Science.gov

Sample records for 1-ma 100-ns rise-time

  1. Autonomous Magnetoexplosive Generator of Megavolt, 100 NS Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurin, V. Ye.; Kataev, V. N.; Korolev, P. V.; Kargin, V. I.; Makartsev, G. F.; Nudikov, V. N.; Pikar, A. S.; Popkov, N. F.; Saratov, A. F.

    2004-11-01

    Here we present the results of the work carried out at different stages aimed at the development of autonomous magnetocumulative generators having 100 ns megavolt pulses. This generator is meant to replace the PIRIT-01 stationary facility by a magnetocumulative energy source. Using a generator with permanent magnets as a source of initial energy and multiplying this energy by a cascade of magnetoexplosive generators allows 100 kJ of energy accumulation in a contour. The generator that has a permanent magnet does not need an additional energy source for its operation. It is convenient to operate and is always available for service. Shortening the MC generator current pulse up to 1 μs is implemented using a high-voltage explosive driven opening switch. In the first sharpening cascade, the voltage increases up to 500 kV. Further shortening of the current pulse duration up to 100 ns and the voltage rise up to 1 MV are performed using plasma opening switches according to the two-stage formation scheme. Such a scheme allows the decrease of electric field strength on the insulator surface and the use of magnetic insulation in the high-voltage section of the facility.

  2. Circuit models and three-dimensional electromagnetic simulations of a 1-MA linear transformer driver stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Madrid, E. A.; Mostrom, C. B.; Stygar, W. A.; Lechien, K. R.; Mazarakis, M. A.; Langston, W. L.; Porter, J. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2010-09-01

    A 3D fully electromagnetic (EM) model of the principal pulsed-power components of a high-current linear transformer driver (LTD) has been developed. LTD systems are a relatively new modular and compact pulsed-power technology based on high-energy density capacitors and low-inductance switches located within a linear-induction cavity. We model 1-MA, 100-kV, 100-ns rise-time LTD cavities [A. A. Kim , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402] which can be used to drive z-pinch and material dynamics experiments. The model simulates the generation and propagation of electromagnetic power from individual capacitors and triggered gas switches to a radially symmetric output line. Multiple cavities, combined to provide voltage addition, drive a water-filled coaxial transmission line. A 3D fully EM model of a single 1-MA 100-kV LTD cavity driving a simple resistive load is presented and compared to electrical measurements. A new model of the current loss through the ferromagnetic cores is developed for use both in circuit representations of an LTD cavity and in the 3D EM simulations. Good agreement between the measured core current, a simple circuit model, and the 3D simulation model is obtained. A 3D EM model of an idealized ten-cavity LTD accelerator is also developed. The model results demonstrate efficient voltage addition when driving a matched impedance load, in good agreement with an idealized circuit model.

  3. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  4. 100 ns Z-Pinch Performance on the Inductive-Energy-Based ACE 4 Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Philip; Thompson, John; Crumley, Randy; Failor, Bruce; Goodrich, Phillip; Parks, Don; Rauch, John; Song, Yuanxu; Steen, Paul; Waisman, Eduardo; Weber, Bruce; Moosman, Bryan; Qi, Niansheng; Schein, Jochen; McFarland, Mike; Campbell, Kelly; Krishnan, Mahadevan

    2000-10-01

    We report on the performance of a short implosion time ( ~100 ns) argon z-pinch using an inductive-energy-storage system. The generator, ACE 4, used a plasma opening switch (POS) to conduct for over a microsecond before driving the short implosion time 2.5 cm diameter Double Eagle gas nozzle. (Previously reported ACE 4 results used longer implosion times, 150 to over 300 ns, with z-pinch load diameters up to 14 cm.) The Double Eagle nozzle, which produces more than 20 kJ of argon K-shell radiation with a current I of almost 4 MA on Double Eagle, produced more than 6 kJ with 3 MA on ACE 4. This performance is consistent with the expected I to the 4th scaling. Pinch behavior on the two machines was quite similar in terms of zippering, pulse width and pinch diameter. As on Double Eagle, the gas flow away from the nozzle was observed to pinch best. On ACE 4, recessing the nozzle behind a wire grid cathode plane moved the high output part of the pinch down to the cathode plane. This allowed us to reduce the pinch length and load inductance, hence increasing load current and yield. Similar changes could be exploited on other gas puff loads and generators to enhance x-ray output. (Thompson, et. al., report elsewhere at this meeting on the performance of the POS and its interaction with the PRS.)

  5. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  6. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  7. MAIZE: a 1 MA LTD-Driven Z-Pinch at The University of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Zier, J. C.; Tang, W. W.; French, D. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Johnston, M. D.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Kim, A. A.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.

    2009-01-21

    Researchers at The University of Michigan have constructed and tested a 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver (LTD), the first of its type to reach the USA. The Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-pinch Experiments, (MAIZE), is based on the LTD developed at the Institute of High Current Electronics in collaboration with Sandia National Labs and UM. This LTD utilizes 80 capacitors and 40 spark gap switches, arranged in 40 'bricks,' to deliver a 1 MA, 100 kV pulse with 100 ns risetime into a matched resistive load. Preliminary resistive-load test results are presented for the LTD facility.Planned experimental research programs at UM include: a) Studies of Magneto-Raleigh-Taylor instability of planar foils, and b) Vacuum convolute studies including cathode and anode plasma.

  8. Low-noise detector and amplifier design for 100 ns direct detection CO{sub 2} LIDAR receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Cafferty, M.M.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Fuller, K.

    1997-06-01

    The development and test results of a prototype detector/amplifier design for a background limited, pulsed 100 ns, 10--100 kHz repetition rate LIDAR/DIAL receiver system are presented. Design objectives include near-matched filter detection of received pulse amplitude and round trip time-of-flight, and the elimination of excess correlated detector/amplifier noise for optimal pulse averaging. A novel pole-zero cancellation amplifier, coupled with a state-of-the-art SBRC (Santa Barbara Research Center) infrared detector was implemented to meet design objectives. The pole-zero cancellation amplifier utilizes a tunable, pseudo-matched filter technique to match the width of the laser pulse to the shaping time of the filter for optimal SNR performance. Low frequency correlated noise, (l/f and drift noise) is rejected through a second order high gain feedback loop. The amplifier also employs an active detector bias stage minimizing detector drift. Experimental results will be provided that demonstrate near-background limited, 100 ns pulse detection performance given a 8.5--11.5 {micro}m (300 K B.B.) radiant background, with the total noise floor spectrally white for optimal pulse averaging efficiency.

  9. Mapping Rise Time Information with Down-Shift Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T. W., Machorro, E. A., Diaz, A. B.

    2011-11-01

    These viewgraphs summarize the application of recent developments in digital down-shift (DDS) analysis of up converted PDV data to map out how well the PDV diagnostic would capture rise time information (mid point and rise time) in short rise time (<1 ns) shock events. The mapping supports a PDV vs VISAR challenge. The analysis concepts are new (~September FY 2011), simple, and run quickly, which makes them good tools to map out (with ~1 million Monte Carlo simulations) how well PDV captures rise time information as function of baseline velocity, rise time, velocity jump, and signal-to-noise ratios.

  10. Measurements of plasma conditions in precursor plasmas at the 1-MA Zebra facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouart, N. D.; Coverdale, C. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Deeney, C.

    2007-11-01

    Precursor plasmas, both the early time precursor flow of mass and the accumulation of this material on axis, were observed on many z-pinch experiments at various facilities, including low current (< 1MA) and high current (>15 MA, Z) facilities. The impact of these precursors on stagnated plasmas, and targets such as those used for ICF experiments, is still under evaluation. Experiments were performed at the UNR 1-MA, 100ns Zebra facility to study these precursor plasmas with Cu wire arrays. Significant precursor radiation at photon energies > 1 keV was observed on filtered PCDs. Te and ne of the precursor radiation were obtained from modeling of time-resolved spectroscopy of the Cu L-shell emissions for 6 wires on 12mm diameter loads. The precursor plasma temperatures are consistently >250eV. Time resolved pinhole images were also collected, which show bright spots of radiation along the axial length of the pinch. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Work was also supported by the DOE/NNSA Coop. agr. DE-FC52-06NA27616, 06NA27588, 06NA27586, and by fellowship from the NPSC with SNL.

  11. Effect of Current Rise-time on the Formation of Precursor Structures and Mass Ablation Rate in Cylindrical Wire Array Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, S. C.; Eshaq, Y.; Ueda, U.; Haas, D. M.; Beg, F. N.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B.; Greenly, J.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Douglass, J. D.; Bell, K.; Knapp, P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki, F. A.

    2009-01-21

    We present the first study to directly compare the mass ablation rates of cylindrical wire arrays as a function of the current rise-rate. Formation of the precursor column is investigated on both the MAPGIE (1 MA, 250 ns) and COBRA (1 MA, 100 ns) generators, and results are used to infer the change in the mass ablation rate induced by the rise-rate of the drive current. Laser shadowography, gated XUV imaging and x-ray diodes are used to compare the dynamical behavior both generators, and x-pinch radiography and XUV spectroscopy and provide density evolution and temperature measurements respectively. Results are compared to predictions from an analytical scaling model based on a fixed ablation rate, and the close correlation achieved suggests that the effective ablation velocity is not a strong function of the current rise rate.

  12. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  13. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  14. Dynamic response of polyurea subjected to nanosecond rise-time stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, George; Gupta, Vijay

    2012-08-01

    Shaped charges and explosively formed projectiles used in modern warfare can attain speeds as high as 30,000 ft/s. Impacts from these threats are expected to load the armor materials in the 10 to 100 ns timeframe. During this time, the material strains are quite limited but the strain rates are extremely high. To develop armors against such threats it is imperative to understand the dynamic constitutive behavior of materials in the tens of nanoseconds timeframe. Material behavior in this parameter space cannot be obtained by even the most sophisticated plate-impact and split-Hopkinson bar setups that exist within the high energy materials field today. This paper introduces an apparatus and a test method that are based on laser-generated stress waves to obtain such material behaviors. Although applicable to any material system, the test procedures are demonstrated on polyurea which shows unusual dynamic properties. Thin polyurea layers were deformed using laser-generated stress waves with 1-2 ns rise times and 16 ns total duration. The total strain in the samples was less than 3%. Because of the transient nature of the stress wave, the strain rate varied throughout the deformation history of the sample. A peak value of 1.1×105 s-1 was calculated. It was found that the stress-strain characteristics, determined from experimentally recorded incident and transmitted wave profiles, matched satisfactorily with those computed from a 2D wave mechanics simulation in which the polyurea was modeled as a linearly viscoelastic solid with constants derived from the quasi-static experiments. Thus, the test data conformed to the Time-Temperature Superposition (TTS) principle even at extremely high strain rates of our test. This then extends the previous observations of Zhao et al. (Mech. Time-Depend. Mater. 11:289-308, 2007) who showed the applicability of the TTS principle for polyurea in the linearly viscoelastic regime up to peak strain rates of 1200 s-1.

  15. Simple sub-50-ps rise-time high voltage generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekez, M. M.

    1991-12-01

    This article relates to the development of an ultrafast (nanoseconds-picoseconds time scale) compact system(s) readily applicable to the field of EMP/radiation, x-ray-induced nondestructive testing, plasma fusion (energy) experiments, bioelectromagnetic (food-drug) sterilization, drivers for x-ray preionized XeCl laser and similar applications. The present work shows that the Marx and the Pulse forming section can be integrated into a single unit. The stray capacitance present in each stage acts as a peaking capacitor. For a charging voltage per stage of <40 kV, the rise time of the output pulse is below 50 ps at 200 kV into a 100-Ω load. Work is in progress to extend the voltage amplitude to 1.6 MV while maintaining the relative pulse waveform. With a contemporary optical diagnostic technique it is believed that the present concept may achieve 1-10 ps rise-time pulses at a megavolt level in ``smart gas mixtures.'' In addition a solution for the classical peaking circuit has been obtained and presented in the Appendix.

  16. Rise-Time Distortion of Signal without Carrying Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhman, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with one-dimensional problem of rise-time distortion signal without carrying signal, that appears in the starting point intermittently, that is signal distortion at front edge or one of its derivative. The authors show that front edge of signal isn't distorted in case of propagation in unrestricted (including absorbing) area (amplitude of starting signal step or of one of its derivatives doesn't change) and move with the accuracy of vacuum light speed. The paper proves that it is the time interval shortage that causes signal loss with the route extension, but not the reduction of its starting amplitude, during which front edge of signal retains its starting value. The research presents new values for this time interval.

  17. Lithium niobate stress gauge current diagnostic for noninductive measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Williams, R. R.; Porter, J. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Matzen, M. K.

    1990-11-01

    Accurate modeling of load behavior in Z-pinch plasma radiation sources driven by high-current generators requires the measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere currents close to the load. Conventional current diagnostics mounted in inductive cavities (such as B-dot loops and Rogowski coils) fail at small radius because of electrical breakdown produced by high dI/dt. In this paper, we describe the use of large-signal, nanosecond-time-resolution lithium niobate piezoelectric stress gauges to directly measure the magnetic pressure B2/2μ0=μ0I2/8π2r2 generated at radius r by a current I flowing in a radial transmission line. Current measurements have been performed at radius r=2.54×10-2 m on Sandia National Laboratories' Proto-II (10 TW) and SATURN (30 TW) gas puff Z-pinch experiments with maximum currents of 10.1 MA and dI/dt to 2.1×1014 A/s. Comparisons with Faraday rotation and B-dot current diagnostic measurements at large radius are presented. Bremsstrahlung noise problems unique to the SATURN gas puff source are discussed. For a Y-cut lithium niobate stress gauge on a pure tungsten electrode, current densities up to I/2πr=78 MA/m can be measured before the electrode yield strength and the piezoelectric operating stress limit are exceeded. Above the Hugoniot elastic limit of the electrode material, the dynamic range and accuracy of the diagnostic are greatly reduced, but it appears that the technique can be extended to higher current densities using an X-cut quartz piezoelectric element and a tungsten-sapphire electrode impedance stack.

  18. Functional Domain Motions in Proteins on the 1 100 ns Timescale: Comparison of Neutron Spin-Echo Spectroscopy of Phosphoglycerate Kinase with Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Smolin, Nikolai; Biehl, R; Kneller, Gerald; Richter, Dieter O; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Protein function often requires large-scale domain motion. An exciting new development in the experimental characterization of domain motions in proteins is the application of neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). NSE directly probes coherent (i.e., pair correlated) scattering on the 1 100 ns timescale. Here, we report on all-atom molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation of a protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, from which we calculate small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and NSE scattering properties. The simulation-derived and experimental-solution SANS results are in excellent agreement. The contributions of translational and rotational whole-molecule diffusion to the simulation-derived NSE and potential problems in their estimation are examined. Principal component analysis identifies types of domain motion that dominate the internal motion's contribution to the NSE signal, with the largest being classic hinge bending. The associated free-energy profiles are quasiharmonic and the frictional properties correspond to highly overdamped motion. The amplitudes of the motions derived by MD are smaller than those derived from the experimental analysis, and possible reasons for this difference are discussed. The MD results confirm that a significant component of the NSE arises from internal dynamics. They also demonstrate that the combination of NSE with MD is potentially useful for determining the forms, potentials of mean force, and time dependence of functional domain motions in proteins.

  19. A note on some statistical properties of rise time parameters used in muon arrival time measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwalt, D. J.; Devilliers, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Most investigations of the muon arrival time distribution in EAS during the past decade made use of parameters which can collectively be called rise time parameters. The rise time parameter T sub A/B is defined as the time taken for the integrated pulse from a detector to rise from A% to B% of its full amplitude. The use of these parameters are usually restricted to the determination of the radial dependence thereof. This radial dependence of the rise time parameters are usually taken as a signature of the particle interaction characteristics in the shower. As these parameters have a stochastic nature, it seems reasonable that one should also take notice of this aspect of the rise time parameters. A statistical approach to rise time parameters is presented.

  20. Scaling of X pinches from 1 MA to 6 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Wenger, David Franklin; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-09-01

    This final report for Project 117863 summarizes progress made toward understanding how X-pinch load designs scale to high currents. The X-pinch load geometry was conceived in 1982 as a method to study the formation and properties of bright x-ray spots in z-pinch plasmas. X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA currents were found to have source sizes of 1 micron, temperatures >1 keV, lifetimes of 10-100 ps, and densities >0.1 times solid density. These conditions are believed to result from the direct magnetic compression of matter. Physical models that capture the behavior of 0.2 MA X pinches predict more extreme parameters at currents >1 MA. This project developed load designs for up to 6 MA on the SATURN facility and attempted to measure the resulting plasma parameters. Source sizes of 5-8 microns were observed in some cases along with evidence for high temperatures (several keV) and short time durations (<500 ps).

  1. Diet of Theropithecus from 4 to 1 Ma in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cerling, Thure E.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Jablonski, Nina G.; Leakey, Meave G.; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo

    2013-01-01

    Theropithecus was a common large-bodied primate that co-occurred with hominins in many Plio-Pleistocene deposits in East and South Africa. Stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from T. brumpti (4.0–2.5 Ma) and T. oswaldi (2.0–1.0 Ma) in Kenya show that the earliest Theropithecus at 4 Ma had a diet dominated by C4 resources. Progressively, this genus increased the proportion of C4-derived resources in its diet and by 1.0 Ma, had a diet that was nearly 100% C4-derived. It is likely that this diet was comprised of grasses or sedges; stable isotopes cannot, by themselves, give an indication of the relative importance of leaves, seeds, or underground storage organs to the diet of this primate. Theropithecus throughout the 4- to 1-Ma time range has a diet that is more C4-based than contemporaneous hominins of the genera Australopithecus, Kenyanthropus, and Homo; however, Theropithecus and Paranthropus have similar proportions of C4-based resources in their respective diets. PMID:23733967

  2. Diet of Theropithecus from 4 to 1 Ma in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Jablonski, Nina G.; Leakey, Meave G.; Kyalo Manthi, Fredrick

    2013-06-01

    Theropithecus was a common large-bodied primate that co-occurred with hominins in many Plio-Pleistocene deposits in East and South Africa. Stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from T. brumpti (4.0-2.5 Ma) and T. oswaldi (2.0-1.0 Ma) in Kenya show that the earliest Theropithecus at 4 Ma had a diet dominated by C4 resources. Progressively, this genus increased the proportion of C4-derived resources in its diet and by 1.0 Ma, had a diet that was nearly 100% C4-derived. It is likely that this diet was comprised of grasses or sedges; stable isotopes cannot, by themselves, give an indication of the relative importance of leaves, seeds, or underground storage organs to the diet of this primate. Theropithecus throughout the 4- to 1-Ma time range has a diet that is more C4-based than contemporaneous hominins of the genera Australopithecus, Kenyanthropus, and Homo; however, Theropithecus and Paranthropus have similar proportions of C4-based resources in their respective diets.

  3. Identification and discrimination of rise time: is it categorical or noncategorical?

    PubMed

    Kewley-Port, D; Pisoni, D B

    1984-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that rise time of sawtooth waveforms may be discriminated in either a categorical-like manner under some experimental conditions or according to Weber's law under other conditions. In the present experiments, rise time discrimination was examined with two experimental procedures: the traditional labeling and ABX tasks used in speech perception studies and an adaptive tracking procedure used in psychophysical studies. Rise time varied from 0 to 80 ms in 10-ms intervals for sawtooth signals of 1-s duration. Discrimination functions for subjects who simply discriminated the signals on any basis whatsoever as well as functions for subjects who practiced labeling the endpoint stimuli as " pluck " and "bow" before ABX discrimination were not categorical in the ABX task. In the adaptive tracking procedure, the Weber fraction obtained from the jnds of rise time was found to be a constant above 20-ms rise time. The results from the two discrimination paradigms were then compared by predicting a jnd for rise time from the ABX discrimination data by reference to the underlying psychometric function. Using this method of analysis, discrimination results from previous studies were shown to be quite similar to the discrimination results observed in this study. Taken together the results demonstrate clearly that rise time discrimination of sawtooth signals follows predictions derived from Weber's law.

  4. Coefficient of restitution dependence of intruder rise time in two-dimensional Brazil-nut effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesuma, T.; Aji, D. P. Purwa; Viridi, S.; Suprijadi

    2016-04-01

    Brazil-Nut Effect (BNE) is a granular material phenomenon, where larger grains (usually known as intruder) rise to the top when the granular system vibrated. We observe a single intruder rise time of BNE phenomenon in a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of hard spheres collision scheme. Some experiments have shown that some granular properties, such as size and density ratio, play an important role to determine the rise time. However, other property, such as coefficients of restitution, is considered not to have a measurable impact. We explore the intruder inelasticity dependence of the rise time by varying its coefficient of restitution. We found that the intruder rise time tends to be flat for relatively high coefficient of restitution and increases exponentially below a certain deflecting point for low coefficient of restitution. This holds for specific mass ratio.

  5. Influence of voltage rise time on microwave generation in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua

    2015-10-15

    In relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs), although the slow wave structure (SWS) and electron beam determine the main characteristics of beam-wave interaction, many other factors can also significantly affect the microwave generation process. This paper investigates the influence of voltage rise time on beam-wave interaction in RBWOs. Preliminary analysis and PIC simulations demonstrate if the voltage rise time is moderately long, the microwave frequency will gradually increase during the startup process until the voltage reaches its amplitude, which can be explained by the dispersion relation. However, if the voltage rise time is long enough, the longitudinal resonance of the finitely-long SWS will force the RBWO to work with unwanted longitudinal modes for a while and then gradually hop to the wanted longitudinal mode, and this will lead to an impure microwave frequency spectrum. Besides, a longer voltage rise time will delay the startup process and thus lead to a longer microwave saturation time. And if unwanted longitudinal modes are excited due to long voltage rise time, the microwave saturation time will be further lengthened. Therefore, the voltage rise time of accelerators adopted in high power microwave technology should not be too long in case unwanted longitudinal modes are excited.

  6. The role of interplanetary shock orientation on SC/SI rise time and geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumaran, R.; Veenadhari, B.; Ebihara, Y.; Kumar, Sandeep; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.

    2017-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks interact with the Earth's magnetosphere, resulting in compression of the magnetosphere which in turn increases the Earth's magnetic field termed as Sudden commencement/Sudden impulse (SC/SI). Apart from IP shock speed and solar wind dynamic pressure, IP shock orientation angle also plays a major role in deciding the SC rise time. In the present study, the IP shock orientation angle and SC/SI rise time for 179 IP shocks are estimated which occurred during solar cycle 23. More than 50% of the Shock orientations are in the range of 140°-160°. The SC/SI rise time decreases with the increase in the orientation angle and IP shock speed. In this work, the type of IP shocks i.e., Radio loud (RL) and Radio quiet (RQ) are examined in connection with SC/SI rise time. The RL associated IP shock speeds show a better correlation than RQ shocks with SC/SI rise time irrespective of the orientation angle. Magnetic Cloud (MC) associated shocks dominate in producing less rise time when compared to Ejecta (EJ) shocks. Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used for three different IP shock orientation categories to see the importance of orientation angle in determining the geoeffectiveness. Simulations results reveal that shocks hitting parallel to the magnetosphere are more geoeffective as compared to oblique shocks by means of change in magnetic field, pressure and Field Aligned Current (FAC).

  7. CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE THROUGH RISE TIMES AND PEAK LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Maeda, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the diversity in the wind density, supernova ejecta energy, and ejecta mass in Type IIn supernovae based on their rise times and peak luminosities. We show that the wind density and supernova ejecta properties can be estimated independently if both the rise time and peak luminosity are observed. The peak luminosity is mostly determined by the supernova properties and the rise time can be used to estimate the wind density. We find that the ejecta energies of Type IIn supernovae need to vary by factors of 0.2-5 from the average if their ejecta masses are similar. The diversity in the observed rise times indicates that their wind densities vary by factors of 0.2-2 from the average. We show that Type IIn superluminous supernovae should have not only large wind density but also large ejecta energy and/or small ejecta mass to explain their large luminosities and the rise times at the same time. We also note that shock breakout does not necessarily occur in the wind even if it is optically thick, except for the case of superluminous supernovae, and we analyze the observational data both with and without assuming that the shock breakout occurs in the dense wind of Type IIn supernovae.

  8. Rise time perception in children with reading and combined reading and language difficulties.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Rachel L; Manis, Franklin R

    2013-01-01

    Using a non-speech-specific measure of prosody, rise time perception, Goswami and her colleagues have found that individuals with dyslexia perform significantly worse than nonimpaired readers. Studies have also found that children and adults with specific language impairment were impaired on these tasks. Despite the high comorbidity of these disorders, only one study has assessed rise time sensitivity in children with comorbid reading and oral language difficulties. The authors further examined rise time sensitivity in children with both reading and oral language difficulties. They compared performance on rise time perception tasks between 18 children with reading difficulties, 15 children with combined reading and oral language difficulties, and 17 chronological age-matched controls. The authors found a significant interaction between group and performance on auditory tasks. Further tests revealed that chronological age-matched controls were significantly better on the rise time measures compared to both groups of children with reading difficulties. Performance between the groups of children with reading difficulties did not significantly differ.

  9. Dependence of current rise time on laser-triggered discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soowon; Kamohara, Takashi; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Katsuki, Sunao

    2016-07-01

    A powerful, stable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source is the most important component for EUV lithography and EUV mask inspection. Here, we investigate the characteristics of laser-triggered discharge plasma at three different current rise times, fast, middle and slow. A height-adjustable coaxial birdcage was used to change circuit inductance. The rise time was varied between 30 ns-55 ns with peak current of 10 kA. The time-integrated EUV (at 13.5 nm in 2% bandwidth) intensity for the fast rise time was found to be 55% stronger than that of the slow rise time despite its lower energy. A high-speed Mach-Zehnder interferogram and visible imaging of the pinch plasma were employed to discuss plasma compression processes qualitatively and quantitatively. Also discharge produced debris was investigated using a silicon-crystal witness plate. The fast rise current was found to have advantages such as lower debris, higher EUV intensity, and possibility of suppressing instability in comparison with the slow rise time. As expected, total debris amounts lessened proportionally to the primary charged energy, as found from a comparison of fast and slow rise currents.

  10. Extremum seeking-based optimization of high voltage converter modulator rise-time

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Bland, Michael; Krstic, Miroslav; Audia, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    We digitally implement an extremum seeking (ES) algorithm, which optimizes the rise time of the output voltage of a high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) HVCM test stand by iteratively, simultaneously tuning the first 8 switching edges of each of the three phase drive waveforms (24 variables total). We achieve a 50 μs rise time, which is reduction in half compared to the 100 μs achieved at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Considering that HVCMs typically operate with an output voltage of 100 kV, with a 60Hz repetition rate, the 50 μs rise time reduction will result in very significant energy savings. The ES algorithm will prove successful, despite the noisy measurements and cost calculations, confirming the theoretical results that the algorithm is not affected by noise whose frequency components are independent of the perturbing frequencies.

  11. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  12. Rise-Time of FRET-Acceptor Fluorescence Tracks Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Uniform labeling of proteins with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes with an equimolar ratio is paramount for accurate determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies. In practice, however, the labeled protein population contains donor-labeled molecules that have no corresponding acceptor. These FRET-inactive donors contaminate the donor fluorescence signal, which leads to underestimation of FRET efficiencies in conventional fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based FRET experiments. Such contamination is avoided if FRET efficiencies are extracted from the rise time of acceptor fluorescence upon donor excitation. The reciprocal value of the rise time of acceptor fluorescence is equal to the decay rate of the FRET-active donor fluorescence. Here, we have determined rise times of sensitized acceptor fluorescence to study the folding of double-labeled apoflavodoxin molecules and show that this approach tracks the characteristics of apoflavodoxinʼs complex folding pathway. PMID:25535076

  13. Rise Time of the Simulated VERITAS 12 m Davies-Cotton Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    White, Richard J.

    2005-02-21

    The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) will utilise Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) based on a Davies-Cotton design with f-number f/1.0 to detect cosmic gamma-rays. Unlike a parabolic reflector, light from the Davies-Cotton does not arrive isochronously at the camera. Here the effect of the telescope geometry on signal rise-time is examined. An almost square-pulse arrival time profile with a rise time of 1.7 ns is found analytically and confirmed through simulation.

  14. Transistorized Marx bank pulse circuit provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, E. A.; Lewis, R. N.

    1968-01-01

    Base-triggered avalanche transistor circuit used in a Marx bank pulser configuration provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time. The avalanche-mode transistors replace conventional spark gaps in the Marx bank. The delay time from an input signal to the output signal to the output is typically 6 nanoseconds.

  15. Rise Time. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W.

    The rise time test (along with the settleometer procedure) is used to monitor sludge behavior in the secondary clarifier of an activated sludge system. The test monitors the effect of the nitrification/denitrification process and aids the operator in determining optimum clarifier sludge detention time and, to some extent, optimum degree of…

  16. Effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra measured by proportional gas counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Tanaka, M.; Isozumi, S.; Isozumi, Y.; Tosaki, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Air exerts a negative effect on radiation detection using a gas counter because oxygen contained in air has a high electron attachment coefficient and can trap electrons from electron-ion pairs created by ionization from incident radiation in counting gas. This reduces radiation counts. The present study examined the influence of air on energy and rise-time spectra measurements using a proportional gas counter. In addition, a decompression procedure method was proposed to reduce the influence of air and its effectiveness was investigated. For the decompression procedure, the counting gas inside the gas counter was decompressed below atmospheric pressure before radiation detection. For the spectrum measurement, methane as well as various methane and air mixtures were used as the counting gas to determine the effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra. Results showed that the decompression procedure was effective for reducing or eliminating the influence of air on spectra measurement using a proportional gas counter. (authors)

  17. Fast Rise Time and High Voltage Nanosecond Pulses at High Pulse Repetition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth E.; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is conducting research to decrease the rise time and increase the output voltage of the EHT Nanosecond Pulser product line, which allows for independently, user-adjustable output voltage (0 - 20 kV), pulse width (20 - 500 ns), and pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz). The goals are to develop higher voltage pulses (50 - 60 kV), decrease the rise time from 20 to below 10 ns, and maintain the high pulse repetition capabilities. These new capabilities have applications to pseudospark generation, corona production, liquid discharges, and nonlinear transmission line driving for microwave production. This work is supported in part by the US Navy SBIR program.

  18. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  19. Extremum seeking-based optimization of high voltage converter modulator rise-time

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Bland, Michael; Krstic, Miroslav; ...

    2013-02-01

    We digitally implement an extremum seeking (ES) algorithm, which optimizes the rise time of the output voltage of a high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) HVCM test stand by iteratively, simultaneously tuning the first 8 switching edges of each of the three phase drive waveforms (24 variables total). We achieve a 50 μs rise time, which is reduction in half compared to the 100 μs achieved at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Considering that HVCMs typically operate with an output voltage of 100 kV, with a 60Hz repetitionmore » rate, the 50 μs rise time reduction will result in very significant energy savings. The ES algorithm will prove successful, despite the noisy measurements and cost calculations, confirming the theoretical results that the algorithm is not affected by noise whose frequency components are independent of the perturbing frequencies.« less

  20. Subjective response to sonic booms having different shapes, rise times, and durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify the subjective response of people to simulated outdoor sonic booms having different pressure signatures. The specific objectives of the experiments were to compare subjective response to sonic booms when described in terms of 'loudness' and 'annoyance'; to determine the ability of various noise metrics to predict subjective response to sonic booms; to determine the effects on subjective response of rise time, duration, and level; and to compare the subjective response to 'N-wave' sonic boom signatures with the subjective response to 'minimized' sonic boom signatures. The experiments were conducted in a computer-controlled, man-rated sonic boom simulator capable of reproducing user-specified pressure signatures for a wide range of sonic boom parameters. One hundred and fifty sonic booms representing different combinations of two wave shapes, four rise times, seven durations, and three peak overpressures were presented to 36 test subjects in each experiment. The test subjects in the first experiment made judgments of 'loudness' while the test subjects in the second experiment judged 'annoyance.' Subjective response to sonic booms was the same whether expressed in terms of loudness or in terms of annoyance. Analyses of several different noise metrics indicated that A-weighted sound exposure level and Perceived Level were the best predictors of subjective response. Further analyses indicated that, of these two noise metrics, only Perceived Level completely accounted for the effects of wave shape, rise time, and peak overpressure. Neither metric fully accounted for the effect of duration. However, the magnitude of the duration effect was small over the very wide range of durations considered.

  1. Effect of stratification and geometrical spreading on sonic boom rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.; Hamilton, Mark F.; Blackstock, David T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation is to determine the effect of unsteadiness (not associated with turbulence) on rise time. The unsteadiness considered here is due to (1) geometrical spreading, (2) stratification, which includes variation in density, temperature, and relative humidity, and (3) N shaped waveform. A very general Burgers equation, which includes all these effects, is the propagation model for our study. The equation is solved by a new computational algorithm in which all the calculations are done in the time domain. The present paper is a progress report in which some of the factors contributing to unsteadiness are studied, namely geometrical spreading and variation in relative humidity. The work of Pierce and Kang, which motivated our study, is first reviewed. We proceed with a discussion of the Burgers equation model and the algorithm for solving the equation. Some comparison tests to establish the validity of the algorithm are presented. The algorithm is then used to determine the distance required for a steady-state shock, on encountering an abrupt change in relative humidity, to reach a new steady state based on the new humidity. It is found that the transition distance for plane shocks of amplitude 70 Pa is about 4 km when the change in relative humidity is 10 percent. Shocks of amplitude 140 Pa require less distance. The effect of spherical and cylindrical spreading is also considered. We demonstrate that a spreading shock wave never reaches steady state and that its rise time will be less than the equivalent steady state shock. Finally we show that an N wave has a slightly shorter rise time than a step shock of the same amplitude.

  2. DOI Determination by Rise Time Discrimination in Single-Ended Readout for TOF PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R.I.; Surti, S.; Karp, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical TOF PET systems achieve detection efficiency using thick crystals, typically of thickness 2–3cm. The resulting dispersion in interaction depths degrades spatial resolution for increasing radial positions due to parallax error. Furthermore, interaction depth dispersion results in time pickoff dispersion and thus in degraded timing resolution, and is therefore of added concern in TOF scanners. Using fast signal digitization, we characterize the timing performance, pulse shape and light output of LaBr3:Ce, CeBr3 and LYSO. Coincidence timing resolution is shown to degrade by ~50ps/cm for scintillator pixels of constant cross section and increasing length. By controlling irradiation depth in a scintillator pixel, we show that DOI-dependence of time pickoff is a significant factor in the loss of timing performance in thick detectors. Using the correlated DOI-dependence of time pickoff and charge collection, we apply a charge-based correction to the time pickoff, obtaining improved coincidence timing resolution of <200ps for a uniform 4×4×30mm3 LaBr3 pixel. In order to obtain both DOI identification and improved timing resolution, we design a two layer LaBr3[5%Ce]/LaBr3[30%Ce] detector of total size 4×4×30mm3, exploiting the dependence of scintillator rise time on [Ce] in LaBr3:Ce. Using signal rise time to determine interaction layer, excellent interaction layer discrimination is achieved, while maintaining coincidence timing resolution of <250ps and energy resolution <7% using a R4998 PMT. Excellent layer separation and timing performance is measured with several other commercially-available TOF photodetectors, demonstrating the practicality of this design. These results indicate the feasibility of rise time discrimination as a technique for measuring event DOI while maintaining sensitivity, timing and energy performance, in a well-known detector architecture. PMID:24403611

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  4. Rise time of inverted triangular prism intruder in vibrating granular bed: Experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, N.; Adriani, I. K.; Baladram, M. S.; Viridi, S.

    2012-05-01

    Experiment results and a qualitative model of the phenomenon called Brazil nut effect (BNE) with inverted triangular prism are reported in this work. The model is constructed by considering some forces (earth gravitational force, buoyant force, and fluid viscous force) and using Newton's second law of motion. The rise time of BNE T is defined as time needed for the intruder to be on granular surface with all of his parts (no part is still immersed in the granular bed). One side of the triangular base of the intruder l is varied from 1.5 to 5 cm with other two sides are kept in constant values (1 and 3 cm). It has been observed in experiment that l with value 3-4 cm gives the smaller rise time. Plot of T versus l has the form of concave up parabolic curve with minimum lies at l between 3-4 cm. This observation has been confirmed by the proposed model with the same order of magnitude and similar curve trend.

  5. A hybrid model for simulation of secondary electron emission in plasma immersion ion implantation under different pulse rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Navab Safa, N. Ghomi, H.

    2015-02-15

    A hybrid fluid Particle in Cell–Monte Carlo Collision (PiC–MCC) model is presented to study the effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma immersion ion implantation process under different pulse rise time. The model describes the temporal evolution of various parameters of plasma such as ion density, ion velocity, secondary electron density, and secondary electron current for different rise times. A 3D–3 V PiC–MCC model is developed to simulate the secondary electrons which are emitted from the sample surface while the plasma ions and electrons are treated using a 1D fluid model. The simulation results indicate that the secondary electron density and secondary electron current increase as the rise time decreases. The main differences between the results for different rise times are found during the initial phase of the pulse. The results are explained through studying the fundamental parameters of plasma.

  6. SN 2008iy: an unusual Type IIn Supernova with an enduring 400-d rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. A.; Silverman, J. M.; Butler, N. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Chornock, R.; Filippenko, A. V.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Klein, C. R.; Li, W.; Nugent, P. E.; Smith, N.; Steele, T. N.

    2010-05-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Type IIn supernova (SN) 2008iy. SN 2008iy showed an unprecedentedly long rise time of ~400 d, making it the first known SN to take significantly longer than 100 d to reach peak optical luminosity. The peak absolute magnitude of SN 2008iy was Mr ~ -19.1 mag, and the total radiated energy over the first ~700 d was ~2 × 1050 erg. Spectroscopically, SN 2008iy is very similar to the Type IIn SN 1988Z at late times and, like SN 1988Z, it is a luminous X-ray source (both SNe had an X-ray luminosity LX > 1041 ergs-1). SN 2008iy has a growing near-infrared excess at late times similar to several other SNe IIn. The Hα emission-line profile of SN 2008iy shows a narrow P Cygni absorption component, implying a pre-SN wind speed of ~100kms-1. We argue that the luminosity of SN 2008iy is powered via the interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense, clumpy circumstellar medium. The ~400-d rise time can be understood if the number density of clumps increases with distance over a radius ~1.7 × 1016cm from the progenitor. This scenario is possible if the progenitor experienced an episodic phase of enhanced mass loss <1 century prior to explosion or if the progenitor wind speed increased during the decades before core collapse. We favour the former scenario, which is reminiscent of the eruptive mass-loss episodes observed for luminous blue variable (LBV) stars. The progenitor wind speed and increased mass-loss rates serve as further evidence that at least some, and perhaps all, Type IIn SNe experience LBV-like eruptions shortly before core collapse. We also discuss the host galaxy of SN 2008iy, a subluminous dwarf galaxy, and offer a few reasons why the recent suggestion that unusual, luminous SNe preferentially occur in dwarf galaxies may be the result of observational biases.

  7. Considerations for human exposure standards for fast-rise-time high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses.

    PubMed

    Merritt, J H; Kiel, J L; Hurt, W D

    1995-06-01

    Development of new emitter systems capable of producing high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses with very fast rise times and narrow pulse widths is continuing. Such directed energy weapons systems will be used in the future to defeat electronically vulnerable targets. Human exposures to these pulses can be expected during testing and operations. Development of these technologies for radar and communications purposes has the potential for wider environmental exposure, as well. Current IEEE C95.1-1991 human exposure guidelines do not specifically address these types of pulses, though limits are stated for pulsed emissions. The process for developing standards includes an evaluation of the relevant bioeffects data base. A recommendation has been made that human exposure to ultrashort electromagnetic pulses that engender electromagnetic transients, called precursor waves, should be avoided. Studies that purport to show the potential for tissue damage induced by such pulses were described. The studies cited in support of the recommendation were not relevant to the issues of tissue damage by propagated pulses. A number of investigations are cited in this review that directly address the biological effects of electromagnetic pulses. These studies have not shown evidence of tissue damage as a result of exposure to high-peak-power pulsed microwaves. It is our opinion that the current guidelines are sufficiently protective for human exposure to these pulses.

  8. A 200 kV fast rise time, low jitter, trigger system with magnetic pulse sharpener

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, N.C.; Coleman, M.D.; Ramrus, A.; Earley, L.M.; Downing, J.N.; Reisch, H.H.; Caudill, L.D.; Eversol, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    The DARHT Facility is being designed at Los Alamos national Laboratory to produce high resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIA), each in the range of 16 to 20 MeV, will be used to produce intense bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses of short duration (60 ns flat top). Each LIA will produce a 3 kA, high brightness, electron beam using a 4 MeV injector and a series of 250 kV induction cells. Technology demonstration of key accelerator subsystems is under progress at the DARHT Integrated Test Stand (ITS). The eight inductions cells present in the ITS are driven by a Maxwell prototype Induction Cell Pulsed Power supply (ICPPS) which provides 250 kV, 70 ns pulses via four Blumieins. Each Blumiein drives two cells and is triggered using independently controlled trigger units. This turnkey DARHT Trigger System, consisting of four separate trigger units, provides 200 kV trigger pulses with low jitter and fast rise time to each of the four Blumiein coaxial spark gaps. Details of the trigger system design and results obtained during extensive testing at Maxwell are described.

  9. Studies of Al and W wire array z-pinches, and the role of ``magnetic bubbles'' in energy deposition at 1 MA Cobra generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V.; Greenly, J.; Velikovich, A.

    2005-10-01

    Implosions of cylindrical arrays with eight 12.5 μm Al or 5.1 μm W wires were studied on the 1MA, 100-150 ns rise time COBRA generator. X-ray and EUV detectors, time-gated cameras, spectrometers, backlighters and electrical diagnostics were used. Total radiation yieldsof 2.8 and 3.7 kJ, and total radiated powers of 15 GW and 25 GW were measured for Al and W, respectively. The keV yield for W arrays was lower than for Al. The Al spectra have shown Te from 200 eV to 300 eV. X-ray spectra from W arrays included very weak spectral features that were compared with results from W/Mo X-pinch experiments. Relatively uniform plasma columns (life-time 5-10 ns) were observed on time-gated images during the initial implosion stage for both Al and W. Studies of the possible role of ``magnetic bubbles'' on energy deposition were initiated based on the plasma resistance compared with the nonlinear resistance predicted by theory, total radiation yield, and the time-gated and backlighting images. This work was sponsored by NNSA through DOE Coop. Agreement DE-F03-02NA00057 and in part by the DOE/ NNSA under UNR grant DE-FC52-01NV14050.

  10. Learning Novel Phonological Representations in Developmental Dyslexia: Associations with Basic Auditory Processing of Rise Time and Phonological Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jennifer M.; Goswami, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia are known to have impaired lexical phonological representations. Here, we explore associations between learning new phonological representations, phonological awareness, and sensitivity to amplitude envelope onsets (rise time). We show that individual differences in learning novel phonological…

  11. Turbulence Scales, Rise Times, Caustics, and the Simulation of Sonic Boom Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Allan D.

    1996-01-01

    The general topic of atmospheric turbulence effects on sonic boom propagation is addressed with especial emphasis on taking proper and efficient account of the contributions of the portion oi the turbulence that is associated with extremely high wavenumber components. The recent work reported by Bart Lipkens in his doctoral thesis is reexamined to determine whether the good agreement between his measured rise times with the 1971 theory of the author is fortuitous. It is argued that Lipken's estimate of the distance to the first caustic was a gross overestimate because of the use of a sound speed correlation function shaped like a gaussian curve. In particular, it is argued that the expected distance to the first caustic varies with the kinematic viscosity nu and the energy epsilon dissipated per unit mass per unit time, and the sound speed c as : d(sub first caustic) = nu(exp 7/12) c(exp 2/3)/ epsilon(exp 5/12)(nu x epsilon/c(exp 4))(exp a), where the exponent a is greater than -7/12 and can be argued to be either O or 1/24. In any event, the surprising aspect of the relationship is that it actually goes to zero as the viscosity goes to zero with s held constant. It is argued that the apparent overabundance of caustics can be grossly reduced by a general computational and analytical perspective that partitions the turbulence into two parts, divided by a wavenumber k(sub c). Wavenumbers higher than kc correspond to small-scale turbulence, and the associated turbulence can be taken into account by a renormalization of the ambient sound speed so that the result has a small frequency dependence that results from a spatial averaging over of the smaller-scale turbulent fluctuations. Selection of k(sub c). can be made so large that only a very small number of caustics are encountered if one adopts the premise that the frequency dispersion of pulses is caused by that part of the turbulence spectrum which lies in the inertial range originally predicted by Kolmogoroff. The

  12. Diversity of Decline-Rate-Corrected Type 1a Supernova Rise times:One Mode or Two?

    SciTech Connect

    Strovink, Mark

    2007-05-01

    B-band light-curve rise times for eight unusually well-observed nearby Type Ia supernova (SNe) are fitted by a newly developed template-building algorithm, using light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. From the available literature, photometric BVRI data collected over many months, including the earliest points, are reconciled, combined, and fitted to a unique time of explosion for each SN. On average, after they are corrected for light-curve decline rate, three SNe rise in 18.81 {+-} 0.36 days, while five SNe rise in 16.64 {+-} 0.21 days. If all eight SNe are sampled from a single parent population (a hypothesis not favored by statistical tests), the rms intrinsic scatter of the decline-rate-corrected SN rise time is 0.96{sub -0.25}{sup +0.52} days--a first measurement of this dispersion. The corresponding global mean rise time is 17.44 {+-} 0.39 days, where the uncertainty is dominated by intrinsic variance. This value is {approx}2 days shorter than two published averages that nominally are twice as precise, though also based on small samples. When comparing high-z to low-z SN luminosities for determining cosmological parameters, bias can be introduced by use of a light-curve template with an unrealistic rise time. If the period over which light curves are sampled depends on z in a manner typical of current search and measurement strategies, a two-day discrepancy in template rise time can bias the luminosity comparison by {approx}0.03 magnitudes.

  13. Construction and Initial Tests of MAIZE: 1 MA LTD-Driven Z-Pinch *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Zier, J. C.; Tang, W.; French, D. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Johnston, M. D.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Kim, A. A.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    We report construction and initial testing of a 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver (LTD), The Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-pinch Experiments, (MAIZE). This machine, the first of its type to reach the USA, is based on the joint HCEI, Sandia Laboratories, and UM development effort. The compact LTD uses 80 capacitors and 40 spark gap switches, in 40 ``bricks'', to deliver 1 MA, 100 kV pulses with 70 ns risetime into a matched resistive load. Test results will be presented for a single brick and the full LTD. Design and construction will be presented of a low-inductance MITL. Experimental research programs under design and construction at UM include: a) Studies of Magneto-Raleigh-Taylor Instability of planar foils, and b) Vacuum convolute studies including cathode and anode plasma. Theory and simulation results will be presented for these planned experiments. Initial experimental designs and moderate-current feasibility experiments will be discussed. *Research supported by U. S. DoE through Sandia National Laboratories award document numbers 240985, 768225, 790791 and 805234 to the UM. MRG supported by NNSA Fellowship and JCZ supported by NPSC Fellowship / Sandia National Labs.

  14. The 1 Ma Lake Bosumtwi (West Africa) Paleoclimate Record: Comparisons to Marine and Polar Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, J. A.; Shanahan, T. M.; King, J. W.; Overpeck, J. T.; Scholz, C. A.; Heil, C.; Forman, S. L.; Amoako, P. Y.

    2007-12-01

    Lake Bosumtwi is a hydrologically closed lake occupying a 1.07 Ma impact crater in Ghana, West Africa. The lake lies beneath the path of the seasonal migration of the ITCZ and therefore can provide a sedimentary record of monsoon variability in West Africa. Scientific drilling recovered a 291-m long sediment section that spans the full 1 Ma history of the lake. This long continental record is ideal for comparison to long marine and ice-core records at both glacial-interglacial and abrupt-change timescales. Oxygen-isotope stratigraphy, derived from calcareous fossils, often provides age control and a way to place individual marine sediment cores into a global stratigraphic framework. Lacking a direct tie-in to the marine oxygen-isotope stratigraphy, individual lacustrine basins can present challenges for global correlation. Through radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence and paleomagnetic dating, limited age control has been established for the 1 Ma Lake Bosumtwi sediment sequence. Within a Bosumtwi sediment sequence that is mostly laminated occur intervals of non-laminated sediment having increased density, decreased organic content and a high-coercivity magnetic mineral assemblage. Some of these massive layers contain slump-folding and intraformational clasts. These lithologies are interpreted to represent lake-level lowstands when a diminished West African summer monsoon resulted in decreased moisture balance and lake-level regression. Some Bosumtwi lake-level lowstands match intervals of increased sea surface salinity in the Gulf of Guinea resulting from reduced river discharge (Weldeab et al. 2007, Science, 316, 1303-1307). However, during other intervals (MIS2) there are differences between the two records. Corresponding to glacial stages and stadials, increased amounts of high-coercivity magnetic minerals are present in the Lake Bosumtwi sediment. Elevated aerosol dust export from arid Sahel sources, possibly accompanied by enhanced magnetic

  15. MOSFET solid state switching circuit improves the 0 to 99% rise time for framing camera deflection electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, A.T.; Thomas, S.

    1996-09-01

    We have improved the 0 to 99% rise time voltage on our 2 frame deflection plates from 160 to 65 nS with the addition of a peaking circuit that works in conjunction with our primary 2 frame deflection circuitry. Our peaking technique has applications to other HV pulsers including those which must drive 51 ohm loads. Generally, rise time voltages are measured between 10 and 90%. To minimize the camera image blur resulting from the dynamic influence of deflection plate potentials acting on photocathode electrons, it was necessary to design a circuit that would rise from 0 to the 99% voltage level in under 100nS. Once this voltage was reached, it was necessary to stay within 1% of the attained voltage level for a duration of 1 uS. This was accomplished with the use of MOSFET solid state switching.

  16. Rise time reduction of thermal actuators operated in air and water through optimized pre-shaped open-loop driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Doll, J. C.; Loizeau, F.; Hosseini, N.; Peng, A. W.; Fantner, G. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Pruitt, B. L.

    2017-04-01

    Electrothermal actuators have many advantages compared to other actuators used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). They are simple to design, easy to fabricate and provide large displacements at low voltages. Low voltages enable less stringent passivation requirements for operation in liquid. Despite these advantages, thermal actuation is typically limited to a few kHz bandwidth when using step inputs due to its intrinsic thermal time constant. However, the use of pre-shaped input signals offers a route for reducing the rise time of these actuators by orders of magnitude. We started with an electrothermally actuated cantilever having an initial 10–90% rise time of 85 μs in air and 234 μs in water for a standard open-loop step input. We experimentally characterized the linearity and frequency response of the cantilever when operated in air and water, allowing us to obtain transfer functions for the two cases. We used these transfer functions, along with functions describing desired reduced rise-time system responses, to numerically simulate the required input signals. Using these pre-shaped input signals, we improved the open-loop 10–90% rise time from 85 μs to 3 μs in air and from 234 μs to 5 μs in water, an improvement by a factor of 28 and 47, respectively. Using this simple control strategy for MEMS electrothermal actuators makes them an attractive alternative to other high speed micromechanical actuators such as piezoelectric stacks or electrostatic comb structures which are more complex to design, fabricate, or operate.

  17. EARLY-PHASE PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITIONAL TYPE Ia SN 2012ht: DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON THE RISE TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Nogami, Daisaku; Maeda, Keiichi; Kawabata, Miho; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura; Tanaka, Masaomi; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Itoh, Ryosuke; Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Koichi; Kabashima, Fujio

    2014-02-20

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from –15.8 days to +49.1 days after B-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is Δm {sub 15}(B) = 1.39 ± 0.05 mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the ''transitional'' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at a very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the B-band maximum is estimated to be 17.6 ± 0.5 days and the time of the explosion is MJD 56277.98 ± 0.13. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the light curve can be fitted by a quadratic function, and shows no sign of a shock-heating component due to the interaction of the ejecta with a companion star. The rise time is significantly longer than that inferred for subluminous SNe such as SN 1991bg, which suggests that a progenitor and/or explosion mechanism of transitional SNe Ia are more similar to normal SNe Ia rather than to subluminous SNe Ia.

  18. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  19. UV Laser Diagnostics of the 1-MA Z-pinch Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Altemara, S. D.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Haboub, A.

    2009-01-21

    The 532 nm laser diagnostic set at the Zebra generator shows the details of the ablation and stagnation phases in cylindrical, planar, and star-like wire arrays but it cannot show the structure of the stagnated z-pinch and the implosion in small diameter loads, 1-3 mm in diameter. The absorption increment and the refraction angle of the 532 nm laser, when passing through the plasma, are too great to obtain quality images. An ultraviolet probing beam at the wavelength of 266 nm was developed to study small-diameter loads and to investigate the structure of the 1-MA z-pinch. The UV radiation has a much smaller absorption increment and refraction angles in plasmas than the 532 nm light and allows for better imaging of the z-pinch plasmas. Estimates showed that UV probing would be able to probe the high-density z-pinch plasma in experiments on the Zebra generator, and the early results of UV probing on the Zebra generator have shown promise.

  20. Development of the 50 TW laser for joint experiments with 1 MA z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiewior, P. P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Chalyy, O.

