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Sample records for 1-mm slice thickness

  1. Thick Slice and Thin Slice Teaching Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tom, Gail; Tong, Stephanie Tom; Hesse, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Student-based teaching evaluations are an integral component to institutions of higher education. Previous work on student-based teaching evaluations suggest that evaluations of instructors based upon "thin slice" 30-s video clips of them in the classroom correlate strongly with their end of the term "thick slice" student evaluations. This study's…

  2. Red meat and fruit intake is prognostic among patients with localized cutaneous melanomas more than 1 mm thick

    PubMed Central

    Gould Rothberg, Bonnie E.; Bulloch, Kaleigh J.; Fine, Judith A.; Barnhill, Raymond L.; Berwick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Background As the 10-year mortality for localized cutaneous melanoma more than 1.00 mm thick approaches 40% following complete resection, non-therapeutic interventions that can supplement recommended active surveillance are needed. Although guidelines recommending nutrition, physical activity and tobacco cessation for cancer survivors have been published, data describing their associations with melanoma survivorship are lacking. Methods Analysis of modifiable lifestyle behaviors collected on the 249 cases with melanomas more than 1.00 mm thick enrolled in the Connecticut Case-Control Study of Skin Self-Examination study was conducted. Independent associations with melanoma-specific survival were evaluated through Cox proportional hazards modeling adjusting for age, gender, Breslow thickness, ulceration and the presence of microsatellites. Independently significant variables were then combined into a single model and backwards elimination was employed until all remaining variables were significant at p<0.05. Results Following adjustment for age, Breslow thickness and anatomic site of the index melanoma, daily fruit consumption was associated with improved melanoma-specific survival (HR=0.54; 95% CI: 0.34–0.86) whereas at least weekly red meat consumption was associated with worse outcomes (HR=1.84; 95% CI: 1.02–3.30). Natural red (HR=0.44; 95% CI: 0.22–0.88) or blond (HR=0.52; 95% CI: 0.29–0.94) hair were also favorably prognostic. Higher fish consumption was of borderline significance for improved survival only when considered independently (HR=0.65; 95% CI: 0.40–1.05); no association was seen following adjustment for red meat and fruit consumption (p>0.10). Conclusions Dietary choices at the time of diagnosis are associated with melanoma-specific survival in patients with melanomas more than 1.00 mm thick. Further validation of our findings in larger cohorts with repeated post-diagnostic measures is warranted to further evaluate whether dietary

  3. [Fractal analysis of trabecular architecture: with special reference to slice thickness and pixel size of the image].

    PubMed

    Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Mimura, Hiroaki; Murase, Kenya; Tamada, Tsutomu; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2005-06-20

    Many analyses of bone microarchitecture using three-dimensional images of micro CT (microCT) have been reported recently. However, as extirpated bone is the subject of measurement on microCT, various kinds of information are not available clinically. Our aim is to evaluate usefulness of fractal dimension as an index of bone strength different from bone mineral density in in-vivo, to which microCT could not be applied. In this fundamental study, the relation between pixel size and the slice thickness of images was examined when fractal analysis was applied to clinical images. We examined 40 lumbar spine specimens extirpated from 16 male cadavers (30-88 years; mean age, 60.8 years). Three-dimensional images of the trabeculae of 150 slices were obtained by a microCT system under the following conditions: matrix size, 512 x 512; slice thickness, 23.2 em; and pixel size, 18.6 em. Based on images of 150 slices, images of four different matrix sizes and nine different slice thicknesses were made using public domain software (NIH Image). The threshold value for image binarization, and the relation between pixel size and the slice thickness of an image used for two-dimensional and three-dimensional fractal analyses were studied. In addition, the box counting method was used for fractal analysis. One hundred forty-five in box counting was most suitable as the threshold value for image binarization on the 256 gray levels. The correlation coefficients between two-dimensional fractal dimensions of processed images and three-dimensional fractal dimensions of original images were more than 0.9 for pixel sizes < or =148.8 microm at a slice thickness of 1 mm, and < or =74.4 microm at one of 2 mm. In terms of the relation between the three-dimensional fractal dimension of processed images and three-dimensional fractal dimension of original images, when pixel size was less than 74.4 microm, a correlation coefficient of more than 0.9 was obtained even for the maximal slice thickness

  4. Comparative evaluation of physicians' pulmonary nodule detection with reduced slice thickness at CT screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsuat, Marodina; Shimamura, Ichiro; Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Tominaga, Keigo; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-03-01

    With thin and thick section Multi-slice CT images at lung cancer screening, we have statistically and quantitatively shown and evaluated the diagnostic capabilities of these slice thicknesses on physicians' pulmonary nodule diagnosis. To comparatively evaluate the 2 mm and 10 mm slice thicknesses, MSCT images of 360 people were read by six physicians. The reading criteria consisted of nodule for further examination (NFE), nodule for no further examination (NNFE) and no abnormality (NA) case. For reading results evaluation; firstly, cross-tabulation was carried out to roughly analyze the diagnoses based on whole lung field and each lung lobes. Secondly, from semi-automated extraction result of the nodule, detailed quantitative analysis was carried out to determine the diagnostic capabilities of two slice thicknesses. Finally, using the reading results of 2 mm thick image as the gold standard, the diagnostic capabilities were analyzed through the features and locations of pulmonary nodules. The study revealed that both slice thicknesses can depict lung cancer. Thin section may not be effective to diagnose nodules of <=3 mm in size and nodules of <= 5mm in size for thick section. Though thick section is less tiring for reading physicians, it is not good at depicting nodules located at the border of lung upper lobe and which have a pixel size distance of <=5 from the chest wall. The information presented may serve as a useful reference to determine in which particular pulmonary nodule condition the two slice thicknesses can be effectively used for early detection of lung cancer.

  5. The effect of slice thickness on quantitation of in vivo renal volume with cine computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lerman, L.O.; Bentley, M.D.; Bell, M.R.; Rumberger, J.A.; Romero, J.C. )

    1990-02-26

    The development of fast computed tomography (CT) scanners allows the accurate quantitations of the volume (V) of the in-vivo kidney (K) and its component tissues, using 3 mm thick slices. Utilizing thicker slices may potentially enable the use of shorter scan times with less exposure to contrast media. To determine the relative accuracy of such scans, the right Ks of 14 anesthetized dogs were first scanned, using 3mm thick slices, after a venous bolus injection of iohexol (0.5 cc/kg). The images were then averaged to produce 6 and 10 mm thick slices, and the Vs of the Ks, and their cortical and medullary Vs, determined after boundary identification. Following the scans, the Ks were excised and their Vs determined post-mortem by fluid displacement. The whole K Vs obtained with the 6 and 10 mm thick slices correlated well with those obtained with the 3 mm thick slices. The difference between the in vivo and the post-mortem renal and medullary Vs was consistent with the blood, filtrate and urine contents of the in vivo kidney. In conclusion, the use of 6 and 10 mm thick slices resulted in an overestimation of the in vivo cortical V due to a partial volume effect, which was reflected in a consistent overestimation of KV.

  6. Culturing thick brain slices: an interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability.

    PubMed

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M

    2009-06-15

    Brain slice preparations are well-established models for a wide spectrum of in vitro investigations in the neuroscience discipline. However, these investigations are limited to acute preparations or thin organotypic culture preparations due to the lack of a successful method that allows culturing of thick organotypic brain slices. Thick brain slice cultures suffer necrosis due to ischemia deep in the tissue resulting from a destroyed circulatory system and subsequent diffusion-limited supply of nutrients and oxygen. Although thin organotypic brain slice cultures can be successfully cultured using a well-established roller-tube method (a monolayer organotypic culture) (Gahwiler B H. Organotypic monolayer cultures of nervous tissue. J Neurosci Methods. 1981; 4: 329-342) or a membrane-insert method (up to 1-4 cell layers, <150 microm) (Stoppini L, Buchs PA, Muller D. A simple method for organotypic cultures of neural tissue. J Neurosci Methods 1991; 37: 173-182), these methods fail to support thick tissue preparations. A few perfusion methods (using submerged or interface/microfluidic chambers) have been reported to enhance the longevity (up to few hours) of acute slice preparations (up to 600 microm thick) (Hass HL, Schaerer B, Vosmansky M. A simple perfusion chamber for study of nervous tissue slices in vitro. J Neurosci Methods 1979; 1: 323-325; Nicoll RA, Alger BE. A simple chamber for recording from submerged brain slices. J Neurosci Methods 1981; 4: 153-156; Passeraub PA, Almeida AC, Thakor NV. Design, microfabrication and characterization of a microfluidic chamber for the perfusion of brain tissue slices. J Biomed Dev 2003; 5: 147-155). Here, we report a unique interstitial microfluidic perfusion technique to culture thick (700 microm) organotypic brain slices. The design of the custom-made microperfusion chamber facilitates laminar, interstitial perfusion of oxygenated nutrient medium throughout the tissue thickness with concomitant removal of depleted medium

  7. Constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation of 3D volumetric MRI images.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Aleš; Salvado, Olivier; Acosta, Oscar; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen

    2012-03-01

    Due to physical limitations inherent in magnetic resonance imaging scanners, three dimensional volumetric scans are often acquired with anisotropic voxel resolution. We investigate several interpolation approaches to reduce the anisotropy and present a novel approach - constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation. This technique was compared to common methods: linear and cubic B-Spline interpolation and a technique based on non-rigid registration of neighboring slices. The methods were evaluated on artificial MR phantoms and real MR scans of human brain. The constrained reverse diffusion approach delivered promising results and provides an alternative for thick slice interpolation, especially for higher anisotropy factors.

  8. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  9. Culturing thick brain slices: An interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain slice preparations are well-established models for a wide spectrum of in vitro investigations in the neuroscience discipline. However, these investigations are limited to acute preparations or thin organotypic culture preparations due to the lack of a successful method that allows culturing of thick organotypic brain slices. Thick brain slice cultures suffer necrosis due to ischemia deep in the tissue resulting from a destroyed circulatory system and subsequent diffusion-limited supply of nutrients and oxygen. Although thin organotypic brain slice cultures can be successfully cultured using a well established roller tube method (a monolayer organotypic culture) (Gahwiler B H, 1981) or a membrane insert method (up to 1–4 cell layers, <150μm)(Stoppini L et al., 1991), these methods fail to support thick tissue preparations. A few perfusion methods (using submerged or interface/microfluidic chambers) have been reported to enhance the longevity (up to few hours) of acute slice preparations (up to 600μm thick) (Hass H L et al., 1979; Nicoll R A and Alger B E, 1981; Passeraub P A et al., 2003). Here, we report a unique interstitial microfluidic perfusion technique to culture thick (700μm) organotypic brain slices. The design of the custom-made micro-perfusion chamber facilitates laminar, interstitial perfusion of oxygenated nutrient medium throughout the tissue thickness with concomitant removal of depleted medium and catabolites. We examined the utility of this perfusion method to enhance the viability of the thick organotypic brain slice cultures after 2 days and 5 days in vitro (DIV). We investigated the range of amenable flow rates that enhance the viability of 700μm thick organotypic brain slices compared to the unperfused control cultures. Our perfusion method allows up to 84.6% viability (P<0.01) and up to 700μm thickness, even after 5 DIV. Our results also confirm that these cultures are functionally active and have their in vivo cytoarchitecture

  10. [Impact of planning CT slice thickness on the accuracy of automatic target registration using the on-board cone-beam CT].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Miura, Hideharu; Nakagawa, Hideo; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Oda, Masahiko; Yasumasa, Katsumi; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2011-01-01

    We have evaluated relationship between planning CT slice thickness and the accuracy of automatic target registration using cone-beam CT (CBCT). Planning CT images were acquired with reconstructed slice thickness of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10mm for three different phantoms: Penta-Guide phantom, acrylic ball phantom, and pelvic phantom. After correctly placing the phantom at the isocenter using an in-room laser, we purposely displaced it by moving the treatment couch and then obtained CBCT images. Registration between the planning CT and the CBCT was performed using automatic target registration software, and the registration errors were recorded for each planning CT data set with different slice thickness. The respective average and standard deviation of errors for 10 mm slice thickness CT in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions (n=15 data sets) were: 0.7 +/- 0.2mm, 0.8 +/- 0.2mm, and 0.2 +/- 0.2mm for the Penta-Guide phantom; 0.5 +/- 0.4 mm, 0.6 +/- 0.3 mm, and 0.4 +/- 0.3 mm for the acrylic ball phantom; and 0.6 +/- 0.2 mm, 0.9 +/- 0.2 mm, and 0.2 +/- 0.2 mm for the pelvic phantom. We found that the mean registration errors were always less than 1 mm regardless of the slice thickness tested. The results suggest that there is no obvious correlation between the planning CT slice thickness and the registration errors.

  11. Spontaneously poling of electro-optic polymer thin films across a 1.1-mm thick glass substrate by pyroelectric crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su; Luo, Jingdong; Jin, Zhian; Li, Ming; Kim, Tae-Dong; Chen, Antao; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    We developed a method to pole electro-optic (E-O) polymer thin films using pyroelectric crystals instead of external high voltage source unit. The process is based on a multi-layered dielectric stack, in which micron-thick E-O polymer films were sandwiched between millimeter thick pyroelectric crystal and borosilicate glass substrate. Through modest temperature change, very large electric fields could be spontaneously generated from pyroelectric effect of the crystals, which can deliver high effective field strength (up to 0.7 MV/cm) to the E-O polymer thin films across the glass plate. Very intriguing phenomena of significantly reduced leak through current (LTC) and improved dielectric breakdown strength of E-O polymers were observed. As a result, large Pockels coefficients of 62 pm/V at 1.31 μm can be obtained for poled E-O thin films. The good agreement between theory and experimentally measured results in the study provide important insights of electrostatics in pyroelectric systems and their effective interactions with thin film E-O polymeric materials. It also demonstrates that pyroelectric poling is a promising alternative to commonly used contact poling and corona poling that offers unique advantages of high field strength and near-zero LTC for polarizing dielectric functional materials and devices.

  12. The effect of temperature and slice thickness on drying kinetics tomato in the infrared dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadin, Rasool; Chegini, Gholam-Reza; Sadin, Hassan

    2014-04-01

    In this study thin layer drying of tomato slices were investigated in the infrared dryer. Drying rate increased with increasing temperature and reduction thickness and thus reduced the drying time. The effective diffusivity increased with increasing temperature and with increasing thickness of the samples. The effective diffusivity values changed from 1.094 × 10-9 to 4.468 × 10-9 m2/s and for activation energy varied from 110 to 120 kJ/mol. The best model for drying process of tomato slices was Midilli model.

  13. Optimal slice thickness for cone-beam CT with on-board imager

    PubMed Central

    Seet, KYT; Barghi, A; Yartsev, S; Van Dyk, J

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To find the optimal slice thickness (Δτ) setting for patient registration with kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kVCBCT) on the Varian On Board Imager (OBI) system by investigating the relationship of slice thickness to automatic registration accuracy and contrast-to-noise ratio. Materials and method: Automatic registration was performed on kVCBCT studies of the head and pelvis of a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom. Images were reconstructed with 1.0 ≤ Δτ (mm) ≤ 5.0 at 1.0 mm increments. The phantoms were offset by a known amount, and the suggested shifts were compared to the known shifts by calculating the residual error. A uniform cylindrical phantom with cylindrical inserts of various known CT numbers was scanned with kVCBCT at 1.0 ≤ Δτ (mm) ≤ 5.0 at increments of 0.5 mm. The contrast-to-noise ratios for the inserts were measured at each Δτ. Results: For the planning CT slice thickness used in this study, there was no significant difference in residual error below a threshold equal to the planning CT slice thickness. For Δτ > 3.0 mm, residual error increased for both the head and pelvis phantom studies. The contrast-to-noise ratio is proportional to slice thickness until Δτ = 2.5 mm. Beyond this point, the contrast-to-noise ratio was not affected by Δτ. Conclusion: Automatic registration accuracy is greatest when 1.0 ≤ Δτ (mm) ≤ 3.0 is used. Contrast-to-noise ratio is optimal for the 2.5 ≤ Δτ (mm) ≤ 5.0 range. Therefore 2.5 ≤ Δτ (mm) ≤ 3.0 is recommended for kVCBCT patient registration where the planning CT is 3.0 mm. PMID:21611047

  14. [Suggestion of new slice thickness mensuration using partial volume effect in magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Higashida, Mitsuji; Takatsu, Yasuo; Ogura, Akio

    2011-01-01

    The wedge and the slab methods are standard procedures as slice thickness mensuration of the MRI needs an expensive and exclusive phantom, and they are poor in versatility. We suggest a new method, that we call "differential edge response function method". This is a modified version of the partial method which Higashida and others proposed. In this method, we use an original phantom which has an acrylic disk on the bottom, and take an image of it while moving a slice position so it includes the disk part. We established the region of interest on an image set up and got the edge response function (ERF) from the mean signal intensity and relations of the Z position of the image. In this method, the effective slice thickness is the half width of the slice profile, which is differentiated ERF. This method can be measured even if the linearity of the signal intensity is poor compared to the partial method. It is possible to correct the alignment. In this method the measurement accuracy was approximately equal to the wedge method. This method is minimally influenced by signal-to-noise ratio in comparison with the wedge method. Furthermore, versatility is high, because it is simple and relatively easy to use.

  15. The influence of change in slice thickness on the accuracy of reconstruction of cranium geometry.

    PubMed

    Budzik, Grzegorz; Turek, Paweł; Traciak, Julian

    2017-03-01

    The article presents a comparative study of change in slice thickness on the accuracy of reconstruction of cranium geometry. Research was performed on 10 different patients. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data were obtained on the Siemens Somatom Sensation Open 40 scanner. At the stage of reconstruction, the same parameters were utilized, while only slice thickness was changed. Modeling with voxel dimensions of 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm × 2.4 mm was chosen as the gold standard over the modeling approach comprising voxel dimensions of 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm × 4.8 mm. The influence of layer thickness on the accuracy of cranium geometry is very similar for the 10 presented patients. The average results show a distribution with a positive skew and kurtosis. The value of skewness is 0.284 (small asymmetry) and kurtosis is 3.746 (a distribution more peaked). Based on 95% confidence, the changes in layer thickness from 2.4 to 4.8 mm generated errors reconstructing the geometry of the cranium by 0.516 mm ± 1.345 mm. The presented research highlights new opportunities to control deviations at the stage of data processing and modeling geometry of the cranium.

  16. Automatic lung nodule detection in thick slice CT: a comparative study of different gating schemes in CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakota, Pandu; Dinesh, M. S.; Maduskar, Pragnya; Vikal, Siddharth; Raghupathi, Laks; Salganicoff, Marcos

    2011-03-01

    Common chest CT clinical workflows for detecting lung nodules use a large slice thickness protocol (typically 5 mm). However, most existing CAD studies are performed on a thin slice data (0.3-2 mm) available on state-of-the art scanners. A major challenge for the widespread clinical use of Lung CAD is the concurrent availability of both thick and thin resolutions for use by radiologist and CAD respectively. Having both slice thickness reconstructions is not always possible based on the availability of scanner technologies, acquisition parameters chosen at remote site, and transmission and archiving constraints that may make transmission and storage of large data impracticable. However, applying current thin-slice CAD algorithms on thick slice cases outside their designed acquisition parameters may result in degradation of sensitivity and high false-positive rate making them clinically unacceptable. Therefore a CAD system that can handle thicker slice acquisitions is desirable to address those situations. In this paper, we propose a CAD system which works directly on thick slice scans. We first propose a multi-stage classifier based CAD system for detecting lung nodules in such data. Furthermore, we propose different gating systems adapted for thick slice scans. The proposed gating schemes are based on: 1. wall-attached and non wall-attached. 2. central and non-central region. These gating schemes can be used independently or combined as well. Finally, we present prototype1 results showing significant improvement of CAD sensitivity at much better false positive rate on thick-slice CT images are presented.

  17. A rapid approach to high-resolution fluorescence imaging in semi-thick brain slices.

    PubMed

    Selever, Jennifer; Kong, Jian-Qiang; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2011-07-26

    -intensive tissue preparation, or cost-prohibitive instrumentation respectively. Here, we present a relatively rapid and simple method to visualize fluorescently labelled cells in fixed semi-thick mouse brain slices by optical clearing and imaging. In the attached protocol we describe the methods of: 1) fixing brain tissue in situ via intracardial perfusion, 2) dissection and removal of whole brain, 3) stationary brain embedding in agarose, 4) precision semi-thick slice preparation using new vibratome instrumentation, 5) clearing brain tissue through a glycerol gradient, and 6) mounting on glass slides for light microscopy and z-stack reconstruction (Figure 1). For preparing brain slices we implemented a relatively new piece of instrumentation called the 'Compresstome' VF-200 (http://www.precisionary.com/products_vf200.html). This instrument is a semi-automated microtome equipped with a motorized advance and blade vibration system with features similar in function to other vibratomes. Unlike other vibratomes, the tissue to be sliced is mounted in an agarose plug within a stainless steel cylinder. The tissue is extruded at desired thicknesses from the cylinder, and cut by the forward advancing vibrating blade. The agarose plug/cylinder system allows for reproducible tissue mounting, alignment, and precision cutting. In our hands, the 'Compresstome' yields high quality tissue slices for electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and direct fixed-tissue mounting and imaging. Combined with optical clearing, here we demonstrate the preparation of semi-thick fixed brain slices for high-resolution fluorescent imaging.

  18. Effect of slice thickness and blanching time on different quality attributes of instant ginger candy.

    PubMed

    Nath, A; Deka, Bidyut C; Jha, A K; Paul, D; Misra, L K

    2013-02-01

    Fresh ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) suffers from weight loss, shrinkage, sprouting and rotting during storage after 3-4 weeks. This spoilage may be overcome by processing fresh produce to some value added products. An attempt was made to optimize the protocol for production of instant ginger candy. The experimental parameters considered were slice thickness (5.0-25.0 mm) and blanching duration (10-30 min) followed by dipping in 40°B and 75°B sugar solutions containing 2.0% citric acid respectively, for 1 and 2 h at 95 °C and dried at 60 °C for 1 h. RSM design was considered for this experiment and final products were evaluated for their textural properties, TSS, acidity, TSS: acid ratio, taste score and overall acceptability. The optimum product qualities in terms of hardness (2.08 kg), TSS (73.4%), acidity (1.31%), TSS: acid ratio (56.3), taste score (7.98) and overall acceptability (8.07) were obtained for slice thickness of 10.9 mm and blanching time of 24.9 min.

  19. Assessment of slice thickness effect on visibility of inferior alveolar canal in cone beam computed tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Daryoush Goodarzi; Arzi, Banafsheh; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of slice thickness on the visibility of inferior alveolar canal (IAC) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Materials and Methods: CBCT images of thirty patients (15 male and 15 female) with an age range between 40–50 years old were used. Cross-sectional images were obtained with 0.5, 1, and 2 mm slice thickness and 2 mm interval. Two oral radiologists with at least 5 years' of experience observed all of the 90 images and rated the images based on the visibility of IAC in a 4-score classification (highly visible, visible, nearly visible, nearly invisible). Friedman test was used for the comparison of visibility of IAC in different slice thicknesses. To do the above test, the average of the scores of two examiners was calculated. A P. value below 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Visibility of IAC in different slice thicknesses of both raters showed no significant difference (P = 0.20). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study the slice thickness has no effect on visibility of IAC in cross-sectional images. Future studies on other multiplanar images are recommended. PMID:28182059

  20. GnRH neuron firing and response to GABA in vitro depend on acute brain slice thickness and orientation.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Stephanie; Piet, Richard; Iremonger, Karl; Hwa Yeo, Shel; Clarkson, Jenny; Porteous, Robert; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-08-01

    The GnRH neurons exhibit long dendrites and project to the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to generate an acute brain slice preparation that enabled recordings to be undertaken from GnRH neurons maintaining the full extent of their dendrites or axons. A thick, horizontal brain slice was developed, in which it was possible to record from the horizontally oriented GnRH neurons located in the anterior hypothalamic area (AHA). In vivo studies showed that the majority of AHA GnRH neurons projected outside the blood-brain barrier and expressed c-Fos at the time of the GnRH surge. On-cell recordings compared AHA GnRH neurons in the horizontal slice (AHAh) with AHA and preoptic area (POA) GnRH neurons in coronal slices [POA coronal (POAc) and AHA coronal (AHAc), respectively]. AHAh GnRH neurons exhibited tighter burst firing compared with other slice orientations. Although α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) excited GnRH neurons in all preparations, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was excitatory in AHAc and POAc but inhibitory in AHAh slices. GABA(A) receptor postsynaptic currents were the same in AHAh and AHAc slices. Intriguingly, direct activation of GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors respectively stimulated and inhibited GnRH neurons regardless of slice orientation. Subsequent experiments indicated that net GABA effects were determined by differences in the ratio of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor-mediated effects in "long" and "short" dendrites of GnRH neurons in the different slice orientations. These studies document a new brain slice preparation for recording from GnRH neurons with their extensive dendrites/axons and highlight the importance of GnRH neuron orientation relative to the angle of brain slicing in studying these neurons in vitro.

  1. The relationship between decorrelation time and sample thickness in acute rat brain tissue slices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, Joshua; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    The optical opacity of biological tissue has long been a challenge in biomedical optics due to the strong scattering nature of tissue in the optical regime. While most conventional optical techniques attempt to gate out multiply scattered light and use only unscattered light, new approaches in the field of wavefront shaping exploit the time reversible symmetry of optical scattering in order to focus light inside or through scattering media. While these approaches have been demonstrated effectively on static samples, it has proven difficult to apply them to dynamic biological samples since even small changes in the relative positions of the scatterers within will cause the time symmetry that wavefront shaping relies upon to decorrelate. In this paper we investigate the decorrelation curves of acute rat brain slices for thicknesses in the range 1-3 mm (1/e decorrelation time on the order of seconds) using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS) and compare the results with theoretical predictions. The results of this study demonstrate that the 1/L^2 relationship between decorrelation time and thickness predicted by diffusing wave spectroscopy provides a good rule of thumb for estimating how the decorrelation of a sample will change with increasing thickness. Understanding this relationship will provide insight to guide the future development of biophotonic wavefront shaping tools by giving an estimate of how fast wavefront shaping systems need to operate to overcome the dynamic nature of biological samples.

  2. Effects of contrast-enhancement, reconstruction slice thickness and convolution kernel on the diagnostic performance of radiomics signature in solitary pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Huang, Yanqi; Ma, Zelan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-10-10

    The Effects of contrast-enhancement, reconstruction slice thickness and convolution kernel on the diagnostic performance of radiomics signature in solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) remains unclear. 240 patients with SPNs (malignant, n = 180; benign, n = 60) underwent non-contrast CT (NECT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) which were reconstructed with different slice thickness and convolution kernel. 150 radiomics features were extracted separately from each set of CT and diagnostic performance of each feature were assessed. After feature selection and radiomics signature construction, diagnostic performance of radiomics signature for discriminating benign and malignant SPN was also assessed with respect to the discrimination and classification and compared with net reclassification improvement (NRI). Our results showed NECT-based radiomics signature demonstrated better discrimination and classification capability than CECT in both primary (AUC: 0.862 vs. 0.829, p = 0.032; NRI = 0.578) and validation cohort (AUC: 0.750 vs. 0.735, p = 0.014; NRI = 0.023). Thin-slice (1.25 mm) CT-based radiomics signature had better diagnostic performance than thick-slice CT (5 mm) in both primary (AUC: 0.862 vs. 0.785, p = 0.015; NRI = 0.867) and validation cohort (AUC: 0.750 vs. 0.725, p = 0.025; NRI = 0.467). Standard convolution kernel-based radiomics signature had better diagnostic performance than lung convolution kernel-based CT in both primary (AUC: 0.785 vs. 0.770, p = 0.015; NRI = 0.156) and validation cohort (AUC: 0.725 vs.0.686, p = 0.039; NRI = 0.467). Therefore, this study indicates that the contrast-enhancement, reconstruction slice thickness and convolution kernel can affect the diagnostic performance of radiomics signature in SPN, of which non-contrast, thin-slice and standard convolution kernel-based CT is more informative.

  3. Effects of contrast-enhancement, reconstruction slice thickness and convolution kernel on the diagnostic performance of radiomics signature in solitary pulmonary nodule

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Huang, Yanqi; Ma, Zelan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Effects of contrast-enhancement, reconstruction slice thickness and convolution kernel on the diagnostic performance of radiomics signature in solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) remains unclear. 240 patients with SPNs (malignant, n = 180; benign, n = 60) underwent non-contrast CT (NECT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) which were reconstructed with different slice thickness and convolution kernel. 150 radiomics features were extracted separately from each set of CT and diagnostic performance of each feature were assessed. After feature selection and radiomics signature construction, diagnostic performance of radiomics signature for discriminating benign and malignant SPN was also assessed with respect to the discrimination and classification and compared with net reclassification improvement (NRI). Our results showed NECT-based radiomics signature demonstrated better discrimination and classification capability than CECT in both primary (AUC: 0.862 vs. 0.829, p = 0.032; NRI = 0.578) and validation cohort (AUC: 0.750 vs. 0.735, p = 0.014; NRI = 0.023). Thin-slice (1.25 mm) CT-based radiomics signature had better diagnostic performance than thick-slice CT (5 mm) in both primary (AUC: 0.862 vs. 0.785, p = 0.015; NRI = 0.867) and validation cohort (AUC: 0.750 vs. 0.725, p = 0.025; NRI = 0.467). Standard convolution kernel-based radiomics signature had better diagnostic performance than lung convolution kernel-based CT in both primary (AUC: 0.785 vs. 0.770, p = 0.015; NRI = 0.156) and validation cohort (AUC: 0.725 vs.0.686, p = 0.039; NRI = 0.467). Therefore, this study indicates that the contrast-enhancement, reconstruction slice thickness and convolution kernel can affect the diagnostic performance of radiomics signature in SPN, of which non-contrast, thin-slice and standard convolution kernel-based CT is more informative. PMID:27721474

  4. Efficacy of UV-C irradiation for inactivation of food-borne pathogens on sliced cheese packaged with different types and thicknesses of plastic films.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Back, Kyeong-Hwan; Kim, Yoon-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the efficacy of using UV-C light to inactivate sliced cheese inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes and, packaged with 0.07 mm films of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyvinylchloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene (PE) was investigated. The results show that compared with PET and PVC, PP and PE films showed significantly reduced levels of the three pathogens compared to inoculated but non-treated controls. Therefore, PP and PE films of different thicknesses (0.07 mm, 0.10 mm, and 0.13 mm) were then evaluated for pathogen reduction of inoculated sliced cheese samples. Compared with 0.10 and 0.13 mm, 0.07 mm thick PP and PE films did not show statistically significant reductions compared to non-packaged treated samples. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences between the efficacy of PP and PE films. These results suggest that adjusted PP or PE film packaging in conjunction with UV-C radiation can be applied to control foodborne pathogens in the dairy industry.

  5. Automated airway evaluation system for multi-slice computed tomography using airway lumen diameter, airway wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2006-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases such as bronchiectasis, asthma, and emphysema are characterized by abnormalities in airway dimensions. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has become one of the primary means to depict these abnormalities, as the availability of high-resolution near-isotropic data makes it possible to evaluate airways at oblique angles to the scanner plane. However, currently, clinical evaluation of airways is typically limited to subjective visual inspection only: systematic evaluation of the airways to take advantage of high-resolution data has not proved practical without automation. We present an automated method to quantitatively evaluate airway lumen diameter, wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratios. In addition, our method provides 3D visualization of these values, graphically illustrating the location and extent of disease. Our algorithm begins by automatic airway segmentation to extract paths to the distal airways, and to create a map of airway diameters. Normally, airway diameters decrease as paths progress distally; failure to taper indicates abnormal dilatation. Our approach monitors airway lumen diameters along each airway path in order to detect abnormal profiles, allowing even subtle degrees of pathologic dilatation to be identified. Our method also systematically computes the broncho-arterial ratio at every terminal branch of the tree model, as a ratio above 1 indicates potentially abnormal bronchial dilatation. Finally, the airway wall thickness is computed at corresponding locations. These measurements are used to highlight abnormal branches for closer inspection, and can be summed to compute a quantitative global score for the entire airway tree, allowing reproducible longitudinal assessment of disease severity. Preliminary tests on patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis demonstrated rapid identification of lack of tapering, which also was confirmed by corresponding demonstration of elevated broncho-arterial ratios.

  6. Lunar polarization studies at 3.1 mm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, T. L.; Cogdell, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the distribution of linearly polarized lunar thermal emission were made at a wavelength of 3.1 mm with The University of Texas 4.88 m parabolic reflector (0.042 deg HPBW). A shadow corrected, rough surface, thermal emission model for a homogeneous moon was least-squares-fitted to the polarization data. Results indicate an effective lunar dielectric constant of 1.34 plus or minus 0.04 with surface roughness characterized by a standard deviation of 17 (plus or minus 5) deg for surface slopes with a normal probability density, independent of lunar phase. A comparison of these results with published values at other wavelengths suggests that the effective lunar dielectric constant, as obtained by lunar emission measurements, decreases with decreasing wavelength of observation. This wavelength dependence may be interpreted in terms of an inhomogeneous surface and/or a surface that possesses intermediate scale surface roughness.

  7. Mechanical characteristics of native tendon slices for tissue engineering scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ting-Wu; Chen, Qingshan; Sun, Yu-Long; Steinmann, Scott P.; Amadio, Peter C.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the mechanical behavior of tendon slices with different thicknesses. Tendon slices of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μm thickness were mechanically tested. The 300 μm slices were further tested for strength and modulus after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing under different applied strain levels (0, 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12%). The tendon slice structure, morphology, and viability of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded onto the slices were also examined with histology, scanning electron microscopy, and vital cell labeling, respectively. Tendon slices 300 μm or more in thickness had similar ultimate tensile strength and Young's modulus to the intact tendon bundle. A strain of 5% or less did not cause any structural damage, nor did it change the mechanical properties of a 300 μm-thick tendon slice after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing. BMSCs were viable between and on the tendon slices after 2 weeks in tissue culture. This study demonstrated that, if tendon slices are used as a scaffold for tendon tissue engineering, slices 300 μm or more in thickness would be preferable from a mechanical strength point of view. If mechanical stimulation is performed for seeded-cell preparations, 5% strain or less would be appropriate. PMID:22323314

  8. Stable operation with gain of a double phase Liquid Argon LEM-TPC with a 1 mm thick segmented LEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnati, F.; Badertscher, A.; Curioni, A.; Horikawa, S.; Knecht, L.; Lussi, D.; Marchionni, A.; Natterer, G.; Rubbia, A.; Viant, T.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present results from a test of a small Liquid Argon Large Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber (LAr LEM-TPC). This detector concept provides a 3D-tracking and calorimetric device capable of charge amplification, suited for next-generation neutrino detectors and possibly direct Dark Matter searches. During a test of a 3 lt chamber equipped with a 10×10 cm2 readout, cosmic muon data was recorded during three weeks of data taking. A maximum gain of 6.5 was achieved and the liquid argon was kept pure enough to ensure 20 cm drift (O(ppb) O2 equivalent).

  9. Additional atmospheric opacity measurements at lambda = 1.1 mm from Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Barrett, J. W.; Solomon, P.; Connor, B.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric opacity values in the zenith direction are given for a wavelength of 1.1 mm (278 GHz) at the summit of Mauna Kea in the Hawaiian Islands. A total of 75 days is covered during the period 1983-1986. Observations were made on a quasi-continuous basis, with opacity measured every 20 minutes around the clock for significant periods of time. A conversion from opacity at lambda = 1.1 mm to the equivalent precipitable water vapor column is given from the measurements of Zammit and Ade (1981), from which opacities at other wavelengths may be derived.

  10. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. “Light-emitting diode” light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm2 and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm2. The “quartz-tungsten-halogen” LCU (400 mW/cm2) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Results: Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Conclusion: Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity. PMID:27095897

  11. Effect of simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration on quality characteristics of carrot slices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of various processing parameters on carrot slices exposed to infrared (IR) radiation heating for achieving simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD). The investigated parameters were product surface temperature, slice thickness and processing ti...

  12. AzTEC 1.1 mm OBSERVATIONS OF THE MBM12 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. J.; Kim, S.; Youn, S.; Kang, Y.-W.; Yun, M. S.; Wilson, G. W.; Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D. H.; Humphrey, A.; Williams, J. P.; Austermann, J. E.; Perera, T. A.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Magnani, L.

    2012-02-10

    We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We surveyed 6.34 deg{sup 2} centered on MBM12, making this the largest area that has ever been surveyed in this region with submillimeter and millimeter telescopes. Eight secure individual sources were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 4.4. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate. The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 {mu}m emission and the {sup 12}CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkH{alpha}262 and LkH{alpha}264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkH{alpha}262 is likely to be Class II (pre-main-sequence star), but there are also indications that it could be a late Class I (protostar). A flared disk and a bipolar cavity in the models of Class I sources lead to more complicated SEDs. From the present AzTEC observations of the MBM12 region, it appears that other sources detected with AzTEC are likely to be extragalactic and located behind MBM12. Some of these have radio counterparts and their star formation rates are derived from a fit of the SEDs to the photometric evolution of galaxies in which the effects of a dusty interstellar medium have been included.

  13. 1.1 mm Observations of the MBM12 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungeun; Kim, M.; Youn, S.; Yun, M. S.; Wilson, G. W.; Aretxaga, I.; Williams, J. P.; Hughes, D. H.; Humphrey, A.; Austermann, J. E.; Perera, T. A.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Magnani, L.

    2012-05-01

    We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Eight secure individual sources were detected with over 4.4 signal-to-noise ratio. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate (FDR). The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 microm emission and the CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkHalpha 262 and LkHalpha 264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkHalpha 262 is likely to be Class II (pre-main sequence star), but there are also indications that it could be a late Class I (protostar). A flared disk and a bipolar cavity in the models of Class I sources lead to more complicated SEDs. From the present AzTEC observations of the MBM12 region, it appears that other sources detected with AzTEC are likely to be extragalactic and located behind MBM12. Some of these have radio counterparts and their star-formation rates (SFRs) are derived from a fit of the SEDs to the photometric evolution of galaxies in which the effects of a dusty interstellar medium have been included. This research was supported in part by Mid-career Researcher Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology 2011-0028001.

  14. Field experience with various slicing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H. I.

    1982-01-01

    Wafer slicing using internal diameter (ID) saw, multiblade slurry (MBS) saw and multiwire slurry (MWS) saw techniques were evaluated. Wafer parameters such as bow, taper, and roughness which may not be important factors for solar cell fabrication, were considerably better for ID saw than those of the MBS and MWS saw. Analysis of add-on slicing cost indicated that machine productivity seems to be a major limiting factor for ID saw, while expendible material costs are a major factor for both MBS and MWS saw. Slicing experience indicated that the most important factors controling final wafer cost are: (1) silicon cost (wafer thickness + kerf loss); (2) add-on slicing cost, and (3) mechanical yield. There is a very strong interaction between these parameters, suggesting a necessity of optimization of these parameters.

  15. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-06-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (≥4σ) sources detected in a continuous 2.0-arcmin2 area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fitting function of the number counts, we find that ˜40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S1.1mm > 0.2 mJy.

  16. Parametric Trace Slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosu, Grigore (Inventor); Chen, Feng (Inventor); Chen, Guo-fang; Wu, Yamei; Meredith, Patrick O. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A program trace is obtained and events of the program trace are traversed. For each event identified in traversing the program trace, a trace slice of which the identified event is a part is identified based on the parameter instance of the identified event. For each trace slice of which the identified event is a part, the identified event is added to an end of a record of the trace slice. These parametric trace slices can be used in a variety of different manners, such as for monitoring, mining, and predicting.

  17. Profile analysis of hepatic porcine and murine brain tissue slices obtained with a vibratome.

    PubMed

    Mattei, G; Cristiani, I; Magliaro, C; Ahluwalia, A

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing soft tissue slices using a vibratome. In particular, the effect of two sectioning parameters (i.e., step size and sectioning speed) on resultant slice thickness was investigated for fresh porcine liver as well as for paraformaldehyde-fixed (PFA-fixed) and fresh murine brain. A simple framework for embedding, sectioning and imaging the slices was established to derive their thickness, which was evaluated through a purposely developed graphical user interface. Sectioning speed and step size had little effect on the thickness of fresh liver slices. Conversely, the thickness of PFA-fixed murine brain slices was found to be dependent on the step size, but not on the sectioning speed. In view of these results, fresh brain tissue was sliced varying the step size only, which was found to have a significant effect on resultant slice thickness. Although precision-cut slices (i.e., with regular thickness) were obtained for all the tissues, slice accuracy (defined as the match between the nominal step size chosen and the actual slice thickness obtained) was found to increase with tissue stiffness from fresh liver to PFA-fixed brain. This quantitative investigation can be very helpful for establishing the most suitable slicing setup for a given tissue.

  18. [Design and accuracy analysis of upper slicing system of MSCT].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rongjian

    2013-05-01

    The upper slicing system is the main components of the optical system in MSCT. This paper focuses on the design of upper slicing system and its accuracy analysis to improve the accuracy of imaging. The error of slice thickness and ray center by bearings, screw and control system were analyzed and tested. In fact, the accumulated error measured is less than 1 microm, absolute error measured is less than 10 microm. Improving the accuracy of the upper slicing system contributes to the appropriate treatment methods and success rate of treatment.

  19. Ultrashort pulse laser slicing of semiconductor crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eunho; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Meanwhile, by the convention wire-saw technique, it is difficult to slice off a thin wafer from bulk SiC crystal without the reserving space for cutting. In this study, we have achieved exfoliation of 4H-SiC single crystal by femtosecond laser induced slicing method. By using this, the exfoliated surface with the root-mean-square roughness of 3 μm and the cutting-loss thickness smaller than 30 μm was successfully demonstrated. We have also observed the nanostructure on the exfoliated surface in SiC crystal.

  20. Multilayer PDMS microfluidic chamber for controlling brain slice microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Blake, A J; Pearce, T M; Rao, N S; Johnson, S M; Williams, J C

    2007-07-01

    A novel three-layer microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device was constructed with two fluid chambers that holds a brain slice in place with microposts while maintaining laminar perfusate flow above and below the slice. Our fabrication technique permits rapid production of PDMS layers that can be applied to brain slices of different shapes and sizes. In this study, the device was designed to fit the shape and thickness (530-700 microm) of a medullary brain slice taken from P0-P4 neonatal rats. Medullary slices in this chamber spontaneously produced rhythmic, respiratory-related motor output for up to 3 h, thereby demonstrating that brain slice viability was maintained for prolonged periods. This design is unique in that it achieves independent control of fluids through multiple channels in two separate fluid chambers. The laminar flow exhibited by the microfluidic chamber allows controlled solutions to target specific areas of the brain slice based on the input flow rates. To demonstrate this capability, a stream of Na(+)-free solution was focused on one half of a medullary slice to abolish spontaneous neural activity in only that half of the brain slice, while the other half remained active. We also demonstrated that flow of different solutions can be focused over the midline of the brain slice. The multilayer brain slice chamber design can integrate several traditional types of electrophysiology tools that are commonly used to measure neurophysiological properties of brain slices. Thus, this new microfluidic chamber is advantageous for experiments that involve controlled drug or solution delivery at high spatiotemporal resolution.

  1. Silhouette-Slice Theorems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-20

    with standard expressions of spherical trigonometry is sinr)0 = cos0 sini//0 (4.37) which is consistent with the results obtained previously with...theorems for discrete transforms. However, sampling questions inlroduce difficult obstacles in the develop- ment of a discrete theory. First, sampling...additional obstacle to discrete represen- tations of the CT. An example of qualitative predication of the shape of silhouettes with the Silhouette-Slice

  2. Radiation phantom with humanoid shape and adjustable thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; Levy, Joshua; Stern, Robin L.; Siantar, Christine Hartmann; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2006-12-19

    A radiation phantom comprising a body with a general humanoid shape and at least a portion having an adjustable thickness. In one embodiment, the portion with an adjustable thickness comprises at least one tissue-equivalent slice.

  3. System for slicing wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A newly patented process for slicing silicon wafers that has distinct advantages over methods now widely used is described. The primary advantage of the new system is that it allows the efficient slicing of a number of ingots simultaneously at high speed. The cutting action is performed mechanically, most often with diamond particles that are transported to the cutting zone by a fluid vehicle or have been made an integral part of the blade by plating or impregnation. The new system uses a multiple or ganged band saw, arranged and spaced so that each side, or length, segment of a blade element, or loop, provides a cutting function. Each blade is maintained precisely in position by guides as it enters and leaves each ingot. The cutting action is performed with a conventional abrasive slurry composed of diamond grit suspended in an oil- or water-based vehicle. The distribution system draws the slurry from the supply reservoir and pumps it to the injection tubes to supply it to each side of each ingot. A flush system is provided at the outer end of the work-station zone. In order to reduce potential damage, a pneumatically driven flushing fluid is provided.

  4. The theory of interface slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Interface slicing is a new tool which was developed to facilitate reuse-based software engineering, by addressing the following problems, needs, and issues: (1) size of systems incorporating reused modules; (2) knowledge requirements for program modification; (3) program understanding for reverse engineering; (4) module granularity and domain management; and (5) time and space complexity of conventional slicing. The definition of a form of static program analysis called interface slicing is addressed.

  5. Record high-speed short-range transmission over 1 mm core diameter POF employing DMT modulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Lee, S C J; Okonkwo, C M; Abraha, S T; van den Boom, H P A; Breyer, F; Randel, S; Koonen, A M J; Tangdiongga, E

    2010-03-01

    We report multigigabit/second transmission capacity in 1 mm core diameter graded index plastic optical fiber (POF) exploiting off-the-shelf low-cost components and discrete multitone (DMT) modulation. Transmission capacities of 10.1 Gbits/s x 15 m and 12.7 Gbits/s x 3 m are achieved for average bit-error rates less than 10(-3).

  6. First characterization of a digital SiPM based time-of-flight PET detector with 1 mm spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Stefan; van der Lei, Gerben; van Dam, Herman T; Schaart, Dennis R

    2013-05-07

    Monolithic scintillator detectors can offer a combination of spatial resolution, energy resolution, timing performance, depth-of-interaction information, and detection efficiency that make this type of detector a promising candidate for application in clinical, time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET). In such detectors the scintillation light is distributed over a relatively large number of photosensor pixels and the light intensity per pixel can be relatively low. Therefore, monolithic scintillator detectors are expected to benefit from the low readout noise offered by a novel photosensor called the digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). Here, we present a first experimental characterization of a TOF PET detector comprising a 24 × 24 × 10 mm(3) LSO:Ce,0.2%Ca scintillator read out by a dSiPM array (DPC-6400-44-22) developed by Philips Digital Photon Counting. A spatial resolution of ~1 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) averaged over the entire crystal was obtained (varying from just below 1 mm FWHM in the detector center to ~1.2 mm FWHM close to the edges). Furthermore, the bias in the position estimation at the crystal edges that is typically found in monolithic scintillators is well below 1 mm even in the corners of the crystal.

  7. Cardiac tissue slices: preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ken; Lee, Peter; Mirams, Gary R.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Borg, Thomas K.; Gavaghan, David J.; Kohl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue slices are becoming increasingly popular as a model system for cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology research and development. Here, we describe in detail the preparation, handling, and optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular free calcium concentration transients (CaT) in ventricular tissue slices from guinea pigs and rabbits. Slices cut in the epicardium-tangential plane contained well-aligned in-slice myocardial cell strands (“fibers”) in subepicardial and midmyocardial sections. Cut with a high-precision slow-advancing microtome at a thickness of 350 to 400 μm, tissue slices preserved essential action potential (AP) properties of the precutting Langendorff-perfused heart. We identified the need for a postcutting recovery period of 36 min (guinea pig) and 63 min (rabbit) to reach 97.5% of final steady-state values for AP duration (APD) (identified by exponential fitting). There was no significant difference between the postcutting recovery dynamics in slices obtained using 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime or blebistatin as electromechanical uncouplers during the cutting process. A rapid increase in APD, seen after cutting, was caused by exposure to ice-cold solution during the slicing procedure, not by tissue injury, differences in uncouplers, or pH-buffers (bicarbonate; HEPES). To characterize intrinsic patterns of CaT, AP, and conduction, a combination of multipoint and field stimulation should be used to avoid misinterpretation based on source-sink effects. In summary, we describe in detail the preparation, mapping, and data analysis approaches for reproducible cardiac tissue slice-based investigations into AP and CaT dynamics. PMID:25595366

  8. CSO Bolocam 1.1 mm Continuum Mapping of the Braid Nebula Star Formation Region in Cygnus OB7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspin, Colin; Beck, Tracy L.; Davis, Chris J.; Froebrich, Dirk; Khanzadyan, Tigran; Magakian, Tigran Yu.; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald H.; Movsessian, Tigran A.; Mitchison, Sharon; Nikogossian, Elena G.; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Smith, Michael D.

    2011-04-01

    We present a 1.1 mm map of the Braid Nebula star formation region in Cygnus OB7 taken using Bolocam on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Within the 1 deg2 covered by the map, we have detected 55 cold dust clumps all of which are new detections. A number of these clumps are coincident with IRAS point sources although the majority are not. Some of the previously studied optical/near-IR sources are detected at 1.1 mm. We estimate total dust/gas masses for the 55 clumps together with peak visual extinctions. We conclude that over the whole region, approximately 20% of the clumps are associated with IRAS sources suggesting that these are protostellar objects. The remaining 80% are classed as starless clumps. In addition, both FU Orionis (FUor) like objects in the field, the Braid Star and HH 381 IRS, are associated with strong millimeter emission. This implies that FUor eruptions can occur at very early stages of pre-main-sequence life. Finally, we determine that the cumulative clump mass function for the region is very similar to that found in both the Perseus and ρ Ophiuchus star-forming regions.

  9. The effect of collimation on scatter fraction in multi-slice pet

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.J.

    1988-02-01

    The scatter fraction in a Positron Emission Tomograph depends on the collimator size and shape. Monte Carlo techniques were used to estimate the scatter fraction in multi-slice PET. Simulations of BGO detector arrays of 51 and 64 cm in diameter and a field of view of 25 cm diameter and 9.5 cm axially were done for a 20 cm diameter phantom. Scatter fractions for one central direct 1 cm thick slice varied between 12% for a 15 slice geometry with 2 mm tungsten inter-slice septa to 43% for one slice with true 3-D collimation without septa. These values compare with an 8% scatter fraction with a 1 cm opening between lead collimators in a single slice geometry. The scatter fraction in a transmission scan on a 20 cm source is higher than in an emission scan.

