M.

    2007-01-01

    The title topics are investigated, discussed, and new insights provided by considering isothermal frequency response data for seven different materials having quite different conductivity spans and involving different electrode polarization effects and temperatures. These data sets were fitted using several different models, including the Kohlrausch-related K0 and K1 ones derived from stretched-exponential response in the temporal domain. The quasi-universal UN model, the K1 with its shape parameter, β1, fixed at 1/3, fitted most of the data very well, and its fits of such data were used to compare its predictions for hopping rate with those derived from fitting with the conventional 'universal dynamic response' Almond-West real-part-of-conductivity model. The K1-model theoretical hopping rate, involving the mean waiting time for a hop and derived from microscopic stochastic analysis, was roughly twice as large as the empirical Almond-West rate for most of the materials considered and should be used in place of it. Its use in a generalized Nernst-Einstein equation led to comparison of estimates of the concentration of fully dissociated mobile charge carriers in superionic PbSnF4 with earlier estimates of Ahmad using an Almond-West hopping rate value. Agreement with an independent structure-derived value was relatively poor. Fitting results obtained using the K0 model, for Na2SO4 data sets for two different polycrystalline material phases, and involving severely limited conductivity variation, were far superior to those obtained using the K1 model. The estimated values of the K0 shape parameter, β0, were close to 1/3 for both phases, strongly suggesting that the charge motion was one dimensional for each phase, even though they involved different crystalline structures.

  11. On the inclusion of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction in surface hopping methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherib, Rami; Ye, Liyuan; Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2016-04-01

    The diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (DBOC) stems from the diagonal second derivative coupling term in the adiabatic representation, and it can have an arbitrary large magnitude when a gap between neighbouring Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential energy surfaces (PESs) is closing. Nevertheless, DBOC is typically neglected in mixed quantum-classical methods of simulating nonadiabatic dynamics (e.g., fewest-switch surface hopping (FSSH) method). A straightforward addition of DBOC to BO PESs in the FSSH method, FSSH+D, has been shown to lead to numerically much inferior results for models containing conical intersections. More sophisticated variation of the DBOC inclusion, phase-space surface-hopping (PSSH) was more successful than FSSH+D but on model problems without conical intersections. This work comprehensively assesses the role of DBOC in nonadiabatic dynamics of two electronic state problems and the performance of FSSH, FSSH+D, and PSSH methods in variety of one- and two-dimensional models. Our results show that the inclusion of DBOC can enhance the accuracy of surface hopping simulations when two conditions are simultaneously satisfied: (1) nuclei have kinetic energy lower than DBOC and (2) PESs are not strongly nonadiabatically coupled. The inclusion of DBOC is detrimental in situations where its energy scale becomes very high or even diverges, because in these regions PESs are also very strongly coupled. In this case, the true quantum formalism heavily relies on an interplay between diagonal and off-diagonal nonadiabatic couplings while surface hopping approaches treat diagonal terms as PESs and off-diagonal ones stochastically.

  12. Role of Plasmids in Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 Hop Tolerance and Beer Spoilage

    PubMed Central

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Baecker, Nina; Pittet, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Specific isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can grow in the harsh beer environment, thus posing a threat to brew quality and the economic success of breweries worldwide. Plasmid-localized genes, such as horA, horC, and hitA, have been suggested to confer hop tolerance, a trait required for LAB survival in beer. The presence and expression of these genes among LAB, however, do not universally correlate with the ability to grow in beer. Genome sequencing of the virulent beer spoilage organism Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 revealed the presence of eight plasmids, with plasmids 1, 2, and 3 containing horA, horC, and hitA, respectively. To investigate the roles that these and the other five plasmids play in L. brevis BSO 464 growth in beer, plasmid curing with novobiocin was used to derive 10 plasmid variants. Multiplex PCRs were utilized to determine the presence or absence of each plasmid, and how plasmid loss affected hop tolerance and growth in degassed (noncarbonated) beer was assessed. Loss of three of the eight plasmids was found to affect hop tolerance and growth in beer. Loss of plasmid 2 (horC and 28 other genes) had the most dramatic effect, with loss of plasmid 4 (120 genes) and plasmid 8 (47 genes) having significant, but smaller, impacts. These results support the contention that genes on mobile genetic elements are essential for bacterial growth in beer and that beer spoilage ability is not dependent solely on the three previously described hop tolerance genes or on the chromosome of a beer spoilage LAB isolate. PMID:25501474

  13. Role of plasmids in Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 hop tolerance and beer spoilage.

    PubMed

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Baecker, Nina; Pittet, Vanessa; Ziola, Barry