    2010-08-01

    A 50 TW high-intensity laser (aka "Leopard" laser) was developed for experiments with the 1 MA z-pinch generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The laser produces short pulses of 0.35 ps; energy is 15 J. Long pulses are 1 ns; energy is 30 J. The output beam diameter is 80 mm. The Leopard laser applies chirped pulse amplification technology. The laser is based on the 130 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator, Öffner-type stretcher, Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier, mixed Nd:glass rod and disk amplifiers, and vacuum grating compressor. An adaptive optics system ameliorates focusing ability and augments the repetition rate. Two beam terminals are available for experiments: in the vacuum chamber of the z-pinch generator (aka "Zebra"), and a laser-only vacuum chamber (aka "Phoenix" chamber). The Leopard laser coupled to the Zebra z-pinch generator is a powerful diagnostic tool for dense z-pinch plasma. We outline the status, design, architecture and parameters of the Leopard laser, and its coupling to Zebra. We present the methods of laser-based z-pinch plasma diagnostics, which are under development at the University of Nevada, Reno.

  1. Development of laser-based diagnostics for 1-MA z-pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Wiewior, P.; Presura, R.; Kindel, J. M.; Shevelko, A. P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Haboub, A.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; Durmaz, T.

    2009-11-01

    The 50 TW Leopard laser coupled with the 1-MA Zebra generator was used for development of new diagnostics of z-pinch plasmas. Two plasma diagnostics are presented: an x-ray broadband backlighting for z-pinch absorption spectroscopy and parametric two-plasmon decay of the laser beam in dense z-pinch plasma. Implementation of new diagnostics on the Zebra generator and the first results are discussed. The absorption spectroscopy is based on backlighting of z-pinch plasma with a broadband x-ray radiation from a Sm laser plasma. Detailed analysis of the absorption spectra yields the electron temperature and density of z-pinch plasma at the non-radiative stage. The parametric two-plasmon decay of intensive laser radiation generates 3/2φ and 1/2φ harmonics. These harmonics can be used to derive a temperature of z-pinch plasma with the electron density near the quarter of critical plasma density.

  2. Study of Laser Ablation Plumes in 1-MA Z-Pinch Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Austin; Dutra, Eric; McKee, Erik; Beatty, Cuyler; Darling, Timothy; Ivanov, Vladimir; Wiewior, Piotr; Chalyy, Oleksandr; Asttanovitskiy, Alexey; Nalajala, Vidya; Dmitriev, Oleg; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Laser ablation plumes have been explored as a vehicle for pinch experiments and pulsed neutron production at the NTF research facility. The laser ablation plume is generated by striking a target with a 20J, 0.8ns laser pulse from the Leopard laser. The plume is allowed to expand and then pinched by a 1 MA current generated by the Zebra pulsed power machine. The plume is compact and pre-ionized, offering an advantage over neutral gas puffs and wire arrays. When used with deuterated-polyethylene targets, pinched ablation plumes can generate a pulse of 1011 neutrons with a 35 ns pulse width. A laser-based 532 nm Mach-Zender interferometer and 16 frame imaging with 5 ns temporal resolution are used to characterize plasma density and observe implosion dynamics. Cathode activation was also measured post shot and has been used to determine the deuteron currents produced in the shots. Results and discussion are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE NNSA Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0002075 and National Securities Technologies, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946/subcontract No. 165819.

  3. Climatic change record during the past 1 Ma of the Lake Biwa sediments, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, K.; Hayashida, A.; Danhara, T.

    2010-12-01

    Lake Biwa is the largest and oldest lake in Japan. The drilled core in 1982-1983 (i.e., the 1400 m core) has revealed ~900 m lake and terrestrial sediments overlying the basement rock (Takemura, 1990). The age data obtained from fission-track dating and tephra correlation indicated the discontinuity of the sedimentary sequence in present Lake Biwa. Recently, the doubt on discontinuity of the sequence in present Lake Biwa was completely cleared by the reinvestigation of the fission-track ages and tephra identification of Danhara et al. (2010). Improvements on fission track timescale have successfully identified the paleomagnetic data from middle Matuyama reversed Epoch including the Jaramillo event, determining time coverage of the Lake Biwa sediment as ~1.5 Ma. A highly linear sediment accumulation rate curve is thus given to the 900 m-deep Lake Biwa sediment. This secures the stable sedimentary environment of the basin, and the significance of Lake Biwa sediment as a good recorder for paleoclimate changes. Lake Biwa is, therefore, an ideal terrestrial site to explore paleoclimate and tectonic history during the past 1 Ma of East Asia. We summarize the data from multidiscipline approaches of pollen, diatom, geochemistry and paleomagnetic analyses using the drilling core in 1982-1983.

  4. Calmodulin Binds a Highly Extended HIV-1 MA Protein That Refolds Upon Its Release

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James E.; Chow, John Y.H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Duff, Anthony P.; Hamilton, William A.; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) expression is upregulated upon HIV-1 infection and interacts with proteins involved in viral processing, including the multifunctional HIV-1 MA protein. We present here the results of studies utilizing small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation that, when considered in the light of earlier fluorescence and NMR data, show CaM binds MA in an extended open-clamp conformation via interactions with two tryptophans that are widely spaced in sequence and space. The interaction requires a disruption of the MA tertiary fold such that MA becomes highly extended in a long snakelike conformation. The CaM-MA interface is extensive, covering ∼70% of the length of the MA such that regions known to be important in MA interactions with critical binding partners would be impacted. The CaM conformation is semiextended and as such is distinct from the classical CaM-collapse about short α-helical targets. NMR data show that upon dissociation of the CaM-MA complex, either by the removal of Ca2+ or increasing ionic strength, MA reforms its native tertiary contacts. Thus, we observe a high level of structural plasticity in MA that may facilitate regulation of its activities via intracellular Ca2+-signaling during viral processing. PMID:22947870

  5. The Effect of Driver Rise-Time on Pinch Current and its Impact on Plasma Focus Performance and Neutron Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; Welch, Dale

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have suggested that dense plasma focus (DPF) neutron yield increases with faster drivers [Decker NIMP 1986]. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP [Schmidt PRL 2012], we reproduce this trend in a kJ DPF [Ellsworth 2014], and demonstrate how driver rise time is coupled to neutron output. We implement a 2-D model of the plasma focus including self-consistent circuit-driven boundary conditions. Driver capacitance and voltage are varied to modify the current rise time, and anode length is adjusted so that run-in coincides with the peak current. We observe during run down that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities of the sheath shed blobs of plasma that remain in the inter-electrode gap during run in. This trailing plasma later acts as a low-inductance restrike path that shunts current from the pinch during maximum compression. While the MHD growth rate increases slightly with driver speed, the shorter anode of the fast driver allows fewer e-foldings and hence reduces the trailing mass between electrodes. As a result, the fast driver postpones parasitic restrikes and maintains peak current through the pinch during maximum compression. The fast driver pinch therefore achieves best simultaneity between its ion beam and peak target density, which maximizes neutron production. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Characteristics of a fast rise time power supply for a pulsed plasma reactor for chemical vapor destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, P.A.; Yamamoto, Toshiaki; Shofran, S.P.; Boss, C.B.; Nunez, C.M.; Ramsey, G.H.; Engels, R.L.

    1996-11-01

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages higher than can be obtained with dc. The resulting energetic plasma is effective for destroying a variety of molecules. The spark gap circuit configuration plays an important role in the effectiveness of the plasma generation. A single-gap circuit is effective for generating moderate peak voltages, but is limited by a multiple sparking phenomenon. A double-gap circuit can achieve equal peak voltages with every spark, but with a reduced number of pulses, compared to the single gap. Both configurations have an upper voltage imposed by the changing impedance of the reactor as voltage and frequency are varied. The pulse characteristics are reported for both types of circuits. The general performance of the reactors for destruction of some compounds with both circuits is also reported.

  7. RISE TIME DELAY DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1959-09-29

    A pulse-height discriminator for generating an output pulse when the accepted input pulse is approximately at its maximum value is described. A gating tube and a negative bias generator responsive to the derivative of the input pulse and means for impressing the output of the bias generator to at least one control electrode of the gating tube are included.

  8. Development of a novel voltage divider for measurement of sub-nanosecond rise time high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Senthil, K.; Singh, S. K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Sharma, Archana

    2016-02-01

    This paper is about the development of a copper sulphate based aqueous-electrolytic voltage divider for the measurement of high voltage pulses, 100 kV, with pulse widths of 1-2 ns and rise time <1 ns. Novel features are incorporated in the design of the divider, to meet the performance requirements for the application. Analytical calculations to justify design are described. Structural simulation of the divider is carried out using field wave simulation software to verify the effectiveness. A calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the divider. Results obtained during calibration are subjected to statistical analysis to determine the confidence of measurement. Details of design, analysis, and simulation are described in this paper.

  9. Extracting Short Rise-Time Velocity Profiles with Digital Down-Shift Analysis of Optically Up-Converted PDV Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abel Diaz, Nathan Riley, Cenobio Gallegos, Matthew Teel, Michael Berninger, Thomas W. Tunnell

    2010-09-08

    This work describes the digital down-shift (DDS) technique, a new method of extracting short rise-time velocity profiles in the analysis of optically up-converted PDV data. The DDS technique manipulates the PDV data by subtracting a constant velocity (i.e., the DDS velocity νDDS) from the velocity profile. DDS exploits the simple fact that the optically up-converted data ride on top of a base velocity (ν0, the apparent velocity at no motion) with a rapid rise to a high velocity (νf) of a few km/s or more. Consequently, the frequency content of the signal must describe a velocity profile that increases from ν0 to ν0 + νf. The DDS technique produces velocity reversals in the processed data before shock breakout when ν0 < νDDS < ν0 + νf. The DDS analysis process strategically selects specific DDS velocities (velocity at which the user down shifts the data) that produce anomalous reversals (maxima and/or minima), which are predictable and easy to identify in the mid-range of the data. Additional analysis determines when these maxima and minima occur. By successive application of the DDS technique and iterative analysis, velocity profiles are extracted as time as a function of velocity rather than as a function of time as it would be in a conventional velocity profile. Presented results include a description of DDS, velocity profiles extracted from laser-driven shock data with rise times of 200 ps or less, and a comparison with other techniques.

  10. Magnetic Piston Propagation in a 100-ns Plasma Opening Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, A.; Grabowski, C.; Chakrabarti, N.; Maron, Y.; Fruchtman, A.

    1998-11-01

    The propagation of a magnetic piston through the plasma of a 90-ns, 170-kA POS is observed by studying the electron density, magnetic field, and ion velocity evolution. For the prefilled plasma n_e=(2.2± 0.5)× 10^14 cm-3, and T_e=5.5± 1 eV. The plasma composition is studied from absolute line intensities and collisional-radiative calculations. Most of the plasma ions are protons (90% near the cathode) with the rest being mainly CIV. The Hall-MHD conditions are not fulfilled for our experiment and ion motion is significant. The 3D-resolved ne evolution during the current pulse is studied from the line intensities of ions doped in the plasma using laser evaporation, and the magnetic field from Zeeman splitting. A diagonal magnetic piston propagates from the generator towards the load at about half the proton Alfven velocity. The protons are specularly reflected by the piston, while the heavy ions cross the potential hill in the piston, acquiring a lower velocity. The proton reflection causes an increase of ne ahead of the piston, followed by a sharp (10-20 ns) and substantial drop in ne (to 10-50% from the initial value). The magnetic field distribution studied using chordal observation, and theoretical analysis of ne and the magnetic field evolution are presented.

  11. Rise time and formant transition duration in the discrimination of speech sounds: the Ba-Wa distinction in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Usha; Fosker, Tim; Huss, Martina; Mead, Natasha; Szucs, Dénes

    2011-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia have a specific difficulty with the neural representation of the sound structure (phonological structure) of speech. One likely cause of their difficulties with phonology is a perceptual difficulty in auditory temporal processing (Tallal, 1980). Tallal (1980) proposed that basic auditory processing of brief, rapidly successive acoustic changes is compromised in dyslexia, thereby affecting phonetic discrimination (e.g. discriminating /b/ from /d/) via impaired discrimination of formant transitions (rapid acoustic changes in frequency and intensity). However, an alternative auditory temporal hypothesis is that the basic auditory processing of the slower amplitude modulation cues in speech is compromised (Goswami et al., 2002). Here, we contrast children's perception of a synthetic speech contrast (ba/wa) when it is based on the speed of the rate of change of frequency information (formant transition duration) versus the speed of the rate of change of amplitude modulation (rise time). We show that children with dyslexia have excellent phonetic discrimination based on formant transition duration, but poor phonetic discrimination based on envelope cues. The results explain why phonetic discrimination may be allophonic in developmental dyslexia (Serniclaes et al., 2004), and suggest new avenues for the remediation of developmental dyslexia.

  12. High-voltage isolation transformer for sub-nanosecond rise time pulses constructed with annular parallel-strip transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Homma, Akira

    2011-07-01

    A novel annular parallel-strip transmission line was devised to construct high-voltage high-speed pulse isolation transformers. The transmission lines can easily realize stable high-voltage operation and good impedance matching between primary and secondary circuits. The time constant for the step response of the transformer was calculated by introducing a simple low-frequency equivalent circuit model. Results show that the relation between the time constant and low-cut-off frequency of the transformer conforms to the theory of the general first-order linear time-invariant system. Results also show that the test transformer composed of the new transmission lines can transmit about 600 ps rise time pulses across the dc potential difference of more than 150 kV with insertion loss of -2.5 dB. The measured effective time constant of 12 ns agreed exactly with the theoretically predicted value. For practical applications involving the delivery of synchronized trigger signals to a dc high-voltage electron gun station, the transformer described in this paper exhibited advantages over methods using fiber optic cables for the signal transfer system. This transformer has no jitter or breakdown problems that invariably occur in active circuit components.

  13. Measuring charge transport from transient photovoltage rise times. A new tool to investigate electron transport in nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Brian C; Bakker, Klaas; Kroeze, Jessica; Smit, Herman; Sommeling, Paul; Durrant, James R

    2006-08-31

    Charge transport rate at open-circuit potential (V(oc)) is proposed as a new characterization method for dye-sensitized (DS) and other nanostructured solar cells. At V(oc), charge density is flat and measurable, which simplifies quantitative comparison of transport and charge density. Transport measured at V(oc) also allows meaningful comparison of charge transport rates between different treatments, temperatures, and types of cells. However, in typical DS cells, charge transport rates at V(oc) often cannot be measured by photocurrent transients or modulation techniques due to RC limitations and/or recombination losses. To circumvent this limitation, we show that charge transport at V(oc) can be determined directly from the transient photovoltage rise time using a simple, zero-free-parameter model. This method is not sensitive to RC limitation or recombination losses. In trap limited devices, such as DS cells, the comparison of transport rates between different devices or conditions is only valid when the Fermi level in the limiting conductor is at the same distance from the band edge. We show how to perform such comparisons, correcting for conduction band shifts using the density of states (DOS) distribution determined from the same photovoltage transients. Last we show that the relationship between measured transport rate and measured charge density is consistent with the trap limited transport model.

  14. Scaling of Radiation Parameters of Planar and Compact Cylindrical Wire Arrays at the 1 MA Zebra Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, K. M.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Osborne, G. C.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2009-01-21

    Analysis is presented on scaling of radiated x-ray power, energy and implosion timing of single planar wire arrays (SPWA), double planar wire array (DPWA), and compact cylindrical wire array (CCWA) loads (diameter is 3 and 6 mm) of Mo and W with respect to current peak (0.8-1.4 MA), mass and array dimensions at 100 ns current pulse. Such scaling investigations are important for understanding the potential of these loads as an ICF radiation source{sup 7}. These data are used to identify promising directions to pursue with regard to highest x-ray output, smallest load size, and most consistent shot-to-shot performance. It is shown that W SPWA and DPWA total energy yield and peak power increased near-quadratically with current. DPWA scans of inter-planar gaps from 1.5 mm to 9 mm show an output maximum at 1.5 mm with decreasing output for 6 mm and 9 mm. A DPWA width scan shows that radiation yields decrease slowly as the width is decreased, which may allow for more compact loads without significant sacrifice to the output radiation. A mass scan of several W loads show that the implosion timing increases with mass.

  15. Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times Observed During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month Period in the Oklahoma City Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month period in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather observations are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.

  16. Sedimentary architecture of the Bohai Sea China over the last 1 Ma and implications for sea-level changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xuefa; Yao, Zhengquan; Liu, Qingsong; Larrasoaña, Juan Cruz; Bai, Yazhi; Liu, Yanguang; Liu, Jihua; Cao, Peng; Li, Xiaoyan; Qiao, Shuqing; Wang, Kunshan; Fang, Xisheng; Xu, Taoyu

    2016-10-01

    Sedimentary architecture dominated by transgression-regression cycles in the shallow Bohai shelf region contains information about global sea-level, climate and local tectonics. However, previous studies of transgression-regression cycles in this region at orbital timescales that extend back to the early Pleistocene are sparse, mainly because of the shortage of well-dated long cores. Although transgression-regression sedimentary cycles in the region have been interpreted in terms of local tectonics, sea-level, and climate change, the detailed structure of marine transgressions and their significance for Quaternary global sea-level variations remains to be examined. In this study, we present an integrated sedimentological, geochemical and paleontological study of a 212.4 m (∼1 Ma) core (BH08) recovered from the Bohai Sea, China, for which an astronomically-based age model is available. Correspondence between marine-terrestrial sedimentary cycles and global sea-level fluctuations suggests that stacking of marine and terrestrial sediments was driven mainly by glacio-eustatic sea-level fluctuations in a context in which tectonic subsidence was largely balanced by sediment supply over the last ∼1 Ma. We report a dominant 100-kyr cycle beginning at ∼650 ka, which reflects the worldwide influence of the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) in sea-level records. We find that neritic deposits after the MPT were relatively thicker than before the MPT, which indicates an important control of the MPT on sedimentary architecture through lengthening of the duration of sea-level highstands.

  17. Television viewing, internet use, and self-reported bedtime and rise time in adults: implications for sleep hygiene recommendations from an exploratory cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Custers, Kathleen; Van den Bulck, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the availability of the Internet and TV in the bedroom and overall Internet use and TV viewing were related to sleep variables in a sample of 711 residents of Flanders, Belgium. Although the relations were small, there was some evidence of time shifting: Internet access in the bedroom predicted later bedtime (β = .12, p < .05) and later rise time (β = .11, p < .05) on weekdays and later bedtime (β = .10, p < .001) on weekends. Internet use volume predicted later bedtime (β = .10, p < .001) and rise time (β = .07, p < .05) on weekends, and TV viewing predicted later bedtime (β = .10, p < .05) on weekends. However, neither the availability of the Internet or TV in the bedroom, nor the volume of Internet use or TV viewing, was a significant predictor of reduced sleep window or tiredness. Reducing media use might not be important for sleep hygiene advice to adults.

  18. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hyroxyflavone isolated in solid argon: fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectra and tautomer fluorescence rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, B.; Ernsting, N.P.

    1987-07-30

    The fluorescence properties of 3-hydroxyflavone isolated in solid argon at 15 K have been investigated. Upon electronic excitation the molecules undergo rapid intramolecular proton transfer. No fluorescence from the excited state of the normal form of the molecule could be detected. Perturbations due to hydrogen-bonding impurities which produce serious experimental problems in hydrocarbon glasses are largely suppressed in argon matrices. The rise of the green fluorescence of the tautomer was studied with excitation pulses of 230-fs duration and streak camera detection. An apparent tautomer fluorescence rise time of 2.7 ps was obtained by deconvolution. A comparative measurement of the dye coumarine 6 yielded an apparent fluorescence rise time of 2.5 ps, which can be entirely attributed to the group velocity dispersion of the streak camera optics. This indicates a rate constant for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone of greater than 10/sup 12/ s/sup -1/.

  19. Striation Formation in Cylindrical Liners Made of Various Materials Driven by a 1 MA Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, Levon; Byvank, Tom; Engelbrecht, Joseph; Greenly, John; Pikuz, Sergei; Potter, William; Shelkovenko, Tania; Kusse, Bruce; Hammer, David

    2016-10-01

    Peterson et al. found on the 20 MA Z machine that, without any applied external axial magnetic field, horizontal striations appear in radiographic images of a metal liner [Phys. Plasmas 19, 092701, 2012], a result that has been reproduced on other pulsed power machines since. In this work we present experimental results of horizontal striations on the 1 MA, 100-200 ns COBRA pulsed power generator [T. A. Shelkovenko et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10F521, 2006]. The pattern is observed in our experiments using extreme ultraviolet imaging, laser imaging, and X-ray backlighting. Using this combination of diagnostics, we were able to view simultaneously the pattern near the liner surface as well as in the higher density portion of the liner, displaying features with different wavelengths. Furthermore, materials such as Al, Cu, and Ti will be used for the liner to determine if the striation formation is affected by the nature of the material. This research is supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836 and DOE account DE-NA0002952.

  20. Dating the Homo erectus bearing travertine from Kocabaş (Denizli, Turkey) at at least 1.1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Alçiçek, M. Cihat; Rochette, Pierre; Khatib, Samir; Vialet, Amélie; Boulbes, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Demory, François; Guipert, Gaspard; Mayda, Serdar; Titov, Vadim V.; Vidal, Laurence; de Lumley, Henry

    2014-03-01

    Since its discovery within a travertine quarry, the fragmentary cranium of the only known Turkish Homo erectus, the Kocabaş hominid, has led to conflicting biochronological estimations. First estimated to be ˜500 ka old, the partial skull presents a combination of archaic and evolved features that puts it as an intermediate specimen between the Dmanisi fossils (Homo georgicus) and the Chinese Zhoukoudian skulls (Homo erectus) respectively dated to 1.8 to ˜0.8 Ma. Here we present a multidisciplinary study combining sedimentological, paleontological and paleoanthropological observations together with cosmogenic nuclide concentration and paleomagnetic measurements to provide an absolute chronological framework for the Upper fossiliferous Travertine unit where the Kocabaş hominid and fauna were discovered. The 26Al/10Be burial ages determined on pebbles from conglomeratic levels framing the Upper fossiliferous Travertine unit, which exhibits an inverse polarity, constrains its deposition to before the Cobb Mountain sub-chron, that is between 1.22 and ˜1.5 Ma. The alternative match of the normal polarity recorded above the travertine with the Jaramillo subchron (lower limit 1.07 Ma) may also be marginally compatible with cosmogenic nuclides interpretation, thus the proposed minimum age of 1.1 Ma for the end of massive travertine deposition. The actual age of the fossils is likely to be in the 1.1-1.3 Ma range. This absolute date is in close agreement with the paleoanthropological conclusions based on morphometric comparisons implying that Kocabaş hominid belongs to the Homo erectus s.l. group that includes Chinese and African fossils, and is different from Middle and Upper Pleistocene specimens. Furthermore, this date is confirmed by the large mammal assemblage, typical of the late Villafranchian. Because it attests to the antiquity of human occupation of the Anatolian Peninsula and one of the waves of settlements out of Africa, this work challenges the current

  1. Simulation and measurement of pulse height and rise-time for electron signals in CZT detectors:. influence of material and electronics parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathy, F.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Gliere, A.; Mestais, C.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    A model for simulation of amplitude vs. rise-time biparametric spectra as a function of CZT materials properties was developed. This model takes into account the physical properties of the CZT detectors, the electric field profile and the physics of γ- ray interaction with CZT. The model has been refined to include the filtering effects of the front-end electronics and applied again to biparametric spectra. The electronic filtering is represented by a combination of linear band pass filters. The rise-time measurement circuit induces a non-linearity that is taken into account. A comparison between the electronics simulations and calibration measurements on the actual circuits is presented. In addition, physical and electrical properties of several CZT samples have been characterized and these properties have been incorporated in the model so that actual and simulated biparametric spectra can be compared. Finally, the model is applied to show the influence of the main physical parameters (mobility and lifetime) and of the applied electric field on the biparametric spectra.

  2. Note: A rectangular pulse generator for 50 kV voltage, 0.8 ns rise time, and 10 ns pulse width based on polymer-film switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hanyu; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Zeng, Zhengzhong; Cong, Peitian; Zhang, Shaoguo

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we describe a rectangular pulse generator, consisting of a polymer-film switch, a tri-plate transmission line, and parallel post-shaped ceramic resistor load, for 50-kV voltage, 0.8-ns rise time, and 10-ns width. The switch and resistors are arranged in atmospheric air and the transmission line can work in atmospheric air or in transformer oil to change the pulse width from 6.7 ns to 10 ns. The fast switching and low-inductance characteristics of the polymer-film switch ensure the fast rising wavefront of <1 ns. This generator can be applied in the calibration of nanosecond voltage dividers and used for electromagnetic pulse tests as a fast-rising current injection source.

  3. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET.

    PubMed

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-07

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (τd) and the number of photons detected (n'), i.e. CTR proportional variant √τd/n'. However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (τr) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the single photon time

  4. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time ({τd} ) and the number of photons detected ({{n}\\prime} ), i.e. CTR\\propto \\sqrt{{τd}/{{n}\\prime}} . However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time ({τr} ) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the

  5. Sonic-boom measurements in the focus region during the ascent of Apollo 17. [maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bow-shock rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.; Hilton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Sonic-boom pressure signatures recorded during the ascent phase of Apollo 17 are presented. The measurements were obtained onboard six U.S. Navy ships positioned along the ground track of the spacecraft vehicle in the area of expected focus resulting from the flight path and acceleration of the vehicle. Tracings of the measured signatures are presented along with values of the maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bowshock rise time. Also included are brief descriptions of the ships and their location, the deployment of the sonic-boom instrumentation, flight profiles and operating conditions for the launch vehicle and spacecraft, surface-weather and sea-state information at the measuring sites, and high-altitude weather information for the general measurement areas. Comparisons of the measured and predicted sonic-boom overpressures for the Apollo 17 mission are presented. The measured data are also compared with data from the Apollo 15 and 16 missions and data from flight test programs of various aircraft.

  6. Soil weathering and accumulation rates of oxalate-extractable phases derived from alpine chronosequences of up to 1 Ma in age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Dennis; Favilli, Filippo; Krebs, Rolf; Egli, Markus

    2012-05-01

    In this study we compare newly-developed chemical weathering data with previously published data from soils developed along two chronosequences of glacial deposits in the European Alps and the Rocky Mountains (Wind River Range, USA). By combining these chronosequences, we are able to present a comprehensive dataset that represents a time period of > 1 Ma. We describe weathering trends of important elements using a number of weathering indices (e.g., K + Ca/Ti ratio, the weathering 'index B' of Kronberg and Nesbitt (1981) and the open mass transport function). Further, we describe the accumulation of Al, Fe, Si and Mn oxyhydroxides (including partially organic phases) as a function of time, and derive the corresponding accumulation rates. We calculated pedogenetically formed oxyhydroxides using an approach based on immobile elements. Our study represents one of only a few studies that describe rates of soil chemical weathering over a period as long as ~ 1 Ma. Results show that rates of chemical weathering clearly decrease along the chronosequences with increasing age of the soils. We find weathering rates are nearly four orders of magnitude lower in the 1 Ma-old soils than in the young soils. Our results suggest that the older soils may be reaching a steady state for these chemical properties in their present environments. A power function best explains the measured time-trends of the 'index B' and (K + Ca)/Ti) ratios in the soils. The best time-trend model for pedogenic weakly- to poorly crystalline phases and the relative losses/gains (based on the open-system mass transport function) were obtained with an exponential decay model function. In terms of the soil system, the decreases in the accumulation rate of the oxyhydroxides appears to be influenced not only by the factor of time but by climate as well (increased precipitation at higher altitudes slows the decrease in weathering rate over time). Thus, our ~ 1 Ma chronosequences also become pedogenic gradients

  7. Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomaly inthe Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan: implications for a westward shift of the volcanic front after ~2.1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Oda, H.; Ishizuka, O.; Arai, K.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies in the southern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc reveal recent volcanic structures in a southwestward extension of the active volcanic front of the Ryukyu Arc. A line of bathymetric highs running subparallel to this recent volcanic front was observed ~20 km to the east. A set of small, sharply defined magnetic anomalies extends southward from this line of bathymetric highs to the islands Kume-jima and Aguni-jima, suggesting the former existence of an ancient volcanic front. The ages of volcanic rocks from these islands indicate that magmatic activity along the ancient volcanic front continued until at least ~2.1 Ma. The presence of magnetic anomalies between the two volcanic fronts suggests that the volcanic front has moved gradually westward. This shift can be explained by the termination of asthenospheric upwelling and/or the rapid retreat of the Ryukyu Trench after its change in subduction direction.

  8. Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomaly in the Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan: implications for a westward shift of the volcanic front after approximately 2.1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taichi; Oda, Hirokuni; Ishizuka, Osamu; Arai, Kohsaku

    2014-12-01

    Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies in the southern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc reveal recent volcanic structures in a southwestward extension of the active volcanic front of the Ryukyu Arc. A line of bathymetric highs running subparallel to this recent volcanic front was observed approximately 20 km to the east. A set of small, sharply defined magnetic anomalies extends southward from this line of bathymetric highs to the islands Kume-jima and Aguni-jima, suggesting the former existence of an ancient volcanic front. The ages of volcanic rocks from these islands indicate that magmatic activity along the ancient volcanic front continued until at least approximately 2.1 Ma. The presence of magnetic anomalies between the two volcanic fronts suggests that the volcanic front has moved gradually westward. This shift can be explained by the termination of asthenospheric upwelling and/or the rapid retreat of the Ryukyu Trench after its change in subduction direction.

  9. Modeling of K-Shell Al and Mg and L-Shell Mo Radiation from Compact Cylindrical Wire Array Plasmas Produced on the 1 MA UNR Zebra Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, M. F.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Quart, N. D.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.

    2009-01-21

    K-shell radiation of Al and Mg and L-shell radiation of Mo from implosions of compact cylindrical wire arrays (CCWA) on the 1 MA UNR Zebra generator was studied. Specifically, radiation from implosions of 3 and 6 mm CCWA with (16-24) Al-5052 (95% Al and 5% Mg) and Al-5052 (97.5% Al and 2.5% Mg) and Mo wires was analyzed using the full set of diagnostics: PCD and current signals, and X-ray pinhole images and spectra. Previously developed non-LTE models were applied to model spatially resolved time integrated as well as time-gated spatially integrated spectra from Al, Mg, and Mo plasmas. Derived electron temperature and density spatial gradients as well as percentage of radiating mass were studied and compared. In addition, the novel Wire Dynamics Model (WDM) was used to analyze the implosion dynamics of compact wire array loads.

  10. Analysis of Compact Cylindrical Wire Array Implosions with Brass and also by Alternating Brass and Al wires on the 1-MA COBRA Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Bell, K. S.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2009-01-21

    Implosions from compact cylindrical wire arrays (CCWA) with mid-Z and low-Z wires were carried out on the 1-MA COBRA generator at Cornell University. In particular, the CCWA used either Brass 310 (70% Cu, 30% Zn) wires or a combination of Brass 310 and Al 5056 (95% Al, 5% Mg) wires arranged in an alternating pattern. A total of 16 wires were used on either a 6 or 4 mm diameter array. The diagnostic suite included a bolometer, fast x-ray detectors, a time-integrated spectrometer, and a streak camera. A higher energy output was observed from bolometer measurements when alternating the brass and Al wires compared to using only the brass wires. This study will focus mainly on the spectroscopy of the brass and alternating brass and Al CCWA by applying the non-LTE kinetic models of Cu and Zn to account for the L-shell radiation. The resulting plasma parameters, electron density and electron temperature, will be discussed and compared for the CCWA with only brass wires and alternating brass and Al wires. The simulations with the novel Wire Ablation Dynamics Model that account for wire ablation will be performed to analyze the differences in implosion dynamics of the uniform and alternating compact cylindrical arrays.

  11. The relationship between eruptive activity, flank collapse, and sea level at volcanic islands: A long-term (>1 Ma) record offshore Montserrat, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, Maya; Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Talling, Peter. J.; Watt, Sebastian. F. L.; Cassidy, Michael; Jutzeler, Martin; Clare, Michael A.; Hunt, James. E.; Manga, Michael; Gernon, Thomas. M.; Palmer, Martin. R.; Hatter, Stuart. J.; Boudon, Georges; Endo, Daisuke; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Hornbach, Matthew. J.; Ishizuka, Osamu; Kataoka, Kyoko; Le Friant, Anne; Maeno, Fukashi; McCanta, Molly; Stinton, Adam. J.

    2016-07-01

    Hole U1395B, drilled southeast of Montserrat during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 340, provides a long (>1 Ma) and detailed record of eruptive and mass-wasting events (>130 discrete events). This record can be used to explore the temporal evolution in volcanic activity and landslides at an arc volcano. Analysis of tephra fall and volcaniclastic turbidite deposits in the drill cores reveals three heightened periods of volcanic activity on the island of Montserrat (˜930 to ˜900 ka, ˜810 to ˜760 ka, and ˜190 to ˜120 ka) that coincide with periods of increased volcano instability and mass-wasting. The youngest of these periods marks the peak in activity at the Soufrière Hills volcano. The largest flank collapse of this volcano (˜130 ka) occurred toward the end of this period, and two younger landslides also occurred during a period of relatively elevated volcanism. These three landslides represent the only large (>0.3 km3) flank collapses of the Soufrière Hills edifice, and their timing also coincides with periods of rapid sea level rise (>5 m/ka). Available age data from other island arc volcanoes suggest a general correlation between the timing of large landslides and periods of rapid sea level rise, but this is not observed for volcanoes in intraplate ocean settings. We thus infer that rapid sea level rise may modulate the timing of collapse at island arc volcanoes, but not in larger ocean-island settings.

  12. Study of Ablation and Implosion Stages of 1-MA Wire Array Z-Pinch using X-ray Laser-Based Backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Austin; Ivanov, Vladimir; Papp, Daniel; Talbot, Bjorn; Astanovitskiy, Alexey

    2013-10-01

    The ablation and implosion stages of wire array z-pinches were studied using laser-based x-ray imaging at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. X-ray backlighting at the wavelength of 6.65 Å was provided by hitting a Si target with the 50 TW Leopard laser. Laser-based radiography allows flexibility in both the timing and the position of the x-ray source. The issue of the method is the small energy of the laser pulse compared to radiation of the Z pinch. A spherically bent quartz crystal can give spatial resolution <10 microns and spectral linewidth of the x-ray on the order of 10-4. X-ray imaging allows viewing of the dense core of plasma column during the ablation stage. Wires with diameters 7.6-15 were resolved in test shots. Images of the wire-array at the ablation stage are discussed. Work was supported by the DOE grant DE-SC0008824 and DOE/NNSA UNR grant DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  13. Calcareous nannofossil evidence for Marine Isotope Stage 31 (1 Ma) in Core AND-1B, ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf Project (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Giuliana; Persico, Davide; Wise, Sherwood W.; Gadaleta, Alessia

    2012-10-01

    ANDRILL Core AND-1B, recovered in the Western Ross Sea of Antarctica, has been examined in search of calcareous nannofossils. Exhaustive and detailed analyses of the interval from 86.61 to 98.99 mbsf revealed for the first time at an extreme southern high latitude (77.88° S) the presence of lower Pleistocene calcareous nannofossils, together with Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous reworked species. Other calcareous microfossils in the assemblage include, spicules of calciosponges and small foraminifers. The short normal magnetozone between 84.97 and 91.13 mbsf is correlated with the Jaramillo Subchron (C1r.1n) (Wilson et al., 2007). The presence of nannofossils in the biogenic interglacial sediments is consistent with an episode of warm surface waters and open-marine conditions during the Jaramillo subchron, at ~ 1 Ma, which corresponds with Marine Isotope Stage (MIS)-31 (Scherer et al., 2007; Naish et al., 2007). Climate proxies such as oxygen isotope stratigraphy and calcareous nannofossils at ODP Site 1165 (Pospichal, 2003; Villa et al., 2008) and the diatom assemblage in a shelly carbonate sequence at Cape Roberts 1 (Bohaty et al., 1998) also support a warming event during this time and suggest it extended around the Antarctic Continent. This in turn implies a total or partial collapse of the McMurdo Ice Shelf and a concurrent shift or temporary dissipation of the Polar Front (Antarctic Convergence) and Antarctic Divergence that currently serve as barriers to the influx of calcareous nannofossils to the margins of Antarctica.

  14. Measurement of DNA translocation dynamics in a solid-state nanopore at 100-ns temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Shekar, Siddharth; Niedzwiecki, David J.; Chien, Chen-Chi; Ong, Peijie; Fleischer, Daniel A.; Lin, Jianxun; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Drndic, Marija; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the potential for nanopores to be a platform for high-bandwidth study of single-molecule systems, ionic current measurements through nanopores have been limited in their temporal resolution by noise arising from poorly optimized measurement electronics and large parasitic capacitances in the nanopore membranes. Here, we present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) nanopore (CNP) amplifier capable of low noise recordings at an unprecedented 10 MHz bandwidth. When integrated with state-of-the-art solid-state nanopores in silicon nitride membranes, we achieve an SNR of greater than 10 for ssDNA translocations at a measurement bandwidth of 5 MHz, which represents the fastest ion current recordings through nanopores reported to date. We observe transient features in ssDNA translocation events that are as short as 200 ns, which are hidden even at bandwidths as high as 1 MHz. These features offer further insights into the translocation kinetics of molecules entering and exiting the pore. This platform highlights the advantages of high-bandwidth translocation measurements made possible by integrating nanopores and custom-designed electronics. PMID:27332998

  15. X-ray diagnostics of imploding plasmas from planar wire arrays composed of Cu and few tracer Al wires on the 1MA pulsed power generator at UNR.

    PubMed

    Safronova, A S; Kantsyrev, V L; Esaulov, A A; Ouart, N D; Yilmaz, M F; Williamson, K M; Shlyaptseva, V; Shrestha, I; Osborne, G C; Coverdale, C A; Jones, B; Deeney, C

    2008-10-01

    Tracer aluminum alloyed wires (Al5056) are used to provide additional information for x-ray diagnostics of implosions of Cu planar wire arrays (PWAs). Specifically, the analysis of combined PWA experiments using the extensive set of x-ray diagnostics is presented. In these experiments, which were conducted at the 1MA pulsed power generator at University of Nevada, Reno, the Z-pinch load consisted of several (eight) Cu alloyed (main material) and one to two Al alloyed (tracer) wires mounted in a single plane row or double parallel plane rows, single planar wire array (SPWA) or double planar wire array (DPWA), respectively. The analysis of x-ray spatially resolved spectra from the main material indicates the increase in the electron temperature T(e) near the cathode. In general, the axial gradients in T(e) are more pronounced for SPWA than for DPWA due to the more "columnlike" plasma formation for SPWA compared to "hot-spot-like" plasma formation for DPWA. In addition, x-ray spectra from tracer wires are studied, and estimated plasma parameters are compared with those from the main material. It is observed that the x-ray K-shell Al spectra manifest more opacity features for the case of SPWA with about 18% of Al mass (to the total load mass) compared to the case of DPWA with about 11% of Al mass. The analysis of time-gated spectra shows that the relative intensity of the most intense K-shell Al line, small before the x-ray burst, increases with time and peaks close to the maximum of the sub-keV signal.

  16. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  17. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, G.J.; Sampayan, S.E.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-10-13

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 12 figs.

  18. The 2013 M8.3 Sea of Okhotsk Deep-Focus Earthquake: Rupture Beyond the Metastable Olivine Wedge and Thermally-Controlled Rise Time near the Edge of a Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, J. P.; Meng, L.

    2013-12-01

    frequency (f > 0.25 Hz) source images. The southern rupture extends towards SSE over 100 km and is consistently observed across all frequency bands, although it appears intermittently as two individual subevents in the high frequency imaging. The rupture speed of both segments is on average about 3.5 km/s, 60% of the shear-wave speed, and significantly faster than the deeper 1994 Bolivian earthquake, which is compatible with the depth distribution of rupture speeds of other deep earthquakes. The difference in frequency content between the northern and southern rupture segments can be interpreted as a lateral variation of rise time controlled by the thermal thickness of the subducting slab. The earthquake occurred near the northern edge of the subducting Pacific slab. Towards the north, the younger age of the slab and the effect of the mantle flow around its edge are expected to make the slab warmer and decrease the width between given isotherms at a given depth. In dynamic rupture models, the rise time is ultimately limited by the width of the seismogenic zone. If temperature controls the seismogenic width, this results in shorter rise time and thus more energetic high frequency radiation in the north.

  19. Systematic investigation of effects of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering on photoluminescence rise times of free excitons in GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As single quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Masaaki Ohno, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-07

    We have systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics of free excitons in GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As single quantum wells, focusing on the energy relaxation process due to exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering under non-resonant and weak excitation conditions as a function of GaAs-layer thickness from 3.6 to 12.0 nm and temperature from 30 to 50 K. The free exciton characteristics were confirmed by observation that the PL decay time has a linear dependence with temperature. We found that the free exciton PL rise rate, which is the reciprocal of the rise time, is inversely linear with the GaAs-layer thickness and linear with temperature. This is consistent with a reported theoretical study of the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate in the energy relaxation process in quantum wells. Consequently, it is conclusively verified that the PL rise rate is dominated by the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate. In addition, from quantitative analysis of the GaAs-layer thickness and temperature dependences, we suggest that the PL rise rate reflects the number of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering events.

  20. Design of a 5-MA 100-ns linear-transformer-driver accelerator for wire array Z-pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Zhenghong; Wang, Zhen; Liang, Chuan; Li, Mingjia; Qi, Jianmin; Chu, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The linear-transformer-driver (LTD) is a recently developed pulsed-power technology that shows great promise for a number of applications. These include a Z -pinch-driven fission-fusion-hybrid reactor that is being developed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics. In support of the reactor development effort, we are planning to build an LTD-based accelerator that is optimized for driving wire-array Z -pinch loads. The accelerator comprises six modules in parallel, each of which has eight series 0.8-MA LTD cavities in a voltage-adder configuration. Vacuum transmission lines are used from the interior of the adder to the central vacuum chamber where the load is placed. Thus the traditional stack-flashover problem is eliminated. The machine is 3.2 m tall and 12 m in outer diameter including supports. A prototype cavity was built and tested for more than 6000 shots intermittently at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A novel trigger, in which only one input trigger pulse is needed by utilizing an internal trigger brick, was developed and successfully verified in these shots. A full circuit modeling was conducted for the accelerator. The simulation result shows that a current pulse rising to 5.2 MA in 91 ns (10%-90%) can be delivered to the wire-array load, which is 1.5 cm in height, 1.2 cm in initial radius, and 1 mg in mass. The maximum implosion velocity of the load is 32 cm /μ s when compressed to 0.1 of the initial radius. The maximum kinetic energy is 78 kJ, which is 11.7% of the electric energy stored in the capacitors. This accelerator is supposed to enable a radiation energy efficiency of 20%-30%, providing a high efficient facility for research on the fast Z pinch and technologies for repetition-rate-operated accelerators.

  1. Paleoceanography/climate and taphonomy at intermediate water depth in the Subtropical Western North Pacific Ocean over the last 1 Ma from IODP Exp 350 Sites U1436C and U1437B, Izu arc area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautravers, Maryline

    2015-04-01

    IODP Expedition 350 Site U1436C lies in the western part of the Izu fore arc basin, ~60 km east of the arc front volcano Aogashima, at 1776 m water depth. This site is a technical hole (only a 150 m long record) for a potential future deep drilling by Chikyu. Site U1437 is located in the Izu rear arc, ~90 km west of the arc front volcanoes Myojinsho and Myojin Knoll, at 2117 m water depth. At this site in order to study the evolution of the IZU rear arc crust we recovered a 1800 meter long sequence of mud and volcaniclastic sediments. These sites provide a rich and well-preserved record of volcanic eruptions within the area of the Izu Bonin-Arc. However, the material recovered, mostly mud with ash containing generally abundant planktonic foraminifera, can support additional paleoceanographic goals in an area affected by the Kuroshio Current. Also, the hydrographic divide created by the Izu rise provides a rare opportunity to gain some insight into the operation of the global intermediate circulation. The Antarctic Intermediate Water Mass is more influential at the depth of U1437B in the West and the North Pacific Intermediate Water at Site U1436C to the East. We analyzed 460 samples recovered at Sites U1436C and U1437B for a quantitative planktonic foraminifer study, and also for carbonate preservation indices, including: shell weight, percent planktonic foraminifera fragments planktonic foraminifer concentrations, various faunal proxies, and benthic/planktonic ratio. We measured the stable isotopes for a similar number of samples using the thermocline dwelling Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. The dataset presented here covers the last 1 Ma at Site U1437B and 0.9 Ma at Site U1436C. The age models for the two sites are largely established through stable isotope stratigraphy (this study). On their respective age models we evidence based on polar/subpolar versus subtropical faunal assemblages changes qualitative surface water temperature variations recording the changing

  2. Plasma Jet Interaction with Thomson Scattering Probe Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byvank, Tom; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Kusse, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering systems can diagnose plasma temperatures and velocities. When probing a plasma jet with the Thomson scattering laser, we observe a laser-plasma interaction that inputs energy into the plasma jet. The absorbed energy causes a bubble of low density ( 5*1017 cm-2) in the jet (unperturbed 1018 cm-2). A pulsed power machine (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) with a radial foil (15 μm thick Al) configuration generates the plasma jet. We compare the effects of using 10 J and 1 J laser energies, for which the 10 J laser is a larger perturbation. We discuss how the interaction affects the Thomson scattering temperature and velocity measurements. Work supported by National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836 and National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant PHY-1102471.

  3. Cyclostratigraphy and eccentricity tuning of the early Oligocene through early Miocene (30.1-17.1 Ma): Cibicides mundulus stable oxygen and carbon isotope records from Walvis Ridge Site 1264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebrand, Diederik; Beddow, Helen M.; Lourens, Lucas J.; Pälike, Heiko; Raffi, Isabella; Bohaty, Steven M.; Hilgen, Frederik J.; Saes, Mischa J. M.; Wilson, Paul A.; van Dijk, Arnold E.; Hodell, David A.; Kroon, Dick; Huck, Claire E.; Batenburg, Sietske J.

    2016-09-01

    Few astronomically calibrated high-resolution (≤5 kyr) climate records exist that span the Oligocene-Miocene time interval. Notably, available proxy records show responses varying in amplitude at frequencies related to astronomical forcing, and the main pacemakers of global change on astronomical time-scales remain debated. Here we present newly generated X-ray fluorescence core scanning and benthic foraminiferal stable oxygen and carbon isotope records from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1264 (Walvis Ridge, southeastern Atlantic Ocean). Complemented by data from nearby Site 1265, the Site 1264 benthic stable isotope records span a continuous ∼13-Myr interval of the Oligo-Miocene (30.1-17.1 Ma) at high resolution (∼3.0 kyr). Spectral analyses in the stratigraphic depth domain indicate that the largest amplitude variability of all proxy records is associated with periods of ∼ 3.4 m and ∼ 0.9 m, which correspond to 405- and ∼110-kyr eccentricity, using a magnetobiostratigraphic age model. Maxima in CaCO3 content, δ18O and δ13C are interpreted to coincide with ∼110 kyr eccentricity minima. The strong expression of these cycles in combination with the weakness of the precession- and obliquity-related signals allow construction of an astronomical age model that is solely based on tuning the CaCO3 content to the nominal (La2011_ecc3L) eccentricity solution. Very long-period eccentricity maxima (∼2.4-Myr) are marked by recurrent episodes of high-amplitude ∼110-kyr δ18O cycles at Walvis Ridge, indicating greater sensitivity of the climate/cryosphere system to short eccentricity modulation of climatic precession. In contrast, the responses of the global (high-latitude) climate system, cryosphere, and carbon cycle to the 405-kyr cycle, as expressed in benthic δ18O and especially δ13C signals, are more pronounced during ∼2.4-Myr minima. The relationship between the recurrent episodes of high-amplitude ∼110-kyr δ18O cycles and the ∼1.2-Myr amplitude

  4. Climatic and tectonic feedbacks and implications on sedimentation, tectonic deformation, and erosion circa 3.1 Ma in the Qaidam Basin, China: Evidence from magnetostratigaphy, geochemistry, and stratigraphic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heermance, R.; Pullen, A.; Kapp, P. A.; Song, P.

    2011-12-01

    strata at 3.0 Ma, a sharp lithofacies change (Formation boundary) to shallow and sub-areal conditions by 2.6 Ma, and the observation of paleoyardangs (buried, wind-sculpted landforms) within lake-marginal strata at 2.4 Ma, imply that emergence of the adjacent anticline was followed by the shallowing or narrowing of the lake basin and sub-aerial exposure and erosion of marginal lake sediments. Together, these data imply an abrupt change in climate between 3.1 Ma and ~2.6 Ma, just prior to the onset of northern hemisphere glaciations. This abrupt change caused a shift in lake geochemistry, reduced sedimentation rates, aeolian erosion of lake-marginal sediments, and paleosol development. Tectonic inversion and enhanced aridification after 2.6 Ma provided a fertile environment for the wind deflation of the Qaidam Basin and provides a likely sediment source for the Chinese Loess Plateau at that time.

  5. High voltage electrical amplifier having a short rise time

    DOEpatents

    Christie, David J.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1991-01-01

    A circuit, comprising an amplifier and a transformer is disclosed that produces a high power pulse having a fast response time, and that responds to a digital control signal applied through a digital-to-analog converter. The present invention is suitable for driving a component such as an electro-optic modulator with a voltage in the kilovolt range. The circuit is stable at high frequencies and during pulse transients, and its impedance matching circuit matches the load impedance with the output impedance. The preferred embodiment comprises an input stage compatible with high-speed semiconductor components for amplifying the voltage of the input control signal, a buffer for isolating the input stage from the output stage; and a plurality of current amplifiers connected to the buffer. Each current amplifier is connected to a field effect transistor (FET), which switches a high voltage power supply to a transformer which then provides an output terminal for driving a load. The transformer comprises a plurality of transmission lines connected to the FETs and the load. The transformer changes the impedance and voltage of the output. The preferred embodiment also comprises a low voltage power supply for biasing the FETs at or near an operational voltage.

  6. Research on fast rise time EMP radiating-wave simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lisi; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Yun

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an antenna of High altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) radiating-wave simulator which expands the testing zone larger than the traditional transmission line simulator. The numerical results show that traverse electramagnetic (TEM) antenna can be used to radiate HEMP simulation radiating wave, but in low frequency band the emissive capability is poor. The experiment proves the numerical model is valid. The results of this paper show that TEM antenna can be used to HEMP radiating-wave simulator, and can prove the low frequency radiation capability through resistance loaded method.

  7. Calmodulin disrupts the structure of the HIV-1 MA protein†

    PubMed Central

    Chow, John Y. H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill

    2010-01-01

    The MA protein from HIV-1 is a small, multifunctional protein responsible for regulating various stages of the viral replication cycle. To achieve its diverse tasks MA interacts with host cell proteins and it has been reported that one of these is the ubiquitous calcium -sensing calmodulin (CaM) which is up-regulated upon HIV-1 infection. The nature of the CaM-MA interaction has been the subject of structural studies using peptides based on the MA sequence that have led to conflicting conclusions. The results presented here show that CaM binds intact MA with 1:1 stoichiometry in a Ca2+-dependent manner and that the complex adopts a highly extended conformation in solution as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Alterations in tryptophan fluorescence suggest that the two tryptophans at the N-terminus of MA mediate the CaM interaction. Major chemical shift changes occur in the NMR spectrum of MA upon complex formation, while chemical shift changes in the CaM spectrum are quite modest and are assigned to residues within the target-protein binding hydrophobic clefts of CaM. The NMR data indicate that CaM binds MA via its N-and C-terminal lobes and induces a dramatic conformational change involving a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structure within MA. Circular dichroism experiments suggest that MA looses ~20% of its α-helical content upon CaM binding. Thus CaM binding is expected to impact upon the accessibility of interaction sites within MA that are involved in its various functions. PMID:20488189

  8. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-21

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as {approx}2 T inside a wire-array for {approx}40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  9. Design and optimization of a gas-puff nozzle for staged Z-pinch experiments using computational fluid dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Beg, F. N.; Wessel, F.; Rahman, H.; Ney, P.; Presura, R.; McKee, E.; Darling, T.; Covington, A.

    2015-11-01

    Previous experimental work on staged Z-pinches demonstrated that gas liners can efficiently couple energy and implode uniformly a target-plasma. A 1.5 MA, 1 μs current driver was used to implode a magnetized, Kr liner onto a D + target, producing 1010 neutrons per shot and providing clear evidence of enhanced pinch stability. Time-of-flight data suggest that primary and secondary neutrons were produced. MHD simulations show that in Zebra, a 1.5MA and 100ns rise-time current driver, high fusion gain can be attained when the optimum liner and plasma target conditions are used. In this work we present the design and optimization of a liner-on-target nozzle to be fielded in Zebra and demonstrate high fusion gain at 1 MA current level. The nozzle is composed of an annular high atomic number gas-puff and an on-axis plasma gun that will deliver the ionized deuterium target. The nozzle optimization was carried out using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent and the MHD code Mach2. The CFD simulation produces density and temperature profiles, as a function of the nozzle shapes and gas conditions, which are then used in Mach2 to find the optimum plasma liner implosion-pinch conditions. Funded by the US Department of Energy, ARPA-E, Control Number 1184-1527.