  10. Scanning fiber endoscopy with highly flexible, 1-mm catheterscopes for wide-field, full-color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cameron M.; Engelbrecht, Christoph J.; Soper, Timothy D.; Helmchen, Fritjof; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    In modern endoscopy, wide field of view and full color are considered necessary for navigating inside the body, inspecting tissue for disease and guiding interventions such as biopsy or surgery. Current flexible endoscope technologies suffer from reduced resolution when device diameter shrinks. Endoscopic procedures today using coherent fiber bundle technology, on the scale of 1 mm, are performed with such poor image quality that the clinician’s vision meets the criteria for legal blindness. Here, we review a new and versatile scanning fiber imaging technology and describe its implementation for ultrathin and flexible endoscopy. This scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) or catheterscope enables high quality, laser-based, video imaging for ultrathin clinical applications while also providing new options for in vivo biological research of subsurface tissue and high resolution fluorescence imaging. PMID:20336702

  11. Continuum observations of M 51 and M 83 at 1.1 mm with AzTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, W. F.; Puerari, I.; Tilanus, R.; Israel, F. P.; Austermann, J. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Wilson, G.; Yun, M.; Scott, K. S.; Perera, T. A.; Roberts, C. M.; Hughes, D. H.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the spiral galaxies M 51 and M 83 at 20 arscec spatial resolution with the bolometer array Aztronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) on the JCMT in the 1.1 mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6 ± 0.7 and 9.9 ± 1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 × 109 M⊙ and 7.2 × 109 M⊙ for M 51 and M 83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies, the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ˜1.5-2. In the inner discs of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 × 1020 cm- 2 (K km s- 1)- 1. In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M 51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M 83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate (SFR) and the gas surface density in the same proportion. Our maps reveal a threshold gas surface density for an SFR increase by two or more orders of magnitude. In both galaxy centres, the molecular gas depletion time is about 1 Gyr climbing to 10-20 Gyr at radii of 6-8 kpc. This is consistent with an inside-out depletion of the molecular gas in the discs of spiral galaxies.

  12. Axonal and dendritic density field estimation from incomplete single-slice neuronal reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    van Pelt, Jaap; van Ooyen, Arjen; Uylings, Harry B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal information processing in cortical networks critically depends on the organization of synaptic connectivity. Synaptic connections can form when axons and dendrites come in close proximity of each other. The spatial innervation of neuronal arborizations can be described by their axonal and dendritic density fields. Recently we showed that potential locations of synapses between neurons can be estimated from their overlapping axonal and dendritic density fields. However, deriving density fields from single-slice neuronal reconstructions is hampered by incompleteness because of cut branches. Here, we describe a method for recovering the lost axonal and dendritic mass. This so-called completion method is based on an estimation of the mass inside the slice and an extrapolation to the space outside the slice, assuming axial symmetry in the mass distribution. We validated the method using a set of neurons generated with our NETMORPH simulator. The model-generated neurons were artificially sliced and subsequently recovered by the completion method. Depending on slice thickness and arbor extent, branches that have lost their outside parents (orphan branches) may occur inside the slice. Not connected anymore to the contiguous structure of the sliced neuron, orphan branches result in an underestimation of neurite mass. For 300 μm thick slices, however, the validation showed a full recovery of dendritic and an almost full recovery of axonal mass. The completion method was applied to three experimental data sets of reconstructed rat cortical L2/3 pyramidal neurons. The results showed that in 300 μm thick slices intracortical axons lost about 50% and dendrites about 16% of their mass. The completion method can be applied to single-slice reconstructions as long as axial symmetry can be assumed in the mass distribution. This opens up the possibility of using incomplete neuronal reconstructions from open-access data bases to determine population mean mass density fields

  13. Detecting 1mm/Year Signals in Altimetric Global Sea Level: Effect of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlotnicki, Victor

    1999-01-01

    Several research efforts exist to use Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/ Projet d'Observatorie de Surveillance et d'Etudes Integrees de la Dynamique des Oceans (Poseidon) (T/P) to detect changes in global sea level possibly associated with climate change. This requires much better than 1 mm/yr accuracy, something that none of the instruments in T/P [or the European Remote Sensing (ERS-2) satellite, or the U.S. Navy's Geosat Follow-On (GFO) satellite] were designed for. This work focuses on the ability of the T/P microwave radiometer (TMR) to retrieve the path delay due to atmospheric water vapor along the altimeter's path with accuracy in the time changes below 1 mm/yr on global average. In collaboration with Stephen Keihm of JPL and Christopher Ruf of Pennsylvania State University, we compared TMR path delay (PD) estimates with atmospheric precipitable water (PW) from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) series of satellites for 1992-1998 to selected radiosondes, and we also looked at the brightness temperatures measured by TMR in the lowest 1% of the histogram. The conclusion is that TMR had a slow instrumental drift, associated with the 18-GHz channel, which causes an approximate underestimation of water vapor at a rate equivalent to 1.2 mm/yr in path delay between 1992 and 1996; this effect stopped and no drift is detected in 1997. The same study concluded that there is no detectable scale error (one which is proportional to measured vapor) in TMR. In related work, carried out with graduate student Damien Cailliau, we investigated the relative abilities of TMR, SSMI and the UP dual-frequency radar altimeter to detect rain, relative to a climatology of shipborne observations. Rain is a crucial but poorly measured variable in studies of the climate system, and a dedicated mission, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), was recently launched to measure it. However, the climatologies built over the

  14. Surface-micromachined magnetic undulator with period length between 10μm and 1 mm for advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jere; Joshi, Abhijeet; Lake, Jonathan; Candler, Rob; Musumeci, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    A technological gap exists between the μm-scale wiggling periods achieved using electromagnetic waves of high intensity laser pulses and the mm scale of permanent-magnet and superconducting undulators. In the sub-mm range, surface-micromachined soft-magnetic micro-electro-mechanical system inductors with integrated solenoidal coils have already experimentally demonstrated 100 to 500 mT field amplitude across air gaps as large as 15μm. Simulations indicate that magnetic fields as large as 1.5 T across 50μm inductor gaps are feasible. A simple rearranging of the yoke and pole geometry allows for fabrication of 10+ cm long undulator structures with period lengths between 12.5μm and 1 mm. Such undulators find application both in high average power spontaneous emission sources and, if used in combination with ultrahigh-brightness electron beams, could lead to the realization of low energy compact free-electron lasers. Challenges include electron energy broadening due to wakefields and Joule heating in the electromagnet.

  15. Influence of cement type and thickness on polyfiber post adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoğlu, Emel; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Yilmaz, Zeliha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the effect of two different post space diameters and related resin cement film thicknesses on the bond strength of a polyfiber post. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 premolars were randomly divided into two according to the post space diameter: 1.1 mm and 1.5 mm. Then each group was divided into three sub-groups according to luting cement used: RelyX U100, Panavia F2.0/ED primer, Clearfil SA cement. Spirapost was then luted into the canal using luting cements. Two slices were obtained from each root specimen. Push-out tests were performed. Data was analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Connover post-hoc and Mann-Whitney U-test (P < 0.05). Results: Push-out bond strength was found to vary significantly according to type of adhesive system and post space diameter size (P < 0.05). The self-adhesive resin cement RelyX U100 had significantly higher bond strengths compared with the other adhesive system (P < 0.05). The self-etch adhesive system (Panavia F2.0) showed significantly lower bond strengths compared with the other systems (P < 0.05). There was a significant interaction between the luting systems and post space diameter (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The increases in post space diameter significantly reduced the bond strength of Spirapost to root dentine for both groups. PMID:24944450

  16. Trumpet slices in Kerr spacetimes.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Kenneth A; Baumgarte, Thomas W; Montero, Pedro J

    2014-12-31

    We introduce a new time-independent family of analytical coordinate systems for the Kerr spacetime representing rotating black holes. We also propose a (2+1)+1 formalism for the characterization of trumpet geometries. Applying this formalism to our new family of coordinate systems we identify, for the first time, analytical and stationary trumpet slices for general rotating black holes, even for charged black holes in the presence of a cosmological constant. We present results for metric functions in this slicing and analyze the geometry of the rotating trumpet surface.

  17. Processing and Quality Characteristics of Apple Slices under Simultaneous Infrared Dry-blanching and Dehydration with Intermittent Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of three processing parameters, e.g. product surface temperature, slice thickness and processing time, on blanching and dehydration characteristics of apple slices exposed to simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD) with intermittent heating. A...

  18. Study of the performance of a novel 1 mm resolution dual-panel PET camera design dedicated to breast cancer imaging using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jin; Olcott, Peter D.; Chinn, Garry; Foudray, Angela M. K.; Levin, Craig S.

    2007-02-15

    We studied the performance of a dual-panel positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging using Monte Carlo simulation. The PET camera under development has two 10x15 cm{sup 2} plates that are constructed from arrays of 1x1x3 mm{sup 3} LSO crystals coupled to novel ultra-thin (<200 {mu}m) silicon position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). In this design the photodetectors are configured ''edge-on'' with respect to incoming photons which encounter a minimum of 2 cm thick of LSO with directly measured photon interaction depth. Simulations predict that this camera will have 10-15% photon sensitivity, for an 8-4 cm panel separation. Detector measurements show {approx}1 mm{sup 3} intrinsic spatial resolution, <12% energy resolution, and {approx}2 ns coincidence time resolution. By performing simulated dual-panel PET studies using a phantom comprising active breast, heart, and torso tissue, count performance was studied as a function of coincident time and energy windows. We also studied visualization of hot spheres of 2.5-4.0 mm diameter and various locations within the simulated breast tissue for 1x1x3 mm{sup 3}, 2x2x10 mm{sup 3}, 3x3x30 mm{sup 3}, and 4x4x20 mm{sup 3} LSO crystal resolutions and different panel separations. Images were reconstructed by focal plane tomography with attenuation and normalization corrections applied. Simulation results indicate that with an activity concentration ratio of tumor:breast:heart:torso of 10:1:10:1 and 30 s of acquisition time, only the dual-plate PET camera comprising 1x1x3 mm{sup 3} crystals could resolve 2.5 mm diameter spheres with an average peak-to-valley ratio of 1.3.

  19. Thermal regulation of tightly packed solid-state photodetectors in a 1 mm3 resolution clinical PET system

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, A.; Innes, D.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Hsu, D. F. C.; Reynolds, P. D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Silicon photodetectors are of significant interest for use in positron emission tomography (PET) systems due to their compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and high quantum efficiency. However, one of their main disadvantages is fluctuations in temperature cause strong shifts in gain of the devices. PET system designs with high photodetector density suffer both increased thermal density and constrained options for thermally regulating the devices. This paper proposes a method of thermally regulating densely packed silicon photodetectors in the context of a 1 mm3 resolution, high-sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The PET camera under construction consists of 2304 units, each containing two 8 × 8 arrays of 1 mm3 LYSO crystals coupled to two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). A subsection of the proposed camera with 512 PSAPDs has been constructed. The proposed thermal regulation design uses water-cooled heat sinks, thermoelectric elements, and thermistors to measure and regulate the temperature of the PSAPDs in a novel manner. Active cooling elements, placed at the edge of the detector stack due to limited access, are controlled based on collective leakage current and temperature measurements in order to keep all the PSAPDs at a consistent temperature. This thermal regulation design is characterized for the temperature profile across the camera and for the time required for cooling changes to propagate across the camera. These properties guide the implementation of a software-based, cascaded proportional-integral-derivative control loop that controls the current through the Peltier elements by monitoring thermistor temperature and leakage current. The stability of leakage current, temperature within the system using this control loop is tested over a period of 14 h. The energy resolution is then measured over a period of 8.66 h. Finally, the consistency of PSAPD gain between independent operations of the

  20. Urea Biosynthesis Using Liver Slices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a practical scheme to enable introductory biology students to investigate the mechanism by which urea is synthesized in the liver. The tissue-slice technique is discussed, and methods for the quantitative analysis of metabolites are presented. (Author/SL)

  1. Wire blade development for Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST) slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.; Smith, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A low cost, effective slicing method is essential to make ingot technology viable for photovoltaics in terrestrial applications. The fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) combines the advantages of the three commercially developed techniques. In its development stage FAST demonstrated cutting effectiveness of 10 cm and 15 cm diameter workpieces. Wire blade development is still the critical element for commercialization of FAST technology. Both impregnated and electroplated wire blades have been developed; techniques have been developed to fix diamonds only in the cutting edge of the wire. Electroplated wires show the most near term promise and this approach is emphasized. With plated wires it has been possible to control the size and shape of the electroplating, it is expected that this feature reduces kerf and prolongs the life of the wirepack.

  2. The 1.1 mm Continuum Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Physical Properties and Evolution of the Dust-selected Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takekoshi, Tatsuya; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Komugi, Shinya; Kohno, Kotaro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Sorai, Kazuo; Muller, Erik; Mizuno, Norikazu; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu; Fukui, Yasuo; Ezawa, Hajime; Oshima, Tai; Scott, Kimberly S.; Austermann, Jason E.; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hughes, David H.; Kawabe, Ryohei; Wilson, Grant W.; Yun, Min S.

    2017-01-01

    The first 1.1 mm continuum survey toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was performed using the AzTEC instrument installed on the ASTE 10 m telescope. This survey covered 4.5 deg2 of the SMC with 1σ noise levels of 5–12 mJy beam‑1, and 44 extended objects were identified. The 1.1 mm extended emission has good spatial correlation with Herschel 160 μm, indicating that the origin of the 1.1 mm extended emission is thermal emission from a cold dust component. We estimated physical properties using the 1.1 mm and filtered Herschel data (100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm). The 1.1 mm objects show dust temperatures of 17–45 K and gas masses of 4 × 103–3 × 105 M⊙, assuming single-temperature thermal emission from the cold dust with an emissivity index, β, of 1.2 and a gas-to-dust ratio of 1000. These physical properties are very similar to those of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in our galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The 1.1 mm objects also displayed good spatial correlation with the Spitzer 24 μm and CO emission, suggesting that the 1.1 mm objects trace the dense gas regions as sites of massive star formation. The dust temperature of the 1.1 mm objects also demonstrated good correlation with the 24 μm flux connected to massive star formation. This supports the hypothesis that the heating source of the cold dust is mainly local star-formation activity in the 1.1 mm objects. The classification of the 1.1 mm objects based on the existence of star-formation activity reveals the differences in the dust temperature, gas mass, and radius, which reflects the evolution sequence of GMCs. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Boone, J M; Abbey, C K; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, K K; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-04-21

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast.The percent correct of the human observer's responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist's performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist observer, however trends

  4. Physical performance evaluation of a 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Kandatsu, Susumu; Tanada, Shuji; Aradate, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Satoh, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Masahiro

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional (4D) imaging that employs continuous rotations of a cone-beam. Since a cone-beam scan along a circular orbit does not collect a complete set of data to make an exact reconstruction of a volume [three-dimensional (3D) image], it might cause disadvantages or artifacts. To examine effects of the cone-beam data collection on image quality, we have evaluated physical performance of the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner with 0.5 mm slices and compared it to that of a 16-slice CT-scanner with 0.75 mm slices. As a result, we found that image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were independent of z coordinate. A Feldkamp artifact was observed in distortion measurements. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of slice sensitivity profiles (SSP) increased with z coordinate though it seemed to be caused by other reasons than incompleteness of data. With regard to low contrast detectability, smaller objects were detected more clearly at the midplane (z = 0 mm) than at z = 40 mm, though circular-band like artifacts affected detection. The comparison between the 16-slice and the 256-slice scanners showed better performance for the 16-slice scanner regarding the SSP, low contrast detectability, and distortion. The inferiorities of the 256-slice scanner in other than distortion measurement (Feldkamp artifact) seemed to be partly caused by the prototype nature of the scanner and should be improved in the future scanner. The image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were almost identical for both CTs. The 256-slice scanner was superior to the 16-slice scanner regarding the PSF, though it was caused by the smaller transverse beam width of the 256-slice scanner. In order to compare both scanners comprehensively in terms of exposure dose, noise, slice thickness, and transverse spatial resolution, K=Dsigma2ha3 was calculated, where D was exposure dose (CT dose index), sigma was magnitude of

  5. Single-shot curved slice imaging.

    PubMed

    Jochimsen, Thies H; Norris, David G

    2002-03-01

    The feasibility of imaging a curved slice with a single-shot technique so that the reconstructed image shows an un-warping of the slice is examined. This could be of practical importance when the anatomical structures of interest can be more efficiently covered with curved slices than with a series of flat planes. One possible example of such a structure is the cortex of the human brain. Functional imaging would especially benefit from this technique because several planar images can be replaced by a few curved slice images. A method is introduced that is based on multidimensional pulses to excite the desired curved slice profile. A GRASE imaging sequence is then applied that is tailored to the k-space representation of the curved slice. This makes it possible to capture the in-plane information of the slice with a single-shot technique. The method presented is limited to slices that are straight along one axis and can be approximated by a polygon. Reconstruction is performed using a simple numeric Fourier integration along the curved slice. This leads to an image that shows the desired un-warped representation of the slice. Experimental results obtained with this method from healthy volunteers are presented and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  6. Robust reflective pupil slicing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, Jeffrey T.; Behr, Bradford B.; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2014-07-01

    Tornado Spectral Systems (TSS) has developed the High Throughput Virtual Slit (HTVSTM), robust all-reflective pupil slicing technology capable of replacing the slit in research-, commercial- and MIL-SPEC-grade spectrometer systems. In the simplest configuration, the HTVS allows optical designers to remove the lossy slit from pointsource spectrometers and widen the input slit of long-slit spectrometers, greatly increasing throughput without loss of spectral resolution or cross-dispersion information. The HTVS works by transferring etendue between image plane axes but operating in the pupil domain rather than at a focal plane. While useful for other technologies, this is especially relevant for spectroscopic applications by performing the same spectral narrowing as a slit without throwing away light on the slit aperture. HTVS can be implemented in all-reflective designs and only requires a small number of reflections for significant spectral resolution enhancement-HTVS systems can be efficiently implemented in most wavelength regions. The etendueshifting operation also provides smooth scaling with input spot/image size without requiring reconfiguration for different targets (such as different seeing disk diameters or different fiber core sizes). Like most slicing technologies, HTVS provides throughput increases of several times without resolution loss over equivalent slitbased designs. HTVS technology enables robust slit replacement in point-source spectrometer systems. By virtue of pupilspace operation this technology has several advantages over comparable image-space slicer technology, including the ability to adapt gracefully and linearly to changing source size and better vertical packing of the flux distribution. Additionally, this technology can be implemented with large slicing factors in both fast and slow beams and can easily scale from large, room-sized spectrometers through to small, telescope-mounted devices. Finally, this same technology is directly

  7. Radiation sterilization and identification of gizzard slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S.; Fu, C.; Jiang, W.; Yao, D.; Zhao, K.; Zhang, Y.

    1998-06-01

    An orthogonal test of 4 factors of radiation dose, storage temperature, storage time, and sanitation of cutting places was carried out to optimize the conditions for disinfection of gizzard slices. In the optimized condition, both the sanitary quality and the shelf-life of gizzard slices were improved. To identify irradiated gizzard slices, the sensory change, and the levels of water-soluble nitrogen, amino acid, total volatile basic nitrogen, peroxide value, vitamin C consumption and KMnO 4 consumption were determinated. No significant change was observed except for the color which was light brown on the surface of irradiated slices.

  8. The outcome for women with microinvasive cervical cancer with stromal invasion 1 mm or less: should we always re-excise?

    PubMed

    Palmer, Julia Elizabeth; Amarad, Prathiba; Ellis, Kay; Dudding, Nick; Smith, John; Tidy, John A

    2012-09-01

    To assess the management and outcome for women with microinvasive cervical cancer with stromal invasion 1 mm or less, examining the impact of re-excision. A retrospective cohort study with interval analysis performed between December 2000 and December 2010. Sheffield Gynaecological Cancer Centre and Jessop Wing Colposcopy Unit, Sheffield, UK. Women diagnosed with microinvasive cervical cancer with stromal invasion 1 mm or less during the allocated study period. Methods used is a retrospective cohort study. Risk of recurrence and mortality from disease; incidence of residual disease in repeat excision specimens. A total of 140 women were identified as having microinvasive cervical cancer with stromal invasion 1 mm or less. Sixty-three (45%) had a completely excised lesion; 77 (55%) had an incompletely excised lesion at first treatment. Fifty-five women underwent repeat excision. No residual disease was found in the majority (n=40; 73%). No women suffered disease recurrence or died from disease during the allocated study period. Outcome for women with microinvasive cervical cancer with stromal invasion 1 mm or less is excellent. Repeat excision is associated with very low rates of residual disease. A more conservative approach to follow-up incorporating HPV testing should be explored.

  9. A slice of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lapparent, V.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary discussion is presented of recent results obtained as part of the extension of the Center of Astrophysics redshift survey. Several features of the results are striking. The distribution of galaxies in the sample, which contains 1100 galaxies in a 6 deg x 117 deg strip going through the Coma cluster, looks like a slice through the suds in the kitchen sink. It appears that the galaxies are on the surfaces of bubble-like structures with diameters of 25-50/h-Mpc. The largest bubble in the survey has a diameter comparable with the most recent estimates of the diameter of the void in Bootes. This topology poses serious challenges for current models for the formation of large-scale structure. The best available model for generating these structures is the explosive galaxy formation theory of Ostriker and Cowie (1981).

  10. Electrohydrodynamic Drying of Carrot Slices

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun; Song, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique. PMID:25874695

  11. Electrohydrodynamic drying of carrot slices.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun; Song, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique.

  12. Comparison of sliced lungs with whole lung sets for a torso phantom measured with Ge detectors using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP).

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gary H; Guerriere, Steven

    2003-02-01

    Lung counters are generally used to measure low energy photons (<100 keV). They are usually calibrated with lung sets that are manufactured from a lung tissue substitute material that contains homogeneously distributed activity; however, it is difficult to verify either the activity in the phantom or the homogeneity of the activity distribution without destructive testing. Lung sets can have activities that are as much as 25% different from the expected value. An alternative method to using whole lungs to calibrate a lung counter is to use a sliced lung with planar inserts. Experimental work has already indicated that this alternative method of calibration can be a satisfactory substitute. This work has extended the experimental study by the use of Monte Carlo simulation to validate that sliced and whole lungs are equivalent. It also has determined the optimum slice thicknesses that separate the planar sources in the sliced lung. Slice thicknesses have been investigated in the range of 0.5 cm to 9.0 cm and at photon energies from 17 keV to 1,000 keV. Results have shown that there is little difference between sliced and whole lungs at low energies providing that the slice thickness is 2.0 cm or less. As the photon energy rises the slice thickness can increase substantially with no degradation on equivalence.

  13. Energetic and exergetic performance analysis and modeling of drying kinetics of kiwi slices.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Hosain; Zarein, Mohammad; Farhudi, Zanyar

    2016-05-01

    This work focused on the effects of the moisture content, slices thickness and microwave power on aspects of energy and exergy, drying kinetics, moisture diffusivity, activation energy, and modeling of the thin layer drying of kiwi slices. Results showed that energy and exergy efficiency increased with increasing microwave power and decreasing slice thickness while values of energy efficiency (15.15-32.27 %) were higher than exergy efficiency (11.35-24.68 %). Also, these parameters decreased with a decrease in moisture content. Specific energy consumption varied from 7.79 to 10.02, 8.59 to 10.77 and 9.57 to16.20 to MJ/kg water evaporated for 3, 6 and 9 mm, respectively. The values of exergy loss were found to be in the range of 5.90 and 14.39 MJ/kg water and decreased as the microwave power increased and slice thickness decreased. Effective diffusivity increased with decreasing moisture content and increasing microwave power and slice thickness. Average effective moisture diffusivity of kiwi slices changes between 1.47 × 10(-9) and 39.29 × 10(-9) m(2)/s within the given variables range. Activation energy (17.96-21.38 W/g) showed a significant dependence on the moisture content. Although the Midilli model showed the best fit, Page's model was selected, since it had almost a similar performance but the model is simpler with two parameters instead of four.

  14. Radiation Phantom with Humanoid Shape and Adjustable Thickness (RPHAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, J; Stern, R L; Levy, J; Daly, T; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Goldberg, Z

    2003-08-11

    A new radiation phantom with humanoid shape and adjustable thickness (RPHAT) has been developed. Unlike the RANDO{reg_sign} Phantom which is a fixed thickness, this newly designed phantom has adjustable thickness to address the variable thickness of real-world patients. RPHAT allows adjustment of the body thickness by being sliced in the coronal direction (as opposed to axial). Center slices are designed such that more sections can be added or removed while maintaining the anthropomorphic shape. A prototype of the new phantom has been successfully used in a study investigating peripheral dose delivery, where the amount of scatter within the patient, and therefore the patient thickness, plays a critical role in dose deposition. This newly designed phantom is an important tool to improve the quality of radiation therapy.

  15. Integrating interface slicing into software engineering processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Interface slicing is a tool which was developed to facilitate software engineering. As previously presented, it was described in terms of its techniques and mechanisms. The integration of interface slicing into specific software engineering activities is considered by discussing a number of potential applications of interface slicing. The applications discussed specifically address the problems, issues, or concerns raised in a previous project. Because a complete interface slicer is still under development, these applications must be phrased in future tenses. Nonetheless, the interface slicing techniques which were presented can be implemented using current compiler and static analysis technology. Whether implemented as a standalone tool or as a module in an integrated development or reverse engineering environment, they require analysis no more complex than that required for current system development environments. By contrast, conventional slicing is a methodology which, while showing much promise and intuitive appeal, has yet to be fully implemented in a production language environment despite 12 years of development.

  16. Cutting of living hippocampal slices by a highly pressurised water jet (macromingotome).

    PubMed

    Bingmann, D; Wiemann, M; Speckmann, E J; Köhling, R; Straub, H; Dunze, K; Wittkowski, W

    2000-10-15

    Living brain slices are usually cut with razor blades, which compress a ca. 50-microm-thick layer of tissue. This results in cell debris and lesioned cells which, e.g. form diffusion barriers between the bath and living neurons underneath, thereby prolonging response times of neurons to drugs in the bath saline and impeding the experimental access to intact neurons. To avoid such drawbacks, a macromingotome was developed which cuts nervous tissue with water jets. Physiological saline under pressures of 100-1800 bar was ejected through nozzles of 35-100 microm to cut 300-500-microm-thick hippocampal slices. Systematic variations of pressure and nozzle diameter revealed best results at 400-600 bar and with nozzle diameters of 60-80 microm. Under these conditions, intact CA1- and CA3-neurons as well as granule cells were detected with infrared microscopy at less than 10 microm underneath the surface of the slice. Superficial neurons with intact fine structures were also seen when the slices were studied by light-microscopy. Intra- and extracellular recordings from superficial neurons showed normal membrane- and full action potentials and the development of stable epileptiform discharges in 0 Mg(2+)-saline. These results indicate that the macromingotome offers an alternative way of cutting slices which may facilitate electrophysiological/neuropharmacological or fluorometric studies on superficial neurons.

  17. Viability assessment of primo-node slices from organ surface primo-vascular tissues in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Tae Hee; Lim, Chae Jeong; Choi, Jae-Hong; Lee, So Yeong; Ryu, Pan Dong

    2010-12-01

    The primo-vascular system is a novel thread-like structure which is recently rediscovered, but its cellular properties are largely unknown. In this study, a slice preparation for primo-nodes was developed to facilitate study of the cellular properties of primo-node cells in vitro. Slices (4-8 slices; 200 μm thick) were sectioned from single primo-nodes collected from the abdominal organ surface of rats and incubated in oxygenated Krebs solution at 25°C or 31°C for up to 7 hours. Trypan blue staining and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed to estimate the viability of cells in the slices. Viability was largely maintained during the first 3 hours, but subsequently decreased (from 80% to 21%, p < 0.001). In addition, the viability of slices incubated at 31°C was higher than those incubated at 25°C (80%vs. 47%, p < 0.001). In whole-cell patch-clamp experiments, high resistance seals readily formed and primo-node cells showed a mean resting membrane potential (-38 mV) comparable to that recorded with sharp electrodes and outwardly-rectifying current-voltage relationships. The results show that the primo-node slices developed in this study maintained viability for up to 4 hours in vitro.

  18. AROUSAL FROM SLICES TO HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Kezunovic, N.; Simon, C.; Hyde, J.; Smith, K.; Beck, P.; Odle, A.

    2012-01-01

    Most psychiatric and neurological disorders exhibit sleep disorders, and in some cases presage the disease. Study of the control of sleep and waking has the potential for making a major impact on a number of disorders, making translational neuroscience research on this area critical. One element of the reticular activating system (RAS) is the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), which is the cholinergic arm of the RAS, and projects to the thalamus to trigger thalamocortical rhythms and to the brainstem to modulate muscle tone and locomotion. We developed a research program using brainstem slices containing the PPN to tell us about the cellular and molecular organization of this region. In addition, we developed the P13 midlatency auditory evoked potential, which is generated by PPN outputs, preparation in freely moving rats. This allows the study of PPN cellular and molecular mechanisms at the level of the whole animal. We also study the P50 midlatency auditory evoked potential, which is the human equivalent of the rodent P13 potential, allowing us to study processes detected in vitro, confirmed in the whole animal, and tested in humans. This translational research program led to the discovery of a novel mechanism of sleep-wake control, pointing the way to a number of new clinical applications in the development of novel stimulants and anesthetics. PMID:22639732

  19. Unusually severe food poisoning from vanilla slices.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, P. A.; Dobson, K. W.; Eyre, A.; McKendrick, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty six people suffered from severe vomiting and diarrhoea 15 min to 3 h after eating vanilla slices from the same bakery. Five patients were admitted to hospital, and one developed unusual skin lesions after admission. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in large numbers from vanilla slices of the same batch as those giving rise to symptoms, and from five faecal specimens obtained from affected persons. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were also isolated from the slices. Unbaked custard provides an ideal environment for bacterial multiplication, especially when (as on this occasion) the ambient temperature is persistently high. PMID:6438231

  20. Overview of a new slicing method: Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Smith, M. B.; Khattak, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    The fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) was developed to slice silicon ingots more effectively. It was demonstrated that 25 wafers/cm can be sliced from 10 cm diameter and 19 wafers/cm from 15 cm diameter ingots. This was achieved with a combination of machine development and wire-blade development programs. Correlation was established between cutting effectiveness and high surface speeds. A high speed slicer was designed and fabricated for FAST slicing. Wirepack life of slicing three 10 cm diameter ingots was established. Electroforming techniques were developed to control widths and prolong life of wire-blades. Economic analysis indicates that the projected add-on price of FAST slicing is compatible with the DOE price allocation to meet the 1986 cost goals.

  1. Photosynthesis and Respiration in Leaf Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how leaf slices provide an inexpensive material for illustrating several fundamental points about the biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration. Presents experiments that illustrate the effects of photon flux density and herbicides and carbon dioxide concentration. (DDR)

  2. A quasi-continuous record of atmospheric opacity at lambda = 1.1 mm over 34 days at Mauna Kea Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Zafra, R. L.; Parrish, A.; Solomon, P. M.; Barrett, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    A quasi-continuous record of atmospheric attenuation is obtained. The data were gathered during a 24-day period in September and October 1982 and a 10-day period in December of that year. The opacity is arrived at by measuring the thermal emission of the atmosphere over a bandwidth of approximately 300 MHz. Using an experimental relationship established by Zammit and Ade (1981), opacity measurements at 1.1 mm are converted to the precipitable water vapor column overhead. With the precipitable water vapor, estimates of opacity due to water vapor can be made for other mm and FIR wavelengths. These estimates require model absorption curves for the atmosphere.

  3. Test and Evaluation of Program Slicing Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-19

    and engineering databases. Berzins received BS, MS, EE, and PhD degrees from MIT and has been on the faculty at the University of Texas and the...slice. C. Existing Tools A thesis (Lim & Ben Kahia, 2011) was done at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in which the students tried to find a...reduction of testing effort (Unpublished master’s thesis ). Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Weiser, M. (1984). Program slicing. IEEE

  4. Organotypic slice culture of embryonic brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Daza, Ray A M; Englund, Chris; Hevner, Robert F

    2007-12-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes how to dissect, assemble, and cultivate mouse embryonic (E) brain tissue from age E11.5 to E18.5 (days) for organotypic slice culture. These preparations can be used for a variety of assays and studies including coculture of different brain regions, cell migration assays, axon guidance assays, and DNA electroporation experiments. During electroporation, an electric current is applied to the surface of a specific target area of the brain slice in order to open holes in the plasma membrane and introduce a plasmid of coding DNA. The floating slice-on-membrane construct helps to preserve the structural integrity of the brain slices, while maintaining easy experimental access and optimal viability. Experiments can be monitored in living slices (e.g., with confocal imaging), and further studies can be completed using slices that have been fixed and cryosectioned at the end of the experiment. Any region of embryonic brain or spinal tissue can be used in this protocol.

  5. HEPES prevents edema in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, D G; Chesler, M; Rice, M E

    2001-05-11

    Brain slices gain water when maintained in bicarbonate-buffered artificial cerebro-spinal fluid (ACSF) at 35 degrees C. We previously showed that this edema is linked to glutamate receptor activation and oxidative stress. An additional factor that may contribute to swelling is acidosis, which arises from high CO2 tension in brain slices. To examine the role of acidosis in slice edema, we added N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) to osmotically balanced ACSF (HEPES-ACSF), thereby increasing buffering capacity beyond that provided by bicarbonate/CO2. Water gain was markedly inhibited in HEPES-ACSF. After 3 h incubation in HEPES-ACSF at 35 degrees C, water gain was limited to that of fresh slices after 1 h recovery in ACSF at room temperature. The effect of HEPES in decreasing slice water gain was concentration dependent from 0.3 to 20 mM. The inhibition of water gain by HEPES suggests that tissue acidosis is a contributing factor in brain slice edema.

  6. A Myocardial Slice Culture Model Reveals Alpha-1A-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R. Croft; Singh, Abhishek; Cowley, Patrick; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Montgomery, Megan D.; Swigart, Philip M.; De Marco, Teresa; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translation of preclinical findings could benefit from a simple, reproducible, high throughput human model to study myocardial signaling. Alpha-1A-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are expressed at very low levels in the human heart, and it is unknown if they function. Objectives To develop a high throughput human myocardial slice culture model, and to test the hypothesis that alpha-1A- ARs are functional in the human heart. Methods Cores of LV free wall 8 mm diameter were taken from 52 hearts (18 failing and 34 nonfailing). Slices 250 μm thick were cut with a Krumdieck apparatus and cultured using a rotating incubation unit. Results About 60 slices were cut from each LV core, and a typical study could use 96 slices. Myocyte morphology was maintained, and diffusion into the slice center was rapid. Slice viability was stable for at least 3 days in culture by ATP and MTT assays. The beta-AR agonist isoproterenol stimulated phospholamban phosphorylation, and the alpha-1A-AR agonist A61603 stimulated ERK phosphorylation, with nanomolar EC50 values in slices from both failing and nonfailing hearts. Strips cut from the slices were used to quantify activation of contraction by isoproterenol, A61603, and phenylephrine. The slices supported transduction by adenovirus. Conclusions We have developed a simple, high throughput LV myocardial slice culture model to study signaling in the human heart. This model can be useful for translational studies, and we show for the first time that the alpha-1A-AR is functional in signaling and contraction in the human heart. PMID:27453955

  7. Thin layer drying of tomato slices.

    PubMed

    Das Purkayastha, Manashi; Nath, Amit; Deka, Bidyut Chandra; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2013-08-01

    The hot air convective drying characteristics of blanched tomato (Lycopersicon esculantum L.) slices have been investigated. Drying experiments were carried out at four different temperatures (50, 60, 65 and 70 °C). The effect of drying temperatures on the drying behavior of the tomato slices was evaluated. All drying experiments had only falling rate period. The average effective diffusivity values varied from 0.5453 × 10(-9) to 2.3871 × 10(-9) m(2)/s over the temperature range studied and the activation energy was estimated to be 61.004 kJ/mol. In order to select a suitable form of the drying curve, six different thin layer drying models (Henderson-Pabis, Page, Diamante et al., Wang and Singh, Logarithmic and Newton models) were fitted to the experimental data. The goodness of fit tests indicated that the Logarithmic model gave the best fit to experimental results, which was closely followed by the Henderson-Pabis model. The influence of varied drying temperatures on quality attributes of the tomato slices viz. Hunter color parameters, ascorbic acid, lycopene, titratable acidity, total sugars, reducing sugars and sugar/acid ratio of dried slices was also studied. Slices dried at 50 and 60 °C had high amount of total sugars, lycopene, sugar/acid ratio, Hunter L- and a-values. Drying of slices at 50 °C revealed optimum retention of ascorbic acid, sugar/acid ratio and red hue, whereas, drying at higher temperature (65 and 70 °C) resulted in a considerable decrease in nutrients and colour quality of the slices.

  8. Nuclear shrinkage in live mouse hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Kasischke, K; Büchner, M; Ludolph, A C; Riepe, M W

    2001-05-01

    Brain slices are used extensively for biochemical, electrophysiological and molecular investigations. However, only the time frame for electrophysiological and biochemical investigations has as yet been defined. The goal of the present study was to investigate the time course of nuclear structure in live brain slices. Hippocampal slices (300 microm) were prepared from male CD1 mice (25-30 g), stained with Hoechst 33342 (10 microM), calcein-AM (2 microM) and ethidium homodimer (4 microM), and imaged with single- and dual-photon microscopy. The volume of CA1 pyramidal cell nuclei decreased from 759+/-229 microm3 in 40-50 microm depth 25 min after preparation to 453+/-169 microm3 (P<0.001) after 60 min, 315+/-112 microm3 (P<0.001) after 120 min and 128+/-71 microm3 (P<0.001) after 8 h. Similar results were obtained on a prolonged time scale in 70-80 microm depth and with an accelerated time scale in 20-30 microm depth. Live-dead staining showed that cell damage is progressing from the surface to deeper layers of the slices in a time-dependent fashion. We conclude that nuclei of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells show a time- and depth-dependent shrinkage converging 8 h after slice preparation to a volume of 90-130 microm; in any depth between 20 and 80 microm. The nucleus in the superficial 80 microm of each side appears dysfunctional even at times suitable for electrophysiological and biochemical experimentation in hippocampal slices. Molecular analysis of cell regulation in brain slices may, therefore, be time-dependently distorted by progressing cell death in at least half of the tissue under investigation.

  9. Ultrafast multi-slice spatiotemporally encoded MRI with slice-selective dimension segmented

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Lin; Huang, Jianpan; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Cai, Congbo; Chen, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    As a recently emerging method, spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a high robustness to field inhomogeneity and chemical shift effect. It has been broadened from single-slice scanning to multi-slice scanning. In this paper, a novel multi-slice SPEN MRI method was proposed. In this method, the slice-selective dimension was segmented to lower the specific absorption rate (SAR) and improve the image quality. This segmented method, dubbed SeSPEN method, was theoretically analyzed and demonstrated with phantom, lemon and in vivo rat brain experiments. The experimental results were compared with the results obtained from the spin-echo EPI, spin-echo SPEN method and multi-slice global SPEN method proposed by Frydman and coauthors (abbr. GlSPEN method). All the SPEN images were super-resolved reconstructed using deconvolution method. The results indicate that the SeSPEN method retains the advantage of SPEN MRI with respect to resistance to field inhomogeneity and can provide better signal-to-noise ratio than multi-slice GlSPEN MRI technique. The SeSPEN method has comparable SAR to the GlSPEN method while the T1 signal attenuation effect is alleviated. The proposed method will facilitate the multi-slice SPEN MRI to scan more slices within one scan with better image quality.

  10. Peripheral pulmonary arteries: identification at multi-slice spiral CT with 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Pawlak, Sebastien; Dechambre, Stéphane; Maldague, Baudouin

    2003-04-01

    Our objective was to analyze the peripheral pulmonary arteries using thin-collimation multi-slice spiral CT. Twenty consecutive patients underwent enhanced-spiral multi-slice CT using 1-mm collimation. Two observers analyzed the pulmonary arteries by consensus on a workstation. Each artery was identified on axial and 3D shaded-surface display reconstruction images. Each subsegmental artery was measured at a mediastinal window setting and compared with anatomical classifications. The location and branching of every subsegmental artery was recorded. The number of well-visualized sub-subsegmental arteries at a mediastinal window setting was compared with those visualized at a lung window setting. Of 800 subsegmental arteries, 769 (96%) were correctly visualized and 123 accessory subsegmental arteries were identified using the mediastinal window setting. One thousand ninety-two of 2019 sub-subsegmental arteries (54%) identified using the lung window setting were correctly visualized using the mediastinal window setting. Enhanced multi-slice spiral CT with thin collimation can be used to analyze precisely the subsegmental pulmonary arteries and may identify even more distal pulmonary arteries.

  11. In vitro positron emission tomography (PET): use of positron emission tracers in functional imaging in living brain slices.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Bergström, M; Onoe, H; Takechi, H; Westerberg, G; Antoni, G; Bjurling, P; Jacobson, G B; Långström, B; Watanabe, Y

    1995-05-01

    Positron-emitting radionuclides have short half-lives and high radiation energies compared with radioisotopes generally used in biomedical research. We examined the possibility of applying positron emitter-labeled compounds to functional imaging in brain slices kept viable in an oxygenated buffer solution. Brain slices (300 microns thick) containing the striatum were incubated with positron emitter-labeled tracers for 30-45 min. The slices were then rinsed and placed on the bottom of a Plexiglas chamber filled with oxygenated Krebs-Ringer solution. The bottom of the chamber consisted of a thin polypropylene film to allow good penetration of beta+ particles from the brain slices. The chamber was placed on a storage phosphor screen, which has a higher sensitivity and a wider dynamic range than X-ray films. After an exposure period of 15-60 min, the screen was scanned by the analyzer and radioactivity images of brain slices were obtained within 20 min. We succeeded in obtaining quantitative images of (1) [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake, (2) dopamine D2 receptor binding, (3) dopa-decarboxylase activity, and (4) release of [11C]dopamine preloaded as L-[11C]DOPA in the brain slice preparation. These results demonstrate that positron emitter-labeled tracers in combination with storage phosphor screens are useful for functional imaging of living brain slices as a novel neuroscience technique.

  12. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  13. New method of assessing the relationship between buccal bone thickness and gingival thickness

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between buccal bone thickness and gingival thickness by means of a noninvasive and relatively accurate digital registration method. Methods In 20 periodontally healthy subjects, cone-beam computed tomographic images and intraoral scanned files were obtained. Measurements of buccal bone thickness and gingival thickness at the central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines were performed at points 0–5 mm from the alveolar crest on the superimposed images. The Friedman test was used to compare buccal bone and gingival thickness for each depth between the 3 tooth types. Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between buccal bone thickness and gingival thickness. Results Of the central incisors, 77% of all sites had a buccal thickness of 0.5–1.0 mm, and 23% had a thickness of 1.0–1.5 mm. Of the lateral incisors, 71% of sites demonstrated a buccal bone thickness <1.0 mm, as did 63% of the canine sites. For gingival thickness, the proportion of sites <1.0 mm was 88%, 82%, and 91% for the central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines, respectively. Significant differences were observed in gingival thickness at the alveolar crest level (G0) between the central incisors and canines (P=0.032) and between the central incisors and lateral incisors (P=0.013). At 1 mm inferior to the alveolar crest, a difference was found between the central incisors and canines (P=0.025). The lateral incisors and canines showed a significant difference for buccal bone thickness 5 mm under the alveolar crest (P=0.025). Conclusions The gingiva and buccal bone of the anterior maxillary teeth were found to be relatively thin (<1 mm) overall. A tendency was found for gingival thickness to increase and bone thickness to decrease toward the root apex. Differences were found between teeth at some positions, although the correlation between buccal bone thickness and soft tissue thickness was

  14. An LMT/AzTEC 1.1 mm Survey of Dense Cores in the Monoceros R2 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Alyssa D.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Wilson, Grant; Offner, Stella; Heyer, Mark H.; Pokhrel, Riwaj; Gomez-Ruiz, Arturo; Luna, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    We present a census of dense gas cores in the MonR2 Giant Molecular Cloud with observations from the AzTEC instrument on the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) at λ = 1.1 mm. We detect 270 cores total, 84 with protostars, and 186 starless. AzTEC’s excellent 8‧‧resolution allows for the identification of discrete 1.1 mm sources about 0.05 × 0.05 pc in size in this distant (830 pc) cloud. After performing total flux and half-power area corrections for under-detected low S/N cores, we find that the cores have a median mass ˜ 2.8 M⊙ and a median deconvolved FWHM size ˜ 0.09 pc. 58% of the cores (154) lie above the Bonnor-Ebert mass versus size stability line for cores with T˜12K, suggesting they are unstable to further collapse. Bonnor-Ebert, Plummer-like, and Gaussian models are fit to 1-D and 2-D core radial column density profiles, with Plummer-like performing the best fit of the three models. We present a correlation between local core mass density and column density of gas (as traced by Herschel) characterized by a steep power-law that flattens above Σgas ~ 62 M⊙pc-2 (4.15 AV )smoothing over parsec scales. This core-gas correlation’s resemblance to the star-gas correlation for YSOs in Gutermuth et al. (2011) yields an approximate Mstar ˜ 0.4Mcore and indicates that stellar clustering is likely set by core clustering. Finally we derive an estimated global core formation efficiency that increases with increasing Herschel column density and asymptotically approaches CFE ˜ 0.4 for AV > 15.

  15. ID slicing and the automated factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, T.

    1982-01-01

    The automation of the slicing system utilizing internal-diameter saws for the production of the silicon wafers used in solar arrays is discussed. It is argued that saw productivity can be increased by reducing silicon waste, decreasing usage of consumables, keeping the saw slicing, and increasing the cutting speed. Several machine enhancements utilizing automatic control are discussed. The need for record keeping to anticipate maintenance operations is noted, and a digital serial communication interface with the microprocessor-based saws is recommended. Distributed control of the manufacturing process is discussed in detail, and is recommended as a method for increasing productivity.

  16. Silicon ingot casting: Heat exchanger method. Multi-wire slicing: Fixed abrasive slicing technique, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    In the area of ingot casting the proof of concept of heat exchanger method (HEM) was established. It was also established that HEM cast silicon yielded solar cell performance comparable to Czochralski grown material. Solar cells with conversion efficiencies of up to 15% were fabricated. It was shown that square cross-section ingots can be cast. In the area of crystal slicing, it was established that silicon can be sliced efficiently with the fixed abrasive slicing technique approach. This concept was carried forward to 10 cm diameter workpiece.

  17. The ALMA Frontier Fields Survey. I. 1.1 mm continuum detections in Abell 2744, MACS J0416.1-2403 and MACS J1149.5+2223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, J.; Bauer, F. E.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Kneissl, R.; Villard, E.; Carvajal, R.; Kim, S.; Laporte, N.; Anguita, T.; Aravena, M.; Bouwens, R. J.; Bradley, L.; Carrasco, M.; Demarco, R.; Ford, H.; Ibar, E.; Infante, L.; Messias, H.; Muñoz Arancibia, A. M.; Nagar, N.; Padilla, N.; Treister, E.; Troncoso, P.; Zitrin, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Dusty star-forming galaxies are among the most prodigious systems at high redshift (z > 1), characterized by high star-formation rates and huge dust reservoirs. The bright end of this population has been well characterized in recent years, but considerable uncertainties remain for fainter dusty star-forming galaxies, which are responsible for the bulk of star formation at high redshift and thus play a key role in galaxy growth and evolution. Aims: In this first paper of our series, we describe our methods for finding high redshift faint dusty galaxies using millimeter observations with ALMA. Methods: We obtained ALMA 1.1 mm mosaic images for three strong-lensing galaxy clusters from the Frontier Fields Survey, which constitute some of the best studied gravitational lenses to date. The ≈2' × 2' mosaics overlap with the deep HST WFC3/IR footprints and encompass the high magnification regions of each cluster for maximum intrinsic source sensitivity. The combination of extremely high ALMA sensitivity and the magnification power of these clusters allows us to systematically probe the sub-mJy population of dusty star-forming galaxies over a large surveyed area. Results: We present a description of the reduction and analysis of the ALMA continuum observations for the galaxy clusters Abell 2744 (z = 0.308), MACS J0416.1-2403 (z = 0.396) and MACS J1149.5+2223 (z = 0.543), for which we reach observed rms sensitivities of 55, 59 and 71 μJy beam-1 respectively. We detect 12 dusty star-forming galaxies at S/N ≥ 5.0 across the three clusters, all of them presenting coincidence with near-infrared detected counterparts in the HST images. None of the sources fall close to the lensing caustics, thus they are not strongly lensed. The observed 1.1 mm flux densities for the total sample of galaxies range from 0.41 to 2.82 mJy, with observed effective radii spanning ≲0.̋05 to 0.̋37 ± 0.̋21 . The lensing-corrected sizes of the detected sources appear to be in the

  18. Beef longissimus slice shear force measurement among steak locations and institutions.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    2007-09-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to determine which longissimus thoracis et lumborum steaks were appropriate for slice shear force measurement and 2) to determine the among and within institution variation in LM slice shear force values of 6 institutions after they received expert training on the procedure and a standard kit of equipment. In experiment 1, longissimus thoracis et lumborum muscles were obtained from the left sides of 50 US Select carcasses. Thirteen longissimus thoracis and 12 longissimus lumborum steaks were cut 2.54 cm thick from each muscle. Slice shear force was measured on each steak. Mean slice shear force among steak locations (1 to 25) ranged from 19.7 to 27.3 kg. Repeatability of slice shear force (based on variance) among steak locations ranged from 0.71 to 0.96. In experiment 2, the longissimus thoracis et lumborum were obtained from the left sides of 154 US Select beef carcasses. Eight 2.54-cm-thick steaks were obtained from the caudal end of each frozen longissimus thoracis, and six 2.54-cm-thick steaks were obtained from the cranial end of each frozen longissimus lumborum. Seven pairs of consecutive steaks were assigned for measurement of slice shear force. Seven institutions were assigned to steak pairs within each carcass using a randomized complete block design, such that each institution was assigned to each steak pair 22 times. Repeatability estimates for slice shear force for the 7 institutions were 0.89, 0.83, 0.91, 0.90, 0.89, 0.76, and 0.89, respectively, for institutions 1 to 7. Mean slice shear force values were least (P <0.05) for institutions 3 (22.7 kg) and 7 (22.3 kg) and were greatest (P <0.05) for institutions 5 (27.3 kg) and 6 (27.6 kg). Institutions with greater mean slice shear force (institutions 5 and 6) used cooking methods that required more (P <0.05) time (32.0 and 36.9 min vs. 5.5 to 11.8 min) to reach the end point temperature (71 degrees C) and resulted in greater (P <0.05) cooking loss (both 26.6% vs. 14

  19. Heat and Mass Transfer Modeling of Apple Slice under Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration Process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop a new simultaneous infrared dry blanching and dehydration process for producing high-quality blanched and partially dehydrated products, apple slices with three different thicknesses, 5, 9, and 13 mm, were heated using infrared for up to 10 min at 4000W/m2 IR intensity. The surface and ce...

  20. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) redshift survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettolani, G.; Zucca, E.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G.; Zamorani, G.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey over about 30 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude bj = 19.4 and consists of more than three thousands galaxies with reliable redshift determination.

  1. Thin-Slice Perception Develops Slowly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balas, Benjamin; Kanwisher, Nancy; Saxe, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Body language and facial gesture provide sufficient visual information to support high-level social inferences from "thin slices" of behavior. Given short movies of nonverbal behavior, adults make reliable judgments in a large number of tasks. Here we find that the high precision of adults' nonverbal social perception depends on the slow…

  2. Neuroprotection against diisopropylfluorophosphate in acute hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ferchmin, P. A.; Pérez, Dinely; Cuadrado, Brenda L.; Carrasco, Marimée; Martins, Antonio H.; Eterović, Vesna A.