    2015-02-01

    Specific isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can grow in the harsh beer environment, thus posing a threat to brew quality and the economic success of breweries worldwide. Plasmid-localized genes, such as horA, horC, and hitA, have been suggested to confer hop tolerance, a trait required for LAB survival in beer. The presence and expression of these genes among LAB, however, do not universally correlate with the ability to grow in beer. Genome sequencing of the virulent beer spoilage organism Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 revealed the presence of eight plasmids, with plasmids 1, 2, and 3 containing horA, horC, and hitA, respectively. To investigate the roles that these and the other five plasmids play in L. brevis BSO 464 growth in beer, plasmid curing with novobiocin was used to derive 10 plasmid variants. Multiplex PCRs were utilized to determine the presence or absence of each plasmid, and how plasmid loss affected hop tolerance and growth in degassed (noncarbonated) beer was assessed. Loss of three of the eight plasmids was found to affect hop tolerance and growth in beer. Loss of plasmid 2 (horC and 28 other genes) had the most dramatic effect, with loss of plasmid 4 (120 genes) and plasmid 8 (47 genes) having significant, but smaller, impacts. These results support the contention that genes on mobile genetic elements are essential for bacterial growth in beer and that beer spoilage ability is not dependent solely on the three previously described hop tolerance genes or on the chromosome of a beer spoilage LAB isolate. PMID:25501474

  14. Dynamic Task Allocation in Multi-Hop Multimedia Wireless Sensor Networks with Low Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yichao; Vural, Serdar; Gluhak, Alexander; Moessner, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a task allocation-oriented framework to enable efficient in-network processing and cost-effective multi-hop resource sharing for dynamic multi-hop multimedia wireless sensor networks with low node mobility, e.g., pedestrian speeds. The proposed system incorporates a fast task reallocation algorithm to quickly recover from possible network service disruptions, such as node or link failures. An evolutional self-learning mechanism based on a genetic algorithm continuously adapts the system parameters in order to meet the desired application delay requirements, while also achieving a sufficiently long network lifetime. Since the algorithm runtime incurs considerable time delay while updating task assignments, we introduce an adaptive window size to limit the delay periods and ensure an up-to-date solution based on node mobility patterns and device processing capabilities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that yields multi-objective task allocation in a mobile multi-hop wireless environment under dynamic conditions. Simulations are performed in various settings, and the results show considerable performance improvement in extending network lifetime compared to heuristic mechanisms. Furthermore, the proposed framework provides noticeable reduction in the frequency of missing application deadlines. PMID:24135992

  15. A very general rate expression for charge hopping in semiconducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Fornari, Rocco P.; Aragó, Juan; Troisi, Alessandro

    2015-05-14

    We propose an expression of the hopping rate between localized states in semiconducting disordered polymers that contain the most used rates in the literature as special cases. We stress that these rates cannot be obtained directly from electron transfer rate theories as it is not possible to define diabatic localized states if the localization is caused by disorder, as in most polymers, rather than nuclear polarization effects. After defining the separate classes of accepting and inducing nuclear modes in the system, we obtain a general expression of the hopping rate. We show that, under the appropriate limits, this expression reduces to (i) a single-phonon rate expression or (ii) the Miller-Abrahams rate or (iii) a multi-phonon expression. The description of these limits from a more general expression is useful to interpolate between them, to validate the assumptions of each limiting case, and to define the simplest rate expression that still captures the main features of the charge transport. When the rate expression is fed with a range of realistic parameters the deviation from the Miller-Abrahams rate is large or extremely large, especially for hopping toward lower energy states, due to the energy gap law.

  16. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) response mechanisms in drought stress: Proteomic analysis with physiology.

    PubMed

    Kolenc, Zala; Vodnik, Dominik; Mandelc, Stanislav; Javornik, Branka; Kastelec, Damijana; Čerenak, Andreja

    2016-08-01

    Drought is one of the major environmental devastating stressors that impair the growth and productivity of crop plants. Despite the relevance of drought stress, changes in physiology and resistance mechanisms are not completely understood for certain crops, including hop (Humulus lupulus L.). In this research the drought response of hop was studied using a conventional physiological approach (gas exchange techniques, fluorescence, relative water content measurements) and proteomic analysis (2D-DIGE). Plants of two cultivars (Aurora and Savinjski golding) were exposed to progressive drought in a pot experiment and analysed at different stress stages (mild, moderate and severe). Measurements of relative water content revealed a hydrostable water balance of hop. Photosynthesis was decreased due to stomatal and non-stomatal limitation to the same extent in both cultivars. Of 28 identified differentially abundant proteins, the majority were down regulated and included in photosynthetic (41%) and sugar metabolism (33%). Fifteen % of identified proteins were classified into the nitrogen metabolism, 4% were related to a ROS related pathway and 7% to other functions. PMID:27085598