  10. Characterisation of the current switch mechanism in two-stage wire array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hall, G. N.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Khoory, E.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; de Grouchy, P.; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Waisman, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the operation of a two-stage wire array z-pinch driven by the 1.4 MA, 240 ns rise-time Magpie pulsed-power device at Imperial College London. In this setup, an inverse wire array acts as a fast current switch, delivering a current pre-pulse into a cylindrical load wire array, before rapidly switching the majority of the generator current into the load after a 100-150 ns dwell time. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the load array during the pre-pulse is presented. Measurements of the load resistivity and energy deposition suggest significant bulk heating of the array mass occurs. The ˜5 kA pre-pulse delivers ˜0.8 J of energy to the load, leaving it in a mixed, predominantly liquid-vapour state. The main current switch occurs as the inverse array begins to explode and plasma expands into the load region. Electrical and imaging diagnostics indicate that the main current switch may evolve in part as a plasma flow switch, driven by the expansion of a magnetic cavity and plasma bubble along the length of the load array. Analysis of implosion trajectories suggests that approximately 1 MA switches into the load in 100 ns, corresponding to a doubling of the generator dI/dt. Potential scaling of the device to higher current machines is discussed.

  11. Laser pumping of thyristors for fast high current rise-times

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2013-06-11

    An optically triggered semiconductor switch includes an anode metallization layer; a cathode metallization layer; a semiconductor between the anode metallization layer and the cathode metallization layer and a photon source. The semiconductor includes at least four layers of alternating doping in the form P-N-P-N, in which an outer layer adjacent to the anode metallization layer forms an anode and an outer layer adjacent the cathode metallization layer forms a cathode and in which the anode metallization layer has a window pattern of optically transparent material exposing the anode layer to light. The photon source emits light having a wavelength, with the light from the photon source being configured to match the window pattern of the anode metallization layer.

  12. Studies of High Power Density, Pico-Second Rise-Time Light Activated Semiconductor Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-31

    34 Proceedings of the IEEE, vol.55, pp.2192-2193, 1967. 3. McKay, K., K. McAfee, "Electron Multiplication in Silicon and Germanium ," Physical Review...Conwell, E., "Properties of Silicon and Germanium : II," Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers. vol.46, pp.1281-1300, 1958. 6. Zucker, 0...light activated semiconductor switches made of silicon junction diode have been demonstrated. A novel optical delay line has been designed in sampling

  13. Dietary changes of large herbivores in the Turkana Basin, Kenya from 4 to 1 Ma.

    PubMed

    Cerling, Thure E; Andanje, Samuel A; Blumenthal, Scott A; Brown, Francis H; Chritz, Kendra L; Harris, John M; Hart, John A; Kirera, Francis M; Kaleme, Prince; Leakey, Louise N; Leakey, Meave G; Levin, Naomi E; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo; Passey, Benjamin H; Uno, Kevin T

    2015-09-15

    A large stable isotope dataset from East and Central Africa from ca. 30 regional collection sites that range from forest to grassland shows that most extant East and Central African large herbivore taxa have diets dominated by C4 grazing or C3 browsing. Comparison with the fossil record shows that faunal assemblages from ca. 4.1-2.35 Ma in the Turkana Basin had a greater diversity of C3-C4 mixed feeding taxa than is presently found in modern East and Central African environments. In contrast, the period from 2.35 to 1.0 Ma had more C4-grazing taxa, especially nonruminant C4-grazing taxa, than are found in modern environments in East and Central Africa. Many nonbovid C4 grazers became extinct in Africa, notably the suid Notochoerus, the hipparion equid Eurygnathohippus, the giraffid Sivatherium, and the elephantid Elephas. Other important nonruminant C4-grazing taxa switched to browsing, including suids in the lineage Kolpochoerus-Hylochoerus and the elephant Loxodonta. Many modern herbivore taxa in Africa have diets that differ significantly from their fossil relatives. Elephants and tragelaphin bovids are two groups often used for paleoecological insight, yet their fossil diets were very different from their modern closest relatives; therefore, their taxonomic presence in a fossil assemblage does not indicate they had a similar ecological function in the past as they do at present. Overall, we find ecological assemblages of C3-browsing, C3-C4-mixed feeding, and C4-grazing taxa in the Turkana Basin fossil record that are different from any modern ecosystem in East or Central Africa.

  14. Studies of Hot Spots in Imploding Wire Arrays at 1 MA on COBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, Sergey A.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; McBride, Ryan D.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    We present recent results from hot spot investigations in imploding Al wire array z-pinches on the COBRA generator at Cornell University using x-ray diagnostics. Measurements of the temporal and spatial distribution of hot spots in stagnating plasmas by an x-ray streak-camera are included. Experiments show that hot spots have nanosecond lifetime and appear randomly along the array axis after plasma stagnation in secondary pinches in 8 mm diameter and during plasma stagnation in the arrays with 4 mm diameter.

  15. Sediment Flux from Stratigraphy: Insights from <1 Ma to >300 Ma Sedimentary Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romans, B.; Mason, C. C.; Eriksson, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Tectonic or climate signals that originate in net-erosional catchments are transmitted down-system as sediment. The accumulation of that sediment in net-depositional regions and preservation as stratigraphy can be accessed and used to reconstruct signal generation and propagation. Studies of modern to <20 ka sedimentary systems suggest that signal propagation (or lack thereof) is, in part, controlled by the size, relief, and other morphologic characteristics of sediment-production segments. Thus, it's critical to measure, estimate, or infer aspects of the feeder catchment when reconstructing system behavior from sedimentary deposits. Here, we present results from two studies aimed at determining paleo-sediment flux from stratigraphic archives. The first study uses outcropping middle Pleistocene (~0.6 Ma) alluvial-fan deposits in the Panamint Mountains, California, to investigate the relationship of sediment supply to stratigraphic architecture in a small catchment-fan system. The youth of this system allows us to estimate fan volumes from facies architecture and depositional system dimensions based on catchment-area to fan-area relationships of nearby modern systems. These data, combined with preliminary cosmogenic radionuclide-derived paleo-denudation rates, provide an opportunity to examine the nature of erosional signal propagation. The second study examines much older, Upper Mississippian (~325 Ma), fluvial and deltaic strata. Absolute chronologic tools to calculate centennial-millennial rates in deep-time sedimentary archives do not yet exist. Here, we use the extraordinary tidal rhythmite deposits of the Pride Shale in the Appalachian Basin as a high-resolution chronometer to constrain the duration of basin filling. We then use the scale of fluvial channel bodies in the underlying and overlying units combined with climate-specific empirical relationships derived from modern systems to estimate the size of the paleo-catchment. The resultant estimates of sediment yield allow calculation of denudation rates for a system in which the catchment has long-since eroded.

  16. Dietary changes of large herbivores in the Turkana Basin, Kenya from 4 to 1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Andanje, Samuel A.; Blumenthal, Scott A.; Brown, Francis H.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Harris, John M.; Hart, John A.; Kirera, Francis M.; Kaleme, Prince; Leakey, Louise N.; Leakey, Meave G.; Levin, Naomi E.; Kyalo Manthi, Fredrick; Passey, Benjamin H.; Uno, Kevin T.

    2015-09-01

    A large stable isotope dataset from East and Central Africa from ca. 30 regional collection sites that range from forest to grassland shows that most extant East and Central African large herbivore taxa have diets dominated by C4 grazing or C3 browsing. Comparison with the fossil record shows that faunal assemblages from ca. 4.1-2.35 Ma in the Turkana Basin had a greater diversity of C3-C4 mixed feeding taxa than is presently found in modern East and Central African environments. In contrast, the period from 2.35 to 1.0 Ma had more C4-grazing taxa, especially nonruminant C4-grazing taxa, than are found in modern environments in East and Central Africa. Many nonbovid C4 grazers became extinct in Africa, notably the suid Notochoerus, the hipparion equid Eurygnathohippus, the giraffid Sivatherium, and the elephantid Elephas. Other important nonruminant C4-grazing taxa switched to browsing, including suids in the lineage Kolpochoerus-Hylochoerus and the elephant Loxodonta. Many modern herbivore taxa in Africa have diets that differ significantly from their fossil relatives. Elephants and tragelaphin bovids are two groups often used for paleoecological insight, yet their fossil diets were very different from their modern closest relatives; therefore, their taxonomic presence in a fossil assemblage does not indicate they had a similar ecological function in the past as they do at present. Overall, we find ecological assemblages of C3-browsing, C3-C4-mixed feeding, and C4-grazing taxa in the Turkana Basin fossil record that are different from any modern ecosystem in East or Central Africa.

  17. Dietary changes of large herbivores in the Turkana Basin, Kenya from 4 to 1 Ma

    PubMed Central

    Cerling, Thure E.; Andanje, Samuel A.; Blumenthal, Scott A.; Brown, Francis H.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Harris, John M.; Hart, John A.; Kirera, Francis M.; Kaleme, Prince; Leakey, Louise N.; Leakey, Meave G.; Levin, Naomi E.; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo; Passey, Benjamin H.; Uno, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    A large stable isotope dataset from East and Central Africa from ca. 30 regional collection sites that range from forest to grassland shows that most extant East and Central African large herbivore taxa have diets dominated by C4 grazing or C3 browsing. Comparison with the fossil record shows that faunal assemblages from ca. 4.1–2.35 Ma in the Turkana Basin had a greater diversity of C3–C4 mixed feeding taxa than is presently found in modern East and Central African environments. In contrast, the period from 2.35 to 1.0 Ma had more C4-grazing taxa, especially nonruminant C4-grazing taxa, than are found in modern environments in East and Central Africa. Many nonbovid C4 grazers became extinct in Africa, notably the suid Notochoerus, the hipparion equid Eurygnathohippus, the giraffid Sivatherium, and the elephantid Elephas. Other important nonruminant C4-grazing taxa switched to browsing, including suids in the lineage Kolpochoerus-Hylochoerus and the elephant Loxodonta. Many modern herbivore taxa in Africa have diets that differ significantly from their fossil relatives. Elephants and tragelaphin bovids are two groups often used for paleoecological insight, yet their fossil diets were very different from their modern closest relatives; therefore, their taxonomic presence in a fossil assemblage does not indicate they had a similar ecological function in the past as they do at present. Overall, we find ecological assemblages of C3-browsing, C3–C4-mixed feeding, and C4-grazing taxa in the Turkana Basin fossil record that are different from any modern ecosystem in East or Central Africa. PMID:26240344

  18. Early time studies of cylindrical liner implosions at 1 MA on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, L.; Byvank, T.; Cahill, A. D.; Hoyt, C. L.; de Grouchy, P. W. L.; Potter, W. M.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Tests of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept will make use of the 27 MA Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, to implode a cylindrical metal liner to compress and heat preheated, magnetized plasma contained within it. While most pulsed power machines produce much lower currents than the Z-machine, there are issues that can still be addressed on smaller scale facilities. Recent work on the Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) has made use of 10 mm long and 4 mm diameter metal liners having different wall thicknesses to study the initiation of plasma on the liner's surface as well as axial magnetic field compression [P.-A. Gourdain et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 083006 (2013)]. This report presents experimental results with non-imploding liners, investigating the impact the liner's surface structure has on initiation and ablation. Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging and optical 12 frame camera imaging were used to observe and assess emission non-uniformities as they developed. Axial and side-on interferometry was used to determine the distribution of plasma near the liner surface, including the impact of non-uniformities during the plasma initiation and ablation phases of the experiments.

  19. Pulsed Electric Fields for Biological Weapons Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    studies of Bacillus atrophaeus (formerly Bacillus subtilis var. niger). 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanosecond high-field electric pulse, electroperturbation...sterility monitoring kit, which utilizes spores of Bacillus atrophaeus (formerly Bacillus subtilis var. niger) deposited on paper in glassine envelopes, has...report a study of the application of ultra- short high-field electric pulses (5 MV/m, 100-ns pulse width, 4-ns rise time) to Bacillus atrophaeus spores

  20. Persistent perceptual delay for head movement onset relative to auditory stimuli of different durations and rise times.

    PubMed

    Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Raeder, Sophie M; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-07-01

    The perception of simultaneity between auditory and vestibular information is crucially important for maintaining a coherent representation of the acoustic environment whenever the head moves. It has been recently reported, however, that despite having similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated. This suggests that perceptual latency of a head movement is longer than a co-occurring sound. However, these studies paired a vestibular stimulation of long duration (~1 s) and of a continuously changing temporal envelope with a brief (10-50 ms) sound pulse. In the present study, the stimuli were matched for temporal envelope duration and shape. Participants judged the temporal order of the two stimuli, the onset of an active head movement and the onset of brief (50 ms) or long (1,400 ms) sounds with a square- or raised-cosine-shaped envelope. Consistent with previous reports, head movement onset had to precede the onset of a brief sound by about 73 ms in order for the stimuli to be perceived as simultaneous. Head movements paired with long square sounds (~100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds. Surprisingly, head movements paired with long raised-cosine sound (~115 ms) had to be presented even earlier than brief stimuli. This additional lead time could not be accounted for by differences in the comparison stimulus characteristics (temporal envelope duration and shape). Rather, differences between sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound. The persistent lead time required for vestibular stimulation provides further evidence that the perceptual latency of vestibular stimulation is greater than the other senses.

  1. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg Interferometry in Quantum Dots with Fast Rise Times: Evidence for Coherent Phonon Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusinski, M.; Studenikin, S. A.; Aers, G.; Granger, G.; Kam, A.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Manipulating qubits via electrical pulses in a piezoelectric material such as GaAs can be expected to generate incidental acoustic phonons. In this Letter we determine theoretically and experimentally the consequences of these phonons for semiconductor spin qubits using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Theoretical calculations predict that phonons in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction produce both phonon-Rabi fringes and accelerated evolution at the singlet-triplet anticrossing. Observed features confirm the influence of these mechanisms. Additionally, evidence is found that the pulsed gates themselves act as phonon cavities increasing the influence of phonons under specific resonant conditions.

  2. Design considerations for a high-power, short rise-time pulser for thick-transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammell, Paul M.; Harris, Gerald R.

    2002-05-01

    When transiently-excited, thick ultrasonic source transducers are used in NDE applications, such as broadband measurements of attenuation or of directivity and frequency responses of receiving transducers, the pulser must provide an excitation pulse that is very short and of high voltage and current. Also, it is desirable that the pulser be of simple and stable design. Features of several designs, including modern FET pulser circuits, are discussed.

  3. Rise Time and Formant Transition Duration in the Discrimination of Speech Sounds: The Ba-Wa Distinction in Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Usha; Fosker, Tim; Huss, Martina; Mead, Natasha; Szucs, Denes

    2011-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia have a specific difficulty with the neural representation of the sound structure (phonological structure) of speech. One likely cause of their difficulties with phonology is a perceptual difficulty in auditory temporal processing (Tallal, 1980). Tallal (1980) proposed that basic auditory…

  4. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg Interferometry in Quantum Dots with Fast Rise Times: Evidence for Coherent Phonon Driving.

    PubMed

    Korkusinski, M; Studenikin, S A; Aers, G; Granger, G; Kam, A; Sachrajda, A S

    2017-02-10

    Manipulating qubits via electrical pulses in a piezoelectric material such as GaAs can be expected to generate incidental acoustic phonons. In this Letter we determine theoretically and experimentally the consequences of these phonons for semiconductor spin qubits using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Theoretical calculations predict that phonons in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction produce both phonon-Rabi fringes and accelerated evolution at the singlet-triplet anticrossing. Observed features confirm the influence of these mechanisms. Additionally, evidence is found that the pulsed gates themselves act as phonon cavities increasing the influence of phonons under specific resonant conditions.

  5. Q-switching an all-fiber laser using acousto-optic null coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Yuval; Goldring, Sharone; Pearl, Shaul; Arie, Ady

    2013-05-01

    A new method for Q-switching an all-fiber laser is presented. It is based on induced acoustic long period grating operating on a null coupler, which acts as acoustically controlled tunable output coupler. Q-switching is achieved by switching on and off the acoustic wave in a burst mode, thereby generating laser pulses that are ~400 times shorter than the acoustically controlled coupler's rise time. Output pulse energy of 22 μJ and temporal width of ~100 ns were measured at a wavelength of 1.54 μm.

  6. A compact, coaxial shunt current diagnostic for X pinches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangping; Zhang, Jinhai; Li, Mo; Zhang, Xinjun; Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Shaoguo

    2015-08-01

    A compact coaxial shunt was applied in X-pinches experiments on Qiangguang pulsed power generator. The coaxial shunt was designed to have a compact construction for smaller inductance and more, for conveniently assembling upon the X pinch load structure. The coaxial shunt is also a cheap current probe and was easily built by research groups. The shunt can monitor a 100 kA high current with a 100 ns rise time. The calibration results showed that the probe used in the experiments has a resistance of 3.2 mΩ with an uncertainty of 3%, and its response time to the step signal is less than 7 ns.

  7. Nested X Pinches on the COBRA Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Wilhelm, H.; Hammer, D. A.; Sinars, D. B.

    2009-01-21

    Recent results of X pinch studies on the COBRA generator at Cornell University (peak current up to 1.2 MA and rise time of 100 ns) are presented. Using an initial configuration of wires before their twisting, similar to nested cylindrical wire arrays enables the assembly of a symmetric configuration at the X pinch crossing region. It also enables an investigation of multilayered X pinches. X pinches with different configurations, including with different materials in the inner and outer wire layers, were tested.

  8. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Youssef, G; Crum, R; Prikhodko, S V; Seif, D; Po, G; Ghoniem, N; Kodambaka, S; Gupta, V

    2013-02-28

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>10(7) s(-1)), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (∼1.20 μm in tall and ∼0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  9. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Kodambaka, S.; Ghoniem, N.; Gupta, V.

    2013-02-28

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>10{sup 7} s{sup -1}), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars ({approx}1.20 {mu}m in tall and {approx}0.45 {mu}m in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  10. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Ghoniem, N.; Kodambaka, S.; Gupta, V.

    2013-02-01

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>107 s-1), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (˜1.20 μm in tall and ˜0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  11. A close look at beam aborts with rise times less than 40 ms from the years 2014-2016. Case studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.

    2016-09-14

    In an effort to understand the risks of operating RHIC with an additional delay of 40 ms in the abort system, all beam aborts triggered by loss monitors at store from the years 2014, 2015 and 2016 were analyzed; and particularly fast cases, selected. The results were presented at the RHIC retreat on Jul 29, 2016. All beam aborts at injection, during the ramp and at flattop but before the “ev-lumi” event were ignored since the additional delay of 40 ms is proposed for operation at store only. Many (but not all) of the 15 studied cases are of no concern. Cases with high damage potential are rare - but not rare enough. In order to make an added 40 ms during physics store conditions as safe as reasonably possible, additional permit inputs such as 10 Hz BF power supplies, RF storage cavities, power supply error states or BPMs, in addition to significantly reduced loss monitors (LM) thresholds for selected LM should be commissioned.

  12. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Ghoniem, N.; Kodambaka, S.; Gupta, V.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>107 s−1), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (∼1.20 μm in tall and ∼0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars. PMID:23526837

  13. Volume-surface barrier discharge in dried air in three-electrode system fed by impulse high voltage with nanosecond rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashin, Maxim; Rebrov, Igor; Nebogatkin, Sergey; Sokolova, Marina; Nikitin, Alexey; Voevodin, Vadim; Krivov, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    Results of experimental investigation of a volume-surface barrier discharge in a three-electrode system under periodic impulse voltage applied to the surface discharge (SD) electrodes and a d.c. potential applied to an additional third electrode are presented. It is shown that there is a strong influence of polarity and amplitude of the d.c. potential on the direct current "extracted" out of the surface discharge plasma layer by electric field of the third electrode. The amount of charged positive species that constitute the "extracted" current prevails under positive impulse voltage for low values of the negative d.c. potential of the third electrode. The amount of negative species prevails with higher values of the positive d.c. positive of the third electrode. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  14. Influence of configuration effects on multiple burst simulation testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuely, J. L.; Cantaloube, M.

    1991-01-01

    During the initial phase of a lightning strike attachment on an aircraft, fast current pulses (rise time approximately 100 ns, I(sub max) approximately few kA) were measured, which can create equipment upsets or disturbances. This threat, made of repetitive pulses and usually called 'multiple bursts', can be reproduced at the equipment interfaces assuming that the transfer function of the structure was determined. The normalized waveform H (10 kA - 100 ns rise time) is the reference for one of these pulses. The importance of the coaxial return path termination for the injection of the wave H is emphasized. According to the constitutive materials of the test bed, and the adaptation of the line, the natural oscillations of the structure and the internal coupling mechanisms can be modified. As a conclusion, various test configurations in relation with the nature of the test bed and the characteristics of the generator are detailed, for a more accurate ground simulation of the attachment phase.

  15. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm²

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; ...

    2014-12-03

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films grown on LaAlO₃ (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10⁶ A/cm² at 5 K was obtained. In this study, magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals,more » FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.« less

  16. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm²

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2014-12-03

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films grown on LaAlO₃ (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10⁶ A/cm² at 5 K was obtained. In this study, magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals, FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.

  17. Origin, structure and exposure history of a wave-cut platform more than 1 Ma in age at the coast of northern Spain: A multiple cosmogenic nuclide approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Marrón, J.; Hetzel, R.; Niedermann, S.; Menéndez, R.; Marquínez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Along the Asturian coast of northern Spain an uplifted wave-cut platform extends for ˜ 100 km east-west. The steep cliff which bounds the gently seaward-dipping platform to the north increases in height from 30 m in the west to 100 m in the east and reflects the overall eastward increase in platform elevation. The southern edge of the 2-4 km-wide platform runs along the foothills of the Cantabrian Mountains, as constrained by a high-resolution digital elevation model. The marine platform, which was carved into deformed Paleozoic bedrock with abundant quartzite beds, is largely covered by weathered marine and continental sediments. Quartzite samples from flat bedrock outcrops which are currently not covered by sediment or soil yield cosmogenic nuclide concentrations ( 21Ne, 10Be and 26Al) that demonstrate a long and complex exposure history, including periods of burial with partial or complete shielding from cosmic rays. The combination of multiple cosmogenic nuclides yields a minimum age of 1-2 Ma for the platform. Taking into account (i) the horizontal and vertical extent of the platform, (ii) the high resistance to erosion of the quartzitic bedrock, and (iii) published data on the magnitude of past sea level fluctuations, we suggest that the wave-cut platform formed in the Pliocene. Subvertical faults cutting the platform at high angles to the coastline offset the southern edge of the platform by 20 to 40 m and reactivate the pre-existing anisotropy in the Paleozoic bedrock. Uplift and crustal deformation of the coastal region have occurred after platform formation in the Pliocene and may still be active. The slow deformation of the northern edge of the Iberian plate including the Cantabrian Mountains may result from the ongoing slow convergence at an incipient subduction zone extending along the coast of northern Spain.

  18. Deep Ocean Circulation and Nutrient Contents from Atlantic-Pacific Gradients of Neodymium and Carbon Isotopes During the Last 1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, A. M.; Elderfield, H.; Howe, J. N. W.

    2014-12-01

    The last few million years saw changing boundary conditions to the Earth system which set the stage for bi-polar glaciation and Milankovich-forced glacial-interglacial cycles which dominate Quaternary climate variability. Recent studies have highlighted the relative importance of temperature, ice volume and ocean circulation changes during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition at ~900 ka (Elderfield et al., 2012, Pena and Goldstein, 2014). Reconstructing the history of global deep water mass propagation and its carbon content is important for fully understanding the ocean's role in amplifying Milankovich changes to cause glacial-interglacial transitions. A new foraminiferal-coating Nd isotope record from ODP Site 1123 on the deep Chatham Rise is interpreted as showing glacial-interglacial changes in the bottom water propagation of Atlantic-sourced waters into the Pacific via the Southern Ocean during the last 1 million years. This is compared to globally-distributed bottom water Nd isotope records; including a new deep western equatorial Atlantic Ocean record from ODP Site 929, as well as published records from ODP 1088 and Site 1090 in the South Atlantic (Pena and Goldstein, 2014), and ODP 758 in the deep Indian Ocean (Gourlan et al., 2010). Atlantic-to-Pacific gradients in deep ocean neodymium isotopes are constructed for key time intervals to elucidate changes in deep water sourcing and circulation pathways through the global ocean. Benthic carbon isotopes are used to estimate deep water nutrient contents of deep water masses and constrain locations and modes of deep water formation. References: Elderfield et al. Science 337, 704 (2012) Pena and Goldstein, Science 345, 318 (2014) Gourlan et al., Quaternary Science Reviews 29, 2484-2498 (2010)

  19. Acceleration of thin flyer foils with a 1 MA pulsed power device for shock-wave experiments in clumpy foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2007-11-01

    The dynamics of shock waves in clumpy media are important for understanding many astrophysical processes, including the triggering of star formation in interstellar gas clouds by passing shock waves. This phenomena can be studied in the laboratory by launching a flyer plate into a low density foam with clumps. Low density foams offer the advantage of relative low sound speeds (a few hundred meters per second) compared to normal solids, thus reducing the flyer speed required to create shock waves. In first experiments aluminum foils with thicknesses between 20 micrometer and 130 micrometer were accelerated to speeds up to 2.3 km/s. In addition, the impact of the flyers on plexiglas targets was studied. Additional measurements will focus on optimizing the flyer properties (thicker flyers, higher velocities) and on characterizing the flyer in more detail (temperature of the flyer and plasma ablation from the flyer). The results of these measurements will be used to design an experiment studying the dynamics of shock waves in clumpy foams, using the 100 TW laser system Leopard for back-lighting the foam target.

  20. Integration of chronic disease prevention and management services into primary care: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (PR1MaC)

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Dubois, Marie-France; Bélanger, Martin; Almirall, José; Bouhali, Tarek; Sasseville, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease prevention and management programs are usually single-disease oriented. Our objective was to evaluate an intervention that targeted multiple chronic conditions and risk factors. Methods: We conducted a pragmatic randomized controlled trial involving patients aged 18-75 years with at least 1 of the targeted chronic conditions or risk factors from 8 primary care practices in the Saguenay region of Quebec, Canada, to evaluate an intervention that included self-management support and patient-centred motivational approaches. Self-management (primary outcome) was evaluated using the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ). Secondary outcomes included self-efficacy, health-related quality of life, psychological distress and health behaviours. Results: Three hundred thirty-two patients were recruited and randomly assigned (n = 166 for both intervention and control groups) and evaluated after 3 months. The intervention group showed improvement in 6 of the 8 heiQ domains: health-directed behaviour (relative risk [RR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 2.59), emotional well-being (RR 1.73, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.79), self-monitoring and insight (RR 2.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 4.86), constructive attitudes and approaches (RR 2.40, 95% CI 1.37 to 4.21), skill and technique acquisition (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.53), and health service navigation (RR 1.93, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.47). Improvement was also observed in the Physical Component Summary (p = 0.017) and the Single Index (p = 0.041) of the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (version 2). The intervention group improved in fruit and vegetable consumption (odds ratio [OR] 2.36, 95% CI 1.41 to 3.95) and physical activity (OR 3.81, 95% CI 1.65 to 8.76). One-year improvement was maintained in the intervention group for several outcomes. Interpretation: It is possible to implement an intervention integrating chronic disease prevention and management services into primary care settings. We obtained positive and promising results using this intervention. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no.: NCT01319656. PMID:28018871

  1. Determination of plasma pinch time and effective current radius of double planar wire array implosions from current measurements on a 1-MA linear transformer driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Adam M.; Yager-Elorriaga, David A.; Patel, Sonal G.; Jordan, Nicholas M.; Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Safronova, Alla S.; Kantsyrev, Victor L.; Shlyaptseva, Veronica V.; Shrestha, Ishor; Schmidt-Petersen, Maximillian T.

    2016-10-01

    Implosions of planar wire arrays were performed on the Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-pinch Experiments, a linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan. These experiments were characterized by lower than expected peak currents and significantly longer risetimes compared to studies performed on higher impedance machines. A circuit analysis showed that the load inductance has a significant impact on the current output due to the comparatively low impedance of the driver; the long risetimes were also attributed to high variability in LTD switch closing times. A circuit model accounting for these effects was employed to measure changes in load inductance as a function of time to determine plasma pinch timing and calculate a minimum effective current-carrying radius. These calculations showed good agreement with available shadowgraphy and x-ray diode measurements.

  2. Bremsstrahlung target optimization for reflex triodes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Mosher, D.; Commisso, R. J.

    2008-08-15

    The anode (tantalum) foil thickness in a reflex triode was varied from 2.5 to 250 {mu}m to maximize the dose from bremsstrahlung produced by a 1 MV, 1 MA, 100 ns electron beam. Experiments and computer simulations show that the dose is maximized for a foil thickness of about 25 {mu}m, 1/18th of the electron range computed from the continuous slowing down approximation. For foils thicker than optimum, self-absorption in the foil attenuates 10-100 keV photons, reducing the dose. For foils thinner than optimum, the dose decreases as a result of electron migration to large radius. A simple formula that predicts the optimum thickness as a function of the beam current and voltage is derived that should be applicable to a large range of experimental parameters.

  3. Ultrawide-band electromagnetic pulses induced hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, S T; Mathur, S P; Akyel, Y; Lee, J C

    The ultrawide-band (UWB) electromagnetic pulses are used as a new modality in radar technology. Biological effects of extremely high peak E-field, fast rise time, ultrashort pulse width, and ultrawide band have not been investigated heretofore due to the lack of animal exposure facilities. A new biological effects database is needed to establish personnel protection guidelines for these new type of radiofrequency radiation. Functional indices of the cardiovascular system (heart rate, systolic, mean, and diastolic pressures) were selected to represent biological end points that may be susceptible to the UWB radiation. A noninvasive tail-cuff photoelectric sensor sphygmomanometer was used. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were subjected to sham exposure, 0.5-kHz (93 kV/m, 180 ps rise time, 1.00 ns pulse width, whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, SAR = 70 mW/kg) or a 1-kHz (85 kV/m, 200 ps rise time, 1.03 ns pulse width, SAR = 121 mW/kg) UWB fields in a tapered parallel plate GTEM cell for 6 min. Cardiovascular functions were evaluated from 45 min to 4 weeks after exposures. Significant decrease in arterial blood pressures (hypotension) was found. In contrast, heart rate was not altered by these exposures. The UWB radiation-induced hypotension was a robust, consistent, and persistent effect.

  4. Ultrawide-band electromagnetic pulses induced hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, S T; Mathur, S P; Akyel, Y; Lee, J C

    1999-09-01

    The ultrawide-band (UWB) electromagnetic pulses are used as a new modality in radar technology. Biological effects of extremely high peak E-field, fast rise time, ultrashort pulse width, and ultrawide band have not been investigated heretofore due to the lack of animal exposure facilities. A new biological effects database is needed to establish personnel protection guidelines for these new type of radiofrequency radiation. Functional indices of the cardiovascular system (heart rate, systolic, mean, and diastolic pressures) were selected to represent biological end points that may be susceptible to the UWB radiation. A noninvasive tail-cuff photoelectric sensor sphygmomanometer was used. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were subjected to sham exposure, 0.5-kHz (93 kV/m, 180 ps rise time, 1.00 ns pulse width, whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, SAR = 70 mW/kg) or a 1-kHz (85 kV/m, 200 ps rise time, 1.03 ns pulse width, SAR = 121 mW/kg) UWB fields in a tapered parallel plate GTEM cell for 6 min. Cardiovascular functions were evaluated from 45 min to 4 weeks after exposures. Significant decrease in arterial blood pressures (hypotension) was found. In contrast, heart rate was not altered by these exposures. The UWB radiation-induced hypotension was a robust, consistent, and persistent effect.

  5. High-voltage, low-inductance gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, Frederick R.; Stygar, William A.

    2016-03-22

    A low-inductance, air-insulated gas switch uses a de-enhanced annular trigger ring disposed between two opposing high voltage electrodes. The switch is DC chargeable to 200 kilovolts or more, triggerable, has low jitter (5 ns or less), has pre-fire and no-fire rates of no more than one in 10,000 shots, and has a lifetime of greater than 100,000 shots. Importantly, the switch also has a low inductance (less than 60 nH) and the ability to conduct currents with less than 100 ns rise times. The switch can be used with linear transformer drives or other pulsed-power systems.

  6. Study of composition of the ultrafine material produced from graphite-catalyst mixture under extreme energy action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikova, N. V.; Alikin, D. O.; Melnikov, Yu B.; Grigorov, I. G.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafine materials were produced under conditions of extreme energy effects on the mixture of graphite and Ni-Mn catalysts. For the purpose to obtain various forms of carbon, including diamond-like forms, experiments were performed on a MIG high-current generator with the current amplitude of 2-2.5 MA and current rise time of 100 ns. The composition of the explosion products was studied using x-ray diffraction and x-ray phase analyses, the impedance spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis and energy dispersive x-ray analysis and the laser confocal Raman microscopy. It was found that the carbon in the studied materials is in the graphite, diamond-like (the faceted particles or agglomerates of faceted particles in size about or less than 250 nm) and amorphous forms.

  7. Influence of grid control on beam quality in laser ion source generating high-current low-charged copper ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Yoshida, M.; Ogawa, M.; Oguri, Y.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.; Kwan, J.

    2003-08-01

    We examined grid-controlled extraction for a laser ion source using a KrF laser. By using grid-controlled extraction in the over-dense regime, we found that the ion beam current waveforms were stabilized more significantly as the grid bias raised from -90 V to -280 V. The normalized emittance of 0.08 {pi}mm-mrad measured without the grid control was improved to 0.06 {pi}mm-mrad with the grid control. In contrast to this observation, the grid bias disturbed the pattern of the beam extracted in the source-limited regime. Fast extraction was carried out using a high-voltage pulse with a rise time of {approx} 100 ns. The grid control suppressed successfully the beam pedestal originating from the plasma pre-filled in the extraction gap.

  8. Influence of surface finish on the plasma formation at the skin explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsko, I. M.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports on experiments to investigate how the quality of surface finish, i.e., surface roughness, influences the plasma formation in a skin explosion of conductors. The experiments were performed on a MIG terawatt generator with a current amplitude of up to 2.5 MA and current rise time of 100 ns. The plasma formation at the conductor surface and the evolution of the plasma boundary was recorded using a four-frame optical camera with an exposure time of 3 ns per frame. It is shown that the quality of surface finish little affects the onset of plasma formation in a skin explosion of stainless steel and St3 steel conductors at a magnetic field of up to 400 T.

  9. Dynamics of large-scale instabilities in conductors electrically exploded in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsko, I. M.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    The growth of large-scale instabilities during the propagation of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave through a conductor was studied experimentally. The experiment was carried out using the MIG terawatt pulsed power generator at a peak current up to 2.5 MA with 100 ns rise time. It was observed that instabilities with a wavelength of 150 μm developed on the surface of the conductor hollow part within 160 ns after the onset of current flow, whereas the surface of the solid rod remained almost unperturbed. A system of equations describing the propagation of a nonlinear diffusion wave through a conductor and the growth of thermal instabilities has been solved numerically. It has been revealed that the development of large- scale instabilities is obviously related to the propagation of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave.

  10. Experimental study of the nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and skin explosion of cylindrical conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the skin explosion of cylindrical conductors of diameter 1-3 mm (copper, aluminum, titanium, steel 3, and stainless steel) at a peak magnetic field of 200-600 T. The experiments were carried out on the MIG pulsed power generator at a current of up to 2.5 MA and a current rise time of 100 ns. The surface explosion of a conductor was identified by the appearance of a flash of extreme ultraviolet radiation. A minimum magnetic induction has been determined below which no plasma is generated at the conductor surface. For copper, aluminum, steel 3, titanium, and stainless steel, the minimum magnetic induction has been estimated to be (to within 10%) 375, 270, 280, 220, and 245 T, respectively.

  11. Development of Miniature and High-repetition-rate Magnetic Pulse Compression Circuit for Production of Streamer-like Discharge Plasmas in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Takahisa; Kouno, Kanako; Akiyama, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sakugawa, Takashi

    Pulsed power technology enables production of non-thermal plasmas with a large volume in gases by generating a high electric field at the tip of streamer discharge plasmas. Recently, all solid-state pulsed power generators which are operated with a high repetition rate, long lifetime and high reliability, have been developed aiming for industrial applications. Here, a new high-repetition-rate pulsed power generator for discharge plasmas in water is developed. The generator consists of semiconductor switches and saturable inductors. The semiconductor switches are thyristors in parallel and series circuits. An output peak voltage over 20kV is generated with a voltage rise time of 100ns, and streamer-like discharge plasmas in water are produced repetitively.

  12. MHD instabilities developing in a conductor exploding in the skin effect mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Mesyats, G. A.; Oreshkin, E. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of experiments with exploding copper conductors, performed on the MIG facility (providing currents of amplitude of about 2.5 MA and rise time of 100 ns), are analyzed. With an frame optical camera, large-scale instabilities of wavelength 0.2-0.5 mm were detected on the conductor surface. The instabilities show up as plasma "tongues" expanding with a sound velocity in the opposite direction to the magnetic field gradient. Analysis performed using a two-dimensional MHD code has shown that the structures observed in the experiments were formed most probably due to flute instabilities. The growth of flute instabilities is predetermined by the development of thermal instabilities near the conductor surface. The thermal instabilities arise behind the front of the nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave propagating through the conductor. The wavefront on its own is not subject to thermal instabilities.

  13. University-scale pulsed-power system using linear transformer driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yu; Huang, Mei-Feng; Iang, Tzong Huan; Tsai, Yi-Liang

    2016-10-01

    Linear transformer driver (LTD) is a compact pulsed-power system suitable for x-ray sources or laboratory astrophysics and space research for university-scale laboratory. A LTD with 20 bricks storing 8kJ of total energy delivering 500kA to the load with a 100ns rise time is being built. It will be used for following two purposes: (1) gas-puff z pinches generating soft x-ray sources for bio-medical research in the future and (2) generating plasma jets to study interactions between plasma flows and unmagnetized/magnetized obstacles analogous to the interactions between solar winds and planetary magnetic fields or unmagnetized planets. One brick consisting of two 40nF capacitors connected in series charged to +/- 100kV and delivering a peak current of 25kA to the load was built. The results of current measurement and circuit characteristics are shown.

  14. Study of Thin Foil Explosion Using Point-Projection Radiography of Hybrid X-Pinch X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Atoyan, L.; Hammer, D. A.; Tilikin, I. N.

    2016-10-01

    The explosion of thin flat and cylindrical foils has been studied on the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns rise time) and COBRA (1.0 MA, 100 ns rise time) pulsed-power generators using X-ray point-projection imaging to investigate the exploded foil structure dependence on the foil material, thickness, geometry, and current through the foil. The geometry of the experiments and hybrid X-pinch source of soft X-ray radiation enabled better than 3 microns spatial resolution and less then 1 ns temporal resolution on both generators. On the BIN pulser the HXP was used as the main load and 1-15 microns thick and about 2-3 mm long foils were exploded in the return current circuit by 50-60 kA current. Al (4, 15 microns), Cu (1, 10 microns) and Ni (5 microns) foils were used in the experiments. Cylindrical foils 4 microns thick with 0.5 mm diameters were used as the main load on the COBRA generator with the HXP placed in one of two return current rods as the source of radiation for high resolution point-projection radiography. Some common features between explosion of fine wires and foils were observed. The exploded foil structure depended dominantly on the current through the foil. Work at Cornell was supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836; the work at the Lebedev Institute was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research Project No. 140201206.

  15. New Planar Wire Array Experiments on the LTD Generator at U Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, M. E.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Cooper, M. C.; Lorance, M. Y.; Stafford, A.; Petkov, E. E.; Jordan, N. M.; Patel, S. G.; Steiner, A. M.; Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments on planar wire array z-pinches have been carried out on the MAIZE Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) generator at the University of Michigan (UM) for the first time. Specifically, Al (Al 5056, 95% Al, 5% Mg) double planar wire arrays (DPWAs) comprising six wires in each plane with interplanar gaps of 3.0 mm and 6.0 mm and interwire gaps of 0.7 mm and 1.0 mm were imploded with x-ray time-integrated spectra indicating electron temperatures of over 450 eV for K-shell Al and Mg, while producing mostly optically thin lines. In addition to x-ray time-integrated spectra, the diagnostics included x-ray time-integrated pinhole cameras, two silicon diodes, and shadowgraphy, which are analyzed and compared. The MAIZE LTD is capable of supplying up 1.0 MA, 100 kV pulses with 100 ns rise time into a matched load. However, for these experiments the LTD was charged to +-70 kV resulting in up to 0.5 MA with a current rise time of approximately 150 ns. Future experiments and the importance of studying planar wire arrays on LTD devices are discussed. This work supported by NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984. S. Patel & A. Steiner supported by Sandia. D. Yager-Elorriaga supported by NSF GF.

  16. High-voltage pulsed generators for electro-discharge technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kharlov, A. V.; Kumpyak, E. V.; Sinebrykhov, V. A.

    2013-09-01

    A high-voltage pulse technology is one of effective techniques for the disintegration and milling of rocks, separation of ores and synthesized materials, recycling of building and elastoplastic materials. We present here the design and test results of two portable HV pulsed generators, designed for materials fragmentation, though some other technological applications are possible as well. Generator #1 consists of low voltage block, high voltage transformer, high voltage capacitive storage block, two electrode gas switch, fragmentation chamber and control system block. Technical characteristics of the #1 generator: stored energy in HV capacitors can be varied from 50 to 1000 J, output voltage up to 300 kV, voltage rise time ~ 50 ns, typical operation regime 1000 pulses bursts with a repetitive rate up to 10 Hz. Generator #2 is made on an eight stages Marx scheme with two capacitors (100 kV-400 nF) per stage, connected in parallel. Two electrode spark gap switches, operated in atmospheric air, are used in the Marx generator. Parameters of the generator: stored energy in capacitors 2÷8 kJ, amplitude of the output voltage 200÷400 kV, voltage rise time on a load 50÷100 ns, repetitive rate up to 0.5 Hz. The fragmentation process can be controlled within a wide range of parameters for both generators.

  17. Kicker thyratron experience from SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.; Cassel, R.L.; Mattison, T.S. ); Reginato, L.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has five fast kickers for the damping ring injectors, extractors, and the electron extractor for the positron target that use multi-gap Deuterium-filled thyratrons. The thyratrons operate with 30 to 70 kV anode voltages and 1 to 5 kA currents, to deliver pulses to kicker magnets with {approx} 30 ns rise times, up to {approx} 150 ns pulse widths, at 120 Hz. Operating and lifetime experience with several types of thyratrons and support electronics are discussed. Floating driver and power supply electronics were replaced by a ferrite choke isolator to allow grounding of the cathode support electronics with a commensurate increase in operating reliability. The construction of a 100 ns Blumlein enabled detailed measurements of the switching times for all SLC thyratrons under similar conditions. In the final focus area, the kickers dump the SLC beams after the e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} collisions. These thyratrons function with 15 kV anode voltages and up to 2 kA currents to produce 1/2 sine pulses with {approx} 300 ns rise times, {approx} 550 ns FWHM, at 120 Hz. Operating experience with these thyratrons will also be presented. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Simulation of tectonic evolution of the Kanto basin of Japan since 1 Ma due to subduction of the Pacific and Philippine sea plates and collision of the Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashima, Akinori; Sato, Toshinori; Sato, Hiroshi; Asao, Kazumi; Furuya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shuji; Kameo, Koji; Miyauchi, Takahiro; Ito, Tanio; Tsumura, Noriko; Kaneda, Heitaro

    2015-04-01

    The Kanto basin, the largest lowland in Japan, developed by flexure as a result of (1) the subduction of the Philippine Sea (PHS) and the Pacific (PAC) plates and (2) the collision of the Izu-Bonin arc with the Japanese island arc. Geomorphological, geological, and thermochronological data on long-term vertical movements over the last 1 My suggest that subsidence initially affected the entire Kanto basin after which the area of subsidence gradually narrowed until, finally, the basin began to experience uplift. In this study, we modelled the tectonic evolution of the Kanto basin following the method of Matsu'ura and Sato (1989) for a kinematic subduction model with dislocations, in order to quantitatively assess the effects of PHS and PAC subduction. We include the steady slip-rate deficit (permanent locking rate at the plate interface) in our model to account for collision process. We explore how the arc-arc collision process has been affected by a westerly shift in the PHS plate motion vector with respect to the Eurasian plate, thought to have occurred between 1.0-0.5 Ma, using long-term vertical deformation data to constrain extent of the locked zone on the plate interface. We evaluated the change in vertical deformation rate for two scenarios: (1) a synchronous shift in the orientation of the locked zone as PHS plate motion shifts and (2) a delayed shift in the orientation of the locked zone following a change in plate motion. Observed changes in the subsidence/uplift pattern are better explained by scenario (2), suggesting that recent (<1 My) deformation in the Kanto basin shows a lag in crustal response to the shift in plate motion. We also calculated recent stress accumulation rates and found a good match with observed earthquake mechanisms, which shows that intraplate earthquakes serve to release stress accumulated through long-term plate interactions.

  19. High northern geomagnetic field behavior and new constraints on the Gilsá event: Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results of ∼0.5-3.1 Ma basalts from Jökuldalur, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Supakulopas, Radchagrit; Riishuus, Morten S.; Mac Niocaill, Conall

    2016-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic results of extrusive rocks from high southern latitudes (>60°S) and high northern latitudes (>60°N) have been suggested to reflect a hemispheric asymmetry of the geomagnetic field on time-scales of 105 to 106 yrs, with higher and more stable fields in the north. This interpretation, however, is based on only a few modern-standard paleodirectional data sets and on high northern stable field paleointensity data of rocks that are mainly younger than 100 kyr. The sparsity of modern-standard data questions the validity (and age range) of this potential geomagnetic asymmetry. In 2013 and 2014, we sampled basaltic lava flows in Jökuldalur, north-eastern Iceland, to obtain high-standard paleodirectional and paleointensity data at relatively high-northern latitudes (65.2°N). On average, we sampled >15 cores per site at 51 sites of predominantly Matuyama age. Complete demagnetization was carried out on all samples using AF or thermal demagnetization. We present 45 distinct paleomagnetic directions based on overall N > 10 ChRMs per site and α 95 < 3.5 °. We obtain a mean direction of D = 355.7 °, I = 76.3 °, and α 95 = 3.2 for N = 45 sites that is not significantly different from a GAD field. The resulting 45 VGPs distribute around the North Pole, and the global mean paleomagnetic pole (λ bar = 87.8 °, ϕ bar = 224.3 °) is coincident with the North Pole within the α95 confidence limit. We calculate a VGP dispersion S B (Mat) = 20.523.3/17.8 and an average inclination anomaly ΔI = - 0.91 ° 2.94/-4.88 for our 38 Matuyama age data. The dispersion SB overall supports the interpretation of a dependence of SB on latitude during the Matuyama, while the negligible ΔI suggests little deviation from a GAD field. Based on relatively strict cut-off criteria we also present six new field strength estimates from the time interval ∼1.2-1.83 Ma, thus filling a large data gap of the high-northern stable field behavior. We obtain a median VADM of 57 ± 3ZAm2 (VDM of 60 ± 5Am2), which is higher than the median VADM of 16 intensity estimates from Antarctica (39 ± 7 ZAm2) from the same period. A higher northern field is also found when using less strict cut-off criteria resulting in 14 field estimates from Jökuldalur, i.e. we find support for higher field strength in the northern hemisphere as compared to the southern hemisphere during the Matuyama. Finally, we deliver a revised magneto-chronostratigraphic model of Jökuldalur and conduct an investigation of the type sections of the so-called Gilsá normal polarity event around 1.62 Ma. Our revised model is based on 11 new 40Ar/39Ar ages. No evidence is found of the existence of the Gilsá event in Jökuldalur. Instead we find that the normal polarity intervals in the type sections can both be correlated to Olduvai subchron.

  20. Comment on "Zircon U-Th-Pb dating using LA-ICP-MS: Simultaneous U-Pb and U-Th dating on 0.1 Ma Toya Tephra, Japan" by Hisatoshi Ito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillong, M.; Schmitt, A. K.; Bachmann, O.

    2015-04-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) of eight zircon reference materials and synthetic zircon-hafnon end-members indicate that corrections for abundance sensitivity and molecular zirconium sesquioxide ions (Zr2O3+) are critical for reliable determination of 230Th abundances in zircon. Other polyatomic interferences in the mass range 223-233 amu are insignificant. When corrected for abundance sensitivity and interferences, activity ratios of (230Th)/(238U) for the zircon reference materials we used average 1.001 ± 0.010 (1σ error; mean square of weighted deviates MSWD = 1.45; n = 8). This includes the 91500 and Plešovice zircons, which were deemed unsuitable for calibration of (230Th)/(238U) by Ito (2014). Uranium series zircon ages generated by LA-ICP-MS without mitigating (e.g., by high mass resolution) or correcting for abundance sensitivity and molecular interferences on 230Th such as those presented by Ito (2014) are potentially unreliable.

  1. Simulation of tectonic evolution of the Kanto Basin of Japan since 1 Ma due to subduction of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates and the collision of the Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashima, Akinori; Sato, Toshinori; Sato, Hiroshi; Asao, Kazumi; Furuya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shuji; Kameo, Koji; Miyauchi, Takahiro; Ito, Tanio; Tsumura, Noriko; Kaneda, Heitaro

    2016-06-01

    The Kanto Basin, the largest lowland in Japan, developed by flexure as a result of (1) the subduction of the Philippine Sea (PHS) and the Pacific (PAC) plates and (2) the repeated collision of the Izu-Bonin arc fragments with the Japanese island arc. Geomorphological, geological, and thermochronological data on vertical movements over the last 1 My suggest that subsidence initially affected the entire basin after which the area of subsidence gradually narrowed until, finally, the basin began to experience uplift. In this study, we modeled the tectonic evolution of the Kanto Basin following the method of Matsu'ura and Sato (1989) for a kinematic subduction model with dislocations, in order to quantitatively assess the effects of PHS and PAC subduction. We include the steady slip-rate deficit (permanent locking rate at the plate interface) in our model to account for collision process. We explore how the latest collision of the Izu Peninsula block has been affected by a westerly shift in the PHS plate motion vector with respect to the Eurasian plate, thought to have occurred between 1.0-0.5 Ma, using long-term vertical deformation data to constrain extent of the locked zone on the plate interface. We evaluated the change in vertical deformation rate for two scenarios: (1) a synchronous shift in the orientation of the locked zone as PHS plate motion shifts and (2) a delayed shift in the orientation of the locked zone following the shift in plate motion. Observed changes in the uplift/subsidence pattern are better explained by scenario (2), suggesting that recent (< 1 My) deformation in the Kanto Basin shows a lag in crustal response to the plate motion shift. We also calculated stress accumulation rates and found a good match with observed earthquake mechanisms, which shows that intraplate earthquakes serve to release stress accumulated through long-term plate interactions.

  2. Final Report: Radiation-magnetohydrodynamic evolution and instability of conductors driven by megagauss magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Bruno, S.; Siemon, Richard, E.

    2008-10-22

    We are pleased to report important progress in experimentally characterizing and numerically modeling the transformation into plasma of walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields. Understanding this is important to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) because an important limitation to the metal liner approach to MTF comes from the strong eddy current heating on the surface of the metal liner. This has intriguing non-linear aspects when the magnetic field is in the megagauss regime as needed for MTF, and may limit the magnetic field in an MTF implosion. Many faculty, students, and staff have contributed to this work, and, implicitly or explicitly, to this report. Contributors include, in addition to the PIs, Andrey Esaulov, Stephan Fuelling, Irvin Lindemuth, Volodymyr Makhin, Ioana Paraschiv, Milena Angelova, Tom Awe, Tasha Goodrich, Arunkumar Prasadam, Andrew Oxner, Bruno Le Galloudec, Radu Presura, and Vladimir Ivanov. Highlights of the progress made during the grant include: • 12 articles published, and 44 conference and workshop presentations made, on a broad range of issues related to this project; • An ongoing experiment that uses the 1 MA, 100-ns Zebra z-pinch at UNR to apply 2 5 megagauss to a variety of metal surfaces, examining plasma formation and evolution; • Numerical simulation studies of the 1-MA Zebra, and potential Shiva Star and Atlas experiments that include realistic equations of state and radiation effects, using a variety of tables. • Collaboration with other groups doing simulations of this experiment at LANL, VNIIEF, SNL, and NumerEx leading to a successful international workshop at UNR in the spring of 2008.

  3. Implementing and diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed power accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Ryan D.; Bliss, David E.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Martin, Matthew R.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Slutz, Stephen A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Awe, Thomas James; Hess, M. H.; Lemke, Raymond W.; Dolan, D. H.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Jobe, Marc Ronald Lee; Fang, Lu; Hahn, Kelly D.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Maurer, A. J.; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Cuneo, Michael E.; Sinars, Daniel; Tomlinson, Kurt; Smith, Gary; Paguio, Reny; Intrator, Tom; Weber, Thomas; Greenly, John

    2015-11-01

    and fabricating novel micro B-dot probes to measure B z ( t ) inside of an imploding liner. In one approach, the micro B-dot loops were fabricated on a printed circuit board (PCB). The PCB was then soldered to off-the-shelf 0.020- inch-diameter semi-rigid coaxial cables, which were terminated with standard SMA connectors. These probes were recently tested using the COBRA pulsed power generator (0-1 MA in 100 ns) at Cornell University. In another approach, we are planning to use new multi-material 3D printing capabilities to fabricate novel micro B-dot packages. In the near future, we plan to 3D print these probes and then test them on the COBRA generator. With successful operation demonstrated at 1-MA, we will then make plans to use these probes on a 20-MA Z experiment.