    2015-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and a surrogate of the organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent sarin. The neurotoxicity of DFP was assessed as a reduction of population spike (PS) area elicited by synaptic stimulation in acute hippocampal slices. Two classical antidotes, atropine, and pralidoxime, and two novel antidotes, 4R-cembranotriene-diol (4R) and a caspase 9 inhibitor, were tested. Atropine, pralidoxime, and 4R significantly protected when applied 30 min after DFP. The caspase inhibitor was neuroprotective when applied 5–10 min before or after DFP, suggesting that early synaptic apoptosis is responsible for the loss of PSs. It is likely that apoptosis starts at the synapses and, if antidotes are not applied, descends to the cell bodies, causing death. The acute slice is a reliable tool for mechanistic studies, and the assessment of neurotoxicity and neuroprotection with PS areas is, in general, pharmacologically congruent with in vivo results and predicts the effect of drugs in vivo. 4R was first found to be neuroprotective in slices and later we demonstrated that 4R is neuroprotective in vivo. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of OPs is not well understood, and there is a need for novel antidotes that could be discovered using acute slices. PMID:26438150

  3. nem_slice ver. 3.34

    SciTech Connect

    HUTCHINSON, SCOTT; STJOHN, MATTHEW; SJAARDEMA, GREGORY; HENNIGAN, GARY; SHADID, JOHN; DEVINE, KAREN

    2009-06-08

    Nem_slice reads in a finite element model description of the geometry of a problem from an ExodusII file and generates either a nodal or elemental graph of the problem. It then calls Chaco to load balance the graph and then outputs a NemesisI load-balance file.

  4. Detecting Psychopathy from Thin Slices of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate that features of psychopathy can be reliably and validly detected by lay raters from "thin slices" (i.e., small samples) of behavior. Brief excerpts (5 s, 10 s, and 20 s) from interviews with 96 maximum-security inmates were presented in video or audio form or in both modalities combined. Forty raters used…

  5. Thickness measurement of tablet coating using continuous-wave terahertz reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Nirmala; Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala

    2016-02-01

    THz rays have higher penetration depth compared to infrared rays and hence can be effectively used to measure tablet coating thickness. In addition, THz wavelength (1 mm - 0.1 mm) provides an optimal depth resolution for the thickness measurement. This method can be non-invasive and hence ideal for inline quality monitoring. Tablet coating thickness is one of the major parameters of interest in Process Analytical Technology (PAT). In this paper, a reflection mode Continuous Wave (CW) Terahertz (THz) system has been employed to measure the tablet coating thickness. A frequency scan of the sample has been carried out from 0.1 THz to 1.1 THz and the reflection coefficient of the sample is inverse fourier transformed to obtain the tablet thickness. The calculated thickness has also been validated using the optical microscope. Results show that the thickness can be measured with considerable accuracy.

  6. Amplitude modulation drive to rectangular-plate linear ultrasonic motors with vibrators dimensions 8 mm x 2.16 mm X 1 mm.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yang; Hanson, Ben; Levesley, Martin C; Walker, Peter G; Watterson, Kevin G

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, to exploit the contribution from not only the stators but also from other parts of miniature ultrasonic motors, an amplitude modulation drive is proposed to drive a miniature linear ultrasonic motor consisting of two rectangular piezoelectric ceramic plates. Using finite-element software, the first longitudinal and second lateral-bending frequencies of the vibrator are shown to be very close when its dimensions are 8 mm x 2.16 mm x 1 mm. So one single frequency power should be able to drive the motor. However, in practice the motor is found to be hard to move with a single frequency power because of its small vibration amplitudes and big frequency difference between its longitudinal and bending resonance, which is induced by the boundary condition variation. To drive the motor effectively, an amplitude modulation drive is used by superimposing two signals with nearly the same frequencies, around the resonant frequency of the vibrators of the linear motor. When the amplitude modulation frequency is close to the resonant frequency of the vibrator's surroundings, experimental results show that the linear motor can move back and forward with a maximum thrust force (over 0.016 N) and a maximum velocity (over 50 mm/s).

  7. High-resolution 1050 nm spectral domain retinal optical coherence tomography at 120 kHz A-scan rate with 6.1 mm imaging depth

    PubMed Central

    An, Lin; Li, Peng; Lan, Gongpu; Malchow, Doug; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2013-01-01

    We report a newly developed high speed 1050nm spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system for imaging posterior segment of human eye. The system is capable of an axial resolution at ~10 µm in air, an imaging depth of 6.1 mm in air, a system sensitivity fall-off at ~6 dB/3mm and an imaging speed of 120,000 A-scans per second. We experimentally demonstrate the system’s capability to perform phase-resolved imaging of dynamic blood flow within retina, indicating high phase stability of the SDOCT system. Finally, we show an example that uses this newly developed system to image posterior segment of human eye with a large view of view (10 × 9 mm2), providing detailed visualization of microstructural features from anterior retina to posterior choroid. The demonstrated system parameters and imaging performances are comparable to those that a typical 1 µm swept source OCT would deliver for retinal imaging. PMID:23411636

  8. Bronchial wall region extraction algorithm using multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Kengo; Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Niimi, Akio; Matsumoto, Hisako; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kawata, Naoko; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    As multi-slice CT develops, there are great expectations for an automatic and computer-support diagnoses. This research is on bronchial area which is composed of the bronchial wall regions and the air regions in the internal bronchial tube. Since to diagnose this is difficult, support diagnosis using CT images is desired. The thickness of bronchial wall changes as the airway of early lung cancer, bronchial asthma and the bronchial enhancing syndrome and others change into a malignant state. These changes are detected and the thickness of bronchial wall becomes important information. In this research, the extraction accuracy of the algorithm for bronchial wall evaluation is good.

  9. The Characteristics of LTP Induced in Hippocampal Slices Are Dependent on Slice-Recovery Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godaux, Emile; Ris, Laurence; Capron, Brigitte; Sindic, Christian

    2006-01-01

    In area CA1 of hippocampal slices which are allowed to recover from slicing "in interface" and where recordings are carried out in interface, a single 1-sec train of 100-Hz stimulation triggers a short-lasting long-term potentiation (S-LTP), which lasts 1-2 h, whereas multiple 1-sec trains induce a long-lasting LTP (L-LTP), which lasts several…

  10. Slice stretching effects for maximal slicing of a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, Bernd

    2005-11-01

    Slice stretching effects such as slice sucking and slice wrapping arise when foliating the extended Schwarzschild spacetime with maximal slices. For arbitrary spatial coordinates these effects are quantified here in the context of boundary conditions where the lapse arises as a linear combination of odd and even lapse. Favourable boundary conditions are then derived which make the overall slice stretching occur late in numerical simulations. Allowing the lapse to become negative, this requirement leads to lapse functions which approach at late times the odd lapse corresponding to the static Schwarzschild metric. Demanding, however, that a numerically favourable lapse remains non-negative, as a result the average of odd and even lapse is obtained. At late times the lapse with zero gradient at the puncture arising for the puncture evolution is precisely of this form. Finally, analytic arguments are given on how slice stretching effects can be avoided. Here the excision technique and the working mechanism of the shift function are studied in detail.

  11. Supplementary comparison COOMET.L-S7: Standards of the unit for length (metre) in the measurement range from 0.1 mm to 100 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, V.

    2012-01-01

    The COOMET Project No 390/BY/07, 'Supplementary comparison of standards of the unit for length (metre) in the measurement range from 0.1 mm to 100 mm', KCDB reference COOMET.L-S7, was organized by the Technical Committee TC 1.5 'Length and Angle' of COOMET. This comparison started in May 2007 and finished in October 2010. It was piloted by the Belarusian State Institute of Metrology BelGIM, Minsk, the Republic of Belarus, with other participants as follows: GUM (Warsaw, Poland), DP 'Ukrmetrteststandart' (Kiev, Ukraine), NSC 'Institute of Metrology' (Kharkov, Ukraine), SMU (Bratislava, Slovakia) and RSE 'KazInMetr' (Astana, Kazakhstan). The transfer standards provided by BelGIM were carried to the place of the comparison by NMI attendant specialists as personal baggage, where they were measured. The pilot laboratory processed the data obtained for the deviations of measured median lengths from the nominal lengths of the transfer standards in order to estimate the measurement result differences between the measuring instruments. The conclusion is that the equivalence of the reference installations for parameter measurements of the participating National Metrology Institutes is sufficient, and constitutes an appropriate basis for mutual recognition of measurement results. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by COOMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  12. Drying kinetics, rehydration and colour characteristics of convective hot-air drying of carrot slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymaz, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    The effects of air drying temperature, slice thickness and pre-treatment application on the drying kinetics of carrot slices during convective drying in the range 50-70 °C were investigated. Results indicated that drying time, rehydration ratio and colour characteristics of carrot slices were more affected by drying air temperature, followed by pre-treatment applications. Five thin-layer drying models were applied to describe the drying kinetics. Midilli et al. model was the best model to characterize the drying kinetics of carrot slices. The moisture effective diffusivity calculated from the second Fick's law of diffusion ranged from 3.46 × 10-10 to 1.02 × 10-9 m2/s. The values of activation energy determined from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, ln( D eff ) versus 1/(T + 273.15), were 35.53, 43.42, and 37.75 kJ/mol for blanch, potas and control samples, respectively.

  13. Organotypic brain slice cultures as a model to study angiogenesis of brain vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hutter-Schmid, Bianca; Kniewallner, Kathrin M.; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Brain vessels are the most important structures in the brain to deliver energy and substrates to neurons. Brain vessels are composed of a complex interaction between endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes, controlling the entry of substrates into the brain. Damage of brain vessels and vascular impairment are general pathologies observed in different neurodegenerative disorders including e.g., Alzheimer's disease. In order to study remodeling of brain vessels, simple 3-dimensional in vitro systems need to be developed. Organotypic brain slices of mice provide a potent tool to explore angiogenic effects of brain vessels in a complex 3-dimensional structure. Here we show that organotypic brain slices can be cultured from 110 μm thick sections of postnatal and adult mice brains. The vessels are immunohistochemically stained for laminin and collagen IV. Co-stainings are an appropriate method to visualize interaction of brain endothelial cells with pericytes and astrocytes in these vessels. Different exogenous stimuli such as fibroblast growth factor-2 or vascular endothelial growth factor induce angiogenesis or re-growth, respectively. Hyperthermia or acidosis reduces the vessel density in organotypic slices. In conclusion, organotypic brain slices exhibit a strong vascular network which can be used to study remodeling and angiogenesis of brain vessels in a 3-dimensional in vitro system. PMID:26389117

  14. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  15. Experimental demonstration of spectrum-sliced elastic optical path network (SLICE).

    PubMed

    Kozicki, Bartłomiej; Takara, Hidehiko; Tsukishima, Yukio; Yoshimatsu, Toshihide; Yonenaga, Kazushige; Jinno, Masahiko

    2010-10-11

    We describe experimental demonstration of spectrum-sliced elastic optical path network (SLICE) architecture. We employ optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulation format and bandwidth-variable optical cross-connects (OXC) to generate, transmit and receive optical paths with bandwidths of up to 1 Tb/s. We experimentally demonstrate elastic optical path setup and spectrally-efficient transmission of multiple channels with bit rates ranging from 40 to 140 Gb/s between six nodes of a mesh network. We show dynamic bandwidth scalability for optical paths with bit rates of 40 to 440 Gb/s. Moreover, we demonstrate multihop transmission of a 1 Tb/s optical path over 400 km of standard single-mode fiber (SMF). Finally, we investigate the filtering properties and the required guard band width for spectrally-efficient allocation of optical paths in SLICE.

  16. Slicing, sampling, and distance-dependent effects affect network measures in simulated cortical circuit structures

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Daniel C.; Triesch, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The neuroanatomical connectivity of cortical circuits is believed to follow certain rules, the exact origins of which are still poorly understood. In particular, numerous nonrandom features, such as common neighbor clustering, overrepresentation of reciprocal connectivity, and overrepresentation of certain triadic graph motifs have been experimentally observed in cortical slice data. Some of these data, particularly regarding bidirectional connectivity are seemingly contradictory, and the reasons for this are unclear. Here we present a simple static geometric network model with distance-dependent connectivity on a realistic scale that naturally gives rise to certain elements of these observed behaviors, and may provide plausible explanations for some of the conflicting findings. Specifically, investigation of the model shows that experimentally measured nonrandom effects, especially bidirectional connectivity, may depend sensitively on experimental parameters such as slice thickness and sampling area, suggesting potential explanations for the seemingly conflicting experimental results. PMID:25414647

  17. Neutron diffraction investigation of residual stresses in transverse/oblique rail slices subjected to different grinding strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Gnaeupel-Herold, T.; Brand, P.C.; Prask, H.J.

    1999-05-01

    Using the Double Axis system for Residual stress, Texture, and Single crystal analysis (DARTS) at NIST, neutron diffraction residual stress measurements were carried out in the head region of five pairs of transverse and oblique cut slices of railroad track, each having a thickness of 6.35 mm. The slices were taken from a 300 HB rail of CFI 136 RE size. All slices except one unworn reference piece had the same accumulated tonnage but were ground in different intervals. The measurements confirm the results previously found which indicated the existence of high sub-surface residual tensile stresses, while the regional close to the wheel-rail contact line shows high residual compressive stresses.

  18. Optimised microcomputer-guided quantitative microradiography on dental mineralised tissue slices.

    PubMed

    de Josselin de Jong, E; ten Bosch, J J; Noordmans, J

    1987-07-01

    It is well realised that the contact microradiographic method is the most direct method that gives position-dependent information on the mineral content of calcified tissue and its loss. We developed a microcomputer-guided microradiographic system which features fast operation by the experimenter with a low appearance of errors. Tooth tissue slices of 75 micron thickness are cut with a sawing machine. Images (Cu K alpha radiation) of the tooth slice and an aluminium step wedge (exposure 10-15 s) are made on film (Kodak SO-253). The images of step wedge and tooth slice are scanned in a densitometer (1 micron X 30 microns slit), which is fitted with an XY table (0.5 micron steps). A microcomputer (Apple IIe) is programmed to control the XY table and to record the optical film transmission. Scans of the images are plotted on the computer screen. The calibration step optical film transmission values are determined by the operator by adjusting a computer-generated bar onto the individual steps shown on the screen. The dose-density relation of the film is approximated by the program by a fourth-degree polynomial using the step-wedge data. The resulting curve is used to convert the tooth-slice data into a mineral volume percentage. To enable the calculation of total mineral loss (in kg m-2) (loss integrated over depth), the operator adds the assumed diagram for sound enamel onto the display. This is done by adjusting computer-generated bars to the scan of the tooth slice shown on the screen. The resolving power in the image made by the microradiographic system is 3 microns X 30 microns. On the basis of the analysis of random errors and a comparison with chemical analysis of tooth slices we claim that the error in mineral volume percentage amounts to 4% of its value. Starting with a microradiographic image of a tooth slice 5 min are required to obtain a microradiographic curve on paper and to obtain a value for mineral loss.

  19. A novel method for air drying aloe leaf slices by covering with filter papers as a shrink-proof layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Baek, J H; Lee, S J; Choi, S Y; Hur, W; Lee, S Y

    2009-01-01

    To prevent the shrinkage of aloe vera slices during air drying, a method utilizing a shrink-proof layer was developed. The sample was configured of whole leaf aloe slices, where 1 side or both sides were covered with filter papers as shrink-proof layers. After air drying by varying the air temperature and the slice thickness, the drying characteristics, as well as several quality factors of the dried aloe vera leaf slices, were analyzed. In the simulation of the drying curves, the modified Page model showed the best fitness, representing a diffusion-controlled drying mechanism. Nonetheless, there was a trace of a constant-rate drying period in the samples dried by the method. Shrinkage was greatly reduced, and the rehydration ratios increased by approximately 50%. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed that the surface structure of original fibrous form was well sustained. FT-IR characteristics showed that the dried samples could sustain aloe polysaccharide acetylation. Furthermore, the functional properties of the dried slices including water holding capacity, swelling, and fat absorption capability were improved, and polysaccharide retention levels increased by 20% to 30%. Therefore, we concluded that application of shrink-proof layers on aloe slices provides a novel way to overcome the shrinkage problems commonly found in air drying, thereby improving their functional properties with less cost. Practical Application: This research article demonstrates a novel air drying method using shrink-proof layers to prevent the shrinkage of aloe slices. We analyzed extensively the characteristics of shrinkage mechanism and physical properties of aloe flesh gels in this drying system. We concluded that this method can be a beneficial means to retain the functional properties of dried aloe, and a potential alternative to freeze drying, which is still costly.

  20. Metabolism of Red Beet Slices I. Effects of Washing 1

    PubMed Central

    Reed, D. J.; Kolattukudy, P. E.

    1966-01-01

    The changes in relative participation of pathways of glucose catabolism in red beet slices during washing have been examined using specifically 14C labeled glucoses. Washing of these slices brings about an increase in participation of the pentose phosphate pathway. The composition of the washing medium influences slightly the extent of change in pathway participation. The activity level of certain enzymes participating in the initial stages of glucose catabolism has been measured in fresh and washed beet slices. Fresh slices which barely metabolized gluconate were found to have very little 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Washing brings about a dramatic increase in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity and this increase was accompanied by a marked increase in the ability of the slices to metabolize gluconate. In red beet slices the TPNH generated via pentose phosphate pathway appears to be utilized for biosynthetic reductions rather than as respiratory substrate. PMID:16656302

  1. Organotypic brain slice cultures: A review.

    PubMed

    Humpel, C

    2015-10-01

    In vitro cell cultures are an important tool for obtaining insights into cellular processes in an isolated system and a supplement to in vivo animal experiments. While primary dissociated cultures permit a single homogeneous cell population to be studied, there is a clear need to explore the function of brain cells in a three-dimensional system where the main architecture of the cells is preserved. Thus, organotypic brain slice cultures have proven to be very useful in investigating cellular and molecular processes of the brain in vitro. This review summarizes (1) the historical development of organotypic brain slices focusing on the membrane technology, (2) methodological aspects regarding culturing procedures, age of donors or media, (3) whether the cholinergic neurons serve as a model of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, (4) or the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons as a model of Parkinson's disease and (5) how the vascular network can be studied, especially with regard to a synthetic blood-brain barrier. This review will also highlight some limits of the model and give an outlook on future applications.

  2. ORGANOTYPIC BRAIN SLICE CULTURES: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    HUMPEL, C.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cell cultures are an important tool for obtaining insights into cellular processes in an isolated system and a supplement to in vivo animal experiments. While primary dissociated cultures permit a single homogeneous cell population to be studied, there is a clear need to explore the function of brain cells in a three-dimensional system where the main architecture of the cells is preserved. Thus, organotypic brain slice cultures have proven to be very useful in investigating cellular and molecular processes of the brain in vitro. This review summarizes (1) the historical development of organotypic brain slices focusing on the membrane technology, (2) methodological aspects regarding culturing procedures, age of donors or media, (3) whether the cholinergic neurons serve as a model of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease, (4) or the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons as a model of Parkinson’s disease and (5) how the vascular network can be studied, especially with regard to a synthetic blood–brain barrier. This review will also highlight some limits of the model and give an outlook on future applications. PMID:26254240

  3. Mixed time slicing in path integral simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Ryan P.; Zwickl, Jill; Shushkov, Philip; Tully, John C.

    2011-02-01

    A simple and efficient scheme is presented for using different time slices for different degrees of freedom in path integral calculations. This method bridges the gap between full quantization and the standard mixed quantum-classical (MQC) scheme and, therefore, still provides quantum mechanical effects in the less-quantized variables. Underlying the algorithm is the notion that time slices (beads) may be "collapsed" in a manner that preserves quantization in the less quantum mechanical degrees of freedom. The method is shown to be analogous to multiple-time step integration techniques in classical molecular dynamics. The algorithm and its associated error are demonstrated on model systems containing coupled high- and low-frequency modes; results indicate that convergence of quantum mechanical observables can be achieved with disparate bead numbers in the different modes. Cost estimates indicate that this procedure, much like the MQC method, is most efficient for only a relatively few quantum mechanical degrees of freedom, such as proton transfer. In this regime, however, the cost of a fully quantum mechanical simulation is determined by the quantization of the least quantum mechanical degrees of freedom.

  4. Slice sampling technique in Bayesian extreme of gold price modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Mohammad; Adam, Mohd Bakri; Ibrahim, Noor Akma; Yahya, Mohamed Hisham

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a simulation study of Bayesian extreme values by using Markov Chain Monte Carlo via slice sampling algorithm is implemented. We compared the accuracy of slice sampling with other methods for a Gumbel model. This study revealed that slice sampling algorithm offers more accurate and closer estimates with less RMSE than other methods . Finally we successfully employed this procedure to estimate the parameters of Malaysia extreme gold price from 2000 to 2011.

  5. SLICE/MARC-O: Description of Services. Second Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

    Following the discussions of: what is SLICE, what is MARC, what is MARC-O, and what is SLICE/MARC-O are descriptions of the five services offered by SLICE/MARC-O. These services are: (1) cataloging data search and print, (2) MARC record and search and copy, (3) standard S.D.I. current awareness, (4) custom S.D.I. current awareness and (5) SLICE…

  6. Experiments and analysis of thin tungsten slice and W/Cu brazing for primary collimator scraper in CSNS/RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, YiQing; Kang, Ling; Yu, JieBing; Qu, HuaMin; He, ZheXi

    2014-04-01

    According to the requirements for the beam collimation system of the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), the main structure of a scraper of primary collimator is made by W/Cu brazing, in which the thickness of tungsten slice is 0.17 mm. In order to get the best mechanical properties, the brazing temperature is suggested to be controlled under the recrystallization temperature of tungsten, while the recrystallization temperature is affected directly by the thickness of tungsten. Because of little research and application on the brazing of thin tungsten slice of 0.17 mm and copper, tensile tests are done to get the mechanical properties of tungsten slices which experience different brazing temperatures. In keeping the inner relationships between the mechanical properties and temperature, another experiment is done by using SEM to scan the microstructures including the size and distribution of crystals. Finally we determine the recrystallization temperature of tungsten slice of 0.17 mm, and get the best parameters of W/Cu brazing for scrapers of primary collimator in CSNS/RCS.

  7. The identification of a Pliocene time slice(s) for data/model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, A. M.; Dolan, A. M.; Pickering, S.; Dowsett, H. J.; McClymont, E. L.; Prescott, C.; Salzmann, U.; Hill, D. J.; Hunter, S. J.; Lunt, D. J.; Pope, J. O.; Valdes, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    The characteristics of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (3.264 to 3.025 Ma BP) have been examined using geological proxies and climate models. Whilst there is agreement between models and data, details of regional climate differ. Uncertainties in prescribed forcings and in proxy data, limit the utility of the interval to understand the dynamics of a warmer than present climate or evaluate models. This uncertainty comes, in part, from the reconstruction of a time slab rather than a time slice, where forcings required by climate models can be more adequately constrained. Here we describe the rationale and approach for identifying a time slice(s) for Pliocene environmental reconstruction. A time slice centred on 3.205 Ma BP (3.204 to 3.207 Ma BP) has been identified as a priority for investigation. It is a warm interval characterised by a negative benthic oxygen isotope excursion (0.21-0.23‰) centred on Marine Isotope Stage KM5c (KM5.3). It occurred during a period of orbital forcing which was very similar to present-day. Climate model simulations indicate that proxy temperature estimates are unlikely to be significantly affected by orbital forcing for at least a precession cycle centred on the time slice, with the North Atlantic being an important exception. As a result, uncertainties in the chronological control of proxy records will only be moderately detrimental to the synthesis of temperature data. Furthermore, proxy estimates are already able to restrict the carbon dioxide increase in the atmosphere to <120 ppmv above the pre-industrial concentration, and sea-level rise to ~22 m ± 10 m higher than present-day.

  8. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  9. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  10. Thin slices of child personality: Perceptual, situational, and behavioral contributions.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Herzhoff, Kathrin; Kushner, Shauna C; Rule, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined whether thin-slice ratings of child personality serve as a resource-efficient and theoretically valid measurement of child personality traits. We extended theoretical work on the observability, perceptual accuracy, and situational consistency of childhood personality traits by examining intersource and interjudge agreement, cross-situational consistency, and convergent, divergent, and predictive validity of thin-slice ratings. Forty-five unacquainted independent coders rated 326 children's (ages 8-12) personality in 1 of 15 thin-slice behavioral scenarios (i.e., 3 raters per slice, for over 14,000 independent thin-slice ratings). Mothers, fathers, and children rated children's personality, psychopathology, and competence. We found robust evidence for correlations between thin-slice and mother/father ratings of child personality, within- and across-task consistency of thin-slice ratings, and convergent and divergent validity with psychopathology and competence. Surprisingly, thin-slice ratings were more consistent across situations in this child sample than previously found for adults. Taken together, these results suggest that thin slices are a valid and reliable measure to assess child personality, offering a useful method of measurement beyond questionnaires, helping to address novel questions of personality perception and consistency in childhood.

  11. Constant mean curvature slicings of Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzle, J. Mark

    2011-04-15

    We investigate existence, uniqueness, and the asymptotic properties of constant mean curvature (CMC) slicings in vacuum Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes with positive cosmological constant. Since these spacetimes violate the strong energy condition, most of the general theorems on CMC slicings do not apply. Although there are in fact Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes with a unique CMC foliation or CMC time function, we prove that there also exist Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes with an arbitrary number of (families of) CMC slicings. The properties of these slicings are analyzed in some detail.

  12. Characterization of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of machine learning in projection views and reconstructed slices

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Wu Yita; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhang Yiheng; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Way, Ted

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), quasi-three-dimensional (3D) structural information is reconstructed from a small number of 2D projection view (PV) mammograms acquired over a limited angular range. The authors developed preliminary computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) methods for classification of malignant and benign masses and compared the effectiveness of analyzing lesion characteristics in the reconstructed DBT slices and in the PVs. Methods: A data set of MLO view DBT of 99 patients containing 107 masses (56 malignant and 51 benign) was collected at the Massachusetts General Hospital with IRB approval. The DBTs were obtained with a GE prototype system which acquired 11 PVs over a 50 deg. arc. The authors reconstructed the DBTs at 1 mm slice interval using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique. The region of interest (ROI) containing the mass was marked by a radiologist in the DBT volume and the corresponding ROIs on the PVs were derived based on the imaging geometry. The subsequent processes were fully automated. For classification of masses using the DBT-slice approach, the mass on each slice was segmented by an active contour model initialized with adaptive k-means clustering. A spiculation likelihood map was generated by analysis of the gradient directions around the mass margin and spiculation features were extracted from the map. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to a band of pixels around the segmented mass boundary. The RBST image was enhanced by Sobel filtering in the horizontal and vertical directions, from which run-length statistics texture features were extracted. Morphological features including those from the normalized radial length were designed to describe the mass shape. A feature space composed of the spiculation features, texture features, and morphological features extracted from the central slice alone and seven feature spaces obtained by averaging the corresponding features from three to 19

  13. Brain slice stimulation using a microfluidic network and standard perfusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Shaikh Mohammed, Javeed; Caicedo, Hugo; Fall, Christopher P; Eddington, David T

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated the fabrication of a two-level microfluidic device that can be easily integrated with existing electrophysiology setups. The two-level microfluidic device is fabricated using a two-step standard negative resist lithography process. The first level contains microchannels with inlet and outlet ports at each end. The second level contains microscale circular holes located midway of the channel length and centered along with channel width. Passive pumping method is used to pump fluids from the inlet port to the outlet port. The microfluidic device is integrated with off-the-shelf perfusion chambers and allows seamless integration with the electrophysiology setup. The fluids introduced at the inlet ports flow through the microchannels towards the outlet ports and also escape through the circular openings located on top of the microchannels into the bath of the perfusion. Thus the bottom surface of the brain slice placed in the perfusion chamber bath and above the microfluidic device can be exposed with different neurotransmitters. The microscale thickness of the microfluidic device and the transparent nature of the materials [glass coverslip and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane)] used to make the microfluidic device allow microscopy of the brain slice. The microfluidic device allows modulation (both spatial and temporal) of the chemical stimuli introduced to the brain slice microenvironments.

  14. Spectral slicing X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B.; Shealy, D.; Chao, S.-H.

    1986-01-01

    Layered synthetic microstructure (LSM) X-ray optics is investigated as a system for coupling a conventional glancing incidence X-ray mirror to a high sensitivity X-ray detector. It is shown that, by the use of figured LSM optics, it is possible to magnify the X-ray image produced by the primary mirrors so as to maintain their high inherent spatial resolution. The results of theoretical and design analyses of several spectral slicing X-ray telescope systems that utilize LSM mirrors of hyperboloidal, spherical, ellipsoidal, and constant optical path aspheric configurations are presented. It is shown that the spherical LSM optics are the preferred configuration, yielding subarcsecond performance over the entire field. The Stanford/Marshall Space Flight Center Rocket X-ray Telescope, which will utilize normal incidence LSM optics to couple a Wolter-Schwarzschild primary mirror to high resolution detectors for solar X-ray/EUV studies, is discussed. Design diagrams are included.

  15. Slicing AADL Specifications for Model Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odenbrett, Maximilian; Nguyen, Viet Yen; Noll, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    To combat the state-space explosion problem in model checking larger systems, abstraction techniques can be employed. Here, methods that operate on the system specification before constructing its state space are preferable to those that try to minimize the resulting transition system as they generally reduce peak memory requirements. We sketch a slicing algorithm for system specifications written in (a variant of) the Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL). Given a specification and a property to be verified, it automatically removes those parts of the specification that are irrelevant for model checking the property, thus reducing the size of the corresponding transition system. The applicability and effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated by analyzing the state-space reduction for an example, employing a translator from AADL to Promela, the input language of the SPIN model checker.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Thin Layer Microwave Drying of Taro Slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vivek; Sharma, H. K.; Singh, K.

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigated the drying kinetics of taro slices precooked in different medium viz water (WC), steam (SC) and Lemon Solution (LC) and dried at different microwave power 360, 540 and 720 W. Drying curves of all precooked slices at all microwave powers showed falling rate period along with a very short accelerating period at the beginning of the drying. At all microwave powers, higher drying rate was observed for LC slices as compared to WC and SC slices. To select a suitable drying curve, seven thin-layer drying models were fitted to the experimental data. The data revealed that the Page model was most adequate in describing the microwave drying behavior of taro slices precooked in different medium. The highest effective moisture diffusivity value of 2.11 × 10-8 m2/s was obtained for LC samples while the lowest 0.83 × 10-8 m2/s was obtained for WC taro slices. The activation energy (E a ) of LC taro slices was lower than the E a of WC and SC taro slices.

  17. Evidence for liquefaction identified in peeled slices of Holocene deposits along the Lower Columbia River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takada, K.; Atwater, B.F.

    2004-01-01

    Peels made from 10 geoslices beneath a riverbank at Washington's Hunting Island, 45 km inland from the Pacific coast, aid in identifying sand that liquefied during prehistoric earthquakes of estimated magnitude 8-9 at the Cascadia subduction zone. Each slice was obtained by driving sheetpile and a shutter plate to depths of 6-8 m. The resulting sample, as long as 8 m, had a trapezoidal cross section 42-55 cm by 8 cm. The slicing created few artifacts other than bending and smearing at slice edges. Each slice is dominated by well-stratified sand and mud deposited by the tidal Columbia River. Nearly 90% of the sand is distinctly laminated. The sand contains mud beds as thick as 0.5 m and at least 20 m long, and it is capped by a mud bed that contains a buried soil that marks the 1700 Cascadia earthquake of estimated magnitude 9. Every slice intersected sills and dikes of fluidized sand, and many slices show folds and faults as well. Sills, which outnumber dikes, mostly follow and locally invade the undersides of mud beds. The mud beds probably impeded diffuse upward flow of water expelled from liquefied sand. Trapped beneath mud beds, this water flowed laterally, destroyed bedding by entraining (fluidizing) sand, and locally scoured the overlying mud. Horizontal zones of folded sand extend at least 10 or 20 m, and some contain low-angle faults. Many of the folds probably formed while sand was weakened by liquefaction. The low-angle faults may mark the soles of river-bottom slumps or lateral spreads. As many as four great Cascadia earthquakes in the past 2000 yr contributed to the intrusions, folds, and faults. This subsurface evidence for fluid escape and deformation casts doubt on maximum accelerations that were previously inferred from local absence of liquefaction features at the ground surface along the Columbia River. The geosliced evidence for liquefaction abounds not only beneath banks riddled with dikes but also beneath banks in which dikes are absent. Such

  18. Lead Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-02-16

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in{sup 3}, an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  19. A survey of program slicing for software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jon

    1993-01-01

    This research concerns program slicing which is used as a tool for program maintainence of software systems. Program slicing decreases the level of effort required to understand and maintain complex software systems. It was first designed as a debugging aid, but it has since been generalized into various tools and extended to include program comprehension, module cohesion estimation, requirements verification, dead code elimination, and maintainence of several software systems, including reverse engineering, parallelization, portability, and reuse component generation. This paper seeks to address and define terminology, theoretical concepts, program representation, different program graphs, developments in static slicing, dynamic slicing, and semantics and mathematical models. Applications for conventional slicing are presented, along with a prognosis of future work in this field.

  20. Organotypic slice cultures for studies of postnatal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Adam J; Wang, Sabrina; Tan, Yao Fang; Wojtowicz, J Martin

    2015-03-04

    Here we describe a technique for studying hippocampal postnatal neurogenesis in the rodent brain using the organotypic slice culture technique. This method maintains the characteristic topographical morphology of the hippocampus while allowing direct application of pharmacological agents to the developing hippocampal dentate gyrus. Additionally, slice cultures can be maintained for up to 4 weeks and thus, allow one to study the maturation process of newborn granule neurons. Slice cultures allow for efficient pharmacological manipulation of hippocampal slices while excluding complex variables such as uncertainties related to the deep anatomic location of the hippocampus as well as the blood brain barrier. For these reasons, we sought to optimize organotypic slice cultures specifically for postnatal neurogenesis research.

  1. Acetic acid pretreatment improves the hardness of cooked potato slices.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenlin; Shehzad, Hussain; Yan, Shoulei; Li, Jie; Wang, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of acetic acid pretreatment on the texture of cooked potato slices were investigated in this work. Potato slices were pretreated with acetic acid immersion (AAI), distilled water immersion (DWI), or no immersion (NI). Subsequently, the cell wall material of the pretreated samples was isolated and fractioned to evaluate changes in the monosaccharide content and molar mass (MM), and the hardness and microscopic structure of the potato slices in different pretreatments before and after cooking were determined. The results showed that the highest firmness was obtained with more intact structure of the cell wall for cooked potato slices with AAI pretreatment. Furthermore, the MM and sugar ratio demonstrated that the AAI pretreated potato slices contained a higher content of the small molecular polysaccharides of cell walls, especially in the hemicellulose fraction. This work may provide a reference for potato processing.

  2. Organotypic Slice Cultures for Studies of Postnatal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mosa, Adam J.; Wang, Sabrina; Tan, Yao Fang; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a technique for studying hippocampal postnatal neurogenesis in the rodent brain using the organotypic slice culture technique. This method maintains the characteristic topographical morphology of the hippocampus while allowing direct application of pharmacological agents to the developing hippocampal dentate gyrus. Additionally, slice cultures can be maintained for up to 4 weeks and thus, allow one to study the maturation process of newborn granule neurons. Slice cultures allow for efficient pharmacological manipulation of hippocampal slices while excluding complex variables such as uncertainties related to the deep anatomic location of the hippocampus as well as the blood brain barrier. For these reasons, we sought to optimize organotypic slice cultures specifically for postnatal neurogenesis research. PMID:25867138

  3. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  4. Effect of ultrasound and centrifugal force on carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) slices during osmotic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Barman, Nirmali; Badwaik, Laxmikant S

    2017-01-01

    Osmotic dehydration (OD) of carambola slices were carried out using glucose, sucrose, fructose and glycerol as osmotic agents with 70°Bx solute concentration, 50°C of temperature and for time of 180min. Glycerol and sucrose were selected on the basis of their higher water loss, weight reduction and lowers solid gain. Further the optimization of OD of carambola slices (5mm thick) were carried out under different process conditions of temperature (40-60°C), concentration of sucrose and glycerol (50-70°Bx), time (180min) and fruit to solution ratio (1:10) against various responses viz. water loss, solid gain, texture, rehydration ratio and sensory score according to a composite design. The optimized value for temperature, concentration of sucrose and glycerol has been found to be 50°C, 66°Bx and 66°Bx respectively. Under optimized conditions the effect of ultrasound for 10, 20, 30min and centrifugal force (2800rpm) for 15, 30, 45 and 60min on OD of carambola slices were checked. The controlled samples showed 68.14% water loss and 13.05% solid gain in carambola slices. While, the sample having 30min ultrasonic treatment showed 73.76% water loss and 9.79% solid gain; and the sample treated with centrifugal force for 60min showed 75.65% water loss and 6.76% solid gain. The results showed that with increasing in treatment time the water loss, rehydration ratio were increased and solid gain, texture were decreased.

  5. Software Method for Computed Tomography Cylinder Data Unwrapping, Re-slicing, and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    A software method has been developed that is applicable for analyzing cylindrical and partially cylindrical objects inspected using computed tomography (CT). This method involves unwrapping and re-slicing data so that the CT data from the cylindrical object can be viewed as a series of 2D sheets (or flattened onion skins ) in addition to a series of top view slices and 3D volume rendering. The advantages of viewing the data in this fashion are as follows: (1) the use of standard and specialized image processing and analysis methods is facilitated having 2D array data versus a volume rendering; (2) accurate lateral dimensional analysis of flaws is possible in the unwrapped sheets versus volume rendering; (3) flaws in the part jump out at the inspector with the proper contrast expansion settings in the unwrapped sheets; and (4) it is much easier for the inspector to locate flaws in the unwrapped sheets versus top view slices for very thin cylinders. The method is fully automated and requires no input from the user except proper voxel dimension from the CT experiment and wall thickness of the part. The software is available in 32-bit and 64-bit versions, and can be used with binary data (8- and 16-bit) and BMP type CT image sets. The software has memory (RAM) and hard-drive based modes. The advantage of the (64-bit) RAM-based mode is speed (and is very practical for users of 64-bit Windows operating systems and computers having 16 GB or more RAM). The advantage of the hard-drive based analysis is one can work with essentially unlimited-sized data sets. Separate windows are spawned for the unwrapped/re-sliced data view and any image processing interactive capability. Individual unwrapped images and un -wrapped image series can be saved in common image formats. More information is available at http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/OptInstr/ NDE_CT_CylinderUnwrapper.html.

  6. A unified approach to diffusion direction sensitive slice registration and 3-D DTI reconstruction from moving fetal brain anatomy.

    PubMed

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Xi Cheng; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, Francois; Studholme, Colin

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and an experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to current state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function.

  7. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Cheng, Xi; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, François

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3-D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and a experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to a state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function. PMID:24108711

  8. Assessment of regional cytochrome P450 activities in rat liver slices using resorufin substrates and fluorescence confocal laser cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, J T; Sidhu, J S; Reilly, M T; Farin, F M; Omiecinski, C J; Eaton, D L; Kavanagh, T J

    1996-01-01

    Characterizing constitutive activities and inducibility of various cytochrome P450 isozymes is important for elucidating species and individual differences in susceptibility to many toxicants. Although expression of certain P450s has been studied in homogenized tissues, the ability to assess functional enzyme activity without tissue disruption would further our understanding of interactive factors that modulate P450 activities. We used precision-cut, viable rat liver slices and confocal laser cytometry to determine the regional enzyme activities of P450 isozymes in situ. Livers from control and beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF)-treated rats were sectioned with a Krumdieck tissue slicer into 250-microns thick sections. A slice perfusion chamber that mounts on the cytometer stage was developed to allow for successive measurement of region-specific P450-dependent O-dealkylation of 7-ethoxy-, 7-pentoxy-, and 7-benzyloxyresorufin (EROD, PROD, and BROD activity, respectively) in the same liver slice. Images of the accumulated fluorescent resorufin product within the tissue were acquired using a confocal laser cytometer in confocal mode. As expected, slices isolated from beta NF-treated rats showed high levels of centrilobular EROD activity compared to slices from control rats, whereas PROD and BROD activities remained at control levels. These techniques should allow for the accurate quantification of regional and cell-specific P450 enzyme activity and, with subsequent analysis of the same slice, the ability to correlate specific P450 mRNAs or other factors with enzymatic activity. Moreover, these techniques should be amenable to examination of similar phenomena in other tissues such as lung and kidney, where marked heterogeneity in cellular P450 expression patterns is also known to occur. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8743442

  9. Endometrial thickness predicts endometrial hyperplasia in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Betsy A; Wilburn, Rochelle D; Thomas, Michael A; Williams, Daniel B; Maxwell, Rose; Aubuchon, Mira

    2011-06-30

    Body mass index is predictive of sonographic endometrial stripe thickness, which in turn is predictive of endometrial hyperplasia in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. For every 1-mm increase in endometrial stripe, the odds ratio of hyperplasia increased by 1.48 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.10).

  10. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  11. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  12. Education and "Thick" Epistemology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzee, Ben

    2011-01-01

    In this essay Ben Kotzee addresses the implications of Bernard Williams's distinction between "thick" and "thin" concepts in ethics for epistemology and for education. Kotzee holds that, as in the case of ethics, one may distinguish between "thick" and "thin" concepts of epistemology and, further, that this distinction points to the importance of…

  13. Simultaneous multi-slice excitation by parallel transmission

    PubMed Central

    Poser, Benedikt A.; Anderson, Robert James; Guérin, Bastien; Setsompop, Kawin; Deng, Weiran; Mareyam, Azma; Serano, Peter; Wald, Lawrence L.; Stenger, V. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A technique is described for simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) excitation using radiofrequency (RF) parallel transmission (pTX). Methods Spatially distinct slices are simultaneously excited by applying different RF frequencies on groups of elements of a multi-channel transmit array. The localized transmit sensitivities of the coil geometry are thereby exploited to reduce RF power. The method is capable of achieving SMS-excitation using single-slice RF pulses, or multi-band pulses. SMS-pTX is demonstrated using eight-channel parallel RF transmission on a dual-ring pTX coil at 3 T. The effect on B1+ homogeneity and SAR is evaluated experimentally and by simulations. Slice-GRAPPA reconstruction was used for separation of the collapsed slice signals. Results Phantom and in vivo brain data acquired with FLASH and blipped-CAIPIRINHA EPI are presented at SMS excitation factors of two, four and six. We also show that with our pTX coil design, slice placement and binary division of transmitters, SMS-pTX excitations can achieve the same mean flip angles excitations at approximately 30% lower RF power than a conventional SMS approach with multi-band RF pulses. Conclusion The proposed SMS-pTX allows simultaneous multi-slice excitations at reduced RF power by exploiting the local B1+ sensitivities of suitable multi-element pTX arrays. PMID:23716365

  14. Slice Culture Modeling of Central Nervous System (CNS) Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Thin slicing and subsequent culture of CNS tissue has become a valued means to study neuronal and glial biology within the context of the physiologically relevant tissue milieu. Modern membrane-interface slice culturing methodology allows straightforward access to both CNS tissue and feeding medium, enabling experimental manipulations and analyses that would otherwise be impossible in vivo. CNS slices can be successfully maintained in culture for up to several weeks for investigation of evolving pathology and long-term intervention in models of chronic neurologic disease. Herein, membrane-interface slice culture models for studying viral encephalitis and myelitis are detailed, with emphasis on the use of these models for investigation of pathogenesis and evaluation of novel treatment strategies. We describe techniques to (1) generate brain and spinal cord slices from rodent donors, (2) virally infect slices, (3) monitor viral replication, (4) assess virally induced injury/apoptosis, (5) characterize “CNS-specific” cytokine production, and (6) treat slices with cytokines/pharmaceuticals. Although our focus is on CNS viral infection, we anticipate that the described methods can be adapted to address a wide range of investigations within the fields of neuropathology, neuroimmunology, and neuropharmacology. PMID:23975824

  15. Effects of immunological castration (Improvest) on further processed belly characteristics and commercial bacon slicing yields of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Kyle, J M; Bohrer, B M; Schroeder, A L; Matulis, R J; Boler, D D

    2014-09-01

    Objectives were to compare fresh belly characteristics, further processed belly characteristics, and commercial bacon slicing yields of immunologically castrated (IC) barrows, IC barrows fed ractopamine hydrochloride (IC+RAC), physically castrated (PC) barrows, intact males, and gilts. One hundred eighty-eight bellies from pigs housed in single sex pens (n = 48) slaughtered at 130 kg ending live weight were evaluated for flop distance, length, width, thickness, and fatty acid composition. Bellies were injected, thermally processed, and sliced according to standard protocols at a USDA federally inspected facility. Complete slices were sorted by trained plant personnel. Then, sliced bellies were individually packaged to maintain anatomical orientation. The effects of treatments were analyzed as a generalized linear mixed model with pen of pigs serving as the experimental unit for all comparisons. Belly thickness was not different (P ≥ 0.11) in bellies from IC barrows (3.74 cm) compared with bellies from IC+RAC (3.60 cm), PC barrows (3.94 cm), or gilts (3.64 cm); however, bellies were 0.42 cm thicker (P < 0.01) in IC barrows compared with intact males. Iodine value was not different (P ≥ 0.06) in bellies from IC barrows (68.26) compared with bellies from IC+RAC (69.78), PC barrows (67.55), or gilts (69.45); however, iodine value was 2.32 units less (P < 0.01) in IC barrows compared with intact males. Green weight was not different (P ≥ 0.09) in bellies from IC barrows (4.88 kg) compared with bellies from IC+RAC (5.11 kg), PC barrows (5.10 kg), or gilts (4.79 kg); however, green weight was 0.56 kg greater (P < 0.0001) in IC barrows compared with intact males. Pump uptake and cooked yield was not different (P ≥ 0.15) among treatment groups. Slicing yield (as a percentage of green weight) was decreased (P ≤ 0.01) in bellies from IC barrows (93.61%) compared with bellies from PC barrows (98.42%) or gilts (98.19%); however, slicing yield was not different (P

  16. Microcutting of living brain slices by a pulsed ultrafine water jet which allows simultaneous electrophysiological recordings (micromingotome).

    PubMed

    Speckmann, E J; Köhling, R; Lücke, A; Straub, H; Wittkowski, W; Elger, C E; Wiemann, M; Bingmann, D

    1998-07-01

    Up to now microsurgical dissections in living nervous tissue (e.g. in slices or cell cultures) are performed either by micro-scalpels or by laser beams. As an alternative technique, a device for cutting with an ultrafine pulsed water jet was developed to allow precise, visually controled dissections in neuronal circuits even during electrophysiological recordings. Water is ejected by pressure (20-30 bar) from patch pipettes with tip diameters of 10-12 microm. By means of a piezo-element the pipette and the water jet are forced to oscillate vertically with a frequency of 200-400 Hz with an adjustable amplitude. These oscillations facilitate the transsection of neuronal connections even in thick slice preparations. Best results were obtained when the tip of the pipette was about 500 microm above the surface of the submerged slice tissue. This micromingotome offers the following advantages: (i) histological studies show that the water jet cleans the cutting surface, thus avoiding debris and its uncontrolable effects on cells underneath; (ii) the arrangement enables ongoing electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices during the cutting procedure and thus facilitates studies of the functions of neuronal connections; (iii) the device allows even disconnection in cultured nervous tissue overgrowing polyamid grids with 50 microm wide meshes.

  17. Slices method to describe ray propagation in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Gutiérrez, J. F.; Arroyo Carrasco, M. L.; Iturbe-Castillo, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    We describe an alternative method that numerically calculates the trajectory followed by a light ray in rotationally symmetric inhomogeneous media in the paraxial approximation. The medium is divided into thin parallel slices and a radial quadratic refractive index is considered for each slice. The ABCD matrix is calculated in each slice and the trajectory of the ray was obtained. The method is demonstrated considering media with a refractive index distribution used to describe the human eye lens. The results are compared with the exact numerical solution for each particular distribution. In all cases, a good agreement is obtained for the proposed method and the exact numerical solution.

  18. Effect of ceramic thickness and composite bases on stress distribution of inlays--a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Durand, Letícia Brandão; Guimarães, Jackeline Coutinho; Monteiro Junior, Sylvio; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cavity depth, ceramic thickness, and resin bases with different elastic modulus on von Mises stress patterns of ceramic inlays. Tridimensional geometric models were developed with SolidWorks image software. The differences between the models were: depth of pulpal wall, ceramic thickness, and presence of composite bases with different thickness and elastic modulus. The geometric models were constrained at the proximal surfaces and base of maxillary bone. A load of 100 N was applied. The stress distribution pattern was analyzed with von Mises stress diagrams. The maximum von Mises stress values ranged from 176 MPa to 263 MPa and varied among the 3D-models. The highest von Mises stress value was found on models with 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay. Intermediate values (249-250 MPa) occurred on models with 2-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay and 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 2-mm-thick ceramic inlay. The lowest values were observed on models restored exclusively with ceramic inlay (176 MPa to 182 MPa). It was found that thicker inlays distribute stress more favorably and bases with low elastic modulus increase stress concentrations on the internal surface of the ceramic inlay. The increase of ceramic thickness tends to present more favorable stress distribution, especially when bonded directly onto the cavity without the use of supporting materials. When the use of a composite base is required, composite resin with high elastic modulus and reduced thickness should be preferred.

  19. Are there species smaller than 1 mm?

    PubMed Central

    Rossberg, Axel G.; Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid advance in genetic sequencing technologies has provided an unprecedented amount of data on the biodiversity of meiofauna. It was hoped that these data would allow the identification and counting of species, distinguished as tight clusters of similar genomes. Surprisingly, this appears not to be the case. Here, we begin a theoretical discussion of this phenomenon, drawing on an individual-based ecological model to inform our arguments. The determining factor in the emergence (or not) of distinguishable genetic clusters in the model is the product of population size with mutation rate—a measure of the adaptability of the population as a whole. This result suggests that indeed one should not expect to observe clearly distinguishable species groupings in data gathered from ultrasequencing of meiofauna. PMID:23884092

  20. Slice Accelerated Gradient-Echo Spin-Echo Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Imaging with Blipped CAIPI for Increased Slice Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Cornelius; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Cauley, Stephen; Bhat, Himanshu; Polaskova, Pavlina; Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Rapalino, Otto; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L.; Stufflebeam, Steven; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve slice coverage of gradient echo spin echo (GESE) sequences for dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using a simultaneous-multiple-slice (SMS) method. Methods Data were acquired on 3 Tesla (T) MR scanners with a 32-channel head coil. To evaluate use of SMS for DSC, an SMS GESE sequence with two-fold slice coverage and same temporal sampling was compared with a standard GESE sequence, both with 2× in-plane acceleration. A signal to noise ratio (SNR) comparison was performed on one healthy subject. Additionally, data with Gadolinium injection were collected on three patients with glioblastoma using both sequences, and perfusion analysis was performed on healthy tissues as well as on tumor. Results Retained SNR of SMS DSC is 90% for a gradient echo (GE) and 99% for a spin echo (SE) acquisition, compared with a standard acquisition without slice acceleration. Comparing cerebral blood volume maps, it was observed that the results of standard and SMS acquisitions are comparable for both GE and SE images. Conclusion Two-fold slice accelerated DSC MRI achieves similar SNR and perfusion metrics as a standard acquisition, while allowing a significant increase in slice coverage of the brain. The results also point to a possibility to improve temporal sampling rate, while retaining the same slice coverage. PMID:24285593

  1. Measuring coal thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, C.; Blaine, J.; Geller, G.; Robinson, R.; Summers, D.; Tyler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory tested concept, for measuring thickness of overhead coal using noncontacting sensor system coupled to controller and high pressure water jet, allows mining machines to remove virtually all coal from mine roofs without danger of cutting into overlying rock.