  17. A very general rate expression for charge hopping in semiconducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Fornari, Rocco P; Aragó, Juan; Troisi, Alessandro

    2015-05-14

    We propose an expression of the hopping rate between localized states in semiconducting disordered polymers that contain the most used rates in the literature as special cases. We stress that these rates cannot be obtained directly from electron transfer rate theories as it is not possible to define diabatic localized states if the localization is caused by disorder, as in most polymers, rather than nuclear polarization effects. After defining the separate classes of accepting and inducing nuclear modes in the system, we obtain a general expression of the hopping rate. We show that, under the appropriate limits, this expression reduces to (i) a single-phonon rate expression or (ii) the Miller-Abrahams rate or (iii) a multi-phonon expression. The description of these limits from a more general expression is useful to interpolate between them, to validate the assumptions of each limiting case, and to define the simplest rate expression that still captures the main features of the charge transport. When the rate expression is fed with a range of realistic parameters the deviation from the Miller-Abrahams rate is large or extremely large, especially for hopping toward lower energy states, due to the energy gap law. PMID:25978881

  18. Time-resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Hopping: Body Size Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipper, A. N.; Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    The flow field of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna is quantified with time-resolved tomographic PIV. In the current work, we compare body kinematics and flow disturbance between organisms of small (body length = 1.8 mm) versus medium (2.3 mm) versus large (2.65 mm) size. These plankters are equipped with a pair of antennae that are biramous such that the protopodite splits or branches into an exopodite and an endopodite. They beat the antennae pair synchronously to impulsively propel themselves, or `hop,' through the water. The stroke cycle of Daphnia magna is roughly 80 ms in duration and this period is evenly split between the power and recovery strokes. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. Unlike copepod escape motion, no body vortex is observed in front of the animal. Rather, the flow induced by each antennae consists of a viscous vortex ring that demonstrates a slow decay. The time-record of velocity (peak of 40 mm/s for the medium specimen) and hop acceleration (1.8 m/s2 for the medium specimen) are compared, as well as the strength, size, and decay of the induced viscous vortex rings. The viscous vortex ring analysis will be presented in the context of a double Stokeslet model consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width.

  19. Gap anisotropy of layered cuprates in the framework of a correlated hopping model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, Alexander A.; Mishonov, Todor M.

    1997-04-01

    The superconductivity of the conducting CuO2plane of the layered cuprates is considered in the framework of a two-dimensional (2D) tight-binding model which contains O2pσand Cu3dx2 - y2states. Besides the standard LCAO amplitudes the correlated hopping between O2pσand Cu3dx2 - y2orbitals is also considered. The fact that the conduction band is mainly oxygen like and that the one electron hopping between next nearest neighbours (NNN) oxygen ions is relatively smaller then the nearest neighbours (NN) hopping between NN Cu and O ions is taken into account. The equations for the superconducting gap are derived. It is shown that such a choice of the orbitals leads to as-type superconducting gap, which is in qualitative agreement with data for strongly irradiated samples. It is briefly discussed that the addition to the Emery model of the Cu4sorbital could lead to ad-type gap in agreement with the π-shift of the Josephson effect and location of Δ(p) zeroes by recent ARPES data.

  20. Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-α-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-α-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-α-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-α-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-α-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-α-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-α-acids.

  1. Structural Basis of Human PXR Activation by the Hops Constituent Colupulone

    PubMed Central

    Teotico, Denise G.; Bischof, Jason J.; Peng, Li; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2008-01-01

    Hops extracts are used to alleviate menopausal symptoms and as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, but can produce potentially harmful drug-drug interactions. The nuclear xenobiotic receptor PXR is promiscuously activated by a range of structurally distinct chemicals. It has a key role in the transcriptional regulation of genes that encode xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. In this study, hops extracts are shown to induce the expression of numerous drug metabolism and excretion proteins. The β-bitter acid colupulone is demonstrated to be a bioactive component and direct activator of human PXR. The 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of human PXR in complex with colupulone was elucidated, and colupulone was observed to bind in a single orientation stabilized by both Van der Waals and hydrogen bonding contacts. The crystal structure also indicates that related α- and β-bitter acids have the capacity to serve as PXR agonists, as well. Taken together, these results reveal the structural basis for drug-drug interactions mediated by colupulone and related constituents of hops extracts. PMID:18768384