  4. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  5. Development and Characterization of Pulsed Neutron Sources at NTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Erik; Hammel, Ben; Lowe, Danny; Presura, Radu; Ivanov, Vladimir; Haque, Showera; Covington, Aaron; Iratcabal, Jeremy; McCormick, Zephyr; Darling, Tim; NTF Team; Nevada Security Technologies, LLC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Short duration, high-intensity pulsed neutron sources are being developed on the Zebra 1-MA/100ns pulsed-power generator. Ion beam collisions above threshold energies in a Z-pinch containing deuterium are the primary production mechanism of the 2.45 MeV neutrons. Deuterium treated palladium wire-arrays have been successfully used to produce neutrons on Zebra, but the deuterium content of the Pd wire storage diminishes rapidly. More traditional single-shell gas puffs have also been designed and implemented and allow for much higher repetition rates and ability to control the load composition; both pure deuterium and binary mixtures of krypton and deuterium gases were used. Both sources are capable of producing 1e10 neutrons per pulse. The yield and spectrum of the neutron pulse was measured by a combination of Ag and Y activation detectors and time-of-flight scintillator-PMT detectors. A model of the experimental area was used in the MCNP code to determine the scattering contribution and assist in calibration of the neutron detectors. Support for this work is provided by DOE/NNSA grant DE-NA0002075.

  6. Observations of ETI under dielectric-overcoated aluminum pulsed to hundreds of Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Trevor; Bauer, Bruno; Fuelling, Stephan; Yates, Kevin; Awe, Thomas; Yelton, Graham

    2016-10-01

    MagLIF is an inertial confinement concept that takes advantage of relaxed fusion criteria due to premagnetized and preheated fuel. The drive surface is particularly susceptible to highly azimuthally correlated magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instabilities, which section the liner wall and compromise confinement. This degree of azimuthal correlation is not due to residual lathe machining or surface roughness and a growing body of evidence suggest electrothermal instabilities (ETI) seed the MRT instability and allow for levels of azimuthal correlation that have been observed experimentally. Implementation of dielectric coatings on Sandia's Z accelerator has reduced MRT amplitudes by at least a factor of ten, which simulations suggest is due to mass tamping of the ETI. However, neither ETI nor its theorized suppression via an applied dielectric overcoat has been experimentally observed on a thick wire. We will report on experimental observations of ETI on the surface of 500 um radius aluminum rods with a 70 um parylene-N overcoat pulsed with 1 MA in 100 ns. This work was funded in part by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (Project No. 178661).

  7. HEMP-induced transients in transmission and distribution (T and D) lines

    SciTech Connect

    Engheta, N.; Lee, K.S.H.; Yang, F.C.; Aguero, R.

    1985-09-01

    The corona effects on the early-time induced transients on the transmission and distribution (T and D) lines are calculated based on two different corona models. Three different sources of excitation of the lines are considered, which include a HEMP plane wave, a localized voltage source, and a current injected at a point on the wire. The induced current and charge are calculated and compared with some available experimental data and with the results of Baum's model. The results illustrate that the corona generally reduces the peak value of the induced current as much as 30% of the value and decreases the rate of rise by about 40%. The HEMP-induced stresses across dielectric insulators in some typical electric power systems are also calculated. The insulators that are considered are line supports in T and D line poles, and transformer bushings in distribution and power transformers. Different elevation and azimuthal angles of HEMP incidence with two different values of ground conductivity are considered. The HEMP-induced ''potential difference'' across the line support and air gap in the transmission lines and the HEMP-induced open-circuit voltage across transformer bushings are calculated. The ''potential difference'' across the line support and across the air gap can be as high as 7 MV. The rise time of the ''potential difference'' is about 110 ns, and the fall time is about 2 to 3 ..mu..s. The open-circuit voltage across transformer bushings can be as large as few tens of MVs and the rise time is in the order of 100 ns and the fall time 800 ns.

  8. Protein response to ligation reactions in myoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causgrove, Timothy P.; Dyer, R. B.

    1993-05-01

    The protein response to the photodissociation, escape and subsequent rebinding of carbon monoxide in myoglobin is studied using time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy. All phases of these reactions are investigated, from ultrafast phenomena (picoseconds) to relatively slow processes (milliseconds). Conformational changes in myoglobin (Mb) are detected by time-resolved infrared absorption changes in the amide I band. On the hundreds of nanoseconds to milliseconds timescale, a 'real-time' apparatus is used. This apparatus is based on a tunable diode laser operating in the region of 1650 cm-1. The time course of changes in the amide I band are shown to follow the recombination of CO with photolyzed Mb. On the basis of the rise times of the amide I and Fe-CO signals, it is concluded that protein motion is complete within 100 ns. A time-resolved difference spectrum in the amide I region is generated from single wavelength transients taken throughout the amide I envelope. A static difference spectrum is also generated by subtracting FTIR spectra of carbonmonoxy and deoxy myoglobin. The two difference spectra are compared and are interpreted in terms of the three-dimensional structures of deoxy and carbonmonoxy Mb. Preliminary picosecond TRIR data are also given for the ultrafast response of the protein immediately following photodissociation of CO.

  9. Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Stygar, William A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Nash, Thomas J.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Keith Matzen, M.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; McDaniel, Dillon H.; Deeney, Christopher E.; Douglas, Melissa R.; Chittenden, Jerry

    2011-11-15

    We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to {approx}5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the {approx}20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of {approx}375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

  10. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Hammer, David; Lipson, Michal

    2007-11-01

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in experiments on the COBRA pulsed power generator [1]. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. We will also present our progress on field measurements using an optical fiber sensor and a very small ``thin film waveguide'' coupled to a fiber optic system. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor for a greater fraction of the current pulse than magnetic probes, with which we compare our results. This research was sponsored by NNSA under SSAA program via DOE Coop Agreement DE-F03-02NA00057. [1] W. Syed, D. A. Hammer, & M. Lipson, 34^th ICOPS & 16^th PPPS, Albuquerque, NM, June 2007.

  11. Contactless microwave study of dispersive transport in thin film CdSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabtchak, Serguei Yu; Cocivera, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The contactless microwave technique was used to measure light-induced transients in the power absorbed by thin films of polycrystalline CdSe. Because the rise time of the microwave cavity was 60 ns, the analysis was limited to 100 ns or longer. Measurement of these transients at a number of fixed frequencies across the ``dark'' resonance frequency made reconstruction of the difference signal possible. This signal, which represents the difference between the ``dark'' and ``light'' Lorentz resonance curves, was determined at various times during the decay. Analysis of these signals provided the time dependence for the changes in the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant, which correspond to the densities of the trapped and free electrons. The decays of these parameters were characterized by three time domains. At the shortest times, the two parameters did not have the same time dependence. At intermediate times, the densities of both the trapped and free electrons had the same time dependence characterized by a power law decay, and a mechanism consistent with these results involves rapid equilibration between the free electrons and those in the shallow traps. Decay in this region was consistent with a dispersive transport mechanism. Intensity effects indicate saturation of the shallow traps. The third region occurred at the break in the power law dependence indicating a bimolecular recombination process. Measurements at higher temperatures indicate a change from a bimolecular to a monomolecular recombination mechanism.

  12. Experimental demonstration of fusion-relevant conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A..; Sefkow, Adam B.; ...

    2014-10-06

    This Letter presents results from the first fully integrated experiments testing the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], in which a cylinder of deuterium gas with a preimposed axial magnetic field of 10 T is heated by Z beamlet, a 2.5 kJ, 1 TW laser, and magnetically imploded by a 19 MA current with 100 ns rise time on the Z facility. Despite a predicted peak implosion velocity of only 70 km/s, the fuel reaches a stagnation temperature of approximately 3 keV, with Te ≈ Ti, and produces up to 2e12 thermonuclearmore » DD neutrons. In this study, X-ray emission indicates a hot fuel region with full width at half maximum ranging from 60 to 120 μm over a 6 mm height and lasting approximately 2 ns. The number of secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons observed was greater than 1010, indicating significant fuel magnetization given that the estimated radial areal density of the plasma is only 2 mg/cm2.« less

  13. Diagnostic arrangement on S-300 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshaev, Yu. L.; Blinov, P. I.; Chernenko, A. S.; Dan'ko, S. A.; Kalinin, Yu. G.; Korolev, V. D.; Tumanov, V. I.; Shashkov, A. Yu.; Chesnokov, A. V.; Ivanov, M. I.

    2001-01-01

    A set of experiments on neutron and x-ray generation was performed on the S-300 facility for the last few months. The S-300 facility is a pulse generator with electric current achieving 3.5 MA, voltage 400-500 kV, and rise time ˜100 ns. (Chernenko et al., Proc. of the 11th International Conference of Power Particle Beams, Prague, 1966, p. 154). It is designed as van eight-module machine transmitting electromagnetic power to the low-inductive load through the vacuum line with self-magnetic isolation. Diagnostic techniques and methods on S-300 used are described in this article. Ten-channel polychromator is used for the soft x-ray and vacuum ultraviolet bands (50-500 eV) measurements with spectral resolution of 5%-20% and time resolution less than 2.5 ns. Radiated power measurements in the region of 0.1-10 keV are performed by vacuum x-ray diodes and semiconductor detectors equipped with different filters. Curved crystal x-ray spectrography is intended for plasma density, electron, and ion temperature evaluation. Visible and x-ray radiation image converter tubes and a streak camera reproduce plasma dynamics. Laser shadow and schlieren probing are used to investigate rare periphery plasma motion. Time-of-flight and activation technique is designed for total neutron yield determination.

  14. Skin explosion of double-layer conductors in fast-rising high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-04-01

    An experiment has been performed to study the electrical explosion of thick cylindrical conductors using the MIG pulsed power generator capable of producing a peak current of 2.5 MA within 100 ns rise time. The experimental goal was to compare the skin explosion of a solid conductor with that of a double-layer conductor whose outer layer had a lower conductivity than the inner one. It has been shown that in magnetic fields of peak induction up to 300 T and average induction rise rate 3 × 109 T/s, the double-layer structure of a conductor makes it possible to achieve higher magnetic induction at the conductor surface before it explodes. This can be accounted for, in particular, by the reduction of the ratio of the Joule heat density to the energy density of the magnetic field at the surface of a double-layer conductor due to redistribution of the current density over the conductor cross section.

  15. Modeling of the Magnetic Field Entrained in Precursor Plasma of a Fast Cylindrical Shell Implosion on Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthew; McBride, Ryan; Greenly, John

    2012-10-01

    Recent experiments on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the measurement of magnetic fields inside an imploding cylindrical liner. The aspect ratio six beryllium liner had a two micron thick aluminum radiographic tracer layer on its inner surface and was driven with approximately 20MA of current over a 100ns rise time. B-dot probes were placed at varying radial positions inside the liner and a time-dependent magnetic field was measured. We compare the results of these experiments to simulations performed with the multi-physics ALEGRA code. These simulations suggest that the measured magnetic field is due to flux frozen into the release from the liner's inner surface. In short pulse mode, the surface magnetic pressure drives a shock into the liner. This shock has a magnetic component which is then frozen into the release wave formed when the shock reaches the liner's free inner surface. Simulations suggest this magnetized low density release then flows past the B-dot probe and is the source of the measured magnetic field. We demonstrate how these experimental measurements could be utilized to infer the amount of magnetic field at the shock front just before it releases into the vacuum. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of Radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouza, Romualdo; Vadas, Justin; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M.

    2017-01-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. The detector is optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (<) 5 MeV/A. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a rise-time of 60 to 70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate while providing a time resolution of 6 to 8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as 8 % for an energy deposit of 3.5 MeV. Beam tests indicate that the detector is an effective tool for the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams at beam intensities up to 3 x 105 ions/s. Supported by the U.S. DOE under Award # DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and the NSF under Grant No. 1342962.

  17. Experimental demonstration of fusion-relevant conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A..; Sefkow, Adam B.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Harding, Eric C.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Awe, Thomas James; Geissel, Matthias; Rovang, Dean C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Herrmann, Mark; Hess, M. H.; Johns, Owen; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew R.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle J.; Porter, John L.; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Rochau, Gregory A.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Savage, Mark E.; Smith, Ian C.; Stygar, William A.; Vesey, Roger A.

    2014-10-06

    This Letter presents results from the first fully integrated experiments testing the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], in which a cylinder of deuterium gas with a preimposed axial magnetic field of 10 T is heated by Z beamlet, a 2.5 kJ, 1 TW laser, and magnetically imploded by a 19 MA current with 100 ns rise time on the Z facility. Despite a predicted peak implosion velocity of only 70 km/s, the fuel reaches a stagnation temperature of approximately 3 keV, with Te ≈ Ti, and produces up to 2e12 thermonuclear DD neutrons. In this study, X-ray emission indicates a hot fuel region with full width at half maximum ranging from 60 to 120 μm over a 6 mm height and lasting approximately 2 ns. The number of secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons observed was greater than 1010, indicating significant fuel magnetization given that the estimated radial areal density of the plasma is only 2 mg/cm2.

  18. A repetitive long-pulse power generator based on pulse forming network and linear transformer driver.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjia; Kang, Qiang; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Faqiang; Luo, Min; Xiang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    A compact module for long-pulse power generator, based on Blumlein pulse forming network (PFN), was designed. Two Blumlein PFNs with L-type configuration and 20 Ω characteristic impedance were connected symmetrically to the primary coil of the linear transformer driver (LTD) and driven by an identical high voltage spark switch to ensure two Blumlein PFNs synchronizing operation. The output pulse of the module connected with 10 Ω water load is about 135 kV in amplitude and 200 ns in duration with a rise time of ∼50 ns and a flat top of ∼100 ns. On this basis, a repetitive long-pulse power generator based on PFN-LTD has been developed, which was composed of four modules. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved on planar diode: output voltage amplitude of ∼560 kV, output current amplitude of ∼10 kA at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The generator operates stable and outputs more than 10(4) pulses. Meanwhile, the continuous operating time of the generator is up to 60 s.

  19. Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshnay, N. K.; Singh, A.; Benerji, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression suitable for material processing applications are presented here. The laser incorporates in-built compact gas circulation and gas cooling to ensure fresh gas mixture between the electrodes for repetitive operation. A magnetically coupled tangential blower is used for gas circulation inside the laser chamber for repetitive operation. The exciter consists of C-C energy transfer circuit and thyratron is used as a high-voltage main switch with single-stage magnetic pulse compression (MPC) between thyratron and the laser electrodes. Low inductance of the laser head and uniform and intense pre-ionization are the main features of the electric circuit used in the laser. A 250 ns rise time voltage pulse was compressed to 100 ns duration with a single-stage magnetic pulse compressor using Ni-Zn ferrite cores. The laser can generate about 150 mJ at ˜100 Hz rep-rate reliably from a discharge volume of 100 cm 3. 2D spatial laser beam profile generated is presented here. The profile shows that the laser beam is completely filled with flat-top which is suitable for material processing applications. The SEM image of the microhole generated on copper target is presented here.

  20. Soldered Contact and Current Risetime Effects on Negative Polarity Wire Array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalenski, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Hammer, D. A.; Knapp, P. F.

    2009-01-01

    The Cornell University COBRA pulser is a nominal 1 MA machine, capable of driving up to 32 wire cylindrical Z-pinch arrays. COBRA can operate with variable current risetimes ranging from 100 ns to 200 ns (short and long pulse, respectively). Wires are typically strung with a "press" contact to the electrode hardware, where the wire is loosely pulled against the hardware and held there to establish electrical contact. The machine is normally negative, but a bolt-on convolute can be used to modify the current path and effectively produce positive polarity operation at the load. Previous research with single wires on a 1-5 kA pulser [1] has shown that soldering the wire, thereby improving the wire/electrode contact, and operating in positive polarity can improve the energy deposition into the wire and enhance wire core expansion. Negative polarity showed no difference. Previous experiments on the negative polarity, 20 MA, 100 ns Z accelerator [2] have shown that improving the contact improved the x-ray yield. Cornell data were collected on 16-wire Aluminum Z-pinch arrays in negative polarity. Experiments were conducted with both short and long current pulses with soldered and no-soldered wire/electrode contacts. The initiation, ablation, implosion and stagnation phases were compared for these four conditions. Time dependent x-ray signals were measured using diodes and diamond detectors. An inductive voltage monitor was used to infer minimum current radius achieved, as defined by a uniform shell of current moving radially inward, producing a time dependent inductance. Total energy data were collected with a metal-strip bolometer. Self-emission data were collected by an XUV 4-frame camera and an optical streak camera. In negative polarity and with short pulses, soldering appeared to produce a smaller radius pinch and decrease variations in the x-ray pulse shape. The bolometer, laser backlighter, 4-frame and streak cameras showed negligible differences in the initiation

  1. Development of a spectroscopic technique for simultaneous magnetic field, electron density, and temperature measurements in ICF-relevant plasmas (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Eric C.; Covington, Aaron M.; Darling, Timothy; Mancini, Roberto C.; Haque, Showera; Angermeier, William A.

    2016-09-01

    Visible spectroscopic techniques are often used in plasma experiments to measure B-field induced Zeeman splitting, electron densities via Stark broadening and temperatures from Doppler broadening. However, when electron densities and temperatures are sufficiently high, the broadening of the Stark and Doppler components can dominate the emission spectra and obscure the Zeeman component. In this research, we are developing a time-resolved multi-axial technique for measuring the Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened line emission of dense magnetized plasmas for Z-pinch and Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) accelerators. The line emission is used to calculate the electron densities, temperatures, and B-fields. In parallel, we are developing a line-shape modeling code that incorporates the broadening effects due to Stark, Doppler, and Zeeman effects for dense magnetized plasma. Experiments conducted at the University of Nevada (Reno) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) using the 1 MA Z-pinch (Zebra). The research explored the response of Al III doublet, 4p 2P3/2 to 4s 2S1/2 and 4p 2P1/2 to 4s 2S1/2 transitions. Optical light emitted from the pinch is fiber coupled to high-resolution spectrometers. The dual spectrometers are coupled to two high-speed visible streak cameras to capture time-resolved emission spectra from the experiment. The data reflects emission spectra from 100 ns before the current peak to 100 ns after the current peak, where the current peak is approximately the time at which the pinch occurs. The Al III doublet is used to measure Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened emission. The line emission is then used to calculate the temperature, electron density, and B-fields. The measured quantities are used as initial parameters for the line shape code to simulate emission spectra and compare to experimental results. Future tests are planned to evaluate technique and modeling on other material wire array, gas puff, and DPF platforms. This work was done by National

  2. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ˜600 kA with ˜200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  3. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    SciTech Connect

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As a result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  4. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    DOE PAGES

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; ...

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As amore » result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.« less

  5. Strategy for stabilization of the antiferroelectric phase (Pbma) over the metastable ferroelectric phase (P2{sub 1}ma) to establish double loop hysteresis in lead-free (1−x)NaNbO{sub 3}-xSrZrO{sub 3} solid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hanzheng Randall, Clive A.; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Youichi

    2015-06-07

    A new lead-free antiferroelectric solid solution system, (1−x)NaNbO{sub 3}-xSrZrO{sub 3}, was rationalized through noting the crystal chemistry trend, of decreasing the tolerance factor and an increase in the average electronegativity of the system. The SrZrO{sub 3} doping was found to effectively stabilize the antiferroelectric (P) phase in NaNbO{sub 3} without changing its crystal symmetry. Preliminary electron diffraction and polarization measurements were presented which verified the enhanced antiferroelectricity. In view of our recent report of another lead-free antiferroelectric system (1−x)NaNbO{sub 3}-xCaZrO{sub 3} [H. Shimizu et al. “Lead-free antiferroelectric: xCaZrO{sub 3} - (1−x)NaNbO{sub 3} system (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10),” Dalton Trans. (published online)], the present results point to a general strategy of utilizing tolerance factor to develop a broad family of new lead-free antiferroelectrics with double polarization hysteresis loops. We also speculate on a broad family of possible solid solutions that could be identified and tested for this important type of dielectric.

  6. Megawatt, 330 Hz PRF tunable gyrotron experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spark, S. N.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    1994-12-01

    Repetitively pulsed and cw gyrotrons have hitherto used thermionic cathodes, whereas cold cathode gyrotrons have normally operated as ‘single shot’ devices. The novel results presented here show that cold cathode gyrotrons can be successfully pulsed repetitively. A tunable gyrotron with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 150Hz is demonstrated. This system developed >4MW mm-wave output pulses at 100GHz. The gyrotron is based on a two-electrode configuration comprising a field-immersed, field emission, cold cathode and a shaped anode cavity. A superconducting magnet was used to produce the homogeneous intra-cavity magnetic field and a cable pulser was used to drive the electron beam. This pulser produced up to a (200±20)kV pulse with 10ns rise time, a 100ns flat top, a 10ns decay with a characteristic impedance of 200Ω. The energy storage capacity of the cable pulser was 35J. The charging unit limited the maximum PRF to 330Hz. Due to spark gap switching limitations 330Hz was only obtainable in 5 to 10 pulse bursts. For substantial periods of the order of 30 seconds, 100Hz PRF was achieved over an oscillating range of 28 to 100GHz and 150Hz PRF was achieved at 80GHz. No degradation effects on the mm-wave output pulse was evident due to diode recovery time throughout this series of results. A subsequent conclusion is that the diode recovery time in our cold cathode gyrotron is less than 3ms.

  7. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wiresa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-01

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from ≳0.1g/cm3 and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm3 and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 μm aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by ˜150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and ˜2μm X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 μm spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s → 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s → 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within ±25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  8. A 7.2 keV spherical crystal backlighter system for Sandia's Z Pulsed Power Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Knapp, P. F.; Ampleford, D. J.; Loisel, G. P.; Robertson, G.; Shores, J. E.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Porter, J. L.; McBride, R. D.

    2016-10-01

    Many experiments on Sandia's Z facility, a 30 MA, 100 ns rise-time, pulsed-power driver, use a monochromatic Quartz crystal imaging backlighter system at 1.865 keV (Si Heα) or 6.151 keV (Mn Heα) x-ray energy to radiograph an imploding liner (cylindrical tube) or wire array. The x-ray source is generated by the Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL), which provides up to 4.5 kJ at 527 nm during a 6 ns window. Radiographs of an imploding thick-walled Beryllium liner at a convergence ratio of about 20 [CR =Rin . (0) /Rin . (t) ] were too opaque to identify the inner surface of the liner with high confidence, demonstrating the need for a higher-energy x-ray backlighter between 6 and 10 keV. We present the design, test and first application of a Ge (335) spherical crystal x-ray backlighter system using the 7.242 keV Co Heα resonance line. The system operates at an almost identical Bragg angle as the existing 1.865 and 6.151 keV backlighters, enhancing our capabilities such as two-color, two-frame radiography, without changing detector shielding hardware. SAND No: SAND2016-6724 A. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. DoE NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Low inductance gas switching.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and

  10. Soldered contact and current risetime effects on negative polarity wire array Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalenski, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.

    2009-08-01

    The experimental results described in this paper were motivated by earlier, low current, single wire experiments. In these experiments, single 10-25 μm diameter wires were driven by 1-5 kA current pulses with variable dI /dt from 5 to 60 A/ns. The amount of energy deposited in the wires, the expansion rate, and expansion uniformity that occurred before a plasma induced voltage collapse were found to depend on the polarity, dI /dt, and the quality of the contacts between the wires and the electrodes. This paper reports the results of experiments with cylindrical wire arrays driven by Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) [J. B. Greenly, J. D. Douglas, D. A. Hammer et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 073501 (2008)] current pulses that reached 1 MA. The pulse lengths were varied from 100 to 200 ns. These larger current pulses drove the wires of the array through the initiation phase studied in the single wire experiments and through ablation and Z-pinch implosion to stagnation on the cylindrical axis of the array. Regardless of the current pulse length, the COBRA dI /dt per wire during initiation reached approximately 175 A/ns and resistive voltage breakdown occurred at ˜13 ns. Wire-electrode contacts were modified by soldering the cathode ends of the wires to the brass electrode. With the 100 ns COBRA pulse, voltage monitor data suggested that soldering produced a smaller radius pinch, but bolometer data showed that this did not affect the total energy emitted from the array compared to nonsoldered contacts. With the 200 ns COBRA pulse and soldered contacts, the bolometer data showed an average of 69% increase in time integrated x-ray emission and the photoconducting detector data showed an increase in x-ray power and yield compared with nonsoldered contacts. Under these same conditions the four-frame extreme ultraviolet images showed a more pronounced "Christmas tree" effect at the cathode.

  11. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wires

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-15

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.1g/cm{sup 3} and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm{sup 3} and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 {mu}m aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by {approx}150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and {approx}2{mu}m X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 {mu}m spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s{yields} 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s{yields} 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within {+-}25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  12. Design and performance of the Z magnetically-insulated transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W.A.; Spielman, R.B.; Allshouse, G.O.

    1997-08-01

    The 36-module Z accelerator was designed to drive z-pinch loads for weapon-physics and inertial-confinement-fusion experiments, and to serve as a testing facility for pulsed-power research required to develop higher-current drivers. The authors have designed and tested a 10-nH 1.5-m-radius vacuum section for the Z accelerator. The vacuum section consists of four vacuum flares, four conical 1.3-m-radius magnetically-insulated transmission lines, a 7.6-cm-radius 12-post double-post-hole convolute which connects the four outer MITLs in parallel, and a 5-cm-long inner MITL which connects the output of the convolute to a z-pinch load. IVORY and ELECTRO calculations were performed to minimize the inductance of the vacuum flares with the constraint that there be no significant electron emission from the insulator-stack grading rings. Iterative TLCODE calculations were performed to minimize the inductance of the outer MITLs with the constraint that the MITL electron-flow-current fraction be {le} 7% at peak current. The TLCODE simulations assume a 2.5 cm/{micro}s MITL-cathode-plasma expansion velocity. The design limits the electron dose to the outer-MITL anodes to 50 J/g to prevent the formation of an anode plasma. The TLCODE results were confirmed by SCREAMER, TRIFL, TWOQUICK, IVORY, and LASNEX simulations. For the TLCODE, SCREAMER, and TRIFL calculations, the authors assume that after magnetic insulation is established, the electron-flow current launched in the outer MITLs is lost at the convolute. This assumption has been validated by 3-D QUICKSILVER simulations for load impedances {le} 0.36 ohms. LASNEX calculations suggest that ohmic resistance of the pinch and conduction-current-induced energy loss to the MITL electrodes can be neglected in Z power-flow modeling that is accurate to first order. To date, the Z vacuum section has been tested on 100 shots. They have demonstrated they can deliver a 100-ns rise-time 20-MA current pulse to the baseline z-pinch load.

  13. Characterisation of the current switch mechanism in two-stage wire array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hall, G. N.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Khoory, E.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Waisman, E. M.

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, we describe the operation of a two-stage wire array z-pinch driven by the 1.4 MA, 240 ns rise-time Magpie pulsed-power device at Imperial College London. In this setup, an inverse wire array acts as a fast current switch, delivering a current pre-pulse into a cylindrical load wire array, before rapidly switching the majority of the generator current into the load after a 100–150 ns dwell time. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the load array during the pre-pulse is presented. Measurements of the load resistivity and energy deposition suggest significant bulk heating of the array mass occurs. The ∼5 kA pre-pulse delivers ∼0.8 J of energy to the load, leaving it in a mixed, predominantly liquid-vapour state. The main current switch occurs as the inverse array begins to explode and plasma expands into the load region. Electrical and imaging diagnostics indicate that the main current switch may evolve in part as a plasma flow switch, driven by the expansion of a magnetic cavity and plasma bubble along the length of the load array. Analysis of implosion trajectories suggests that approximately 1 MA switches into the load in 100 ns, corresponding to a doubling of the generator dI/dt. Potential scaling of the device to higher current machines is discussed.

  14. Gas puff Z-pinches with deuterium-krypton gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Timothy; McKee, Erik; Covington, Aaron; Ivanov, Vladimir; Wessel, Frank; Rahman, Hafiz

    2015-11-01

    We discuss experiments with single-shell, pure and mixed-gas loads on the zebra pulsed-power generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF). These experiments are modeled using the MACH2 code and provide input and benchmarking for further models and experiments on upcoming staged Z-pinch (SZP) studies under an ARPA-E program. The 1MA-70ns rise time discharge of Zebra produces bursts of both high and low energy X-rays and neutrons if deuterium gas is present. The gas is injected from the (grounded) anode to cathode as an expanding cylindrical shell of approximately 4cm diameter. A pulsed valve and a flow-forming nozzle determine the details of the gas target geometry which is imaged as a density map using a UV excited fluorescent tracer (LIF). The gases imaged are pure Kr and D2 and binary mixtures thereof. A pure D2 pinch produces a (yet to be optimized) neutron yield in the 1e10 regime. Additional diagnostics include a 2-frame Schlieren 1064nm IR imaging diagnostic, which provides information on the implosion dynamics of the pinch. Support for this work comes from DOE/NNSA (grant # DE-NA0002075) and the ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  15. Radial and Azimuthal Velocity Profiles in Gas-Puff Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Sophia; Engelbrecht, Joseph; Banasek, Jacob; de Grouchy, Philip; Qi, Niansheng; Hammer, David

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of neon, argon, and krypton (either singly or in combination) gas puff z-pinch plasmas are studied on Cornell's 1MA, 100-200ns rise-time COBRA pulsed power generator. The triple-nozzle gas puff valve, consisting of two annular gas puffs and a central jet, allows radial tailoring of the gas puff mass-density profile and the use of 1, 2 or 3 different gases at different pressures. Interferometry supplies information on sheath thickness and electron density, variously filtered PCDs and silicon diodes measure hard and soft x-ray production, and multi frame visible and extreme UV imaging systems allow tracking of the morphology of the plasma. A 527nm, 10J Thomson scattering diagnostic system is used to determine radial and azimuthal velocities. Implosion velocities of 170km/s (Kr) and 300km/s (Ne/Ar) are observed. We are investigating the correlations between instability growth, plasma density profile, velocity partitioning as a function of radius, and radiation production. Research supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836.

  16. Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field Stimulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells is Ca2+-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Lui, Kaying; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    The cellular response to 100 ns pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) exposure includes the formation of transient nanopores in the plasma membrane and organelle membranes, an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. 100 ns, 30 kV/cm nsPEF stimulates an increase in ROS proportional to the pulse number. This increase is inhibited by the anti-oxidant, Trolox, as well as the presence of Ca2+ chelators in the intracellular and extracellular media. This suggests that the nsPEF-triggered Ca2+ increase is required for ROS generation. PMID:23680664

  17. Mega-ampere submicrosecond generator GIT-32.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, B M; Kharlov, A V; Kiselev, V N; Kumpyak, E V; Zorin, V B; Chupin, V V; Morozov, A V

    2007-03-01

    The GIT-32 current generator was developed for experiments with current carrying pulsed plasma. The main parts of the generator are capacitor bank, multichannel multigap spark switches, low inductive current driving lines, and central load part. The generator consists of four identical sections, connected in parallel to one load. The capacitor bank is assembled from 32 IEK-100-0.17 (0.17 microF, 40 nH, 100 kV) capacitors, connected in parallel. It stores approximately 18 kJ at 80 kV charging voltage. Each two capacitors are commuted to a load by a multigap spark switch with eight parallel channels. Switches operate in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The GIT-32 generator was tested with 10, 15, and 20 nH inductive loads. At 10 nH load and 80 kV of charging voltage it provides 1 MA of current amplitude and 490 ns rise time with 0.8 Omega damping resistors in discharge circuit of each capacitor and 1.34 MA530 ns without resistors. The net generator inductance without a load was optimized to be as low as 12 nH, which results in extremely low self-impedance of the generator ( approximately 0.05 Omega). It ensures effective energy coupling with low impedance loads like Z pinch. The generator operates reliably without any adjustments in 40-80 kV range of charging voltage. Maximum jitter (relative to a triggering pulse) at 40 kV charging voltage is about 7 ns and lower at higher charging voltages. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil and no purified gases are required for the generator. The GIT-32 generator has dimensions of 3200 x 3200 x 400 mm(3) and total weight of about 2500 kg, thus manifesting itself as a simple, robust, and cost effective apparatus.

  18. Mega-ampere submicrosecond generator GIT-32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kharlov, A. V.; Kiselev, V. N.; Kumpyak, E. V.; Zorin, V. B.; Chupin, V. V.; Morozov, A. V.

    2007-03-01

    The GIT-32 current generator was developed for experiments with current carrying pulsed plasma. The main parts of the generator are capacitor bank, multichannel multigap spark switches, low inductive current driving lines, and central load part. The generator consists of four identical sections, connected in parallel to one load. The capacitor bank is assembled from 32 IEK-100-0.17 (0.17μF, 40nH, 100kV) capacitors, connected in parallel. It stores ˜18kJ at 80kV charging voltage. Each two capacitors are commuted to a load by a multigap spark switch with eight parallel channels. Switches operate in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The GIT-32 generator was tested with 10, 15, and 20nH inductive loads. At 10nH load and 80kV of charging voltage it provides 1MA of current amplitude and 490ns rise time with 0.8Ω damping resistors in discharge circuit of each capacitor and 1.34MA/530ns without resistors. The net generator inductance without a load was optimized to be as low as 12nH, which results in extremely low self-impedance of the generator (˜0.05Ω). It ensures effective energy coupling with low impedance loads like Z pinch. The generator operates reliably without any adjustments in 40-80kV range of charging voltage. Maximum jitter (relative to a triggering pulse) at 40kV charging voltage is about 7ns and lower at higher charging voltages. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil and no purified gases are required for the generator. The GIT-32 generator has dimensions of 3200×3200×400mm3 and total weight of about 2500kg, thus manifesting itself as a simple, robust, and cost effective apparatus.

  19. Emission spectra of YAG:Er3+ under pulse laser-thermal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, V. M.; Shakir, Yu. A.

    2016-12-01

    Spectra and kinetics of emission of YAG:0.5% Er3+ monocrystal in visible and NIR ranges were investigated under laser-thermal excitation by the pulses of CO2 laser of 100 ns duration at wavelength λ = 10,6 μμm. Kinetics of integral emission was interpreted.

  20. Plasma Formation and Evolution on Cu, Al, Ti, and Ni Surfaces Driven by a Mega-Ampere Current Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Kevin C.

    Metal alloy mm-diameter rods have been driven by a 1-MA, 100-ns current pulse from the Zebra z-pinch. The intense current produces megagauss surface magnetic fields that diffuse into the load, ohmically heating the metal until plasma forms. Because the radius is much thicker than the skin depth, the magnetic field reaches a much higher value than around a thin-wire load. With the "barbell" load design, plasma formation in the region of interest due to contact arcing or electron avalanche is avoided, allowing for the study of ohmically heated loads. Work presented here will show first evidence of a magnetic field threshold for plasma formation in copper 101, copper 145, titanium, and nickel, and compare with previous work done with aluminum. Copper alloys 101 and 145, titanium grade II, and nickel alloy 200 form plasma when the surface magnetic field reaches 3.5, 3.0, 2.2, and 2.6 megagauss, respectively. Varying the element metal, as well as the alloy, changes multiple physical properties of the load and affects the evolution of the surface material through the multiple phase changes. Similarities and differences between these metals will be presented, giving motivation for continued work with different material loads. During the current rise, the metal is heated to temperatures that cause multiple phase changes. When the surface magnetic field reaches a threshold, the metal ionizes and the plasma becomes pinched against the underlying cooler, dense material. Diagnostics fielded have included visible light radiometry, two-frame shadowgraphy (266 and 532 nm wavelengths), time-gated EUV spectroscopy, single-frame/2ns gated imaging, and multi-frame/4ns gated imaging with an intensified CCD camera (ICCD). Surface temperature, expansion speeds, instability growth, time of plasma formation, and plasma uniformity are determined from the data. The time-period of potential plasma formation is scrutinized to understand if and when plasma forms on the surface of a heated

  1. Generation of nanosecond neutron pulses in vacuum accelerating tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, A. N.; Shikanov, A. E.; Rashchikov, V. I.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Shatokhin, V. L.

    2014-06-01

    The generation of neutron pulses with a duration of 1-100 ns using small vacuum accelerating tubes is considered. Two physical models of acceleration of short deuteron bunches in pulse neutron generators are described. The dependences of an instantaneous neutron flux in accelerating tubes on the parameters of pulse neutron generators are obtained using computer simulation. The results of experimental investigation of short-pulse neutron generators based on the accelerating tube with a vacuum-arc deuteron source, connected in the circuit with a discharge peaker, and an accelerating tube with a laser deuteron source, connected according to the Arkad'ev-Marx circuit, are given. In the experiments, the neutron yield per pulse reached 107 for a pulse duration of 10-100 ns. The resultant experimental data are in satisfactory agreement with the results of computer simulation.

  2. A Current Source Method For t(sub q) Measurement of Fast Switching Thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    A current source driven circuit has been constructed to measure the turn-off time (t(sub q)) of fast-switching SiC thyristors. This circuit operates from a single power supply and a dual channel pulse generator to provide adjustment of forward current, magnitude and duration of reverse applied voltage, and rate of rise of reapplied forward voltage. Values of t(sub q) down to 100 ns can be resolved.

  3. Tungsten quasispherical wire loads with a profiled mass

    SciTech Connect

    Grabovskii, E. V.; Dzhangobegov, V. V. Oleinik, G. M.; Rodionov, R. N.

    2015-12-15

    Wire arrays made from micrometer tungsten wires with linear mass profiled along their height are developed for experiments on the generation of X-ray radiation upon pinch compression with a current of ∼3 MA at a pulse duration of ∼100 ns. Wires are imaged with a scanning electron microscope, and their diameter is determined. It is shown that the arrays have such a profile of height distribution of linear mass that allows for compact spherical compression upon current implosion.

  4. Developing a Knowledge Base for Detection of Powertrain Failures by Reversibly Seeding Engine Faults

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    engine sensors (timing, temperature and pressure) and actuators (injectors and PWM valves for controlling Boost and Injection Control pressure). The...signals with higher frequency content, we relied on a FPGA -based system that included a CAN board, a 16 bit Analog board, and a Timing board with 100 ns...plots in Fig. 5 The plots in Fig. 4 indicate that exhaust temperature in the port increases as a function of torque (more heat is generated

  5. Equivalent Ground Conductivity Inversion in Maritime ASF Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yurong; Xi, Xiaoli; Zhu, Hong

    This letter presents an efficient method for the maritime Loran-C additional secondary factor (ASF) correction based on equivalent ground conductivity inversion. Using the proposed method, the accuracy of Loran-C system on maritime positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) can be improved significantly with a limited number of surveys. Comparison with measured ASF results shows a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of less than 100ns in most areas.

  6. Nonlinear absorption and transmission properties of Ge, Te and InAs using tuneable IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Becker, K.; Brau, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear absorption properties of Ge, Te and InAs are being investigated using the transmission of FEL optical pulses through these semiconductors (z-scan method). Wavelength, intensity and macropulse dependence are used to differentiate between two-photon and free-carrier absorption properties of these materials. Macropulse dependence is resolved by using a Pockles Cell to chop the 4-{mu}s macropulse down to 100 ns. Results of these experiments will be presented and discussed.

  7. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  8. Measurement of the front-end dead-time of the LHCb muon detector and evaluation of its contribution to the muon detection inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Anelli, M.; Archilli, F.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bochin, B.; Bozzi, C.; Brundu, D.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Casu, L.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; De Simone, P.; Falabella, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, M.; Fontana, M.; Fresch, P.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Loi, A.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Martellotti, G.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Saitta, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Tellarini, G.; Vacca, C.; Vazquez-Gomez, R.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Vorobyev, A.

    2016-04-01

    A method is described which allows to deduce the dead-time of the front-end electronics of the LHCb muon detector from a series of measurements performed at different luminosities at a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz. The measured values of the dead-time range from ~ 70 ns to ~ 100 ns. These results allow to estimate the performance of the muon detector at the future bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz and at higher luminosity.

  9. Holmium-doped fibre amplifier operating at 2.1 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Kamynin, V A; Antipov, S O; Kurkov, A S; Baranikov, A V

    2014-02-28

    A small-signal holmium-doped fibre amplifier is demonstrated. The seed source is a cw holmium-doped fibre laser whose output power is modulated by an electro-optical modulator. The maximum gain reached (wavelength, 2.1 μm; power, 0.25 mW; pulse duration, 100 ns; pulse repetition rate, 1 μs) is 28.5 dB. (lasers)

  10. Excimer emission from pulsed microhollow cathode discharges in xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.-J.; Nam, S. H.; Rahaman, H.; Iberler, M.; Jacoby, J.; Frank, K.

    2013-12-15

    Direct current (dc) microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) is an intense source for excimer radiation in vacuum ultraviolet at a wavelength of 172 nm in a high pressure xenon (Xe) gas. The concentration of precursors for the excimer formation, i.e., excited and ionized gas atoms, increases significantly by applying high voltage pulse onto the dc MHCD over the pulse duration range from 20 to 100 ns. The intensity of the excimer emission for the voltage pulse of 20 ns duration exceeds that of the emission intensity obtained from the same MHCD operated only in the dc mode, by one order of magnitude. In addition, the emission intensity increases by one order of magnitude over the pulse duration range from 20 to 100 ns. It can be assumed that the emission intensity of the MHCD source increases as long as the duration of the high voltage pulse is shorter than the electron relaxation time. For the high voltage pulse of 100 ns duration, the emission intensity has been found to be further enhanced by a factor of three when the gas pressure is increased from 200 to 800 mbar.

  11. DNA EMP AWARENESS COURSE NOTES. THIRD EDITION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    fast rise times of the EMP, the spectral energy is distributed Although a lightning stroke can have throughout the spectrum through the lower a fast ...com- fore, must be considered on a system ponents were tested. EHP waveforms, having basis during all phases of system design. very fast rise times...prototyp waveforms. In all cases, these protectioiu components were destroyed. High current, fast rise-time pulses can be applied di- W rectly to the

  12. 49 CFR 173.127 - Class 5, Division 5.1-Definition and assignment of packing groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Manual of Tests and Criteria, it spontaneously ignites or its mean time for a pressure rise from 690 kPa... cellulose in a 1:1 ratio; or (B) Any material which exhibits a mean pressure rise time less than the pressure rise time of a 1:1 perchloric acid (50 percent)/cellulose mixture. (ii) Packing Group II,...

  13. 49 CFR 173.127 - Class 5, Division 5.1-Definition and assignment of packing groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, it spontaneously ignites or its mean time for a pressure rise... ignites when mixed with cellulose in a 1:1 ratio; or (B) Any material which exhibits a mean pressure rise time less than the pressure rise time of a 1:1 perchloric acid (50 percent)/cellulose mixture....

  14. Experimental investigation of vibration-induced bulk solids transport and segregation. Quarterly report ending March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rosato, A.D.; Dave, R.N.

    1996-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the motion of a single large sphere in a bed of dry granular material subjected to vertical vibration is presented. We have studied the rise time of the sphere as a function of vibration parameters, frequency and amplitude. While previous results report a decreasing rise time with increasing relative acceleration, we evidence the existence of a critical frequency where the rise time jumps to greater values before decreasing again. We also show that the rise time scales with the velocity amplitude of vibration and the transition corresponds approximately to a doubling of rise time. The results reported are over a rather narrow range of input accelerations, and generally involve gross phenomena of heaping and fluidization. Observations of the dynamic trajectory of the rising particle are also reported through the use of a novel non-intrusive particle tracking system. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  15. The First Tests of a Large-Area Light Detector Equipped with Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Scintillating Bolometers for the LUMINEU Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Kempf, S.; Loidl, M.; Navick, X. F.; Rodrigues, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future rare-event searches using scintillating crystals need very low background levels for high sensitivity; however, unresolved pile-up can limit this. We present the design and fabrication of large-area photon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), optimized for fast rise times to resolve close pile-up. The first prototypes have been characterized using Fe-55 X-rays and ZnMoO4 crystal scintillation light. A fast intrinsic rise time of 25-30 \\upmu s has been measured and has been compared to the 250 \\upmu s scintillation light pulse rise time constant. The difference indicates that the scintillation process limits the light pulse rise time. The fast rise time allows for a reduction of background due to close pile-up events as well as the study of the inherent crystal scintillation process. MMC-based photon detectors are shown to be a promising tool for scintillating crystal based rare event searches.

  16. Searching the conformational complexity and binding properties of HDAC6 through docking and molecular dynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Sixto-López, Yudibeth; Bello, Martiniano; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Rolando Alberto; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Gómez-Vidal, José Antonio; Correa-Basurto, José

    2016-09-23

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of proteins involved in the deacetylation of histones and other non-histones substrates. HDAC6 belongs to class II and shares similar biological functions with others of its class. Nevertheless, its three-dimensional structure that involves the catalytic site remains unknown for exploring the ligand recognition properties. Therefore, in this contribution, homology modeling, 100-ns-long Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation and docking calculations were combined to explore the conformational complexity and binding properties of the catalytic domain 2 from HDAC6 (DD2-HDAC6), for which activity and affinity toward five different ligands have been reported. Clustering analysis allowed identifying the most populated conformers present during the MD simulation, which were used as starting models to perform docking calculations with five DD2-HDAC6 inhibitors: Cay10603 (CAY), Rocilinostat (RCT), Tubastatin A (TBA), Tubacin (TBC), and Nexturastat (NXT), and then were also submitted to 100-ns-long MD simulations. Docking calculations revealed that the five inhibitors bind at the DD2-HDAC6 binding site with the lowest binding free energy, the same binding mode is maintained along the 100-ns-long MD simulations. Overall, our results provide structural information about the molecular flexibility of apo and holo DD2-HDAC6 states as well as insight of the map of interactions between DD2-HDAC6 and five well-known DD2-HDAC6 inhibitors allowing structural details to guide the drug design. Finally, we highlight the importance of combining different theoretical approaches to provide suitable structural models for structure-based drug design.

  17. Charge transfer dynamics between photoexcited CdS nanorods and mononuclear Ru water-oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Huan-Wei; Wilker, Molly B; Damrauer, Niels H; Dukovic, Gordana

    2013-03-06

    We describe the charge transfer interactions between photoexcited CdS nanorods and mononuclear water oxidation catalysts derived from the [Ru(bpy)(tpy)Cl](+) parent structure. Upon excitation, hole transfer from CdS oxidizes the catalyst (Ru(2+) → Ru(3+)) on a 100 ps to 1 ns timescale. This is followed by 10-100 ns electron transfer (ET) that reduces the Ru(3+) center. The relatively slow ET dynamics may provide opportunities for the accumulation of multiple holes at the catalyst, which is necessary for water oxidation.

  18. Effect of Alcohol on Interaction of Model Biological Membrane with Steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Mura, Manuela; Famili, Marjan; Zhou, Yuhua; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2014-03-01

    The effect of alcohol in the lipid bilayer changes the gel-phase structure of the lipid bilayer. Interactions between the alcohol molecules and the lipid bilayer were investigated using molecular dynamics. Alcohols such as ethanol and methanol are often used in drug delivery application. Ethanol is used to dissolve hydrophobic steroidal drugs such as Beclamethasone dipropionate, Fluticasone propionate and Prednisone. All the systems considered were equilibrated at 310K and ran for 100ns in the presence of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer. In addition the simulations were performed to investigate the behaviour of anti-asthma drugs such as Beclamethasone dipropionate in the water environment and 2.5% of ethanol.

  19. Study of transient spark discharge focused at NOx generation for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, M.; Martišovitš, V.; Hensel, K.; Machala, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The paper is focused at nitrogen oxides generation by transient spark (TS) in atmospheric pressure air. The TS is a DC-driven self-pulsing discharge with short duration (∼⃒10-100 ns) high current pulses (>1A), with the repetition frequency 1-10 kHz. Thanks to the short spark duration, highly reactive non-equilibrium plasma is generated, producing ∼⃒300 ppm of NOx per input energy density 100 J.l-1. Further optimization of NO/NO2 production to improve the biomedical/antimicrobial effects is possible by modifying the electric circuit generating the TS.

  20. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-12-31

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell ({pi} mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design.

  1. Interatomic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei

    2010-01-01

    In spite of greatly increased computer speeds, the application of ab initio methods for an atomistic simulation of materials is still limited to relatively small ensembles of atoms and, in molecular dynamics, relatively short simulation times (~5 ps). In contrast, the use of empirical or semiempirical interatomic potentials makes it possible to simulate much larger systems (~ up to a few million atoms) for much longer times (~100 ns), and thus to tackle such problems as plastic deformation, ion-solid interaction, or atomic diffusion. This chapter reviews various interatomic potentials used in large-scale computer simulations.

  2. A composition analyzer for microparticles using a spark ion source. [using time of flight spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.; Berg, O. E.

    1975-01-01

    Iron microparticles were fired onto a capacitor-type microparticle detector which responded to an impact with a spark discharge. Ion currents were extracted from the spark and analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectra showed the element of both detector and particle materials. The total extracted ion currents was typically 10A within a period of 100ns, indicating very efficient vaporization of the particle and ionization of the vapor. Potential applications include research on cosmic dust, atmospheric aerosols and cloud droplets, particles ejected by rocket or jet engines, by machining processes, or by nuclear bomb explosions.

  3. Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Imaging of Y1Ba2Cu3O7-delta Thin Films in High-Frequency AC Current Regime (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    pumped solid-state laser which provides 100 ns short pulses at 527 nm wavelength. The pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the laser can be varied...substrate with typical dimensions of 10 mm × 5 mm [14]. The YBCO films are about 250 nm thick. The samples exhibit a critical transition temperature (Tc) of...evolution of the magnetic flux density distribution in YBa2Cu3O7−δ ( YBCO ) thin film samples is studied as a function of the phase of the applied AC current

  4. Towards real-time identification of cosmic rays with LOw-Frequency ARray radio antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonardi, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Enriquez, J. Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Mitra, Pragati; Mulrey, Katie; Nelles, Anna; Rachen, Jörg Paul; Rossetto, Laura; Schellart, Pim; Scholten, Olaf; Thoudam, Satyendra; Trinh, Gia; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    Cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere produce Extensive Air Showers, which emit a radio signal through Geo-magnetic radiation and Askaryan emission. At the present time, one of the biggest challenges for assessing the Radio detection as a valuable technique for Cosmic-ray observation is to identify in real-time the very short (less than 100 ns) radio signals over the background noise. In this work, we present the latest updates on the real-time identification of radio signals from Extensive Air Showers by using the data from LOFAR Low Band Antenna stations, which are sensitive in the 30-80 MHz region.

  5. Widely tunable gas laser for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothe, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced, highly efficient and reliable Rare-Gas Halide laser was developed. It employs the following: (1) novel prepulse techniques and impedance matching for efficient energy transfer; (2) magnetic switches for high reliability; (3) x-ray preionization for discharge uniformity and beam quality; and (4) an integrated gas flow loop for compactness. When operated as a XeCl laser, the unit produces 2 J per pulse with good beam uniformity. Optical pulse duration is 100 ns. Pulse repetition rate was tested up to 25 Hz. Efficiency is 3 percent.

  6. Material-dependent high-frequency current fluctuations of cathodicvacuum arcs: Evidence for the ecton cutoff of the fractal model

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim

    2005-12-22

    Current fluctuations of cathodic arcs were recorded withhigh analog bandwidth (up to 1 GHz) and fast digital sampling (up to 5Gsamples/sec). The power spectral density of the arc current wasdetermined by fast Fourier transform clearly showing material dependent,non-linear features in the frequency domain. These features can beassociated with the non-linear impedance of the conducting channelbetween cathode and anode, driven by the explosive nature of electronemission and plasma formation. The characteristic times of less than 100ns can be associated with individual explosive processes, "ectons," andtherefore represent the short-time physical cutoff for the fractal modelof cathodic arcs.

  7. Characterisation of a Surface-Flashover Ion Source with 10-250 ns Pulse Width

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P L; Meyer, G A; Sampayan, S E; Tang, V; Morse, J D

    2008-08-05

    As a step towards developing an ultra compact D-D neutron source for various defense and homeland security applications, a compact ion source is needed. Towards that end, we are testing a pulsed, surface flashover source, with deuterated titanium films deposited on alumina substrates as the electrodes. As the duration of the arc current is varied, it was observed that the integrated deuteron current per pulse initially increases rapidly, then reaches a maximum near a pulse length of 100 ns. Thin film patterning techniques and deuteration parameters will be discussed.

  8. Experimental results of the performance of the new phase and frequency controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannermaa, Jari; Kalliomaeki, Kalevi

    1992-06-01

    The application of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to control phase locked crystals of Loran C receivers is reported. Performance optimization of the MEM controller achieved the result of 9 ns and 7 x 10(exp -12) for phase and frequency residuals, respectively. These values are comparable with 100 ns and 9 x 10(exp -12) of the older conventional PI controller, respectively. The performance of the MEM controlled Loran C receiver is at least 50 percent better when compared with the identical receiver equipped with the PI controller. The results verify the presumed superiority of the MEM controller over the conventional PI.