  2. Origami of thick panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  3. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    PubMed

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (p<0.001); however, the thickness of ceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in fracture resistance values between a lithium disilicate ceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  4. Precision of Cavalieri sections and slices with local errors.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Orive, L M

    1999-03-01

    Cavalieri sections--and more recently Cavalieri slices, especially in combination with non-invasive scanning--are widely used to estimate volumes. Physical Cavalieri slices are also increasingly used to estimate neuron numbers via the optical fractionator. In either case, the prediction of the error variance is important to assess optimal sample sizes. The error variance consists of two components, one due to the variation among the true contents of sections or slices, and the other due to local or 'nugget' errors. The latter may arise for instance estimating section areas by point counting discrete particles in slices or disectors. In this paper, a fairly comprehensive set of prediction formulae is presented to separate both variance components.

  5. Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy The sometimes deadly conditions cost $75 billion in ... a major impact on Americans and the U.S. economy, a new report finds. "The impact of skin ...

  6. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  7. Eight-Bit-Slice GaAs General Processor Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, John; Gauthier, Robert V.

    1989-01-01

    Novel GaAs 8-bit slice enables quick and efficient implementation of variety of fast GaAs digital systems ranging from central processing units of computers to special-purpose processors for communications and signal-processing applications. With GaAs 8-bit slice, designers quickly configure and test hearts of many digital systems that demand fast complex arithmetic, fast and sufficient register storage, efficient multiplexing and routing of data words, and ease of control.

  8. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  9. Quantitative transfer of Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 during mechanical slicing of tomatoes as impacted by multiple processing variables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqiang; Ryser, Elliot T

    2016-10-03

    Slicing of fresh produce can readily lead to pathogen cross-contamination with pre-sliced tomatoes having been linked to multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis in the United States. This study aimed to assess the impact of multiple processing variables on quantitative transfer of Salmonella during simulated commercial slicing of tomatoes. One red round tomato was inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 at ~5logCFU/g and sliced using a manual or electric slicer, followed by 20 uninoculated tomatoes. Thereafter, the distribution of Salmonella on inoculated and uninoculated tomato slices was evaluated along with the transfer of Salmonella from different parts of the slicer. The impact of multiple processing variables including post-contamination hold time (0 and 30min), tomato wetness (dry and wet), processing room temperature (23, 10 and 4°C), slice thickness (0.48, 0.64, and 0.95cm), tomato variety (Torero, Rebelski, and Bigdena) and pre-wash treatment (no wash, tap water, and chlorine) was also investigated. The data were fitted to a two-parameter exponential decay model (Y=A⋅exp(BX)) with the percentage of Salmonella transferred to 20 uninoculated tomatoes then calculated. Salmonella populations on nine inoculated tomato slices ranged from 4.6±0.2 to 5.5±0.3logCFU/g, with higher populations on slices from the blossom and stem scar ends. However, Salmonella transfer to the previously uninoculated slices was similar (P>0.05), ranging from 2.1±0.2 to 3.4±0.2logCFU/g. Significantly fewer salmonellae transferred from the blade (3.4±0.4 log CFU, P≤0.05) than from the back and bottom plates (4.7±0.3 log CFU) or the whole manual slicer (5.2±0.2 log CFU) to the 20 uninoculated tomatoes. However, the blade was the primary contributor to Salmonella transfer for the electric slicer. Post-contamination hold time, processing temperature and tomato slice thickness did not significantly impact (P>0.05) the Salmonella transfer rate (parameter B) or the overall

  10. Comparative evaluation of efficacy of EndoVac irrigation system to Max-I probe in removing smear layer in apical 1 mm and 3 mm of root canal: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Ankur; Dua, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of EndoVac irrigation system and side-vented closed ended needle (Max-I probe) in removing smear layer from root canals at 1 mm and 3 mm from working length using ProTaper rotary instrumentation. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups after complete cleaning and shaping with ProTaper rotary files. In one group, final irrigation was performed with EndoVac system while in other group, final irrigation was done with a 30 gauge Max-I probe. 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid were used as final irrigants in all teeth. During instrumentation, 1 ml of 3% NaOCl was used for irrigation after each rotary instrument in the similar manner as in final irrigation. After instrumentation and irrigation, teeth were sectioned longitudinally into buccal and palatal halves and viewed under scanning electron microscope for evaluation of smear layer. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-test. (P < 0.05) Results: At 3 mm level, there was no significant difference between two groups. At 1 mm level, EndoVac group showed significantly better smear layer removal compared with Max-I probe (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: EndoVac system results in better smear layer removal at 1 mm from working length when compared to Max-I probe irrigation. PMID:25709673

  11. Silicon Ingot Casting: Heat Exchanger Method. Multi-wire Slicing: Fixed Abrasine Slicing Technique, Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    Ingot casting was scaled up to 16 cm by 16 cm square cross section size and ingots weighing up to 8.1 kg were cast. The high degree of crystallinity was maintained in the large ingot. For large sizes, the nonuniformity of heat treatment causes chipping of the surface of the ingot. Progress was made in the development of a uniform graded structure in the silica crucibles. The high speed slicer blade-head weight was reduced to 37 pounds, allowing surface speeds of up to 500 feet per minute. Slicing of 10 cm diameter workpieces at these speeds increased the through-put of the machine to 0.145 mm/min.

  12. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  13. Minimum wafer thickness by rotated ingot ID wafering. [Inner Diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The efficient utilization of materials is critical to certain device applications such as silicon for photovoltaics or diodes and gallium-gadolinium-garnet for memories. A variety of slicing techniques has been investigated to minimize wafer thickness and wafer kerf. This paper presents the results of analyses of ID wafering of rotated ingots based on predicted fracture behavior of the wafer as a result of forces during wafering and the properties of the device material. The analytical model indicated that the minimum wafer thickness is controlled by the depth of surface damage and the applied cantilever force. Both of these factors should be minimized. For silicon, a minimum thickness was found to be approximately 200 x 10 - 6th m for conventional sizes of rotated ingot wafering. Fractures through the thickness of the wafer rather than through the center supporting column were found to limit the minimum wafer thickness. The model suggested that the use of a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center supporting core and, with silicon, by using 111-line-type ingots could have potential for reducing minimum wafer thickness.

  14. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR{sup 2} ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  15. Perineal body anatomy in living women: 3-D analysis using thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kindra A.; Yousuf, Aisha; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina; Fenner, Dee E.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe a framework for visualizing the perineal body's complex anatomy using thin-slice MR imaging. Study Design Two mm-thick MR images were acquired in 11 women with normal pelvic support and no incontinence/prolapse symptoms. Anatomic structures were analyzed in axial, sagittal and coronal slices. 3-D models were generated from these images. Results Three distinct perineal body regions are visible on MRI: (1) a superficial region at the level of the vestibular bulb, (2) a mid region at the proximal end of the superficial transverse perineal muscle, and (3) a deep region at the level of the midurethra and puborectalis muscle. Structures are best visualized on axial scans while cranio-caudal relationships are appreciated on sagittal scans. The 3-D model further clarifies inter-relationships. Conclusion Advances in MR technology allow visualization of perineal body anatomy in living women and development of 3D models which enhance our understanding of its three different regions: superficial, mid and deep. PMID:21055513

  16. Organotypic slice cultures of human gastric and esophagogastric junction cancer.

    PubMed

    Koerfer, Justus; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Merz, Felicitas; Wittekind, Christian; Kubick, Christoph; Kassahun, Woubet T; Schumacher, Guido; Moebius, Christian; Gaßler, Nikolaus; Schopow, Nikolas; Geister, Daniela; Wiechmann, Volker; Weimann, Arved; Eckmann, Christian; Aigner, Achim; Bechmann, Ingo; Lordick, Florian

    2016-07-01

    Gastric and esophagogastric junction cancers are heterogeneous and aggressive tumors with an unpredictable response to cytotoxic treatment. New methods allowing for the analysis of drug resistance are needed. Here, we describe a novel technique by which human tumor specimens can be cultured ex vivo, preserving parts of the natural cancer microenvironment. Using a tissue chopper, fresh surgical tissue samples were cut in 400 μm slices and cultivated in 6-well plates for up to 6 days. The slices were processed for routine histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Cytokeratin stains (CK8, AE1/3) were applied for determining tumor cellularity, Ki-67 for proliferation, and cleaved caspase-3 staining for apoptosis. The slices were analyzed under naive conditions and following 2-4 days in vitro exposure to 5-FU and cisplatin. The slice culture technology allowed for a good preservation of tissue morphology and tumor cell integrity during the culture period. After chemotherapy exposure, a loss of tumor cellularity and an increase in apoptosis were observed. Drug sensitivity of the tumors could be assessed. Organotypic slice cultures of gastric and esophagogastric junction cancers were successfully established. Cytotoxic drug effects could be monitored. They may be used to examine mechanisms of drug resistance in human tissue and may provide a unique and powerful ex vivo platform for the prediction of treatment response.

  17. Rapid and quantitative discrimination of tumour cells on tissue slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wei, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er

    2016-06-01

    After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. Currently, tissue slices are immersed in a bioprobe-linked fluorescent reagent for several minutes, washed to remove the unbound reagent, and then observed using a fluorescence microscope. However, the observation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry (SSB) method for avoiding these drawbacks. First, stain reagents were synthesised for the dual modalities of fluorescent and magnetic imaging by combining iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles and the currently used fluorescent reagent. The reagent for the proposed approach was stained using the same procedure as that for the current fluorescent reagent, and tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. Analysing the total intensity of magnetic spots in SSB images enables quantitatively determining the tumour cells of tissue slices. To confirm the magnetic imaging results, a traditional observation methodology entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will benefit future clinical pathology.

  18. Short pulse generation by laser slicing at NSLSII

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Blednykh, A.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Tchoubar, O.; Wang, G.; Willeke, F.; Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    We discuss an upgrade R&D project for NSLSII to generate sub-pico-second short x-ray pulses using laser slicing. We discuss its basic parameters and present a specific example for a viable design and its performance. Since the installation of the laser slicing system into the storage ring will break the symmetry of the lattice, we demonstrate it is possible to recover the dynamical aperture to the original design goal of the ring. There is a rapid growth of ultrafast user community interested in science using sub-pico-second x-ray pulses. In BNL's Short Pulse Workshop, the discussion from users shows clearly the need for a sub-pico-second pulse source using laser slicing method. In the proposal submitted following this workshop, NSLS team proposed both hard x-ray and soft x-ray beamlines using laser slicing pulses. Hence there is clearly a need to consider the R&D efforts of laser slicing short pulse generation at NSLSII to meet these goals.

  19. A multifunctional pipette for localized drug administration to brain slices.

    PubMed

    Ahemaiti, Aikeremu; Ainla, Alar; Jeffries, Gavin D M; Wigström, Holger; Orwar, Owe; Jesorka, Aldo; Jardemark, Kent

    2013-10-15

    We have developed a superfusion method utilizing an open-volume microfluidic device for administration of pharmacologically active substances to selected areas in brain slices with high spatio-temporal resolution. The method consists of a hydrodynamically confined flow of the active chemical compound, which locally stimulates neurons in brain slices, applied in conjunction with electrophysiological recording techniques to analyze the response. The microfluidic device, which is a novel free-standing multifunctional pipette, allows diverse superfusion experiments, such as testing the effects of different concentrations of drugs or drug candidates on neurons in different cell layers with high positional accuracy, affecting only a small number of cells. We demonstrate herein the use of the method with electrophysiological recordings of pyramidal cells in hippocampal and prefrontal cortex brain slices from rats, determine the dependence of electric responses on the distance of the superfusion device from the recording site, document a multifold gain in solution exchange time as compared to whole slice perfusion, and show that the device is able to store and deliver up to four solutions in a series. Localized solution delivery by means of open-volume microfluidic technology also reduces reagent consumption and tissue culture expenses significantly, while allowing more data to be collected from a single tissue slice, thus reducing the number of laboratory animals to be sacrificed for a study.

  20. Dimensions of the human sclera: Thickness measurement and regional changes with axial length.

    PubMed

    Norman, Richard E; Flanagan, John G; Rausch, Sophie M K; Sigal, Ian A; Tertinegg, Inka; Eilaghi, Armin; Portnoy, Sharon; Sled, John G; Ethier, C Ross

    2010-02-01

    Scleral thickness, especially near the region of the optic nerve head (ONH), is a potential factor of interest in the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Our goal was to characterize the scleral thickness distribution and other geometric features of human eyes. Eleven enucleated human globes (7 normal and 4 ostensibly glaucomatous) were imaged using high-field microMRI, providing 80 microm isotropic resolution over the whole eye. The MRI scans were segmented to produce 3-D corneoscleral shells. Each shell was divided into 15 slices along the anterior-posterior axis of the eye, and each slice was further subdivided into the anatomical quadrants. Average thickness was measured in each region, producing 60 thickness measurements per eye. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify trends in the thickness distribution, and scleral geometric features were correlated with globe axial length. Thickness over the whole sclera was 670 +/- 80 microm (mean +/- SD; range: 564 microm-832 microm) over the 11 eyes. Maximum thickness occurred at the posterior pole of the eye, with mean thickness of 996 +/- 181 microm. Thickness decreased to a minimum at the equator, where a mean thickness of 491 +/- 91 microm was measured. Eyes with a reported history of glaucoma were found to have longer axial length, smaller ONH canal dimensions and thinner posterior sclera. Several geometrical parameters of the eye, including posterior scleral thickness, axial length, and ONH canal diameter, appear linked. Significant intra-individual and inter-individual variation in scleral thickness was evident. This may be indicative of inter-individual differences in ocular biomechanics.

  1. Microbeam of 100 keV x ray with a sputtered-sliced Fresnel zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijo, Nagao; Suzuki, Yoshio; Takano, Hidekazu; Tamura, Shigeharu; Yasumoto, Masato; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Awaji, Mitsuhiro

    2003-12-01

    Microfocusing of 100 keV x ray with a sputtered-sliced Fresnel zone plate (ss-FZP) has been performed at the 250-m-long beamline (20XU) of SPring-8. The ss-FZP with an outermost zone width 0.16 μm which is composed of 70 layers of alternating Cu and Al layers and having thickness ˜180 μm was fabricated and characterized. The minimum focal spot size attained for the first order focal beam was 0.5 μm with a focal distance 900 mm at a photon energy 100 keV. The total flux of the microprobe was ˜2×106 photons s-1 μm-2.

  2. Multi-wire slurry wafering demonstrations. [slicing silicon ingots for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Ten slicing demonstrations on a multi-wire slurry saw, made to evaluate the silicon ingot wafering capabilities, reveal that the present sawing capabilities can provide usable wafer area from an ingot 1.05m/kg (e.g. kerf width 0.135 mm and wafer thickness 0.265 mm). Satisfactory surface qualities and excellent yield of silicon wafers were found. One drawback is that the add-on cost of producing water from this saw, as presently used, is considerably higher than other systems being developed for the low-cost silicon solar array project (LSSA), primarily because the saw uses a large quantity of wire. The add-on cost can be significantly reduced by extending the wire life and/or by rescue of properly plated wire to restore the diameter.

  3. [Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging].

    PubMed

    Bink, A; Berkefeld, J; Zanella, F

    2009-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples.

  4. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J; Atwood, Jerry L; Lawrance, Warren D; Raston, Colin L

    2016-03-11

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes.

  5. Unstable periodic orbits in human epileptic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pen-Ning Yu; Min-Chi Hsiao; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    Inter-ictal activity is studied in hippocampal slices resected from patients with epilepsy using local field potential recording. Inter-ictal activity in the dentate gyrus (DG) is induced by high-potassium (8 mM), low-magnesium (0.25 mM) aCSF with additional 100 μM 4-aminopyridine(4-AP). The dynamics of the inter-ictal activity is investigated by developing the first return map with inter-pulse intervals. Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) are detected in the hippocampal slice at the DG area according to both the topological recurrence method and the periodic orbit transform method. Surrogate analysis suggests the presence of UPOs in hippocampal slices from patients with epilepsy. This finding also suggests that inter-ictal activity is a chaotic system and will allow us to apply chaos control techniques to manipulate inter-ictal activity.

  6. Stimulation of Ethylene Production in Apple Tissue Slices by Methionine

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Morris; Kunishi, Alice; Mapson, L. W.; Wardale, D. A.

    1966-01-01

    Methionine can induce more than a 100% increase in ethylene production by apple tissue slices. The increased amount of ethylene derives from carbons 3 and 4 of methionine. Only post-climacteric fruit tissues are stimulated by methionine, and stimulation is optimum after 8 months' storage. Copper chelators such as sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate and cuprizone very markedly inhibit ethylene production by tissue slices. Carbon monoxide does not effect ethylene production by the slices. These data suggest that the mechanism for the conversion of methionine to ethylene, in apple tissues, is similar to the previously described model system for producing ethylene from methionine and reduced copper. Therefore, it is suggested that one of the ethylene-forming systems in tissues derives from methionine and proceeds to ethylene via a copper enzyme system which may be a peroxidase. PMID:16656267

  7. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes. PMID:26965728

  8. Drying kinetics and colour change of lemon slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvishi, Hosain; Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad H.; Minaei, Saeid

    2014-03-01

    The effect of microwave-convective heating on drying characteristics and colour change of lemon slices was investigated. The drying experiments were carried out at 180, 360, 540 and 720Wand at 22°C, with air velocity of 1ms-1. The values of effective moisture diffusivity were found to be in the range between 1.87 10-8 and 3.95 10-8 m2 s-1, and the activation energy was estimated to be 10.91 Wg-1. The drying data were fitted with ten mathematical models available in the literature. The model describing drying kinetics of lemon slices in the best way was found. The colour change of the dried lemon slices was analysed and considered as a quality index affecting the drying quality of the product. The values of lightness/darkness, yellowness/blueness and hue angle increased, while the value of redness/greenness decreased with increasing microwave power.

  9. Performance Characteristics of Thick Silicon Double-sided Strip Detectors.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S; Durko, Heather L; Fritz, Mark A; Furenlid, Lars R; Peterson, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60 mm × 60 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 µm strip pitch is attainable. Good flood uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD shows high potential for small-animal SPECT imaging.

  10. Reflectance dependence of polytetrafluoroethylene on thickness for xenon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, J.; Neff, A.; Arthurs, M.; Batista, E.; Morton, D.; Okunawo, M.; Pushkin, K.; Sander, A.; Stephenson, S.; Wang, Y.; Lorenzon, W.

    2017-06-01

    Many rare event searches including dark matter direct detection and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments take advantage of the high VUV reflective surfaces made from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) reflector materials to achieve high light collection efficiency in their detectors. As the detectors have grown in size over the past decade, there has also been an increased need for ever thinner detector walls without significant loss in reflectance to reduce dead volumes around active noble liquids, outgassing, and potential backgrounds. We report on the experimental results to measure the dependence of the reflectance on thickness of two PTFE samples at wavelengths near 178 nm. No change in reflectance was observed as the wall thickness of a cylindrically shaped PTFE vessel immersed in liquid xenon was varied between 1 mm to 9.5 mm.

  11. Performance Characteristics of Thick Silicon Double-sided Strip Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60 mm × 60 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 µm strip pitch is attainable. Good flood uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD shows high potential for small-animal SPECT imaging. PMID:26778911

  12. TU-EF-204-11: Impact of Using Multi-Slice Training Sets On the Performance of a Channelized Hotelling Observer in a Low-Contrast Detection Task in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Favazza, C; Yu, L; Leng, S; McCollough, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate using multiple CT image slices from a single acquisition as independent training images for a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) model to reduce the number of repeated scans for CHO-based CT image quality assessment. Methods: We applied a previously validated CHO model to detect low contrast disk objects formed from cross-sectional images of three epoxy-resin-based rods (diameters: 3, 5, and 9 mm; length: ∼5cm). The rods were submerged in a 35x 25 cm2 iodine-doped water filled phantom, yielding-15 HU object contrast. The phantom was scanned 100 times with and without the rods present. Scan and reconstruction parameters include: 5 mm slice thickness at 0.5 mm intervals, 120 kV, 480 Quality Reference mAs, and a 128-slice scanner. The CHO’s detectability index was evaluated as a function of factors related to incorporating multi-slice image data: object misalignment along the z-axis, inter-slice pixel correlation, and number of unique slice locations. In each case, the CHO training set was fixed to 100 images. Results: Artificially shifting the object’s center position by as much as 3 pixels in any direction relative to the Gabor channel filters had insignificant impact on object detectability. An inter-slice pixel correlation of >∼0.2 yielded positive bias in the model’s performance. Incorporating multi-slice image data yielded slight negative bias in detectability with increasing number of slices, likely due to physical variations in the objects. However, inclusion of image data from up to 5 slice locations yielded detectability indices within measurement error of the single slice value. Conclusion: For the investigated model and task, incorporating image data from 5 different slice locations of at least 5 mm intervals into the CHO model yielded detectability indices within measurement error of the single slice value. Consequently, this methodology would Result in a 5-fold reduction in number of image acquisitions. This project

  13. Single-slice mapping of ultrashort T 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Stefan; Schad, Lothar R.

    2011-05-01

    In this communication we present a method for single-slice mapping of ultrashort transverse relaxation times T2. The RF pulse sequence consists of a spin echo preparation of the magnetization followed by slice-selective ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with radial k-space sampling. In order to keep the minimum echo time as small as possible, avoid out-of-slice contamination and signal contamination due to unwanted echoes, the implemented pulse sequence employs a slice-selective 180° RF refocusing pulse and a 4-step phase cycle. The slice overlap of the two slice-selective RF pulses was investigated. An acceptable Gaussian slice profile could be achieved by adjusting the strength of the two slice-selection gradients. The method was tested on a short T2 phantom consisting of an arrangement of a roll of adhesive tape, an eraser, a piece of modeling dough made of Plasticine®, and a 10% w/w agar gel. The T2 measurements on the phantom revealed exponential signal decays for all samples with T2(adhesive tape) = (0.5 ± 0.1) ms, T2(eraser) = (2.33 ± 0.07) ms, T2(Plasticine®) = (2.8 ± 0.06) ms, and T2(10% agar) = (9.5 ± 0.83) ms. The T2 values obtained by the mapping method show good agreement with the T2 values obtained by a non-selective T2 measurement. For all samples, except the adhesive tape, the effective transverse relaxation time T2∗ was significantly shorter than T2. Depending on the scanner hardware the presented method allows mapping of T2 down to a few hundreds of microseconds. Besides investigating material samples, the presented method can be used to study the rapidly decaying MR-signal from biological tissue (e.g.: bone, cartilage, and tendon) and quadrupolar nuclei (e.g.: 23Na, 35Cl, and 17O).

  14. Classification of CT-brain slices based on local histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Tymkovych, Maksym Y.; Pavlov, Sergii V.; Timchik, Sergii V.; Kisała, Piotr; Orakbaev, Yerbol

    2015-12-01

    Neurosurgical intervention is a very complicated process. Modern operating procedures based on data such as CT, MRI, etc. Automated analysis of these data is an important task for researchers. Some modern methods of brain-slice segmentation use additional data to process these images. Classification can be used to obtain this information. To classify the CT images of the brain, we suggest using local histogram and features extracted from them. The paper shows the process of feature extraction and classification CT-slices of the brain. The process of feature extraction is specialized for axial cross-section of the brain. The work can be applied to medical neurosurgical systems.

  15. Emission-line galaxies in the Slice of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzer, John J.; Aldering, Gregory S.; Bothun, Gregory D.; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Lonsdale, Carol J.

    1988-01-01

    The relative spatial distributions of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) and normal galaxies that lie in the sky area covered by the 'Slice' survey (de Lapparent et al., 1986) are considered. ELGs follow the same spatial distribution as found for the Slice galaxies, with the exception that they avoid the Coma cluster. It is pointed out that although the present ELGs are not shown to occur in regions of very low density, the luminosity distribution of the sample is such that luminosity/mass-dependent effects on the spatial distribution would not be noticeable.

  16. Verification of Software Product Lines with Delta-Oriented Slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Daniel; Klebanov, Vladimir; Schaefer, Ina

    Software product line (SPL) engineering is a well-known approach to develop industry-size adaptable software systems. SPL are often used in domains where high-quality software is desirable; the overwhelming product diversity, however, remains a challenge for assuring correctness. In this paper, we present delta-oriented slicing, an approach to reduce the deductive verification effort across an SPL where individual products are Java programs and their relations are described by deltas. On the specification side, we extend the delta language to deal with formal specifications. On the verification side, we combine proof slicing and similarity-guided proof reuse to ease the verification process.

  17. Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using Inside Diameter (I.D.) saws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonyan, P.

    1980-01-01

    Modifications to a 16 inch STC automated saw included: a programmable feed system; a crystal rotating system; and a STC dynatrack blade boring and control system. By controlling the plating operation and by grinding the cutting edge, 16 inch I.D. blades were produced with a cutting edge thickness of .22 mm. Crystal rotation mechanism was used to slice 100 mm diameter crystals with a 16 inch blade down to a thickness of .20 mm. Cutting rates with crystal rotation were generally slower than with standard plunge I.D. slicing techniques. Using programmed feeds and programmed rotation, maximum cutting rates were from 0.3 to 1.0 inches per minute.

  18. Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using Inside-Diameter (I.D.) saws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonyan, P.

    1980-01-01

    Inside diametar wafering equipment, blades and processes were used to develop methods to produce large areas of silicon sheet. Modifications to a 16 inch STC automated saw included: programmable feed system, crystal rotating system, and STC dynatrack blade monitoring and control system. By controlling the plating operation and by grinding of the cutting edge, 16 inch ID blades with a cutting edge thickness of .22 mm can be produced. Crystal rotation mechanism was used to slice 100 mm diameter crystals with a 16 inch blade down to a thickness of .20 mm. Cutting rates with crystal rotation were generally slower than with standard plunge ID slicing techniques. Using programmed feeds and programmed rotation, maximum cutting rates were from 0.3 to 1.0 inches per minute.

  19. Measurement of compressed breast thickness by optical stereoscopic photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Albert H; Mawdsley, Gordon E; Yaffe, Martin J

    2009-02-01

    The determination of volumetric breast density (VBD) from mammograms requires accurate knowledge of the thickness of the compressed breast. In attempting to accurately determine VBD from images obtained on conventional mammography systems, the authors found that the thickness reported by a number of mammography systems in the field varied by as much as 15 mm when compressing the same breast or phantom. In order to evaluate the behavior of mammographic compression systems and to be able to predict the thickness at different locations in the breast on patients, they have developed a method for measuring the local thickness of the breast at all points of contact with the compression paddle using optical stereoscopic photogrammetry. On both flat (solid) and compressible phantoms, the measurements were accurate to better than 1 mm with a precision of 0.2 mm. In a pilot study, this method was used to measure thickness on 108 volunteers who were undergoing mammography examination. This measurement tool will allow us to characterize paddle surface deformations, deflections and calibration offsets for mammographic units.

  20. Model-based cartilage thickness measurement in the submillimeter range

    SciTech Connect

    Streekstra, G. J.; Strackee, S. D.; Maas, M.; Wee, R. ter; Venema, H. W.

    2007-09-15

    Current methods of image-based thickness measurement in thin sheet structures utilize second derivative zero crossings to locate the layer boundaries. It is generally acknowledged that the nonzero width of the point spread function (PSF) limits the accuracy of this measurement procedure. We propose a model-based method that strongly reduces PSF-induced bias by incorporating the PSF into the thickness estimation method. We estimated the bias in thickness measurements in simulated thin sheet images as obtained from second derivative zero crossings. To gain insight into the range of sheet thickness where our method is expected to yield improved results, sheet thickness was varied between 0.15 and 1.2 mm with an assumed PSF as present in the high-resolution modes of current computed tomography (CT) scanners [full width at half maximum (FWHM) 0.5-0.8 mm]. Our model-based method was evaluated in practice by measuring layer thickness from CT images of a phantom mimicking two parallel cartilage layers in an arthrography procedure. CT arthrography images of cadaver wrists were also evaluated, and thickness estimates were compared to those obtained from high-resolution anatomical sections that served as a reference. The thickness estimates from the simulated images reveal that the method based on second derivative zero crossings shows considerable bias for layers in the submillimeter range. This bias is negligible for sheet thickness larger than 1 mm, where the size of the sheet is more than twice the FWHM of the PSF but can be as large as 0.2 mm for a 0.5 mm sheet. The results of the phantom experiments show that the bias is effectively reduced by our method. The deviations from the true thickness, due to random fluctuations induced by quantum noise in the CT images, are of the order of 3% for a standard wrist imaging protocol. In the wrist the submillimeter thickness estimates from the CT arthrography images correspond within 10% to those estimated from the anatomical

  1. Climate variability around the first Pliocene time slice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, C.; Haywood, A.; Dolan, A. M.; Hunter, S. J.; Tindall, J.; Pope, J. O.; Pickering, S.

    2013-12-01

    Existing data/model comparisons for the mid-Pliocene (Dowsett et al., 2013) have identified specific regions of concordance and discord between climate models and proxy data. One reason for site-specific disagreement is likely related to the time (warm peak) averaged nature of the mid-Pliocene ocean temperatures provided within existing proxy syntheses. To facilitate improved data/model comparisons in the future new proxy sea surface temperature reconstructions will focus on specific time slices within the Pliocene epoch. Haywood et al. (2013) identified an initial time slice for environmental reconstruction and climate modelling centred on an interglacial event at Marine Isotope Stage KM5c (3.205 Ma). Critically, this interval displays a very near to modern orbital configuration simplifying the interpretation of proxy data and the experimental design for climate models. Nevertheless, current limitations of chronology and correlation make it likely that new proxy records will be attributable to a time range around the time slice, and may not always represent the time slice specifically. This introduces an element of uncertainty through orbital forcing around the time slice which can be investigated and quantified within a numerical climate modelling framework. The Hadley Centre Coupled Climate Model Version 3 (HadCM3) has been used to perform a series of orbital forcing sensitivity tests around the identified time slice at MIS KM5c. Simulations every 2 kyr either side of the time slice to a range +/- 20 kyr have been completed. The model results indicate that +/- 20 kyr either side of the time slice, orbital forcing generates a less than 1°C change on global MAT. One exception to this relative stability in climate is seen in the North Atlantic (a region noted for disagreement in existing Pliocene data/model comparisons). Here, ocean surface temperature variations of up to 6°C are predicted. These model responses appear to be linked to changes in ocean circulation

  2. Conversion factors for determining organ doses received by paediatric patients in high-resolution single slice computed tomography with narrow collimation.

    PubMed

    Seidenbusch, Michael C; Harder, Dietrich; Regulla, Dieter F; Schneider, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Estimations of organ doses DT received during computed tomographic examinations are usually performed by applying conversion factors to basic dose indicators like the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) or the dose-length-product (DLP). In addition to the existing conversion factors for beam apertures of 5 mm or 10 mm, we present new DLP-DT conversion factors adapted to high-resolution CT (HRCT) examinations of infants and young children with beam apertures of the order of 1 mm and under consideration of bow tie filtration. Calculations are performed on mathematical MIRD phantoms for an age range from 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 up to (for comparison) 30 years by adapting PCXMC, a Monte Carlo algorithm originally developed by STUK (Helsinki, Finland) for dose reconstructions in projection radiography. For this purpose, each single slice CT examination is approximated by a series of corresponding virtual planar radiographies comprising all focus positions. The transformation of CT exposure parameters into exposure parameters of the series of corresponding planar radiographies is performed by a specially developed algorithm called XCT. The DLP values are evaluated using the EGSRay code. The new method is verified at a beam aperture of 10 mm by comparison with formerly published conversion factors. We show that the higher spatial resolution leads to an enhanced DLP-DT conversion factor if a small organ (e. g. thyroid gland, mammae, uterus, ovaries, testes) is exactly met by the chosen CT slice, while the conversion factor is drastically reduced if the chosen CT slice is positioned above or below the organ. This effect is utilized for dose-saving examinations with only a few single slices instead a full scan, which technique is applied in about 10% of all paediatric chest CT examinations.

  3. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, C.; Breen, S.; Purdie, T. G.; Owrangi, A.; Publicover, J.; Bartolac, S.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods: The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as ''volume'' and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Results: Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE{sub 160mm}=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Conclusions: Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for

  4. Effects of feeding pelleted diets without or with distillers dried grains with solubles on fresh belly characteristics, fat quality, and commercial bacon slicing yields of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Overholt, M F; Lowell, J E; Wilson, K B; Matulis, R J; Stein, H H; Dilger, A C; Boler, D D

    2016-05-01

    One hundred ninety-two pigs were blocked by age and stratified by initial BW (25.7 ± 2.3 kg) into pens (2 barrows and 2 gilts/pen), and within blocks, pens were assigned randomly to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, with main effects of diet form (meal vs. pelleted) and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) inclusion (0% vs. 30%). Pigs were slaughtered after a 91-d feeding trial, and carcasses were fabricated after a 24-h chilling period. Belly dimensions and flop distance were measured, and an adipose tissue sample from each belly was collected for fatty acid analysis. Bacon was manufactured at a commercial processing facility before being returned to the University of Illinois Meat Science Laboratory for further evaluation. Although bellies from pigs fed pelleted diets were 5.3% heavier ( < 0.01) than bellies from meal-fed pigs, belly weight as a percentage of chilled side weight ( = 0.55) and fresh belly dimensions ( ≥ 0.11) were not affected by diet form. Slab bacon weight and cooked yield were greater ( ≤ 0.01) for bellies from pellet-fed than meal-fed pigs. Despite pellet-fed pigs having a 3.1-unit greater iodine value (IV) than meal-fed pigs, there was no effect ( ≥ 0.16) of diet form on commercial bacon slicing yields. Bacon slabs from pellet-fed pigs produced more ( < 0.01) total bacon slices, but 3.1% fewer ( < 0.01) slices per kilogram than slabs from meal fed pigs. Inclusion of 30% DDGS reduced belly thickness ( < 0.001), flop distance ( < 0.001), and initial belly weight ( = 0.04) by 0.32 cm, 4.97 cm, and 2.85, respectively, and increased ( < 0.001) belly fat IV by 7.1 units compared with bellies from pigs fed 0% DDGS. Feeding 0% DDGS produced more ( < 0.01) total bacon slices than feeding 30% DDGS. Distillers dried grains with solubles inclusion had no effect on slice yields ( ≥ 0.14) or slices per kilogram ( = 0.08). Overall, bellies from pellet-fed pigs were heavier and had greater IV but did not differ in

  5. Cyanide-resistant Respiration in Freshly Cut Potato Slices.

    PubMed

    Rychter, A; Janes, H W; Frenkel, C

    1978-04-01

    Treating intact white potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber with ethylene in air or O(2) made it possible to obtain freshly cut slices which exhibit cyanide-resistant respiration. The cyanide-resistant path requires induction in whole tubers. The data also indicate that high O(2) concentration is necessary for the full development of cyanide-resistant respiration.

  6. Stochastic neural network model for spontaneous bursting in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Biswal, B; Dasgupta, C

    2002-11-01

    A biologically plausible, stochastic, neural network model that exhibits spontaneous transitions between a low-activity (normal) state and a high-activity (epileptic) state is studied by computer simulation. Brief excursions of the network to the high-activity state lead to spontaneous population bursting similar to the behavior observed in hippocampal slices bathed in a high-potassium medium. Although the variability of interburst intervals in this model is due to stochasticity, first return maps of successive interburst intervals show trajectories that resemble the behavior expected near unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) of systems exhibiting deterministic chaos. Simulations of the effects of the application of chaos control, periodic pacing, and anticontrol to the network model yield results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained in experiments on hippocampal slices. Estimation of the statistical significance of UPOs through surrogate data analysis also leads to results that resemble those of similar analysis of data obtained from slice experiments and human epileptic activity. These results suggest that spontaneous population bursting in hippocampal slices may be a manifestation of stochastic bistable dynamics, rather than of deterministic chaos. Our results also question the reliability of some of the recently proposed, UPO-based, statistical methods for detecting determinism and chaos in experimental time-series data.

  7. Hemodialysis fistula occlusion: demonstration with 64-slice CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    The speed and resolution of 64-slice CT have resulted in new applications for CT angiography (CTA) owing to rapid data acquisition during the arterial phase, improved visualization of small vessels, and lengthened anatomic coverage. Extremity CT angiography is one such region. This case report shows the utility of multislice CTA for the evaluation of hemodialysis graft dysfunction.

  8. Blanching, salting and sun drying of different pumpkin fruit slices.

    PubMed

    Workneh, T S; Zinash, A; Woldetsadik, K

    2014-11-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the quality of pumpkin (Cucuribita Spp.) slices that were subjected to pre-drying treatments and drying using two drying methods (uncontrolled sun and oven) fruit accessions. Pre-drying had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect on the quality of dried pumpkin slices. 10 % salt solution dipped pumpkin fruit slices had good chemical quality. The two-way interaction between drying methods and pre-drying treatments had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect on chemical qualities. Pumpkin subjected to salt solution dipping treatment and oven dried had higher chemical concentrations. Among the pumpkin fruit accessions, pumpkin accession 8007 had the superior TSS, total sugar and sugar to acid ratio after drying. Among the three pre-drying treatment, salt solution dipping treatment had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect and the most efficient pre-drying treatment to retain the quality of dried pumpkin fruits without significant chemical quality deterioration. Salt dipping treatment combined with low temperature (60 °C) oven air circulation drying is recommended to maintain quality of dried pumpkin slices. However, since direct sun drying needs extended drying time due to fluctuation in temperature, it is recommended to develop or select best successful solar dryer for use in combination with pre-drying salt dipping or blanching treatments.

  9. Spontaneous recurrent network activity in organotypic rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Mohajerani, Majid H; Cherubini, Enrico

    2005-07-01

    Organotypic hippocampal slices were prepared from postnatal day 4 rats and maintained in culture for >6 weeks. Cultured slices exhibited from 12 days in vitro spontaneous events which closely resembled giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) recorded in neonatal hippocampal slices. GDP-like events occurred over the entire hippocampus with a delay of 30-60 ms between two adjacent regions as demonstrated by pair recordings from CA3-CA3, CA3-CA1 and interneurone-CA3 pyramidal cells. As in acute slices, spontaneous recurrent events were generated by the interplay of GABA and glutamate acting on AMPA receptors as they were reversibly blocked by bicuculline and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione but not by dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentaoic acid. The equilibrium potentials for GABA measured in whole cell and gramicidin-perforated patch from interconnected interneurones-CA3 pyramidal cells were -70 and -56 mV, respectively. The resting membrane potential estimated from the reversal of N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced single-channel currents in cell-attach experiments was -75 mV. In spite of its depolarizing action, in the majority of cases GABA was still inhibitory as it blocked the firing of principal cells. The increased level of glutamatergic connectivity certainly contributed to network synchronization and to the development of interictal discharges after prolonged exposure to bicuculline. In spite of its inhibitory action, in a minority of cells GABA was still depolarizing and excitatory as it was able to bring principal cells to fire, suggesting that a certain degree of immaturity is still present in cultured slices. This was in line with the transient bicuculline-induced block of GDPs and with the isoguvacine-induced increase of GDP frequency.

  10. Fan beam image reconstruction with generalized Fourier slice theorem.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    For parallel beam geometry the Fourier reconstruction works via the Fourier slice theorem (or central slice theorem, projection slice theorem). For fan beam situation, Fourier slice can be extended to a generalized Fourier slice theorem (GFST) for fan-beam image reconstruction. We have briefly introduced this method in a conference. This paper reintroduces the GFST method for fan beam geometry in details. The GFST method can be described as following: the Fourier plane is filled by adding up the contributions from all fanbeam projections individually; thereby the values in the Fourier plane are directly calculated for Cartesian coordinates such avoiding the interpolation from polar to Cartesian coordinates in the Fourier domain; inverse fast Fourier transform is applied to the image in Fourier plane and leads to a reconstructed image in spacial domain. The reconstructed image is compared between the result of the GFST method and the result from the filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The major differences of the GFST and the FBP methods are: (1) The interpolation process are at different data sets. The interpolation of the GFST method is at projection data. The interpolation of the FBP method is at filtered projection data. (2) The filtering process are done in different places. The filtering process of the GFST is at Fourier domain. The filtering process of the FBP method is the ramp filter which is done at projections. The resolution of ramp filter is variable with different location but the filter in the Fourier domain lead to resolution invariable with location. One advantage of the GFST method over the FBP method is in short scan situation, an exact solution can be obtained with the GFST method, but it can not be obtained with the FBP method. The calculation of both the GFST and the FBP methods are at O(N^3), where N is the number of pixel in one dimension.

  11. Astronomy in the region between 1 mm and 0.1 mm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Rainer; Meyer, Stephan S.

    1994-01-01

    The research under this grant resulted in the measurement of anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) on angular scales from 90 degrees to 0.3 degrees. A bolometric radiometer was built with a sensitivity of better than 500 micro K divided by the square root of (Hz). The measurements complement the COBE anisotropy measurement in two ways. The large scale measurements were shown to cross-correlate with the COBE DMR anisotropy detection, confirming the results. The small scale measurements further the understanding of the structure in the CMBR on scales where we can begin to model the early stages in galaxy and galaxy cluster formation.

  12. A new look at the fetus: thick-slab T2-weighted sequences in fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Peter C; Mittermayer, Christoph; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the fetus is considered an established adjunct to fetal ultrasound, stacks of images alone cannot provide an overall impression of the fetus. The present study evaluates the use of thick-slab T2-weighted MR images to obtain a three-dimensional impression of the fetus using MRI. A thick-slab T2-weighted sequence was added to the routine protocol in 100 fetal MRIs obtained for various indications (19th to 37th gestational weeks) on a 1.5 T magnet using a five-element phased-array surface coil. Slice thickness adapted to fetal size and uterine geometry varied between 25 and 50mm, as did the field of view (250-350 mm). Acquisition of one image took less than 1s. The pictorial essay shows that these images visualize fetal anatomy in a more comprehensive way than is possible with a series of 3-4mm thick slices. These thick-slab images facilitate the assessment of the whole fetus, fetal proportions, surface structures, and extremities. Fetal pathology may be captured in one image. Thick-slab T2-weighted images provide additional information that cannot be gathered from a series of images and are considered a valuable adjunct to conventional 2D MR images.

  13. Ultrasonic Inspection Of Thick Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friant, C. L.; Djordjevic, B. B.; O'Keefe, C. V.; Ferrell, W.; Klutz, T.

    1993-01-01

    Ultrasonics used to inspect large, relatively thick vessels for hidden defects. Report based on experiments in through-the-thickness transmission of ultrasonic waves in both steel and filament-wound composite cases of solid-fuel rocket motors.

  14. How thick is the lithosphere?

    PubMed

    Kanamori, H; Press, F

    1970-04-25

    A rapid decrease in shear velocity in the suboceanic mantle is used to infer the thickness of the lithosphere. It is proposed that new and highly precise group velocity data constrain the solutions and imply a thickness near 70 km.

  15. Comparison between Aging of Slices and Ethylene Treatment of Whole White Potato Tubers.

    PubMed

    Janes, H W; Wiest, S C

    1980-07-01

    Cyanide-resistant O(2) consumption can be stimulated by either treating whole white potato tubers (Norchip) with ethylene, in the presence of 100% O(2), or aging slices obtained from untreated potato tubers. A comparison of alternative pathway activity elicited by either treatment was undertaken. The proportion of electrons flowing through the alternative path in the presence of intermediate concentrations of KCN and at various concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid was identical in both cases. However, the respiration of slices from ethylene-treated tubers was in every case stimulated by KCN, whereas the aged slices never exhibited this phenomenon. Furthermore, the metabolism of d-[U-(14)C]glucose was several hundred times greater in aged slices than in fresh slices from C(2)H(4)-treated tubers. These results, along with the respiratory kinetics of aged slices from ethylene-treated tubers, suggest that aged slices and fresh slices from ethylene-treated tubers are biochemically dissimilar.

  16. Current economic and sensitivity analysis for ID slicing of 4 inch and 6 inch diameter silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E. G.; Johnson, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The economics and sensitivities of slicing large diameter silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications were examined. Current economics and slicing add on cost sensitivities are calculated using variable parameters for blade life, slicing yield, and slice cutting speed. It is indicated that cutting speed has the biggest impact on slicing add on cost, followed by slicing yield, and by blade life as the blade life increases.

  17. Waterway Ice Thickness Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The ship on the opposite page is a U. S. Steel Corporation tanker cruising through the ice-covered waters of the Great Lakes in the dead of winter. The ship's crew is able to navigate safely by plotting courses through open water or thin ice, a technique made possible by a multi-agency technology demonstration program in which NASA is a leading participant. Traditionally, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System is closed to shipping for more than three months of winter season because of ice blockage, particularly fluctuations in the thickness and location of ice cover due to storms, wind, currents and variable temperatures. Shippers have long sought a system of navigation that would allow year-round operation on the Lakes and produce enormous economic and fuel conservation benefits. Interrupted operations require that industrial firms stockpile materials to carry them through the impassable months, which is costly. Alternatively, they must haul cargos by more expensive overland transportation. Studies estimate the economic benefits of year-round Great Lakes shipping in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually and fuel consumption savings in the tens of millions of gallons. Under Project Icewarn, NASA, the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration collaborated in development and demonstration of a system that permits safe year-round operations. It employs airborne radars, satellite communications relay and facsimile transmission to provide shippers and ships' masters up-to-date ice charts. Lewis Research Center contributed an accurate methods of measuring ice thickness by means of a special "short-pulse" type of radar. In a three-year demonstration program, Coast Guard aircraft equipped with Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) flew over the Great Lakes three or four times a week. The SLAR, which can penetrate clouds, provided large area readings of the type and distribution of ice cover. The information was supplemented by short

  18. Microscopic structural analysis of fractured silk fibers from Bombyx mori and Samia cynthia ricini using 13C CP/MAS NMR with a 1mm microcoil MAS NMR probehead.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Shizuo; Takahashi, Rui; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2010-07-01

    Conformational changes have been studied in silk fibers from the domestic silkworm Bombyx mori and a wild silkworm Samia cynthia ricini as a result of fractured by stretching. About 300 samples consisting of only the fractured regions of [1-13C]Ala or [1-13C]Gly labeled silk fibers were collected and observed by 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra. The total amount of these fractured fibers is only about 1mg and therefore we used a home-built 1mm microcoil MAS NMR probehead. A very small increase in the fraction of random coil was noted for the alanine regions of both silk fibroins and for the glycine region of B. mori silk fibroin. However, there is no difference in the spectra before and after fractured for the glycine region of S. c. ricini silk fibroin. Thus, the influence of fracture occurs exclusively at the Ala region for S. c. ricini. The relationship between sequence, fracture and structure is discussed.

  19. Alternative oxidase expression in aged potato tuber slices

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, C.; Herdies, L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    Higher plant mitochondria posses a cyanide-resistant, hydroxamate-sensitive alternative pathway of electron transport that does not conserve energy. Aging of potato tuber slices for 24 hours leads to the development of an alternative pathway capacity. We have shown that a monoclonal antibody raised against the alternative pathway terminal oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum crossreacts with a protein of similar size in aged potato slice mitochondria. This protein was partially purified and characterized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and its relative levels parallel the rise in cyanide-resistant respiration. We are using a putative clone of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase gene to isolate the equivalent gene from potato and to examine its expression.

  20. Analysis of the halo background in femtosecond slicing experiments.

    PubMed

    Schick, Daniel; Le Guyader, Loïc; Pontius, Niko; Radu, Ilie; Kachel, Torsten; Mitzner, Rolf; Zeschke, Thomas; Schüßler-Langeheine, Christian; Föhlisch, Alexander; Holldack, Karsten

    2016-05-01

    The slicing facility FemtoSpeX at BESSY II offers unique opportunities to study photo-induced dynamics on femtosecond time scales by means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, resonant and non-resonant X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments in the soft X-ray regime. Besides femtosecond X-ray pulses, slicing sources inherently also produce a so-called `halo' background with a different time structure, polarization and pointing. Here a detailed experimental characterization of the halo radiation is presented, and a method is demonstrated for its correct and unambiguous removal from femtosecond time-resolved data using a special laser triggering scheme as well as analytical models. Examples are given for time-resolved measurements with corresponding halo correction, and errors of the relevant physical quantities caused by either neglecting or by applying a simplified model to describe this background are estimated.

  1. ERTS-1 image enhancement by optically combining density slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapper, G. O.; Pease, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The technique of density slicing using a photographic film and its application to enhancement of ERTS-1 imagery has proved to be useful for mapping varigated areal phenomena and provides a useful supplement ot the I2S MiniAddcol viewing system. The intial experiments conducted with this film were encouraging, and indicated that this technique of density slicing using readily accessible darkroom facilities and simple darkroom procedures allows rapid, accurate, and facile interpretation of certain areal phenomena to be made from the imagery. The distribution of the tree yucca, Yucca brevifolia Jaegeriana, in the eastern Mojave Desert of Southern California and southern Nevada was used as an example to test the accuracy of the technique for mapping purposes. The distribution was mapped at a relatively high level of accuracy.

  2. Preliminary Results from the ESO Slice Project (ESP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettolani, G.; Zucca, E.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G.; Zamorani, G.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Alimi, J.; Blanchard, A.; Cayatte, V.; Felenbock, P.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Ramella, M.

    We present the first results of a galaxy redshift survey, ESO Slice Project (ESP), we are accomplishing as an ESO Key-Project over about 30 square degrees in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The limiting magnitude is b_J = 19.4. Observations have been almost completed and about 90% of the data obtained so far has been reduced providing about 3000 galaxy redshifts. We present some preliminary results concerning the large scale galaxy distribution and their luminosity function.