  2. The Number of Trials Required to Obtain a Representative Movement Pattern During a Hurdle Hop Exercise.

    PubMed

    Gore, Shane J; Marshall, Brendan M; Franklyn-Miller, Andrew D; Falvey, Eanna C; Moran, Kieran A

    2016-06-01

    When reporting a subject's mean movement pattern, it is important to ensure that reported values are representative of the subject's typical movement. While previous studies have used the mean of 3 trials, scientific justification of this number is lacking. One approach is to determine statistically how many trials are required to achieve a representative mean. This study compared 4 methods of calculating the number of trials required in a hopping movement to achieve a representative mean. Fifteen males completed 15 trials of a lateral hurdle hop. Range of motion at the trunk, pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle, in addition to peak moments for the latter 3 joints were examined. The number of trials required was computed using a peak intraclass correlation coefficient method, sequential analysis with a bandwidth of acceptable variance in the mean, and a novel method based on the standard error of measurement (SEMind). The number of trials required across all variables ranged from 2 to 12 depending on method, joint, and anatomical plane. The authors advocate the SEMind method as it demonstrated fewer limitations than the other methods. Using the SEMind, the required number of trials for a representative mean during the lateral hurdle hop is 6. PMID:26667614

  3. An Energy Efficient MAC Protocol for Multi-Hop Swallowable Body Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chengfeng; Wong, Kai Juan; Yan, Hao; Shen, Junwen; Phee, Soo Jay

    2014-01-01

    Swallowable body sensor networks (BSNs) are composed of sensors which are swallowed by patients and send the collected data to the outside coordinator. These sensors are energy constraint and the batteries are difficult to be replaced. The medium access control (MAC) protocol plays an important role in energy management. This paper investigates an energy efficient MAC protocol design for swallowable BSNs. Multi-hop communication is analyzed and proved more energy efficient than single-hop communication within the human body when the circuitry power is low. Based on this result, a centrally controlled time slotting schedule is proposed. The major workload is shifted from the sensors to the coordinator. The coordinator collects the path-loss map and calculates the schedules, including routing, slot assignment and transmission power. Sensor nodes follow the schedules to send data in a multi-hop way. The proposed protocol is compared with the IEEE 802.15.6 protocol in terms of energy consumption. The results show that it is more energy efficient than IEEE 802.15.6 for swallowable BSN scenarios. PMID:25330049

  4. The Number of Trials Required to Obtain a Representative Movement Pattern During a Hurdle Hop Exercise.

    PubMed

    Gore, Shane J; Marshall, Brendan M; Franklyn-Miller, Andrew D; Falvey, Eanna C; Moran, Kieran A

    2016-06-01

    When reporting a subject's mean movement pattern, it is important to ensure that reported values are representative of the subject's typical movement. While previous studies have used the mean of 3 trials, scientific justification of this number is lacking. One approach is to determine statistically how many trials are required to achieve a representative mean. This study compared 4 methods of calculating the number of trials required in a hopping movement to achieve a representative mean. Fifteen males completed 15 trials of a lateral hurdle hop. Range of motion at the trunk, pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle, in addition to peak moments for the latter 3 joints were examined. The number of trials required was computed using a peak intraclass correlation coefficient method, sequential analysis with a bandwidth of acceptable variance in the mean, and a novel method based on the standard error of measurement (SEMind). The number of trials required across all variables ranged from 2 to 12 depending on method, joint, and anatomical plane. The authors advocate the SEMind method as it demonstrated fewer limitations than the other methods. Using the SEMind, the required number of trials for a representative mean during the lateral hurdle hop is 6.

  5. Gold Digger or Video Girl: the salience of an emerging hip-hop sexual script.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jasmine N; Coleman, Nicole M

    2011-02-01

    Concerns have been expressed in the common discourse and scholarly literature about the negative influence of Hip-Hop on its young listeners' ideas about sex and sexuality. Most of the scholarly literature has focused on the impact of this urban, Black media on young African American girls' sexual self-concept and behaviours. In response to this discourse, Stephens and Phillips (2003) proposed a Hip-Hop sexual scripting model that theorises about specific sexual scripts for young African American women. Their model includes eight different sexual scripts including the Gold Digger script. The present study proposes a ninth emerging script - the Video Girl. Participants were 18 female African American college students, between the ages of 18 and 30 years old from a large urban public university in the Southwest USA. Using q-methodology the present study found support for the existence of a Video Girl script. In addition, the data indicates that this script is distinct but closely related to Stephens and Phillips' Gold Digger script. These findings support their theory by suggesting that Hip-Hop sexual scripts are salient and hold real meaning for this sample.