  9. Inactivation of a 25.5 µm Enterococcus faecalis biofilm by a room-temperature, battery-operated, handheld air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X.; Lu, X.; Liu, J.; Liu, D.; Yang, Y.; Ostrikov, K.; Chu, Paul K.; Pan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Effective biofilm inactivation using a handheld, mobile plasma jet powered by a 12 V dc battery and operated in open air without any external gas supply is reported. This cold, room-temperature plasma is produced in self-repetitive nanosecond discharges with current pulses of ˜100 ns duration, current peak amplitude of ˜6 mA and repetition rate of ˜20 kHz. It is shown that the reactive plasma species penetrate to the bottom layer of a 25.5 µm-thick Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and produce a strong bactericidal effect. This is the thickest reported biofilm inactivated using room-temperature air plasmas.

  10. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  11. Alternative approaches to the design of targets for a hybrid thermonuclear station

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N G; Lebo, I G; Rozanov, Vladislav B; Feoktistov, L P; Tishkin, V F

    1998-04-30

    Targets with low degrees of compression, such as those with internal energy deposition, two-stage conical targets for lasers emitting pulses of duration of the order of 100 ns, and multilayer shell targets for short-pulse long-wavelength CO{sub 2} and CO lasers may prove acceptable for hybrid thermonuclear reactors with high values (of the order of 10{sup 3}) of the gain in the blanket. Estimates and one-dimensional calculations of the compression of such targets are reported for the laser radiation energy range 0.2-2 MJ. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  12. Intense gigawatt relativistic electron beam generation in the presence of prepulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, J.; Kumar, D. D. P.; Roy, A.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, A.; Singh, S. K.; Rao, G. V.; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2007-02-01

    Large pulse power systems in the presence of prepulse can deliver gigawatt power pulses into a matched load. While employing these pulse power systems for the generation of intense relativistic electron beams (IREBs), the prepulse initiated plasma closes the anode cathode gap, if the gap distance is set by the Child-Langmuir formula. In order to reduce the prepulse effect, the anode cathode gap has been increased for the generation of IREB with output parameters of 400kV, 20kA, and 100ns pulse duration. In this paper the generation of IREB in the presence of prepulse without using any prepulse switch has been discussed.

  13. Plasma x-ray radiation source.

    PubMed

    Popkov, N F; Kargin, V I; Ryaslov, E A; Pikar', A S

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the results of studies on a plasma x-ray source, which enables one to obtain a 2.5-krad radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm2 in the quantum energy range from 20 to 500 keV. Pulse duration is 100 ns. Spectral radiation distributions from a diode under various operation conditions of a plasma are obtained. A Marx generator served as an initial energy source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4 = 10-6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10-7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches.

  14. Energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during laser and electron beam irradiation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.W.; Aziz, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The fundamentals of energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during energy deposition from lasers and electron beams is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the deposition of energy from pulsed sources (10 to 100 ns pulse duration time) in order to achieve high heating and cooling rates (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/C/s) in the near surface region. The response of both metals and semiconductors to pulsed energy deposition is considered. Guidelines are presented for the choice of energy source, wavelength, and pulse duration time.

  15. Ultrasound propagation measurements and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Papadakis, E. P.; Fowler, K. A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews three systems designed for accurately measuring the propagation of ultrasonic pulses. The three systems are presented in order of velocity-measuring precision: + or - 100 ns, + or - 1 ns, + or - 0.2 ns. Also included is a brief discussion of phase and group velocities, with reference to dispersive, highly attenuating materials. Measurement of attenuation by pulse-echo buffer rod techniques is described briefly. These techniques and instruments have been used to measure sound velocity and attenuation in a variety of materials and shapes, over a wide temperature range.

  16. Tuning resistance states by thickness control in an electroforming-free nanometallic complementary resistance random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiang; Lu, Yang; Lee, Jongho; Chen, I-Wei

    2016-01-04

    Tuning low resistance state is crucial for resistance random access memory (RRAM) that aims to achieve optimal read margin and design flexibility. By back-to-back stacking two nanometallic bipolar RRAMs with different thickness into a complementary structure, we have found that its low resistance can be reliably tuned over several orders of magnitude. Such high tunability originates from the exponential thickness dependence of the high resistance state of nanometallic RRAM, in which electron wave localization in a random network gives rise to the unique scaling behavior. The complementary nanometallic RRAM provides electroforming-free, multi-resistance-state, sub-100 ns switching capability with advantageous characteristics for memory arrays.

  17. Possibility of applying a hydrodynamic model to describe the laser erosion of metals irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozadaev, K. V.

    2014-04-01

    We report the results of experimental investigations of the production and development of plasma-vapour plumes upon irradiation of metal targets by nanosecond (10-100 ns) pulses with a high (108-1010 W cm-2) power density under atmospheric conditions. The transition from a quasi-stationary thermal mechanism of metal erosion to an explosion hydrodynamic one takes place when the radiation power density increases from 108 to 109 W cm-2. The resultant experimental information is extremely important for the laser deposition of metal nanostructures under atmospheric conditions, which is possible only for power densities of 108-109 W cm-2.

  18. Prepulse minimization in KALI-5000.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D Durga Praveen; Mitra, S; Senthil, K; Sharma, Vishnu K; Singh, S K; Roy, A; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-07-01

    A pulse power system (1 MV, 50 kA, and 100 ns) based on Marx generator and Blumlein pulse forming line has been built for generating high power microwaves. The Blumlein configuration poses a prepulse problem and hence the diode gap had to be increased to match the diode impedance to the Blumlein impedance during the main pulse. A simple method to eliminate prepulse voltage using a vacuum sparkgap and a resistor is given. Another fundamental approach of increasing the inductance of Marx generator to minimize the prepulse voltage is also presented. Experimental results for both of these configurations are given.

  19. Prepulse minimization in KALI-5000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Durga Praveen; Mitra, S.; Senthil, K.; Sharma, Vishnu K.; Singh, S. K.; Roy, A.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-07-01

    A pulse power system (1 MV, 50 kA, and 100 ns) based on Marx generator and Blumlein pulse forming line has been built for generating high power microwaves. The Blumlein configuration poses a prepulse problem and hence the diode gap had to be increased to match the diode impedance to the Blumlein impedance during the main pulse. A simple method to eliminate prepulse voltage using a vacuum sparkgap and a resistor is given. Another fundamental approach of increasing the inductance of Marx generator to minimize the prepulse voltage is also presented. Experimental results for both of these configurations are given.

  20. Comparison of nonlinear absorption and carrier recombination times in GaAs grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and Bridgman processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Leonel P.; Murray, Joel; Carpenter, Amelia; Upchurch, Derek; Barnes, Jacob O.; Schunemann, Peter G.; Zawilski, Kevin; Guha, Shekhar

    2010-02-01

    μA 760 μm thick GaAs crystal was grown using HVPE. Transmission spectrum of this sample showed minimal absorption for light having photon energy below the bandgap energy, indicating the absence of the EL2 defects commonly found in Bridgman grown samples. Irradiance dependent absorption measured at 1.535 μm using 100 ns duration laser pulses showed increased nonlinear absorption in the HVPE grown GaAs compared to Bridgman grown samples. The dominant nonlinear absorption process in both samples was absorption due to free carriers generated by two-photon absorption. The HVPE grown sample showed higher nonlinear absorption due to longer carrier lifetimes.

  1. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ∼10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (∼10{sup −10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (∼10{sup 28}m{sup −3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  2. Energy resolution enhancement of mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, M.; Prince, T. A.; Padgett, L.; Prickett, B.; Schnepple, W.

    1984-01-01

    A pulse processing technique has been developed which improves the gamma-ray energy resolution of mercuric iodide detectors. The technique employs a fast (100 ns) and a slow (6.4 microsec) pulse height analysis to correct for signal variations due to variations in charge trapping. The capabilities of the technique for energy resolution enhancement are discussed as well as the utility of the technique for examining the trapping characteristics of individual detectors. An energy resolution of 2.6 percent FWHM at 662 keV was achieved with an acceptance efficiency of 100 percent from a mercuric iodide detector which gives 8.3 percent FWHM using standard techniques.

  3. A design approach for systems based on magnetic pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D Durga Praveen; Mitra, S; Senthil, K; Sharma, D K; Rajan, Rehim N; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-04-01

    A design approach giving the optimum number of stages in a magnetic pulse compression circuit and gain per stage is given. The limitation on the maximum gain per stage is discussed. The total system volume minimization is done by considering the energy storage capacitor volume and magnetic core volume at each stage. At the end of this paper, the design of a magnetic pulse compression based linear induction accelerator of 200 kV, 5 kA, and 100 ns with a repetition rate of 100 Hz is discussed with its experimental results.

  4. Non-sticking of helium buffer gas to hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, James F. E.; Bohn, John L.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetimes of complexes formed during helium-hydrocarbon collisions at low temperature are estimated for symmetric-top hydrocarbons. The lifetimes are obtained using a density-of-states approach. In general the lifetimes are less than 10-100 ns and are found to decrease with increasing hydrocarbon size. This suggests that clustering will not limit precision spectroscopy in helium-buffer-gas experiments. Lifetimes are computed for noble-gas benzene collisions and are found to be in reasonable agreement with lifetimes obtained from classical trajectories as reported by J. Cui et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 164315 (2014), 10.1063/1.4898796].

  5. Vector Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer for high-order acoustic modes.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Michel; Bacquet, Denis; Szriftgiser, Pascal

    2010-11-15

    Thanks to a double-frequency phase modulation scheme, we report a vector Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer (BOTDA). This BOTDA has a high immunity level to noise, and it features a phase spectrogram capability. It is well suited for complex situations involving several acoustic resonances, such as high-order longitudinal modes. It has notably been used to characterize a dispersion-shifted fiber, allowing us to report spectrograms with multiple acoustic resonances. A very high 57 dB dynamic range is also reported for 100-ns-long pulses simultaneously with a 16 cm numerical resolution.

  6. rf-microwave switches based on reversible semiconductor-metal transition of VO2 thin films synthesized by pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas-Bouchiat, F.; Champeaux, C.; Catherinot, A.; Crunteanu, A.; Blondy, P.

    2007-11-01

    Microwave switching devices based on the semiconductor-metal transition of VO2 thin films were developped on two types of substrates (C-plane sapphire and SiO2/Si), and in both shunt and series configurations. Under thermal activation, the switches achieved up to 30-40dB average isolation of the radio-frequency (rf) signal on 500MHz -35GHz frequency band with weak insertion losses. These VO2-based switches can be electrically activated with commutation times less than 100ns, which make them promising candidates for realizing efficient and simple rf switches.

  7. Condensation of ablation plumes in the irradiation of metals by high-intensity nanosecond laser pulses at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2016-01-31

    The Anisimov–Luk'yanchuk model is adapted for describing the condensation of vapour-plasma plumes produced in the irradiation of metal targets by high-intensity (10{sup 8} – 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) nanosecond (10 – 100 ns) pulses at atmospheric pressure. The resultant data suggest that the initial stages of the development of metal ablation plumes correspond with a high degree of accuracy to the Zel'dovich–Raizer theory of dynamic condensation; however, at the stage of the ablation plume decay, the liquid-droplet phase is formed primarily by coalescence of 'nuclei'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  8. TEMPO machine

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Lancaster, K.T.; Lawson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    TEMPO is a transformer powered megavolt pulse generator with an output pulse of 100 ns duration. The machine was designed for burst mode operation at pulse repetition rates up to 10 Hz with minimum pulse-to-pulse voltage variations. To meet the requirement for pulse duration a nd a 20-..omega.. output impedance within reasonable size constraints, the pulse forming transmission line was designed as two parallel water-insulated, strip-type Blumleins. Stray capacitance and electric fields along the edges of the line elements were controlled by lining the tank with plastic sheet.

  9. Analysis of Recombination in CdTe Heterostructures With Time-Resolved Two-Photon Excitation Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuciauskas, Darius; Wernsing, Keith; Jensen, Soren Alkaersig; Barnes, Teresa M.; Myers, Thomas H.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-11-01

    Here, we used time-resolved photoluminescence microscopy to analyze charge carrier transport and recombination in CdTe double heterostructures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). This allowed us to determine the charge carrier mobility in this system, which was found to be 500-625 cm2/(V s). Charge carrier lifetimes in the 15-100 ns range are limited by the interface recombination, and the data indicate higher interface recombination velocity near extended defects. This study describes a new method to analyze the spatial distribution of the interface recombination velocity and the interface defects in semiconductor heterostructures.

  10. Analysis of Recombination in CdTe Heterostructures With Time-Resolved Two-Photon Excitation Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Kuciauskas, Darius; Wernsing, Keith; Jensen, Soren Alkaersig; ...

    2016-11-01

    Here, we used time-resolved photoluminescence microscopy to analyze charge carrier transport and recombination in CdTe double heterostructures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). This allowed us to determine the charge carrier mobility in this system, which was found to be 500-625 cm2/(V s). Charge carrier lifetimes in the 15-100 ns range are limited by the interface recombination, and the data indicate higher interface recombination velocity near extended defects. This study describes a new method to analyze the spatial distribution of the interface recombination velocity and the interface defects in semiconductor heterostructures.

  11. The relationship between beliefs about sleep and adherence to behavioral treatment combined with meditation for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Cvengros, Jamie A; Crawford, Megan R; Manber, Rachel; Ong, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    This study examined beliefs about sleep, as measured by the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep (DBAS) scale, as predictors of adherence to 3 specific insomnia treatment recommendations: restriction of time spent in bed, maintenance of a consistent rise time, and completion of daily meditation practice. Higher DBAS scores predicted poorer adherence to restriction of time spent in bed and to maintenance of a prescribed rise time. DBAS scores were not associated with completion of daily meditation. These preliminary findings suggest that pre-treatment beliefs about sleep may impact patient engagement with behavioral recommendations regarding time in bed and consistent rise time during treatment for insomnia.

  12. Effects of discharge voltage waveform on the discharge characteristics in a helium atmospheric plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Giichiro Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-04-21

    We present here an analysis of the discharge characteristics of a He plasma jet operating under three different types of applied voltage waveform: (a) a μs-pulse voltage waveform with a slow voltage rise time, (b) ns-pulse, and (c) rectangular voltage waveforms with fast voltage rise time. Optical emission measurements show that the application of a voltage with a fast voltage rise time induces rapid discharge growth and, consequently, produces an abundance of energetic electrons, which in turn leads to high optical emission from the O atoms. We also estimate the optical emission efficiency of the O atom (η{sub o}), which corresponds roughly to the production efficiency of the reactive O species. η{sub o} increases with increasing applied voltage, and the highest value of η{sub o} is obtained in the shortest pulse discharge, which was ignited by a ns-pulse voltage waveform with a fast voltage rise time and short pulse width.

  13. Power-control switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, L. L.

    1976-01-01

    Constant-current source creates drive current independent of input-voltage variations, 50% reduction in power loss in base drive circuitry, maintains essentially constant charge rate, and improves rise-time consistency over input voltage range.

  14. 40 CFR 211.203 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... characterized by very short rise time and duration. (o) Label. That item, as described in this regulation, which... ANSI Std S3.19-1974 tests on hearing protective devices. It must meet the applicable requirements...

  15. Study of temporal pulse shape effects on W using simulations and laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; van den Berg, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Transient heat pulses with triangular, square, and ELM-like temporal shapes are investigated in order to further understand how transient plasma instabilities will affect plasma facing components in tokamaks. A solution to the 1D heat equation for triangular pulses allows the peak surface temperature to be written analytically for arbitrary rise times. The solution as well as ANSYS simulations reveal that a positive ramp (maximum rise time) triangular pulse has a higher peak surface temperature by a factor of \\sqrt{2} compared to that from a negative ramp (rise time = 0) pulse shape with equal energy density, peak power, and pulse width. Translating the results to ITER, an ELM or disruption pulse with the shortest rise time is the most benign compared to other pulse shapes with the same peak heat flux and same energy density.

  16. Signal processing for semiconductor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1982-02-01

    A balanced perspective is provided on the processing of signals produced by semiconductor detectors. The general problems of pulse shaping to optimize resolution with constraints imposed by noise, counting rate and rise time fluctuations are discussed.

  17. Observation of particle ejection behavior following laser-induced breakdown on the rear surface of a sodium chloride optical window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Xu, Zhongjie; Wei, Ke; Jiang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Laser-induced rear surface breakdown process of sodium chloride (NaCl) optical window was investigated based on the time-resolved shadowgraphy and interferometry. Violent particle ejection behavior lasting from tens of nanoseconds to tens of microseconds after the breakdown was observed. Classified by the particle velocity and propagating direction, the ejection process can be divided into three phases: (1) high-speed ejection of liquid particles during the first 100-ns delay; (2) micron-sized material clusters ejection from ˜100-ns to ˜1-μs delay; (3) larger and slower solid-state particles ejection from ˜1 μs to tens of microseconds delay. The moving directions of particles in the first and third phases are both perpendicular to the sample surface while particles ejected in the second phase exhibits angular ejection and present a V-like particle pattern. Mechanisms include explosive boiling, impact ejection, and shockwave ejection are discussed to explain this multiple phase ejection behavior. Our results highlight the significance of impact ejection induced by recoil pressure and backward propagating internal shockwave for laser-induced rear surface breakdown events of optical materials with low melting point.

  18. Synchronizable Q-switched, mode-locked, and cavity-dumped ruby laser for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houtman, H.; Meyer, J.

    1985-06-01

    We report on the design and operation of an optimized version of a Q-switched, mode-locked, and cavity-dumped ruby-laser oscillator. The modulator window is much narrower than that assumed in conventional active mode-lock theory, and is shown to yield much shorter pulses than the latter in cases where the number of round trips is restricted. To allow a high-power pulse (≊1 GW) to evolve in the oscillator, and to allow simple synchronization to a (˜100 ns fixed delay) CO2 laser, a limit of 23 round trips was chosen, but similar limits may be imposed by lasers having short-gain duration as in an excimer laser. Details are given on the single spark gap switching element and Pockels cells, with an analysis of their expected switching speeds, in order to establish the effectiveness of the modulator, as compared to conventional sinusoidally driven active mode lockers. Single pulses of 50-70 mJ are reliably cavity-dumped after only 100-ns delay (23 round trips) with pulse length adjustable from 50-100 ps with ±5-ps stability. Relative timing between the main (CO2) and probe (ruby) pulses allows a measurement accuracy of ±50 ps to be attained.

  19. Experiment to Study Alfven Wave Propagation in Plasma Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Mark; Bellan, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Arched plasma-filled twisted magnetic flux tubes are generated in the laboratory using pulsed power techniques (J.F. Hansen, S.K.P. Tripathi, P.M. Bellan, 2004). Their structure and time evolution exhibit similarities with both solar coronal loops and spheromaks. We are now developing a method to excite propagating torsional Alfven wave modes in such plasma loops by superposing a ˜10kA, ˜100ns current pulse upon the ˜50kA, 10μs main discharge current that flows along the ˜20cm long, 2cm diameter arched flux tube. To achieve this high power 100ns pulse, a magnetic pulse compression technique based on saturable reactors is employed. A low power prototype has been successfully tested, and design and construction of a full-power device is nearing completion. The full-power device will compress an initial 2μs pulse by a factor of nearly 20; the final stage utilizes a water-filled transmission line with ultra-low inductance to attain the final timescale. This new pulse device will subsequently be used to investigate interactions between Alfven waves and the larger-scale loop evolution; one goal will be to directly image the wave using high-speed photography. Attention will be paid to wave propagation including dispersion and reflection, as well as dissipation mechanisms and possible energetic particle generation.

  20. Experiment to Study Alfv'en Wave Propagation in Plasma Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Mark; Bellan, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Solar coronal loops are simulated in the laboratory using pulsed power techniques [1]. We are now developing a method to excite propagating Alfv'en wave modes by superposing a current pulse of roughly 10kA and width 100ns upon the ˜50kA, 10 microsecond main discharge current that flows along the ˜10cm long, 1cm diameter arched flux tube. To achieve this short 100ns pulsed timescale at such high power, a magnetic pulse compression technique based on saturable reactors will be employed. A low power prototype has been successfully tested, and design and construction of a full-power device is underway. Upon completion, the fast current pulse device will be used to investigate interactions between the Alfv'en waves and the larger-scale loop evolution. Particular attention will be paid to wave propagation including dispersion and reflection, as well as dissipation mechanisms and possible energetic particle generation.[4pt] [1] J. F. Hansen, S. K. P. Tripathi, P. M. Bellan, ``Co- and Counter-helicity Interaction Between Two Adjacent Laboratory Prominences,'' Phys. Plasmas, vol. 11, issue 6, p. 3177 (2004)

  1. X-Pinch in High-Current Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryunetkin, B. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Ivanenkov, G. V.; Khakhalin, S. Ya.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Romanova, V. M.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.

    1994-03-01

    The review of X-pinch investigations in high current diode of BIN facility (250 kA, 100 ns) is presented. The main purposes were to investigate pinch forming processes and hot dense plasma properties. X-pinch is also considered as a source for multiple charged ions spectroscopy and for X-ray optics testing. The set of diagnostics applied in these experiments allowed us to investigate the pinch forming processes in different configurations of crossed wires loads. High spectral and space resolved measurements of plasma radiation in 1-200 Å range, absolute energy measurements and electron beam registration were provided. Plasma parameters were obtained from relative intensities and shapes of multiple charged ions spectral lines. Electron density of plasma with the temperature Te = 0.2-1 keV variated from 1023 cm-3 in hot spot to 1018 cm-3 during plasma expansion. In recombining plasma, an inversion of Al He-like ions levels population was registrated. Total radiation output of 0.5 mm pinch reached hundreds Joules in 2-100 Å range during 100 ns.

  2. Investigation of the phase stability of an X-band long pulse multibeam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Lei, Lurong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Lele; Li, Shifeng; Yan, Wenkang; He, Hu

    2016-09-01

    To realize coherent high power microwave combining, an X-band long pulse multibeam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed, and the relative phase stability is investigated by three dimensions particle in cell simulation and high power microwave experiment. The simulation shows that the relative phase difference can be stabilized at gigawatt level radiation power. But the relative phase jitter increases in the experiment, then some measures are proposed to improve the stability of relative phase difference and avoid pulse shortening. A 0.98 GW radiation power with pulse duration of 160 ns is obtained in the experiment, the pulse shortening is avoided. The relative phase difference fluctuation between output microwave and input RF signal is less than ±25° in a single shot with duration of 100 ns. Then, the experiment of pulse repetition is carried out, and an output microwave with 0.98 GW radiation power at 25 Hz repetition rate is obtained. The power conversion efficiency is about 35% with pulse duration of 160 ns. The relative phase difference is less than ±30° at 25 Hz repetition rate in 100 ns.

  3. A modified infrared spectrometer with high time resolution and its application for investigating fast conformational changes of the GTPase Ras.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of proteins and protein interactions. The investigation of many biological processes is possible by means of caged compounds, which set free biologically active substances upon light activation. Some caged compounds could provide sub-nanosecond time resolution, e.g., para-hydroxyphenacyl-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) forms GTP in picoseconds. However, the time resolution in single shot experiments with rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers is limited to about 10 ms. Here we use an infrared diode laser instead of the conventional globar and achieve a time resolution of 100 ns. This allows for the time-resolved measurement of the fast Ras(off) to Ras(on) conformational change at room temperature. We quantified the activation parameters for this reaction and found that the free energy of activation for this reaction is mainly enthalpic. Investigation of the same reaction in the presence of the Ras binding domain of the effector Raf (RafRBD) reveals a four orders of magnitude faster reaction, indicating that Ras·RafRBD complex formation directly induces the conformational change. Recent developments of broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers will further improve time resolution and usability of the setup. The reported 100 ns time resolution is the best achieved for a non-repetitive experiment so far.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Axial and Beam-Riding Propulsive Physics with TEA CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I.; Myrabo, L. N.; Notaro, S. N.; Bragulla, P. W.

    2010-10-08

    A twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO{sub 2} laser system (pulse duration of approximately 100 ns FWHM spike, with optional 1 {mu}s tail, depending upon laser gas mix) was employed to experimentally measure both axial thrust and beam-riding behavior of Type no. 200 lightcraft engines, using a ballistic pendulum and Angular Impulse Measurement Device (AIMD, respectively. Beam-riding forces and moments were examined along with engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the vehicle axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse energy ({approx}12 to 40 joules); c) pulse duration (100 ns, and 1 {mu}s); and d) engine size (97.7 mm to 161.2 mm). Maximum lateral momentum coupling coefficients (C{sub M}) of 75 N-s/MJ were achieved with the K922M laser whereas previous PLVTS laser (420 J, 18 {mu}s duration) results reached only 15 N-s/MJ--an improvement of 5x. Maximum axial C{sub M} performance with the K922M reached 225 N-s/MJ, or about {approx}3x larger than the lateral C{sub M} values. These axial C{sub M} results are sharply higher than the 120 N/MW previously reported for long pulse (e.g., 10-18 {mu}s)CO{sub 2} electric discharge lasers.

  5. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  6. Thomson Scattering on exploding wires at 800 kA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William

    2016-10-01

    Laser Thomson scattering measurements have been carried out on a single 0.25 mm diameter Al wire load driven with an 800 kA, 100 ns risetime pulse on the COBRA pulsed power facility. The 527 nm, 10 J, 5 ns laser is brought to a line focus on a chord across the unstable, roughly cylindrical plasma column of the wire, which reaches 8mm outer diameter at 100 ns. The laser path is either on axis or 2mm or 4mm off axis. Scattered signals are collected on a fiber array yielding data across the laser path through the plasma. The scattered light is easily visible over the wire plasma self-emission. The scattered spectra have highly complex structures comprised of as many as four distinct spectral peaks spread over 1 nm in wavelength, both red-and blue-shifted. On axis, the laser does not reach the far side of the plasma, being totally absorbed and/or refracted out of its path. 2 mm off-axis the beam is severely refracted, probably from near the critical surface in the plasma, appearing in images taken with cameras 45 degrees off its entering path. The scattering should be in the collective regime, and analysis is underway to extract information on flow velocities and temperatures within the volume, of 0.5mm radius, imaged by each fiber. Work supported by US DOE NNSA Grant DE-NA0001855.

  7. Multiprotein Interactions during Surface Adsorption: a Molecular Dynamics Study of Lysozyme Aggregation at a Charged Solid Surface

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Multiprotein adsorption of hen egg white lysozyme at a model charged ionic surface is studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations with two, three, and five proteins, in various orientations with respect the surface, are performed over a 100 ns time scale. Mutated proteins with point mutations at the major (Arg128 and Arg125) and minor (Arg68) surface adsorption sites are also studied. The 100 ns time scale used is sufficient to observe protein translations, rotations, adsorption, and aggregation. Two competing processes of particular interest are observed, namely surface adsorption and protein–protein aggregation. At low protein concentration, the proteins first adsorb in isolation and can then reorientate on the surface to aggregate. At high concentration, the proteins aggregate in the solution and then adsorb in nonspecific ways. This work demonstrates the role of protein concentration in adsorption, indicates the residues involved in both types of interaction (protein–protein and protein–surface), and gives an insight into processes to be considered in the development of new functionalized material systems. PMID:21671567

  8. An improved microfluidics approach for monitoring real-time interaction profiles of ultrafast molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Rakshit, Surajit; Kar, Shantimoy; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Our study illustrates the development of a microfluidics (MF) platform combining fluorescence microscopy and femtosecond/picosecond-resolved spectroscopy to investigate ultrafast chemical processes in liquid-phase diffusion-controlled reactions. By controlling the flow rates of two reactants in a specially designed MF chip, sub-100 ns time resolution for the exploration of chemical intermediates of the reaction in the MF channel has been achieved. Our system clearly rules out the possibility of formation of any intermediate reaction product in a so-called fast ionic reaction between sodium hydroxide and phenolphthalein, and reveals a microsecond time scale associated with the formation of the reaction product. We have also used the developed system for the investigation of intermediate states in the molecular recognition of various macromolecular self-assemblies (micelles) and genomic DNA by small organic ligands (Hoechst 33258 and ethidium bromide). We propose our MF-based system to be an alternative to the existing millisecond-resolved "stopped-flow" technique for a broad range of time-resolved (sub-100 ns to minutes) experiments on complex chemical/biological systems.

  9. METHOD FOR EXCHANGING ENERGY WITH A PLASMA BY MAGNETIC PUMPING

    DOEpatents

    Hall, L.S.

    1963-12-31

    A method of heating a plasma confined by a static magnetic field is presented. A time-varying magnetic field having a rise time to a predetermined value substantially less than its fall time is applied to a portion of the plasma. Because of the much shorter rise time, the plasma is reversibly heated. This cycle is repeated until the desired plasma temperature is reached. (AEC)

  10. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges in overhead power lines. Part I. Fast pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ramrus, A.

    1986-02-01

    Objective of the study was to create conceptual designs of high voltage pulsers capable of simulating two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by a high-altitude nuclear burst; the slow rise time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD-EMP) and the fast rise time high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The pulser design was directed towards facilities capable of performing EMP vulnerability testing of components used in the national electric power system.

  11. Rapid testing of pulse transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, J.

    1980-01-01

    Quality-control testing of pulse transformers is speeded up by method for determining rise time and droop. Instead of using oscilloscope and square-wave generator to measure these characteristics directly, method uses voltmeter and sine-wave generator to measure them indirectly in about one-tenth time. Droop and rise time are determined by measuring input/output voltage ratio at just four frequencies.

  12. Constraints on slow earthquake dynamics from a swarm in central italy

    PubMed

    Crescentini; Amoruso; Scarpa

    1999-12-10

    Several clustered slow earthquakes have been recorded by a geodetic interferometer in central Italy. The strain rise times of the events range from tens to thousands of seconds, and the seismic moment scales with the square root of the rise time. This scaling law contrasts with the conservative assumption of constant rupture velocity in fault modeling but is consistent with the occurrence of a slow rupture propagation analogous to heat diffusion in a slab.

  13. Accelerator Fast Kicker R&D with Ultra Compact 50MVA Nano-Second FID Pulse Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    overall length of magnet or deflector . This demands a faster kicker system. To inject a 24 GeV beam into RHIC, the rise time of the kicker...kicker magnet or deflector length. In order to maintaining the same overall strength, six kicker modules, instead of four, will be used with shorter...individual kicker magnets or deflector length. This reduces the electrical pulse rise time constraint. The main parameters of injection kicker

  14. A 600 VOLT MULTI-STAGE, HIGH REPETITION RATE GAN FET SWITCH

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, D.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.

    2016-10-05

    Using recently available GaN FETs, a 600 Volt three- stage, multi-FET switch has been developed having 2 nanosecond rise time driving a 200 Ohm load with the potential of approaching 30 MHz average switching rates. Possible applications include driving particle beam choppers kicking bunch-by-bunch and beam deflectors where the rise time needs to be custom tailored. This paper reports on the engineering issues addressed, the design approach taken and some performance results of this switch.

  15. Novel molecularly imprinted polymer using 1-(α-methyl acrylate)-3-methylimidazolium bromide as functional monomer for simultaneous extraction and determination of water-soluble acid dyes in wastewater and soft drink by solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xubiao; Zhan, Youcai; Tu, Xinman; Huang, Yining; Luo, Shenglian; Yan, Liushui

    2011-02-25

    Novel water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized in methanol-water systems with Tratarzine as template and 1-(α-methyl acrylate)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (1-MA-3MI-Br) as functional monomer, which has π-π hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions with template molecule. 1-MA-3MI-Br molecularly imprinted polymers (1-MA-3MI-Br-MIPs) were used as selective sorbents for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of water-soluble acid dyes from wastewater and soft drink. The good linearity of the method was obtained in a range of 5.0-2000 μg/L with the correlation coefficient of > 0.999. The detection limits were in a range of 0.13-0.51 μg/L for the water-soluble acid dyes in wastewater and 0.095-0.84 μg/L for those in soft drink. The mean recoveries for the acid dyes are from 89.1% to 101.0% in spiked wastewater and 91.0-101.3% in spiked soft drink. Compared with strongly anion exchange solid phase extraction (SAX-SPE), mixture anion exchange solid phase extraction (MAX-SPE), and 1-MA-3MI-Br non-imprinted solid phase extraction (1-MA-3MI-Br-NISPE), almost all of the matrix interferences were removed by 1-MA-3MI-Br-MISPE, exhibiting higher selectivity, recovery and enrichment ability for the acid dyes and better baselines in the results of HPLC analysis.

  16. Photoconductivity studies of carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, Olivia M.

    This thesis presents photoconductivity measurements used to study the properties of carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates. Two types of devices are used. The first class consists of an individual bundle of carbon nanotubes aligned from suspension between electrodes. The second consists of a single-walled nanotube (SWNT) grown via chemical vapor deposition and electrically contacted using novel lithographic techniques. Fabricating nanotube devices on quartz allows optical measurements of the nanotube without any contribution from the substrate. The special considerations for fabrication on quartz substrates are discussed. The photoresponse of bundles is a useful measure of the coupling between individual SWNT in the bundle. Measured photocurrents are of order picoamps and rise times are as long as 10 ms. We propose that the longer-than-expected rise times are due to intertube coupling. Individual SWNT are expected to have very high drift velocities, making SWNT an attractive material for fast-switching device applications. We measure photocurrents of order nanoamps and an upper limit for the rise time of a SWNT diode device. The measured rise times are both fast (<5 mus) and slow (800 mus) indicating that nanotube devices can be used for high speed applications, but that the device configuration may play a critical role in the minimum achievable rise time.

  17. Broadband ground-motion simulation using a hybrid approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, R.W.; Pitarka, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes refinements to the hybrid broadband ground-motion simulation methodology of Graves and Pitarka (2004), which combines a deterministic approach at low frequencies (f 1 Hz). In our approach, fault rupture is represented kinematically and incorporates spatial heterogeneity in slip, rupture speed, and rise time. The prescribed slip distribution is constrained to follow an inverse wavenumber-squared fall-off and the average rupture speed is set at 80% of the local shear-wave velocity, which is then adjusted such that the rupture propagates faster in regions of high slip and slower in regions of low slip. We use a Kostrov-like slip-rate function having a rise time proportional to the square root of slip, with the average rise time across the entire fault constrained empirically. Recent observations from large surface rupturing earthquakes indicate a reduction of rupture propagation speed and lengthening of rise time in the near surface, which we model by applying a 70% reduction of the rupture speed and increasing the rise time by a factor of 2 in a zone extending from the surface to a depth of 5 km. We demonstrate the fidelity of the technique by modeling the strong-motion recordings from the Imperial Valley, Loma Prieta, Landers, and Northridge earthquakes.

  18. Role of Off-Line-of-Sight Propagation in Geomagnetic EMP Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Hans W.

    2016-05-23

    The author’s synchrotron radiation based 3D geomagnetic EMP code MACSYNC has been used to explore the impact on pulse rise time and air conductivity of EMP propagation paths to the observer that are located off the direct line-of-sight (LOS) between gamma source and observer. This geometry is always present because, for an isotropic source, most the gammas are emitted at an angle with respect to the LOS. Computations for a 1 kt near-surface burst observed from space yield two principal findings: 1. The rise time is generated by the combined actions of a) electron spreading along the LOS due to the Compton electron emission angular distribution folded with electron multiple scattering effects, and b) radiation arrival time spreading due to length differences for different off-LOS propagation paths. The pulse rise time does not depend on the rise time of the conductivity. The conductivity rise time determines the pulse amplitude. 2. One-dimensional legacy EMP codes are inherently incapable of producing the correct pulse shape because they cannot treat the dependence of the conductivity on two dimensions, i.e. the radius from the source and the angle of the propagation path with the LOS. This divergence from one-dimensionality begins at a small fraction of a nanosecond for a sea-level burst. This effect will also be present in high-altitude bursts, however, determination of its onset time and magnitude requires high-altitude computations which have not yet been done.

  19. Initial process of photoluminescence dynamics of self-trapped excitons in a β -Ga2O3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Suguru; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics of self-trapped excitons (STEs) in a β -Ga2O3 single crystal from the viewpoint of the transition process from the free exciton to the STE. We succeed in measuring the PL rise time (˜24 ps) at 8 K corresponding to the tunneling time through the barrier between the free exciton and STE states in the adiabatic potential. From the analysis of the PL rise time of the STE based on perturbation theory for the tunneling time considering exciton-phonon interactions, we obtain the following results. Acoustic phonons near the Brillouin zone center contribute to the tunneling process. This suggests that the wave function of the STE is still spatially extended at the final state in the tunneling process. Furthermore, we investigate temperature dependence of the PL rise time of the STE. It is found that the PL rise time decreases with increasing temperature. The PL rise times in the temperature range from 8 to 100 K can be quantitatively explained by an adiabatic theory for the tunneling process. Consequently, the self-trapping process is dominated by the tunneling process at low temperatures.

  20. Paths of Heritable Mitochondrial DNA Mutation and Heteroplasmy in Reference and gas-1 Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wernick, Riana I.; Estes, Suzanne; Howe, Dana K.; Denver, Dee R.

    2016-01-01

    Heteroplasmy—the presence of more than one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence type in a cell, tissue, or individual—impacts human mitochondrial disease and numerous aging-related syndromes. Understanding the trans-generational dynamics of mtDNA is critical to understanding the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial disease and evolution. We investigated mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmy using a set of wild-type (N2 strain) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) mutant (gas-1) mutant Caenorhabditis elegans mutation-accumulation (MA) lines. The N2 MA lines, derived from a previous experiment, were bottlenecked for 250 generations. The gas-1 MA lines were created for this study, and bottlenecked in the laboratory for up to 50 generations. We applied Illumina-MiSeq DNA sequencing to L1 larvae from five gas-1 MA lines and five N2 MA lines to detect and characterize mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmic inheritance patterns evolving under extreme drift. mtDNA copy number increased in both sets of MA lines: three-fold on average among the gas-1 MA lines and five-fold on average among N2 MA lines. Eight heteroplasmic single base substitution polymorphisms were detected in the gas-1 MA lines; only one was observed in the N2 MA lines. Heteroplasmy frequencies ranged broadly in the gas-1 MA lines, from as low as 2.3% to complete fixation (homoplasmy). An initially low-frequency (<5%) heteroplasmy discovered in the gas-1 progenitor was observed to fix in one gas-1 MA line, achieve higher frequency (37.4%) in another, and be lost in the other three lines. A similar low-frequency heteroplasmy was detected in the N2 progenitor, but was lost in all five N2 MA lines. We identified three insertion-deletion (indel) heteroplasmies in gas-1 MA lines and six indel variants in the N2 MA lines, most occurring at homopolymeric nucleotide runs. The observed bias toward accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gas-1 MA lines is consistent with the idea that impaired

  1. Impact ejection of lunar meteorites and the age of Giordano Bruno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    Based on literature data from lunar meteorites and orbital observations it is argued that the lunar crater Giordano Bruno (22 km ∅) formed more than 1 Ma ago and probably ejected the lunar meteorites Yamato 82192/82193/86032 at 8.5 ± 1.5 Ma ago from the Th-poor highlands of the Moon. The efficiency and time scale to deliver 3He-rich lunar material into Earth’s sediments is discussed to assess the temporal relationship between the Giordano Bruno cratering event and a 1 Ma enduring 3He-spike which is observed in 8.2 Ma old sediments on Earth.

  2. Parametric scaling study of a magnetically insulated thermionic vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderberg, B.H.; Eninger, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    A parametric scaling study is performed on MINOS (Magnetically INsulated Opening Switch), a novel fast ({approximately}100 ns) high-power opening switch concept based on a magnetically insulated thermionic vacuum diode. Principal scaling parameters are the switch dimensions, voltage, current, applied magnetic field, and switching time. The scaling range of interest covers voltages up to 100 kV and currents of several kA. Fundamental scaling properties are derived from models of space-charge flow and magnetic cutoff. The scaling is completed with empirical results from the experimental MX-1 switch operated in an inductive storage pulsed power generator. Results are presented in diagrams showing voltage, current, power, and efficiency relationships and their limitations. The scaling is illustrated by the design of a megawatt average power opening switch for pulsed power applications. Trade-offs in the engineering of this type of switch are discussed.

  3. In silico studies for the interaction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) with different saponins from Vietnamese ginseng (Panax vietnamesis)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oanh T. P.; Le, Manh D.; Trinh, Hoang X.; Nong, Hai V.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammatory process and tumor development. Recent studies demonstrate that triterpene saponins from Vietnamese ginseng are efficient inhibitors of TNF-α. But the interactions between TNF-α and the saponins are still unclear. In this study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations of TNF-α with three different triterpene saponins (majonoside R2, vina-ginsenoside R1 and vina-ginsenoside R2) were performed to evaluate their binding ability. Our results showed that the triterpene saponins have a good binding affinity with protein TNF-α. The saponins were docked to the pore at the top of the “bell” or “cone” shaped TNF-α trimer and the complexes were structurally stable during 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted binding sites would help to subsequently investigate the inhibitory mechanism of triterpene saponins. PMID:27924272

  4. Design and characterization of symmetric nucleic acids via molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pant, Pradeep; Afshan Shaikh, Saher; Jayaram, B

    2017-04-01

    Asymmetry (5'→3') associated with each strand of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is inherent in the sugar-phosphate backbone connectivity and is essential for replication and transcription. We note that this asymmetry is due to one single chemical bond (C3' to C2' ) in each nucleotide unit, and the absence of this bond results in directionally symmetric nucleic acids. We also discovered that creation of an extra chemical bond (C5' to C2' ) can lead to a symmetric backbone. Keeping their potential synthetic and therapeutic interest in mind, we designed a few novel symmetric nucleic acids. We investigated their conformational stability and flexibility via detailed all atom explicit solvent 100-ns long molecular dynamics simulations and compared the resulting structures with that of regular B-DNA. Quite interestingly, some of the symmetric nucleic acids retain the overall double helical structure indicating their potential for integration in physiological DNA without causing major structural perturbations.

  5. Electrothermal Annealing (ETA) Method to Enhance the Electrical Performance of Amorphous-Oxide-Semiconductor (AOS) Thin-Film Transistors (TFTs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Kim, Eungtaek; Lee, Myung Keun; Park, Jun-Young; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Jun, Sungwoo; Park, Sang-Hee K; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-09-14

    An electro-thermal annealing (ETA) method, which uses an electrical pulse of less than 100 ns, was developed to improve the electrical performance of array-level amorphous-oxide-semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The practicality of the ETA method was experimentally demonstrated with transparent amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs. The overall electrical performance metrics were boosted by the proposed method: up to 205% for the trans-conductance (gm), 158% for the linear current (Ilinear), and 206% for the subthreshold swing (SS). The performance enhancement were interpreted by X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), showing a reduction of oxygen vacancies in a-IGZO after the ETA. Furthermore, by virtue of the extremely short operation time (80 ns) of ETA, which neither provokes a delay of the mandatory TFTs operation such as addressing operation for the display refresh nor demands extra physical treatment, the semipermanent use of displays can be realized.

  6. Electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven pulsed power liners

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Yu, Edmund P.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Nakhleh, Charles

    2012-09-15

    This paper explores the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. Comparatively little is known about these types of instabilities compared to the well known Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. We present simulations that show electrothermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent MRT instability growth. We also present the results of several experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These experiments show excellent agreement with electrothermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone.

  7. Free-electron laser as a power source for a high-gradient accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1982-02-01

    A two beam colliding linac accelerator is proposed in which one beam is intense (approx. = 1KA), of low energy (approx. = MeV), and long (approx. = 100 ns) and provides power at 1 cm wavelength through a free-electron-laser-mechanism to the second beam of a few electrons (approx. = 10/sup 11/), which gain energy at the rate of 250 MeV/m in a high-gradient accelerating structure and hence reach 375 GeV in 1.5 km. The intense beam is given energy by induction units and gains, and losses by radiation, 250 keV/m thus supplying 25 J/m to the accelerating structure. The luminosity, L, of two such linacs would be, at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, L = 4. x 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/.

  8. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  9. Mössbauer spectra obtained using β - γ coincidence method after 57Mn implantation into LiH and LiD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Mihara, M.; Nagatomo, T.; Sato, W.; Miyazaki, J.; Tanigawa, S.; Natori, D.; Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Highly energetic 57Mn ( T 1/2 = 1.45 m) was generated by nuclear projectile fragmentation in a heavy-ion accelerator, and implanted into lithium hydride (LiH) and lithium deuteride (LiD) at 578 K. Mössbauer spectroscopy with β - γ coincidence detection was then carried out on the 57Fe obtained from β -decay of the 57Mn to study the time dependence of the site distributions and coordination environments of dilute Fe atoms implanted in the LiH and LiD. The results suggest that the Fe atoms can substitute for either the Li and H or D atoms within 100 ns. Additionally, the displacement behavior of the substitutional 57Fe atoms on the lattice sites is discussed.

  10. Time-resolved diode laser infrared absorption spectroscopy of the nascent HCl in the infrared laser chemistry of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Peter; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, George

    1990-04-01

    The IR multiphoton excitation and the frequency, fluence and intensity dependence of the IR-laser chemical yields of CF 2ClCH 2Cl have been studied in the fluence range of 1 to 10 J cm -2 yielding a steady-state constant k(st)/ I=0.74×10 6 s -1 MW -1 cm 2 which is approximately independent of intensity. Time-resolved IR absorption spectroscopy with diode laser sources has been used to observe the nascent HCl during the first few 100 ns indicating a population inversion between the levels ν=1, J=4 and ν=2, J=5. At low reactant pressures ( p⩽10 Pa) the time-resolved measurement gives a steady-state rate constant consistent with the theoretical result adjusted to the static yield measurements. The capability of state-selective and time-resolved IR spectroscopy is thus demonstrated, giving real-time determinations of rate constants.

  11. Tunable repetitively pulsed Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A S; Eremeikin, O N; Pavlenko, K Yu; Savikin, A P; Sharkov, V V

    2012-12-31

    Methods of wavelength tuning of a polycrystalline Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser pumped by a repetitively pulsed Tm : YLF laser (pulse duration {approx}100 ns, pulse repetition rate 3 KHz) are studied. With the use of a prism selector, the laser wavelength was tuned within the range of 2070 - 2400 nm at a linewidth of 11 nm for a SiO{sub 2} prism and 30 nm for a CaF{sub 2} prism. The use of a Lyot filter made it possible to tune the Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser wavelength (with replacement of the cavity mirrors) within the spectral ranges of 2130 - 2400 and 2530 - 2750 nm at a linewidth of 4 nm. (lasers)

  12. 32-channel pyrometer with high dynamic range for studies of shocked nanothermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    A 32-channel optical pyrometer has been developed for studying temperature dynamics of shock-initiated reactive materials with one nanosecond time resolution and high dynamic range. The pyrometer consists of a prism spectrograph which directs the spectrally-resolved emission to 32 fiber optics and 32 photomultiplier tubes and digitizers. Preliminary results show shock-initiated reactions of a nanothermite composite, nano CuO/Al in nitrocellulose binder, consists of three stages. The first stage occurred at 30 ns, right after the shock unloaded, the second stage at 100 ns and the third at 1 μs, and the temperatures ranged from 2100K to 3000K. Time-resolved emission spectra suggest hot spots formed during shock unloading, which initiated the bulk thermite/nitrocellulose reaction.

  13. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M. Gorini, G.; Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V.

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  14. Low-jitter, high-voltage, infrared, laser-triggered, vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Barnes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-triggered, high-voltage vacuum switch using a triggering pellet embedded in the cathode has been developed. The switch was constructed with tungsten electrodes and used either KC1 or Poco graphite pellets. An aperture in the anode allowed the laser beam to strike the pellet on the cathode surface. Reliable triggering was achieved with only 200 {mu}J of laser energy at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The switch was operated with an A-K gap voltage ranging from 5- to 30-kV with switching currents up to 15 kA peak. The delay time of the switch vaired from 70 {plus minus} 3 ns at 25 kv to 500 {plus minus} 100 ns at 5 kV. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Dynamic spectral shifts of molecular anions in organic glasses. [Pulse radiolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R.K.; Miller, J.R.

    1982-06-24

    Time-dependent spectra of the radical anions of pyromellitic dianhydride and p-dinitrobenzene have been observed after formation by pulse radiolysis in frozen 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and triacetin glasses. At temperatures near the glass transition, the spectra shift toward the blue over the entire observed time range 100 ns to 100 s), while at temperatures well below the glass transition, the spectral shifts can be stopped or greatly slowed. The magnitudes of the shifts are not large (typically approx. = to 10 nm), but because they are larger than the vibrational line widths, dramatic kinetics may be observed: the absorbance grows or decays by more than a factor of five at some wavelengths. The observations are consistent with a solvent molecule reorientation mechanism for spectral shifts of molecular ions in low-temperature organic glasses. 6 figures.

  16. Application of melt ejection criterion in simulation of micromachining with laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semak, Vladimir V.; Schriempf, J. T.; Knorovsky, G. A.; MacCallum, D. O.

    2003-07-01

    The theoretical criterion defining the threshold pulse energy and beam intensity required for melt ejection is proposed. The results of numerical simulation present dependencies of the threshold pulse energy and beam intensity as functions of laser pulse duration and beam radius. The experimental verification of proposed criterion is described and the comparison of theoretical predictions and measurements is presented. The criterion is applied for simulation of laser drilling metal foil with thickness in the range 25 μm - 125 μm using laser beam with 12 μm beam radius and pulse durations 10 ns and 100 ns. The computational results are used to interpret the results of experimental study of laser drilling of 125 μm aluminum foil using a single mode beam of a XeCl laser performed at the Nederlands Centrum voor Laser Research (NCLR) and the University of Twente. Additional results on Nd:YAG spot welds in pure Ni are also presented.

  17. Preliminary results of Linear Induction Accelerator LIA-200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Archana; Senthil, K.; Praveen Kumar, D. D.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, V.; Patel, A.; Sharma, D. K.; Rehim, R.; Kolge, T. S.; Saroj, P. C.; Acharya, S.; Amitava, Roy; Rakhee, M.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-05-01

    Repetitive Pulsed Power Technology is being developed keeping in mind the potential applications of this technology in material modifications, disinfections of water, timber, and food pasteurization etc. BARC has indigenously developed a Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA-200) rated for 200 kV, 4 kA, 100 ns, 10 Hz. The satisfactory performance of all the sub-systems including solid state power modulator, amorphous core based pulsed transformers, magnetic switches, water capacitors, water pulse- forming line, induction adder and field-emission diode have been demonstrated. This paper presents some design details and operational results of this pulsed power system. It also highlights the need for further research and development to build reliable and economic high-average power systems for industrial applications.

  18. Efficient light storage with reduced energy loss via nonlinear compensation in rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Hong-Li; Xue, Yan; Wu, Jin-Hui; Xu, Huai-Liang; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2016-06-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of efficient light storage based on a modified technique of electromagnetically induced transparency in hot rubidium vapor. By introducing an auxiliary pump field to go beyond the Λ -type configuration, we find that the undesired four-wave mixing can be greatly suppressed to result in sufficiently reduced energy loss of a probe pulse. The light storage efficiency can be as high as  ∼80% within the storage time of 100 ns with the pump field applied, which is almost 6 times larger than that in the absence of the pump field. We may also amend the light storage efficiency in a linear way by increasing the optical depth of our atomic vapor even without saturation effect. We obtain, in fact, an amplified probe pulse via Raman gain during light storage and retrieval, which should have practical applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  19. Constraints on the pMSSM, AMSB model and on other models from the search for long-lived charged particles in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-17

    Stringent limits are set on the long-lived lepton-like sector of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model (pMSSM) and the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. We derived the limits from the results presented in a recent search for long-lived charged particles in proton–proton collisions, based on data collected by the CMS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. In the pMSSM parameter sub-space considered, 95.9 % of the points predicting charginos with a lifetime of at least 10 ns are excluded. Furthermore, these constraints on the pMSSM are the first obtained at the LHC. Charginos with a lifetime greater than 100 ns and masses up to about 800 GeV in the AMSB model are also excluded. Furthermore, the method described can also be used to set constraints on other models.

  20. Bioventing Feasibility Study at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    C02 NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS PP2b Oz 17.4 0.8 NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS C02 3.1 10.5 NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS PP2c Oz 19.2 7.5 11.0 11.0 11.0...Monitoring Point Measurement 0.00 19 4 2.52 70.75 PP1C Oz 3.2 NS NS NS C02 10.0 NS NS NS PP2C Oz 4.8 NS NS NS C02 11.8 NS NS NS PP3A Oz 19.0 20.8 20.8

  1. Diamond detector for beam profile monitoring in COMET experiment at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    &Cbreve; erv, M.; Sarin, P.; Pernegger, H.; Vageeswaran, P.; Griesmayer, E.

    2015-06-01

    We present the design and initial prototype results of a proton beam profile monitor for the COMET experiment at J-PARC. The goal of COMET is to look for charged lepton flavor violation by direct μ to e conversion at a sensitivity of 10-19. The 8 GeV proton beam pulsed at 100 ns with 1010 protons/s will be used to create muons through pion production and decay. In the final experiment, the proton flux will be raised to 1014 protons/s to increase the sensitivity. These requirements of harsh radiation tolerance and fast readout make diamond a good choice for constructing a beam profile monitor in COMET. We present first results of the characterization of single crystal diamond (scCVD) sourced from a new company 2A SYSTEMS Singapore. Our measurements indicate excellent charge collection and high carrier mobility down to cryogenic temperatures.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tilikin, I. N. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  3. Design and test of a low jitter metal to metal contact solid dielectric switch

    SciTech Connect

    Domning, E.E.