  3. The origin of thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    Thick discs are defined to be disc-like components with a scale height larger than that of the classical discs. They are ubiquitous (Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006; Comerón et al. 2011a), they are made of mostly old and metal-poor stars and are most easily detected in close to edge-on galaxies. Their origin has been considered mysterious and several formation theories have been proposed: • The thick disc being formed secularly by thin disc stars heated by disc overdensities such as giant molecular clouds or spiral arms (Villumsen 1985, ApJ, 290, 75) and by stars moved outwards from their original orbits by radial migration mechanisms (Schönrich & Binney 2009). • The thick disc being formed by the heating of the thin disc by satellites (Quinn et al. 1993) and the tidal stripping of them (Abadi et al. 2003). • The thick disc being formed fast and already thick at high redshift in an highly unstable disc. Inside that thick disc, a thin disc would form afterwards as suggested by Elemgreen & Elmegreen (2006). • The thick disc being formed originally thick at high redshift by the merger of gas-rich protogalactic fragments and a thin disc forming afterwards within it (Brook et al. 2007). The first mechanism is a secular evolution mechanism. The time-scale of the second one is dependent on the merger history of the main galaxy. In the two last mechanisms, the thick disc forms already thick in a short time-scale at high redshift. Recent Milky Way studies, (see, e.g., Bovy et al. 2012), have shown indications that there is no discontinuity between the thin and the thick disc chemical and kinematic properties. Instead, those studies indicate the presence of a monotonic distribution of disc thicknesses. This would suggest a secular origin for the Milky Way thick disc. Studies in external galaxies (Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006; Comerón et al. 2011b), have shown that low-mass disc galaxies have thick disc relative masses much larger than those found in large-mass galaxies

  4. Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics Studies in Ex Vivo TIssue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    An important component of this methodology is to assess the role of the tumor microenvironment on tumor growth and survival. To tackle this problem, we have adapted the original approach of Warburg 1, by combining thin tissue slices with Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to determine detailed metabolic activity of human tissues. SIRM enables the tracing of metabolic transformations of source molecules such as glucose or glutamine over defined time periods, and is a requirement for detailed pathway tracing and flux analysis. In our approach, we maintain freshly resected tissue slices (both cancerous and non- cancerous from the same organ of the same subject) in cell culture media, and treat with appropriate stable isotope-enriched nutrients, e.g. 13C6-glucose or 13C5, 15N2 -glutamine. These slices are viable for at least 24 h, and make it possible to eliminate systemic influence on the target tissue metabolism while maintaining the original 3D cellular architecture. It is therefore an excellent pre-clinical platform for assessing the effect of therapeutic agents on target tissue metabolism and their therapeutic efficacy on individual patients 2,3. PMID:27158639

  5. A recording chamber for small volume slice electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kevin D.; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I.; Reisdorph, Nichole; Lei, Tim C.; Klug, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from brain slices are typically performed in small recording chambers that allow for the superfusion of the tissue with artificial extracellular solution (ECS), while the chamber holding the tissue is mounted in the optical path of a microscope to image neurons in the tissue. ECS itself is inexpensive, and thus superfusion rates and volumes of ECS consumed during an experiment using standard ECS are not critical. However, some experiments require the addition of expensive pharmacological agents or other chemical compounds to the ECS, creating a need to build superfusion systems that operate on small volumes while still delivering appropriate amounts of oxygen and other nutrients to the tissue. We developed a closed circulation tissue chamber for slice recordings that operates with small volumes of bath solution in the range of 1.0 to 2.6 ml and a constant oxygen/carbon dioxide delivery to the solution in the bath. In our chamber, the ECS is oxygenated and recirculated directly in the recording chamber, eliminating the need for tubes and external bottles/containers to recirculate and bubble ECS and greatly reducing the total ECS volume required for superfusion. At the same time, the efficiency of tissue oxygenation and health of the section are comparable to standard superfusion methods. We also determined that the small volume of ECS contains a sufficient amount of nutrients to support the health of a standard brain slice for several hours without concern for either depletion of nutrients or accumulation of waste products. PMID:26203105

  6. Biosensor measurement of purine release from cerebellar cultures and slices.

    PubMed

    Wall, Mark; Eason, Robert; Dale, Nicholas

    2010-09-01

    We have previously described an action-potential and Ca(2+)-dependent form of adenosine release in the molecular layer of cerebellar slices. The most likely source of the adenosine is the parallel fibres, the axons of granule cells. Using microelectrode biosensors, we have therefore investigated whether cultured granule cells (from postnatal day 7-8 rats) can release adenosine. Although no purine release could be detected in response to focal electrical stimulation, purine (adenosine, inosine or hypoxanthine) release occurred in response to an increase in extracellular K(+) concentration from 3 to 25 mM coupled with addition of 1 mM glutamate. The mechanism of purine release was transport from the cytoplasm via an ENT transporter. This process did not require action-potential firing but was Ca(2+)dependent. The major purine released was not adenosine, but was either inosine or hypoxanthine. In order for inosine/hypoxanthine release to occur, cultures had to contain both granule cells and glial cells; neither cellular component was sufficient alone. Using the same stimulus in cerebellar slices (postnatal day 7-25), it was possible to release purines. The release however was not blocked by ENT blockers and there was a shift in the Ca(2+) dependence during development. This data from cultures and slices further illustrates the complexities of purine release, which is dependent on cellular composition and developmental stage.

  7. A recording chamber for small volume slice electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Dondzillo, Anna; Quinn, Kevin D; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I; Reisdorph, Nichole; Lei, Tim C; Klug, Achim

    2015-09-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from brain slices are typically performed in small recording chambers that allow for the superfusion of the tissue with artificial extracellular solution (ECS), while the chamber holding the tissue is mounted in the optical path of a microscope to image neurons in the tissue. ECS itself is inexpensive, and thus superfusion rates and volumes of ECS consumed during an experiment using standard ECS are not critical. However, some experiments require the addition of expensive pharmacological agents or other chemical compounds to the ECS, creating a need to build superfusion systems that operate on small volumes while still delivering appropriate amounts of oxygen and other nutrients to the tissue. We developed a closed circulation tissue chamber for slice recordings that operates with small volumes of bath solution in the range of 1.0 to 2.6 ml and a constant oxygen/carbon dioxide delivery to the solution in the bath. In our chamber, the ECS is oxygenated and recirculated directly in the recording chamber, eliminating the need for tubes and external bottles/containers to recirculate and bubble ECS and greatly reducing the total ECS volume required for superfusion. At the same time, the efficiency of tissue oxygenation and health of the section are comparable to standard superfusion methods. We also determined that the small volume of ECS contains a sufficient amount of nutrients to support the health of a standard brain slice for several hours without concern for either depletion of nutrients or accumulation of waste products.

  8. Slice imaging of photodissociation of spatially oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lipciuc, M. Laura; Brom, Alrik J. van den; Dinu, Laura; Janssen, Maurice H.M.

    2005-12-15

    An electrostatic ion lens to spatially orient parent molecules and to image the angular distribution of photofragments is presented. Photodissociation of laboratory-oriented molecules makes it possible to study the dynamics of the dissociation process in more detail compared to photodissociation of nonoriented molecules. Using the velocity map imaging technique in combination with the slice imaging technique, the spatial recoil distribution of the photofragments can be measured with high resolution and without symmetry restrictions. Insertion of orientation electrodes between the repeller and the extractor of a velocity mapping electrostatic lens severely distorts the ion trajectories. The position where the ions are focused by the lens, the focal length, can be very different in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the inserted orientation electrodes. The focal length depends on the exact dimensions and positions of the electrodes of the ion lens. As this dependence is different in both directions, this dependence can be used to correct for the distorted ion trajectories. We discuss the design of an electrostatic ion lens, which is able to orient parent molecules and map the velocity of the photofragments. We report sliced images of photofragments from photolysis of spatially oriented CD{sub 3}I molecules to demonstrate the experimental combination of molecular orientation and velocity map slice imaging with good resolution.

  9. Influence of dentine thickness and repeated firing on the colour of IPS e.max press.

    PubMed

    Al-Dwairi, Z N; Al-Hamad, K Q; Khasawneh, M I; Lynch, E

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the possible effects of the veneering porcelain thickness, and of repeated firing on the final shade of IPS e.max Press. Sixty disc-shaped IPS e.max Press specimens were fabricated and divided into 6groups according to shade (A2, C2) and porcelain thickness (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm). Repeated firing (3, 5 and 7firings) was performed and the colour differences (AE) were determined. With increased thickness, A2 specimens showed a significant reduction in L* values and increase in a* and b* values while C2 specimens showed reductions in L*a*b values (P < 0.01). We would conclude that clinically, the preparation should provide at least 1 mm of thickness for the aesthetic potential of this dentine porcelain to be realized.

  10. Optical thickness measurement of mask blank glass plate by the excess fraction method using a wavelength-tuning interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2013-10-01

    The absolute optical thickness of a 140-mm2 mask blank glass plate 3.1 mm thickness was measured by three-surface interferometry using a wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer. The interference order was determined by the excess fraction method. The wavelength of a tunable laser diode was scanned linearly from 632 to 642 nm, and a CCD detector recorded 2000 interference images. Two kinds of optical thicknesses measured by discrete Fourier analysis and phase-shifting were synthesized to obtain the optical thickness with respect to the ordinary refractive index. The optical thickness defined by the group refractive index at the 637 nm central wavelength was measured by wavelength scanning. The optical thickness deviation defined by the ordinary refractive index was measured using tunable phase-shifting. The systematic errors caused by nonlinearity in the wavelength tuning were corrected through correlation analysis between the theoretical and observed interference fringes.

  11. Influence of water-layer thickness on Er:YAG laser ablation of enamel of bovine anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Mir, Maziar; Meister, Joerg; Franzen, Rene; Sabounchi, Shabnam S; Lampert, Friedrich; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2008-10-01

    Different ideas have been presented to describe the mechanism of augmented laser ablation of dental enamel with different shapes by adding water to the working environment. In this study, the influence of water-laser interaction on the surface of enamel during ablation was investigated at a wavelength of 2.94 microm with different distances between the laser tip and the enamel surface. A motion-control system was used to produce linear incisions uniformly on flat enamel surfaces of bovine anterior teeth, with free-running Er:YAG laser very short pulses (pulse length = 90-120 micros, repetition rate = 10 pulses per second). Four different output energies (100, 200, 300 and 400 mJ) were radiated on samples under distilled water from different distances (0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.75 and 2.00 mm). The tooth slices were prepared with a cutting machine, and the surfaces of the ablated areas were measured with software under a light microscope. The average and standard deviation of all cut areas in different groups were reported. There was no significant difference when using a different pulse ablation speed (cm(3)/J) and a water-layer thickness between the tip and enamel surface of 0.5-1.25 mm with energy densities of 30-60 J/cm(2) (200-400 mJ). However, using an output energy of 15 J/cm(2) (100 mJ) and a thicker water layer than 1 mm, a linear ablation did not take place. This information led to a clearer view of the efficiency of Er:YAG laser in the conditions of this study. There are several hypotheses which describe a hydrokinetic effect of Er,Cr:YSGG. These basic studies could guide us to have a correct attitude regarding hydro-mechanical effects of water, although the wavelength of 2.78 microm has a better absorption in hydroxyl branch of water molecules. Therefore, our results do not directly interrupt with the series of investigations done with Er,Cr:YSGG. Water propagation and channel formation under water are investigated during the ablation of tooth enamel with

  12. The topology of large-scale structure. VI - Slices of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Melott, Adrian L.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the topology of large-scale structure in two observed slices of the universe are presented. Both slices pass through the Coma cluster and their depths are 100 and 230/h Mpc. The present topology study shows that the largest void in the CfA slice is divided into two smaller voids by a statistically significant line of galaxies. The topology of toy models like the white noise and bubble models is shown to be inconsistent with that of the observed slices. A large N-body simulation was made of the biased cloud dark matter model and the slices are simulated by matching them in selection functions and boundary conditions. The genus curves for these simulated slices are spongelike and have a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology like those of observed slices.

  13. Temperature effects on evoked potentials of hippocampal slices from euthermic chipmunks, hamsters and rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, D. C.; Martin, S. M.; Horowitz, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    1. Neural activity was recorded in hippocampal slices from euthermic chipmunks, hamsters and rats. 2. While recording the evoked potentials, the temperature of the Ringer's solution bathing the slice was varied by controlling the temperature of an outer chamber jacketing the recording chamber. 3. The temperature just below that at which a population spike could be evoked, Tt, was 10.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C (mean +/- SEM) for chipmunk slices, 14.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C for rat slices and 14.8 +/- 0.4 degrees C for hamster slices. Tt was significantly lower in the chipmunk slices (P<0.01) than in the rat and hamster slices. 4. Data were interpreted as consistent with the hypothesis that chipmunk hippocampal neurons are intrinsically cold resistant.

  14. High thickness acrylamide photopolymer for peristrophic multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortuño, M.; Fernández, E.; Márquez, A.; Gallego, S.; Neipp, C.; Pascual, I.

    2006-05-01

    The acrylamide photolymers are considered interesting materials for holographic media. They have high diffraction efficiency (ratio of the intensities of the diffracted and the incident beams), an intermediate energetic sensitivity among other materials and post-processing steps are not necessary, therefore the media is not altered. The layers of these materials, about 1 mm thick, are a suitable media for recording many diffraction gratings in the same volume of photopolymer using peristrophic multiplexing technique, with great practical importance in the field of holographic memories type WORM (write once read many). In this work we study the recording of diffraction gratings by peristrophic multiplexing with axis of rotation perpendicular to the recording media. The photopolymer is composed of acrylamide as the polymerizable monomer, triethanolamine as radical generator, yellowish eosin as sensitizer and a binder of polyvinyl alcohol. We analyze the holographic behaviour of the material during recording and reconstruction of diffraction gratings using a continuous Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) at an intensity of 5 mW/cm2 as recording laser. The response of the material is monitored after recording with an He-Ne laser. We study the recording process of unslanted diffraction gratings of 1125 lines/mm. The diffraction efficiency of each hologram is seen to decrease as the number of holograms recorded increases, due to consumption of the available dynamic range, in a constant exposure scheduling. It can be seen that the photopolymer works well with high energy levels, without excessive dispersion of light by noise gratings. In order to homogenize the diffraction efficiency of each hologram we use the method proposed by Pu. This method is designed to share all or part of the avaliable dynamic range of the recording material among the holograms to be multiplexed. Using exposure schedules derived from this method we have used 3 scheduling recordings from the algorithm used

  15. Investigation of lung nodule detectability in low-dose 320-slice computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, J. D.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-05-15

    Low-dose imaging protocols in chest CT are important in the screening and surveillance of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules. Techniques that maintain nodule detectability yet permit dose reduction, particularly for large body habitus, were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which radiation dose can be minimized while maintaining diagnostic performance through knowledgeable selection of reconstruction techniques. A 320-slice volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems) was used to scan an anthropomorphic phantom at doses ranging from {approx}0.1 mGy up to that typical of low-dose CT (LDCT, {approx}5 mGy) and diagnostic CT ({approx}10 mGy). Radiation dose was measured via Farmer chamber and MOSFET dosimetry. The phantom presented simulated nodules of varying size and contrast within a heterogeneous background, and chest thickness was varied through addition of tissue-equivalent bolus about the chest. Detectability of a small solid lung nodule (3.2 mm diameter, -37 HU, typically the smallest nodule of clinical significance in screening and surveillance) was evaluated as a function of dose, patient size, reconstruction filter, and slice thickness by means of nine-alternative forced-choice (9AFC) observer tests to quantify nodule detectability. For a given reconstruction filter, nodule detectability decreased sharply below a threshold dose level due to increased image noise, especially for large body size. However, nodule detectability could be maintained at lower doses through knowledgeable selection of (smoother) reconstruction filters. For large body habitus, optimal filter selection reduced the dose required for nodule detection by up to a factor of {approx}3 (from {approx}3.3 mGy for sharp filters to {approx}1.0 mGy for the optimal filter). The results indicate that radiation dose can be reduced below the current low-dose (5 mGy) and ultralow-dose (1 mGy) levels with knowledgeable selection of

  16. Precision-cut liver slices of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua): an in vitro system for studying the effects of environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Eide, M; Karlsen, O A; Kryvi, H; Olsvik, P A; Goksøyr, A

    2014-08-01

    The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is an economically important species commonly consumed by humans. The widespread distribution of cod in the North Atlantic Ocean makes it vulnerable to effluents from human activities, such as coastal industries and offshore petroleum exploration. It has been demonstrated that many effluents have adverse effects on cod reproduction and health, e.g. by disrupting endocrine signaling pathways. The liver, expressing important components of the biotransformation and the endocrine system, is one of the main target organs. Thus, reliable and reproducible in vitro systems of the liver are important for studying effects of environmental contaminants. The aim of this study was to investigate precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) as an alternative in vitro system for toxicological studies of the Atlantic cod liver. Slices of 8 mm in diameter and 250 μm thickness were prepared and cultivated from immature cod. Several analyses to measure the liver slice viability were performed: enzyme assays, histology, and morphometric analysis, all confirming cell viability for up to 72 h in culture. The liver slices were also exposed to two well-known model environmental contaminants, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), representing established agonists for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the estrogen receptor (ER), respectively. The results showed increased transcription of the target genes cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) and vitellogenin (VTG), both well-established biomarkers for exposure of fish to the selected compounds. In conclusion, PCLS is a promising in vitro system for toxicological studies of cod liver cells. The liver slices are viable in culture for several days and respond to environmental contaminants in a dose- and time-specific manner.

  17. Choroidal thickness in pregnant women: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ru; Kuang, Guo-Ping; Luo, Di-Xian; Lu, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate choroidal thickness in pregnant women and compare the measurements with those of normal nonpregnant women. METHODS Using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT), choroidal thickness was measured at the fovea and at 1 mm and 3 mm superior, inferior, temporal, and nasal to the fovea in both healthy pregnant women and nonpregnant women. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to evaluate the relationships between subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) and the demographic and ocular parameters. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed-effects model when Meta-analyses were conducted. RESULTS Comparison of choroidal thickness between the groups showed that it was significantly greater in healthy pregnant women's eyes than in normal nonpregnant women's eyes at all locations except at 3 mm superior and 3 mm temporal from the fovea (P<0.05). The mean SFCT was 344.13±50.94 µm in healthy pregnant women's eyes and 315.03±60.57 µm in normal nonpregnant women's eyes, with a statistically significant difference (P=0.008). Pearson correlation analysis showed that age and axial length were significantly related to SFCT in healthy pregnant women, normal nonpregnant women, and all subjects. The results of our cross-sectional study were consistent with the results of the further Meta-analysis, with a pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) of 33.66 µm (95% CI: 26.16 to 41.15) for SFCT. CONCLUSION Our results, along with the comprehensive Meta-analysis, suggest that choroidal thickness in healthy pregnant women is greater than that in normal nonpregnant women. PMID:27588276

  18. Gauge Measures Thicknesses Of Blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, George R.; Yoshino, Stanley Y.

    1991-01-01

    Tool makes highly repeatable measurements of thickness of penetrable blanket insulation. Includes commercial holder for replaceable knife blades, which holds needle instead of knife. Needle penetrates blanket to establish reference plane. Ballasted slider applies fixed preload to blanket. Technician reads thickness value on scale.

  19. Measuring Thicknesses of Wastewater Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Davenport, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Sensor determines when thickness of film of electrically conductive wastewater on rotating evaporator drum exceeds preset value. Sensor simple electrical probe that makes contact with liquid surface. Made of materials resistant to chemicals in liquid. Mounted on shaft in rotating cylinder, liquid-thickness sensor extends toward cylinder wall so tip almost touches. Sensor body accommodates probe measuring temperature of evaporated water in cylinder.

  20. Altered regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in hippocampus following slice preparation.

    PubMed

    Danzer, S C; Pan, E; Nef, S; Parada, L F; McNamara, J O

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) play important roles in regulating survival, structure, and function of CNS neurons. One method of studying the functions of these molecules has utilized in vitro hippocampal slice preparations. An important caveat to using slices, however, is that slice preparation itself might alter the expression of BDNF, thereby confounding experimental results. To address this concern, BDNF immunoreactivity was examined in rodent slices using two different methods of slice preparation. Rapid and anatomically selective regulation of BDNF content followed slice preparation using both methodologies; however, different patterns of altered BDNF immunoreactivity were observed. First, in cultured slices, BDNF content decreased in the dentate molecular layer and increased in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer and the mossy fiber pathway of the hippocampus after 30 min. Furthermore, an initially "punctate" pattern of BDNF labeling observed in the mossy fiber pathway of control sections changed to homogenous labeling of the pathway in vitro. In contrast to these findings, slices prepared as for acute slice physiology exhibited no change in BDNF content in the molecular layer and mossy fiber pathway 30 min after slicing, but exhibited significant increases in the dentate granule and CA3 pyramidal cell layers. These findings demonstrate that BDNF protein content is altered following slice preparation, that different methods of slice preparation produce different patterns of BDNF regulation, and raise the possibility that BDNF release and TrkB activation may also be regulated. These consequences of hippocampal slice preparation may confound analyses of exogenous or endogenous BDNF on hippocampal neuronal structure or function.

  1. Improved sliced velocity map imaging apparatus optimized for H photofragments

    SciTech Connect

    Ryazanov, Mikhail; Reisler, Hanna

    2013-04-14

    Time-sliced velocity map imaging (SVMI), a high-resolution method for measuring kinetic energy distributions of products in scattering and photodissociation reactions, is challenging to implement for atomic hydrogen products. We describe an ion optics design aimed at achieving SVMI of H fragments in a broad range of kinetic energies (KE), from a fraction of an electronvolt to a few electronvolts. In order to enable consistently thin slicing for any imaged KE range, an additional electrostatic lens is introduced in the drift region for radial magnification control without affecting temporal stretching of the ion cloud. Time slices of {approx}5 ns out of a cloud stretched to Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 50 ns are used. An accelerator region with variable dimensions (using multiple electrodes) is employed for better optimization of radial and temporal space focusing characteristics at each magnification level. The implemented system was successfully tested by recording images of H fragments from the photodissociation of HBr, H{sub 2}S, and the CH{sub 2}OH radical, with kinetic energies ranging from <0.4 eV to >3 eV. It demonstrated KE resolution Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1%-2%, similar to that obtained in traditional velocity map imaging followed by reconstruction, and to KE resolution achieved previously in SVMI of heavier products. We expect it to perform just as well up to at least 6 eV of kinetic energy. The tests showed that numerical simulations of the electric fields and ion trajectories in the system, used for optimization of the design and operating parameters, provide an accurate and reliable description of all aspects of system performance. This offers the advantage of selecting the best operating conditions in each measurement without the need for additional calibration experiments.

  2. Inhibition of intermediary metabolism by amiodarone in dog thyroid slices

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquali, D.; Tseng, F.Y.; Rani, C.S.; Field, J.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Amiodarone, an iodine-containing antiarrhythmic drug, has been reported to interfere with thyroid function and thyroid hormone metabolism. We studied the effects of amiodarone on basal and agonist (thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), phorbol ester, or carbachol)-stimulated glucose oxidation, 32PO4 incorporation into phospholipids, and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) concentration in dog thyroid slices. Slices were preincubated with amiodarone at 37 degrees C for 1 h before the addition of agonist and the appropriate radioisotope. cAMP stimulation was measured after 20 min, glucose oxidation for 45 min, and 32PO4 incorporation into phospholipids for 2 h. Amiodarone (0.5 mM) had no effect on basal 14CO2 formation or 32PO4 incorporation into phospholipids but significantly inhibited TSH, phorbol ester, and carbachol stimulation of these parameters. It also inhibited cAMP stimulation by TSH. Inhibition of TSH-stimulated (14C)glucose oxidation was also obtained with another iodide-containing compound, iopanoic acid (0.5 mM), but not with iothalamate (up to 10 mM). Inhibition by amiodarone was still present, but to a lesser extent, when it was added at the same time as the agonist. Inhibition of stimulated (14C)glucose oxidation persisted even after the slices were incubated without amiodarone for 6 h. Inhibition by amiodarone, in contrast to that by inorganic iodide, was not prevented by 1 mM methimazole added at the same time as amiodarone. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects of amiodarone on thyroid function are not due to dissociation of iodide from the molecule.

  3. Spectral slicing X-ray telescope with variable magnification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B.; Hildner, E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A telescope for viewing high frequency radiation (soft X-ray, extreme ultraviolet) is described. This telescope has a long focal length with a selection of magnifications despite a short housing. Light enters the telescope and is reflected by the telescope's primary optical system to one of several secondary mirrors at different locations on a movable frame. The secondary mirrors have varying degrees of magnification and select narrow spectral slices of the incident radiation. Thus, both the magnification and effective focal length field of view and wavelength can be altered by repositioning the moving frame. Configurations for spaceborne applications are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of methylmercury biotransformation using rat liver slices.

    PubMed

    Yasutake, A; Hirayama, K

    2001-09-01

    To examine the demethylation reaction of methylmercury (MeHg) in rat liver, slices prepared from MeHg-treated rats were incubated in L-15 medium under 95% O2/5% CO2 atmosphere. During the incubation, the amount of inorganic Hg in the slices markedly increased in a time-dependent manner, although the concentration of total Hg remained unchanged. Since the C-Hg bond in MeHg was demonstrated to be cleaved by the action of some reactive oxygen species, the effects on MeHg demethylation of several reagents that could modify reactive oxygen production were examined in the present system. Methylviologen was found to be an effective enhancer of the demethylation reaction with only a minor effect on lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, ferrous ion added to the medium showed no effect on demethylation in the presence or absence of methylviologen, although lipid peroxide levels were increased significantly by ferrous ion. Similarly, deferoxamine mesylate, which effectively suppressed the increase in lipid peroxide levels, also had no effect on demethylation. Furthermore, hydroxy radical scavengers, such as mannitol and dimethylsulfoxide, had no effect on inorganic Hg production. Rotenone, an inhibitor of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system, increased levels of both inorganic Hg and lipid peroxide. However, other inhibitors, such as antimycin A, myxothiazole and NaCN, significantly suppressed the demethylation reaction. Cell fractionation of the MeHg-treated rat liver revealed that the ratio of inorganic Hg to total Hg was highest in the mitochondrial fraction. Furthermore, superoxide anion could degrade MeHg in an organic solvent but not in water. These results suggested that the demethylation of MeHg by the liver slice would proceed with the aid of superoxide anion produced in the electron transfer system at the hydrophobic mitochondrial inner membrane. Furthermore, the involvement of hydroxy radicals, which have been demonstrated to be effective in

  5. Differential Conditioning of Associative Synaptic Enhancement in Hippocampal Brain Slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Stephen R.; Brown, Thomas H.

    1986-04-01

    An electrophysiological stimulation paradigm similar to one that produces Pavlovian conditioning was applied to synaptic inputs to pyramidal neurons of hippocampal brain slices. Persistent synaptic enhancement was induced in one of two weak synaptic inputs by pairing high-frequency electrical stimulation of the weak input with stimulation of a third, stronger input to the same region. Forward (temporally overlapping) but not backward (temporally separate) pairings caused this enhancement. Thus hippocampal synapses in vitro can undergo the conditional and selective type of associative modification that could provide the substrate for some of the mnemonic functions in which the hippocampus is thought to participate.

  6. Spectral slicing x-ray telescope with variable magnification

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, R.H.; Hildner, E.

    1985-12-31

    A telescope for viewing high frequency radiation. This telescope has a long focal length with a selection of magnifications despite a short housing. Light enters the telescope and is reflected by the telescope's primary optical system and to one of several secondary mirrors at different locations on a movable frame. The secondary mirrors have varying degrees of magnification and select narrow spectral slices of the incident radiation. Thus, both the magnification and effective focal length field of view and wavelength can be altered by repositioning moving frame.

  7. Association between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in eyes with narrow or open-angle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song-Feng; Wu, Ge-Wei; Chen, Chang-Xi; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in subjects with eyes with narrow or open-angle. METHODS The subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured with enhanced depth-imaging optical coherence tomography and anterior chamber parameters were measured with ultrasound biomicroscopy in one eye of 23 subjects with open-angle eyes and 38 subjects with narrow-angle eyes. The mean age was 59.52±7.04y for narrow-angle subjects and 60.76±7.23y for open-angle subjects (P=0.514). Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between choroidal thickness and narrow-angle parameters. RESULTS There were no differences in subfoveal choroidal thickness between open- and narrow-angle subjects (P=0.231). Anterior chamber parameters, including central anterior chamber depth, trabecular iris angle, iris thickness 500 µm from the scleral spur (IT500), and ciliary body thickness at 1 mm and 2 mm from the scleral spur (CBT1, CBT2) showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Subfoveal choroidal thickness showed negative correlation (β=-0.496, P=0.016) only with anterior chamber depth in the open-angle group and with age (β=-0.442, P=0.003) and IT500 (β=-0.399, P=0.008) in the narrow-angle group. However, subfoveal choroidal thickness was not correlated with trabecular iris angle, anterior chamber depth, ciliary body thickness, or central corneal thickness in the narrow-angle group. CONCLUSION Choroidal thickness does not differ in the two groups and has not correlated with anterior chamber parameters in narrow-angle subjects, suggesting a lack of relationship between choroidal thickness and primary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:27588269

  8. Capturing complex tumour biology in vitro: histological and molecular characterisation of precision cut slices

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Emma J.; Dong, Meng; Gutekunst, Matthias; Närhi, Katja; van Zoggel, Hanneke J. A. A.; Blom, Sami; Nagaraj, Ashwini; Metsalu, Tauno; Oswald, Eva; Erkens-Schulze, Sigrun; Delgado San Martin, Juan A.; Turkki, Riku; Wedge, Stephen R.; af Hällström, Taija M.; Schueler, Julia; van Weerden, Wytske M.; Verschuren, Emmy W.; Barry, Simon T.; van der Kuip, Heiko; Hickman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Precision-cut slices of in vivo tumours permit interrogation in vitro of heterogeneous cells from solid tumours together with their native microenvironment. They offer a low throughput but high content in vitro experimental platform. Using mouse models as surrogates for three common human solid tumours, we describe a standardised workflow for systematic comparison of tumour slice cultivation methods and a tissue microarray-based method to archive them. Cultivated slices were compared to their in vivo source tissue using immunohistochemical and transcriptional biomarkers, particularly of cellular stress. Mechanical slicing induced minimal stress. Cultivation of tumour slices required organotypic support materials and atmospheric oxygen for maintenance of integrity and was associated with significant temporal and loco-regional changes in protein expression, for example HIF-1α. We recommend adherence to the robust workflow described, with recognition of temporal-spatial changes in protein expression before interrogation of tumour slices by pharmacological or other means. PMID:26647838

  9. Shape from equal thickness contours

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, G.; Parvin, B.

    1998-05-10

    A unique imaging modality based on Equal Thickness Contours (ETC) has introduced a new opportunity for 3D shape reconstruction from multiple views. We present a computational framework for representing each view of an object in terms of its object thickness, and then integrating these representations into a 3D surface by algebraic reconstruction. The object thickness is inferred by grouping curve segments that correspond to points of second derivative maxima. At each step of the process, we use some form of regularization to ensure closeness to the original features, as well as neighborhood continuity. We apply our approach to images of a sub-micron crystal structure obtained through a holographic process.

  10. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    2002-01-01

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  11. Projection-slice theorem based 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Homan, R.; Timmer, J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2007-03-01

    In X-ray guided procedures, the surgeon or interventionalist is dependent on his or her knowledge of the patient's specific anatomy and the projection images acquired during the procedure by a rotational X-ray source. Unfortunately, these X-ray projections fail to give information on the patient's anatomy in the dimension along the projection axis. It would be very profitable to provide the surgeon or interventionalist with a 3D insight of the patient's anatomy that is directly linked to the X-ray images acquired during the procedure. In this paper we present a new robust 2D-3D registration method based on the Projection-Slice Theorem. This theorem gives us a relation between the pre-operative 3D data set and the interventional projection images. Registration is performed by minimizing a translation invariant similarity measure that is applied to the Fourier transforms of the images. The method was tested by performing multiple exhaustive searches on phantom data of the Circle of Willis and on a post-mortem human skull. Validation was performed visually by comparing the test projections to the ones that corresponded to the minimal value of the similarity measure. The Projection-Slice Theorem Based method was shown to be very effective and robust, and provides capture ranges up to 62 degrees. Experiments have shown that the method is capable of retrieving similar results when translations are applied to the projection images.

  12. Optimization of taro mucilage and fat levels in sliced breads.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Carina Lumie Pereira; Andrade, Luan Alberto; Pereira, Joelma

    2015-09-01

    Bread is one of the most commonly consumed foods, and much ongoing research is aimed at meeting the demand for higher quality bread products in terms of greater volume and softness with characteristic flavor, aroma and color. The goal of the present study was to optimize the amounts of lyophilized taro mucilage and hydrogenated vegetable fat added to sliced bread formulations to improve the physical characteristics of the bread while reducing lipid levels and maintaining good sensorial quality. For the analysis, a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was used for the two factors, resulting in 11 total experiments. Physical, chemical, and sensory analyses were performed. Breads containing taro mucilage were soft and exhibited good sensorial quality. Optimal amounts of the two factors studied were determined using response surface methodology to produce breads with greater specific volume, higher bread-making quality, and lower fat levels than current formulations. The optimal levels of lyophilized taro mucilage and hydrogenated vegetable fat in the sliced bread formulation were 0.73 g 100 g(-1) and 1.58 g 100 g(-1), respectively.

  13. Warping, extra dimensions, and a slice of AdSd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the Randall-Sundrum framework we consider a number of phenomenologically relevant model-building questions on a slice of compactified AdSd for d>5. Such spaces are interesting as they enable one to realize the weak scale via warping. We perform the Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction for gravitons and bulk vectors in these spaces, and for the case of AdS6 consider the KK spectrum of gauge scalars. We further obtain the KK towers for bulk fermions on a slice of AdS7 and AdS9 and show that the Randall-Sundrum approach to flavor generalizes to these spaces with the localization of chiral zero-mode fermions controlled by their bulk Dirac mass parameters. However, for the phenomenologically interesting case where the transverse radius is R-1˜TeV, we show that bulk standard model fields are not viable due to a resulting volume suppression of the gauge-coupling constants. A similar suppression occurs for the case of UV localization. Thus it seems that the standard model fields should be confined to the infrared brane in such spaces. Sterile fields and extended gauge sectors may propagate in the bulk, with the gauge-coupling volume suppression experienced by the latter motivating a weak coupling to standard model fields. We also discuss some issues regarding the effective 4D theory description in these spaces.

  14. Low-power slice selective imaging of broad signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiqi; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kharkov, Boris; Ilott, Andrew J.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2016-11-01

    One of the major challenges in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study immobile samples, such as solid materials or rigid tissues like bone or ligaments, is that the images appear dark due to these samples' short-lived signals. Although it is well known that narrowband signals can be excited in inhomogeneously-broadened lines, it is less well known that similar effects can be observed in dipolar-broadened systems. These long-lived signals have not been used much, mainly because their description frequently does not match intuition. While 3D imaging with these signals has previously been reported, here we focus on the demonstration of faster, 2D slice-selective imaging. The faster imaging provides more flexibility for visualizing these rigid objects. We also focus on the frequently-encountered regime wherein the maximum power achievable for rf pulses is significantly weaker than the linewidth. This regime is typically encountered in clinical MRI scans or large volume setups. When compared to UTE and conventional slice-selective spin echo methods, this technique provides better representations of the sample considered here (an eraser sample), and higher signal-to-noise ratios than spin-echo techniques in both the high and low power regimes.

  15. Delivery of recombinant alphavirus into hippocampal slice tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in <2 d. The broad host range of alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have shown reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. This protocol describes gene delivery of recombinant alphavirus to hippocampal slice cultures. Organotypic slices are covered by a layer of glial cells that impedes the penetration of viral particles to the neurons. Thus, viral particles should be injected manually into the extracellular space of the tissue.

  16. Cholinergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rabbit kidney slices

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, L.C.; McArdle, S.; Crews, F.T.

    1986-03-01

    The release of inositol phosphates (IP) from phosphoinositides (PI) by carbachol was studied in the tissue slices from cortex (C), outer medulla (OM) and inner medulla (IM) of rabbit kidneys. The method involved the incubation of the slices with (/sup 3/H)inositol for its incorporation into the PI and measurement of the release of IP in presence of lithium which prevents dephosphorylation of IP. The results of (/sup 3/H)IP formation are expressed as % of total (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation in the tissue. No significant effect of carbachol was found on the release of IP in the C. The drug produced a 48% increase in IP release in the OM. In the IM, carbachol produced a concentration dependent increase in IP release with a maximum of 772% at 1 mM. The release of IP in the IM by 1 mM carbachol was completely blocked by 1 ..mu..M atropine. Our results indicate that IP release by carbachol is due to activation of muscarinic receptors in the IM of the rabbit kidney.

  17. Low-power slice selective imaging of broad signals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiqi; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kharkov, Boris; Ilott, Andrew J; Jerschow, Alexej

    2016-11-01

    One of the major challenges in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study immobile samples, such as solid materials or rigid tissues like bone or ligaments, is that the images appear dark due to these samples' short-lived signals. Although it is well known that narrowband signals can be excited in inhomogeneously-broadened lines, it is less well known that similar effects can be observed in dipolar-broadened systems. These long-lived signals have not been used much, mainly because their description frequently does not match intuition. While 3D imaging with these signals has previously been reported, here we focus on the demonstration of faster, 2D slice-selective imaging. The faster imaging provides more flexibility for visualizing these rigid objects. We also focus on the frequently-encountered regime wherein the maximum power achievable for rf pulses is significantly weaker than the linewidth. This regime is typically encountered in clinical MRI scans or large volume setups. When compared to UTE and conventional slice-selective spin echo methods, this technique provides better representations of the sample considered here (an eraser sample), and higher signal-to-noise ratios than spin-echo techniques in both the high and low power regimes.

  18. Promoting consumption of fruit in elementary school cafeterias. The effects of slicing apples and oranges.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Mark; Branscum, Adam; Nakayima, Peace Julie

    2009-10-01

    We examined how slicing apples and oranges affected elementary students' selection and consumption of fruit. Slicing increased the percentage of children selecting and consuming oranges, while a similar effect was not found for apples. The impact of slicing fruit was greatest among younger students. These findings suggest that school cafeterias can increase accessibility and consumption of foods through simple, inexpensive food preparation techniques, with the impact of such measures varying by foods and student characteristics.

  19. Spectral slicing for METIS: an efficient alternative to cross-dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M.; Todd, S. P.; Glasse, A. C. H.; Strachan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Image slicing integral field units were developed to provide spatially resolved spectroscopy over a two dimensional field of view. Spectral slicing applies similar design principles to provide an alternative to cross-dispersion. Key benefits include more efficient use of detector space and greater flexibility in selecting the wavelength ranges within each band. We will describe the design of a deployable spectral slicing mode as part of the METIS LM-band high resolution spectrometer.

  20. Improved Coal-Thickness Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    Summed signals and dielectric-filled antenna improve measurement. Improved FM radar for measuring thickness of coal seam eliminates spectrum splitting and reduces magnitude of echo from front coal surface.

  1. Optimized Protocol of Methanol Treatment for Immunofluorescent Staining in Fixed Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feng; Xiong, Guoxiang; Cohen, Noam A; Cohen, Akiva S

    2017-03-01

    We optimized methanol treatment in paraformaldehyde-fixed slices for immunofluorescent staining of ependymal basal bodies in brain ventricles. As 100% methanol induced severe deformations to the slices (including rolling and folding over), we tried to decrease methanol concentration. We found that 33.3% to 75% methanol could result in ideal immunostaining of basal bodies without inducing obvious deformations. Instead of treating slices at -20°C (without proper cryoprotection measurements) as suggested in previous studies, we carried out methanol treatment at room temperature. Our modified protocol can not only raise immunostaining efficiency in tissue slices, it may also prevent potential freezing damages to the samples.

  2. Optimized Protocol of Methanol Treatment for Immunofluorescent Staining in Fixed Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Feng; Cohen, Noam A.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2017-01-01

    We optimized methanol treatment in paraformaldehyde-fixed slices for immunofluorescent staining of ependymal basal bodies in brain ventricles. As 100% methanol induced severe deformations to the slices (including rolling and folding over), we tried to decrease methanol concentration. We found that 33.3% to 75% methanol could result in ideal immunostaining of basal bodies without inducing obvious deformations. Instead of treating slices at −20°C (without proper cryoprotection measurements) as suggested in previous studies, we carried out methanol treatment at room temperature. Our modified protocol can not only raise immunostaining efficiency in tissue slices, it may also prevent potential freezing damages to the samples. PMID:26509907

  3. Cryopreservation of precision-cut tissue slices for application in drug metabolism research.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, I A M; Koster, H J

    2003-02-01

    Cryopreservation of tissue slices greatly facilitates their use in drug metabolism research, leading to efficient use of human organ material and a decrease of laboratory animal use. In the present review, various mechanisms of cryopreservation such as equilibrium slow freezing, rapid freezing and vitrification, and their application to cryopreservation of tissue slices are discussed as well as the viability parameters often used to evaluate the success of cryopreservation. Equilibrium freezing prevents intracellular ice formation by inducing cellular dehydration, but (large) ice crystals are still formed in the interstitial space of the slices. Upon rapid freezing, (small) intra- and extracellular ice crystals are formed which slices from some tissues can resist. Vitrification prevents the formation of both intra- and extracellular ice crystals while an amorphous glass is formed of the slice liquid constituents. To vitrify, however, high molarity solutions of cryoprotectants are required that may be toxic to the slices. The use of mixtures of high molarity of cryoprotectants overcomes this problem. We conclude that vitrification is the approach that most likely will lead to the development of universal cryopreservation methods for tissue slices of various organs from various animal species. In the future this may lead to the formation of a tissue slice bank from which slices can be derived at any desirable time point for in vitro experimentation.

  4. Near-infrared imaging equipment that detects small organic substances in thick foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phetchalern, Souphaphone; Tashima, Hiroto; Ishii, Yuya; Ishiyama, Takeshi; Arai, Shinichi; Fukuda, Mitsuo

    2014-09-01

    We have developed near-infrared imaging equipment that can detect small organic substances in foodstuffs with thicknesses of more than 1 mm. The equipment is composed of a high output laser diode and a CMOS camera. The irradiated light power distribution was highly uniform with a maximum optical density of 1.3 W/cm2. A 0.3-mmdiameter wooden stick covered with a 2-mm-thick layer of ham can easily be distinguished in the images. The bones in fish and in chicken wing sticks could also be distinguished. The thicknesses of the fish and the chicken wing sticks were approximately 30 mm and 20 mm, respectively. We eliminated the low spatial frequency components from the images to improve the image contrast.

  5. Interfacial adaptation and thickness of bioceramic-based root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Afaf; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Che Ab Aziz, Zeti Adura

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared the sealer thickness and interfacial adaptation of bioceramic sealers (Sankin Apatite III, MTA Fillapex(®), EndoSequence(®) BC) to root dentin against AH Plus(®) sealer. Sixty extracted single-root premolars were prepared and equally divided into four groups. Sealers were labeled with 0.1% Rhodamine B fluorescent dye. Roots were dissected along the transverse plane at 1 mm (apical), 3 mm (middle), and 6 mm (coronal) levels. Sealer-to-whole canal area ratio was evaluated. Percentage of gap-containing region to canal circumference was calculated using a confocal laser microscope. Sealer thickness was significantly higher at apical and middle levels than at coronal level. EndoSequence BC had the significantly highest thickness compared with MTA Fillapex and AH Plus. The coronal level had significantly less interfacial gaps compared with apical and middle levels. Bioceramic sealers showed more gaps compared with AH Plus, with no significant differences among them.

  6. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (<1 years old) with CHD undergoing 128-slice CT prospective ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  7. Laser hole drilling in thick polypropylene sheets for alignment sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, D. E.; Chapman, Glenn H.; Samra, Taranjit S.; Weeks, T. S.

    1996-04-01

    Laser micromachining of polypropylene for transducer applications has the advantage of creating small (< 100 micron) structures through very thick materials (> 400 micron). Normally translucent polypropylene formed using carbon as a dye is an excellent laser machining material having a high optical absorption, and a low thermal conductivity. For an optical alignment system a matrix of high aspect ratio holes of < 130 microns diameter with < 300 micron spacing was needed through thick (> 400 micron) sheets. This alignment sensor is to be used on the end of a robot arm and will aid in the manipulation of the arm. Using an argon ion laser focused through a 50 mm lens (5.2 micron R1/e2 spot, 55.2 micron focal depth), holes as small as 30 microns on 150 micron spacing were achieved in 400 - 500 micron thick black polypropylene sheets with consistent results. Best results currently are achieved with a laser power of only 0.3 W, using 10 - 100 pulse stream of 10 - 100 microsec pulses, and duty cycles of < 10%. Shorter duty cycles require more power, as do shorter pulse durations, and both result in larger holes at wider spacings. Minimum repeatable hole separation is controlled by the lip of material formed around the hole. These settings have achieved 41 X 29 (1189 hole) arrays on a sample, with a computer driven submicron XYZ positioning system. Commercially available opaque white polypropylene required 17 times the power, and achieved holes of only 127 microns, with 500 microns spacing in 500 micron thick material. Thicker (1 mm) black polypropylene produces 144 micron holes on 500 micron spacings due to the lip material, and required a 100 mm lens.

  8. Effects of noradrenaline on potassium efflux, membrane potential and electrolyte levels in tissue slices prepared from guinea-pig liver

    PubMed Central

    Haylett, D. G.; Jenkinson, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    1. Some effects of noradrenaline on potassium efflux, electrolyte levels, membrane potential and current distribution in guinea-pig liver slices have been examined. 2. The slices (thickness ca. 300 μm) were prepared from the median lobe of the liver and incubated at 38° C in a mammalian Ringer fluid containing 2 mM pyruvate. After an initial recovery period, the ionic composition of the tissue remained stable for several hours. 3. The steady-state contents of sodium, potassium and chloride were 296, 266 and 272 m-equiv/kg dry tissue respectively. The inulin space was 29 ml./100 g wet tissue. 4. Most if not all of the tissue potassium was exchangeable. The rate constant for 42K efflux was 0·019 min-1. 5. Noradrenaline (1 μM) markedly increased the efflux of 42K and within 2 min caused tissue potassium to fall by 8%. At the same time the sodium content rose. 6. Traverses of the slices with micro-electrodes showed many negative-going deflexions of 30-40 mV in amplitude. The evidence suggests that these correspond to the membrane potentials of the parenchymal cells. 7. Noradrenaline (1 μM) caused a reversible hyperpolarization of about 10 mV. The response became larger on replacing external chloride by isethionate or methylsulphate, but was little affected by a reduction in external potassium. 8. After slices had been bathed in potassium and chloride-free solutions for several min, restoration of external potassium caused the membrane potential to increase by up to 10 mV. This hyperpolarization, but not that caused by noradrenaline, was abolished by ouabain. 9. Noradrenaline reduced the amplitude and quickened the time course of electrotonic potentials set up by current pulses from another microelectrode, suggesting that the membrane conductance had risen. 10. Although certain mechanisms based on electrogenic active transport processes with unusual properties have not been excluded, the present findings are more simply explained by supposing that noradrenaline

  9. Shell thickness determination of polymer-shelled microbubbles using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-06-01

    Intravenously injected microbubbles (MBs) can be utilized as ultrasound contrast agent (CA) resulting in enhanced image quality. A novel CA, consisting of air filled MBs stabilized with a shell of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been developed. These spherical MBs have been decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in order to serve as both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CA. In this study, a mathematical model was introduced that determined the shell thickness of two types of SPIONs decorated MBs (Type A and Type B). The shell thickness of MBs is important to determine, as it affects the acoustical properties. In order to investigate the shell thickness, thin sections of plastic embedded MBs were prepared and imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the sections were cut at random distances from the MB center, which affected the observed shell thickness. Hence, the model determined the average shell thickness of the MBs from corrected mean values of the outer and inner radii observed in the TEM sections. The model was validated using simulated slices of MBs with known shell thickness and radius. The average shell thickness of Type A and Type B MBs were 651nm and 637nm, respectively.

  10. Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using inside-diameter (I. D. ) saws. Final report, May 1979-April 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonyan, P.

    1980-01-01

    I.D. wafering equipment, blades and processes were used to develop methods for producing large areas of silicon sheet. Modifications to a 16 inch STC automated saw included programmable feed system; crystal rotating system; and STC dyna-track blade monitoring and control system. By controlling the plating operation and by grinding of the cutting edge, we were able to produce 16 inch I.D. blades with a cutting edge thickness of .22 mm. Crystal rotation mechanism was used to slice 100 mm diameter crystals with a 16 inch blade down to a thickness of .20 mm. Cutting rates with crystal rotation were generally slower than with standard plunge I.D. slicing techniques. Using programmed feeds and programmed rotation, maximum cutting rates were from 0.3 to 1.0 inches per minute.

  11. The relation of gingival thickness to dynamics of gingival margin position pre- and post-surgically

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, Kharidhi Laxman; Gupta, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the gingival margin position (GMP) before and after open flap debridement in different gingival thickness (GT). Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy patients with moderate to advanced adult periodontitis were included in a randomized control clinical trial. A calibrated UNC-15 periodontal probe, an occlusal onlay stent was used for clinical measurements recorded at baseline, 3 month, 6 month, and 16 month. The changes in the GMP were studied at midbuccal (Mi-B), mesiobuccal (MB), and distobuccal sites. GT was measured presurgically, transgingivally at Mi-B and interdental sites, divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (thin) and Group 2 (thick). Results: In GT of ≤1 mm group, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP led to gingival recession at all study sites in the early postsurgical period of 1 and 3 months. During 6 and 16 months, the apical shift of GMP coincided with the Chernihiv Airport at Mi-B site (6 months), MB site (16 months). The gingival recession was obvious at Mi-B sites (16 months). In the GT of >1 mm, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP did not cause gingival recession at any sites throughout postsurgical (1, 3, 6, and 16 months) period. Conclusion: Thin gingiva showed apical shift of GMP leading to gingival recession as compared to thick gingiva postsurgically. PMID:27143829

  12. Effects of time after a second dose of immunization against GnRF (Improvest) independent of age at slaughter on commercial bacon slicing characteristics of immunologically castrated barrows.

    PubMed

    Tavárez, M A; Bohrer, B M; Herrick, R T; Mellencamp, M A; Matulis, R J; Ellis, M; Boler, D D; Dilger, A C

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of time after a second dose of anti-GnRF immunization on fresh belly characteristics and slicing yields of immunologically castrated (IC) barrows, physically castrated (PC) barrows and gilts slaughtered at 24 weeks of age. The second dose was staggered so that IC barrows were slaughtered at 4, 6, 8, or 10 weeks after the second dose. Fresh belly characteristics (N=141) were collected at slaughter and bacon was manufactured commercially. The main effects in the model were treatment and the random effects of block and block within replication. Thickness, flop distance, and lipid content increased (L; P<0.04) and iodine value tended to decrease (L; P=0.08) with time after the second dose in IC barrows. Slicing yields increased with time after the second dose (L; P<0.01), but were similar (P=0.11) among sexes. Increasing time of slaughter after second anti-GnRF dose improves fresh belly and bacon slicing characteristics in IC barrows.

  13. Wavepacket propagation using time-sliced semiclassical initial value methods.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Brett B; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2004-12-22

    A new semiclassical initial value representation (SC-IVR) propagator and a SC-IVR propagator originally introduced by Kay [J. Chem. Phys. 100, 4432 (1994)], are investigated for use in the split-operator method for solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. It is shown that the SC-IVR propagators can be derived from a procedure involving modified Filinov filtering of the Van Vleck expression for the semiclassical propagator. The two SC-IVR propagators have been selected for investigation because they avoid the need to perform a coherent state basis set expansion that is necessary in other time-slicing propagation schemes. An efficient scheme for solving the propagators is introduced and can be considered to be a semiclassical form of the effective propagators of Makri [Chem. Phys. Lett. 159, 489 (1989)]. Results from applications to a one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional Hamiltonian for a double-well potential are presented.