  6. Mechanism of leg stiffness adjustment for hopping on surfaces of different stiffnesses.

    PubMed

    Farley, C T; Houdijk, H H; Van Strien, C; Louie, M

    1998-09-01

    When humans hop in place or run forward, leg stiffness is increased to offset reductions in surface stiffness, allowing the global kinematics and mechanics to remain the same on all surfaces. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanism for adjusting leg stiffness. Seven subjects hopped in place on surfaces of different stiffnesses (23-35,000 kN/m) while force platform, kinematic, and electromyographic data were collected. Leg stiffness approximately doubled between the most stiff surface and the least stiff surface. Over the same range of surfaces, ankle torsional stiffness increased 1.75-fold, and the knee became more extended at the time of touchdown (2.81 vs. 2.65 rad). We used a computer simulation to examine the sensitivity of leg stiffness to the observed changes in ankle stiffness and touchdown knee angle. Our model consisted of four segments (foot, shank, thigh, head-arms-trunk) interconnected by three torsional springs (ankle, knee, hip). In the model, an increase in ankle stiffness 1.75-fold caused leg stiffness to increase 1.7-fold. A change in touchdown knee angle as observed in the subjects caused leg stiffness to increase 1.3-fold. Thus both joint stiffness and limb geometry adjustments are important in adjusting leg stiffness to allow similar hopping on different surfaces.

  7. Gold Digger or Video Girl: the salience of an emerging hip-hop sexual script.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jasmine N; Coleman, Nicole M

    2011-02-01

    Concerns have been expressed in the common discourse and scholarly literature about the negative influence of Hip-Hop on its young listeners' ideas about sex and sexuality. Most of the scholarly literature has focused on the impact of this urban, Black media on young African American girls' sexual self-concept and behaviours. In response to this discourse, Stephens and Phillips (2003) proposed a Hip-Hop sexual scripting model that theorises about specific sexual scripts for young African American women. Their model includes eight different sexual scripts including the Gold Digger script. The present study proposes a ninth emerging script - the Video Girl. Participants were 18 female African American college students, between the ages of 18 and 30 years old from a large urban public university in the Southwest USA. Using q-methodology the present study found support for the existence of a Video Girl script. In addition, the data indicates that this script is distinct but closely related to Stephens and Phillips' Gold Digger script. These findings support their theory by suggesting that Hip-Hop sexual scripts are salient and hold real meaning for this sample. PMID:20972917

  8. Appraisal of Surface Hopping as a Tool for Modeling Condensed Phase Linear Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Petit, Andrew S; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-09-01

    Whereas surface hopping is usually used to study populations and mean-field dynamics to study coherences, in two recent papers, we described a procedure for calculating dipole-dipole correlation functions (and therefore absorption spectra) directly from ensembles of surface hopping trajectories. We previously applied this method to a handful of one-dimensional model problems intended to mimic the gas phase. In this article, we now benchmark this new procedure on a set of multidimensional model problems intended to mimic the condensed phase and compare our results against other standard semiclassical methods. By comparison, we demonstrate that methods that include only dynamical information from one PES (the standard Kubo approaches) exhibit large discrepancies with the results of exact quantum dynamics. Furthermore, for model problems with nonadiabatic excited state dynamics but no quantized vibrational structure in the spectra, our surface hopping approach performs comparably to using Ehrenfest dynamics to calculate the electronic coherences. That being said, however, when quantized vibrational structures are present in the spectra but the electronic states are uncoupled, performing the dynamics on the mean PES still outperforms our present method. These benchmark results should influence future studies that use ensembles of independent semiclassical trajectories to model linear as well as multidimensional spectra in the condensed phase.

  9. Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-α-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-α-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-α-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-α-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-α-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-α-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-α-acids. PMID:25475328

  10. Musculoskeletal modelling deconstructs the paradoxical effects of elastic ankle exoskeletons on plantar-flexor mechanics and energetics during hopping

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Dominic James; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.; Sawicki, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have shown that elastic ankle exoskeletons can be used to reduce ankle joint and plantar-flexor muscle loading when hopping in place and, in turn, reduce metabolic energy consumption. However, recent experimental work has shown that such exoskeletons cause less favourable soleus (SO) muscle–tendon mechanics than is observed during normal hopping, which might limit the capacity of the exoskeleton to reduce energy consumption. To directly link plantar-flexor mechanics and energy consumption when hopping in exoskeletons, we used a musculoskeletal model of the human leg and a model of muscle energetics in simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics during hopping with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. Simulations were driven by experimental electromyograms, joint kinematics and exoskeleton torque taken from previously published data. The data were from seven males who hopped at 2.5 Hz with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. The energetics model showed that the total rate of metabolic energy consumption by ankle muscles was not significantly reduced by an ankle exoskeleton. This was despite large reductions in plantar-flexor force production (40–50%). The lack of larger metabolic reductions with exoskeletons was attributed to increases in plantar-flexor muscle fibre velocities and a shift to less favourable muscle fibre lengths during active force production. This limited the capacity for plantar-flexors to reduce activation and energy consumption when hopping with exoskeleton assistance. PMID:25278469