    1993-03-01

    A low jitter metal to metal contact solid dielectric switch was designed and tested. A metal to metal contact solid dielectric switch with a jitter of less than 25 ns is required for the 150 kJ experiment. Since this is one fourth the 100 ns jitter reported using exploding bridge foil (EBF) triggers, experiments to optimize this trigger were performed. A jitter of 25 ns was achieved using the EBF trigger and it was also achieved using a new type of trigger called the magnetic push trigger. This trigger uses the magnetic force between the two plates of a parallel plate transmission line to push the dielectric. It was found to be better than the EBF trigger because it was easier to design, easier to implement and did less damage to switch components.

  4. Submillimeter D2O-18 molecular laser with optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svich, V. A.; Pokormiakho, N. G.; Topkov, A. N.

    1980-11-01

    In the considered investigation, nine new emission lines of the D2O-18 molecule were observed over the wavelength range from 96 to 140 micrometers. In the experiments, a CO2 TEA laser was used for optical pumping. The TEA laser was operated at atmospheric pressure with an output energy up to 2 J and a pulse length of 100 ns. A gaseous mixture with a composition of CO2:N2:He = 1:1:4 was excited by means of a pulsed transverse discharge. A resonator with a length of 1 m was formed by a spherical mirror with a radius of curvature of 10 m, and a gold-plated echelette grating with 100 lines/mm. The submillimeter cell consisted of a glass tube with an inside diameter of 80 mm and a length of 1270 mm, and the spherical mirrors of the submillimeter resonator.

  5. Possibility of applying a hydrodynamic model to describe the laser erosion of metals irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of experimental investigations of the production and development of plasma-vapour plumes upon irradiation of metal targets by nanosecond (10–100 ns) pulses with a high (10{sup 8}–10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) power density under atmospheric conditions. The transition from a quasi-stationary thermal mechanism of metal erosion to an explosion hydrodynamic one takes place when the radiation power density increases from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. The resultant experimental information is extremely important for the laser deposition of metal nanostructures under atmospheric conditions, which is possible only for power densities of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Development and fabrication of low ON resistance high current vertical VMOS power FETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, S.

    1979-01-01

    The design of a VMOS Power FET exhibiting low ON resistance, high current as well as high breakdown voltage and fast switching speeds is described. The design which is based on a 1st-order device model, features a novel polysilicon-gate structure and fieldplated groove termination to achieve high packing density and high breakdown voltage, respectively. One test chip, named VNTKI, can block 180 V at an ON resistence of 2.5 ohm. A 150 mil x 200 mil (.19 sq cm) experimental chip has demonstrated a breakdown voltage of 200v, an ON resistance of 0.12 ohm, a switching time of less than 100 ns, and a pulse drain - current of 50 A with 10 V gate drive.

  7. Modulator considerations for beam chopping in the low energy beam transport at the SSC Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.; Pappas, G.

    1991-06-01

    Beam chopping in the low energy transport line at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory is accomplished using an electrostatic deflection system. LINAC requirements dictate the design of two modulators operating at 10 Hz with rise and fall times (as measured from approximately 10--99%) of {approximately}100 ns. Design of the first pulser, normally at 10 kV and pulsed to ground potential, utilizes a transformer-coupled diode-clamped solid state circuit to achieve the 2--35 {mu}s pulse width range required. The second pulser, which pulses from ground to approximately 7 kV, relies on a series vacuum tube circuit. The current designs, as well as recent test results and other circuit topologies considered, will be presented. 6 refs.

  8. Large lateral photovoltaic effect with ultrafast relaxation time in SnSe/Si junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianjie; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hu, Chang; Zhang, Yang; Song, Bingqian; Zhang, Lingli; Liu, Weilong; Lv, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Jinke; Sui, Yu; Song, Bo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report a large lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) with ultrafast relaxation time in SnSe/p-Si junctions. The LPE shows a linear dependence on the position of the laser spot, and the position sensitivity is as high as 250 mV mm-1. The optical response time and the relaxation time of the LPE are about 100 ns and 2 μs, respectively. The current-voltage curve on the surface of the SnSe film indicates the formation of an inversion layer at the SnSe/p-Si interface. Our results clearly suggest that most of the excited-electrons diffuse laterally in the inversion layer at the SnSe/p-Si interface, which results in a large LPE with ultrafast relaxation time. The high positional sensitivity and ultrafast relaxation time of the LPE make the SnSe/p-Si junction a promising candidate for a wide range of optoelectronic applications.

  9. Influence of laser energy on the electron temperature of a laser-induced Mg plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asamoah, Emmanuel; Hongbing, Yao

    2017-01-01

    The magnesium plasma induced by a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in atmospheric air was investigated. The evolution of the plasma was studied by acquiring spectral images at different laser energies and delay times. We observed that the intensities of the spectral lines decrease with larger delay times. The electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method. At a delay time of 100 ns and laser energy of 350 mJ, the electron temperature attained their highest value at 10164 K and then decreases slowly up to 8833.6 K at 500 ns. We found that the electron temperature of the magnesium plasma increases rapidly with increasing laser energy.

  10. 1.95  μm-pumped OP-GaAs optical parametric oscillator with 10.6  μm idler wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wueppen, Jochen; Nyga, Sebastian; Jungbluth, Bernd; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2016-09-15

    We report on an optical parametric oscillator that generates output idler wavelengths around 10.6 μm. On the basis of orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) as a nonlinear medium and a 1.95 μm ns-pulsed pump laser, a signal-resonant bow-tie resonator was designed in order to maximize the output power at moderate intensities well below the damage threshold of the optical components. With this setup, the average idler output power at 50 kHz and 100 ns idler pulse length was more than 800 mW, which corresponds to a pulse energy of 16 μJ. The maximum quantum conversion efficiency of 36.8% is the highest value measured so far for comparable setups to the best of our knowledge.

  11. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  12. An analysis and demonstration of clock synchronization by VLBI. [Very Long Baseline Interferometry for Deep Space Net

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A prototype of a semi-real time system for synchronizing the Deep Space Net station clocks by radio interferometry was successfully demonstrated on August 30, 1972. The system utilized an approximate maximum likelihood estimation procedure for processing the data, thereby achieving essentially optimum time sync estimates for a given amount of data, or equivalently, minimizing the amount of data required for reliable estimation. Synchronization accuracies as good as 100 ns rms were achieved between Deep Space Stations 11 and 12, both at Goldstone, Calif. The accuracy can be improved by increasing the system bandwidth until the fundamental limitations due to baseline and source position uncertainties and atmospheric effects are reached. These limitations are under 10 ns for transcontinental baselines.

  13. Ultraviolet photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- and nano-crystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Frank; Makarov, Vladimir; Hidalgo, Arturo; Weiner, Brad; Morell, Gerardo

    2011-06-06

    The room-temperature photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- (MCD), submicro- (SMCD) and nano- (NCD) crystalline diamond films synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition was studied. The structure and composition of these diamond materials were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The UV sensitivity and response time were studied for the three types of diamond materials using a steady state broad UV excitation source and two pulsed UV laser radiations. It was found that they have high sensitivity in the UV region, as high as 109 sec-1mV-1 range, linear response in a broad spectral range below 320 nm, photocurrents around ~10-5 A, and short response time better than 100 ns, which is independent of fluency intensity. A phenomenological model was applied to help understand the role of defects and dopant concentration on the materials’ photosensitivity.

  14. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-11-07

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10{sup -6} that is below the error threshold of 10{sup -4} required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  15. Online Tracking Algorithms on GPUs for the P̅ANDA Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, L.; Herten, A.; Ritman, J.; Stockmanns, T.; Adinetz, A.; Kraus, J.; Pleiter, D.

    2015-12-01

    P̅ANDA is a future hadron and nuclear physics experiment at the FAIR facility in construction in Darmstadt, Germany. In contrast to the majority of current experiments, PANDA's strategy for data acquisition is based on event reconstruction from free-streaming data, performed in real time entirely by software algorithms using global detector information. This paper reports the status of the development of algorithms for the reconstruction of charged particle tracks, optimized online data processing applications, using General-Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPU). Two algorithms for trackfinding, the Triplet Finder and the Circle Hough, are described, and details of their GPU implementations are highlighted. Average track reconstruction times of less than 100 ns are obtained running the Triplet Finder on state-of- the-art GPU cards. In addition, a proof-of-concept system for the dispatch of data to tracking algorithms using Message Queues is presented.

  16. The Role of Sub-Target in the Transversely Excited Atmospheric Pressure CO 2 Laser-Induced Shock-Wave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliyanti, Maria; Hedwig, Rinda; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    1998-12-01

    A transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser pulse (50 mJ, 100 ns) was focused on silicon grease which is painted on a copper plate as a subtarget with a power density of 6 GW/cm2 under reduced pressure. The comparison of the characteristics of the induced laser plasma between two cases, with subtarget and without subtarget was made. It is proved that the emission spectrum assigned to the silicon atom can be detected only for the case with the subtarget. It is also proved that in the absence of the subtarget, the gushing speed of the atom is very low, while for the case with subtarget, the gushing speed of atoms becomes very fast. It is shown that the setting of subtarget is very effective for producing laser-induced shock wave plasma and it is very effective for the realize quantitative analysis of a soft material.

  17. A new methodology for determining recombination parameters using an RF photoconductance instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Cuevas, A.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of minority-carrier lifetime in silicon wafers provide an effective technique for process control and device-physics optimization. For example, detailed measurements of minority-carrier lifetime vs. injection level can allow a nearly complete experimental optimization of a solar cell design and process. This extended abstract describes a methodology that allows this fully characterization by using a relatively simple RF photoconductance-decay tool. By analyzing the quasi-steady-state photoconductance as a function of incident light intensity, information corresponding to an I{sub sc}-V{sub oc} curve can be obtained from a non-contacted silicon wafer. This information is available at various stages during the solar cell fabrication process. The use of steady-state photoconductance instead of transient photoconductance makes use of simple electronics and light sources, yet it has the capability to measure lifetimes down into the 100 ns range.

  18. Ultraviolet photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- and nano-crystalline diamond

    DOE PAGES

    Mendoza, Frank; Makarov, Vladimir; Hidalgo, Arturo; ...

    2011-06-06

    The room-temperature photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- (MCD), submicro- (SMCD) and nano- (NCD) crystalline diamond films synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition was studied. The structure and composition of these diamond materials were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The UV sensitivity and response time were studied for the three types of diamond materials using a steady state broad UV excitation source and two pulsed UV laser radiations. It was found that they have high sensitivity in the UV region, as high as 109 sec-1mV-1 range, linear response in a broad spectral range below 320 nm, photocurrentsmore » around ~10-5 A, and short response time better than 100 ns, which is independent of fluency intensity. A phenomenological model was applied to help understand the role of defects and dopant concentration on the materials’ photosensitivity.« less

  19. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-06-14

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Lastly, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ~ 100 ns timescales.

  20. Stripline kicker for integrable optics test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey A.; Didenko, Alexander; Lebedev, Valeri; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    We present a design of a stripline kicker for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). For its experimental program IOTA needs two full-aperture kickers, capable to create an arbitrary controllable kick in 2D. For that reason their strengths are variable in a wide range of amplitudes up to 16 mrad, and the pulse length 100 ns is less than a revolution period for electrons. In addition, the kicker should have a physical aperture of 40 mm for a proposed operation with proton beam, and an outer size of 70 mm to fit inside existing quadrupole magnets to save space in the ring. Computer simulations using CST Microwave Studio show high field uniformity and wave impedance close to 50 {\\Omega}.

  1. The development and test of multi-anode microchannel array detector systems. Part 2: Soft X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Detector systems based on the high gain microchannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier were used extensively for imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths both on the ground and in space. The latest pulse counting electronic readout systems provide zero readout noise, spatial resolutions (FWHM) of 25 microns or better and can determine the arrival times of detected photons to an accuracy of the order of 100 ns. These systems can be developed to produce detectors with active areas of 100 nm in diameter or greater. The use of CsI photocathodes produces very high detective quantum efficiencies at wavelengths between about 100 and 1A (approximately 0.1 to 10 keV) with moderate energy resolution. The operating characteristics of the different types of soft X-ray MCP detector systems are described and the prospects for future developments are discussed.

  2. Density and temperature scaling of disorder-induced heating in ultracold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, S. D.; Denning, A.; Lyon, M.; Robicheaux, F.

    2011-02-15

    We report measurements and simulations of disorder-induced heating in ultracold neutral plasmas. Fluorescence from plasma ions is excited using a detuned probe laser beam while the plasma relaxes from its initially disordered nonequilibrium state. This method probes the wings of the ion velocity distribution. The simulations yield information on time-evolving plasma parameters that are difficult to measure directly and make it possible to connect the fluorescence signal to the rms velocity distribution. The disorder-induced heating signal can be used to estimate the electron and ion temperatures {approx}100 ns after the plasma is created. This is particularly interesting for plasmas in which the electron and ion temperatures are not known.

  3. Characterization of a Surface-Flashover Ion Source with 10 - 250 ns Pulse Width

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P L; Meyer, G A; Sampayan, S E; Tang, V; Morse, J D

    2008-08-05

    As a step towards developing an ultra compact D-D neutron source for various defense and homeland security applications, a compact ion source is needed. Towards that end, we are testing a pulsed, surface flashover source, with deuterated titanium films deposited on alumina substrates as the electrodes. An electrochemically-etched mask was used to define the electrode areas on the substrate during the sputtered deposition of the titanium films. Deuterium loading of the films was performed in an all metal-sealed vacuum chamber containing a heated stage. Deuterium ion current from the source was determined by measuring the neutrons produced when the ions impacted a deuterium-loaded target held at -90 kV. As the duration of the arc current is varied, it was observed that the integrated deuteron current per pulse initially increases rapidly, then reaches a maximum near a pulse length of 100 ns.

  4. A flexible time recording and time correlation analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenhav, Nathan J.; Leiferman, Gabriel; Segal, Yitzhak; Notea, Amos

    1983-02-01

    A system was developed to digitize and record the time intervals between detection event pulses, feed to its input channels from a detection device. The accumulated data is transferred continuously in real time to a dise through a PDP 11/34 minicomputer. Even though the system was designed for a specific scope, i.e., the comparative study of passive neutron nondestructive assay methods. It can be characterized by its features as a general purpose time series recorder. The time correlation analysis is performed by software after completion of the data accumulation. The digitizing clock period is selectable and any value, larger than a minimum of 100 ns may be selected. Bursts of up to 128 events with a frequency up to 10 MHz may be recorded. With the present recorder-minicomputer combination, the maximal average recording frequency is 40 kHz.

  5. The Eagle Nebula on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Cooper, Amy; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Pound, Marc

    2011-10-01

    In one of the eight Science on NIF campaigns, dynamics of molecular clouds such as the Eagle Nebula will be studied in scaled laboratory astrophysics experiments, focusing on new hydrodynamic stabilities of ablation fronts induced by strong directionality of a sustained radiation drive, and on the formation of cometary structures as a model for the famous Eagle Pillars. The NIF Radiation Transport Platform will be adapted to drive a foam target stood off several mm from the halfraum to simulate a molecular cloud illuminated by a distant O-type star, with the drive collimated by an aperture. Pulses of length 20-100 ns generating effective radiation temperatures of 100 eV are being sought. Design of the experiment, theory of the directional radiation instabilities, and supporting astrophysical modeling will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Amplification of femtosecond pulses at 126 nm in optical field-induced plasma filamentation in Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Fujiyoshi, Kazuyuki; Kaku, Masanori; Katto, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    We have observed an optical gain at the wavelength of 126 nm in an Ar excimer (Ar2 *) amplifier by utilizing a femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) seed beam tuned at 126 nm. The maximum optical gain value of 1.1 cm-1 with a spatial distribution in the optical-field-induced ionization (OFI) Ar plasma was observed. The plasma diagnosis revealed that the plasma contraction near the plasma amplifier axis together with the plasma expansion was a key issue to observe such a high optical gain value inside the Ar plasma filament. The center axis of the contracted plasma amplifier showed the high electron density more than 1018 cm-3 even after 100 ns from the plasma production of Ar at 1 MPa. Our OFI plasma/excimer kinetics code reproduced the temporal progress of the optical gain distribution as well as the maximum gain value.

  7. Coherent control of ultracold {sup 85}Rb trap-loss collisions with nonlinearly frequency-chirped light

    SciTech Connect

    Pechkis, J. A.; Carini, J. L.; Rogers, C. E. III; Gould, P. L.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.

    2011-06-15

    We present results on coherent control of ultracold trap-loss collisions using 40-ns pulses of nonlinearly frequency-chirped light. The chirps, either positive or negative, sweep {approx}1 GHz in 100 ns and are centered at various detunings below the D{sub 2} line of {sup 85}Rb. At each center detuning, we compare the collisional rate constant {beta} for chirps that are linear in time, concave-down, and concave-up. For positive chirps, we find that {beta} generally depends very little on the shape of the chirp. For negative chirps, however, we find that {beta} can be enhanced by up to 50(20)% for the case of the concave-down shape. This occurs at detunings where the evolution of the wave packet is expected to be coherent. An enhancement at these detunings is also seen in quantum-mechanical simulations of the collisional process.

  8. System Radiographic Characterization of 7MV Self-Magnetic Pinch Diode on RITS-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Tim J.; Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.

    2011-10-01

    The 7 MV, 160 kA induction voltage adder RITS-6 is used as a test bed for research and development of sub-100 ns flash x-ray radiography of which the self-magnetic pinch (SMP) diode is an example. The x-ray source properties such as dose, source spatial distribution, and energy spectrum couple with the imaging detector sensitivity and blur to form the radiologic system performance which is also highly dependent on the imaging geometry. The system performance of some SMP diode configurations will be presented. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Characterization and reduction of prompt electrical noise on the Saturn PRS x-ray simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Davies, F.W.; Hedemann, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    Experiments have been conducted to identify and characterize the source of prompt electrical noise observed on piezoelectric sensor data traces recorded at the Saturn soft x-ray source. The amplitude of this noise spike often exceeded the amplitude of the signal of interest. Although the noise duration was short (50 to 100 ns), it interfered with many measurements of soft x-ray induced material response detected with piezoelectric gauges. The noise spike can be due to a combination of sources, including bremsstrahlung radiation. However, it was determined that high-energy electrons generated about 90 per cent of the recorded signal in the near-source region. Fixtures employing permanent magnets reduced the noise spike amplitude by more than a factor of ten, permitting sensitive, high-fidelity, material response measurements to be made with greater accuracy and confidence. Furthermore the test environment is more accurately controlled and defined.

  10. Molecular design and MD simulations of epitaxial superlattice of self-assembling ternary lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Multicomponent lipid bilayers represent an important model system for studying cell membranes. At present, an ordered multicomponent phospholipid/cholesterol bilayer system involving charged lipid is still not available. Using a lipid superlattice (SL) model, a 13 x 15 x 15 nm^3 ternary phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine/cholesterol bilayer system in water with simultaneous headgroup SL and acyl chain SL at different depths, or epitaxial SL, of the bilayer has been designed with atomistic detail. The arrangements of this epitaxial SL system were optimized by only two molecular parameters, lattice space and rotational angle of the lipids. Using atomistic MD simulations, we demonstrated the stability of the ordered structures for more than 100 ns. A positional restrained system was also used as a control. This system will provide new insights into understanding the nanodomain structures of cell membranes at the molecular level.

  11. Dense Plasma Focus as Collimated Source of D-D Fusion Neutron Beams for Irradiation Experiences and Study of Emitted Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanese, M.; Niedbalski, J.; Moroso, R.; Guichón, S.; Supán, J.

    2008-04-01

    A "table-top" 2 kJ, 250 kA plasma focus, the PACO (Plasma AutoConfinado), designed by the Dense Plasma Group of IFAS is used in its optimum regime for neutron yield for obtaining collimated pulsed neutron beams (100 ns). A simple and low-cost shielding arrangement was developed in order to fully eliminate the 2.45 MeV neutrons generated in the PACO device (108 per shot at 31 kV, 1-2 mbar). Conventional neutron diagnostics: scintillator-photomultiplier (S-PMT), silver activation counters (SAC), etc., are used to determine the minimum width of the shielding walls. Emission of very hard electromagnetic pulses is also studied. Collimation using lead and copper plates is made to determine the localization of the very hard X-ray source. The maximum energy of the continuum photon distribution is estimated in 0,6 MeV using a system of filters.

  12. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  13. Stopping Narrow-Band X-Ray Pulses in Nuclear Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangjin; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    A control mechanism for stopping x-ray pulses in resonant nuclear media is investigated theoretically. We show that narrow-band x-ray pulses can be mapped and stored as nuclear coherence in a thin-film planar x-ray cavity with an embedded 57Fe nuclear layer. The pulse is nearly resonant to the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in the 57Fe nuclei. The role of the control field is played here by a hyperfine magnetic field which induces interference effects reminiscent of electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that, by switching off the control magnetic field, a narrow-band x-ray pulse can be completely stored in the cavity for approximately 100 ns. Additional manipulation of the external magnetic field can lead to both group velocity and phase control of the pulse in the x-ray cavity sample.

  14. Numerical analysis of electric field profiles in high-voltage GaAs photoconductive switches and comparison to experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, L.E. . Pulse Power Center); Donaldson, W.R. . Lab. for Laser Energetics)

    1993-12-01

    The electric field in GaAs photoconductive switches has been observed with an ultrafast electro-optic imaging system to develop complex spatial and temporal structure immediately after illumination. High-field domains form at the switch cathode as the photogenerated carriers recombine for bias fields above [approximately]10 kV/cm. At these biases, the switch also remained conductive for a much longer time ([approximately]100 ns) than the material recombination time ([approximately]1 ns). A model which includes field-dependent mobility was developed to explain this data. Simulation of the electric field profile across the switch indicates that high-field domains which form at the switch cathode are the result of negative differential resistance.

  15. The development of coated and non-coated wire explosions observed by X-ray backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xinlei; Zhao, Shen; Zou, Xiaobing; Shi, Huantong; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-11-01

    Based on an X-pinch X-ray point source, the electrical explosion of coated and non-coated wires with 25 μm diameter was backlit. The experiments were performed on the pulsed power device PPG-1 (500 kV/400 kA/100 ns) which was designed and constructed by the Department of Electrical Engineering of Tsinghua University. The source X-pinch was installed between the main output electrodes, while the object coated and non-coated wires were placed at the positions of the left and right current return rods, respectively. The backlighting images were recorded by X-ray films with high resolution and sensitivity. By a large number of backlighting experiments, the exploding physical images and expansion ratio curves of the coated and non-coated wires were obtained, and the results showed that coating can make the wire expand to be larger and more uniform.

  16. A repetitive S-band long-pulse relativistic backward-wave oscillator.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhenxing; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhou, Shengyue; Xu, Liurong

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents both numerical and experimental studies of a repetitive S-band long-pulse relativistic backward-wave oscillator. The dispersion relation curve of the main slow-wave structure is given by the numerical calculation. Experimental results show that a 1 GW microwaves with pulse duration of about 100 ns (full width of half magnitude) under 10 Hz repetitive operation mode are obtained. The microwave frequency is 3.6 GHz with the dominant mode of TM(01), and power conversion efficiency is about 20%. The single pulse energy is about 100 J. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation ones. By analyzing the experimental phenomenon, we obtain the conclusion that the explosive emission on the surface of the electrodynamics structure in intense radio frequency field mainly leads to the earlier unexpected termination of microwave output.

  17. High power microwave generation from coaxial virtual cathode oscillator using graphite and velvet cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Singh, S. K.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Kumar, Senthil; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K. V.; Mittal, K. C.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-05-01

    High power microwave (HPM) generation studies were carried out in KALI-5000 pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam was utilized to generate HPMs using a coaxial virtual cathode oscillator. The typical electron beam parameters were 350 kV, 25 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of ampere per centimeter square current density. Microwaves were generated with graphite and polymer velvet cathode at various diode voltage, current, and accelerating gaps. A horn antenna setup with diode detector and attenuators was used to measure the microwave power. It was observed that the microwave power increases with the diode voltage and current and reduces with the accelerating gap. It was found that both the peak power and width of the microwave pulse is larger for the velvet cathode compared to the graphite cathode. In a coaxial vircator, velvet cathode is superior to the graphite cathode due to its shorter turn on time and better electron beam uniformity.

  18. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Uhm, Han S.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 1018 cm-3 within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3×1018 cm-3 occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  19. Circuit model for the inverse Z-pinch wire array switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Lebedev, Sergey V.

    2010-06-01

    A 0D circuit code is introduced to study the wire array switch concept introduced in. It has been implemented and researched at Imperial College. An exploding wire array, the switch, is in parallel with the load, an imploding wire array. Most of the current flows in the exploding array until it expands and becomes highly resistive. The 0D code contains simple models of Joule energy deposition and plasma expansion for W and Al wires. The purpose of the device is to produce fast Z-pinch implosion, below 100ns on MAGPIE and the Sandia Z machine. Self and mutual inductances are taken into consideration as well as the rocket model for wire ablation. The switch characteristics of the exploding array are prescribed and tuned up to agree with MAGPIE shots. The dependence of the device on the configuration of the arrays is studied and scaling to ZR conditions is explored.

  20. Physics Impact of Improvements to the Beam Timing Resolution at MicroBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, Tia; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is a liquid argon time-projection chamber (89 tons active mass) at Fermilab designed to measure interactions of neutrinos from the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB) and the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline. During the first year of data-taking, the arrival time of the neutrinos was only understood with an accuracy of 100 ns for the BNB, and was unverified for NuMI. A set of upgrades has been implemented that will reduce the uncertainty in beam delivery time by two orders of magnitude, significantly improving our ability to observe neutral-current elastic interactions in the BNB, and kaon decays at rest using NuMI. This talk explains the improvements in neutrino arrival timing, their impact on these two analyses, and the overall benefit to all other MicroBooNE measurements. DOE Office of Science.

  1. Potential enhancement of warm X-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.

    1995-08-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of warm x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions, for a Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) class accelerator. The calculations are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggested Jupiter diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung, which accompanies the warm x rays, is a concern then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately}400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately}5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  2. Potential enhancement of warm x-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-07-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of war x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions. The calculation are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggest Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung which accompanies the warm x rays is a concern, then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately} 400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately} 5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilikin, I. N.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  4. The effects of steep-front, short-duration impulses on power distribution components

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.B.; Lux, A.E.; Grzybowski, Stanislaw; Barnes, P.R.

    1989-07-01

    A line type pulser has been developed to test the effects of steep-front, short duration (SFSD) pulses on distribution components. Risetime is 50-100 ns, and pulse duration is on the order of 300 ns. Terminators often shattered or punctured rather than flashing over. Insulator flashover voltage is approximately 1.5 times CFO for standard lightning impulses. Arresters exhibit an inductive character, with SFSD peak voltage at 10 kA approximately 4--5 times the 8 /times/ 20 microsecond 10 kA discharge voltage. Polyethylene insulated cable has a characteristic degradation in which failure voltage decreases with number of SFSD pulses. 7 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Experimental Study of High-Z Gas Buffers in Gas-Filled ICF Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M A; Kane, J; Loosmore, G; DeMuth, J; Latkowski, J

    2010-12-03

    ICF power plants, such as the LIFE scheme at LLNL, may employ a high-Z, target-chamber gas-fill to moderate the first-wall heat-pulse due to x-rays and energetic ions released during target detonation. To reduce the uncertainties of cooling and beam/target propagation through such gas-filled chambers, we present a pulsed plasma source producing 2-5 eV plasma comprised of high-Z gases. We use a 5-kJ, 100-ns theta discharge for high peak plasma-heating-power, an electrode-less discharge for minimizing impurities, and unobstructed axial access for diagnostics and beam (and/or target) propagation studies. We will report on the plasma source requirements, design process, and the system design.

  6. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 {mu}s, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at {approx} 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 {mu}s pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz.

  7. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-06-14

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancymore » spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Lastly, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ~ 100 ns timescales.« less

  8. Continuous-wave and Q-switched operation of a resonantly pumped Ho³⁺:KY₃F₁₀ laser.

    PubMed

    Schellhorn, Martin; Parisi, Daniela; Eichhorn, Marc; Tonelli, Mauro

    2014-03-01

    We report continuous-wave and repetitively Q-switched operation of a resonantly pumped Ho3+:KY3F10 laser at room temperature. End pumped by a Tm3+-doped silica fiber laser operating at 1938 nm, a maximum laser power of 7.8 W was obtained at a wavelength of ∼2041  nm for 21 W of absorbed pump power, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 60.7% with respect to absorbed power. At a repetition rate of 10 kHz up to 0.78 mJ, energy per pulse was demonstrated with pulse widths of 100 ns. The beam propagation factor (M2) was measured to be <1.26 at the maximum output power.

  9. Folding of SAM-II riboswitch explored by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xu; Yongjun, Wang; Zhihong, Li

    2015-01-21

    Riboswitches are cis-acting RNA fragments that function via a conformational transition mechanism when a specific target molecule binds to its binding pocket, representing an inviting new class of biomolecular target for the development of antibiotics. To understand the folding mechanism of SAM-II riboswitch, occurring predominantly in proteobacteria, a 100ns replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent is performed. Our results show that this RNA pseudoknot has multiple folding pathways, and various intermediate structures. The resultant riboswitch conformational transition map is well consistent with the recent fluorescence measurement, which confirms the dynamical properties of this pseudoknot. Moreover, a novel transition pathway is predicted. The global folding dynamics is mainly coupled with the helix rather than the loop region. The potential folding pathways of the riboswitch presented here should lead to a deeper understanding of the folding mechanism of the riboswitch, as well as the conformational change of RNA pseudoknot.

  10. Computational modeling of Krypton gas puffs with tailored mass density profiles on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jones, Brent Manley; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Jobe, Marc Ronald Lee; Reneker, Joseph; Rochau, Gregory A.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Strizic, T.

    2015-05-18

    Large diameter multi-shell gas puffs rapidly imploded by high current (~20 MA, ~100 ns) on the Z generator of Sandia National Laboratories are able to produce high-intensity Krypton K-shell emission at ~13 keV. Efficiently radiating at these high photon energies is a significant challenge which requires the careful design and optimization of the gas distribution. To facilitate this, we hydrodynamically model the gas flow out of the nozzle and then model its implosion using a 3-dimensional resistive, radiative MHD code (GORGON). This approach enables us to iterate between modeling the implosion and gas flow from the nozzle to optimize radiative output from this combined system. Furthermore, guided by our implosion calculations, we have designed gas profiles that help mitigate disruption from Magneto-Rayleigh–Taylor implosion instabilities, while preserving sufficient kinetic energy to thermalize to the high temperatures required for K-shell emission.

  11. Temporal response of a surface flashover on a velvet cathode in a relativistic diode

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Crawford, M. T.; Welch, D. R.; Offermann, D. T.

    2015-03-11

    Surface flashover of a carbon fiber velvet cathode generates a discharge from which electrons are relativistically accelerated to γ ranging from 4.9 to 8.8 through a 17.8 cm diode. This discharge is assumed to be a hydrocarbon mixture. Our objective is to quantify the dynamics over the ~100 ns pulse of the plasma discharge generated on the surface of the velvet cathode and across the anode-cathode (A-K) gap. We present a qualitative comparison of calculated and measured results, which includes time resolved measurements with a photomultiplier tube and charge-coupled device images. Additionally, initial visible spectroscopy measurements will also be presented confirming the ion species are dominated by hydrogen.

  12. Temporal response of a surface flashover on a velvet cathode in a relativistic diode

    DOE PAGES

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Crawford, M. T.; ...

    2015-03-11

    Surface flashover of a carbon fiber velvet cathode generates a discharge from which electrons are relativistically accelerated to γ ranging from 4.9 to 8.8 through a 17.8 cm diode. This discharge is assumed to be a hydrocarbon mixture. Our objective is to quantify the dynamics over the ~100 ns pulse of the plasma discharge generated on the surface of the velvet cathode and across the anode-cathode (A-K) gap. We present a qualitative comparison of calculated and measured results, which includes time resolved measurements with a photomultiplier tube and charge-coupled device images. Additionally, initial visible spectroscopy measurements will also be presentedmore » confirming the ion species are dominated by hydrogen.« less

  13. Simple method of measuring delay time in manufacturing delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Yukio; Mikoda, Masanari

    1982-07-01

    A simple method for measuring delay time in an operational frequency range is required in manufacturing delay lines used for video tape recorders and television receiver sets. This paper describes a simple method of measuring and adjusting the delay time of such delay lines. The delay time is obtained by measuring a phase difference ϑ between the signals at the input and output transducers of the delay line with frequencies under test. The delay time is more precisely obtained by measuring the ϑ at a constant frequency within the bandwidth of the delay line. A delay-time tolerance of a polished glass medium at 3.58 MHz was found to be within 100 ns. The delay time was found to be shortened by 30 ns by attaching the medium on polishing powder and oil. Also shown is a simple method for adjusting the delay time by polishing a delay medium while measuring the phase difference.

  14. Monopolar photoelectromagnetic effect in Pb1-xSnxTe(In) under terahertz laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernichkin, V. I.; Ryabova, L. I.; Nicorici, A. V.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observation of a new effect—the appearance of a galvanic signal in the narrow-gap semiconductor Pb1-xSnxTe(In) in the magnetic field under the action of strong 100 ns-long terahertz laser pulses. The signal changes its sign and kinetics as the temperature increases from 4.2 K to 25 K. This semiconductor possesses inversion symmetry of the crystalline lattice making impossible the observation of the magnetophotogalvanic effect which looks similar in its experimental manifestation. On the other hand, the laser quantum energy is much less than the bandgap of the semiconductor making the effect considerably different from the conventional Kikoin-Noskov photoelectromagnetic effect. Possible mechanisms responsible for the appearance of the effect are discussed.

  15. Exploring energy landscapes of protein folding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    Human diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob's are associated with misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins into amyloid fibrils sharing a generic cross-beta structure. The self-assembly process is complex, but once a nucleus is formed, rapid fibril formation occurs. Insight into the structures of the oligomers during the lag phase, varying between hours and days, is very difficult experimentally because these species are transient, and numerically using all-atom molecular dynamics because the time scale explored is on the order of 10-100 ns. It is therefore important to develop simplified protein models and alternative methods to sample more efficiently the conformational space. In the past few years, we have developed the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) coupled to the OPEP coarse-grained force field. This review reports the application of ART-OPEP on protein folding and aggregation.

  16. Note: A flexible light emitting diode-based broadband transient-absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Sean M.; Corley, Scott C.; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2012-05-01

    This Note presents a simple and flexible ns-to-ms transient absorption spectrometer based on pulsed light emitting diode (LED) technology that can be incorporated into existing ultrafast transient absorption spectrometers or operate as a stand-alone instrument with fixed-wavelength laser sources. The LED probe pulses from this instrument exhibit excellent stability (˜0.5%) and are capable of producing high signal-to-noise long-time (>100 ns) transient absorption signals either in a broadband multiplexed (spanning 250 nm) or in tunable narrowband (20 ns) operation. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated by measuring the photoinduced ns-to-ms photodynamics of the red/green absorbing fourth GMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA domain of the NpR6012 locus of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

  17. High power repetitive excimer lasers pumped by an all solid state magnetic exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Osamu; Noda, Koji; Shimada, Tsutomu; Obara, Minoru

    1986-01-01

    In a high repetition rate excimer laser operation, the lifetime of the exciter is one of the most important problems. To attain a nearly endless lifetime of the excimer laser exciter, an all-solid-state exciter has been developed which consists of a high-voltage transformer switched by a silicon-controlled rectifier, producing a pulse whose energy and duration are 11.2 J and 8 microns, respectively, and a three-stage magnetic compressor. With a 1.4-ohm dummy load, output peak power, energy/pulse, and pulse duration were 100 MW, 5.2 J, and 100 ns, respectively. The electrical efficiency of the exciter was 47 percent. The energy loss of 6 J in the exciter was due both to the core loss and the transfer loss. It should be noted that the time jitter between the SCR gate input pulse and the output voltage pulse was less than 12 ns.

  18. Ultra-low current beams in UMER to model space-charge effects in high-energy proton and ion machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Beaudoin, B.; Baumgartner, H.; Ehrenstein, S.; Haber, I.; Koeth, T.; Montgomery, E.; Ruisard, K.; Sutter, D.; Yun, D.; Kishek, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) has operated traditionally in the regime of strong space-charge dominated beam transport, but small-current beams are desirable to significantly reduce the direct (incoherent) space-charge tune shift as well as the tune depression. This regime is of interest to model space-charge effects in large proton and ion rings similar to those used in nuclear physics and spallation neutron sources, and also for nonlinear dynamics studies of lattices inspired on the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We review the definitions of beam vs. space-charge intensities and discuss three methods for producing very small beam currents in UMER. We aim at generating 60µA - 1.0mA, 100 ns, 10 keV beams with normalized rms emittances of the order of 0.1 - 1.0µm.

  19. A Large Aperture, High Energy Laser System for Optics and Optical Component Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M C; Weiland, T L; Luthi, R L; Vickers, J L; Sell, W D; Stanley, J A; Honig, J; Auerbach, J; Hackel, R P; Wegner, P J

    2003-11-01

    A large aperture, kJ-class, multi-wavelength Nd-glass laser system has been constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Lab which has unique capabilities for studying a wide variety of optical phenomena. The master-oscillator, power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration of this ''Optical Sciences Laser'' (OSL) produces 1053 nm radiation with shaped pulse lengths which are variable from 0.1-100 ns. The output can be frequency doubled or tripled with high conversion efficiency with a resultant 100 cm{sup 2} high quality output beam. This facility can accommodate prototype hardware for large-scale inertial confinement fusion lasers allowing for investigation of integrated system issues such as optical lifetime at high fluence, optics contamination, compatibility of non-optical materials, and laser diagnostics.

  20. High repetition ration solid state switched CO2 TEA laser employed in industrial ultrasonic testing of aircraft parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bergmann, Hubertus; Morkel, Francois; Stehmann, Timo

    2015-02-01

    Laser Ultrasonic Testing (UT) is an important technique for the non-destructive inspection of composite parts in the aerospace industry. In laser UT a high power, short pulse probe laser is scanned across the material surface, generating ultrasound waves which can be detected by a second low power laser system and are used to draw a defect map of the part. We report on the design and testing of a transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser system specifically optimised for laser UT. The laser is excited by a novel solid-state switched pulsing system and utilises either spark or corona preionisation. It provides short output pulses of less than 100 ns at repetition rates of up to 1 kHz, optimised for efficient ultrasonic wave generation. The system has been designed for highly reliable operation under industrial conditions and a long term test with total pulse counts in excess of 5 billion laser pulses is reported.

  1. Using Two-Dimensional Distributed Feedback for Synchronization of Radiation from Two Parallel-Sheet Electron Beams in a Free-Electron Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Kalinin, P. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Malkin, A. M.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Stepanov, V. D.; Thumm, M.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A spatially extended planar 75 GHz free-electron maser with a hybrid two-mirror resonator consisting of two-dimensional upstream and traditional one-dimensional downstream Bragg reflectors and driven by two parallel-sheet electron beams 0.8 MeV /1 kA has been elaborated. For the highly oversized interaction space (cross section 45 ×2.5 vacuum wavelengths), the two-dimensional distributed feedback allowed realization of stable narrow-band generation that includes synchronization of emission from both electron beams. As a result, spatially coherent radiation with the output power of 30-50 MW and a pulse duration of ˜100 ns was obtained in each channel.

  2. Distribution of nanoscale nuclei in the amorphous dome of a phase change random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bong-Sub Darmawikarta, Kristof; Abelson, John R.; Raoux, Simone; Shih, Yen-Hao; Zhu, Yu

    2014-02-17

    The nanoscale crystal nuclei in an amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} bit in a phase change memory device were evaluated by fluctuation transmission electron microscopy. The quench time in the device (∼10 ns) afforded more and larger nuclei in the melt-quenched state than in the as-deposited state. However, nuclei were even more numerous and larger in a test structure with a longer quench time (∼100 ns), verifying the prediction of nucleation theory that slower cooling produces more nuclei. It also demonstrates that the thermal design of devices will strongly influence the population of nuclei, and thus the speed and data retention characteristics.

  3. Gain-switched thulium-doped fiber laser with ultra-wide tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Li, Z.; Hou, J.; Liu, Z.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate an all-fiber gain-switched thulium-doped fiber laser (TDFL) producing nanosecond pulses with variable wavelength in the 2 μm waveband. The laser features tunable operation in an ultra-wide spectral region of 1765 - 2055 nm (24 THz). The nearly 300 nm tunability doubles the record tuning range of existing gain-switched fiber lasers, and to the best of our knowledge, presents the broadest tuning range that has been reported for a monolithic pulsed rare earth doped fiber laser to date. The TDFL can operate at a repetition rate of 5 - 100 kHz with a pulse width as short as 200 ns. A modest compromise in the tuning range allows pulse width reduction to sub-100 ns.

  4. Single-chip pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging using a 32-bit microcontroller.

    PubMed

    Handa, Shinya; Domalain, Thierry; Kose, Katsumi

    2007-08-01

    A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse programmer has been developed using a single-chip microcontroller (ADmicroC7026). The microcontroller includes all the components required for the MRI pulse programmer: a 32-bit RISC CPU core, 62 kbytes of flash memory, 8 kbytes of SRAM, two 32-bit timers, four 12-bit DA converters, and 40 bits of general purpose I/O. An evaluation board for the microcontroller was connected to a host personal computer (PC), an MRI transceiver, and a gradient driver using interface circuitry. Target (embedded) and host PC programs were developed to enable MRI pulse sequence generation by the microcontroller. The pulse programmer achieved a (nominal) time resolution of approximately 100 ns and a minimum time delay between successive events of approximately 9 micros. Imaging experiments using the pulse programmer demonstrated the effectiveness of our approach.

  5. Microcontroller-based binary integrator for millimeter-wave radar experiments.

    PubMed

    Eskelinen, Pekka; Ruoskanen, Jukka; Peltonen, Jouni

    2010-05-01

    An easily on-site reconfigurable multiple binary integrator for millimeter radar experiments has been constructed of static random access memories, an eight bit microcontroller, and high speed video operational amplifiers. The design uses a raw comparator path and two adjustable m-out-of-n chains in a wired-OR configuration. Standard high speed memories allow the use of pulse widths below 100 ns. For eight pulse repetition intervals it gives a maximum improvement of 6.6 dB for stationary low-level target echoes. The doubled configuration enhances the capability against fluctuating targets. Because of the raw comparator path, also single return pulses of relatively high amplitude are processed.

  6. Kinetic response of a photoperturbed allosteric protein.

    PubMed

    Buchli, Brigitte; Waldauer, Steven A; Walser, Reto; Donten, Mateusz L; Pfister, Rolf; Blöchliger, Nicolas; Steiner, Sandra; Caflisch, Amedeo; Zerbe, Oliver; Hamm, Peter

    2013-07-16

    By covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove of a PDZ domain, a conformational transition, similar to the one occurring upon ligand binding to the unmodified domain, can be initiated on a picosecond timescale by a laser pulse. The protein structures have been characterized in the two photoswitch states through NMR spectroscopy and the transition between them through ultrafast IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding groove opens on a 100-ns timescale in a highly nonexponential manner, and the molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the process is governed by the rearrangement of the water network on the protein surface. We propose this rearrangement of the water network to be another possible mechanism of allostery.

  7. A distributed optical fiber sensing system for synchronous vibration and loss measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-ping; Qiao, Wei-yan; Sun, Zhen-hong; Shan, Yuan-yuan; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Yi-xin

    2016-09-01

    We propose a fully distributed fusion system combining phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) and OTDR for synchronous vibration and loss measurement by setting an ingenious frequency sweep rate ( FSR) of the optical source. The relationships between FSR, probe pulse width and repeat period are given to balance the amplitude fluctuation of OTDR traces, the dead zone probability and the measurable frequency range of vibration events. In the experiment, we achieve synchronous vibration and loss measurement with FSR of 40 MHz/s, the proble pulse width of 100 ns and repeat rate of 0.4 ms. The fluctuation of OTDR trace is less than 0.45 dB when the signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR) is over 12 dB for a captured vibration event located at 9.1 km. The proposed method can be used for not only detection but also early warning of damage events in optical communication networks.

  8. Pulsar timing sensitivity to very-low-frequency gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jenet, Fredrick A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-04-15

    We compute the sensitivity, constrained by instrumental, propagation, and other fundamental noises, of pulsar timing to very-low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Reaching predicted GW signal strengths will require suppression of time-of-arrival fluctuations caused by interstellar plasma turbulence and a reduction of white rms timing noise to < or approx. 100 ns. Assuming negligible intrinsic pulsar rotational noise, perfect time transfer from time standard to observatory, and stable pulse profiles, the resulting single-pulsar signal-to-noise ratio=1 sensitivity is limited by terrestrial time standards at h{sub rms}{approx}2x10{sup -16} [f/ (1 cycle/year)]-1/2 for f<3x10{sup -8} Hz, where f is the Fourier frequency and a bandwidth of 1 cycle/(10 years) is assumed. Since this sensitivity is comparable to predicted GW signal levels, a reliable detection will require substantial signal-to-noise ratio improvement via pulsar timing array.

  9. Computational modeling of Krypton gas puffs with tailored mass density profiles on Z

    DOE PAGES

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Lamppa, Derek C.; ...

    2015-05-18

    Large diameter multi-shell gas puffs rapidly imploded by high current (~20 MA, ~100 ns) on the Z generator of Sandia National Laboratories are able to produce high-intensity Krypton K-shell emission at ~13 keV. Efficiently radiating at these high photon energies is a significant challenge which requires the careful design and optimization of the gas distribution. To facilitate this, we hydrodynamically model the gas flow out of the nozzle and then model its implosion using a 3-dimensional resistive, radiative MHD code (GORGON). This approach enables us to iterate between modeling the implosion and gas flow from the nozzle to optimize radiativemore » output from this combined system. Furthermore, guided by our implosion calculations, we have designed gas profiles that help mitigate disruption from Magneto-Rayleigh–Taylor implosion instabilities, while preserving sufficient kinetic energy to thermalize to the high temperatures required for K-shell emission.« less

  10. Stack optimization of oxide-based RRAM for fast write speed (<1 μs) at low operating current (<10 μA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Goux, L.; Fantini, A.; Degraeve, R.; Redolfi, A.; Groeseneken, G.; Jurczak, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we engineer a TiN ⧹ Al2O3 ⧹ (Hf,Al)O2 ⧹ Ta2O5 ⧹ Hf Oxide Resistive Random Access Memory (OxRRAM) device for fast switching at low operation current without sacrificing the retention and endurance properties. The integrated 40 nm × 40 nm cell switches at 10 μA using write pulses shorter than 100 ns (resp. 1 μs) for Reset (resp. Set) and with amplitude <2 V. Using these conditions in a specially developed verify algorithm, a resistive window of 10× is reliably obtained, decreasing the write speed by more than 1 decade compared to state-of-the-art OxRRAM stacks at same current level.

  11. Conformational space of clindamycin studied by ab initio and full-atom molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kulczycka-Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Trylska, Joanna; Sadlej, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations allow determining internal flexibility of molecules at atomic level. Using ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), one can simulate in a reasonable time frame small systems with hundreds of atoms, usually in vacuum. With quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) or full-atom molecular dynamics (FAMD), the influence of the environment can also be simulated. Here, we compare three types of MD calculations: ab initio BOMD, hybrid QM/MM, and classical FAMD. As a model system, we use a small antibiotic molecule, clindamycin, which is one of the lincosamide antibiotics. Clindamycin acquires two energetically stable forms and we investigated the transition between these two experimentally known conformers. We performed 60-ps BOMD simulations in vacuum, 50-ps QM/MM, and 100-ns FAMD in explicit water. The transition between two antibiotic conformers was observed using both BOMD and FAMD methods but was not noted in the QM/MM simulations.

  12. Plasma dynamics in microsecond megaampere plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Loginov, S. V.

    2011-10-15

    The paper considers the transport of a magnetic field in highly ionized plasma of microsecond megaampere plasma opening switches. Self-similar solutions for plasma aggregation by a linearly increasing magnetic field are derived. For these solutions, the magnetic field energy in the current channel is much lower than the energy of the accelerated plasma flow. The effect of Joule heating of the plasma becomes profound only with a uniform current density. It is shown that the evolution of the magnetic field in the accelerated flow is reduced to diffusion with an effective electrical conductivity proportional to the harmonic average of the Spitzer conductivity and conductivity dependent on the magnetic field in the current channel. Thus, during about the first 100 ns of the current pulse the conductivity of the current channel increases due to the plasma heating and, as the plasma is accelerated, its conductivity decreases.

  13. Effects of picosecond terawatt UV laser beam filamentation and a repetitive pulse train on creation of prolonged plasma channels in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.

    2013-08-01

    Amplitude-modulated UV laser pulse of up to 30 J energy was produced at hybrid Ti:Sapphire/KrF GARPUN-MTW laser facility when a preliminary amplified train of short pulses was injected into unstable resonator cavity of the main e-beam-pumped KrF amplifier. The combined radiation consisted of regeneratively amplified picosecond pulses with subTW peak power overlapped with 100-ns pulse of a free-running lasing. The advantages of combined radiation for production of long-lived prolonged plasma channels in air and HV discharge triggering were demonstrated: photocurrent sustained by modulated pulse is two orders of magnitude higher and HV breakdown distance is twice longer than for a smooth UV pulse. It was found that in contrast to IR radiation multiple filamentation of high-power UV laser beam does not produce extended nonlinear focusing of UV radiation.

  14. Evaluation of Non-Structural Protein-1(NS1) positive patients of 2013 dengue outbreak in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Lutfullah, Ghosia; Ahmed, Jawad; Khan, Aftab; Ihsan, Hina; Ahmad, Jamshed

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Dengue infection is an arthropod borne disease caused by Dengue virus in humans. Dengue virus infection has more potential to produce severe form of the disease with more severe symptoms. Proper diagnosis of dengue fever is very important for its safe management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the non structural protein-1 (NS1) positive parameter for identification of dengue fever by using ELISA from 2013 dengue outbreak in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Methods: It was a cross sectional study conducted among 384 patients tested for dengue admitted to different hospitals of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa April to December 2013 with symptoms related to classical dengue fever. Written informed consent was taken from 100 NS1 positive diagnosed patients, and 3 to 5 ml blood sample was collected for confirmation through ELISA testing. ELISA test for dengue IgG and IgM was performed two time in order to confirm the dengue cases. Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 16. Result: The study performed on 100 NS1 positive samples of patients, admitted to hospitals with symptoms related to classical dengue fever, indicated that after performing the IgM and IgG capture ELISA test only 76 samples were actually found positive for dengue. The rest of the 24 samples were found negative for both IgM and IgG capture ELISAs. The study also revealed that 90.8 % patients had primary dengue infection and 35.5% patients had secondary dengue infection. Most patients were between the age of 10-20 years (26%), among them19.7% were having primary dengue infection. Among 10-20 years of age 50% female patients were false dengue patients. Conclusion: About 24 % NSI protein positive samples were found negative for both IgM and IgG capture ELISAs showed that NS1protein positivity does not confirm actual dengue infection. PMID:28367194

  15. Optical properties of water for the Yangbajing water cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shang-qi; Sun, Zhi-bin; Jiang, Yuan-da; Wang, Chao; Du, Ke-ming

    2011-08-01

    Cherenkov radiation is used to study the production of particles during collisions, cosmic rays detections and distinguishing between different types of neutrinos and electrons. The optical properties of water are very important to the research of Cherenkov Effect. Lambert-beer law is a method to study the attenuation of light through medium. In this paper, optical properties of water are investigated by use of a water attenuation performance test system. The system is composed of the light-emitting diode (LED) light source and the photon receiver models. The LED light source model provides a pulse light signal which frequency is 1 kHz and width is 100ns. In photon receiver model, a high sensitivity photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used to detect the photons across the water. Because the output voltage amplitude of PMT is weak which is from 80mv to 120mV, a low noise pre-amplifier is used to improve the detector precise. An effective detector maximum time window of PMT is 100ns for a long lifetime, so a peak holder circuit is used to hold the maximum peak amplitude of PMT for the induced photons signal before the digitalization. In order to reduce the noise of peak holder, a multi-pulse integration is used before the sampling of analog to digital converter. At last, the detector of photons from the light source to the PMT across the water is synchronized to the pulse width of the LED. In order to calculate the attenuation coefficient and attenuation length of water precisely, the attenuation properties of air-to-water boundary is considered in the calculation.