  14. Monitoring aggregate formation in organotypic slice cultures from transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donna L; Bates, Gillian P

    2004-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the HD gene. It encodes a protein known as huntingtin, which aggregates in the nuclei of affected neurons. These aggregates are an obvious therapeutic target, thus an organotypic slice culture assay has been designed to screen potential antiaggregation compounds using the R6/2 mouse model of HD. This assay allows the aggregates to be fully quantified using fluorescent confocal microscopy and gives additional information perturbing to drug solubility, delivery, toxicity, concentration, and efficacy of inhibitors. This information is essential to the planning and application of an in vivo drug trial in the R6/2 mice.

  15. Astrocyte calcium signalling orchestrates neuronal synchronization in organotypic hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tomoe; Abe, Reimi; Nakayama, Ryota; Asada, Akiko; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are thought to detect neuronal activity in the form of intracellular calcium elevations; thereby, astrocytes can regulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. Little is known, however, about how the astrocyte calcium signal regulates the activity of neuronal populations. In this study, we addressed this issue using functional multineuron calcium imaging in hippocampal slice cultures. Under normal conditions, CA3 neuronal networks exhibited temporally correlated activity patterns, occasionally generating large synchronization among a subset of cells. The synchronized neuronal activity was correlated with astrocyte calcium events. Calcium buffering by an intracellular injection of a calcium chelator into multiple astrocytes reduced the synaptic strength of unitary transmission between pairs of surrounding pyramidal cells and caused desynchronization of the neuronal networks. Uncaging the calcium in the astrocytes increased the frequency of neuronal synchronization. These data suggest an essential role of the astrocyte calcium signal in the maintenance of basal neuronal function at the circuit level. PMID:24710057

  16. Optical slicing of large scenes by synthetic aperture integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Héctor; Saavedra, Genaro; Molina, Ainhoa; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Martínez-Cuenca, Raúl; Javidi, Bahram

    2010-04-01

    Integral imaging (InI) technology was created with the aim of providing the binocular observers of monitors, or matrix display devices, with auto-stereoscopic images of 3D scenes. However, along the last few years the inventiveness of researches has allowed to find many other interesting applications of integral imaging. Examples of this are the application of InI in object recognition, the mapping of 3D polarization distributions, or the elimination of occluding signals. One of the most interesting applications of integral imaging is the production of views focused at different depths of the 3D scene. This application is the natural result of the ability of InI to create focal stacks from a single input image. In this contribution we present new algorithm for this optical slicing application, and show that it is possible the 3D reconstruction with improved lateral resolution.

  17. Comparative Visualization of Ensembles Using Ensemble Surface Slicing

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Oluwafemi S.; Wu, Xunlei; Harter, Jonathan M.; Phadke, Madhura; Pinto, Lifford; Petersen, Hannah; Bass, Steffen; Keifer, Michael; Zhong, Sharon; Healey, Chris; Taylor, Russell M.

    2012-01-01

    By definition, an ensemble is a set of surfaces or volumes derived from a series of simulations or experiments. Sometimes the series is run with different initial conditions for one parameter to determine parameter sensitivity. The understanding and identification of visual similarities and differences among the shapes of members of an ensemble is an acute and growing challenge for researchers across the physical sciences. More specifically, the task of gaining spatial understanding and identifying similarities and differences between multiple complex geometric data sets simultaneously has proved challenging. This paper proposes a comparison and visualization technique to support the visual study of parameter sensitivity. We present a novel single-image view and sampling technique which we call Ensemble Surface Slicing (ESS). ESS produces a single image that is useful for determining differences and similarities between surfaces simultaneously from several data sets. We demonstrate the usefulness of ESS on two real-world data sets from our collaborators. PMID:23560167

  18. Measurement of Inositol Triphosphate Levels from Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Woolley, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Inositol triphosphate (IP3) is an important second messenger that participates in signal transduction pathways in diverse cell types including hippocampal neurons. Stimulation of phospholipase C in response to various stimuli (hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, neurotrophins, neuromodulators, odorants, light, etc) results in hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a phospholipid that is located in the plasma membrane, and leads to the production of IP3 and diacylglycerol. Binding of IP3 to the IP3 receptor (IP3R) induces Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and enables the initiation of intracellular Ca2+-dependent signaling. Here we describe a procedure for the measurement of cellular IP3 levels in tissue homogenates prepared from rat hippocampal slices. PMID:27468425

  19. Strong optomechanical interactions in a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam

    PubMed Central

    Leijssen, Rick; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between mechanical and optical degrees of freedom is strongly enhanced by using subwavelength optical mode profiles. We realize an optomechanical system based on a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam, which combines such highly confined optical fields with a low-mass mechanical mode. Analyzing the transduction of motion and effects of radiation pressure we find the system exhibits a photon-phonon coupling rate g0 /2π ≈ 11.5 MHz, exceeding previously reported values by an order of magnitude. We show that the large optomechanical interaction enables detecting thermal motion with detection noise below that at the standard quantum limit, even in broad bandwidth devices, important for both sensor applications as well as measurement-based quantum control. PMID:26522751

  20. System for measuring film thickness

    DOEpatents

    Batishko, Charles R.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Peters, Timothy J.; Rasmussen, Donald E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for determining the thicknesses of thin films of materials exhibiting fluorescence in response to exposure to excitation energy from a suitable source of such energy. A section of film is illuminated with a fixed level of excitation energy from a source such as an argon ion laser emitting blue-green light. The amount of fluorescent light produced by the film over a limited area within the section so illuminated is then measured using a detector such as a photomultiplier tube. Since the amount of fluorescent light produced is a function of the thicknesses of thin films, the thickness of a specific film can be determined by comparing the intensity of fluorescent light produced by this film with the intensity of light produced by similar films of known thicknesses in response to the same amount of excitation energy. The preferred embodiment of the invention uses fiber optic probes in measuring the thicknesses of oil films on the operational components of machinery which are ordinarily obscured from view.

  1. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  2. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  3. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouping; Wiebe, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2013-06-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  4. True Density Prediction of Garlic Slices Dehydrated by Convection.

    PubMed

    López-Ortiz, Anabel; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Juan; Méndez-Lagunas, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    Physiochemical parameters with constant values are employed for the mass-heat transfer modeling of the air drying process. However, structural properties are not constant under drying conditions. Empirical, semi-theoretical, and theoretical models have been proposed to describe true density (ρp). These models only consider the ideal behavior and assume a linear relationship between ρp and moisture content (X); nevertheless, some materials exhibit a nonlinear behavior of ρp as a function of X with a tendency toward being concave-down. This comportment, which can be observed in garlic and carrots, has been difficult to model mathematically. This work proposes a semi-theoretical model for predicting ρp values, taking into account the concave-down comportment that occurs at the end of the drying process. The model includes the ρs dependency on external conditions (air drying temperature (Ta)), the inside temperature of the garlic slices (Ti ), and the moisture content (X) obtained from experimental data on the drying process. Calculations show that the dry solid density (ρs ) is not a linear function of Ta, X, and Ti . An empirical correlation for ρs is proposed as a function of Ti and X. The adjustment equation for Ti is proposed as a function of Ta and X. The proposed model for ρp was validated using experimental data on the sliced garlic and was compared with theoretical and empirical models that are available in the scientific literature. Deviation between the experimental and predicted data was determined. An explanation of the nonlinear behavior of ρs and ρp in the function of X, taking into account second-order phase changes, are then presented.

  5. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels, 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.

  6. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels,more » 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.« less

  7. Applications of film thickness equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1983-01-01

    A number of applications of elastohydrodynamic film thickness expressions were considered. The motion of a steel ball over steel surfaces presenting varying degrees of conformity was examined. The equation for minimum film thickness in elliptical conjunctions under elastohydrodynamic conditions was applied to roller and ball bearings. An involute gear was also introduced, it was again found that the elliptical conjunction expression yielded a conservative estimate of the minimum film thickness. Continuously variable-speed drives like the Perbury gear, which present truly elliptical elastohydrodynamic conjunctions, are favored increasingly in mobile and static machinery. A representative elastohydrodynamic condition for this class of machinery is considered for power transmission equipment. The possibility of elastohydrodynamic films of water or oil forming between locomotive wheels and rails is examined. The important subject of traction on the railways is attracting considerable attention in various countries at the present time. The final example of a synovial joint introduced the equation developed for isoviscous-elastic regimes of lubrication.

  8. Fermion localization on thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Tempo, Jose David

    2006-02-15

    We consider chiral fermion confinement in scalar thick branes, which are known to localize gravity, coupled through a Yukawa term. The conditions for the confinement and their behavior in the thin-wall limit are found for various different BPS branes, including double walls and branes interpolating between different AdS{sub 5} spacetimes. We show that only one massless chiral mode is localized in all these walls, whenever the wall thickness is keep finite. We also show that, independently of wall's thickness, chiral fermionic modes cannot be localized in dS{sub 4} walls embedded in a M{sub 5} spacetime. Finally, massive fermions in double wall spacetimes are also investigated. We find that, besides the massless chiral mode localization, these double walls support quasilocalized massive modes of both chiralities.

  9. SLIMMER: SLIce MRI motion estimation and reconstruction tool for studies of fetal anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    We describe a free software tool which combines a set of algorithms that provide a framework for building 3D volumetric images of regions of moving anatomy using multiple fast multi-slice MRI studies. It is specifically motivated by the clinical application of unsedated fetal brain imaging, which has emerged as an important area for image analysis. The tool reads multiple DICOM image stacks acquired in any angulation into a consistent patient coordinate frame and allows the user to select regions to be locally motion corrected. It combines algorithms for slice motion estimation, bias field inconsistency correction and 3D volume reconstruction from multiple scattered slice stacks. The tool is built onto the RView (http://rview.colin-studholme.net) medical image display software and allows the user to inspect slice stacks, and apply both stack and slice level motion estimation that incorporates temporal constraints based on slice timing and interleave information read from the DICOM data. Following motion estimation an algorithm for bias field inconsistency correction provides the user with the ability to remove artifacts arising from the motion of the local anatomy relative to the imaging coils. Full 3D visualization of the slice stacks and individual slice orientations is provided to assist in evaluating the quality of the motion correction and final image reconstruction. The tool has been evaluated on a range of clinical data acquired on GE, Siemens and Philips MRI scanners.

  10. The Utility of Thin Slice Ratings for Predicting Language Growth in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Katherine M.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2016-01-01

    Literature on "Thin Slice" ratings indicates that a number of personality characteristics and behaviors can be accurately predicted by ratings of very short segments (<5?min) of behavior. This study examined the utility of Thin Slice ratings of young children with autism spectrum disorder for predicting developmental skills and…

  11. Non-enzymatic browning and flavour kinetics of vacuum dried onion slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Jayeeta; Shrivastava, Shanker L.; Rao, Pavuluri S.

    2015-01-01

    Onion slices were dehydrated under vacuum to produce good quality dried ready-to-use onion slices. Colour development due to non-enzymatic browning and flavour loss in terms of thiosulphinate concentration was determined, along with moisture content and rehydration ratio. Kinetics of non-enzymatic browning and thiosulphinate loss during drying was analysed. Colour change due to non-enzymatic browning was found to be much lower in the case of vacuum dried onion, and improved flavour retention was observed as compared to hot air dried onion slices. The optical index values for non-enzymatic browning varied from 18.41 to 38.68 for untreated onion slices and from 16.73 to 36.51 for treated slices, whereas thiosulphinate concentration in the case of untreated onion slices was within the range of 2.96-3.92 μmol g-1 for dried sample and 3.71-4.43 μmol g-1 for the treated onion slices. Rehydration ratio was also increased, which may be attributed to a better porous structure attained due to vacuum drying. The treatment applied was found very suitable in controlling non-enzymatic browning and flavour loss during drying, besides increasing rehydration ratio. Hence, high quality dried ready- to-use onion slices were prepared.

  12. SLICE Office Quarterly Report for the Period January 1, 1973 to March 31, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Library Interstate Cooperative Endeavor, Dallas, TX.

    One purpose of this report is to communicate with all interested parties the status of the Southwestern Library Interstate Cooperative Endeavor (SLICE) Project as of March 31, 1973. A second - and very important - purpose is to stimulate and solicite "feedback," suggestions and guidance for future SLICE Office activities. Candid…

  13. SLICE Office Report for the Period April 1, 1974 to June 30, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Library Interstate Cooperative Endeavor, Dallas, TX.

    The activities of the Southwestern Library Cooperative Endeavor (SLICE) project are directed to those concerned with regional, multi-state library networks and continuing education for library staffs. Two SLICE projects are reviewed in this quarterly report: the planning of a six-state regional bibliographic network, and continuing education for…

  14. Brain slice on a chip: opportunities and challenges of applying microfluidic technology to intact tissues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Williams, Justin C; Johnson, Stephen M

    2012-06-21

    Isolated brain tissue, especially brain slices, are valuable experimental tools for studying neuronal function at the network, cellular, synaptic, and single channel levels. Neuroscientists have refined the methods for preserving brain slice viability and function and converged on principles that strongly resemble the approach taken by engineers in developing microfluidic devices. With respect to brain slices, microfluidic technology may 1) overcome the traditional limitations of conventional interface and submerged slice chambers and improve oxygen/nutrient penetration into slices, 2) provide better spatiotemporal control over solution flow/drug delivery to specific slice regions, and 3) permit successful integration with modern optical and electrophysiological techniques. In this review, we highlight the unique advantages of microfluidic devices for in vitro brain slice research, describe recent advances in the integration of microfluidic devices with optical and electrophysiological instrumentation, and discuss clinical applications of microfluidic technology as applied to brain slices and other non-neuronal tissues. We hope that this review will serve as an interdisciplinary guide for both neuroscientists studying brain tissue in vitro and engineers as they further develop microfluidic chamber technology for neuroscience research.

  15. Comparing Thin Slices of Verbal Communication Behavior of Varying Number and Duration

    PubMed Central

    Carcone, April Idalski; Naar-King, Sylvie; Eggly, Susan; Foster, Tanina; Albrecht, Terrance; Brogan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of thin slices to characterize the verbal communication behavior of counselors and patients engaged in Motivational Interviewing sessions relative to fully coded sessions. Methods Four thin slice samples that varied in number (four versus six slices) and duration (one- versus two-minutes) were extracted from a previously coded dataset. In the parent study, an observational code scheme was used to characterize specific counselor and patient verbal communication behaviors. For the current study, we compared the frequency of communication codes and the correlations among the full dataset and each thin slice sample. Results Both the proportion of communication codes and strength of the correlation demonstrated the highest degree of accuracy when a greater number (i.e., six versus four) and duration (i.e., two- versus one-minute) of slices were extracted. Conclusion These results suggest that thin slice sampling may be a useful and accurate strategy to reduce coding burden when coding specific verbal communication behaviors within clinical encounters. Practice Implications We suggest researchers interested in using thin slice sampling in their own work conduct preliminary research to determine the number and duration of thin slices required to accurately characterize the behaviors of interest. PMID:25441095

  16. Development and characterization of an ex-vivo brain slice culture model of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases have long incubation times in vivo, therefore, modeling the diseases ex-vivo will advance the development of rationale-based therapeutic strategies. An organotypic slice culture assay (POSCA) was recently developed for scrapie prions by inoculating mouse cerebellar brain slices with R...

  17. Chromaticity and wake field effect on the transverse motion of longitudinal bunch slices in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, V.H.; Ivanov, P.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    The Transverse turn-by-turn evolution of a bunch slice after an impulse kick is examined considering chromatic and impedance effects. It is found that by fitting the envelope of the beam slice motion to simulated data is consistent with a resistive wall wake field the strength of which can be determined by fitting.

  18. 3D image reconstruction for PET by multi-slice rebinning and axial filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Lewitt, R.M. |; Muehllehner, G.; Karp, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    Two different approaches are used at present to reconstruct from 3D coincidence data in PET. We refer to these approaches as the single-slice rebinning approach and the fully-3D approach. The single-slice rebinning approach involves geometrical approximations, but it requires the least possible amount of computation. Fully-3D reconstruction algorithms, both iterative and non-iterative, do not make such approximations, but require much more computation. Multi-slice rebinning with axial filtering is a new approach which attempts to achieve the geometrical accuracy of the fully-3D approach with the simplicity and modest amount of computation of the single-slice rebinning approach. The first step (multi-slice rebinning) involves rebinning of coincidence lines into a stack of 2D sinograms, where multiple sinograms are incremented for each oblique coincidence line. This operation is followed by an axial filtering operation, either before or after slice-by-slice reconstruction, to reduce the blurring in the axial direction. Tests with simulated and experimental data indicate that the new method has better geometrical accuracy than single-slice rebinning, at the cost of only a modest increase in computation. 11 refs.

  19. Measuring the thickness profiles of wafers to subnanometer resolution using Fabry-Perot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrant, David I.; Arkwright, John W.; Fairman, Philip S.; Netterfield, Roger P

    2007-05-20

    The resolution of an angle-scanning technique for measuring transparent optical wafers is analyzed, and it is shown both theoretically and experimentally that subnanometer resolution can be readily achieved. Data are acquired simultaneously over the whole area of the wafer, producing two-dimensional thickness variation maps in as little as 10 s.Repeatabilities of 0.07 nm have been demonstrated, and wafers of up to100 mm diameter have been measured, with1 mm or better spatial resolution. A technique for compensating wafer and system aberrations is incorporated and analyzed.

  20. Abnormal endogenous amino acid release in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, T R

    1991-01-02

    The basal and potassium-evoked efflux of glutamate, glycine, taurine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was measured in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted and sufficient 14-day-old rats. The results indicate a reduced level of basal glutamate, taurine, and GABA efflux in hippocampal slices and taurine and GABA in cortical slices from vitamin B-6 restricted animals. In the presence of depolarizing potassium concentrations, there was a reduced level of GABA efflux in hippocampal and cortical slices, and a marked reduction in the release of glutamate in cortical slices from B-6 restricted rats. The abnormalities in the secretion process of these neuroactive amino acids may be related to the neurological sequelae associated with neonatal vitamin B-6 restriction.

  1. A novel dehydration technique for carrot slices implementing ultrasound and vacuum drying methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Tao

    2016-05-01

    A novel drying technique using a combination of ultrasound and vacuum dehydration was developed to shorten the drying time and improve the quality of carrot slices. Carrot slices were dried with ultrasonic vacuum (USV) drying and vacuum drying at 65 °C and 75 °C. The drying rate was significantly influenced by the drying techniques and temperatures. Compared with vacuum drying, USV drying resulted in a 41-53% decrease in the drying time. The drying time for the USV and vacuum drying techniques at 75 °C was determined to be 140 and 340 min for carrot slices, respectively. The rehydration potential, nutritional value (retention of β-carotene and ascorbic acid), color, and textural properties of USV-dried carrot slices are predominately better compared to vacuum-dried carrot slices. Moreover, lower energy consumption was used in the USV technique. The drying data (time versus moisture ratio) were successfully fitted to Wang and Singh model.

  2. Recovering Inner Slices of Layered Translucent Objects by Multi-Frequency Illumination.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yagi, Yasushi

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes a method for recovering appearance of inner slices of translucent objects. The appearance of a layered translucent object is the summed appearance of all layers, where each layer is blurred by a depth-dependent point spread function (PSF). By exploiting the difference of low-pass characteristics of depth-dependent PSFs, we develop a multi-frequency illumination method for obtaining the appearance of individual inner slices. Specifically, by observing the target object with varying the spatial frequency of checker-pattern illumination, our method recovers the appearance of inner slices via computation. We study the effect of non-uniform transmission due to inhomogeneity of translucent objects and develop a method for recovering clear inner slices based on the pixel-wise PSF estimates under the assumption of spatial smoothness of inner slice appearances. We quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method by simulations and qualitatively show faithful recovery using real-world scenes.

  3. Thin and thick primary cutaneous melanomas reveal distinct patterns of somatic copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Apollo, Alessandro; Pescucci, Chiara; Licastro, Danilo; Urso, Carmelo; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Luzzatto, Lucio; Stecca, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most aggressive type of skin tumor. Early stage melanoma can be often cured by surgery; therefore current management guidelines dictate a different approach for thin (<1mm) versus thick (>4mm) melanomas. We have carried out whole-exome sequencing in 5 thin and 5 thick fresh-frozen primary cutaneous melanomas. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) identified two groups corresponding to thin and thick melanomas. The most striking difference between them was the much greater abundance of SCNAs in thick melanomas, whereas mutation frequency did not significantly change between the two groups. We found novel mutations and focal SCNAs in genes that are embryonic regulators of axon guidance, predominantly in thick melanomas. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets provided further support for a potential role of Ephrin receptors in melanoma progression. In addition, we have identified a set of SCNAs, including amplification of BRAF and ofthe epigenetic modifier EZH2, that are specific for the group of thick melanomas that developed metastasis during the follow-up. Our data suggest that mutations occur early during melanoma development, whereas SCNAs might be involved in melanoma progression. PMID:27095580

  4. Involvement of MEK/ERK pathway in cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Yuka; Hiramatsu, Jun; Gemba, Munekazu

    2003-07-20

    We have previously reported that free radical-mediated injury induced by cephaloridine (CER) is enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, in rat renal cortical slices. We have also shown that PKC activation in mitochondria is involved in CER-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. We investigated the role of a downstream PKC pathway, a MEK/ERK pathway, in free radical-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices exposed to CER. Immediately after preparing slices from rat renal cortex, the slices were incubated in the medium containing MEK inhibitors. ERK1/2 activation was determined by Western blot analysis for phosphorylated ERK (pERK) 1/2 protein in nucleus fraction prepared from the slices exposed to CER. Prominently, CER caused not only increases in lipid peroxidation as an index of free radical generation and in LDH leakage as that of cell injury in the slices, but also marked activation of ERK1/2 in nucleus fraction. PD98059 and U0126, MEK1/2 inhibitors, significantly attenuated CER-induced increases in lipid peroxidation and LDH leakage in the slices. PD98059 also suppressed ERK1/2 activation in nucleus fraction prepared from the slices treated with CER. Inhibition of other MAP kinase pathways, p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) had no effect on CER-induced increases in lipid peroxidation level and LDH leakage in the slices. The present results suggest that a MEK/ERK pathway down stream of a PKC pathway is probably involved in free radical-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices exposed to CER.

  5. Endogenous 24S-hydroxycholesterol modulates NMDAR-mediated function in hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Min-Yu; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Benz, Ann; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), a major subtype of glutamate receptors mediating excitatory transmission throughout the central nervous system (CNS), play critical roles in governing brain function and cognition. Because NMDAR dysfunction contributes to the etiology of neurological and psychiatric disorders including stroke and schizophrenia, NMDAR modulators are potential drug candidates. Our group recently demonstrated that the major brain cholesterol metabolite, 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-HC), positively modulates NMDARs when exogenously administered. Here, we studied whether endogenous 24S-HC regulates NMDAR activity in hippocampal slices. In CYP46A1−/− (knockout; KO) slices where endogenous 24S-HC is greatly reduced, NMDAR tone, measured as NMDAR-to-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) ratio, was reduced. This difference translated into more NMDAR-driven spiking in wild-type (WT) slices compared with KO slices. Application of SGE-301, a 24S-HC analog, had comparable potentiating effects on NMDAR EPSCs in both WT and KO slices, suggesting that endogenous 24S-HC does not saturate its NMDAR modulatory site in ex vivo slices. KO slices did not differ from WT slices in either spontaneous neurotransmission or in neuronal intrinsic excitability, and exhibited LTP indistinguishable from WT slices. However, KO slices exhibited higher resistance to persistent NMDAR-dependent depression of synaptic transmission induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an effect restored by SGE-301. Together, our results suggest that loss of positive NMDAR tone does not elicit compensatory changes in excitability or transmission, but it protects transmission against NMDAR-mediated dysfunction. We expect that manipulating this endogenous NMDAR modulator may offer new treatment strategies for neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:26745248

  6. [Ecological environment of cultivated Astragali radix and market specification of prepared slices].

    PubMed

    Yu, Kunzi; Liu, Jing; Hong, Hao; Guo, Baolin; Cai, Shaoqing; Chen, Hubiao

    2010-05-01

    Astragali Radix is derived from roots of Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus and A. membranaceus. The exhaustion of wild Astragali Radix has made cultivated Astragali Radix possess the commercial market of Astragali Radix. So the ecological environment of cultivated Astragali Radix should be investigated through field survey. Through investigation, we found that A. membranaceus var. mongholicus are cultivated in Hengshan mountain of Shanxi province, Longnan of Gansu province, south of Inner Mongolia and Qinghai provinces. A. membranaceus var. mongholicus is almost planted on the plain, except in Shanxi province it grows on the sunny side of the mountain. What is more, soil type, elevation, annual temperature and annual rainfall of these locations are different. So the ecological environments of cultivated location of Astragali Radix are different from each other. A. membranaceus is wild in Heilongjiang and northeast of Inner Mongolia, but the resource is drying up. It is also planted in few places of the provinces of Shanxi, Shandong, Hebei, Gansu, but cultivated scope of A. membranaceus is smaller than A. membranaceus var. mongholicus.. So A. membranaceus var. mongholicus possesses large part of Astragali Radix market. In market, there exists no unified specification fro slices of Astragali Radix, and specification of prepared slices will influence the contents of chemical components. Through investigation, different kind of prepared slices can be collected and compared, this provides evidences for quality control of prepared slices. Through investigation, five different specifications of prepared slices were found in market. The distributions of some specification of prepared slices are specified, like transverseprepared slices prepared from A. membranaceus only found in Heilongjiang province. Transverse prepared slices possess half part of prepared slice market, and can be used to identify original plant of Astragali Radix. So transverse prepared slices

  7. Terahertz in-line sensor for direct coating thickness measurement of individual tablets during film coating in real-time.

    PubMed

    May, Robert K; Evans, Michael J; Zhong, Shuncong; Warr, Ian; Gladden, Lynn F; Shen, Yaochun; Zeitler, J Axel

    2011-04-01

    We present a new in-line measurement technique to determine the coating thickness of individual pharmaceutical tablets during film coating in a pan coating unit using pulsed terahertz technology. Results of these real-time terahertz measurements acquired during a production scale coating run are validated using both off-line high-resolution terahertz pulsed imaging of the whole dosage form as well as weight-gain measurements made on sample tablets removed at discrete time intervals during the process run. The terahertz measurements provide a direct method of determining the coating thickness, and no chemometric calibration models are required for the quantification. The results, and their repeatability, demonstrate that real-time monitoring of pharmaceutical tablet coating is not only possible but also provides substantially more information of the coating quality than the standard quality control method. Rather than providing the average coating thickness of a large number of tablets, the terahertz sensor provides the thickness of up to 100 individual tablet coatings per minute. Using this information, the operator can get additional information about the thickness distribution in the coating pan and adjust the process accordingly. At present, a minimum coating thickness of 40 μm is required to determine the coating thickness. The technique is applicable for coatings up to 1 mm in thickness. Within that range, it provides thickness measurements of sub-micron resolution. Terahertz in-line coating process measurements show considerable potential for applications in real-time release, process analytical technology and quality by design.

  8. Eddy current thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Gary J.; Sinclair, Frank; Soskov, Alexander; Buff, James S.

    2015-06-16

    A sheet of a material is disposed in a melt of the material. The sheet is formed using a cooling plate in one instance. An exciting coil and sensing coil are positioned downstream of the cooling plate. The exciting coil and sensing coil use eddy currents to determine a thickness of the solid sheet on top of the melt.

  9. Hair growth in human split-thickness skin grafts transplanted onto nude rats: the role of cyclosporin.

    PubMed

    Gilhar, A; Etzioni, A; Krueger, G G

    1990-01-01

    To date, there have been no descriptions of hair growth following transplantation of human split-thickness skin grafts (HSTSG) to congenitally athymic (nude) mice or rats. Recently, we noted hair growth in HSTSG from scalp skin (HSTSG-SS) transplanted onto rats treated with ciclosporin (CS). By definition, HSTSG-SS of 0.4 mm had all the anagen hairs cut from the papillae. Two months after engraftment, there was histological evidence of the formation of new papillae. Density of hair correlated with thickness of HSTSG, i.e. there were more hairs/square centimeter in HSTSG-SS of 1 mm thickness than in those of 0.4 mm thickness. New hairs appeared on an average of 1 cm2/week in HSTSG-SS that were 1 mm thick; by 10 weeks, the mean density was 7.9 hairs/cm2. In the thinner grafts, the density was 3.5 hairs/cm2 (p less than 0.025). The rate of growth in the thicker grafts ranged from 0 to 0.25 mm/day, with an average of 0.1 mm/day. At 10 weeks after grafting, the hairs had a mean length of 4.4 mm in the thicker and 1.7 mm in the thinner grafts (p less than 0.001). The average diameter of the hair shafts was 0.05 mm at the various times tested. These observations identify a previously unrecognized process of hair growth and present an in vivo model to study human hair growth process, including the role of CS in hair growth.

  10. Thick resist for MEMS processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Joe; Hamel, Clifford

    2001-11-01

    The need for technical innovation is always present in today's economy. Microfabrication methods have evolved in support of the demand for smaller and faster integrated circuits with price performance improvements always in the scope of the manufacturing design engineer. The dispersion of processing technology spans well beyond IC fabrication today with batch fabrication and wafer scale processing lending advantages to MEMES applications from biotechnology to consumer electronics from oil exploration to aerospace. Today the demand for innovative processing techniques that enable technology is apparent where only a few years ago appeared too costly or not reliable. In high volume applications where yield and cost improvements are measured in fractions of a percent it is imperative to have process technologies that produce consistent results. Only a few years ago thick resist coatings were limited to thickness less than 20 microns. Factors such as uniformity, edge bead and multiple coatings made high volume production impossible. New developments in photoresist formulation combined with advanced coating equipment techniques that closely controls process parameters have enable thick photoresist coatings of 70 microns with acceptable uniformity and edge bead in one pass. Packaging of microelectronic and micromechanical devices is often a significant cost factor and a reliability issue for high volume low cost production. Technologies such as flip- chip assembly provide a solution for cost and reliability improvements over wire bond techniques. The processing for such technology demands dimensional control and presents a significant cost savings if it were compatible with mainstream technologies. Thick photoresist layers, with good sidewall control would allow wafer-bumping technologies to penetrate the barriers to yield and production where costs for technology are the overriding issue. Single pass processing is paramount to the manufacturability of packaging

  11. Assessment of Macular Thickness in Healthy Eyes Using Cirrus HD-OCT: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    SABOURI, Mohammad Rasoul; KAZEMNEZHAD, Ehsan; HAFEZI, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine normal macular thickness using Cirrus high definition optical coherence tomography. In this cross-sectional survey, 112 subjects were selected using random sampling from the Rasht telephone directory. All subjects underwent complete eye examinations. Both eyes of each patient were evaluated. The creation of a macular thickness map using a macular cube 512 × 128 combo was optional. The average thickness of the retina was determined in 9 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) regions. To assess reproducibility and system reliability, the thickness of the retina was measured up to 5 times in 10 healthy subjects. The coefficient of variation was then calculated for each individual. The coefficient of variation of macular thickness within 1 mm of the center was 0.15 - 1.33%. The means and standard deviations of central subfield thickness (CST), macular thickness (MT), and macular volume (MV) were 245.44 ± 20.39 µm, 277.9 ± 12.0 µm, and 9.98 ± 0.43 mm3, respectively. The mean CST (P < 0.0001), MT (P = 0.038), and MV (P = 0.030) were significantly higher in men than in women. In addition, regardless of age or sex, macular thickness increased when moving from within 1 mm of the center to 3 mm and 6 mm away from the center, so that the upper 3 mm (S3) was the thickest region, and the temporal 6 mm (T6) was the thinnest region in the ETDRS regions. The mean MT of healthy subjects was 280.67 ± 12.79 µm in men and 276.63 ± 11.61 µm in women. Therefore, the macula is significantly thicker in men than in women (P = 0.038). PMID:28293656

  12. Relationship between macular thickness measurement and signal strength using Stratus optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Ori; Shapira, Yinon; Gershoni, Assaf; Vainer, Igor; Nemet, Arie Y; Geffen, Noa; Mimouni, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between signal strength and macular thickness as measured by Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT)’s fast macular thickness protocol in healthy subjects. Methods In this prospective cross-sectional study 79 eyes of 42 healthy subjects were enrolled. The age, gender, and eye (right vs left) of each subject were recorded. The Stratus OCT fast macular thickness scan protocol was used and the macular thickness was measured with retinal thickness map analysis. Each eye was imaged at least six times to acquire images with signal strengths of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 out of 10 via adjustment of the focusing knob. The OCT parameters included in the analysis were thickness in the central 1 mm and in the different quadrants in the 3-mm area. Results Overall 79 eyes of 42 patients with a mean age of 38.4±12.4 were included. There was no significant difference between the signal strength measurements obtained with different signal strengths in the central thickness (P=0.20). In the superior, nasal, inferior, and temporal quadrants, a signal strength of 8 demonstrated up to 3 µm thicker measurements than a signal strength of 5 (P<0.05). In general linear regression analysis, after accounting for age and gender, signal strength did not remain a significant predictor of thickness in any quadrant. Conclusions When using fast map macular measurements, a signal strength of 5 is clinically as efficient as a signal strength of 8 in measuring macular thickness in all quadrants. Insisting on higher signal strength may not be necessary. PMID:27956823

  13. Analysis of stress on mucosa and basal bone underlying complete dentures with different reliner material thicknesses: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Lima, J B G; Orsi, I A; Borie, E; Lima, J H F; Noritomi, P Y

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal thickness of reliner material that provides the least amount of stress on thin mucosa and supporting bone in patients with complete removable dentures using a three-dimensional finite element analyses. The model was obtained from two CT scans of edentulous mandibles with dentures supported by the alveolar ridge. After virtual reconstruction, the three-dimensional models were exported to the solidworks cad software and divided into six groups based on the thickness of the reliner material as follows: (i) without material, (ii) 0·5 mm, (iii) 1 mm, (iv) 1·5 mm, (v) 2 mm and (vi) 2·5 mm. The applied load was 60 N and perpendicular to the long axis of the alveolar ridge of all the prosthetic teeth, and the mucosal thickness used was 1 mm. The analyses were based on the maximum principal stress in the fibromucosa and the minimum principal stress in the basal bone. Stress concentration was observed in the anterior zone of the mandible in the mucosa and in the bone. The maximum and minimum principal stress in the mucosa and bone, respectively, decreased, whereas the thickness of the reliner material increased until 2 mm, which transmitted the lowest stress, compared with the control. Reliner materials with a thickness of 2·5 mm showed higher stress values than those with a thickness of 2 mm. In conclusion, reliner material with a thickness of 2 mm transmitted the lowest amount of stress to the mucosa and bone in 1 mm of mucosa thickness.

  14. Design of Three-Dimensional Multiple Slice Turbo Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaedig, David; Boutillon, Emmanuel; Jézéquel, Michel

    2005-12-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to designing low-complexity high-speed turbo codes for very low frame error rate applications. The key idea is to adapt and optimize the technique of multiple turbo codes to obtain the required frame error rate combined with a family of turbo codes, called multiple slice turbo codes (MSTCs), which allows high throughput at low hardware complexity. The proposed coding scheme is based on a versatile three-dimensional multiple slice turbo code (3D-MSTC) using duobinary trellises. Simple deterministic interleavers are used for the sake of hardware simplicity. A new heuristic optimization method of the interleavers is described, leading to excellent performance. Moreover, by a novel asymmetric puncturing pattern, we show that convergence can be traded off against minimum distance (i.e., error floor) in order to adapt the performance of the 3D-MSTC to the requirement of the application. Based on this asymmetry of the puncturing pattern, two new adapted iterative decoding structures are proposed. Their performance and associated decoder complexities are compared to an 8-state and a 16-state duobinary 2D-MSTC. For a [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] information frame, the [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-state trellis 3D-MSTC proposed achieves a throughput of [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] for an estimated area of[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] in a [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] technology. The simulation results show that the FER is below [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] at SNR of [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.], which represents a gain of more than [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] over an [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-state 2D-MSTC. The union bound gives an error floor that appears at FER below [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]. The performance of the proposed 3D-MSTC for low FERs outperforms the

  15. Lumen irregularity dominates the relationship between mechanical stress condition, fibrous-cap thickness, and lumen curvature in carotid atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Sadat, Umar; Ji, Guangyu; Zhu, Chengcheng; Young, Victoria E; Graves, Martin J; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2011-03-01

    High mechanical stress condition over the fibrous cap (FC) has been widely accepted as a contributor to plaque rupture. The relationships between the stress, lumen curvature, and FC thickness have not been explored in detail. In this study, we investigate lumen irregularity-dependent relationships between mechanical stress conditions, local FC thickness (LT(FC)), and lumen curvature (LC(lumen)). Magnetic resonance imaging slices of carotid plaque from 100 patients with delineated atherosclerotic components were used. Two-dimensional structure-only finite element simulations were performed for the mechanical analysis, and maximum principal stress (stress-P₁) at all integral nodes along the lumen was obtained. LT(FC) and LC(lumen) were computed using the segmented contour. The lumen irregularity (L-δir) was defined as the difference between the largest and the smallest lumen curvature. The results indicated that the relationship between stress-P₁, LT(FC), and LC(lumen) is largely dependent on L-δir. When L-δir ≥ .31 (irregular lumen), stress-P₁ strongly correlated with lumen curvature and had a weak/no correlation with local FC thickness, and in 73.4% of magnetic resonance (MR) slices, the critical stress (maximum of stress-P₁ over the diseased region) was found at the site where the lumen curvature was large. When L-δir ≤ 0.28 (relatively round lumen), stress-P₁ showed a strong correlation with local FC thickness but weak/no correlation with lumen curvature, and in 71.7% of MR slices, the critical stress was located at the site of minimum FC thickness. Using lumen irregularity as a method of identifying vulnerable plaque sites by referring to the lumen shape is a novel and simple method, which can be used for mechanics-based plaque vulnerability assessment.

  16. High-Resolution Radioluminescence Microscopy for the Study of Prostate Tissue Slice Cell Metabolism and Monitoring of Treatment Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    a few cells) image of the local metabolism in prostate cancer tissue slice cultures (TSCs). Our hypothesis is that the local glucose concentration in...5 Objective 1: Design of a radioluminescence microscope for the imaging of FDG uptake in prostate tissue slice cultures (TSCs...imaging of FDG uptake in Prostate tissue slice cultures (TSCs

  17. 78 FR 61389 - Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control... to workers of Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations, Salem, Oregon... Salem, Oregon location of Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations....

  18. Effects of freezing and canning of papaya slices on their carotenoid composition.

    PubMed

    Cano, M P; de Ancos, B; Lobo, G; Monreal, M

    1996-04-01

    An HPLC study of the carotenoid composition of fresh, frozen and canned papaya fruit slices was done. There were no qualitative differences between the carotenoid patterns of fresh and frozen papaya fruit slices (cultivar Sunrise). The major carotenoids found in papaya extracts were lycopene and carotenol fatty acid esters of beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin-5, 6-epoxide. Other xanthophylls detected were beta-cryptoxanthin, trans-zeaxanthin and cryptoflavin. It was possible to determine the quantitative losses of carotenoids in papaya slices as a result of the freezing process and frozen storage, since samples of these fruits were available before processing. The pigment pattern of the canned product showed lycopene as being a major pigment. Thermal treatment induced the degradation of carotenol fatty acid esters of xanthophylls. The freezing and canning processing of papaya slices led to significant decreases in the total carotenoids quantified by HPLC, with frozen female slices and canned samples showing lower amounts of pigments. Hunter colour values of frozen slices were similar to those of fresh papaya fruit slices.

  19. Precise spatial and temporal control of oxygen within in vitro brain slices via microfluidic gas channels.

    PubMed

    Mauleon, Gerardo; Fall, Christopher P; Eddington, David T

    2012-01-01

    The acute brain slice preparation is an excellent model for studying the details of how neurons and neuronal tissue respond to a variety of different physiological conditions. But open slice chambers ideal for electrophysiological and imaging access have not allowed the precise spatiotemporal control of oxygen in a way that might realistically model stroke conditions. To address this problem, we have developed a microfluidic add-on to a commercially available perfusion chamber that diffuses oxygen throughout a thin membrane and directly to the brain slice. A microchannel enables rapid and efficient control of oxygen and can be modified to allow different regions of the slice to experience different oxygen conditions. Using this novel device, we show that we can obtain a stable and homogeneous oxygen environment throughout the brain slice and rapidly alter the oxygen tension in a hippocampal slice. We also show that we can impose different oxygen tensions on different regions of the slice preparation and measure two independent responses, which is not easily obtainable with current techniques.

  20. Slicing of silicon ingots with reduced kerf. Final report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, F.; Smith, M.; Schmid, K.; Khattak, C.P.

    2001-01-04

    The Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST) has been developed as an effective wafering technique by combining the advantages of diamond as an abrasive like internal diamond (ID), a reciprocating bladehead as in Multi-Blade Slurry (MBS) and wire slicing as in multiwire slicing (MWS) techniques. During the development stage, it was necessary to develop a slicer, bladepacks and the technique. It was recognized that high pressures were required between the diamond abrasive and the crystal to achieve effective slicing. This was achieved by rocking the workpiece to minimize the contact length. During the present work, the cutting effectiveness was enhanced by increasing the rotary speed of the crystal in the range of 2,500 to 5,000 rpm and the reciprocating rate of the bladehead to about 100 cycles/minute. The combination of high speed rotation of the crystal and FAST slicing have produced more effective slicing by increasing the cutting rate by a factor of 50 to produce multiple wafers wit h low kerf, low surface damage and high accuracy. In addition, this technique is now applicable for soft as well as very hard crystals. Based on these developments, Crystal Systems is currently commercializing FAST for slicing of a wide variety of hard and soft crystals.

  1. A 64-slice multi-detector CT scan could evaluate the change of the left atrial appendage thrombi of the atrial fibrillation patient, which was reduced by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hidekazu

    2011-08-19

    Curable cause of stroke is the left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombi of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Some AF patients have the LAA thrombi. It is very important to cure AF patients by warfarin. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) is the usual clinical tool to detect the LAA thrombi. Recently, a 64-slice multi-detector CT (64-MDCT) scan enables us to display the LAA thrombi more easily than TOE. I reported a case that a 64-MDCT scan had been used successfully in displaying the change of the LAA thrombi reduced by warfarin therapy. The size of the LAA thrombi was reduced from 25.2 mm × 19.3 mm (figure 1) to 22.1 mm × 14.8 mm (figure 2) after the 3-month warfarin therapy. It was useful to estimate the LAA thrombi by a 64-MDCT scan to estimate LAA thrombi itself and the change of LAA thrombi to evaluate the effectiveness of warfarin therapy.

  2. Lonsdaleite Films with Nanometer Thickness.

    PubMed

    Kvashnin, Alexander G; Sorokin, Pavel B

    2014-02-06

    We investigate the properties of potentially the stiffest quasi-2-D films with lonsdaleite structure. Using a combination of ab initio and empirical potential approaches, we analyze the elastic properties of lonsdaleite films in both elastic and inelastic regimes and compare them with graphene and diamond films. We review possible fabrication methods of lonsdaleite films using the pure nanoscale "bottom-up" paradigm: by connecting carbon layers in multilayered graphene. We propose the realization of this method in two ways: by applying direct pressure and by using the recently proposed chemically induced phase transition. For both cases, we construct the phase diagrams depending on temperature, pressure, and film thickness. Finally, we consider the electronic properties of lonsdaleite films and establish the nonlinear dependence of the band gap on the films' thicknesses and their lower effective masses in comparison with bulk crystal.

  3. Measurement of opaque film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Jaarinen, J.; Reyes, C.; Oppenheim, I. C.; Favro, L. D.; Kuo, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental framework for thickness measurements of thin metal films by low frequency thermal waves is described. Although it is assumed that the films are opaque and the substrates are comparatively poor thermal conductors, the theory is easily extended to other cases of technological interest. A brief description is given of the thermal waves and the experimental arrangement and parameters. The usefulness of the technique is illustrated for making absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivities of isotropic substrate materials. This measurement on pure elemental solids provides a check on the three dimensional theory in the limiting case of zero film thickness. The theoretical framework is then presented, along with numerical calculations and corresponding experimental results for the case of copper films on a glass substrate.

  4. Fiber optic biofluorometer for physiological research on muscle slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, Mathias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Werner, Jan; Lambertz, Daniel; Klein, Karl-Friedrich

    2016-03-01

    A focus of research in cell physiology is the detection of Ca2+, NADH, FAD, ATPase activity or membrane potential, only to name a few, in muscle tissues. In this work, we report on a biofluorometer using ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), optical fibers and two photomultipliers (PMTs) using synchronized fluorescence detection with integrated background correction to detect free calcium, Ca2+, in cardiac muscle tissue placed in a horizontal tissue bath and a microscope setup. Fiber optic probes with imaging optics have been designed to transport excitation light from the biofluorometer's light output to a horizontal tissue bath and to collect emission light from a tissue sample of interest to two PMTs allowing either single excitation / single emission or ratiometric, dual excitation / single emission or single excitation / dual emission fluorescence detection of indicator dyes or natural fluorophores. The efficient transport of light from the excitation LEDs to the tissue sample, bleaching effects of the excitation light in both, polymer and fused silica-based fibers will be discussed. Furthermore, a new approach to maximize light collection of the emission light using high NA fibers and high NA coupling optics will be shown. Finally, first results on Ca2+ measurements in cardiac muscle slices in a traditional microscope setup and a horizontal tissue bath using fiber optic probes will be introduced and discussed.

  5. Slicing-independent RISC activation requires the argonaute PAZ domain.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuo; Jin, Lan; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Feijie; Kay, Mark A

    2012-08-21

    Small RNAs regulate genetic networks through a ribonucleoprotein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which, in mammals, contains at its center one of four Argonaute proteins (Ago1-Ago4). A key regulatory event in the RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways is Ago loading, wherein double-stranded small-RNA duplexes are incorporated into RISC (pre-RISC) and then become single-stranded (mature RISC), a process that is not well understood. The Agos contain an evolutionarily conserved PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain whose primary function is to bind the 3' end of small RNAs. We created multiple PAZ-domain-disrupted mutant Ago proteins and studied their biochemical properties and biological functionality in cells. We found that the PAZ domain is dispensable for Ago loading of slicing-competent RISC. In contrast, in the absence of slicer activity or slicer-substrate duplex RNAs, PAZ-disrupted Agos bound duplex small interfering RNAs, but were unable to unwind or eject the passenger strand and form functional RISC complexes. We have discovered that the highly conserved PAZ domain plays an important role in RISC activation, providing new mechanistic insights into how miRNAs regulate genes, as well as new insights for future design of miRNA- and RNAi-based therapeutics.

  6. State-correlated DC slice imaging of formaldehyde photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, Arthur G.; Chambreau, Steven D.; Lahankar, Sridhar A.

    High-resolution slice imaging methods allow for detection of single product quantum states with sufficient velocity resolution to infer the full correlated product state distribution of the undetected fragment. This is a level of detail not available in previous studies of formaldehyde photodissociation, and in this application it reveals startling new aspects of unimolecular decomposition. The CO rotational distributions from near ultraviolet dissociation of formaldehyde are bimodal, and the imaging experiments allow us to decompose these into two dynamically distinct components: the conventional molecular dissociation over a high exit barrier, and a novel `roaming atom' reaction in which frustrated radical dissociation events lead to intramolecular H abstraction, bypassing the transition state entirely. In probing the dynamics of the conventional molecular dissociation over the barrier, we use the complete vH2-jCO correlation to model the exit channel dynamics in new detail. Furthermore, these state-correlated measurements provide insight into radical-radical reactions and the underlying dynamics and energy dependence of the roaming pathway.

  7. Assessment of immunotoxicity using precision-cut tissue slices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    1. When the immune system encounters incoming infectious agents, this generally leads to immunity. The evoked immune response is usually robust, but can be severely perturbed by potentially harmful environmental agents such as chemicals, pharmaceuticals and allergens. 2. Immunosuppression, hypersensitivity and autoimmunity may occur due to changed immune activity. Evaluation of the immunotoxic potency of agents as part of risk assessment is currently established in vivo with animal models and in vitro with cell lines or primary cells. 3. Although in vivo testing is usually the most relevant situation for many agents, more and more in vitro models are being developed for assessment of immunotoxicity. In this context, hypersensitivity and immunosuppression are considered to be a primary focus for developing in vitro methods. Three-dimensional organotypic tissue models are also part of current research in immunotoxicology. 4. In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in organotypic tissue models. In the context of immunotoxicity testing, precision-cut lung slices in particular have been intensively studied. Therefore, this review is very much focused on pulmonary immunotoxicology. Respiratory hypersensitivity and inflammation are further highlighted aspects of this review. Immunotoxicity assessment currently is of limited use in other tissue models, which are therefore described only briefly within this review. PMID:23199366

  8. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Alison E. M.; Ulyanov, Anatoly V.; Fisher, Robyn L.

    2017-01-01

    Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM), diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM) and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM). Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM) and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM), while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM), terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM), and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM). Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%), CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%), and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%). Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%), while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%). Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%), ETM (66%), DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%), APAP, CBZ (57%–56%), and DTL (48%). Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%), CBZ and ETM (44%–43%), APAP and DCF (40%–38%), MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%). This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects. PMID:28272341

  9. MSE spectrograph optical design: a novel pupil slicing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanò, P.

    2014-07-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer shall be mainly devoted to perform deep, wide-field, spectroscopic surveys at spectral resolutions from ~2000 to ~20000, at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Simultaneous spectral coverage at low resolution is required, while at high resolution only selected windows can be covered. Moreover, very high multiplexing (3200 objects) must be obtained at low resolution. At higher resolutions a decreased number of objects (~800) can be observed. To meet such high demanding requirements, a fiber-fed multi-object spectrograph concept has been designed by pupil-slicing the collimated beam, followed by multiple dispersive and camera optics. Different resolution modes are obtained by introducing anamorphic lenslets in front of the fiber arrays. The spectrograph is able to switch between three resolution modes (2000, 6500, 20000) by removing the anamorphic lenses and exchanging gratings. Camera lenses are fixed in place to increase stability. To enhance throughput, VPH first-order gratings has been preferred over echelle gratings. Moreover, throughput is kept high over all wavelength ranges by splitting light into more arms by dichroic beamsplitters and optimizing efficiency for each channel by proper selection of glass materials, coatings, and grating parameters.

  10. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  11. Central Corneal Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the central corneal thickness (CCT) in healthy white, African-American, and Hispanic children from birth to 17 years of age. Design Prospective observational multicenter study. Central corneal thickness was measured with a hand-held contact pachymeter. Results Two thousand seventy-nine children were included in the study, with ages ranging from day of birth to 17 years. Included were 807 white, 494 Hispanic, and 474 African-American individuals, in addition to Asian, unknown and mixed race individuals. African-American children had thinner corneas on average than that of both white (p< .001) and Hispanic children (p< .001) by approximately 20 micrometers. Thicker median CCT was observed with each successive year of age from age 1 to 11 years, with year-to-year differences steadily decreasing and reaching a plateau after age 11 at 573 micrometers in white and Hispanic children and 551 micrometers in African-American children. For every 100 micrometers of thicker CCT measured, the intraocular pressure was 1.5 mmHg higher on average (p< 0.001). For every diopter of increased myopic refractive error (p< 0.001) CCT was 1 micrometer thinner on average. Conclusions Median CCT increases with age from 1 to 11 years with the greatest increase present in the youngest age groups. African-American children on average have thinner central corneas than white and Hispanic children, while white and Hispanic children demonstrate similar central corneal thickness. PMID:21911662

  12. Thickness of western mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehon, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An isopach map of the basalt thickness in the western mare basins is constructed from measurements of the exposed external rim height of partially buried craters. The data, although numerically sparse, is sufficiently distributed to yield gross thickness variations. The average basalt thickness in Oceanus Procellarum and adjacent regions is 400 m with local lenses in excess of 1500 m in the circular maria. The total volume of basalt in the western maria is estimated to be in the range of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power cu km. The chief distinction between the eastern and western maria appears to be one of basalt volumes erupted to the surface. Maximum volumes of basalt are deposited west of the central highlands and flood subjacent terrain to a greater extent than on the east. The surface structures of the western maria reflect the probability of a greater degree of isostatic response to a larger surface loading by the greater accumulation of mare basalt.