  11. Structural Identification of the Vps18 β-Propeller Reveals a Critical Role in the HOPS Complex Stability and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Heide; Lürick, Anna; Kuhlee, Anne; Balderhaar, Henning Kleine; Bröcker, Cornelia; Kümmel, Daniel; Engelbrecht-Vandré, Siegfried; Gohlke, Ulrich; Raunser, Stefan; Heinemann, Udo; Ungermann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion at the vacuole, the lysosome equivalent in yeast, requires the HOPS tethering complex, which is recruited by the Rab7 GTPase Ypt7. HOPS provides a template for the assembly of SNAREs and thus likely confers fusion at a distinct position on vacuoles. Five of the six subunits in HOPS have a similar domain prediction with strong similarity to COPII subunits and nuclear porins. Here, we show that Vps18 indeed has a seven-bladed β-propeller as its N-terminal domain by revealing its structure at 2.14 Å. The Vps18 N-terminal domain can interact with the N-terminal part of Vps11 and also binds to lipids. Although deletion of the Vps18 N-terminal domain does not preclude HOPS assembly, as revealed by negative stain electron microscopy, the complex is instable and cannot support membrane fusion in vitro. We thus conclude that the β-propeller of Vps18 is required for HOPS stability and function and that it can serve as a starting point for further structural analyses of the HOPS tethering complex. PMID:25324549

  12. Low-coverage surface diffusion in complex periodic energy landscapes. II. Analytical solution for systems with asymmetric hops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosálvez, Miguel A.; Otrokov, Mikhail M.; Ferrando, Nestor; Ryabishchenkova, Anastasia G.; Ayuela, Andres; Echenique, Pedro M.; Chulkov, Evgueni V.

    2016-05-01

    This is part II in a series of two papers that introduce a general expression for the tracer diffusivity in complex, periodic energy landscapes with M distinct hop rates in one-, two-, and three-dimensional diluted systems (low coverage, single-tracer limit). While Part I [Gosálvez et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 075429 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.075429] focuses on the analysis of diffusion in systems where the end sites of the hops are located symmetrically with respect to the hop origins (symmetric hops), as encountered in many ideal surfaces and bulk materials, this report (Part II) presents a more general approach to determining the tracer diffusivity in systems where the end sites can be located asymmetrically with respect to the hop origins (asymmetric hops), as observed in reconstructed and/or chemically modified surfaces and/or bulk materials. The obtained diffusivity formulas for numerous systems are validated against kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and previously reported analytical expressions based on the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) method. The proposed method corrects some of the CTRW formulas and provides new expressions for difficult cases that have not been solved earlier. This demonstrates the ability of the proposed formalism to describe tracer diffusion.

  13. Formation and accumulation of alpha-acids, beta-acids, desmethylxanthohumol, and xanthohumol during flowering of hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    De Keukeleire, Jelle; Ooms, Geert; Heyerick, Arne; Roldan-Ruiz, Isabel; Van Bockstaele, Erik; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2003-07-16

    Important secondary metabolites, present in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), include alpha-acids and beta-acids, which are essential for the brewing of beer, as well as the prenylated chalcones, desmethylxanthohumol, and xanthohumol, which exhibit interesting bioactive properties. Their formation and accumulation in five selected hop varieties, Wye Challenger, Wye Target, Golding, Admiral, and Whitbread Golding Variety, were quantitatively monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography using UV detection. All target compounds were present from the onset of flowering, not only in female hop cones but also in male inflorescences, albeit in low concentrations. During development from female inflorescences to cones, levels of alpha-acids, beta-acids, desmethylxanthohumol, and xanthohumol gradually increased, while each hop variety exhibited individual accumulation rates. Furthermore, these compounds were present in leaves of fully grown hops as well. The study demonstrated that key compounds for flavor and potential beneficial health effects associated with beer not only reside in the glandular lupulin structures but also are distributed over various parts of the hop plant. PMID:12848522

  14. Significance of ligand interactions involving Hop2-Mnd1 and the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases in homologous DNA repair and XX ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick

    2015-04-30

    The evolutionarily conserved Hop2-Mnd1 complex is a key cofactor for the meiosis-specific recombinase Dmc1. However, emerging evidence has revealed that Hop2-Mnd1 is expressed in somatic tissues, primary human fibroblasts and cell lines, and that it functions in conjunction with the Rad51 recombinase to repair damaged telomeres via the alternate lengthening of telomeres mechanism. Here, we reveal how distinct DNA-binding activities of Hop2-Mnd1 mediate the stabilization of the RAD51-ssDNA presynaptic filament or stimulate the homologous DNA pairing reaction. We have also endeavored to define the interface that governs the assembly of the higher order complex of Hop2-Mnd1 with RAD51. Unexpectedly, we find that ATP enhances the interaction between Hop2-Mnd1 and RAD51, and that both Hop2 and Mnd1 are involved in RAD51 interaction via their C-terminal regions. Importantly, mutations introduced into these Hop2 and Mnd1 domains, including the HOP2 p.del201Glu mutation present in a patient of XX ovarian dysgenesis, diminish the association and functional synergy of Hop2-Mnd1 with both RAD51 and DMC1. Our findings help delineate the intricate manner in which Hop2-Mnd1 engages and functions with RAD51 and DMC1 in mammalian cells and speak to the possible cause of XX ovarian dysgenesis.

  15. Growth inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects of xanthohumol, a prenylated chalone present in hops, in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deeb, D; Gao, X; Jiang, H; Arbab, A S; Dulchavsky, S A; Gautam, S C

    2010-09-01

    Promotion of apoptosis in cancer cells could potentially lead to the regression and improved prognosis of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone-derived from hops, has shown strong antitumorigenic activity towards diverse types of cancer cells. In the present study, the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activity of XN was tested in hormone-sensitive and hormone-refractory human prostate cancer cells lines. Cell growth/viability assay (MTS) demonstrated that prostate cancer cells are highly sensitive to XN at a concentration range of 20-40 μM. The primary mode of tumor cell destruction was apoptosis as demonstrated by the binding of annexin V-FITC, cleavage of PARP-1, activation of procaspases -3, -8, and -9, mitochondrial depolarization and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Induction of apoptosis by XN was associated with the inhibition of prosurvival Akt, NF-κB and mTOR signaling proteins and NF-κB-regulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and survivin. These studies provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of XN for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:20944105

  16. Growth Inhibitory and Apoptosis-inducing Effects of Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Chalcone Present in Hops, in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    DEEB, D.; GAO, X.; JIANG, H.; ARBAB, A.S.; DULCHAVSKY, S.A.; GAUTAM, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Promotion of apoptosis in cancer cells could potentially lead to the regression and improved prognosis of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone-derived from hops, has shown strong antitumorigenic activity towards diverse types of cancer cells. In the present study, the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activity of XN was tested in hormone-sensitive and hormone-refractory human prostate cancer cells lines. Cell growth/viability assay (MTS) demonstrated that prostate cancer cells are highly sensitive to XN at a concentration range of 20-40 μM. The primary mode of tumor cell destruction was apoptosis as demonstrated by the binding of annexin V-FITC, cleavage of PARP-1, activation of procaspases -3, -8, and -9, mitochondrial depolarization and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Induction of apoptosis by XN was associated with the inhibition of prosurvival Akt, NF-κB and mTOR signaling proteins and NF-κB-regulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and survivin. These studies provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of XN for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:20944105

  17. A new neuro-FDS definition for indirect adaptive control of unknown nonlinear systems using a method of parameter hopping.

    PubMed

    Boutalis, Yiannis; Theodoridis, Dimitris C; Christodoulou, Manolis A

    2009-04-01

    The indirect adaptive regulation of unknown nonlinear dynamical systems is considered in this paper. The method is based on a new neuro-fuzzy dynamical system (neuro-FDS) definition, which uses the concept of adaptive fuzzy systems (AFSs) operating in conjunction with high-order neural network functions (FHONNFs). Since the plant is considered unknown, we first propose its approximation by a special form of an FDS and then the fuzzy rules are approximated by appropriate HONNFs. Thus, the identification scheme leads up to a recurrent high-order neural network (RHONN), which however takes into account the fuzzy output partitions of the initial FDS. The proposed scheme does not require a priori experts' information on the number and type of input variable membership functions making it less vulnerable to initial design assumptions. Once the system is identified around an operation point, it is regulated to zero adaptively. Weight updating laws for the involved HONNFs are provided, which guarantee that both the identification error and the system states reach zero exponentially fast, while keeping all signals in the closed loop bounded. The existence of the control signal is always assured by introducing a novel method of parameter hopping, which is incorporated in the weight updating law. Simulations illustrate the potency of the method and comparisons with conventional approaches on benchmarking systems are given. Also, the applicability of the method is tested on a direct current (dc) motor system where it is shown that by following the proposed procedure one can obtain asymptotic regulation.