  16. Voltage breakdown limits at a high material temperature for rapid pulse heating in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P A; Speer, R

    1999-06-07

    The proposed Advanced Hydro Facility (AHF) is required to produce multi-pulse radiographs. Electron beam pulse machines with sub-microsecond repetition are not yet available to test the problem of electron beam propagation through the hydro-dynamically expanding plasma from the nearby previously heated target material. A proposed test scenario includes an ohmically heated small volume of target material simulating the electron beam heating, along with an actual electron beam pulse impinging on nearby target material. A pulse power heating circuit was tested to evaluate the limits of pulse heating a small volume of material to tens of kilo-joules per gram. The main pulse heating time (50 to 100 ns) was to simulate the electron beam heating of a converter target material. To avoid skin heating non-uniformity a longer time scale pulse of a few microseconds first heats the target material to a few thousand degrees near the liquid to vapor transition. Under this state the maximum electric field that the current carrying conductor can support is the important parameter for insuring that the 100 ns heating pulse can deposit sufficient power. A small pulse power system was built for tests of this limit. Under cold conditions the vacuum electric field hold-off limit has been quoted as high as many tens of kilovolts per centimeter. The tests for these experiments found that the vacuum electric field hold-off was limited to a few kilovolts per centimeter when the material approached melting temperatures. Therefore the proposed test scenario for AHF was not achievable.*

  17. Influence of Contactopy on Two-Dimensional Brazil-Nut Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesuma, Teja; Praja Purwa Aji, Dimas; Viridi, Sparisoma; Suprijadi

    2016-01-01

    Using hard sphere collision scheme and molecular dynamics method simulation, two-dimension Brazil-Nut Effect (BNE) is conducted. BNE inital configurations are artificially created to obtain number of contacts between the grains, called as contactopy. It is observed that from initial condition until the end of BNE observation, center-of-mass in vertical direction tends to decrease, while contactopy tends to increase, which are similar to the reported results in a Gedankenexperiment (Viridi et al., 2014). Initial configurations which are also dependent on contactopy influence the rise time since it can override influence of density ratio that should affect rise time (Möbius et al., 2001). We investigate on how the intruder rise time influenced by contactopy, as well as density.

  18. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  19. Delayed emission from InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots grown by migration-enhanced epitaxy due to carrier localization in a wetting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, C. S.; Jang, Y. D.; Lee, H.; Lee, D.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.

    2013-05-01

    Wetting layer (WL) photoluminescence (PL) at 10 K dominated the PL spectra of low-density quantum dots (QDs) grown by migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE), even at very low excitation powers. Long PL rise time at the ground state (GS) of QDs was observed, when carriers are generated in the WL, indicating suppressed carrier capture from the WL into the QDs. Fluctuations in the WL thickness due to WL thinning in the MEE-grown QDs produced strong localization effects. Temperature dependence of the WL PL intensity and the GS PL rise time agreed well with this interpretation.

  20. The dependence of solar flare energetics on flare volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    The sizes of 45 X-ray flares observed on Skylab have been measured and compared to flare rise times, energies, and energy release rates as determined from Solard and XREA X-ray data. The X-ray rise time is correlated with the length and volume of the flare. The energy of the flare and the rate of increase of that energy are correlated with flare length and volume. Both the energy per unit volume and the rate of energy increase per unit volume are inversely correlated with flare length and volume. There is no correlation between the emission measure and the volume.

  1. Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Cox, S.A.; Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

    1982-10-21

    Apparatus and method are presented for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

  2. Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Cox, Samson A.; Bennett, Edgar F.; Yule, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

  3. Statistical aspects of the 1980 solar flares. Part 3: Parametric comparison and final comments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The 1349 study flares are considered addressing relationships between pairs of specific study paremeters; namely, H alpha rise time versus H alpha importance, X-ray class and H alpha decay time; H alpha decay time versus H alpha importance and X-ray class; and H alpha importance versus X-ray class. Mean H alpha rise time and decay time versus X-ray class and H alpha importance will also be discussed, and some final comments regarding the study flares are given.

  4. An Evaluation of the Palladium-Silver Isotope Systematics in the Oldest Differentiated Planetesimal: Beyond Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, M. F.; Carlson, R. W.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2012-03-01

    Pd-Ag isotopic systematics in Muonionlusta (Group IVA iron meteorite, troilite Pb-Pb age = 4565.3±0.1 Ma) yield an initial solar system abundance of 107Pd/108Pd of (2.8±0.4) × 10^-^5, despite heterogeneous shock effects in troilite.

  5. Atmospheric composition 1 million years ago from blue ice in the Allan Hills, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John A; Kurbatov, Andrei V; Spaulding, Nicole E; Brook, Ed; Introne, Douglas S; Chimiak, Laura M; Yan, Yuzhen; Mayewski, Paul A; Bender, Michael L

    2015-06-02

    Here, we present direct measurements of atmospheric composition and Antarctic climate from the mid-Pleistocene (∼1 Ma) from ice cores drilled in the Allan Hills blue ice area, Antarctica. The 1-Ma ice is dated from the deficit in (40)Ar relative to the modern atmosphere and is present as a stratigraphically disturbed 12-m section at the base of a 126-m ice core. The 1-Ma ice appears to represent most of the amplitude of contemporaneous climate cycles and CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the ice range from 221 to 277 ppm and 411 to 569 parts per billion (ppb), respectively. These concentrations, together with measured δD of the ice, are at the warm end of the field for glacial-interglacial cycles of the last 800 ky and span only about one-half of the range. The highest CO2 values in the 1-Ma ice fall within the range of interglacial values of the last 400 ka but are up to 7 ppm higher than any interglacial values between 450 and 800 ka. The lowest CO2 values are 30 ppm higher than during any glacial period between 450 and 800 ka. This study shows that the coupling of Antarctic temperature and atmospheric CO2 extended into the mid-Pleistocene and demonstrates the feasibility of discontinuously extending the current ice core record beyond 800 ka by shallow coring in Antarctic blue ice areas.

  6. Atmospheric composition 1 million years ago from blue ice in the Allan Hills, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, John A.; Kurbatov, Andrei V.; Spaulding, Nicole E.; Brook, Ed; Introne, Douglas S.; Chimiak, Laura M.; Yan, Yuzhen; Mayewski, Paul A.; Bender, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present direct measurements of atmospheric composition and Antarctic climate from the mid-Pleistocene (∼1 Ma) from ice cores drilled in the Allan Hills blue ice area, Antarctica. The 1-Ma ice is dated from the deficit in 40Ar relative to the modern atmosphere and is present as a stratigraphically disturbed 12-m section at the base of a 126-m ice core. The 1-Ma ice appears to represent most of the amplitude of contemporaneous climate cycles and CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the ice range from 221 to 277 ppm and 411 to 569 parts per billion (ppb), respectively. These concentrations, together with measured δD of the ice, are at the warm end of the field for glacial–interglacial cycles of the last 800 ky and span only about one-half of the range. The highest CO2 values in the 1-Ma ice fall within the range of interglacial values of the last 400 ka but are up to 7 ppm higher than any interglacial values between 450 and 800 ka. The lowest CO2 values are 30 ppm higher than during any glacial period between 450 and 800 ka. This study shows that the coupling of Antarctic temperature and atmospheric CO2 extended into the mid-Pleistocene and demonstrates the feasibility of discontinuously extending the current ice core record beyond 800 ka by shallow coring in Antarctic blue ice areas. PMID:25964367

  7. East Antarctic ice-sheet dynamics between 5.2 and 0 Ma from a high-resolution terrigenous particle size record, ODP Site 1165, Prydz Bay-Cooperation Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passchier, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a 5.2-0 Ma high-resolution terrigenous particle size record recovered from a sediment drift off East Antarctica. The particle size properties of Hole 1165B are interpreted in the context of previously acquired data on a continental shelf to slope transect drilled by ODP Leg 188 in Prydz Bay and the Cooperation Sea. The new data indicate that the Lambert ice stream stayed predominantly landward of the shelf break in the early Pliocene (5.2-3.5 Ma) with periods of ice sheet recession on land. The middle Pliocene (3.5-3.1 Ma) is characterized as major ice expansion during glacials with deposition of laminated clays from meltwater plumes on the continental rise, alternating with periods of ice recession. A change in sedimentary facies and a decrease in sedimentation rates occurred at ~3.1 Ma indicating a more retreated Lambert Glacier. Between 2.5 and 1 Ma the ice stream was generally stable and had become cold-based with ice flow in a glacial trough extending to the shelf break. Three-four large pulses of coarse-grained glacigenic debris mark the record at ~1 Ma. These are interpreted as extensive calving due to decoupling of the marine terminus from its bed in response to Northern Hemisphere deglaciations and associated sea level rises.

  8. 42 CFR 422.252 - Terminology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... supplemental benefit, as described at § 422.266(b)(1). MA-PD plan means an MA local or regional plan that...). MA monthly prescription drug beneficiary premium is the MA-PD plan base beneficiary premium, defined... and the national average bid (as described in § 422.256(c)) less the amount of rebate the MA-PD...

  9. LDRD final report on confinement of cluster fusion plasmas with magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, Jeffrey W.; Kellogg, Jeffrey W.; Headley, Daniel Ignacio; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Waugh, Caleb J.; Lewis, Sean M.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Wisher, Matthew; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Bengtson, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Two versions of a current driver for single-turn, single-use 1-cm diameter magnetic field coils have been built and tested at the Sandia National Laboratories for use with cluster fusion experiments at the University of Texas in Austin. These coils are used to provide axial magnetic fields to slow radial loss of electrons from laser-produced deuterium plasmas. Typical peak field strength achievable for the two-capacitor system is 50 T, and 200 T for the ten-capacitor system. Current rise time for both systems is about 1.7 {mu}s, with peak current of 500 kA and 2 MA, respectively. Because the coil must be brought to the laser, the driver needs to be portable and drive currents in vacuum. The drivers are complete but laser-plasma experiments are still in progress. Therefore, in this report, we focus on system design, initial tests, and performance characteristics of the two-capacitor and ten-capacitors systems. The questions of whether a 200 T magnetic field can retard the breakup of a cluster-fusion plasma, and whether this field can enhance neutron production have not yet been answered. However, tools have been developed that will enable producing the magnetic fields needed to answer these questions. These are a two-capacitor, 400-kA system that was delivered to the University of Texas in 2010, and a 2-MA ten-capacitor system delivered this year. The first system allowed initial testing, and the second system will be able to produce the 200 T magnetic fields needed for cluster fusion experiments with a petawatt laser. The prototype 400-kA magnetic field driver system was designed and built to test the design concept for the system, and to verify that a portable driver system could be built that delivers current to a magnetic field coil in vacuum. This system was built copying a design from a fixed-facility, high-field machine at LANL, but made to be portable and to use a Z-machine-like vacuum insulator and vacuum transmission line. This system was sent to the

  10. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar isotopic dates from the Cripple Creek gold-Telluride district, Colorado: Constraints on the timing of magmatism and mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K.D.; Snee, L.W. ); Thompson, T.B. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-04-01

    The Cripple Creek district is within a Tertiary diatreme-intrusive complex, a steep-walled basin in Proterozoic pelitic and igneous rocks that is filled with terrigenous sedimentary rocks, volcanic and hydrothermal breccias, and tuffs. The orebodies occur as veins in Proterozoic and Tertiary rocks or as deposits localized within hydrothermal breccia bodies or disseminated in diatreme breccias. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dates from igneous rocks demonstrate the approximately contemporaneous emplacement of the most differentiated phonolitic rocks. Three sanidine samples from phonolite yield apparent ages ranging from 30.9 [+-] 0.1 to 31.8 [+-] 0.1 Ma (1 sigma). Biotite and sanidine age spectra from relatively less differentiated tephriphonolite are discordant; the emplacement age is estimated to be between 31.4 [+-] 0.1 and 32.5 [+-] 0.1 Ma. A maximum age of 31.5 [+-] 0.1 Ma was obtained on a whole-rock sample of trachyandesite. The mafic phonolitic rocks are relatively younger. A sample of the Isabella dike, a phonotephrite dike cutting phonolite, yields a whole-rock age of 28.7 [+-] 0.04 Ma. The data suggest that mineralization both predates and postdates emplacement of the mafic phonolitic rocks. Hydrothermal biotite in a vein cutting phonolite yields an age of 29.9 [+-] 0.1 Ma. The age spectrum of adularia from a vein cutting volcaniclastic rocks is difficult to interpret due to the presence of excess argon, but an age is estimated to be between 29.5 and 30.4 Ma. In the vicinity of the phonotephrite dike, field evidence suggests that vein mineralization postdates emplacement of the dike; potassium feldspar from potassium altered phonolite in the vicinity of mineralized rock yields ages of 28.2 [+-] 0.1 and 28.8 [+-] 0.1 Ma.

  11. Amplitude Envelope Perception, Phonology and Prosodic Sensitivity in Children with Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Usha; Gerson, Danielle; Astruc, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Here we explore relations between auditory perception of amplitude envelope structure, prosodic sensitivity, and phonological awareness in a sample of 56 typically-developing children and children with developmental dyslexia. We examine whether rise time sensitivity is linked to prosodic sensitivity, and whether prosodic sensitivity is linked to…

  12. Low-Level Deficits in Beat Perception: Neither Necessary nor Sufficient for Explaining Developmental Dyslexia in a Consistent Orthography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno K.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports two different studies examining the theoretical account of low-level deficits in beat perception as an alternative explanation of developmental dyslexia in Greek, an orthographically consistent language. Study I examined the relationship of amplitude rise time and frequency discrimination with measures of phonological…

  13. Reflected Blast Measurements at Small Scaled Distances for M26E1 Propellant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    produces a half- sine , positive pressure pulse with peak amplitudes from 100 psi (0.7 MPa) to more than 10,000 psi (70 MPa), and rise times of 1 to 2...Plant ATTN: SARMI-S Milan, TN 38358 Commander Radford Army Ammunition Plant ATTN: SARRA -IE (2) Radford, VA 24141 Commander Badger Army

  14. Optical Oscillation Established Using Acousto-Optic Bragg Angle Defraction In Conjunction With Closed Cavity Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, G. C.; Cadwallender, W.; Megargel, L. R.; Mentzer, M. A.; Craley, D. E.

    1987-03-01

    An optical oscillator has been designed, constructed, and operated by using a HeNe laser and acousto-optic modulator in conjunction with two opposed fiber optic feedback circuits. Depending on round-trip feedback time, a low frequency ( 1Hz) sinusoidal oscillator or a high frequency (100KHz) square wave (,..%,1 us rise time) is obtained.

  15. A CW Gunn diode bistable switching element.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurtado, M.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments with a current-controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode are reported. Switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by current pulses of short duration (5-10 ns). Rise times of the order of several nanoseconds could be obtained.

  16. Human Effectiveness and Risk Characterization of the Electromuscular Incapacitation Device - A Limited Analysis of the TASER. Part 1. Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    the effects of rapid-rise-time, short-duration, high-voltage (the TASER peak current is high relative to electrostimulation thresholds, but the...Springer Verlag. Reilly, J.P. (2003). Mechanisms of electrostimulation , Chapter in P. Chadwick and C. Gabriel (eds.), The international EMF dosimetry

  17. As-Built design specification for PARPLT. [program to produce scatter plots of crop greenness profile parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, M. A.; Cheng, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The design and implementation of the PARPLT program are described. The program produces scatter plots of the greenness profile derived parameters alpha, beta, and t sub o computed by the CLASFYG program (alpha being the approximate greenness rise time; beta, the greenness decay time; and t sub o, the spectral crop emergence date). Statistical information concerning the parameters is also computed.

  18. Embedded fiber Bragg grating pressure measurement during thermal ignition of a high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.

    2016-10-01

    A high-speed fiber Bragg grating based pressure-only measurement is reported for the high explosive PBXN-9 under thermal initiation conditions. During exothermic thermal runaway, an explosion rise time of 500 μs reaching a peak pressure of 660 MPa is measured. The approach offers a direct measure pressure diagnostic useful for quantifying reaction violence for high explosive chemistry.

  19. Basic Auditory Processing Deficits in Dyslexia: Systematic Review of the Behavioral and Event-Related Potential/Field Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hämäläinen, Jarmo A.; Salminen, Hanne K.; Leppänen, Paavo H. T.

    2013-01-01

    A review of research that uses behavioral, electroencephalographic, and/or magnetoencephalographic methods to investigate auditory processing deficits in individuals with dyslexia is presented. Findings show that measures of frequency, rise time, and duration discrimination as well as amplitude modulation and frequency modulation detection were…

  20. Red Tigress Mission Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    9961 9962 9963 9964 9965 9966 9967 9968 9969 9970 9971 9972 9973 9974 9975 9976 9977 287 287 287 287 287 287 287 287 287 287...Lost at: Q-2 H^Active Illumination Rise Time Q o’. 3-~) t 4 i ^ Elevation gs ° o 2lS Range m°\\o CPC^ Laser Power .Watts Range Gating

  1. 49 CFR 173.127 - Class 5, Division 5.1-Definition and assignment of packing groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rise time of a 1:1 aqueous sodium chlorate solution (40 percent)/cellulose mixture and the criteria for... mixture. (2) A liquid material is classed as a Division 5.1 material if, when tested in accordance with... mixture. (b) Assignment of packing groups. (1) The packing group of a Division 5.1 material which is...

  2. 49 CFR 173.127 - Class 5, Division 5.1-Definition and assignment of packing groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... rise time of a 1:1 aqueous sodium chlorate solution (40 percent)/cellulose mixture and the criteria for... mixture. (2) A liquid material is classed as a Division 5.1 material if, when tested in accordance with... mixture. (b) Assignment of packing groups. (1) The packing group of a Division 5.1 material which is...

  3. Acoustic reflex patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Canale, Andrea; Albera, Roberto; Lacilla, Michelangelo; Canosa, Antonio; Albera, Andrea; Sacco, Francesca; Chiò, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate acoustic reflex testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. Amplitude, latency, and rise time of stapedial reflex were recorded for 500 and 1000 Hz contralateral stimulus. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test and the level of significance was set at 5 %. Fifty-one amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and ten sex- and age-matched control subjects were studied. Patients were further divided in two groups: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar (38 cases, with bulbar signs at evaluation) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal (13 cases, without bulbar signs at evaluation). Stapedial reflex was present in all patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean amplitude, latency, and rise time between the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients as compared with the controls. Amplitude was lower in both the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients than in the controls (p < 0.05) and rise time was longer in both patient groups compared with the controls (p < 0.05). These results confirm the presence of abnormal acoustic reflex patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases with bulbar signs and, moreover, suggesting a possible subclinical involvement of the stapedial motor neuron even in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients. Amplitude and rise time seem to be good sensitive parameters for investigating subclinical bulbar involvement.

  4. Auditory Processing in Specific Language Impairment (SLI): Relations with the Perception of Lexical and Phrasal Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Susan; Goswami, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether impaired acoustic processing is a factor in developmental language disorders. The amplitude envelope of the speech signal is known to be important in language processing. We examined whether impaired perception of amplitude envelope rise time is related to impaired perception of lexical and phrasal stress in…

  5. Quantifying the evidence for dark matter in CoGeNT data

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jonathan H.; McCabe, Christopher; Boehm, Céline E-mail: christopher.mccabe@durham.ac.uk

    2014-08-01

    We perform an independent analysis of data from the CoGeNT direct detection experiment to quantify the evidence for dark matter recoils. We critically re-examine the assumptions that enter the analysis, focusing specifically on the separation of bulk and surface events, the latter of which constitute a large background. This separation is performed using the event rise-time, with the surface events being slower on average. We fit the rise-time distributions for the bulk and surface events with a log-normal and Pareto distribution (which gives a better fit to the tail in the bulk population at high rise-times) and account for the energy-dependence of the bulk fraction using a cubic spline. Using Bayesian and frequentist techniques and additionally investigating the effect of varying the rise-time cut, the bulk background spectrum and bin-sizes, we conclude that the CoGeNT data show a preference for light dark matter recoils at less than 1σ.

  6. Embedded fiber Bragg grating pressure measurement during thermal ignition of a high explosive

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, George; Smilowitz, Laura Beth; Henson, Bryan Fayne

    2016-10-17

    A high-speed fiber Bragg grating based pressure-only measurement is reported for the high explosive PBXN-9 under thermal initiation conditions. During exothermic thermal runaway, an explosion rise time of 500 μs reaching a peak pressure of 660 MPa is measured. Lastly, the approach offers a direct measure pressure diagnostic useful for quantifying reaction violence for high explosive chemistry.

  7. Statistical aspects of the 1980 solar flars. 1: Data base, frequency distributions, and overview remarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    AII1349 H alpha flares occurring in 1980 which have known start, maximum brightness, and end times, latitudes, and associated importance and X-ray classes were used to perform a statistical study of flare rise time, decay time, duration, latitude, importance (areal and relative intensity), and X-ray class. Frequency distributions of these parameters are tabulated and plotted.

  8. Effect of pulse profile and chirp on a laser wakefield generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Ji Liangliang; Wang Wenpeng; Xu Jiancai; Yu Yahong; Yi Longqing; Wang Xiaofeng; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Kulagin, V.

    2012-05-15

    A laser wakefield driven by an asymmetric laser pulse with/without chirp is investigated analytically and through two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For a laser pulse with an appropriate pulse length compared with the plasma wavelength, the wakefield amplitude can be enhanced by using an asymmetric un-chirped laser pulse with a fast rise time; however, the growth is small. On the other hand, the wakefield can be greatly enhanced for both positively chirped laser pulse having a fast rise time and negatively chirped laser pulse having a slow rise time. Simulations show that at the early laser-plasma interaction stage, due to the influence of the fast rise time the wakefield driven by the positively chirped laser pulse is more intense than that driven by the negatively chirped laser pulse, which is in good agreement with analytical results. At a later time, since the laser pulse with positive chirp exhibits opposite evolution to the one with negative chirp when propagating in plasma, the wakefield in the latter case grows more intensely. These effects should be useful in laser wakefield acceleration experiments operating at low plasma densities.

  9. Evaluation of Hamamatsu R1635 photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C.; Leskovar, B.

    1983-05-01

    Characteristics have been measured of the Hamamatsu R1635 10 mm-diameter photomultiplier. Some typical photomultiplier characteristics - such as gain, dark current, transit and rise times - are compared with data provided by the manufacturer. Photomultiplier characteristics, generally not available from the manufacturer, such as the single photoelectron and pulse response time spread for full photocathode illumination were measured and are discussed.

  10. Ozone synthesis initiated by a nanosecond corona in air

    SciTech Connect

    Amirov, R.Kh.; Asinovskii, E.I.; Samoilov, I.S.

    1992-07-01

    The dynamics of power absorption in a pulsed corona was investigated experimentally as a function of the polarity, amplitude, and voltage rise time. The experiment was compared with calculations using a capacitive model of the corona. The efficiency of ozone synthesis was measured as a function of the polarity and diameter of the discharging electrode.

  11. Bipolar square-wave current source for transient electromagnetic systems based on constant shutdown time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shilong; Yin, Changchun; Lin, Jun; Yang, Yu; Hu, Xueyan

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative work of multiple magnetic transmitting sources is a new trend in the development of transient electromagnetic system. The key is the bipolar current waves shutdown, concurrently in the inductive load. In the past, it was difficult to use the constant clamping voltage technique to realize the synchronized shutdown of currents with different peak values. Based on clamping voltage technique, we introduce a new controlling method with constant shutdown time. We use the rising time to control shutdown time and use low voltage power source to control peak current. From the viewpoint of the circuit energy loss, by taking the high-voltage capacitor bypass resistance and the capacitor of the passive snubber circuit into account, we establish the relationship between the rising time and the shutdown time. Since the switch is not ideal, we propose a new method to test the shutdown time by the low voltage, the high voltage and the peak current. Experimental results show that adjustment of the current rising time can precisely control the value of the clamp voltage. When the rising time is fixed, the shutdown time is unchanged. The error for shutdown time deduced from the energy consumption is less than 6%. The new controlling method on current shutdown proposed in this paper can be used in the cooperative work of borehole and ground transmitting system.

  12. Basic Auditory Processing and Developmental Dyslexia in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan Sharon; Huss, Martina; Hamalainen, Jarmo A.; Goswami, Usha

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores the relationship between basic auditory processing of sound rise time, frequency, duration and intensity, phonological skills (onset-rime and tone awareness, sound blending, RAN, and phonological memory) and reading disability in Chinese. A series of psychometric, literacy, phonological, auditory, and character…

  13. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  14. Low-power integrated-circuit driver for ferrite-memory word lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, S.

    1970-01-01

    Composite circuit uses both n-p-n bipolar and p-channel MOS transistors /BIMOS/. The BIMOS driver provides 1/ ease of integrated circuit construction, 2/ low standby power consumption, 3/ bidirectional current pulses, and 4/ current-pulse amplitudes and rise times independent of active device parameters.

  15. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  16. Circadian Type and Bed-Timing Regularity in 654 Retired Seniors: Correlations with Subjective Sleep Measures

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Timothy H.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Billy, Bart D.; Fletcher, Mary E.; Kennedy, Kathy S.; Schlarb, Janet E.; Beach, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Using telephone interview data from retired seniors to explore how inter-individual differences in circadian type (morningness) and bed-timing regularity might be related to subjective sleep quality and quantity. Design: MANCOVA with binary measures of morningness, stability of bedtimes, and stability of rise-times as independent variables; sleep measures as dependent variables; age, former shift work, and gender as covariates. Setting: Telephone interviews using a pseudo-random age-targeted sampling process. Participants: 654 retired seniors (65 y+, 363M, 291F). Intervention: none. Measurements and Results: Independent variables: (1) circadian type (from Composite Scale of Morningness [CSM]), and stability of (2) bedtime and (3) rise-time from the Sleep Timing Questionnaire (STQ). Dependent variables: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score, time in bed, time spent asleep, and sleep efficiency, from Sleep Timing Questionnaire (STQ). Morning-type orientation, stability in bedtimes, and stability in rise-times were all associated with better sleep quality (P < 0.001, for all; effect sizes: 0.43, 0.33, and 0.27). Morningness was associated with shorter time in bed (P < 0.0001, effect size 0.45) and time spent asleep (P < 0.005, effect size 0.26). For bedtime and rise-time stability the direction of effect was similar but mostly weaker. Conclusions: In retired seniors, a morning-type orientation and regularity in bedtimes and rise-times appear to be correlated with improved subjective sleep quality and with less time spent in bed. Citation: Monk TH; Buysse DJ; Billy BD; Fletcher ME; Kennedy KS; Schlarb JE; Beach SR. Circadian type and bed-timing regularity in 654 retired seniors: correlations with subjective sleep measures. SLEEP 2011;34(2):235-239. PMID:21286245

  17. 40Ar/39Ar age of the Manson impact structure, Iowa, and correlative impact ejecta in the Crow Creek member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous), South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Obradovich, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A set of 34 laser total-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses of sanidine from a melt layer in crater-fill deposits of the Manson impact structure in Iowa has a weighted-mean age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma. This age is about 9.0 m.y. older than 40Ar/39Ar ages of shocked microcline from the Manson impact structure reported previously by others. The 74.1 Ma age of the sanidine, which is a melt product of Precambrian microcline clasts, indicates that the Manson impact structure played no part in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) mass extinction at 64.5 Ma. Moreover, incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages of the sanidine show that it is essentially free of excess 40Ar and has not been influenced by postcrystallization heating or alteration. An age spectrum of the matrix of the melt layer shows effects of 39Ar recoil, including older ages in the low-temperature increments and younger ages in the high-temperature increments. At 17 places in eastern South Dakota and Nebraska, shocked quartz and feldspar grains are concentrated in the lower part of the Crow Creek Member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The grains are largest (3.2 mm) in southeastern South Dakota and decrease in size (0.45 mm) to the northwest, consistent with the idea that the Manson impact structure was their source. The ubiquitous presence of shocked grains concentrated in a thin calcarenite at the base of the Crow Creek Member suggests it is an event bed recording an instant of geologic time. Ammonites below and above the Crow Creek Member limit its age to the zone of Didymoceras nebrascense of earliest late Campanian age. Plagioclase from a bentonite bed in this zone in Colorado has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma commensurate with our sanidine age of 74.1 Ma for the Manson impact structure. 40Ar/39Ar ages of bentonite beds below and above the Crow Creek are consistent with our 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma age for the Manson impact structure and limit its age to the interval ?? 74.5 0.1 to 73.8 ?? 0.1 Ma. Recently, two origins for the

  18. Mid-Quaternary decoupling of sediment routing in the Nankai Forearc revealed by provenance analysis of turbiditic sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammed O.; Masago, Hideki; Winkler, Wilfried; Strasser, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Coring during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 315, 316, and 333 recovered turbiditic sands from the forearc Kumano Basin (Site C0002), a Quaternary slope basin (Site C0018), and uplifted trench wedge (Site C0006) along the Kumano Transect of the Nankai Trough accretionary wedge offshore of southwest Japan. The compositions of the submarine turbiditic sands here are investigated in terms of bulk and heavy mineral modal compositions to identify their provenance and dispersal mechanisms, as they may reflect changes in regional tectonics during the past ca. 1.5 Myrs. The results show a marked change in the detrital signature and heavy mineral composition in the forearc and slope basin facies around 1 Ma. This sudden change is interpreted to reflect a major change in the sand provenance, rather than heavy mineral dissolution and/or diagenetic effects, in response to changing tectonics and sedimentation patterns. In the trench-slope basin, the sands older than 1 Ma were probably eroded from the exposed Cretaceous-Tertiary accretionary complex of the Shimanto Belt and transported via the former course of the Tenryu submarine canyon system, which today enters the Nankai Trough northeast of the study area. In contrast, the high abundance of volcanic lithics and volcanic heavy mineral suites of the sands younger than 1 Ma points to a strong volcanic component of sediment derived from the Izu-Honshu collision zones and probably funnelled to this site through the Suruga Canyon. However, sands in the forearc basin show persistent presence of blue sodic amphiboles across the 1 Ma boundary, indicating continuous flux of sediments from the Kumano/Kinokawa River. This implies that the sands in the older turbidites were transported by transverse flow down the slope. The slope basin facies then switched to reflect longitudinal flow around 1 Ma, when the turbiditic sand tapped a volcanic provenance in the Izu-Honshu collision zone, while the sediments transported

  19. Dynamic NBTI effects in HfSiON.

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, Roderick A. B.; Kambour, Kenneth E.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Mee, Jesse K.

    2010-12-01

    between 'bursts' of AC stress cycles, the I{sub ds}(V{sub gs}) characteristic in the range (-0.6V, -1.3V) was measured in 10.2 {micro}s. V{sub th} was extracted directly from this curve, or from a single I{sub ds} point normalized to the initial I{sub ds}{sup o} using our previous method. The resulting I{sub ds}/I{sub ds}{sup o} curves are compared; in Fig 2, the continuous stress results are included. In the second method, we examined the recovery dynamic by holding V{sub gs} = 0V for a finite amount of time (range 100 ns to 100 ms) following stress at V{sub gs} = - 2V for various times. In Fig 3 we compare |{Delta}V{sub th}(t)| results for recovery times of 100ms, 1ms, 100{micro}s, 50{micro}s, 25{micro}s, 10{micro}s, 100ns, and DC (i.e. no recovery) The data in Fig 2 shows that with a high frequency stress (2.5MHz) devices undergo significantly less (but finite) current degradation than devices stressed at 10Hz. This appears to be limited by charging and not by recovery. Fig 3 supports this hypothesis since for 100ns recovery periods, only a small percentage of the trapped charge relaxes. Detailed explanation of these experiments will be presented at the conference.

  20. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  1. DETECTING MASSIVE GRAVITONS USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kejia; Kramer, Michael; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Price, Richard H.; Wex, Norbert

    2010-10-20

    At the limit of weak static fields, general relativity becomes Newtonian gravity with a potential field that falls off as inverse distance rather than a theory of Yukawa-type fields with a finite range. General relativity also predicts that the speed of disturbances of its waves is c, the vacuum light speed, and is non-dispersive. For these reasons, the graviton, the boson for general relativity, can be considered to be massless. Massive gravitons, however, are features of some alternatives to general relativity. This has motivated experiments and observations that, so far, have been consistent with the zero-mass graviton of general relativity, but further tests will be valuable. A basis for new tests may be the high sensitivity gravitational wave (GW) experiments that are now being performed and the higher sensitivity experiments that are being planned. In these experiments, it should be feasible to detect low levels of dispersion due to non-zero graviton mass. One of the most promising techniques for such a detection may be the pulsar timing program that is sensitive to nano-Hertz GWs. Here, we present some details of such a detection scheme. The pulsar timing response to a GW background with the massive graviton is calculated, and the algorithm to detect the massive graviton is presented. We conclude that, with 90% probability, massless gravitons can be distinguished from gravitons heavier than 3 x 10{sup -22} eV (Compton wavelength {lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 12} km), if bi-weekly observation of 60 pulsars is performed for 5 years with a pulsar rms timing accuracy of 100 ns. If 60 pulsars are observed for 10 years with the same accuracy, the detectable graviton mass is reduced to 5 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 2.5 x 10{sup 13} km); for 5 year observations of 100 or 300 pulsars, the sensitivity is respectively 2.5 x 10{sup -22} ({lambda}{sub g} = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} km) and 10{sup -22} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 1.2 x 10{sup 13} km). Finally, a 10 year

  2. Antenna induced hot restrike of a ceramic metal halide lamp recorded by high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, P.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Ruhrmann, C.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2016-03-01

    The hot restrike is one of the biggest challenges in operating ceramic metal halide lamps with mercury as buffer gas. Compared to a cold lamp, the pressure within a ceramic burner is two orders of magnitude higher during steady state operation due to the high temperature of the ceramic tube and the resulting high mercury vapour pressure. Room temperature conditions are achieved after 300 s of cooling down in a commercial burner, enclosed in an evacuated outer bulb. At the beginning of the cooling down, ignition voltage rises up to more than 14 kV. A significant reduction of the hot-restrike voltage can be achieved by using a so called active antenna. It is realized by a conductive sleeve surrounding the burner at the capillary of the upper electrode. The antenna is connected to the lower electrode of the lamp, so that its potential is extended to the vicinity of the upper electrode. An increased electric field in front of the upper electrode is induced, when an ignition pulse is applied to the lamp electrodes. A symmetrically shaped ignition pulse is applied with an amplitude, which is just sufficient to re-ignite the hot lamp. The re-ignition, 60 s after switching off the lamp, when the mercury pressure starts to be saturated, is recorded for both polarities of the ignition pulse with a high-speed camera, which records four pictures within the symmetrically shaped ignition pulse with exposure times of 100 ns and throws of 100 ns. The pictures show that the high electric field and its temporal variation establish a local dielectric barrier discharge in front of the upper electrode inside the burner, which covers the inner wall of the burner with a surface charge. It forms a starting point of streamers, which may induce the lamp ignition predominantly within the second half cycle of the ignition pulse. It is found out that an active antenna is more effective when the starting point of the surface streamer in front of the sleeve is a negative surface charge on the

  3. Protein molecular data from ancient (>1 million years old) fossil material: pitfalls, possibilities and grand challenges.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Mary Higby; Schroeter, Elena R; Goshe, Michael B

    2014-07-15

    Advances in resolution and sensitivity of analytical techniques have provided novel applications, including the analyses of fossil material. However, the recovery of original proteinaceous components from very old fossil samples (defined as >1 million years (1 Ma) from previously named limits in the literature) is far from trivial. Here, we discuss the challenges to recovery of proteinaceous components from fossils, and the need for new sample preparation techniques, analytical methods, and bioinformatics to optimize and fully utilize the great potential of information locked in the fossil record. We present evidence for survival of original components across geological time, and discuss the potential benefits of recovery, analyses, and interpretation of fossil materials older than 1 Ma, both within and outside of the fields of evolutionary biology.

  4. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  5. Magnetic fabrics may proxy as neotectonic stress trajectories, Polis rift, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Hamilton, Tom

    2004-02-01

    The Miocene Polis rift opened along a NNW axis, obviously in response to WSW relative extension and relative tension starting ˜5 Myr ago. However, geologically young plate movements are believed to be closing the rift by sinistral transpression producing minor younger faults since 1 Ma. Modern earthquake solutions give E-W compression compatible with the younger faults. Magnetic fabrics using anisotropy of low field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization are kinematically compatible with stress axes required by the fault and rift geometry and thus were acquired in <5 Ma. However, by different statistical treatments and selecting samples from different subareas it is possible to reveal sedimentary-depositional fabrics and perhaps also a composite AMS fabric related to young transpression (≤1 Ma).

  6. Chronotype, bed timing and total sleep time in seniors.

    PubMed

    Monk, Timothy H; Buysse, Daniel J

    2014-06-01

    Many older adults (seniors) experience problems with getting enough sleep. Because of the link between sleep and circadian rhythms, changes in bedtime lead to changes in the amount of sleep obtained. Although primarily determined genetically, chronotype changes with advancing age towards a more morning-type (M-type) orientation. In a 2006 study, we have found a linear relationship, by which the earlier a senior's bedtime, the more sleep she/he will obtain. The aim of this study was to see whether this relationship differs for M-type seniors, as compared to seniors outside the M-type category. Retired seniors (n = 954, 535 M, 410F, 65 years+, mean age 74.4 years) taking part in a telephone interview were divided into M-types and Other types (O-types) using the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM). The relationship between bedtime and Total Sleep Time (TST), and between rise-time and TST, was tested using linear regression separately for M-types and O-types. For each participant, habitual bedtime, rise-time and total Sleep Time (TST) [after removing time spent in unwanted wakefulness] were obtained using a telephone version of the Sleep Timing Questionnaire (STQ). Both chronotype groups showed a significant linear relationship between bedtime and TST (p < 0.001); with earlier bedtimes leading to more TST (M-type 5.6 min; O-type 4.4 min per 10 min change [slope difference p = 0.05]); and an opposite relationship between rise-time and TST with earlier rise-times leading to less TST (M-type 6.7 min; O-type 4.2 min per 10 min change [slope difference p = 0.001]). M-types retired to bed 56 min earlier (p < 0.001), awoke 93 min earlier (p < 0.001) and obtained 23 min less TST (p < 0.001) than O-types. In conclusion, both chronotypes showed TST to be related in a linear way to bedtime and rise-time; the overall shorter TST in M-types was due to them rising 93 min earlier, but only retiring to bed 56 min earlier than O

  7. Chronotype, bed timing and total sleep time in seniors

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Timothy H.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Many older adults (seniors) experience problems with getting enough sleep. Because of the link between sleep and circadian rhythms, changes in bedtime lead to changes in the amount of sleep obtained. Although primarily determined genetically, chronotype changes with advancing age towards a more morning-type (M-type) orientation. In a 2006 study, we have found a linear relationship, by which the earlier a senior’s bedtime, the more sleep she/he will obtain. The aim of this study was to see whether this relationship differs for M-type seniors, as compared to seniors outside the M-type category. Retired seniors (n = 954, 535 M, 410F, 65 years+, mean age 74.4 years) taking part in a telephone interview were divided into M-types and Other types (O-types) using the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM). The relationship between bedtime and Total Sleep Time (TST), and between rise-time and TST, was tested using linear regression separately for M-types and O-types. For each participant, habitual bedtime, rise-time and total Sleep Time (TST) [after removing time spent in unwanted wakefulness] were obtained using a telephone version of the Sleep Timing Questionnaire (STQ). Both chronotype groups showed a significant linear relationship between bedtime and TST (p<0.001); with earlier bedtimes leading to more TST (M-type 5.6 min; O-type 4.4 min per 10 min change [slope difference p = 0.05]); and an opposite relationship between rise-time and TST with earlier rise-times leading to less TST (M-type 6.7 min; O-type 4.2 min per 10 min change [slope difference p 0.001]). M-types retired to bed 56 min earlier (p<0.001), awoke 93 min earlier (p<0.001) and obtained 23 min less TST (p<0.001) than O-types. In conclusion, both chronotypes showed TST to be related in a linear way to bedtime and rise-time; the overall shorter TST in M-types was due to them rising 93 min earlier, but only retiring to bed 56 min earlier than O-types; as well as having a steeper rise-time versus TST

  8. Competition Between Pairing and Ferromagnetic Instabilities in Ultracold Fermi Gases Near Feshbach Resonances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-13

    In- ternational School of Physics “ Enrico Fermi ”, Course CLXIV, 5 Varenna, 20-30 June 2006, edited by M. Inguscio, W. Ketterle, and C. Salomon (IOS...Competition between pairing and ferromagnetic instabilities in ultracold Fermi gases near Feshbach resonances David Pekker1, Mehrtash Babadi1...MA 02139, USA We study the quench dynamics of a two-component ultracold Fermi gas from the weak into the strong inter- action regime, where the

  9. High-current channel characteristics in high-pressure gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, M. E.; Bogomaz, A. A.; Budin, A. V.; Leont'ev, V. V.; Leks, A. G.; Pozubenkov, A. A.; Rutberg, Ph G.

    2015-11-01

    Research results for discharge initiated by wire explosion in hydrogen at initial pressures up to 30 MPa and current amplitudes up to 1 MA are presented. Measurements of channel radius oscillation amplitude by magnetic probe diagnostics were made to calculate channel plasma parameters. The amplitude of channel radius oscillations was observed to decrease with growth of initial gas pressure and to increase with growth of current amplitude.

  10. Long-term non-isothermal reactive transport model of compacted bentonite, concrete and corrosion products in a HLW repository in clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, Alba; Samper, Javier; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Fernández, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories envisages engineered barriers such as carbon-steel canisters, compacted bentonite and concrete liners. The stability and performance of the bentonite barrier could be affected by the corrosion products at the canister-bentonite interface and the hyper-alkaline conditions caused by the degradation of concrete at the bentonite-concrete interface. Additionally, the host clay formation could also be affected by the hyper-alkaline plume at the concrete-clay interface. Here we present a non-isothermal multicomponent reactive transport model of the long-term (1 Ma) interactions of the compacted bentonite with the corrosion products of a carbon-steel canister and the concrete liner of the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository in clay. Model results show that magnetite is the main corrosion product. Its precipitation reduces significantly the porosity of the bentonite near the canister. The degradation of the concrete liner leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals and the reduction of the porosity of the bentonite and the clay formation at their interfaces with the concrete liner. The reduction of the porosity becomes especially relevant at t = 104 years. The zones affected by pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces at 1 Ma are approximately equal to 1 and 3.3 cm thick, respectively. The hyper-alkaline front (pH > 8.5) spreads 2.5 cm into the clay formation after 1 Ma. Our simulation results share the key features of the models reported by others for engineered barrier systems at similar chemical conditions, including: 1) Pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces; 2) Narrow alteration zones; and 3) Limited smectite dissolution after 1 Ma.

  11. Tokamak Startup Using Point-Source dc Helicity Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Redd, A. J.; Sontag, A. C.

    2009-06-05

    Startup of a 0.1 MA tokamak plasma is demonstrated on the ultralow aspect ratio Pegasus Toroidal Experiment using three localized, high-current density sources mounted near the outboard midplane. The injected open field current relaxes via helicity-conserving magnetic turbulence into a tokamaklike magnetic topology where the maximum sustained plasma current is determined by helicity balance and the requirements for magnetic relaxation.

  12. Long-term non-isothermal reactive transport model of compacted bentonite, concrete and corrosion products in a HLW repository in clay.

    PubMed

    Mon, Alba; Samper, Javier; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Fernández, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories envisages engineered barriers such as carbon-steel canisters, compacted bentonite and concrete liners. The stability and performance of the bentonite barrier could be affected by the corrosion products at the canister-bentonite interface and the hyper-alkaline conditions caused by the degradation of concrete at the bentonite-concrete interface. Additionally, the host clay formation could also be affected by the hyper-alkaline plume at the concrete-clay interface. Here we present a non-isothermal multicomponent reactive transport model of the long-term (1Ma) interactions of the compacted bentonite with the corrosion products of a carbon-steel canister and the concrete liner of the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository in clay. Model results show that magnetite is the main corrosion product. Its precipitation reduces significantly the porosity of the bentonite near the canister. The degradation of the concrete liner leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals and the reduction of the porosity of the bentonite and the clay formation at their interfaces with the concrete liner. The reduction of the porosity becomes especially relevant at t=10(4)years. The zones affected by pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces at 1Ma are approximately equal to 1 and 3.3cm thick, respectively. The hyper-alkaline front (pH>8.5) spreads 2.5cm into the clay formation after 1Ma. Our simulation results share the key features of the models reported by others for engineered barrier systems at similar chemical conditions, including: 1) Pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces; 2) Narrow alteration zones; and 3) Limited smectite dissolution after 1Ma.

  13. Long Term Trends in Subantarctic Nutrient Consumption: Evidence from Sedimentary and Diatom-Bound Nitrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedsole, P.

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that the long term increase in Subantarctic opal export during glacial periods, centered around 1 Ma, is related to enhanced iron deposition and, potentially, carbon dioxide drawdown. New bulk sedimentary and diatom-bound nitrogen isotope records are used in combination with opal accumulation data from ODP Site 1090 to investigate controls on export production over the last 3 Ma. Sedimentary nitrogen content tracks opal during periods of high iron accumulation, especially after ~1 Ma. Bulk sedimentary nitrogen isotope trends are negatively correlated with sedimentary N-content and opal accumulation. This may be signal weaker nutrient consumption during times of high production, perhaps as a result of enhanced vertical nutrient supply. Alternatively, this variation in bulk, where high values occur in organic poor intervals, is consistent with other evidence for nitrogen isotopic alteration during periods of low export to the seafloor. The diatom-bound nitrogen isotope record does not have a clear relationship with opal or iron accumulation. A long term shift in the diatom-bound N isotope values is apparent, where the average diatom-bound δ15N from 0.5-1 Ma is 4.4 ‰, and from 2-2.6 Ma is 5.9 ‰. This decrease may reflect long-term changes in nitrate availability. A first order comparison to planktonic/benthic carbon isotopic gradients suggests that enhanced vertical mixing may explain the observed productivity peaks and lower overall diatom-bound N isotope values in the interval centered around 1 Ma.

  14. Geology, age, and tectonic setting of the Cretaceous Sliderock Mountain Volcano, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.; Harlan, Stephen S.

    1998-01-01

    The Sliderock Mountain stratovolcano, part of the Upper Cretaceous continental magmatic arc in southwestern Montana, consists of volcaniclastic strata and basaltic andesite lava flows. An intrusive complex represents the volcano's solidified magma chamber. Compositional diversity within components of the volcano appears to reflect evolution via about 50 percent fractional crystallization involving clinopyroxene and plagioclase. 40Ar/39Ar indicate that the volcano was active about 78?1 Ma.

  15. Spatial variations in focused exhumation along a continental-scale strike-slip fault: The Denali fault of the eastern Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benowitz, J.A.; Layer, P.W.; Armstrong, P.; Perry, S.E.; Haeussler, P.J.; Fitzgerald, P.G.; VanLaningham, S.

    2011-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission-track, and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronological techniques were used to determine the Neogene exhumation history of the topographically asymmetric eastern Alaska Range. Exhumation cooling ages range from ~33 Ma to ~18 Ma for 40Ar/39Ar biotite, ~18 Ma to ~6 Ma for K-feldspar minimum closure ages, and ~15 Ma to ~1 Ma for apatite fission-track ages, and apatite (U-Th)/He cooling ages range from ~4 Ma to ~1 Ma. There has been at least ~11 km of exhumation adjacent to the north side of Denali fault during the Neogene inferred from biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology. Variations in exhumation history along and across the strike of the fault are influenced by both far-field effects and local structural irregularities. We infer deformation and rapid exhumation have been occurring in the eastern Alaska Range since at least ~22 Ma most likely related to the continued collision of the Yakutat microplate with the North American plate. The Nenana Mountain region is the late Pleistocene to Holocene (~past 1 Ma) primary locus of tectonically driven exhumation in the eastern Alaska Range, possibly related to variations in fault geometry. During the Pliocene, a marked increase in climatic instability and related global cooling is temporally correlated with an increase in exhumation rates in the eastern Alaska Range north of the Denali fault system.

  16. Interfacial structures of 1-methyladenine, 3-methyladenine, 7-methyladenine, and 9-methyladenine on gold nanoparticles by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dinh Bao; Joo, Sang-Woo; Choo, Jaebum

    2017-01-01

    Interfacial structures of 1-methyladenine (1 MA), 3-methyladenine (3 MA), 7-methyladenine (7 MA), and 9-methyladenine (9 MA) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were investigated by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Different positions of the methyl group in the purine ring of adenine were found to result in not only dissimilarity among Raman spectral features but also surface binding schemes. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predicted that the amino-9H tautomeric form would be most stable among the conformers of 1 MA, 3 MA, 7 MA, and 9 MA including amino and imino tautomeric conformers. SERS spectral features were analyzed with appropriate vibrational assignments based on DFT calculations. After considering the enhancement factors, the Raman spectra of 1 MA, 3 MA, 7 MA, and 9 MA on AuNPs were dissimilar, suggesting the methyl group at the purine ring of methyladenine may be significantly affecting the binding on AuNPs. Our Raman study indicates the position of the methyl group in methyladenine may play a significant role in coordinating metal surfaces.

  17. A sedimentary paleomagnetic record of the Matuyama chron from the Western Antarctic margin (ODP Site 1101)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyodo, Yohan; Acton, Gary D.; Brachfeld, Stefanie; Channell, James E. T.

    2001-08-01

    A high-resolution paleomagnetic record for part of the Matuyama chron (0.7-2.1 Ma) is reported for Ocean Drilling Program Site 1101 (Leg 178), off the Antarctic Peninsula Pacific margin. A rock-magnetic investigation of 62 discrete samples revealed that the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) is carried by pseudo-single domain magnetite. Progressive alternating field demagnetization of 83 m of U-channels provided a polarity stratigraphy down to the Olduvai subchron. Two geomagnetic events preceding the Jaramillo subchron were identified, including the Cobb Mountain polarity interval. The bulk magnetic parameters vary by more than a factor of 20 over the entire time interval, but by less than a factor of 6 over the 0.7-1.1 Ma interval. This latter interval was selected for paleointensity determinations, which were carried out by normalizing the NRM by the anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM). Direct comparison of the Site 1101 paleointensity record with other curves available for the same time interval suggests a geomagnetic origin for features present in the record. A more quantitative comparison was achieved by means of a jackknife test performed on nine records of relative paleointensity over the 0.95-1.1 Ma interval. This test yielded no outlier for the period considered, confirming the geomagnetic character of the records. We have constructed a low-resolution stack revealing some of the characteristic paleointensity features of the Jaramillo subchron.

  18. Arctic Dinoflagellate Migration Marks the Oligocene Glacial Maximum: Implications for the Rupelian-Chattian Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Simaeys, S.; Brinkhuis, H.; Pross, J.; Williams, G. L.; Zachos, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Various geochemical and biotic climate proxies, and notably deep-sea benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records indicate that the Eocene 'greenhouse' state of the Earth gradually evolved towards an earliest Oligocene 'icehouse' state, eventually triggering the abrupt appearance of large continental ice-sheets on Antarctic at ˜33.3 Ma (Oi-1 event). This, however, was only the first of two major glacial events in the Oligocene. Benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records show a second positive excursion in the mid Oligocene, consistent with a significant ice-sheet expansion and/or cooling at 27.1 Ma (Oi-2b) coincident with magnetosubchron C9n. Here, we report on a mid Oligocene, globally synchronous, Arctic dinoflagellate migration event, calibrated against the upper half of C9n. A sudden appearance, and abundance increases of the Arctic taxon Svalbardella at lower-middle latitudes coincides with the so-called Oi-2b benthic δ 18O event, dated at ˜27.1 Ma. This phenomenon is taken to indicate significant high-latitude surface water cooling, concomitant Antarctic ice-sheet growth, and sea level lowering. The duration of the Svalbardella migrations, and the episode of profound cooling is estimated as ˜500 ka, and is here termed the Oligocene Glacial Maximum (OGM). Our records suggest a close link between the OGM, sea-level fall, and the classic Rupelian-Chattian boundary, magnetostratigraphically dating this boundary as ˜27.1 Ma.

  19. Isotopic ages from intrusive rocks near the Stuyahok gold placer deposits, south-central Holy Cross quadrangle, Alaska: A section in Geologic studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Marti L.; Tucker, Robert D.; Layer, Paul W.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    In the Stuyahok area of the south-central Holy Cross quadrangle, Alaska, felsic to intermediate dikes and sills intrude Lower Cretaceous volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Koyukuk terrane. These previously undated intrusions are the probable source of at least 933 kg (30,000 oz) of past placer gold production. Additional placer, and perhaps lode, resources are likely present at Stuyahok. New U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar isotopic data indicate two of the dikes are early Tertiary in age (63.6+0.2 Ma and 60.4+1.1 Ma, respectively). In addition to helping constrain the age of gold mineralization, these early Tertiary ages suggest the Stuyahok dikes are part of a Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary belt of gold mineralized felsic dikes that lie in the Kuskokwim mineral belt. Also reported herein are previously unpublished conventional K-Ar ages of 69.4+2.1 Ma and 69.3+2.1 Ma for two felsic intrusions from the western edge of this mineralized belt, the Marshall–Kako Creek area, which lies about 40 km west-southwest of the Stuyahok area.

  20. Investigation of the effect of a bumpy base on granular segregation and transport properties under vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. C.; Hunt, M. L.; Hsiau, S. S.; Lu, S. H.

    2014-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates the effect of a bumpy base on the Brazil-nut phenomenon in a vertically vibrated granular bed. The rise dynamics of an intruder is determined by the particle tracking method. The results indicate that the rise time increases with an increase in the base roughness, and the variation of the rise time with different base factors is more pronounced with smaller vibration acceleration and higher vibration frequency. A theoretical model is employed to measure the penetration length of the intruder and the drag force between the intruder and the immersed beads. The penetration length is reduced and the drag force is enhanced with surface roughness of the base. Additionally, the transport properties of the vibrated glass beads are also measured and discussed. With greater base roughness, the strength of the diffusive and convective motion is reduced leading to a weaker Brazil-nut effect.