  13. Measuring Rind Thickness on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C.; Miller, J.; Brown, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nondestructive test determines rind thickness of polyurethane foam. Surface harness of foam measured by Shore durometer method: hardness on Shore D scale correlates well with rind thickness. Shore D hardness of 20, for example, indicates rind thickness of 0.04 inch (1 millimeter). New hardness test makes it easy to determine rind thickness of sample nondestructively and to adjust fabrication variables accordingly.

  14. Slice emittance measurement for photocathode RF gun with solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Huang, WenHui; Du, YingChao; Yan, LiXin; Tang, ChuanXiang

    2011-12-01

    The radiation of high-gain short-wavelength free-electron laser depends on the slice transverse emittance of the electron bunch. This essay introduces the method of slice emittance measurement, and shows the brief setup of this experiment using the solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity at Tsinghua University. The preliminary experimental results show that the slice rms emittance of the electron bunch generated by photocathode RF gun has considerable variations along the bunch and is typically less than 0.55 mm mrad for the laser rms radius of 0.4 mm.

  15. Slice-Based Formal Specification Measures -- Mapping Coupling and Cohesion Measures to Formal Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollin, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that existing slice-based measures can reasonably be mapped to the field of state-based specification languages. By making use of Z specifications this contribution renews the idea of slice-profiles and derives coupling and cohesion measures for them. The measures are then assessed by taking a critical look at their sensitiveness in respect to modifications on the specification source. The presented study shows that slice-based coupling and cohesion measures have the potential to be used as quality indicators for specifications as they reflect the changes in the structure of a specification as accustomed from their program-related pendants.

  16. Cartography of high-dimensional flows: a visual guide to sections and slices.

    PubMed

    Cvitanović, Predrag; Borrero-Echeverry, Daniel; Carroll, Keith M; Robbins, Bryce; Siminos, Evangelos

    2012-12-01

    Symmetry reduction by the method of slices quotients the continuous symmetries of chaotic flows by replacing the original state space by a set of charts, each covering a neighborhood of a dynamically important class of solutions, qualitatively captured by a "template." Together these charts provide an atlas of the symmetry-reduced "slice" of state space, charting the regions of the manifold explored by the trajectories of interest. Within the slice, relative equilibria reduce to equilibria and relative periodic orbits reduce to periodic orbits. Visualizations of these solutions and their unstable manifolds reveal their interrelations and the role they play in organizing turbulence/chaos.

  17. Automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, J.; Saita, S.; Kubo, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Nishitani, H.; Ohmatsu, H.; Eguchi, K.; Moriyama, N.

    2006-03-01

    Multi-slice CT technology was developed, so, we can get clear contrast images and thin slice images. But doctors need to diagnosis many image, thus their load increases. Therefore, development of the algorithm that analyses lung internal-organs is expected. When doctors diagnose lung internal-organs, they understand it. So, detailed analyze of lung internal-organs is applicant to early detection of a nodule. Especially, analyzing bronchus provides that useful information of detection of airway disease and classification of the pulmonary vein and artery. In this paper, we describe a method for automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on Multi-Slice CT images.

  18. Automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, J.; Saita, S.; Kubo, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Nishitani, H.; Ohmatsu, H.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Kusumoto, M.; Kakinuma, R.; Moriyama, N.

    2007-03-01

    Multi-slice CT technology was developed, so, we can get clear contrast images and thin slice images. But doctors need to diagnosis many image, thus their load increases. Therefore, development of the algorithm that analyses lung internal-organs is expected. When doctors diagnose lung internal-organs, they understand it. So, detailed analyze of lung internal-organs is applicant to early detection of a nodule. Especially, analyzing bronchus provides that useful information of detection of airway disease and classification of the pulmonary vein and artery. In this paper, we describe a method for automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on Multi-Slice CT images.

  19. Sliced-pupil grating: a novel concept for increasing spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Blanco, E.; García-Vargas, M.; Maldonado, M.; Gallego, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Carrasco, E.; Pérez, A.; Martínez-Delgado, I.; Zamorano, J.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the opto-mechanical design of a novel spectroscopic element - sliced pupil grating - that allows increasing the spectral resolution while keeping the instrument geometry. The concept is based on "cutting" the pupil into different slices by placing a number of prisms at the two sites of a VPH grating. The independent beams are guided through a precise opto-mechanical assembly to assure the recombination of the individual images on the detector within the available error budget, producing a single spectrum. To probe the feasibility of the concept, we have designed and manufactured a 3-slice prototype for an already-built spectrograph (Elmer, for the GTC 10-m telescope).

  20. Development of a fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) for reducing the cost of photovoltaic wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, F. )

    1991-12-01

    This report examines a wafer slicing technique developed by Crystal Systems, Inc. that reduces the cost of photovoltaic wafers. This fixed, abrasive slicing technique (FAST) uses a multiwire bladepack and a diamond-plated wirepack; water is the coolant. FAST is in the prototype production stage and reduces expendable material costs while retaining the advantages of a multiwire slurry technique. The cost analysis revealed that costs can be decreased by making more cuts per bladepack and slicing more wafers per linear inch. Researchers studied the degradation of bladepacks and increased wirepack life. 21 refs.

  1. Thick Silicon Double-Sided Strip Detectors for Low-Energy Small-Animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 μm strip pitch is attainable. Good trigger uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD (Double-sided strip detector) shows high potential for small-animal SPECT. PMID:20686626

  2. Reducing shield thickness and backscattered radiation using a multilayered shield for 6–10 MeV electron beams.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin; Chen, Tom; Rattanavoang, Somkhit; Hellyer, James; Gray, Alison; Nelson, Vinod; Short, Richard; Rajapakse, Satya; Lee, James; Fogarty, Gerald; Izard, Michael; Hill, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Intraoral and external electron shields used in radiotherapy are designed to minimize radiation exposure to non-treatment tissue. Sites where shields are used include but are not limited to, the treatment of lips, cheeks and ears whilst shielding the underlying oral cavity, tongue, gingival or temporal region. A commonly known and published effect, concerns the enhancement in dose that can occur on the beam side on an electron shield caused by an increase in electron backscatter radiation. In this work a lead shield has been designed incorporating copper, aluminium and wax in a step down filter arrangement to minimise backscatter whilst minimizing overall shield thickness for better clinical setup and ease of use. For electron beams ranging from 6 to 10 MeV, a standard shield design of 4 mm lead, 0.6 mm copper, 1.0 mm aluminium and 1.5 mm wax (3.1 mm added filtration, 7.1 mm total thickness) provided adequate backscatter and transmission reduction to match a standard 4.5 mm lead and 10 mm wax (total thickness 14.5 mm) electron shield. Dose enhancement values of no more than 10 % were measured utilising this shield design with a 50 % reduction in shield thickness. The thinner shield will not only allow easier patient set up but should be tolerated better by patients when mucosal reactions occur as they place less physical pressure on these sites during treatment due to their smaller size.

  3. Effect of the amount of thickness reduction on color and translucency of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jai-Bong

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study investigated the effect of amount of thickness reduction on color and translucency of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS One-hundred sixty-five monolithic zirconia specimens (16.3 mm × 16.3 mm × 2.0 mm) were divided into 5 groups (Group I to V) according to the number of A2-coloring liquid applications. Each group was then divided into 11 subgroups by reducing the thickness up to 1.0 mm in 0.1-mm increments (Subgroup 0 to 10, n=3). Colors and spectral distributions were measured according to CIELAB on a reflection spectrophotometer. All measurements were performed on five different areas of each specimen. Color difference (ΔE*ab) and translucency parameter (TP) were calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and multiple comparison Scheffé test (α=.05). RESULTS There were significant differences in CIE L* between Subgroup 0 and other subgroups in all groups. CIE a* increased (0.52thickness reduction. Perceptible color differences (ΔE* ab>3.7) were obtained between Subgroup 0 and other subgroups. TP values generally increased as the thickness reduction increased in all groups (R2>0.89, P<.001). CONCLUSION Increasing thickness reduction reduces lightness and increases a reddish, bluish appearance, and translucency of monolithic zirconia ceramics. PMID:26949486

  4. Effect of Specimen Thickness on Mechanical Behavior of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Freedman, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Potential composite applications in aerospace and transportation application systems have different thickness requirements. For example, space applications such as nozzle ramps or heat exchangers use very thin (less than 1 mm) structures whereas turbine blades need very thick parts greater than or equal to cm). There has been little investigation into the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-NicalonTM fibers, a carbon interphase, and CVI Sic matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies to provide variable thickness. The composites ranged from a single ply (approximately 0.4 mm) to thirty-six plies (approximately 1 cm). Tensile tests were performed at room temperature with acoustic emission used to monitor matrix crack behavior. Elevated temperature tensile stress-rupture tests were performed in air. Considerably different room and elevated temperature tensile behavior was observed that will be discussed with respect to the effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and oxidation diffusion kinetics.

  5. Carotid Plaque Characterization, Stenosis, and Intima-Media Thickness According to Age and Gender in a Large Registry Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Nancy M.; Gardin, Julius M.; Malik, Shaista; Postley, John; Wong, Nathan D.

    2017-01-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is a well-established predictor of cardiovascular disease events. Not well described, however, is the prevalence of plaque and stenosis severity and how this varies according to extent of CIMT, age, and gender. We evaluated the extent of carotid plaque and stenosis severity according to CIMT, age, and gender in a large CIMT screening registry. We studied 9,347 women and 12,676 men (n = 22,023) who received carotid ultrasound scans. The presence and severity of both carotid plaque and stenosis was compared according to extent of CIMT (≥1 mm vs <1 mm), age, and gender using the chi-square test of proportions. Among those aged <45 to ≥80 years, the prevalence of CIMT ≥1 mm ranged from 0.13% to 29.3% in women and 0.6% to 40.1% in men, stenosis ≥50% from 0.1% to 14.9% in women and 0.1% to 13.2% in men, and mixed and/or soft plaque from 7.1% to 66.5% in women, and 9.2% to 65.8% in men (all p <0.001 across age groups). Even when CIMT levels were <1 mm, >30% of patients demonstrated mixed or soft plaque potentially prone to rupture. Of those with CIMT ≥1 mm, more than 70% had such mixed or soft plaque and more than 40% demonstrated stenoses of 30% or greater. In conclusion, we describe in a large CIMT registry study a substantial age-related increase in both men and women of increased CIMT, plaque presence, and severity, and stenosis. Even in those with normal CIMT, mixed or soft plaque was common, further demonstrating the value in assessing for plaque when doing carotid ultrasound. PMID:26869392

  6. Water content and thickness of the stratum corneum contribute to skin surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Sato, J; Yanai, M; Hirao, T; Denda, M

    2000-08-01

    Skin surface morphology has long been recognized as reflecting skin pathology. In the present study, we evaluated skin surface morphology using hairless mice under contrasting conditions of humidity. The skin surface microrelief was recorded with opaque quick-drying silicone rubber, and examined under a microscope. A binary image was produced by density slicing. Within 3 days of exposure to dry conditions, skin roughness was significantly increased. The skin roughness was partially mitigated by topical application of an aqueous solution of glycerol or hydration by immersion in water. A significant correlation between skin roughness and stratum corneum thickness was also observed. These results suggest that skin surface morphology is associated with both water content and thickness of the stratum corneum.

  7. Effect of drying temperature and slice size on quality of dried okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench).

    PubMed

    Pendre, N K; Nema, Prabhat K; Sharma, Harsh P; Rathore, S S; Kushwah, S S

    2012-06-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L) Moench) is an important vegetable crop of India. Dried okra pods have wide use in snacks and are in great demand for domestic as well as export market. Hence, effect of four slice sizes (1, 2, 3 and 4 cm) and four drying temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 °C) on quality of hot air dried okra were studied. Okra pods were dried in the form of slices cut across the length at different temperatures. Quality assessment of okra was done on the basis of protein, ascorbic acid and fibre content. Okra slice sizes and drying temperatures affected all the quality parameters significantly (p < 0.05). Maximum retention of protein, ascorbic acid and fibre content were found in 2 cm long slices dried at 60 °C temperature.

  8. Analysis of Spine Motility of Newborn Granule Cells in Acute Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Ayumu; Zhao, Chunmei; Suh, Hoonkyo; Gage, Fred H

    2015-10-01

    In this protocol, acute brain slices are prepared from mice in which newborn granule cells have been labeled using retroviral vector technology. Using a live-cell imaging stage and confocal microscopy coupled to imaging software, dendritic spines are analyzed.

  9. Dynamic imaging with multiple resolutions along phase-encode and slice-select dimensions.

    PubMed

    Panych, L P; Zhao, L; Jolesz, F A; Mulkern, R V

    2001-06-01

    An implementation is reported of an imaging method to obtain MUltiple Resolutions along Phase-encode and Slice-select dimensions (MURPS), which enables dynamic imaging of focal changes using a graded, multiresolution approach. MURPS allows one to trade spatial resolution in part of the volume for improved temporal resolution in dynamic imaging applications. A unique method of Hadamard slice encoding is used, enabling the varying of the phase encode and slice resolution while maintaining a constant effective TR throughout the entire 3-D volume. MURPS was implemented using a gradient-recalled echo sequence, and its utility was demonstrated for MR temperature monitoring. In this preliminary work, it has been shown that changes throughout a large volume can be effectively monitored in times that would normally only permit dynamic imaging in one or a very few slices.

  10. Holographic Photolysis for Multiple Cell Stimulation in Mouse Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Ventalon, Cathie; Angulo, María Cecilia; Emiliani, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Background Advanced light microscopy offers sensitive and non-invasive means to image neural activity and to control signaling with photolysable molecules and, recently, light-gated channels. These approaches require precise and yet flexible light excitation patterns. For synchronous stimulation of subsets of cells, they also require large excitation areas with millisecond and micrometric resolution. We have recently developed a new method for such optical control using a phase holographic modulation of optical wave-fronts, which minimizes power loss, enables rapid switching between excitation patterns, and allows a true 3D sculpting of the excitation volumes. In previous studies we have used holographic photololysis to control glutamate uncaging on single neuronal cells. Here, we extend the use of holographic photolysis for the excitation of multiple neurons and of glial cells. Methods/Principal Findings The system combines a liquid crystal device for holographic patterned photostimulation, high-resolution optical imaging, the HiLo microscopy, to define the stimulated regions and a conventional Ca2+ imaging system to detect neural activity. By means of electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in acute hippocampal slices, we show that the use of excitation patterns precisely tailored to the shape of multiple neuronal somata represents a very efficient way for the simultaneous excitation of a group of neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that fast shaped illumination patterns also induce reliable responses in single glial cells. Conclusions/Significance We show that the main advantage of holographic illumination is that it allows for an efficient excitation of multiple cells with a spatiotemporal resolution unachievable with other existing approaches. Although this paper focuses on the photoactivation of caged molecules, our approach will surely prove very efficient for other probes, such as light-gated channels, genetically encoded photoactivatable

  11. Analysis and improvement of SNR using time slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanam, Srikrishna; Singh, Amarjot; Kumar, Devinder; Choubey, Akash; Bacchuwar, Ketan

    2011-06-01

    Noise is a very important factor which in most cases, plays an antagonistic role in the vast field of image processing. Thus noise needs to be studied in great depth in order to improve the quality of images. The quantity of signal in an image, corrupted by noise is generally described by the term Signal-to-Noise ratio. Capturing multiple photos at different focus settings is a powerful approach for improving SNR. The paper analyses a frame work for optimally balancing the tradeoff's between defocus and sensor noise by experimenting on synthetic as well as real video sequences. The method is first applied to synthetic image where the improvement in SNR is studied by the ability of Hough transform to extract the number of lines with respect to the variation in SNR. The paper further experiments on real time video sequences while the improvement in SNR is analyzed using different edge operators like Sobel, Canny, Prewitt, Roberts and Laplacian. The result obtained is further analyzed using different edge operators. The main aim is to detect the edges at different values of SNR which will be a prominent measure of the signal strength as well as clarity of an image. The paper also explains in depth the modeling of noise leading to better understanding of SNR. The results obtain from both synthetic image and real time video sequences elaborate the increase in SNR with the increment in the total number of time slices in a fixed budget leading to clear pictures. This technique can be very effectively applied to capture high quality images from long distances.

  12. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve M; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and parasite

  13. Neuroprotective effects of mild hypoxia in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seh Hyun; Lee, Woo Soon; Lee, Na Mi; Yun, Sin Weon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of mild hypoxia in the mature and immature brain. Methods We prepared organotypic slice cultures of the hippocampus and used hippocampal tissue cultures at 7 and 14 days in vitro (DIV) to represent the immature and mature brain, respectively. Tissue cultures were exposed to 10% oxygen for 60 minutes. Twenty-four hours after this hypoxic insult, propidium iodide fluorescence images were obtained, and the damaged areas in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1), CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) were measured using image analysis. Results In the 7-DIV group compared to control tissue, hypoxia-exposed tissue showed decreased damage in two regions (CA1: 5.59%±2.99% vs. 4.80%±1.37%, P=0.900; DG: 33.88%±12.53% vs. 15.98%±2.37%, P=0.166), but this decrease was not statistically significant. In the 14-DIV group, hypoxia-exposed tissue showed decreased damage compared to control tissues; this decrease was not significant in the CA3 (24.51%±6.05% vs. 18.31%±3.28%, P=0.373) or DG (15.72%±3.47% vs. 9.91%±2.11%, P=0.134), but was significant in the CA1 (50.91%±5.90% vs. 32.30%±3.34%, P=0.004). Conclusion Although only CA1 tissues cultured for 14 DIV showed significantly less damage after exposure to hypoxia, the other tissues examined in this study showed a tendency towards less damage after hypoxic exposure. Therefore, mild hypoxia might play a protective role in the brain. PMID:25932036

  14. Ex Vivo Optogenetic Dissection of Fear Circuits in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Daniel; Asede, Douglas; Ehrlich, Ingrid

    2016-04-05

    Optogenetic approaches are now widely used to study the function of neural populations and circuits by combining targeted expression of light-activated proteins and subsequent manipulation of neural activity by light. Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) are light-gated cation-channels and when fused to a fluorescent protein their expression allows for visualization and concurrent activation of specific cell types and their axonal projections in defined areas of the brain. Via stereotactic injection of viral vectors, ChR fusion proteins can be constitutively or conditionally expressed in specific cells of a defined brain region, and their axonal projections can subsequently be studied anatomically and functionally via ex vivo optogenetic activation in brain slices. This is of particular importance when aiming to understand synaptic properties of connections that could not be addressed with conventional electrical stimulation approaches, or in identifying novel afferent and efferent connectivity that was previously poorly understood. Here, a few examples illustrate how this technique can be applied to investigate these questions to elucidating fear-related circuits in the amygdala. The amygdala is a key region for acquisition and expression of fear, and storage of fear and emotional memories. Many lines of evidence suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) participates in different aspects of fear acquisition and extinction, but its precise connectivity with the amygdala is just starting to be understood. First, it is shown how ex vivo optogenetic activation can be used to study aspects of synaptic communication between mPFC afferents and target cells in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Furthermore, it is illustrated how this ex vivo optogenetic approach can be applied to assess novel connectivity patterns using a group of GABAergic neurons in the amygdala, the paracapsular intercalated cell cluster (mpITC), as an example.

  15. Influence of slice overlap on positron emission tomography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Clare; Gillen, Gerry; Dempsey, Mary Frances; Findlay, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    PET scans use overlapping acquisition beds to correct for reduced sensitivity at bed edges. The optimum overlap size for the General Electric (GE) Discovery 690 has not been established. This study assesses how image quality is affected by slice overlap. Efficacy of 23% overlaps (recommended by GE) and 49% overlaps (maximum possible overlap) were specifically assessed. European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for calculating minimum injected activities based on overlap size were also reviewed. A uniform flood phantom was used to assess noise (coefficient of variation, (COV)) and voxel accuracy (activity concentrations, Bq ml-1). A NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) body phantom with hot/cold spheres in a background activity was used to assess contrast recovery coefficients (CRCs) and signal to noise ratios (SNR). Different overlap sizes and sphere-to-background ratios were assessed. COVs for 49% and 23% overlaps were 9% and 13% respectively. This increased noise was difficult to visualise on the 23% overlap images. Mean voxel activity concentrations were not affected by overlap size. No clinically significant differences in CRCs were observed. However, visibility and SNR of small, low contrast spheres (⩽13 mm diameter, 2:1 sphere to background ratio) may be affected by overlap size in low count studies if they are located in the overlap area. There was minimal detectable influence on image quality in terms of noise, mean activity concentrations or mean CRCs when comparing 23% overlap with 49% overlap. Detectability of small, low contrast lesions may be affected in low count studies—however, this is a worst-case scenario. The marginal benefits of increasing overlap from 23% to 49% are likely to be offset by increased patient scan times. A 23% overlap is therefore appropriate for clinical use. An amendment to EANM guidelines for calculating injected activities is also proposed which better reflects the effect overlap size has

  16. The crustal thickness of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clitheroe, G.; Gudmundsson, O.; Kennett, B.L.N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Australian continent using the temporary broadband stations of the Skippy and Kimba projects and permanent broadband stations. We isolate near-receiver information, in the form of crustal P-to-S conversions, using the receiver function technique. Stacked receiver functions are inverted for S velocity structure using a Genetic Algorithm approach to Receiver Function Inversion (GARFI). From the resulting velocity models we are able to determine the Moho depth and to classify the width of the crust-mantle transition for 65 broadband stations. Using these results and 51 independent estimates of crustal thickness from refraction and reflection profiles, we present a new, improved, map of Moho depth for the Australian continent. The thinnest crust (25 km) occurs in the Archean Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia; the thickest crust (61 km) occurs in Proterozoic central Australia. The average crustal thickness is 38.8 km (standard deviation 6.2 km). Interpolation error estimates are made using kriging and fall into the range 2.5-7.0 km. We find generally good agreement between the depth to the seismologically defined Moho and xenolith-derived estimates of crustal thickness beneath northeastern Australia. However, beneath the Lachlan Fold Belt the estimates are not in agreement, and it is possible that the two techniques are mapping differing parts of a broad Moho transition zone. The Archean cratons of Western Australia appear to have remained largely stable since cratonization, reflected in only slight variation of Moho depth. The largely Proterozoic center of Australia shows relatively thicker crust overall as well as major Moho offsets. We see evidence of the margin of the contact between the Precambrian craton and the Tasman Orogen, referred to as the Tasman Line. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Capitalizing Resolving Power of Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation by Freezing and Precisely Slicing Centrifuged Solution: Enabling Identification of Complex Proteins from Mitochondria by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiqing; Lu, Joann J.; Rao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient centrifugation is widely utilized for various high purity sample preparations, and density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) is often used for more resolution-demanding purification of organelles and protein complexes. Accurately locating different isopycnic layers and precisely extracting solutions from these layers play a critical role in achieving high-resolution DGU separations. In this technique note, we develop a DGU procedure by freezing the solution rapidly (but gently) after centrifugation to fix the resolved layers and by slicing the frozen solution to fractionate the sample. Because the thickness of each slice can be controlled to be as thin as 10 micrometers, we retain virtually all the resolution produced by DGU. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we fractionate complex V from HeLa mitochondria using a conventional technique and this freezing-slicing (F-S) method. The comparison indicates that our F-S method can reduce complex V layer thicknesses by ~40%. After fractionation, we analyze complex V proteins directly on a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twelve out of fifteen subunits of complex V are positively identified. Our method provides a practical protocol to identify proteins from complexes, which is useful to investigate biomolecular complexes and pathways in various conditions and cell types. PMID:27668122

  18. Detection of Cardiac Function Abnormality from MRI Images Using Normalized Wall Thickness Temporal Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wael, Mai; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a method for identifying abnormal myocardial function based on studying the normalized wall motion pattern during the cardiac cycle. Methods. The temporal pattern of the normalized myocardial wall thickness is used as a feature vector to assess the cardiac wall motion abnormality. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the feature dimensionality and the maximum likelihood method is used to differentiate between normal and abnormal features. The proposed method was applied on a dataset of 27 cases from normal subjects and patients. Results. The developed method achieved 81.5%, 85%, and 88.5% accuracy for identifying abnormal contractility in the basal, midventricular, and apical slices, respectively. Conclusions. A novel feature vector, namely, the normalized wall thickness, has been introduced for detecting myocardial regional wall motion abnormality. The proposed method provides assessment of the regional myocardial contractility for each cardiac segment and slice; therefore, it could be a valuable tool for automatic and fast determination of regional wall motion abnormality from conventional cine MRI images.

  19. Effect of layer thickness setting on deposition characteristics in direct energy deposition (DED) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Do-Sik; Baek, Gyeong-Yun; Seo, Jin-Seon; Shin, Gwang-Yong; Kim, Kee-Poong; Lee, Ki-Yong

    2016-12-01

    Direct energy deposition is an additive manufacturing technique that involves the melting of metal powder with a high-powered laser beam and is used to build a variety of components. In laser-assisted metal deposition, the mechanical and metallurgical properties achieved are influenced by many factors. This paper addresses methods for selecting an appropriate layer thickness setting, which is an important parameter in layer-by-layer deposition manufacturing. A new procedure is proposed for determining the layer thickness setting for use in slicing of a part based on the single-layer height for a given depositing condition. This procedure was compared with a conventional method that uses an empirically determined layer thickness and with a feedback control method. The micro-hardness distribution, location of the melting pool, and microstructures of the deposited layers after deposition of a simple target shape were investigated for each procedure. The experimental results show that even though the feedback control method is the most effective method for obtaining the desired geometry, the deposited region was characterized by inhomogeneity of micro-hardness due to the time-variable depositing conditions involved. The largest dimensional error was associated with the conventional deposition procedure, which produced a rise in the melting zone due to over-deposition with respect to the slicing thickness, especially at the high laser power level considered. In contrast, the proposed procedure produced a stable melting zone position during deposition, which resulted in the deposited part having reasonable dimensional accuracy and uniform micro-hardness throughout the deposited region.

  20. Organotypic slice cultures containing the preBötzinger complex generate respiratory-like rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Wiktor S.; Herly, Mikkel; Del Negro, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Study of acute brain stem slice preparations in vitro has advanced our understanding of the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation, but their inherent limitations preclude long-term manipulation and recording experiments. In the current study, we have developed an organotypic slice culture preparation containing the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the core inspiratory rhythm generator of the ventrolateral brain stem. We measured bilateral synchronous network oscillations, using calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes, in both ventrolateral (presumably the preBötC) and dorsomedial regions of slice cultures at 7–43 days in vitro. These calcium oscillations appear to be driven by periodic bursts of inspiratory neuronal activity, because whole cell recordings from ventrolateral neurons in culture revealed inspiratory-like drive potentials, and no oscillatory activity was detected from glial fibrillary associated protein-expressing astrocytes in cultures. Acute slices showed a burst frequency of 10.9 ± 4.2 bursts/min, which was not different from that of brain stem slice cultures (13.7 ± 10.6 bursts/min). However, slice cocultures that include two cerebellar explants placed along the dorsolateral border of the brainstem displayed up to 193% faster burst frequency (22.4 ± 8.3 bursts/min) and higher signal amplitude (340%) compared with acute slices. We conclude that preBötC-containing slice cultures retain inspiratory-like rhythmic function and therefore may facilitate lines of experimentation that involve extended incubation (e.g., genetic transfection or chronic drug exposure) while simultaneously being amenable to imaging and electrophysiology at cellular, synaptic, and network levels. PMID:26655824

  1. Fluidized bed drying characteristics and modeling of ginger ( zingiber officinale) slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Nezaket

    2015-08-01

    In this study fluidized bed drying characteristics of ginger have been investigated. The effects of the fluidizing air temperature, velocity, humidity and bed height on the drying performance of ginger slices have been found. The experimental moisture loss data of ginger slices has been fitted to the eight thin layer drying models. Two-term model drying model has shown a better fit to the experimental data with R2 of 0.998 as compared to others.

  2. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    compatible bioreactor optimized in year 1 to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness. To...accomplish this goal my group finished the engineering of a 5 mm bioreactor and acquired hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate data indicating that similar signal...to noise and quality data can be achieved with 4 to 5 prostate tissue slices in the 5 mm bioreactor as was acquired from 30-40 tissue slices in the

  3. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    bioreactor optimized in year 1 to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness. To accomplish this goal my...group finished the engineering of a 5 mm bioreactor and acquired hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate data indicating that similar signal to noise and...quality data can be achieved with 4 to 5 prostate tissue slices in the 5 mm bioreactor as was acquired from 30-40 tissue slices in the prior 10 mm

  4. Reducing respiratory effect in motion correction for EPI images with sequential slice acquisition order.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Puce, Aina

    2014-04-30

    Motion correction is critical for data analysis of fMRI time series. Most motion correction algorithms treat the head as a rigid body. Respiration of the subject, however, can alter the static magnetic field in the head and result in motion-like slice shifts for echo planar imaging (EPI). The delay of acquisition between slices causes a phase difference in respiration so that the shifts vary with slice positions. To characterize the effect of respiration on motion correction, we acquired fast sampled fMRI data using multi-band EPI and then simulated different acquisition schemes. Our results indicated that respiration introduces additional noise after motion correction. The signal variation between volumes after motion correction increases when the effective TR increases from 675ms to 2025ms. This problem can be corrected if slices are acquired sequentially. For EPI with a sequential acquisition scheme, we propose to divide the image volumes into several segments so that slices within each segment are acquired close in time and then perform motion correction on these segments separately. We demonstrated that the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR) was increased when the motion correction was performed on the segments separately rather than on the whole image. This enhancement of TSNR was not evenly distributed across the segments and was not observed for interleaved acquisition. The level of increase was higher for superior slices. On superior slices the percentage of TSNR gain was comparable to that using image based retrospective correction for respiratory noise. Our results suggest that separate motion correction on segments is highly recommended for sequential acquisition schemes, at least for slices distal to the chest.

  5. Adult human heart slices are a multicellular system suitable for electrophysiological and pharmacological studies.

    PubMed

    Camelliti, Patrizia; Al-Saud, Sara Abou; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Al-Ayoubi, Samha; Bussek, Alexandra; Wettwer, Erich; Banner, Nicholas R; Bowles, Christopher T; Yacoub, Magdi H; Terracciano, Cesare M

    2011-09-01

    Electrophysiological and pharmacological data from the human heart are limited due to the absence of simple but representative experimental model systems of human myocardium. The aim of this study was to establish and characterise adult human myocardial slices from small patients' heart biopsies as a simple, reproducible and relevant preparation suitable for the study of human cardiac tissue at the multicellular level. Vibratome-cut myocardial slices were prepared from left ventricular biopsies obtained from end-stage heart failure patients undergoing heart transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, and from hearts of normal dogs. Multiple slices were prepared from each biopsy. Regular contractility was observed at a range of stimulation frequencies (0.1-2 Hz), and stable electrical activity, monitored using multi-electrode arrays (MEA), was maintained for at least 8 h from slice preparation. ATP/ADP and phosphocreatine/creatine ratios were comparable to intact organ values, and morphology and gap junction distribution were representative of native myocardium. MEA recordings showed that field potential duration (FPD) and conduction velocity (CV) in human and dog slices were similar to the values previously reported for papillary muscles, ventricular wedges and whole hearts. Longitudinal CV was significantly faster than transversal CV, with an anisotropic ratio of 3:1 for human and 2.3:1 for dog slices. Importantly, slices responded to the application of E-4031, chromanol and 4-aminopyridine, three potassium channel blockers known to affect action potential duration, with an increase in FPD. We conclude that viable myocardial slices with preserved structural, biochemical and electrophysiological properties can be prepared from adult human and canine heart biopsies and offer a novel preparation suitable for the study of heart failure and drug screening.

  6. Drying characteristics of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) slices in convective and freeze dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Gulsah; Dirim, Safiye Nur

    2017-01-01

    This study was intended to determine the drying and rehydration kinetics of convective and freeze dried pumpkin slices (0.5 × 3.5 × 0.5 cm). A pilot scale tray drier (at 80 ± 2 °C inlet temperature, 1 m s-1 air velocity) and freeze drier (13.33 kPa absolute pressure, condenser temperature of -48 ± 2 °C) were used for the drying experiments. Drying curves were fitted to six well-known thin layer drying models. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to evaluate the parameters of the selected models by using statistical software SPSS 16.0 (SPSS Inc., USA). For the convective and freeze drying processes of pumpkin slices, the highest R2 values, and the lowest RMSE as well as χ2 values were obtained from Page model. The effective moisture diffusivity (Deff) of the convective and freeze dried pumpkin slices were obtained from the Fick's diffusion model, and they were found to be 2.233 × 10-7 and 3.040 × 10-9 m2s-1, respectively. Specific moisture extraction rate, moisture extraction rate, and specific energy consumption values were almost twice in freeze drying process. Depending on the results, moisture contents and water activity values of pumpkin slices were in acceptable limits for safe storage of products. The rehydration behaviour of [at 18 ± 2 and 100 ± 2 °C for 1:25, 1:50, 1:75, 1:100, and 1:125 solid:liquid ratios (w:w)] dried pumpkin slices was determined by Peleg's model with the highest R2. The highest total soluble solid loss of pumpkin slices was observed for the rehydration experiment which performed at 1:25 solid: liquid ratio (w:w). Rehydration ratio of freeze dried slices was found 2-3 times higher than convective dried slices.

  7. Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    3. Results The DR and XCT scans of the specimen were done using the 225-keV microfocus x - ray tube and II/CCD camera setup in centered rotate-only...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section by William H. Green ARL-MR-791 September...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section William H. Green Weapons and Materials

  8. Effects of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition on Cholinergic Transmission in the Hippocampal Slice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-08

    examined using a completely different experimental paradigm involving the biochemical measurement of sodium fluxes in slices of hippocampus . All of the...Sum OR. Acetylcholinesterase, long-term effects, hippocampus IS. A AC 4rCO.hImaw so M if weem’y andid Wit Ufy ft 61W& awmwrr is research program is...physiological response has been identified in ,the in vitro hippocampal slice, (2) the response of the hippocampus to repeated applications of cholTnerg-g

  9. Fast whole-brain optical tomography capable of automated slice-collection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Lei; Long, Beng; Peng, Jie; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Acquiring brain-wide composite information of neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping is crucial to understand brain functions. However, current whole-brain imaging methods based on mechnical sectioning haven't achieved brain-wide acquisition of both neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping due to the lack of appropriate whole-brain immunostaining of embedded samples. Here, we present a novel strategy of acquiring brain-wide structural and molecular maps in the same brain, combining whole-brain imaging and subsequent immunostaining of automated-collected slices. We developed a whole-brain imaging system capable of automatically imaging and then collecting imaged tissue slices in order. The system contains three parts: structured illumination microscopy for high-throughput optical sectioning, vibratome for high-precision sectioning and slice-collection device for automated collecting of tissue slices. Through our system, we could acquire a whole-brain dataset of agarose-embedded mouse brain at lateral resolution of 0.33 µm with z-interval sampling of 100 µm in 9 h, and automatically collect the imaged slices in sequence. Subsequently, we performed immunohistochemistry of the collected slices in the routine way. We acquired mouse whole-brain imaging datasets of multiple specific types of neurons, proteins and gene expression profiles. We believe our method could accelerate systematic analysis of brain anatomical structure with specific proteins or genes expression information and understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior.

  10. The utility of Thin Slice ratings for predicting language growth in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Walton, Katherine M; Ingersoll, Brooke R

    2016-04-01

    Literature on "Thin Slice" ratings indicates that a number of personality characteristics and behaviors can be accurately predicted by ratings of very short segments (<5 min) of behavior. This study examined the utility of Thin Slice ratings of young children with autism spectrum disorder for predicting developmental skills and language gains over time. A total of 22 preschool-aged children with autism spectrum disorder participated in a battery of developmental assessments and a video-taped therapist-child interaction at Time 1. They then participated in follow-up testing of language skills and a second therapist-child interaction 6 months later (Time 2). Groups of approximately 25 naïve undergraduate students provided impression ratings ("Thin Slice ratings") about each child's skills and behaviors during 2-min segments taken from the therapist-child interaction videos at each time point. Thin Slice ratings at Time 1 were highly correlated with child scores on several developmental assessments at Time 1. In addition, Thin Slice ratings at Time 1 predicted gain in parent-reported expressive vocabulary over the course of 6 months, over and above the predictive utility of Time 1 vocabulary size. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the concurrent and predictive validity of Thin Slice ratings in young children with autism spectrum disorder.

  11. Evaluation of the metabolism and hepatotoxicity of xenobiotics utilizing precision-cut slices.

    PubMed

    Lake, Brian G; Price, Roger J

    2013-01-01

    1. Precision-cut liver slices are a valuable in vitro model system to study the metabolism and toxicity of xenobiotics. Liver slices retain tissue architecture so that all cell types are present and intercellular communication between the various cell types is retained. 2. Precision-cut liver slices from humans and other species have been used to study pathways of phase I (e.g. cytochrome P450-dependent biotransformations) and II (e.g. conjugation with D-glucuronic acid, sulphate and glutathione) metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics. 3. Liver slices can also be employed to investigate the induction and inhibition of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and to obtain kinetic data on the rates of metabolism of xenobiotics. 4. Precision-cut liver slices from humans and other species have been used to study the toxicity of a wide variety of xenobiotics. Toxicity can be assessed by various techniques including gene expression, morphological examination and a wide range of biochemical endpoints. 5. Precision-cut liver slices can be utilized to examine species differences in hepatic xenobiotic metabolism and xenobiotic-induced toxicity, thus permitting comparisons between animal species and humans.

  12. Simulation and experimental study of DC electric field distribution characteristics of rat hippocampal slices in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Qiu, Qian; Li, Ze-yan; Zhao, Zhe; Chen, Rui-juan; Wang, Hui-quan

    2016-06-01

    Direct current (DC) electric field is a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons. Despite its efficacy, the dielectric constant of artificial cerebrospinal fluid and the position and direction of brain slices and other factors can affect the field intensity and distribution acting on the surface of rat hippocampus slices, thus causing errors. In this study, we describe a new analytical method optimized for DC electric fields acting on brain slices, and the design of an external DC electric field stimulator to allow scientific evaluation of brain slices. We investigated parameters regarding the uniformity of electric field distribution and identified the maximal parameters using the finite element method. Then, we selected and simplified slice images using magnetic resonance imaging data and calculated the electric field intensity of the original and simplified models. The electric field simulator induced action potential and excitatory postsynaptic current with intensities of 1, 5, and 10 V/m. This study describes the development of a new electric field stimulator and successfully demonstrates its practicability for scientific evaluation of tissue slices.

  13. Cell death and proliferation in acute slices and organotypic cultures of mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Alasia, Silvia; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the interplay between cell proliferation and death has been greatly advantaged by the development of CNS slice preparations. In slices, interactions between neurons and neurons and the glial cells are fundamentally preserved in a fashion close to the in vivo situation. In parallel, these preparations offer the possibility of an easy experimental manipulation. Two main types of slices are currently in use: the acute slices, which are short living preparations where the major functions of the intact brain (including neurogenesis) are maintained, and the organotypic cultures, where the maturation and plasticity of neuronal circuitries in relation to naturally occurring neuronal death and/or experimental insults can be followed over several weeks in vitro. We will discuss here the main advantages/disadvantages linked to the use of CNS slices for histological analysis of neuronal proliferation and death, as well as the main findings obtained in the most popular types of preparations, i.e. the cortical, hippocampal, cerebellar and retinal slices.

  14. Effect of Carboxylmethyl Cellulose Coating and Osmotic Dehydration on Freeze Drying Kinetics of Apple Slices

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Jamshid; Singh, Ashutosh; Adewale, Peter Olusola; Adedeji, Akinbode A.; Ngadi, Michael O.; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of sugar solution (hypertonic) (30%, 45% and 60% w/v) and carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) (0%, 1% and 2% w/v) coating on freeze drying of apple slices was studied. In total, nine treatments with respect to concentrations of hypertonic solution and coating layer were prepared to analyze their influence on the physical and chemical properties of freeze dried apple slices. It was observed that increase in the sugar solution concentration, decreased the moisture content of the apple slices significantly impacting its water activity, texture and sugar gain. Application of different concentrations of CMC coating had no significant effect on the properties of dried apple slices. A significant change was observed for color of CMC coated freeze dried apple slices pretreated with 60% sugar solution. Drying kinetics of pretreated apple slices were fitted by using two drying models, Newton’s and Page’s. Page’s model showed higher R-square and lower root mean square error (RSME) compared to Newton’s model. PMID:28239107

  15. Interaction of metals during their uptake and accumulation in rabbit renal cortical slices.

    PubMed Central

    Keith, R L; McGuinness, S J; Gandolfi, A J; Lowe, T P; Chen, Q; Fernando, Q

    1995-01-01

    The uptake and accumulation of metals occurs in the kidney, which is a key site for interaction between metal nephrotoxicants. The uptake/accumulation and interaction of CdCl2, HgCl2, K2Cr2O7, and NaAsO2 was examined in precision-cut rabbit renal cortical slices. Slices were incubated with 10(-6) to 10(-3) M of a single metal toxicant or combinations of metal toxicants for 12 hr in DME-F12 media. Slices were blotted and sandwiched between two mylar films stretched across XRF sample cups. Quantitation of the metal in the slices was performed by proton-induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE). The uptake of the metals was rapid, often reaching a maximum between 3 to 6 hr; the accumulation of Hg was highest, followed in order by Cd, Cr, and As. When two metals were present together, substantial alterations were observed in the uptake of the metals in the slices. HgCl2 hindered the uptake of K2Cr2O7, NaAsO2, CdCl2 (in this order), whereas these metals facilitated the uptake of HgCl2. However, a decreased uptake of both metals was often noted after exposure to other combinations of metals. PIXE analysis of metal content in slices is attractive since all elements (atomic number > 20) can be determined simultaneously. This information will be particularly useful in studying potential toxic interactions. PMID:7621806

  16. A Simple Method for Multi-Day Imaging of Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Armin H.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2009-01-01

    The organotypic slice culture (Stoppini et al., 1991) has become the method of choice to answer a variety of questions in neuroscience. For many experiments however, it would be beneficial to image or manipulate a slice culture repeatedly, for example over the course of many days. We prepared organotypic slice cultures of the auditory brainstem of P3 and P4 mice and kept them in vitro for up to 4 weeks. Single cells in the auditory brainstem were transfected with plasmids expressing fluorescent proteins by way of electroporation (Haas et al., 2001). The culture was then placed in a chamber perfused with oxygenated ACSF and the labeled cell imaged with an inverted wide-field microscope repeatedly for multiple days, recording several time-points per day, before returning the slice to the incubator. We describe a simple method to image a slice culture preparation over to the course of multiple days and over many continuous hours, without noticeable damage to the tissue or photobleaching. Our method employs a simple, inexpensive custom-built insulator constructed around the microscope to maintain controlled temperature, and uses a perfusion chamber as used for in vitro slice recordings. PMID:19565635

  17. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  18. Submillimeter (Lambda < 1 mm) Continuum Imaging at CSO: A Retrospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, C. Darren

    2009-01-01

    This contribution is submitted on behalf of all students, postdocs, and staff inspired and supported by Tom Phillips to build an instrument and then wait for low precipitable water vapor. Over the 20 plus years of its existence, the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) has seen a succession of ever more powerful detectors to measure continuum emission in the shortest submillimeter bands available from Mauna Kea. These instruments have been trained on the nearest solar systems, the most distant galaxies, and objects in between. I show several images collected over the 5 plus year history of the SHARC II camera and anecdotal comparison with past work.

  19. High-resolution single-cell imaging for functional studies in the whole brain and spinal cord and thick tissue blocks using light-emitting diode illumination

    PubMed Central

    Safronov, Boris V.; Pinto, Vitor; Derkach, Victor A.

    2009-01-01

    Functional studies of neuronal networks require recordings from visually identified neurons in their natural environment, preservation of which may demand experimenting with a tissue of a significant depth or the entire brain. Here we describe a new technique of single-cell imaging and visually controlled patch-clamp recordings in both brain slices of unlimited thickness and the whole brain or spinal cord preparations with a cut upper surface. It utilizes an upright microscope and ultra bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a source of oblique illumination. This technique provided high quality images of superficial cells regardless of slice thickness or the presence of opaque structures, like metal plate or bone, below the tissue, when conventional differential interference contrast (DIC) optics became powerless. The technique opens broad possibilities for a single-cell imaging and visually guided recordings from intact neuronal networks in the entire brain or spinal cord. PMID:17586052

  20. Identifying Small Coronary Calcification in Non-Contrast 0.5-mm Slice Reconstruction to Diagnose Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with a Conventional Zero Coronary Artery Calcium Score

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, Yoji; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Awai, Kazuo; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In a new-generation computed tomography (CT) scanner, coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores were measured using 3.0-mm slice reconstruction images originally acquired with 0.5 mm thickness scans in a single beat. This study investigated the usefulness of thin-slice (0.5 mm) reconstruction for identifying small calcifications in coronary arteries and evaluated the association with coronary plaques and stenosis compared to conventional 3.0-mm reconstruction images. Methods: We evaluated 132 patients with zero CAC scores in conventional 3.0-mm Agatston method using a 320-slice CT. Then, 0.5-mm slice reconstruction was performed to identify small calcifications. The presence of stenosis and coronary plaques was assessed using coronary CT angiography. Results: In total, 22 small calcifications were identified in 18 patients. There were 28 (21%) patients with any (≥ 25%) stenosis (34 lesions). Forty-seven coronary plaques were found in 33 patients (25%), including 7 calcified plaques in 7 patients (5%), 34 noncalcified plaques in 27 patients (20%), and 6 partially calcified plaques in 5 patients (4%). Patients with small calcifications had a significantly higher prevalence of noncalcified or partially calcified plaques (83% vs 14%; p < 0.001) and obstructive stenosis (33% vs 5.2%; p < 0.001) compared to those without small calcifications. The addition of small calcifications to the coronary risk factors when diagnosing stenosis significantly improved the diagnostic value. Conclusion: Small calcifications detected by thin-slice 0.5-mm reconstruction are useful for distinguishing coronary atherosclerotic lesions in patients with zero CAC scores from conventional CT reconstruction. PMID:27397477

  1. Correlation Between Bone and Soft Tissue Thickness in Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanizadeh, Nasrin; Daneshparvar, Niloufar; Askarpour, Farinaz; Akhoundi, Nasrin; Panjnoush, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine buccal bone and soft tissue thicknesses and their correlation in the maxillary anterior region using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 330 sound maxillary incisors in 60 patients with a mean age of 37.5 years were assessed by CBCT scans. For better visualization of soft tissue, patients were asked to use plastic retractors in order to retract their lips and cheeks away from the gingival tissue before taking the scans. Measurements were made in three different positions: at the crest and at 2 and 5mm apical to the crest. The cementoenamel junction–crest distance was measured. for data analyses, the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, ANOVA and intraclass correlation coefficient were used. Results: There were mildly significant linear associations between labial soft tissue and bone thickness in the canines and incisors (r<0.40, P<0.05), but no association was found for the lateral incisors. The mean thickness of buccal bone differed significantly in the maxillary anterior teeth, being greater for the lateral incisors (P<0.05). For soft tissue thickness, the results were the same, and the least thickness was recorded for the canines. There was a mild association between labial soft tissue and bone thickness in canines and incisors (r=0.2, P=0.3), but no such linear association was seen for the lateral incisors. Conclusions: The mean thickness of buccal bone and soft tissue in the anterior maxilla was <1mm and there was a mild linear correlation between them. PMID:28127323

  2. Thickness and Closure Kinetics of the Suprachoroidal Space Following Microneedle Injection of Liquid Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Bryce; Venugopal, Nitin; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Jung, Jae Hwan; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of injection volume and formulation of a microneedle injection into the suprachoroidal space (SCS) on SCS thickness and closure kinetics. Methods Microneedle injections containing 25 to 150 μL Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) were performed in the rabbit SCS ex vivo. Distribution of SCS thickness was measured by ultrasonography and three-dimensional (3D) cryo-reconstruction. Microneedle injections were performed in the rabbit SCS in vivo using HBSS, Discovisc, and 1% to 5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in HBSS. Ultrasonography was used to track SCS thickness over time. Results Increasing HBSS injection volume increased the area of expanded SCS, but did not increase SCS thickness ex vivo. With SCS injections in vivo, the SCS initially expanded to thicknesses of 0.43 ± 0.06 mm with HBSS, 1.5 ± 0.4 mm with Discovisc, and 0.69 to 2.1 mm with 1% to 5% CMC. After injection with HBSS, Discovisc, and 1% CMC solution, the SCS collapsed to baseline with time constants of 19 minutes, 6 hours, and 2.4 days, respectively. In contrast, injections with 3% to 5% CMC solution resulted in SCS expansion to 2.3 to 2.8 mm over the course of 2.8 to 9.1 hours, after which the SCS collapsed to baseline with time constants of 4.5 to 9.2 days. Conclusions With low-viscosity formulations, SCS expands to a thickness that remains roughly constant, independent of the volume of fluid injected. Increasing injection fluid viscosity significantly increased SCS thickness. Expansion of the SCS is hypothesized to be controlled by a balance between the viscous forces of the liquid formulation and the resistive biomechanical forces of the tissue. PMID:28125842

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of PZT Thick Films for Sensing and Actuation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Kuo, Kuo-Ching

    2007-01-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate oxide (PZT) thick films with thicknesses of up to 10 mm were developed using a modified sol-gel technique. Usually, the film thickness is less than 1 mm by conventional sol-gel processing, while the electrical charge accumulation which reveals the direct effect of piezoelectricity is proportional to the film thickness and therefore restricted. Two approaches were adopted to conventional sol-gel processing – precursor concentration modulation and rapid thermal annealing. A 10 μm thick film was successfully fabricated by coating 16 times via this technique. The thickness of each coating layer was about 0.6 mm and the morphology of the film was dense with a crack-free area as large as 16 mm2. In addition, the structure, surface morphology and physical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrical performance. The dielectric constant and hysteresis loops were measured as electric characteristics. This study investigates the actuation and sensing performance of the vibrating structures with the piezoelectric thick film. The actuation tests demonstrated that a 4 mm × 4 mm × 6.5 mm PZT film drove a 40 mm × 7 mm × 0.5 mm silicon beam as an actuator. Additionally, it generated an electrical signal of 60 mVpp as a sensor, while vibration was input by a shaker. The frequencies of the first two modes of the beam were compared with the theoretical values obtained by Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The linearity of the actuation and sensing tests were also examined.