  18. Target hopping as a useful tool for the identification of novel EphA2 protein-protein antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tognolini, Massimiliano; Incerti, Matteo; Pala, Daniele; Russo, Simonetta; Castelli, Riccardo; Hassan-Mohamed, Iftiin; Giorgio, Carmine; Lodola, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA), a physiological ligand for the nuclear receptor FXR and the G-protein-coupled receptor TGR5, has been recently described as an antagonist of the EphA2 receptor, a key member of the ephrin signalling system involved in tumour growth. Given the ability of LCA to recognize FXR, TGR5, and EphA2 receptors, we hypothesized that the structural requirements for a small molecule to bind each of these receptors might be similar. We therefore selected a set of commercially available FXR or TGR5 ligands and tested them for their ability to inhibit EphA2 by targeting the EphA2-ephrin-A1 interface. Among the selected compounds, the stilbene carboxylic acid GW4064 was identified as an effective antagonist of EphA2, being able to block EphA2 activation in prostate carcinoma cells, in the micromolar range. This finding proposes the "target hopping" approach as a new effective strategy to discover new protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

  19. Elastic and length-force characteristics of the gastrocnemius of the hopping mouse (Notomys alexis) and the rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Ettema, G J

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the contractile and series elastic properties of terrestrial mammals that use bipedal versus quadrupedal gaits. The gastrocnemius muscle of the hopping mouse (body mass 30.2 +/- 2.4 g, mean +/- S.D.) and the rat (313 +/- 10.7 g) were compared with data from the literature for the wallaby and the kangaroo rat to distinguish scaling effects and locomotion-related effects on muscle properties. Contractile length-force properties and series elastic stiffness were measured in situ during maximal tetanic contractions. The rat had a larger muscle-fibre-to-tendon-length ratio. The rat and hopping mouse showed similar normalised length-force characteristics of the gastrocnemius. Normalised stiffness in the hopping mouse was higher. The hopping mouse showed a higher capacity to store elastic energy per unit of contractile work capacity, as well as per unit of body mass. Accounting for body size differences, the rat had a smaller relative muscle mass and thus smaller work capacity than the three hopping animals considered. This is an agreement with a quadrupedal versus bipedal locomotion style. The differences in contractile and elastic properties of the gastrocnemius of the rat and hopping mouse seem to be closely related to locomotion patterns. Small animals seem to be able to utilise the storage and release of elastic energy to a far lesser extent than larger animals. However, even in animals as small as hopping mice, the storage and utilisation of elastic energy during locomotion is of functional significance and probably depends on locomotor behaviour.

  20. The type III effector HopF2Pto targets Arabidopsis RIN4 protein to promote Pseudomonas syringae virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Elmore, James; Felsensteiner, Corinna; Coaker, Gitta; Desveaux, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    Plant immunity can be induced by two major classes of pathogen-associated molecules. Pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs) are conserved molecular components of microbes that serve as “non-self” features to induce PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Pathogen effector proteins used to promote virulence can also be recognized as “non-self” features or induce a “modified-self” state that can induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI). The Arabidopsis protein RIN4 plays an important role in both branches of plant immunity. Three unrelated type III secretion effector (TTSE) proteins from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, AvrRpm1, AvrRpt2, and AvrB, target RIN4, resulting in ETI that effectively restricts pathogen growth. However, no pathogenic advantage has been demonstrated for RIN4 manipulation by these TTSEs. Here, we show that the TTSE HopF2Pto also targets Arabidopsis RIN4. Transgenic plants conditionally expressing HopF2Pto were compromised for AvrRpt2-induced RIN4 modification and associated ETI. HopF2Pto interfered with AvrRpt2-induced RIN4 modification in vitro but not with AvrRpt2 activation, suggestive of RIN4 targeting by HopF2Pto. In support of this hypothesis, HopF2Pto interacted with RIN4 in vitro and in vivo. Unlike AvrRpm1, AvrRpt2, and AvrB, HopF2Pto did not induce ETI and instead promoted P. syringae growth in Arabidopsis. This virulence activity was not observed in plants genetically lacking RIN4. These data provide evidence that RIN4 is a major virulence target of HopF2Pto and that a pathogenic advantage can be conveyed by TTSEs that target RIN4. PMID:20133879