  1. Fluorescence induction characteristics of iron deficient cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.; Guikema, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    The fluorescence induction characteristics of Anacystis nidulans were examined after cultures were stressed with iron deficiency. When these cells were illuminated with 620 nm light to excite phycocyanin, a fluorescence induction transient was observed which was not present in normal cells. The transient had a rise time of approximately 3-4 sec, and was abolished when cells were preilluminated with 620 nm light. One goal of this work was to ascertain the role of electron transfer between PSII and either PSI or the respiratory system in causing the fluorescence transient. The effects of electron transport inhibitors and uncouplers on fluorescence induction were examined. Respiratory inhibitors, such as KCN, had little or no effect on the fluorescence transient. p-Chloromercuribenzoic acid, at concentrations below 0.5 mM, delayed the transient rise time without causing a decrease in the extent. Uncouplers, such as gramicidin and CCCP, caused a decrease in the extent of the transient.

  2. Electric field step in air gap streamer discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Rong; Zhuang Chijie; Yu Zhanqing; Li Zhizhao; Geng Yinan

    2011-11-28

    Electric field (E-field) in air gap streamer discharges under positive lightning impulse was measured by specifically developed integrated electro-optic sensors. An E-field step phenomenon was observed. The E-field firstly agreed with the Laplace field, then suddenly increased with a rise time of {mu}s. The occurrence probability of this phenomenon increased as the applied voltage increased. The discharge current waveforms and photos taken by a fast camera prove the E-field step was caused by the space net charge. From the E-step rise time and the corona area range, the average electron drift speed under the experiment situation was estimated about 0.2 x 10{sup 6} - 0.6x 10{sup 6} m/s.

  3. Robot gripper control system using PVDF piezoelectric sensors.

    PubMed

    Barsky, M F; Lindner, D K; Claus, R O

    1989-01-01

    A novel robot gripper control system is presented that uses PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) piezoelectric sensors to damp exerted force actively. By monitoring the current developed by the PVDF sensor, an output proportional to the rate of change of the force exerted by the gripper is obtained. The signals from the PVDF sensor and strain-gauge force sensor are arranged in a proportional and derivative control system for the control of force. The control system was tested on an instrumented Rhino XR-1 manipulator hand. The capabilities of the control system are analyzed and are verified experimentally. The results for this particular gripper indicate that the additional sensory feedback can decrease the force step response rise time by 88% while maintaining a monotonic zero-overshoot response. The inclusion of the rate feedback increases the damping ratio of the dominant poles while maintaining the step response rise time.

  4. Measurement of Electromagnetic Properties of Lightning with 10 Nanosecond Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, C. E.; Breen, E. L.; Oneill, J. P.; Moore, C. B.; Hall, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Electromagnetic data recorded from lightning strikes are presented. The data analysis reveals general characteristics of fast electromagnetic fields measured at the ground including rise times, amplitudes, and time patterns. A look at the electromagnetic structure of lightning shows that the shortest rise times in the vicinity of 30 ns are associated with leader leader streamers. Lightning location is based on electromagnetic field characteristics and is compared to a nearby sky camera. The fields from both leaders and return strokes were measured and are discussed. The data were obtained during 1978 and 1979 from lightning strikes occuring within 5 kilometers of an underground metal instrumentation room located on South Baldy peak near Langmuir Laboratory, New Mexico. The computer controlled instrumentation consisted of sensors previously used for measuring the nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and analog-digital recorders with 10 ns sampling, 256 levels of resolution, and 2 kilobytes of internal memory.

  5. Droop Compensation with soft Switching for High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Michael; Scheinker, Alexander; Clare, Jon; Watson, Alan; Ji, Chao; Reass, William

    2012-06-04

    High Voltage Converter Modulators (HVCM) offer significant performance advantages over conventional modulator technologies for long pulse applications. One of the key advantages of HVCM technology is the ability to compensate for capacitor bank voltage droop. Achieving droop compensation without incurring significant additional switching loss has not been possible in existing designs. This paper presents an analysis of the 'Y-point' variant of the HVCM topology using the Combined Phase and Frequency Modulation (CPFM) technique. This, combined with the addition of a 'lossless' snubber circuit, enables droop compensation while achieving soft switching over the entire pulse duration. The rise time and overshoot of the output voltage pulse is optimized using an iterative extreme seeking algorithm. The optimization reduces the rise time from 100 {micro}s to 50 {micro}s with no overshoot. This will lead to an increase in overall accelerator efficiency.

  6. Experimental study of propagation characteristics of a pulse-modulated surface-wave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe; Wu, Yue; Li, Zhen-Ye; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing

    2016-12-01

    An atmospheric-pressure, pulse-modulated surface wave argon plasma is investigated with respect to its propagation of the ionization front. The time-resolved photographs about the advance of the ionization front are taken using a high speed camera. The ionization front velocity and its rise time when propagating along the discharge tube are measured with respect to a series of values of input power, duty ratio, and the pulse repetition frequency. The interpretations are given on the basis of the ionization and diffusion processes. And it is also found that the reduced electric field and memory effect from previous discharge impose the influence on both the ionization front velocity and its rise time strongly.

  7. Digital dual-parameter data acquisition for SP2 hydrogen-filled proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, N P; Roberts, N J

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen-filled proportional counters perform well as neutron spectrometers in the energy region from a few tens of keV up to ∼1.5 MeV. Unfortunately, gamma rays also generate signals in these detectors. It is possible in principle to distinguish the two types of event via the rise time of their respective signal pulses, but the data acquisition system needed for this is complex to assemble and adjust if one uses conventional modular analogue electronics. In this work a digital sampling system, in conjunction with custom software, was used to measure and acquire amplitude and rise time data from type SP2 counters. The interpretation of the data was supported by a Monte Carlo calculation. The performance of the system is compared with that of a conventional 1-parameter analogue system, and the potential of the digital technique to supplant conventional methods is discussed.

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Time- and Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishehchi, Sara; Garrett, Gregory A.; Rudin, Sergey; Wraback, Michael; Bellotti, Enrico

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of photo-excited carriers in ZnO. Specifically, we study the luminescence spectrum and the effect of temperature on the luminescence rise time. For comparison, experimental time- resolved photo-luminescence studies on ZnO samples are performed. In the theoretical model, interaction with a laser pulse is treated coherently and a generalized Monte Carlo simulation is used to account for scattering processes. The scattering mechanisms included are carrier interactions with polar optical phonons and acoustic phonons, and carrier-carrier Coulomb interactions. We observed a good agreement between the experimental and simulation results for the photo-luminescence spectrum. Furthermore, as the temperature increases, the luminescence rise time decreases, mostly due to the weaker effect of polar optical scattering at lower temperature.

  9. Microstructural variations in seven aluminas and their effect on impact response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Rosenberg, Z.; Crouch, I. G.; Field, J. E.

    1994-07-01

    Seven aluminas of varying grain size, glass content and porosity were tested in plate-impact experiments over a range of impact stresses. Longitudinal stresses were measured using manganin gauges bonded between 8 mm thick tiles and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) backing blocks. Wave profiles were recorded by a 1 GS s-1 storage oscilloscope. Measurements were made of the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL), rise time of the `plastic' wave and of spall strength for each material. The spall strength was measured at impact velocities corresponding to <0.4 HEL stress for each material. The HEL was observed to decrease with increasing grain size whilst the `plastic' wave rise time increased with increasing grain size. The spall strength increases with a decrease in porosity and an increase in alumina content. Variation in the spall strength was observed to occur over a range of stresses below 0.4 HEL.

  10. Characterization of gigahertz (GHz) bandwidth photomultipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Rowe, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The average impulse response, root-mean-square times jitter as a function of signal level, single photoelectron distribution, and multiphotoelectron dark-count distribution have been measured for two static crossed-field and five electrostatic photomultipliers. The optical signal source for the first three of these tests was a 30 picosecond mode-locked laser pulse at 0.53 micron. The static crossed-field detectors had 2-photoelectron resolution, less than 200 ps rise times, and rms time jitters of 30 ps at the single photoelectron level. The electrostatic photomultipliers had rise times from 1 to 2.5 nanoseconds, and rms time jitters from 160 to 650 ps at the same signal level. The two static crossed-field photomultipliers had ion-feedback-generated dark pulses to the 50-photoelectron level, whereas one electrostatic photomultiplier had dark pulses to the 30-photoelectron level.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Control Actuation System with Fuzzy-PID Logic Controlled Brushless Motor Drives for Missiles Glider Applications.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Murali; Arulmozhiyal, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    A control actuation system has been used extensively in automotive, aerospace, and defense applications. The major challenges in modeling control actuation system are rise time, maximum peak to peak overshoot, and response to nonlinear system with percentage error. This paper addresses the challenges in modeling and real time implementation of control actuation system for missiles glider applications. As an alternative fuzzy-PID controller is proposed in BLDC motor drive followed by linkage mechanism to actuate fins in missiles and gliders. The proposed system will realize better rise time and less overshoot while operating in extreme nonlinear dynamic system conditions. A mathematical model of BLDC motor is derived in state space form. The complete control actuation system is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink environment and verified by performing simulation studies. A real time prototype of the control actuation is developed with dSPACE-1104 hardware controller and a detailed analysis is carried out to confirm the viability of the proposed system.

  12. Pulse-Shape Analysis of Ionization Signals in Cryogenic Ge Detectors for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, N.; Broniatowski, A.; Eitel, K.; Marnieros, S.; Paul, B.; Piro, M.-C.; Siebenborn, B.

    2016-08-01

    The detectors of the direct dark matter search experiment EDELWEISS consist of high-purity germanium crystals operated at cryogenic temperatures (mathrm {{<}20 mK}) and low electric fields (mathrm {{<}1 V/cm}). The surface discrimination is based on the simultaneous measurement of the charge amplitudes on different sets of electrodes. As the rise time of a charge signal strongly depends on the location of an interaction in the crystal, a time-resolved measurement can also be used to identify surface interactions. This contribution presents the results of a study of the discrimination power of the rise time parameter from a hot carrier transport simulation in combination with time-resolved measurements using an EDELWEISS-type detector in a test cryostat at ground level. We show the setup for the time-resolved ionization signal read-out in the EDELWEISS-III experiment and first results from data taking in the underground laboratory of Modane.

  13. Solvent dependence of ultrafast ground state recovery of the triphenylmethane dyes, brilliant green and malachite green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Yutaka; Ando, Yoshito; Okada, Tadashi

    1999-10-01

    We have studied femtosecond ground state recovery dynamics of the triphenylmethane dyes brilliant green (BG) and malachite green (MG) by pump-probe spectroscopy at the center wavelength of 635 nm with a time resolution of 33 fs. The ultrafast recovery of the ground state bleach was highly nonexponential and depended on the solvent viscosity, although all time constants were shorter than the solvation times obtained from other measurements. We observed a plateau or a rise component in the signal, which indicates an intermediate state. The rise time showed a viscosity dependence, even in the ultrafast time domain. It should be noted that the decay times were always longer for BG than MG, while the rise time did not show a solute dependence. The torsional motion of the amino-substituted phenyl group may be involved in the ultrafast process to the intermediate state, but lack of a solute dependence indicates that only a small conformational change is involved.

  14. A study of timing properties of Silicon Photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, Paola; De Santo, Antonella; Lohstroh, Annika; Sajjad, Muhammad T.; Sellin, Paul J.

    2012-12-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are solid-state pixelated photodetectors. Lately these sensors have been investigated for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET) applications, where very good coincidence time resolution of the order of hundreds of picoseconds imply spatial resolution of the order of cm in the image reconstruction. The very fast rise time typical of the avalanche discharge improves the time resolution, but can be limited by the readout electronics and the technology used to construct the device. In this work the parameters of the equivalent circuit of the device that directly affect the pulse shape, namely the quenching resistance and capacitance and the diode and parasitic capacitances, were calculated. The mean rise time obtained with different preamplifiers was also measured.

  15. Nanosecond square high voltage pulse generator for electro-optic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xian-wang; Long, Xing-wu; Tan, Zhong-qi

    2011-07-01

    A scalable square high voltage pulse generator, which has the properties of fast rise time, fast fall time, powerful driving capability, and long lifetime, is presented in this paper by utilizing solid state circuitry. A totem-pole topology is designed to supply a powerful driving capability for the electro-optic (EO) crystal which is of capacitive load. Power MOSFETs are configured in series to sustain high voltage, and proper driving circuits are introduced for the specific MOSFETs configurations. A 3000 V pulse generator with ˜49.04 ns rise time and ˜10.40 ns fall time of the output waveform is presented. This kind of generator is desirable for electro-optic switch. However, it is not specific to EO switch and may have broad applications where high voltage fast switching is required.

  16. Solid-state pulse modulator for a 1.7-MW X-band magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaegu; Shin, Yong-Moon; Choi, Young-Wook; Kim, Kwan-Ho

    2014-05-01

    Medical linear accelerators (LINAC) for cancer treatment require pulse modulators to generate high-power pulses with a fast rise time, flat top and short duration to drive high-power magnetrons. Solid-state pulse modulators (SSPM) for medical LINACs that use high power semiconductor switches with high repetition rates, high stability and long lifetimes have been introduced to replace conventional linear-type pulse generators that use gaseous discharge switches. In this paper, the performance of a developed SSPM, which mainly consists of a capacitor charger, an insulatedgate bipolar transistor (IGBT)-capacitor stack and a pulse transformer, is evaluated with a dummy load and an X-band magnetron load. A theoretical analysis of the pulse transformer, which is a critical element of the SSPM, is carried out. The output pulse has a fast rise time and low droop, such that the modulator can drive the X-band magnetron.

  17. A Modular, IGBT Driven, Ignitron Switched, Optically Controlled Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Evan; von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2013-10-01

    An experiment to investigate the dynamics of canonical flux tubes at the University of Washington uses two high energy pulsed power supplies to generate and sustain the plasma discharge. A modular 240 μF , 12 kV DC capacitor based power supply, discharged by ignitron, has been developed specifically for this application. Design considerations include minimizing inductance, rapid switching, fast rise times, and electrically isolated control. An optically coupled front panel and fast IGBT ignitron drive circuit, sequenced manually or by software, control the charge and discharge of the power supply. A complete, sequenced charge/discharge has been successfully tested with a dummy load, producing a peak current of 100 kA and a rise time of 25 μs . This work was sponsored in part by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  18. Numerical model for the weakly nonlinear propagation of sound through turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipkens, Bart; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    1994-01-01

    When finite amplitude (or intense) sound, such as a sonic boom, propagates through a turbulent atmosphere, the propagation is strongly affected by the turbulence. The interaction between sound and turbulence has mostly been studied as a linear phenomenon, i.e., the nonlinear behavior of the intense sound has been neglected. It has been shown that turbulence has an effect on the perceived loudness of sonic booms, mainly by changing its peak pressure and rise time. Peak pressure and rise time are important factors that determine the loudness of the sonic boom when heard outdoors. However, the interaction between turbulence and nonlinear effects has mostly not been included in propagation studies of sonic booms. It is therefore important to investigate the influence of acoustical nonlinearity on the interaction of intense sound with turbulence.

  19. Excitation of parasitic modes in gyrotrons with fast voltage rise

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M. Jr.; Vlasov, A. N.; Lohr, J.; Danly, B. G.; Hogge, J.-P.

    2008-10-15

    Megawatt-class, long-pulse and continuous-wave gyrotrons operate in high-order modes in order to handle the thermal losses in the resonators. The spectral density of neighboring modes in these devices is high; consequently during the beam voltage rise parasitic modes can be excited. If such gyrotrons are used in plasma experiments, these parasites can be dangerous for the receiving channels of numerous diagnostic tools. It is shown that in gyrotrons utilizing diode-type magnetron injection guns the shortening of the voltage rise time to about one microsecond can practically eliminate excitation of parasitic modes even in devices with a 2 MW power level. Some means for realizing such rise times in high-voltage modulators which can be used for megawatt-class gyrotrons are discussed. It is also shown that allowable beam voltage overshoot in such gyrotrons is about 2.5%.

  20. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  1. Measurements of the scintillation time constants of inorganic crystals for the development of a triple-Phoswich detector for high-energy X-ray quanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelis, Thilo

    1987-04-01

    A setup for the measurement of the rise time distribution of pulses measured by a triple-Phoswich detector that is planned as component of an imaging system of a rotation-modulation telescope (RMT) was built. The principles and characteristics of scintillation crystals, scintillation detectors, and RMT's are outlined. Measurements on CsT(Tl) test crystals show a strong dependence of rise time distribution on Tl-concentration, and a clear dependence on temperature. A system for optimum light collection was developed for a Phoswich detector. The scintillation crystals NaJ(Tl) and CsJ(Na) are very suitable for a strip Phoswich. Proposals for a triple-Phoswich as detector for an RMT are given.

  2. Inner-Shell Photon-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45(Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Snavely, R; Da Silva, L

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Wide (LW) project entitled, ''An Inner-Shell Photo-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45 {angstrom}'', tracking code 99-LW-042. The most significant accomplishments of this project include the design of a suitable x-ray laser target, the invention of a measurement technique for the determination of rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 femtoseconds, and a novel setup for generating a traveling wave with an ultrashort optical laser pulse. The pump probe technique for rise time measurement will allow us to detect ultrashort x-ray pulses, whose generation by means of a variety of 4th generation light sources is currently under planning elsewhere.

  3. Concepts in the integration of photoconductive systems with electro-optics and gain media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Oved S. F.

    1995-03-01

    Light activated semiconductor switches (LASS), when operated in the linear regime, have demonstrated the highest power and fastest rise-time of any other solid state switch. This, in conjunction with their picosecond jitter, allows their integration with electro-optic and magneto-optic devices to serve as an optically controlled optical switches (OCOS). The combination of OCOS with various other optical elements and gain media allows the assembly of various optical circuits that are faster, smaller in size and operate at a higher power density. This paper will discuss the underlying principles of such optical circuits. In addition, experimental results of a microlaser which is Q- switched with an LASS driven Pockets cell with a rise-time of 70 ps will be described, and future laser development based on LASS technology will be presented.

  4. A new solid state extractor pulser for the FNAL magnetron ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S.; Lackey, J.; Larson, J.; Triplett, K.

    2015-10-05

    A new solid state extractor pulser has been installed on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) magnetron ion source, replacing a vacuum tube style pulser that was used for over 40 years. The required ion source extraction voltage is 35 kV for injection into the radio frequency quadrupole. At this voltage, the old pulser had a rise time of over 150 μs due to the current limit of the vacuum tube. The new solid state pulsers are capable of 50 kV, 100 A peak current pulses and have a rise time of 9 μs when installed in the operational system. This paper will discuss the pulser design and operational experience to date.

  5. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Fang; Wang, De-Yu; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model including boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  6. A new solid state extractor pulser for the FNAL magnetron ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S. Lackey, J.; Larson, J.; Triplett, K.

    2016-02-15

    A new solid state extractor pulser has been installed on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) magnetron ion source, replacing a vacuum tube style pulser that was used for over 40 years. The required ion source extraction voltage is 35 kV for injection into the radio frequency quadrupole. At this voltage, the old pulser had a rise time of over 150 μs due to the current limit of the vacuum tube. The new solid state pulsers are capable of 50 kV, 100 A peak current pulses and have a rise time of 9 μs when installed in the operational system. This paper will discuss the pulser design and operational experience to date.

  7. Fast-Neutron Spectrometry Using a 3He Ionization Chamber and Digital Pulse Shape Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury

    2010-05-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type 3He proportional counter to measure the fast neutron spectra of bare 252Cf and 241AmBe neutron sources. Measurements have also been made to determine the attenuated fast neutron spectra of 252Cf shielded by several materials including water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, magnesium, and tungsten. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common rise-time approach for analyzing n +3He ? 1H + 3H ionization events and a new approach has been developed to improve the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed for the different experimental arrangements and are compared, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA processed fast neutron spectra and predictions.

  8. High-speed, high-voltage pulse generation using avalanche transistor.

    PubMed

    Yong-Sheng, Gou; Bai-Yu, Liu; Yong-Lin, Bai; Jun-Jun, Qin; Xiao-Hong, Bai; Bo, Wang; Bing-Li, Zhu; Chuan-Dong, Sun

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the conduction mechanism of avalanche transistors was demonstrated and the operation condition for generating high-speed pulse using avalanche transistors was illustrated. Based on the above analysis, a high-speed and high-voltage pulse (HHP) generating circuit using avalanche transistors was designed, and its working principle and process were studied. To improve the speed of the output pulse, an approach of reducing the rise time of the leading edge is proposed. Methods for selecting avalanche transistor and reducing the parasitic inductance and capacitance of printed circuit board (PCB) were demonstrated. With these instructions, a PCB with a tapered transmission line was carefully designed and manufactured. Output pulse with amplitude of 2 kV and rise time of about 200 ps was realized with this PCB mounted with avalanche transistors FMMT417, indicating the effectiveness of the HHP generating circuit design.

  9. NuMI proton kicker extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.C.; Krafczyk, G.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    This system extracts up to 9.6 {micro}s of 120 GeV beam every 1.87 seconds for the NuMI beamline neutrino experiments. A pulse forming network consisting of two continuous wound coils and 68 capacitors was designed and built to drive three kicker magnets. The field stability requirement is better than {+-} 1% with a field rise time of 1.52 {micro}s. New kicker magnets were built based on the successful traveling wave magnets built for the Main Injector. Two of these magnets are in series which places a serious constraint on the rise time of the pulser. A forced cooling system using Fluorinert{reg_sign} was designed for the magnet termination resistors to maintain the field flatness and amplitude stability.

  10. SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT ONSETS: FAR BACKSIDE SOLAR SOURCES AND THE EAST–WEST HEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.

    2016-03-10

    Prompt onsets and short rise times to peak intensities Ip have been noted in a few solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events from far behind (≥25°) the west limb. We discuss 15 archival and recent examples of these prompt events, giving their source longitudes, onset and rise times, and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) speeds. Their timescales and CME speeds are not exceptional in comparison with a larger set of SEP events from behind the west limb. A further statistical comparison of observed timescales of SEP events from behind the west limb with events similarly poorly magnetically connected to the eastern hemisphere (EH) shows the longer timescales of the latter group. We interpret this result in terms of a difference between SEP production at parallel shocks on the eastern flanks of western backside events and at perpendicular shocks on the western flanks of EH events.

  11. High-speed, high-voltage pulse generation using avalanche transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-sheng, Gou; Bai-yu, Liu; Yong-lin, Bai; Jun-jun, Qin; Xiao-hong, Bai; Bo, Wang; Bing-li, Zhu; Chuan-dong, Sun

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the conduction mechanism of avalanche transistors was demonstrated and the operation condition for generating high-speed pulse using avalanche transistors was illustrated. Based on the above analysis, a high-speed and high-voltage pulse (HHP) generating circuit using avalanche transistors was designed, and its working principle and process were studied. To improve the speed of the output pulse, an approach of reducing the rise time of the leading edge is proposed. Methods for selecting avalanche transistor and reducing the parasitic inductance and capacitance of printed circuit board (PCB) were demonstrated. With these instructions, a PCB with a tapered transmission line was carefully designed and manufactured. Output pulse with amplitude of 2 kV and rise time of about 200 ps was realized with this PCB mounted with avalanche transistors FMMT417, indicating the effectiveness of the HHP generating circuit design.

  12. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  13. Observations of two-dimensional magnetic field evolution in a plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpitalnik, R.; Weingarten, A.; Gomberoff, K.; Krasik, Ya.; Maron, Y.

    1998-03-01

    The time dependent magnetic field distribution was studied in a coaxial 100-ns positive-polarity Plasma Opening Switch (POS) by observing the Zeeman effect in ionic line emission. Measurements local in three dimensions are obtained by doping the plasma using laser evaporation techniques. Fast magnetic field penetration with a relatively sharp magnetic field front (⩽1 cm) is observed at the early stages of the pulse (t≲25). Later in the pulse, the magnetic field is observed at the load-side edge of the plasma, leaving "islands" of low magnetic field at the plasma center that last for about 10 ns. The two-dimensional (2-D) structure of the magnetic field in the r,z plane is compared to the results of an analytical model based on electron-magneto-hydrodynamics, that utilizes the measured 2-D plasma density distribution and assumes fast magnetic field penetration along both POS electrodes. The model results provide quantitative explanation for the magnetic field evolution observed.

  14. Experimental investigation of a pulsed Rb–Ar excimer-pumped alkali laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongling; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Fengfeng; Wang, Mingqiang; Tian, Zhaoshuo; Peng, Qinjun; Cui, Dafu; Xu, Zuyan

    2017-03-01

    We present experimental results of an exciplex-pumped alkali laser (XPAL) at 780 nm based on the 52P3/2 → 52S1/2 transition of the Rb atom in mixtures of Rb vapor and Ar. A laboratory-built Ti:sapphire laser with a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz and a pulse width of 100 ns is used as the pump source. The maximum laser pulse energy of 0.26 µJ at 780 nm is obtained under an absorbed pump pulse energy of 42 µJ at 755 nm in mixtures of Rb vapor and Ar at a temperature of 423 K, corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 0.62%. Further experiments show that the output laser at 780 nm can always be detected for pump wavelengths ranging from 754 to 759 nm, indicating that Rb–Ar mixtures can be effectively pumped by commercial laser diodes (LDs) with a bandwidth of 5 nm.

  15. Stable aqueous dispersions of functionalized multi-layer graphene by pulsed underwater plasma exfoliation of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Plath, Asmus; Beckert, Fabian; Tölle, Folke J.; Sturm, Heinz; Mülhaupt, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    A process was developed for graphite particle exfoliation in water to stably dispersed multi-layer graphene. It uses electrohydraulic shockwaves and the functionalizing effect of solution plasma discharges in water. The discharges were excited by 100 ns high voltage pulsing of graphite particle chains that bridge an electrode gap. The underwater discharges allow simultaneous exfoliation and chemical functionalization of graphite particles to partially oxidized multi-layer graphene. Exfoliation is caused by shockwaves that result from rapid evaporation of carbon and water to plasma-excited gas species. Depending on discharge energy and locus of ignition, the shockwaves cause stirring, erosion, exfoliation and/or expansion of graphite flakes. The process was optimized to produce long-term stable aqueous dispersions of multi-layer graphene from graphite in a single process step without requiring addition of intercalants, surfactants, binders or special solvents. A setup was developed that allows continuous production of aqueous dispersions of flake size-selected multi-layer graphenes. Due to the well-preserved sp2-carbon structure, thin films made from the dispersed graphene exhibited high electrical conductivity. Underwater plasma discharge processing exhibits high innovation potential for morphological and chemical modifications of carbonaceous materials and surfaces, especially for the generation of stable dispersions of two-dimensional, layered materials.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of nitrogen and hydrogen dissociation from vacuum ultraviolet self-absorption spectroscopy in a developing low temperature plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Laity, George; Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas; Frank, Klaus

    2013-05-06

    We demonstrate a method for determining the dissociation density of N and H atoms present in a developing low temperature plasma, based on the emission and self-absorption of vacuum ultraviolet radiation produced from the plasma. Spark plasmas are produced via pulsed discharge in N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixtures at atmospheric pressure, where information on the dissociated densities of the constituent gas molecules is desired without employing invasive diagnostic techniques. By analyzing the self-absorption line profile of 121.5 nm Lyman-{alpha} H radiation emitted within the first {approx}1.0 mm of plasma near the anode tip, a peak dissociated H atom concentration of 5.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed {approx}100 ns into spark formation, with an estimated electron density of 2.65 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} determined from Stark broadening. Similarly, simultaneous line fitting of the N 120.0/124.3 nm emission profiles revealed a peak dissociated N atom concentration of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} during the same discharge period.

  17. Two arginine residues suppress the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA in the canonical nucleosome core.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hidetoshi; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of nucleosomes containing either canonical H3 or its centromere-specific variant CENP-A were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations showed that the histone cores were structurally stable during simulation periods of 100 ns and 50 ns, while DNA was highly flexible at the entry and exit regions and partially dissociated from the histone core. In particular, approximately 20-25 bp of DNA at the entry and exit regions of the CENP-A nucleosome exhibited larger fluctuations than DNA at the entry and exit regions of the H3 nucleosome. Our detailed analysis clarified that this difference in dynamics was attributable to a difference in two basic amino acids in the αN helix; two arginine (Arg) residues in H3 were substituted by lysine (Lys) residues at the corresponding sites in CENP-A. The difference in the ability to form hydrogen bonds with DNA of these two residues regulated the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA at the entry and exit regions. Our exonuclease III assay consistently revealed that replacement of these two Arg residues in the H3 nucleosome by Lys enhanced endonuclease susceptibility, suggesting that the DNA ends of the CENP-A nucleosome are more flexible than those of the H3 nucleosome. This difference in the dynamics between the two types of nucleosomes may be important for forming higher order structures in different phases.

  18. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-01

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  19. Generation of Nonlinear Force Driven Blocks from Skin Layer Interaction of Petawatt-Picosecond Laser Pulses for ICF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hora; Cang, Yu; He, Xiantu; Zhang, Jie; F, Osman; J, Badziak; F, P. Boody; S, Gammino; R, Höpfl; K, Jungwirth; B, Kralikova; J, Kraska; L, Laska; Liu, Hong; G, H. Miley; P, Parys; Peng, Hansheng; M, Pfeifer; K, Rohlena; J, Skala; Z, Skladanowski; L, Torrisi; J, Ullschmied; J, Wolowski; Zhang, Weiyan

    2004-02-01

    The discovery of the essential difference of maximum ion energy for TW - ps laser plasma interaction compared with the 100 ns laser pulses [1] led to the theory of a skin layer model [2] where the control of prepulses suppressed the usual relativistic self-focusing. The subsequent generation of two nonlinear force driven blocks has been demonstrated experimentally and in extensive numerical studies where one block moves against the laser light and the other block into the irradiated target. These blocks of nearly solid state density DT plasma correspond to ion beam current densities [3] exceeding 1010 A/cm2 where the ion velocity can be chosen up to highly relativistic values. Using the results of the expected ignition of DT fuel by light ion beams, a self-sustained fusion reaction front may be generated even into uncompressed solid DT fuel similar to the Nuckolls-Wood [4] scheme where 10 kJ laser pulses produce 100 MJ fusion energy. This new and simplified scheme of laser-ICF needs and optimisation of the involved parameters.

  20. Synchronization of Thomson scattering measurements on MAST using an FPGA based ``Smart'' trigger unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, G.

    2010-10-01

    The MAST Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been upgraded to make electron density and temperature measurements at 130 points across the 1.5 m diameter of the plasma. The new system is able to take 240 measurements per second using eight Nd:YAG lasers, each running at 30 Hz. The exact firing time of these lasers is adjusted with 100 ns precision using a field programmable gate array based trigger unit. Trigger pulses are produced to fire the lamps of all lasers and the Q switches with the appropriate delay depending on the warm-up status. The lasers may be fired in rapid bursts so as to achieve a high temporal resolution over eight points separated down to the microsecond level. This trigger unit receives optical trigger events and signals from external sources, allowing the trigger sequences to be resynchronized to the start of the plasma pulse and further events during the shot such as the entry of a fuelling pellet or randomly occurring plasma events. This resynchronization of the laser firing sequence allows accurate and reproducible measurements of fast plasma phenomena.

  1. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, J. R.; Mosher, D.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.; Hinshelwood, D. D.

    2016-05-01

    A new gas-chemistry model is presented to treat the breakdown of a nitrogen gas with pressures on the order of 1 Torr from intense electron beams with current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm2 and pulse durations on the order of 100 ns. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly ionized molecular state to a strongly ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. The model is coupled to a 0D-circuit model using the rigid-beam approximation that can be driven by specifying the time and spatial profiles of the beam pulse. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line-integrated electron density from experiments done using the Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of optically allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit.

  2. Photoexcited Carrier Dynamics of In2S3 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Robert F; Schaller, Richard D; Gosztola, David J; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-07-02

    Indium sulfide (In2S3) is a promising absorber base for substitutionally doped intermediate band photovoltaics (IBPV); however, the dynamics of charge carriers traversing the electronic density of states that determine the optical and electronic response of thin films under stimuli have yet to be explored. The kinetics of photophysical processes in In2S3 grown by oxygen-free atomic layer deposition are deduced from photoconductivity, photoluminescence (PL), and transient absorption spectroscopy. We develop a map of excited-state dynamics for polycrystalline thin films including a secondary conduction band ∼2.1 eV above the first, plus sulfur vacancy and indium interstitial defect levels resulting in long-lived (∼100 ns) transients. Band-edge recombination produces PL and stimulated emission, which both intensify and red-shift as deposition temperature and grain size increase. The effect of rapid conduction band electron relaxation (<30 ps) and deep defect levels on IBPV employing In2S3-based absorbers is finally considered.

  3. Difference in Magnetic Field Threshold for Thermal Plasma Formation between Copper Alloys 145 and 101 Pulsed to Multi-Megagauss Surface Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, B. S.; Fuelling, S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Yates, K. C.; Awe, T. J.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the impact of choice of metal alloy on plasma formation is important for plasma physics and applications (e.g., fusion energy). Thermal ionization by pulsed ohmic heating of Cu-145 (99.5% Cu, 0-0.7% Te, 0-0.012% P) has been compared with that of a purer alloy, Cu-101 (>99.99% Cu), via well-characterized experiments that avoided contamination by arcing. Copper rods were pulsed to 1.0-MA peak current in 100 ns, with the applied magnetic field rising linearly at 50-80 MG/ μs, depending on the rod initial diameter (0.49-1.59 mm). The initial magnetic skin depth was much smaller than the rod radius, so surface plasma formation was observed while current was propagating into the conductor as a nonlinear diffusion wave. The rod surface finish was controlled (electropolished or not) and examined with optical and scanning electron microscopy. The expansion and ionization of the rod were observed with visible and EUV radiometry, time-resolved imaging, and laser shadowgraphy. Rods of both alloys explode when the applied magnetic field reaches 2 MG, well before plasma formation. Rods of both alloys expand at 3.5 km/s surface velocity. However, Cu-145 undergoes bulk surface ionization at 3.0 MG, whereas Cu-101 only turns to plasma when the magnetic field exceeds 3.5 MG.

  4. Kinetics of liquid-mediated crystallization of amorphous Ge from multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santala, M. K.; Raoux, S.; Campbell, G. H.

    2015-12-24

    The kinetics of laser-induced, liquid-mediated crystallization of amorphous Ge thin films were studied using multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM), a nanosecond-scale photo-emission transmission electron microscopy technique. In these experiments, high temperature gradients are established in thin amorphous Ge films with a 12-ns laser pulse with a Gaussian spatial profile. The hottest region at the center of the laser spot crystallizes in ~100 ns and becomes nano-crystalline. Over the next several hundred nanoseconds crystallization continues radially outward from the nano-crystalline region forming elongated grains, some many microns long. The growth rate during the formation of these radial grains is measured with time-resolved imaging experiments. Crystal growth rates exceed 10 m/s, which are consistent with crystallization mediated by a very thin, undercooled transient liquid layer, rather than a purely solid-state transformation mechanism. The kinetics of this growth mode have been studied in detail under steady-state conditions, but here we provide a detailed study of liquid-mediated growth in high temperature gradients. Unexpectedly, the propagation rate of the crystallization front was observed to remain constant during this growth mode even when passing through large local temperature gradients, in stark contrast to other similar studies that suggested the growth rate changed dramatically. As a result, the high throughput of multi-frame DTEM provides gives a more complete picture of the role of temperature and temperature gradient on laser crystallization than previous DTEM experiments.

  5. A Method For Simultaneous Registration Of Motion And Electromyography During Walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giith, V.; Abbink, F.; Heinrichs, W.; Theysohn, H.

    1980-07-01

    The points the movements of which are to be registered are marked by little light sensitive photoamplifiers. These are periodically (50 times per second) exposed to a VÖshaped bright figure projected by a rotating mirror. The pattern of the resulting electrical impulses is analysed by a computer controlled fast digital time counting apparatus with a clock of 100 ns. Is this way we get every 20 ms the respective position of the marked points (up to nine). The results of this method are simular to the well known photographic chronocyclography with the advantage, however, that the momentary positions of the points are calculated on line (accuracy ± 2 mm). In the intervals between the sweeps of the light-figure the computer picks up 8 lines of analogue data, actually the electromyogram of eight different muscles, and stores them, together with the optical data on digital magnetic tape for further evaluation. After the investigation the obtained data are analysed in the following way : 1) Plotting several parameters of positions (angles, c.g.) together with the electromyogram ver-sus time during one step of walking. 2) Calculating the correlation between the patterns of electrical activity of different muscles. 3) Comparison of the results of 1) and 2) between healthy persons and handicapped persons (C.P.), scoliosis, desease of spine, hip and pelvis, etc...).

  6. Following Ligand Migration Pathways from Picoseconds to Milliseconds in Type II Truncated Hemoglobin from Thermobifida fusca

    PubMed Central

    Marcelli, Agnese; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Bustamante, Juan Pablo; Feis, Alessandro; Bonamore, Alessandra; Boffi, Alberto; Gellini, Cristina; Salvi, Pier Remigio; Estrin, Dario A.; Bruno, Stefano; Viappiani, Cristiano; Foggi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    CO recombination kinetics has been investigated in the type II truncated hemoglobin from Thermobifida fusca (Tf-trHb) over more than 10 time decades (from 1 ps to ∼100 ms) by combining femtosecond transient absorption, nanosecond laser flash photolysis and optoacoustic spectroscopy. Photolysis is followed by a rapid geminate recombination with a time constant of ∼2 ns representing almost 60% of the overall reaction. An additional, small amplitude geminate recombination was identified at ∼100 ns. Finally, CO pressure dependent measurements brought out the presence of two transient species in the second order rebinding phase, with time constants ranging from ∼3 to ∼100 ms. The available experimental evidence suggests that the two transients are due to the presence of two conformations which do not interconvert within the time frame of the experiment. Computational studies revealed that the plasticity of protein structure is able to define a branched pathway connecting the ligand binding site and the solvent. This allowed to build a kinetic model capable of describing the complete time course of the CO rebinding kinetics to Tf-trHb. PMID:22792194

  7. Damage to coated ZnSe optical components by high-power CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, C. R.; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang; Wesner, David A.

    1994-07-01

    Coated ZnSe optical components are irradiated with high-power, pulsed CO2 laser radiation ((lambda equals 10.6 micrometers , pulse length approximately 100 ns) at fluences up to 210 J/cm2. The components are characterized at various stages of irradiation by thermography, optical microscopy, stylus profilometry, and surface chemical analysis (x-ray photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopy). During irradiation no temperature in the component surface is observed. Two types of coating damage occur within the irradiated area of the component: a breaking apart of the ZnSe overlayer of the coating system over relatively large areas, and the formation of isolate craters of diameter approximately 30 - 50 micrometers extending in depth approximately 3 micrometers through the coating system down to the ZnSe substrate. Chemically, the irradiated area is characterized by an oxidation of both Zn and Se and an increase in the stoichiometric ratio of Zn to Se. These effects are especially pronounced at the crater defects, and are attributed to localized optical absorption, leading to thermal stress and chemical reactions of Zn and Se with atmospheric or adsorbed water and/or oxygen.

  8. Characterization, molecular docking, dynamics simulation and metadynamics of kisspeptin receptor with kisspeptin.

    PubMed

    Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Basha, Syed Hussain; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Sharma, Niti; Nandanpawar, Priyanka; Badhe, Mohan; P, Gireesh-Babu; Chaudhari, Aparna; Sundaray, Jitendra Kumar; Sharma, Rupam

    2017-03-20

    We report molecular characterization of the kisspeptin receptor (kiss1r), an essential gatekeeper for reproduction and onset of puberty in vertebrates. The full-length cDNA sequence of kiss1r is 1786bp which consist of 5' UTR (untranslated region) 261bp, 3' UTR of 424bp and open reading frame of 1101 encoding a putative protein of 366 amino acids. Basal tissue expression pattern of kiss1r mRNA revealed that it is mainly expressed in the brain and testis. We also report the structure of the kiss1r, along with plausible activation mechanism of this receptor by kisspeptin using computational modelling and dynamic simulation approach of multiple 100ns of timescale. A present modelling and simulations studies shed light on the molecular level of interaction, suggesting that direct hydrogen bonds between ASN4, SER5, GLY7, ARG9 and PHE10 of kisspeptin and TRP7, ASN8, GLU11, ILE17, ASN19 and TYR183 of kiss1r could be crucial role players in initial binding of receptor and the kisspeptin towards allosteric modulatory effects of kisspeptin on the receptor. To the best our knowledge, this is the first report on computational modelling and molecular dynamic simulations of kiss1r in animals shedding light on its possible mode of activation.

  9. Effects of high voltage nanosecond electric pulses on eukaryotic cells (in vitro): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Batista Napotnik, Tina; Reberšek, Matej; Vernier, P Thomas; Mali, Barbara; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-08-01

    For this systematic review, 203 published reports on effects of electroporation using nanosecond high-voltage electric pulses (nsEP) on eukaryotic cells (human, animal, plant) in vitro were analyzed. A field synopsis summarizes current published data in the field with respect to publication year, cell types, exposure configuration, and pulse duration. Published data were analyzed for effects observed in eight main target areas (plasma membrane, intracellular, apoptosis, calcium level and distribution, survival, nucleus, mitochondria, stress) and an additional 107 detailed outcomes. We statistically analyzed effects of nsEP with respect to three pulse duration groups: A: 1-10ns, B: 11-100ns and C: 101-999ns. The analysis confirmed that the plasma membrane is more affected with longer pulses than with short pulses, seen best in uptake of dye molecules after applying single pulses. Additionally, we have reviewed measurements of nsEP and evaluations of the electric fields to which cells were exposed in these reports, and we provide recommendations for assessing nanosecond pulsed electric field effects in electroporation studies.

  10. Dependence of Initial Oxygen Concentration on Ozone Yield Using Inductive Energy Storage System Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Tomio; Tanaka, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Nobuyuki; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    Dependence of initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield using streamer discharge reactor driven by an inductive energy storage system pulsed power generator is described in this paper. Fast recovery type diodes were employed as semiconductor opening switch to interrupt a circuit current within 100 ns. This rapid current change produced high-voltage short pulse between a secondary energy storage inductor. The repetitive high-voltage short pulse was applied to a 1 mm diameter center wire electrode placed in a cylindrical pulse corona reactor. The streamer discharge successfully occurred between the center wire electrode and an outer cylinder ground electrode of 2 cm inner diameter. The ozone was produced with the streamer discharge and increased with increasing pulse repetition rate. The ozone yield changed in proportion to initial oxygen concentration contained in the injected gas mixture at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. However, the decrease of the ozone yield by decreasing oxygen concentration in the gas mixture at 180 ns forward pumping time of the current was lower than the decrease at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. This dependence of the initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield at 180 ns forward pumping time is similar to that of dielectric barrier discharge reactor.

  11. Transient scaling and resurgence of chimera states in networks of Boolean phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosin, David P.; Rontani, Damien; Haynes, Nicholas D.; Schöll, Eckehard; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    We study networks of nonlocally coupled electronic oscillators that can be described approximately by a Kuramoto-like model. The experimental networks show long complex transients from random initial conditions on the route to network synchronization. The transients display complex behaviors, including resurgence of chimera states, which are network dynamics where order and disorder coexists. The spatial domain of the chimera state moves around the network and alternates with desynchronized dynamics. The fast time scale of our oscillators (on the order of 100ns) allows us to study the scaling of the transient time of large networks of more than a hundred nodes, which has not yet been confirmed previously in an experiment and could potentially be important in many natural networks. We find that the average transient time increases exponentially with the network size and can be modeled as a Poisson process in experiment and simulation. This exponential scaling is a result of a synchronization rate that follows a power law of the phase-space volume.

  12. Signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fast square-pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2016-10-01

    A fast, high voltage square-shaped electrical pulse initiated by laser ablation was investigated as a means to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The electrical pulse is generated by the discharge of a charged coaxial cable into a matching impedance. The pulse duration and the stored charge are determined by the length of the cable. The ablation plasma was produced by hitting an aluminum target with a nanosecond 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam under variable fluence 1.8-900 J cm- 2. An enhancement of up to one order of magnitude on the emission signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the spark discharge assisted laser ablation. Besides, this increment is larger for ionized species than for neutrals. LIBS signal is also increased with the discharge voltage with a tendency to saturate for high laser fluences. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 100 ns after laser ablation plasma onset. Results suggest that the spark discharge mainly re-excites the laser produced plume.

  13. Wild type and mutants of the HET-s(218-289) prion show different flexibility at fibrillar ends: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Ran; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2014-03-01

    The C-terminal segment (residues 218-289) of the HET-s protein of the filamentous fungus Podosporina anserina is a prion-forming domain. The structural model of the HET-s(218-289) amyloid fibril based on solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) restraints shows a β solenoid topology which is comprised of a β-sheet core and interconnecting loops. For the single-point mutants Phe286Ala and Trp287Ala, slower aggregation rates in vitro and loss of prionic infectivity have been reported recently. Here we have used molecular dynamics to compare the flexibility of the mutants and wild type. The simulations, initiated from a trimeric aggregate extracted from the NMR structural model, show structural stability on a 100-ns time scale for wild type and mutants. Analysis of the fluctuations along the simulations reveals that the mutants are less flexible than the wild type in the C-terminal segment at only one of the two external monomers. Analysis of interaction energy and buried accessible surface indicates that residue Phe286 in particular is stabilized in the Trp287Ala mutant. The simulation results provide an atomistic explanation of the suggestion (based on indirect experimental evidence) that flexibility at the protofibril end(s) is required for fibril elongation. Moreover, they provide further evidence that the growth of the HET-s amyloid fibril is directional.

  14. Monochromatic flash embossed radiography using clean K photons from a spherical-plasma target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Akihiro; Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Abderym, Purkhet; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Nagao, Jiro; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-04-01

    Embossed radiography is an important technique for imaging target region by decreasing absorption contrast of objects. The monochromatic flash embossed radiography (M-FER) system consists of a computed radiography system, an intense plasma flash X-ray generator, and a two-dimensional subtraction program for shifting the image pixel. In the flash X-ray generator, a high-voltage condenser of 150 nF is charged to 80 kV, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the flash X-ray tube through a four-cable transmission line after closing the gap switch. The molybdenum-target evaporation leads to the formation of weakly ionized spherical plasma, and intense molybdenum K-series characteristic X-rays (K-rays) were produced utilizing angular dependence of bremsstrahlung X-ray intensity. High-speed monochromatic radiography was performed using molybdenum flash K-rays, and M-FER was carried out utilizing single-energy subtraction after the image shifting. The spatial resolutions of the horizontal and vertical directions were both 125 μm, and monochromatic concavoconvex radiography such as phase-differential imaging was performed with X-ray durations of approximately 100 ns.

  15. Polymer-ionic liquid ternary systems for Li-battery electrolytes: Molecular dynamics studies of LiTFSI in a EMIm-TFSI and PEO blend

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Luciano T.

    2015-07-14

    This paper presents atomistic molecular dynamics simulation studies of lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonylimide (LiTFSI) in a blend of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMIm)-TFSI and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), which is a promising electrolyte material for Li- and Li-ion batteries. Simulations of 100 ns were performed for temperatures between 303 K and 423 K, for a Li:ether oxygen ratio of 1:16, and for PEO chains with 26 EO repeating units. Li{sup +} coordination and transportation were studied in the ternary electrolyte system, i.e., PEO{sub 16}LiTFSI⋅1.0 EMImTFSI, by applying three different force field models and are here compared to relevant simulation and experimental data. The force fields generated significantly different results, where a scaled charge model displayed the most reasonable comparisons with previous work and overall consistency. It is generally seen that the Li cations are primarily coordinated to polymer chains and less coupled to TFSI anion. The addition of EMImTFSI in the electrolyte system enhances Li diffusion, associated to the enhanced TFSI dynamics observed when increasing the overall TFSI anion concentration in the polymer matrix.

  16. An efficiency-enhanced 2X/1.5X SC charge pump with auto-adjustable output regulation for PCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yu; Chen, Houpeng; Li, Xi; Wang, Qian; Fan, Xi; Hu, Jiajun; Liu, Aimeng; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xiaoyun; Tian, Zhen; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a 2X/1.5X switched-capacitor charge pump for phase change memory (PCM). For a 16-bitparallelism PCM, the set/reset time is more than 100 ns, and the charge pump should output a minimum 60 mA load current. The proposed charge pump can supply 4.1 V voltage and 0-60 mA current for PCM, with an input voltage range of 2.2-3.5 V. It can also automatically change the power conversion ratio between the 2X/1.5X modes according to input voltage. For the improvement of efficiency and load transient response, an auto-adjustable output regulation scheme is employed. In this scheme, two new reference voltages are introduced and compared with output voltage. Average lasting time of the enable signal changes under different load conditions. The Enable signal then controls booster's power transistors switching to regulate output voltage. In this way, output voltage was controlled within a permissible range. The charge pump has been designed and simulated in a 40nm CMOS process. The results show maximum power efficiency in 30 mA load current is 90.73%, and conversion ratio control increases the efficiency by 23.06% in 3 V.

  17. Pulsed Orotron - A new microwave source for submillimeter pulse high-field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, Yu.A.; Fuchs, M.R.; Schnegg, A.; Dubinskii, A.A.; Dumesh, B.S.; Rusin, F.S.; Bratman, V.L.; Moebius, K.

    2004-09-01

    A vacuum-tube device for the generation of pulsed microwave radiation in the submillimeter range (up to 380 GHz) is presented, designed for use as a source in a 360 GHz high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer - the pulsed Orotron. Analogous to the known continuous wave (cw) version, in the pulsed Orotron microwave radiation is generated by the interaction of a nonrelativistic electron beam with a diffraction grating (stimulated Smith-Purcell radiation) in feedback with an open Fabry-Perot resonator construction. The presented design extends the cw Orotron by a gate electrode and a high-voltage pulsing unit to control the electron beam current. The generated pulses at 360 GHz have pulse lengths from 100 ns-10 {mu}s and a pulse power of (22{+-}5) mW. The output in a broader frequency band between 320 and 380 GHz ranges from 20 up to 60 mW. Within a 10 {mu}s time slot, incoherent pulse trains of arbitrary duration can be generated. The pulsed Orotron has been incorporated in the quasioptical microwave bridge of a heterodyne induction mode EPR spectrometer. The first free induction decay measurements at a microwave frequency of 360 GHz and a magnetic field of 12.8 T on a polycrystalline perylenyl-ion sample are presented and future applications and extensions of Orotron-EPR spectroscopy are discussed.

  18. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-05

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  19. Microsecond light-induced proton transfer to flavin in the blue light sensor plant cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Langenbacher, Thomas; Immeln, Dominik; Dick, Bernhard; Kottke, Tilman

    2009-10-14

    Plant cryptochromes are blue light photoreceptors that regulate key responses in growth and daily rhythm of plants and might be involved in magnetoreception. They show structural homology to the DNA repair enzyme photolyase and bind flavin adenine dinucleotide as chromophore. Blue light absorption initiates the photoreduction from the oxidized dark state of flavin to the flavin neutral radical, which is the signaling state of the sensor. Previous time-resolved studies of the photoreduction process have been limited to observation of the decay of the radical in the millisecond time domain. We monitored faster, light-induced changes in absorption of an algal cryptochrome covering a spectral range of 375-750 nm with a streak camera setup. Electron transfer from tryptophan to flavin is completed before 100 ns under formation of the flavin anion radical. Proton transfer takes place with a time constant of 1.7 micros leading to the flavin neutral radical. Finally, the flavin radical and a tryptophan neutral radical decay with a time constant >200 micros in the millisecond and second time domain. The microsecond proton transfer has not been observed in animal cryptochromes from insects or photolyases. Furthermore, the strict separation in time of electron and proton transfer is novel in the field of flavin-containing photoreceptors. The reaction rate implies that the proton donor is not in hydrogen bonding distance to the flavin N5. Potential candidates for the proton donor and the involvement of the tryptophan triad are discussed.

  20. Analysis and design methodology for the development of optimized, direct-detection CO{sub 2} DIAL receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Cafferty, M.

    1996-12-31

    The analysis methodology and corresponding analytical tools for the design of optimized, low-noise, hard target return CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) receiver systems implementing both single element detectors and multi-pixel imaging arrays for passive/active, remote-sensing applications are presented. System parameters and components composing the receiver include: aperture, focal length, field of view, cold shield requirements, image plane dimensions, pixel dimensions, pixel pitch and fill factor, detection quantum efficiency, optical filter requirements, amplifier and temporal sampling parameters. The performance analysis is accomplished by calculating the system`s CO{sub 2} laser range response, total noise, optical geometric form factor and optical resolution. The noise components include speckle, photon noise due to signal, scene and atmospheric background, cold shield, and electronic noise. System resolution is simulated through cascaded optical transfer functions and includes effects due to atmosphere, optics, image sampling, and system motion. Experimental results of a developmental single-element detector receiver designed to detect 100 ns wide laser pulses (10 - 100 kHz pulse repetition rates) backscattered from hard-targets at nominal ranges of 10 km are presented. The receiver sensitivity is near-background noise limited, given an 8.5-11.5 {mu}m radiant optical bandwidth, with the total noise floor spectrally white for maximum pulse averaging efficiency.