  4. Dynamic bowtie filter for cone-beam/multi-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglin; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    A pre-patient attenuator ("bowtie filter" or "bowtie") is used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray with respect to a patient to balance the photon flux on a detector array. While the current dynamic bowtie design is focused on fan-beam geometry, in this study we propose a methodology for dynamic bowtie design in multi-slice/cone-beam geometry. The proposed 3D dynamic bowtie is an extension of the 2D prior art. The 3D bowtie consists of a highly attenuating bowtie (HB) filled in with heavy liquid and a weakly attenuating bowtie (WB) immersed in the liquid of the HB. The HB targets a balanced flux distribution on a detector array when no object is in the field of view (FOV). The WB compensates for an object in the FOV, and hence is a scaled-down version of the object. The WB is rotated and translated in synchrony with the source rotation and patient translation so that the overall flux balance is maintained on the detector array. First, the mathematical models of different scanning modes are established for an elliptical water phantom. Then, a numerical simulation study is performed to compare the performance of the scanning modes in the cases of the water phantom and a patient cross-section without any bowtie and with a dynamic bowtie. The dynamic bowtie can equalize the numbers of detected photons in the case of the water phantom. In practical cases, the dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the FOV. Furthermore, the WB can be individualized using a 3D printing technique as the gold standard. We have extended the dynamic bowtie concept from 2D to 3D by using highly attenuating liquid and moving a scale-reduced negative copy of an object being scanned. Our methodology can be applied to reduce radiation dose and facilitate photon-counting detection.

  5. Dynamic Bowtie Filter for Cone-Beam/Multi-Slice CT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fenglin; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    A pre-patient attenuator (“bowtie filter” or “bowtie”) is used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray with respect to a patient to balance the photon flux on a detector array. While the current dynamic bowtie design is focused on fan-beam geometry, in this study we propose a methodology for dynamic bowtie design in multi-slice/cone-beam geometry. The proposed 3D dynamic bowtie is an extension of the 2D prior art. The 3D bowtie consists of a highly attenuating bowtie (HB) filled in with heavy liquid and a weakly attenuating bowtie (WB) immersed in the liquid of the HB. The HB targets a balanced flux distribution on a detector array when no object is in the field of view (FOV). The WB compensates for an object in the FOV, and hence is a scaled-down version of the object. The WB is rotated and translated in synchrony with the source rotation and patient translation so that the overall flux balance is maintained on the detector array. First, the mathematical models of different scanning modes are established for an elliptical water phantom. Then, a numerical simulation study is performed to compare the performance of the scanning modes in the cases of the water phantom and a patient cross-section without any bowtie and with a dynamic bowtie. The dynamic bowtie can equalize the numbers of detected photons in the case of the water phantom. In practical cases, the dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the FOV. Furthermore, the WB can be individualized using a 3D printing technique as the gold standard. We have extended the dynamic bowtie concept from 2D to 3D by using highly attenuating liquid and moving a scale-reduced negative copy of an object being scanned. Our methodology can be applied to reduce radiation dose and facilitate photon-counting detection. PMID:25051067

  6. Tracking and modeling norovirus transmission during mechanical slicing of globe tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Y Carol; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Fleischman, Gregory J; Li, Di; Schaffner, Donald W

    2014-06-16

    Recent epidemiological evidence indicates that preparation of fresh produce for use as ingredients in ready-to-eat food in commercial settings has been a significant source of the norovirus (NoV) infections in the U.S. This research investigated the dissemination of NoV from a single tomato to many others via the use of an 11-horizontal blade slicer commonly found in restaurants or sandwich shops. A total of eight trials were conducted. The source of contamination in each trial was a soak-inoculated, air-dried globe tomato containing ~8log10 murine norovirus (MNV). Each trial began by slicing a single un-inoculated tomato in the slicer, followed by slicing an inoculated tomato. This was then followed by slicing 9 to 27 un-inoculated tomatoes. A similar and constant hand pressure on the slicer was used in every trial. Three slices from each tomato were collected for virus elution, concentration, and extraction before RT-PCR detection of MNV. The change in MNV per sliced tomato was averaged over all eight trials, and two mathematical models were fit to the average data using a logarithmic model or a power model. Regression analysis determined that the equation that best fit the data was y=-0.903∗ln(x)+7.945, where y=log10 MNV per slicing and x=tomato slicing number. An acceptable fit (R(2)=0.913) was indicated. The MNV levels transferred (y) generally decreased as the number of tomatoes sliced (x) increased, with some exceptions. Infrequent but erratic transfers, where the MNV level of a subsequent tomato was higher than that of a preceding tomato, occurred in later transfer of some trials. In contrast, the first and second transfers of each trial were always shown to have sharply decreased levels of MNV from the inoculum. The MNV log10 reduction per slicing event changes throughout the process: with a predicted 0.63log10 reduction from tomato 1 to tomato 2 (76% reduction); a 0.07log10 reduction predicted from tomato 13 to tomato 14 (a 14% reduction); and 0.03log10

  7. Platform-Independent Cirrus and Spectralis Thickness Measurements in Eyes with Diabetic Macular Edema Using Fully Automated Software

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Alex S.; Chiu, Stephanie J.; Silverman, Rachel K.; Farsiu, Sina; Bailey, Clare; Wiley, Henry E.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Jaffe, Glenn J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We determine whether the automated segmentation software, Duke Optical Coherence Tomography Retinal Analysis Program (DOCTRAP), can measure, in a platform-independent manner, retinal thickness on Cirrus and Spectralis spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in eyes with diabetic macular edema (DME) under treatment in a clinical trial. Methods Automatic segmentation software was used to segment the internal limiting membrane (ILM), inner retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and Bruch's membrane (BM) in SD-OCT images acquired by Cirrus and Spectralis commercial systems, from the same eye, on the same day during a clinical interventional DME trial. Mean retinal thickness differences were compared across commercial and DOCTRAP platforms using intraclass correlation (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. Results The mean 1 mm central subfield thickness difference (standard error [SE]) comparing segmentation of Spectralis images with DOCTRAP versus HEYEX was 0.7 (0.3) μm (0.2 pixels). The corresponding values comparing segmentation of Cirrus images with DOCTRAP versus Cirrus software was 2.2 (0.7) μm. The mean 1 mm central subfield thickness difference (SE) comparing segmentation of Cirrus and Spectralis scan pairs with DOCTRAP using BM as the outer retinal boundary was −2.3 (0.9) μm compared to 2.8 (0.9) μm with inner RPE as the outer boundary. Conclusions DOCTRAP segmentation of Cirrus and Spectralis images produces validated thickness measurements that are very similar to each other, and very similar to the values generated by the corresponding commercial software in eyes with treated DME. Translational Relevance This software enables automatic total retinal thickness measurements across two OCT platforms, a process that is impractical to perform manually. PMID:28180033

  8. Intersection Based Motion Correction of Multi-Slice MRI for 3D in utero Fetal Brain Image Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, Anthony J.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years post-processing of fast multi-slice MR imaging to correct fetal motion has provided the first true 3D MR images of the developing human brain in utero. Early approaches have used reconstruction based algorithms, employing a two step iterative process, where slices from the acquired data are re-aligned to an approximate 3D reconstruction of the fetal brain, which is then refined further using the improved slice alignment. This two step slice-to-volume process, although powerful, is computationally expensive in needing a 3D reconstruction, and is limited in its ability to recover sub-voxel alignment. Here, we describe an alternative approach which we term slice intersection motion correction (SIMC), that seeks to directly co-align multiple slice stacks by considering the matching structure along all intersecting slice pairs in all orthogonally planned slices that are acquired in clinical imaging studies. A collective update scheme for all slices is then derived, to simultaneously drive slices into a consistent match along their lines of intersection. We then describe a 3D reconstruction algorithm that, using the final motion corrected slice locations, suppresses through-plane partial volume effects to provide a single high isotropic resolution 3D image. The method is tested on simulated data with known motions and is applied to retrospectively reconstruct 3D images from a range of clinically acquired imaging studies. The quantitative evaluation of the registration accuracy for the simulated data sets demonstrated a significant improvement over previous approaches. An initial application of the technique to studying clinical pathology is included, where the proposed method recovered up to 15 mm of translation and 30 degrees of rotation for individual slices, and produced full 3D reconstructions containing clinically useful additional information not visible in the original 2D slices. PMID:19744911

  9. Upper tropospheric ozone derived from the cloud slicing technique: Implications for large-scale convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-07-01

    This study evaluates the spatial distributions and seasonal cycles in upper tropospheric ozone (pressure range 200-500 hPa) from low to high latitudes (60°S to 60°N) derived from the satellite retrieval method called "cloud slicing." The cloud slicing method determines ozone profile information in the troposphere by combining colocated measurements of cloud top pressure and above-cloud column ozone. Measurements of Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) above-cloud column ozone and Nimbus 7 Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) cloud top pressure during 1979-1984 were merged to derive upper tropospheric ozone. Because of large footprint measurements from TOMS (˜100 km diameter on average), upper tropospheric ozone derived from cloud slicing coincides with large-scale convection events. These events are not necessarily representative of average atmospheric conditions in regions near and poleward of the tropospheric wind jets (around ±30° latitude), especially in winter and spring seasons when dynamical wave activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is most intense. The cloud slicing method with Nimbus 7 geometry in any case provides a unique opportunity to investigate the behavior of upper tropospheric ozone under condition of intense broad-scale convection. In the tropics the measured upper tropospheric ozone shows year-round enhancement in the Atlantic region and evidence of a possible semiannual variability. Outside the tropics, upper tropospheric ozone from cloud slicing shows greatest abundance in winter and spring seasons in both hemispheres with largest variance and largest amounts in the northern hemisphere. This seasonal cycle behavior under conditions of intense convection is different from general ozonesonde climatology which shows instead upper tropospheric ozone maximizing around early to middle summer months. The seasonal cycles and spatial characteristics in upper tropospheric ozone from cloud slicing are similar to

  10. Bovine liver slices: A multifunctional in vitro model to study the prohormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

    PubMed

    Rijk, Jeroen C W; Bovee, Toine F H; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Groot, Maria J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Nielen, Michel W F

    2012-09-01

    Biotransformation of inactive prohormones like dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) can lead to the formation of potent androgens and subsequent androgenic responses in target tissues. In the present study, precision-cut bovine liver slices were used to study the effects of DHEA on the metabolite, transcript and androgenic activity level. Bovine liver slices were exposed for 6h to various concentrations of DHEA. Changes in androgenic activity of the DHEA containing cell culture media were measured using a yeast androgen bioassay and metabolites were identified using ultra performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOFMS), while gene expression in the DHEA-treated liver slices was examined using bovine microarrays and compared with the profile as obtained with 17ß-testosterone (17ß-T). An increase in androgenic activity was observed in the bioassay upon testing of samples from incubations of DHEA with liver slices and the formation of 4-androstenedione (4-AD), 5-androstene-3ß,17ß-diol, 17ß-T, 7α-hydroxy-DHEA, 7-keto-DHEA and 17α-T could be confirmed by UPLC-TOFMS analysis. Exposure of liver slices to DHEA and the strong androgen 17ß-T resulted in the identification of significantly up- and down-regulated genes and revealed similar gene expression profiles for both compounds. The results indicate that DHEA itself is biologically not very active, but is rapidly converted by the liver slices into the more androgen active compounds 4-AD and 17ß-T. Moreover, the present data highlight the multi-functionality of bovine liver slices as an in vitro bioactivation model, allowing the assessment of androgen activity or gene expression as effect-based endpoints for prohormone exposure.

  11. Abscisic Acid accumulation in spinach leaf slices in the presence of penetrating and nonpenetrating solutes.

    PubMed

    Creelman, R A; Zeevaart, J A

    1985-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulated in detached, wilted leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Savoy Hybrid 612) and reached a maximum level within 3 to 4 hours. The increase in ABA over that found in detached turgid leaves was approximately 10-fold. The effects of water stress could be mimicked by the use of thin slices of spinach leaves incubated in the presence of 0.6 molar mannitol, a compound which causes plasmolysis (loss of turgor). About equal amounts of ABA were found both in the leaf slices and in detached leaves, whereas 2 to 4 times more ABA accumulated in the medium than in the slices. When spinach leaf slices were incubated with ethylene glycol, a compound which rapidly penetrates the cell membrane causing a decrease in the osmotic potential of the tissue and only transient loss of turgor, no ABA accumulated. Ethylene glycol was not inhibitory with respect to ABA accumulation. Spinach leaf slices incubated in both ethylene glycol and mannitol had ABA levels similar to those found when slices were incubated with mannitol alone. Increases similar to those found with mannitol also occurred when Aquacide III, a highly purified form of polyethylene glycol, was used. Aquacide III causes cytorrhysis, a situation similar to that found in wilted leaves. Thus, it appears that loss of turgor is essential for ABA accumulation.When spinach leaf slices were incubated with solutes which are supposed to disturb membrane integrity (KHSO(3), 2-propanol, or KCl) no increase in ABA was observed. These data indicate that, with respect to the accumulation of ABA, mannitol caused a physical stress (loss of turgor) rather than a chemical stress (membrane damage).

  12. Real-time monitoring of superoxide accumulation and antioxidant activity in a brain slice model using an electrochemical cytochrome c biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Andreescu, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen species and resulting damage are central to the pathology of many diseases. The study of the temporal and spatial accumulation of reactive oxygen species has been limited due to the lack of specific probes and techniques capable of continuous measurement. We demonstrate the use of a miniaturized electrochemical cytochrome C (Cyt C) biosensor for real-time measurements and quantitative assessment of superoxide production and inactivation by natural and engineered antioxidants in acutely prepared brain slices from mice. During control conditions, superoxide radicals produced from the hippocampal region of the brain in 400 μm thick sections were well within the range of detection of the electrode. Exposure of the slices to ischemic conditions increased the superoxide production two fold and measurements from the slices were stable over a 3–4 hour period. The stilbene derivative and anion channel inhibitor, 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-disulfonic stilbene (DIDS), markedly reduced the extracellular superoxide signal under control conditions suggesting that a transmembrane flux of superoxide into the extracellular space may occur as part of normal redox signaling. The specificity of the electrode for superoxide released by cells in the hippocampus was verified by the exogenous addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) which decreased the superoxide signal in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were seen with the addition of the SOD-mimetic, cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) where the superoxide anion radical scavenging activity of nanoceria with an average diameter of 15 nm was equivalent to 527 U of SOD for each 1 μg/ml of nanoceria added. This study demonstrates the potential of electrochemical biosensors for studying real-time dynamics of reactive oxygen species in a biological model and the utility of these measurements in defining the relative contribution of superoxide to oxidative injury. PMID:23085519

  13. Ethanol inhibits histaminergic neurons in mouse tuberomammillary nucleus slices via potentiating GABAergic transmission onto the neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Jiang, Shi-yu; Ni, Jian; Luo, Yan-jia; Chen, Chang-rui; Hong, Zong-yuan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Qu, Wei-min; Wang, Lu; Huang, Zhi-li

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ethanol, one of the most frequently used and abused substances in our society, has a profound impact on sedation. However, the neuronal mechanisms underlying its sedative effect remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), a brain region thought to be critical for wakefulness. Methods: Coronal brain slices (250 μm thick) containing the TMN were prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. GAD67-GFP was used to identify histaminergic neurons in the TMN. The spontaneous firing and membrane potential of histaminergic neurons, and GABAergic transmission onto these neurons were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Drugs were applied through superfusion. Results: Histaminergic and GAD67-expressing neurons in the TMN of GAD67-GFP mice were highly co-localized. TMN GFP-positive neurons exhibited a regular spontaneous discharge at a rate of 2–4 Hz without burst firing. Brief superfusion of ethanol (64, 190, and 560 mmol/L) dose-dependently and reversibly suppressed the spontaneous firing of the neurons in the TMN; when synaptic transmission was blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 μmol/L), ethanol caused hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Furthermore, superfusion of ethanol markedly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and mIPSCs), which were abolished in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (20 μmol/L). Finally, ethanol-mediated enhancement of sIPSCs and mIPSCs was significantly attenuated when the slices were pretreated with the GABAB agonist baclofen (30 μmol/L). Conclusion: Ethanol inhibits the excitability of histaminergic neurons in mouse TMN slices, possibly via potentiating GABAergic transmission onto the neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic sites. PMID:27498778

  14. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Flávio Hb; Andrade, Kelly Rm; Leite Lima, Débora An; Ambrosano, Gláucia Mb; Lovadino, José R

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5): considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm(2) - 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm(2) - 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm(2) - 40 s) and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm). All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.

  15. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Flávio HB; Andrade, Kelly RM; Leite Lima, Débora AN; Ambrosano, Gláucia MB; Lovadino, José R

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5): considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm2 – 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm2 – 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm2 – 40 s) and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm). All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization. PMID:23674901

  16. Influence of light curing unit and ceramic thickness on temperature rise during resin cement photo-activation.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Mastrofrancisco, Sarina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different ceramic thickness on heat generation during resin cement photo-activation by QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen), LED (light emitting diode), and PAC (plasma arc-curing) LCUs (light curing units). The resin cement used was Rely X ARC (3M-ESPE), and the ceramic was IPS Empress Esthetic (Ivoclar-Vivadent), of which 0.7-, 1.4- and 2.0-mm thick disks, 0.8 mm in diameter were made. Temperature increase was recorded with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). An acrylic resin base was built to guide the thermocouple and support the 1.0-mm thick dentin disk. A 0.1-mm thick black adhesive paper matrix with a perforation 6 mm in diameter was placed on the dentin to contain the resin cement and support the ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Three LCUs were used: QTH, LED and PAC. Nine groups were formed (n=10) according to the interaction: 3 ceramic thicknesses, 1 resin cement and 3 photo-activation methods. Temperature increase data were submitted to Tukey's test (5%). For all ceramic thicknesses, a statistically significant difference in temperature increase was observed among the LCUs, with the highest mean value for the QTH LCU (p<0.05). For all the LCUs, a thickness of 0.7 mm produced the highest temperatures (1.4 and 2.0mm, p<0.05). There was no difference in temperature values between the latter two thicknesses (p>0.05). The interaction of higher energy density with smaller ceramic thickness showed higher temperature increase values.

  17. Pavement thickness evaluation using ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Dwayne Arthur

    Accurate knowledge of pavement thickness is important information to have both at a network and project level. This information aids in pavement management and design. Much of the time this information is missing, out of date, or unknown for highway sections. Current technologies for determining pavement thickness are core drilling, falling weight deflectometer (FWD), and ground penetrating radar (GPR). Core drilling provides very accurate pin point pavement thickness information; however, it is also time consuming, labor intensive, intrusive to traffic, destructive, and limited in coverage. FWD provides nondestructive estimates of both a surface thickness and total pavement structure thickness, including pavement, base and sub-base. On the other hand, FWD is intrusive to traffic and affected by the limitations and assumptions the method used to estimate thickness. GPR provides pavement surface course thickness estimates with excellent data coverage at highway speed. Yet, disadvantages include the pavement thickness estimation being affected by the electrical properties of the pavement, limitations of the system utilized, and heavy post processing of the data. Nevertheless, GPR has been successfully utilized by a number of departments of transportation (DOTs) for pavement thickness evaluation. This research presents the GPR thickness evaluation methods, develops GPRPAVZ the software used to implement the methodologies, and addresses the quality of GPR pavement thickness evaluation.

  18. Peripapillary choroidal thickness in healthy Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the peripapillary choroidal thickness of a healthy Chinese population, and to determine its influencing factors. Methods A total of 76 healthy volunteers (76 eyes) without ophthalmic or systemic symptoms were enrolled. Choroidal scans (360-degree 3.4 mm diameter peripapillary circle scans) were obtained for all eyes using enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Choroid thickness was measured at the temporal, superotemporal, superior, superonasal, nasal, inferonasal, inferior, and inferotemporal segments. Results The average peripapillary choroidal thicknesses were 165.03 ± 40.37 μm. Inferonasal, inferior, and inferotemporal thicknesses were significantly thinner than temporal, superotemporal, superior, superonasal, nasal thicknesses (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found among inferonasal, inferior, and inferotemporal thicknesses. The average peripapillary choroidal thickness decreased linearly with age (β = −1.33, 95% CI −1.98, -0.68, P < 0.001). No correlation was noted between average choroidal thickness and other factors (gender, refractive error, axial length, average retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, intraocular pressure, diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, diastolic ocular perfusion pressure, systolic ocular perfusion pressure, and mean ocular perfusion pressure). Conclusions The inferonasal, inferior, inferotemporal peripapillary choroidal thicknesses were significantly thinner than temporal, superotemporal, superior, superonasal, and nasal thicknesses. A thinner peripapillary choroid is associated with increasing age. PMID:23758729

  19. Optical properties of local surface plasmon resonance in Ag/ITO sliced nanosphere by the discrete dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiwei, Mu; Jingwei, Lv; Zhaoting, Liu; Shijie, Zheng; Lin, Yang; Tao, Sun; Qiang, Liu; Chao, Liu

    2016-04-01

    Optical properties of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) of Ag/ITO sliced nanosphere have been studied using discrete dipole approximation and plasmon hybridization theory. It is found that different morphologies of sliced nanosphere can induce distinctive features in the extinction spectra. In the meanwhile, gap distances and refractive index of the surrounding medium could modulate the plasmon hybridization and the LSPR shifting. At large separation, the shift of LSPR peaks for the nanosphere sliced in halves consisting of ITO and Ag is small and insensitive to the gap distance in the weak coupling, whereas smaller separation exhibits a distinct red shift. Additionally, multiple resonance peaks are excited for the nanosphere sliced in quarters consisting of ITO and Ag. In this situation, electric field is mainly distributed in the gap region of sliced nanosphere and the central point. These results indicate that different morphologies of sliced nanosphere could create abundant tunable LSPR modes, which provides potential for multiplex optical sensing.

  20. Biocompatibility of silicon-based arrays of electrodes coupled to organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, B W; Noraberg, J; Thiébaud, P; Koudelka-Hep, M; Zimmer, J

    2001-03-30

    In this study we examined the passive biocompatibility of a three-dimensional microelectrode array (MEA), designed to be coupled to organotypic brain slice cultures for multisite recording of electrophysiological signals. Hippocampal (and corticostriatal) brain slices from 1-week-old (and newborn) rats were grown for 4-8 weeks on the perforated silicon chips with silicon nitride surfaces and 40 microm sized holes and compared with corresponding tissue slices grown on conventional semiporous membranes. In terms of preservation of the basic cellular and connective organization, as visualized by Nissl staining, Timm sulphide silver-staining, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining, the slice cultures grown on chips did not differ from conventionally grown slice cultures. Neither were there any signs of astrogliosis or neurodegeneration around the upper recording part of the 47-microm-high platinum-tip electrodes. Slice cultures grown on a separate set of chips with platinum instead of silicon nitride surfaces also displayed normal MAP2 and GFAP immunostaining. The width of the GFAP-rich zone (glia limitans) at the bottom surface of the slice cultures was the same ( approximately 20 microm) in cultures grown on chips with silicon nitride and platinum surfaces and on conventional insert membranes. The slice cultures grown on chips maintained a normal, subfield differentiated susceptibility to the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the neurotoxin trimethyltin (TMT), as demonstrated by the cellular uptake of propidium iodide (PI), which was used as a reproducible and quantifiable marker for neuronal degeneration. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures can grow on silicon-based three-dimensional microelectrode arrays and develop normally with display of normal subfield differentiated susceptibilities to known excito- and neurotoxins. From this it is anticipated that the set

  1. Automated method for relating regional pulmonary structure and function: integration of dynamic multislice CT and thin-slice high-resolution CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Kugelmass, Steven D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1993-07-01

    We have developed a method utilizing x-ray CT for relating pulmonary perfusion to global and regional anatomy, allowing for detailed study of structure to function relationships. A thick slice, high temporal resolution mode is used to follow a bolus contrast agent for blood flow evaluation and is fused with a high spatial resolution, thin slice mode to obtain structure- function detail. To aid analysis of blood flow, we have developed a software module, for our image analysis package (VIDA), to produce the combined structure-function image. Color coded images representing blood flow, mean transit time, regional tissue content, regional blood volume, regional air content, etc. are generated and imbedded in the high resolution volume image. A text file containing these values along with a voxel's 3-D coordinates is also generated. User input can be minimized to identifying the location of the pulmonary artery from which the input function to a blood flow model is derived. Any flow model utilizing one input and one output function can be easily added to a user selectable list. We present examples from our physiologic based research findings to demonstrate the strengths of combining dynamic CT and HRCT relative to other scanning modalities to uniquely characterize pulmonary normal and pathophysiology.

  2. Flip-angle profile of slice-selective excitation and the measurement of the MR longitudinal relaxation time with steady-state magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jung-Jiin

    2015-08-01

    In MRI, the flip angle (FA) of slice-selective excitation is not uniform across the slice-thickness dimension. This work investigates the effect of the non-uniform FA profile on the accuracy of a commonly-used method for the measurement, in which the T1 value, i.e., the longitudinal relaxation time, is determined from the steady-state signals of an equally-spaced RF pulse train. By using the numerical solutions of the Bloch equation, it is shown that, because of the non-uniform FA profile, the outcome of the T1 measurement depends significantly on T1 of the specimen and on the FA and the inter-pulse spacing τ of the pulse train. A new method to restore the accuracy of the T1 measurement is described. Different from the existing approaches, the new method also removes the FA profile effect for the measurement of the FA, which is normally a part of the T1 measurement. In addition, the new method does not involve theoretical modeling, approximation, or modification to the underlying principle of the T1 measurement. An imaging experiment is performed, which shows that the new method can remove the FA-, the τ-, and the T1-dependence and produce T1 measurements in excellent agreement with the ones obtained from a gold standard method (the inversion-recovery method).

  3. Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation and Reperfusion Cause Modifications of Postsynaptic Morphology and Activity in the CA3 Area of Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yeon Joo; Suh, Eun Cheng; Lee, Kyung Eun

    2012-12-01

    Brain ischemia leads to overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, referred as excitotoxicity, which mediates neuronal cell death. However, less attention has been paid to changes in synaptic activity and morphology that could have an important impact on cell function and survival following ischemic insult. In this study, we investigated the effects of reperfusion after oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) not only upon neuronal cell death, but also on ultrastructural and biochemical characteristics of postsynaptic density (PSD) protein, in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 area in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. After OGD/reperfusion, neurons were found to be damaged; the organelles such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, dendrites, and synaptic terminals were swollen; and the PSD became thicker and irregular. Ethanolic phosphotungstic acid staining showed that the density of PSD was significantly decreased, and the thickness and length of the PSD were significantly increased in the OGD/reperfusion group compared to the control. The levels of PSD proteins, including PSD-95, NMDA receptor 1, NMDA receptor 2B, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, were significantly decreased following OGD/reperfusion. These results suggest that OGD/reperfusion induces significant modifications to PSDs in the CA3 area of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, both morphologically and biochemically, and this may contribute to neuronal cell death and synaptic dysfunction after OGD/reperfusion.

  4. Age-related changes in susceptibility of rat brain slice cultures including hippocampus to encephalomyocarditis virus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Weiping; Ueno-Yamanouchi, Aito; Uetsuka, Koji; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Doi, Kunio

    1999-01-01

    Replication of the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC-D) and its cytopathic effects were studied in the brain slice cultures including hippocampus (hippocampal slice) obtained from postnatal 1-, 4-, 7-, 14-, 28-and 56-day-old Fischer 344 rats. At 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after infection, virus titres of the slices and culture media were assayed. Viral replication was observed in cultures from 1-to 28-day-old rats, and the highest titre was recorded in the slice and culture medium from the youngest rat. The peak of virus titre decreased with age and no distinct viral replication was observed in the cultures from 56-day-old rats. Light microscopy revealed that degenerative and necrotic changes appeared in the infected hippocampal slices from 1- to 28-day-old rats, and the changes became less prominent with age. In situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that positive signals of viral RNA and antigen were prominent in younger rats and decreased with age. These results suggest that an age-related decrease in the susceptibility of rat brain to EMC-D is less related to the maturation of the immune system but possibly to that of the neurone. PMID:10632784

  5. Effects of copper and the sea lice treatment Slice on nutrient release from marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Mayor, D J; Solan, M; McMillan, H; Killham, K; Paton, G I

    2009-04-01

    Copper-based antifoulant paints and the sea lice treatment Slice are widely used, and often detectable in the sediments beneath farms where they are administered. Ten-day, whole sediment mesocosm experiments were conducted to examine how increasing sediment concentrations of copper or Slice influenced final water column concentrations of ammonium-nitrogen (NH(4)-N), nitrate+nitrite-nitrogen (NO(X)-N) and phosphate-phosphorus (PO(4)-P) in the presence of the non-target, benthic organisms Corophium volutator and Hediste diversicolor. Nominal sediment concentrations of copper and Slice had significant effects on the resulting concentrations of almost all nutrients examined. The overall trends in nutrient concentrations at the end of the 10-day incubations were highly similar between the trials with either copper or Slice, irrespective of the invertebrate species present. This suggests that nutrient exchange from the experimental sediments was primarily influenced by the direct effect of copper/Slice dose on the sediment microbial community, rather than the indirect effect of reduced bioturbation/irrigation due to increased macrofaunal mortality.

  6. On the identification of a Pliocene time slice for data–model comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haywood, Alan M.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Pickering, Steven J.; Dowsett, Harry J.; McClymont, Erin L.; Prescott, Caroline L.; Salzmann, Ulrich; Hill, Daniel J.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pope, James O.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of the mid-Pliocene warm period (mPWP: 3.264–3.025 Ma BP) have been examined using geological proxies and climate models. While there is agreement between models and data, details of regional climate differ. Uncertainties in prescribed forcings and in proxy data limit the utility of the interval to understand the dynamics of a warmer than present climate or evaluate models. This uncertainty comes, in part, from the reconstruction of a time slab rather than a time slice, where forcings required by climate models can be more adequately constrained. Here, we describe the rationale and approach for identifying a time slice(s) for Pliocene environmental reconstruction. A time slice centred on 3.205 Ma BP (3.204–3.207 Ma BP) has been identified as a priority for investigation. It is a warm interval characterized by a negative benthic oxygen isotope excursion (0.21–0.23‰) centred on marine isotope stage KM5c (KM5.3). It occurred during a period of orbital forcing that was very similar to present day. Climate model simulations indicate that proxy temperature estimates are unlikely to be significantly affected by orbital forcing for at least a precession cycle centred on the time slice, with the North Atlantic potentially being an important exception.

  7. Cell suspensions, cell cultures, and tissue slices--important metabolic in vitro systems.

    PubMed

    Cervenková, K; Belejova, M; Veselý, J; Chmela, Z; Rypka, M; Ulrichová, J; Modrianský, M; Maurel, P

    2001-12-01

    In vitro subcellular and cellular systems have important and irreplaceable roles in the metabolic investigations that precede the development of new potential drugs. Of these model systems, tissue slices are probably the nearest to in vivo conditions. From the experimental and complexity points of view, perfused organs lie midway between tissue slices and whole organism. Preparation and working with liver slices is quick and easy, and, excess material can be cryopreserved and stored untill the next experiment. Slices can be prepared from a wide variety of organs and it is possible to co-incubate them. Another important feature is the possibility of interspecies comparison of slices. Different experiments can be run both in the short-term as well as long-term incubations. Each in vitro system has an important place for example, in the development of new medicaments. It is therefore important to compare and supplement experimental results from different in vitro systems when extrapolating to in vivo situations is done.

  8. The effect of collimation on singles rates in multi-slice PET

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.J.

    1989-02-01

    The ratio (S:C) of singles to true coincident events in a Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) depends on the collimator size and shape. As well as causing random counts when they fall within the energy acceptance window, single events are the main cause of dead time. Monte Carlo techniques were used to compare S:C ratios in well collimated single slice, 15 slice and open collimator 3-D configurations. All systems used cylindrical arrays of BGO or Nal crystals 51 cm in diameter and 10 cm deep. A 12 cm deep 20 cm diameter source gives rise to S:C ratio of 53:1 with a low energy threshold of 350 keV in a well collimated single slice tomograph. When all slices are combined the S:C ratio for both 15 slice and 3-D is 24:1 under the same conditions, however the 3-D system detects five times more true coincident events. The 3-D systems are much more sensitive to events outside the scan field.

  9. Comparison of five incubation systems for rat liver slices using functional and viability parameters.

    PubMed

    Olinga, P; Groen, K; Hof, I H; De Kanter, R; Koster, H J; Leeman, W R; Rutten, A A; Van Twillert, K; Groothuis, G M

    1997-10-01

    Precision-cut liver slices are presently used for various research objects, e.g. to study metabolism, transport, and toxicity of xenobiotics. Various incubation systems are presently employed, but a systematic comparison between these incubation systems with respect to preservation of slice function has not been performed yet. Therefore, we started a comparative study to evaluate five of these systems: the shaken flask (an Erlenmeyer in a shaking water bath), the stirred-well (24-well culture plate equipped with grids and magnetic stirrers), rocker platform (6-well culture plate with Netwell insert rocked on a platform), the roller system (dynamic organ culture rolled on an insert in a glass vial), and the 6-well shaker (6-well culture plate in a shaking water bath). The liver slices were incubated in these incubation systems for 0.5, 1.5, and 24.5 h and subsequently subjected to viability and metabolic function tests. The viability of the incubated liver slices was evaluated by: potassium content, MTT assay, energy charge, histomorphology, and LDH leakage. Their metabolic functions were studied by determination of the metabolism of lidocaine, testosterone, and antipyrine. Up to 1.5 h of incubation all five incubation systems gave similar results with respect to viability and metabolic function of the liver slices. However, after 24 h, the shaken flask, the rocker platform, and the 6-well shaker incubation systems appeared to be superior to the stirred well and the roller incubation systems.

  10. Human Organotypic Cultured Cardiac Slices: New Platform For High Throughput Preclinical Human Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kang, C.; Qiao, Y.; Li, G.; Baechle, K.; Camelliti, P.; Rentschler, S.; Efimov, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Translation of novel therapies from bench to bedside is hampered by profound disparities between animal and human genetics and physiology. The ability to test for efficacy and cardiotoxicity in a clinically relevant human model system would enable more rapid therapy development. We have developed a preclinical platform for validation of new therapies in human heart tissue using organotypic slices isolated from donor and end-stage failing hearts. A major advantage of the slices when compared with human iPS-derived cardiomyocytes is that native tissue architecture and extracellular matrix are preserved, thereby allowing investigation of multi-cellular physiology in normal or diseased myocardium. To validate this model, we used optical mapping of transmembrane potential and calcium transients. We found that normal human electrophysiology is preserved in slice preparations when compared with intact hearts, including slices obtained from the region of the sinus node. Physiology is maintained in slices during culture, enabling testing the acute and chronic effects of pharmacological, gene, cell, optogenetic, device, and other therapies. This methodology offers a powerful high-throughput platform for assessing the physiological response of the human heart to disease and novel putative therapies. PMID:27356882

  11. Combined texture feature analysis of segmentation and classification of benign and malignant tumour CT slices.

    PubMed

    Padma, A; Sukanesh, R

    2013-01-01

    A computer software system is designed for the segmentation and classification of benign from malignant tumour slices in brain computed tomography (CT) images. This paper presents a method to find and select both the dominant run length and co-occurrence texture features of region of interest (ROI) of the tumour region of each slice to be segmented by Fuzzy c means clustering (FCM) and evaluate the performance of support vector machine (SVM)-based classifiers in classifying benign and malignant tumour slices. Two hundred and six tumour confirmed CT slices are considered in this study. A total of 17 texture features are extracted by a feature extraction procedure, and six features are selected using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This study constructed the SVM-based classifier with the selected features and by comparing the segmentation results with the experienced radiologist labelled ground truth (target). Quantitative analysis between ground truth and segmented tumour is presented in terms of segmentation accuracy, segmentation error and overlap similarity measures such as the Jaccard index. The classification performance of the SVM-based classifier with the same selected features is also evaluated using a 10-fold cross-validation method. The proposed system provides some newly found texture features have an important contribution in classifying benign and malignant tumour slices efficiently and accurately with less computational time. The experimental results showed that the proposed system is able to achieve the highest segmentation and classification accuracy effectiveness as measured by jaccard index and sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Well-behaved harmonic time slices of a charged, rotating, boosted black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Gregory B.; Scheel, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Harmonic time slicings are used in some hyperbolic formulations of Einstein's equations and are therefore of considerable interest to the field of numerical relativity. We construct an analytic coordinate representation of the Kerr-Newman geometry that is harmonic in both its spatial and temporal coordinates. The metric is independent of time and the spacelike, t= const slices extend from spatial infinity smoothly through the event horizon at r=r+ and end at the Cauchy horizon at r=r-. When the spatial harmonic coordinate condition is imposed, there is also a spatial coordinate singularity at r=M, but this fully harmonic metric can be trivially boosted to yield an analytic solution for a harmonically sliced translating, spinning black hole. We also examine the behavior of evolutions which obey the harmonic slicing condition but start from initial data that is not in the time-independent harmonic slicing foliation. We find that with a suitable choice of the spatial gauge, the evolving three-geometry is ``attracted'' to the time-independent three-geometry we present in this paper.

  13. Free-Breathing Cardiac MR Stress Perfusion with Real-Time Slice Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Tamer A.; Roujol, Sébastien; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a free-breathing cardiac MR perfusion sequence with slice tracking for use after physical exercise. Methods We propose to use a leading navigator, placed immediately before each 2D slice acquisition, for tracking the respiratory motion and updating the slice location in real-time. The proposed sequence was used to acquire CMR perfusion datasets in 12 healthy adult subjects and 8 patients. Images were compared with the conventional perfusion (i.e. without slice tracking) results from the same subjects. The location and geometry of the myocardium were quantitatively analyzed, and the perfusion signal curves were calculated from both sequences to show the efficacy of the proposed sequence. Results The proposed sequence was significantly better compared to the conventional perfusion sequence in terms of qualitative image scores. Changes in the myocardial location and geometry decreased by ~50% in the slice tracking sequence. Furthermore, the proposed sequence had signal curves that are smoother and less noisy. Conclusion The proposed sequence significantly reduces the effect of the respiratory motion on the image acquisition in both rest and stress perfusion scans. PMID:24123153

  14. Evaluation of registration strategies for multi-modality images of rat brain slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Christoph; Vieten, Andrea; Salber, Dagmar; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2009-05-01

    In neuroscience, small-animal studies frequently involve dealing with series of images from multiple modalities such as histology and autoradiography. The consistent and bias-free restacking of multi-modality image series is obligatory as a starting point for subsequent non-rigid registration procedures and for quantitative comparisons with positron emission tomography (PET) and other in vivo data. Up to now, consistency between 2D slices without cross validation using an inherent 3D modality is frequently presumed to be close to the true morphology due to the smooth appearance of the contours of anatomical structures. However, in multi-modality stacks consistency is difficult to assess. In this work, consistency is defined in terms of smoothness of neighboring slices within a single modality and between different modalities. Registration bias denotes the distortion of the registered stack in comparison to the true 3D morphology and shape. Based on these metrics, different restacking strategies of multi-modality rat brain slices are experimentally evaluated. Experiments based on MRI-simulated and real dual-tracer autoradiograms reveal a clear bias of the restacked volume despite quantitatively high consistency and qualitatively smooth brain structures. However, different registration strategies yield different inter-consistency metrics. If no genuine 3D modality is available, the use of the so-called SOP (slice-order preferred) or MOSOP (modality-and-slice-order preferred) strategy is recommended.

  15. A technique for slicing the rat cochlea around the onset of hearing.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D J; Robertson, D; Housley, G D

    2000-12-15

    The cochlea presents a considerable challenge to the study of sound transduction and auditory neurotransmission. This arises from the location of the sensory, supporting and secretory epithelia, and primary auditory neurons within a complex ossified spiral structure comprised of three separate fluid-filled chambers. We have developed a novel cochlear slice preparation, which provides access to the highly differentiated tissues while retaining structural integrity and cell viability. Our technique for slicing the cochlea and imaging tissue structure facilitates the study of peripheral auditory signaling in situ. The preparation was developed in the neonatal rat (postnatal days 4-14) and is based on the use of vibrating blade microtome slicing after perfusing the perilymphatic compartments with chilled Pluronic F127 NF, a block copolymer gel. This material is liquid when cold, and sets when warmed to room temperature, stabilizing the cochlear fluid-filled compartments and thereby supporting the cochlear partition during slicing. Slices (150-300 microm) of neonatal rat cochlea, imaged using infrared videomicroscopy, allow tight-seal voltage clamp recordings from a variety of cell types. Recordings obtained from primary auditory neurons, hair cells, supporting cells, and Reissner's membrane epithelial cells verify the viability of the tissues in the preparation. Data includes novel evidence for glutamatergic and purinergic co-transmission by primary auditory neurons. The preparation has considerable potential in a range of molecular physiological applications requiring cell-specific targeting with retention of cell connectivity.

  16. Relationship between moisture content and electrical impedance of carrot slices during drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Ákos; Hlaváčová, Zuzana; Vozáry, Eszter; Staroňová, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of food materials can give information about the inner structure and physiological state of biological tissues. Generally, the process of drying of fruits and vegetables is followed by weight loss. The aim of this study was to measure the impedance spectra of carrot slices during drying and to correlate impedance parameters to moisture content in different drying periods. Cylindrical slices were cut out from the carrot root along the axis. The slices were dried in a Venticell 111 air oven at 50°C. The weight of the slices was measured with a Denver SI-603 electronic analytical and precision balance. The weighing of the samples was performed every 30 min at the beginning of drying and every 60 min after the process. The moisture content of the samples was calculated on wet basis. The magnitude and phase angle of electrical impedance of the slices were measured with HP 4284A and 4285A precision LCR meters in the frequency range from 30 Hz to 1 MHz and from 75 kHz to 30 MHz, respectively, at voltage 1 V. The impedance measurement was performed after weighting. The change in the magnitude of impedance during drying showed a good correlation with the change in the moisture content.

  17. Maintaining network activity in submerged hippocampal slices: importance of oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Hájos, Norbert; Ellender, Tommas J; Zemankovics, Rita; Mann, Edward O; Exley, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J; Freund, Tamás F; Paulsen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Studies in brain slices have provided a wealth of data on the basic features of neurons and synapses. In the intact brain, these properties may be strongly influenced by ongoing network activity. Although physiologically realistic patterns of network activity have been successfully induced in brain slices maintained in interface-type recording chambers, they have been harder to obtain in submerged-type chambers, which offer significant experimental advantages, including fast exchange of pharmacological agents, visually guided patch-clamp recordings, and imaging techniques. Here, we investigated conditions for the emergence of network oscillations in submerged slices prepared from the hippocampus of rats and mice. We found that the local oxygen level is critical for generation and propagation of both spontaneously occurring sharp wave-ripple oscillations and cholinergically induced fast oscillations. We suggest three ways to improve the oxygen supply to slices under submerged conditions: (i) optimizing chamber design for laminar flow of superfusion fluid; (ii) increasing the flow rate of superfusion fluid; and (iii) superfusing both surfaces of the slice. These improvements to the recording conditions enable detailed studies of neurons under more realistic conditions of network activity, which are essential for a better understanding of neuronal network operation.

  18. Effect of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference in gear slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinchun; Li, Jia; Lou, Benchao; Shi, Jiang; Yang, Qijun

    2013-11-01

    Current researches have not yet found the effect law of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference in gear slicing, the interference between the cutter and machined gear often happens because the appropriate cutter parameters and machining parameters cannot be set, which reduces the gear machining accuracy. The relative position between the major flank face and edge-sweeping surface, distribution law of the interference area in forming process of edge-sweeping surface, and effect law of relative positions among edge-sweeping surfaces on the interference are studied by graphical analysis. The effect law of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference is found. The effect law shows that the interference in gear slicing can be controlled when the relief angle measured on the top edge and feed of every rotation are chosen respectively larger than 9° and smaller than 0.15 mm/r. An internal helical gear is sliced with the spur slice cutter and the cutter parameters and machining parameters are set based on above the effect law. The machined gear is measured in Gear Measuring Center and the detection result shows that the comprehensive accuracy reaches GB/T Class 7, where some reach GB/T Class 6. The result can meet the gear machining accuracy requirement and shows that the effect law found is valid. The problem of the interference in gear slicing is solved and the gear machining accuracy can be improved.

  19. Abscisic acid accumulation in spinach leaf slices in the presence of penetrating and nonpenetrating solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Creelman, R.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1985-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulated in detached, wilted leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Savoy Hybrid 612) and reached a maximum level within 3 to 4 hours. The increase in ABA over that found in detached turgid leaves was approximately 10-fold. The effects of water stress could be mimicked by the use of thin slices of spinach leaves incubated in the presence of 0.6 molar mannitol, a compound which causes plasmolysis (loss of turgor). When spinach leaf slices were incubated with ethylene glycol, a compound which rapidly penetrates the cell membrane causing a decrease in the osmotic potential of the tissue and only transient loss of turgor, no ABA accumulated. Spinach leaf slices incubated in both ethylene glycol and mannitol had ABA levels similar to those found when slices were incubated with mannitol alone. Increases similar to those found with mannitol also occurred when Aquacide III, a highly purified form of polyethylene glycol, was used. When spinach leaf slices were incubated with solutes which are supposed to disturb membrane integrity no increase in ABA was observed. These data indicate that, with respect to the accumulation of ABA, mannitol caused a physical stress rather than a chemical stress.

  20. SLiCE: a novel bacterial cell extract-based DNA cloning method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2012-04-01

    We describe a novel cloning method termed SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (≥15 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from Bacteria Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost effective as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. In addition, the cloning efficiencies and capabilities of these strains can be greatly improved by simple genetic modifications. As an example, we modified the DH10B Escherichia coli strain to express an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system. This strain, termed PPY, facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies and demonstrates the versatility of the method.

  1. Cortical thickness in untreated transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Junque, Carme; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Segovia, Santiago; Carrillo, Beatriz; Rametti, Giuseppina; Guillamon, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Sex differences in cortical thickness (CTh) have been extensively investigated but as yet there are no reports on CTh in transsexuals. Our aim was to determine whether the CTh pattern in transsexuals before hormonal treatment follows their biological sex or their gender identity. We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging on 94 subjects: 24 untreated female-to-male transsexuals (FtMs), 18 untreated male-to-female transsexuals (MtFs), and 29 male and 23 female controls in a 3-T TIM-TRIO Siemens scanner. T1-weighted images were analyzed to obtain CTh and volumetric subcortical measurements with FreeSurfer software. CTh maps showed control females have thicker cortex than control males in the frontal and parietal regions. In contrast, males have greater right putamen volume. FtMs had a similar CTh to control females and greater CTh than males in the parietal and temporal cortices. FtMs had larger right putamen than females but did not differ from males. MtFs did not differ in CTh from female controls but had greater CTh than control males in the orbitofrontal, insular, and medial occipital regions. In conclusion, FtMs showed evidence of subcortical gray matter masculinization, while MtFs showed evidence of CTh feminization. In both types of transsexuals, the differences with respect to their biological sex are located in the right hemisphere.

  2. Coronary Stent Artifact Reduction with an Edge-Enhancing Reconstruction Kernel – A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study with 256-Slice CT

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Stéphanie; Soulez, Gilles; Diez Martinez, Patricia; Larrivée, Sandra; Stevens, Louis-Mathieu; Goussard, Yves; Mansour, Samer; Chartrand-Lefebvre, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Metallic artifacts can result in an artificial thickening of the coronary stent wall which can significantly impair computed tomography (CT) imaging in patients with coronary stents. The objective of this study is to assess in vivo visualization of coronary stent wall and lumen with an edge-enhancing CT reconstruction kernel, as compared to a standard kernel. Methods This is a prospective cross-sectional study involving the assessment of 71 coronary stents (24 patients), with blinded observers. After 256-slice CT angiography, image reconstruction was done with medium-smooth and edge-enhancing kernels. Stent wall thickness was measured with both orthogonal and circumference methods, averaging thickness from diameter and circumference measurements, respectively. Image quality was assessed quantitatively using objective parameters (noise, signal to noise (SNR) and contrast to noise (CNR) ratios), as well as visually using a 5-point Likert scale. Results Stent wall thickness was decreased with the edge-enhancing kernel in comparison to the standard kernel, either with the orthogonal (0.97 ± 0.02 versus 1.09 ± 0.03 mm, respectively; p<0.001) or the circumference method (1.13 ± 0.02 versus 1.21 ± 0.02 mm, respectively; p = 0.001). The edge-enhancing kernel generated less overestimation from nominal thickness compared to the standard kernel, both with the orthogonal (0.89 ± 0.19 versus 1.00 ± 0.26 mm, respectively; p<0.001) and the circumference (1.06 ± 0.26 versus 1.13 ± 0.31 mm, respectively; p = 0.005) methods. The edge-enhancing kernel was associated with lower SNR and CNR, as well as higher background noise (all p < 0.001), in comparison to the medium-smooth kernel. Stent visual scores were higher with the edge-enhancing kernel (p<0.001). Conclusion In vivo 256-slice CT assessment of coronary stents shows that the edge-enhancing CT reconstruction kernel generates thinner stent walls, less overestimation from nominal thickness, and better image quality

  3. Measurement of three-dimensional normal vectors, principal curvatures, and wall thickness of the heart using cine-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coghlan, Leslie; Singleton, H. R.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Linderholm, C. E.; Pohost, G. M.

    1995-05-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the detailed in vivo three dimensional geometry of the left and right ventricles using cine-magnetic resonance imaging. From data in the form of digitized short axis outlines, the normal vectors, principal curvatures and directions, and wall thickness were computed. The method was evaluated on simulated ellipsoids and on human MRI data. Measurements of normal vectors and of wall thickness were very accurate in simulated data and appeared appropriate in patient data. On simulated data, measurements of the principal curvature k1 (corresponding approximately to the short axis direction of the left ventricle) and of principal directions were quite accurate, but measurements of the other principal curvature (k2) were less accurate. The reasons behind this are considered. We expect improvements in the accuracy with thinner slices and improved representation of the surface data. Gradient echo images were acquired from 8 dogs with a 1.5T system (Philips Gyroscan) at baseline and four months after closed chest experimentally produced mitral regurgitation (MR). The product (k1 + k2) X wall thickness averaged over all slices at end-diastole was significantly lower after surgery (n equals 8, p < 0.005). These geometry changes were consistent with the expected increase in wall stress after MR.

  4. Recent developments in multi-wire fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST). [for low cost silicon wafer production from ingots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.; Smith, M. B.; Lynch, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Slicing is an important processing step for all technologies based on the use of ingots. A comparison of the economics of three slicing techniques shows that the fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) is superior to the internal diameter (ID) and the multiblade slurry (MBS) techniques. Factors affecting contact length are discussed, taking into account kerf width, rocking angle, ingot size, and surface speed. Aspects of blade development are also considered. A high concentration of diamonds on wire has been obtained in wire packs usd for FAST slicing. The material removal rate was found to be directly proportional to the pressure at the diamond tips.

  5. Thermal dependence of neural activity in the hamster hippocampal slice preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Thomas, M. P.; Eckerman, P.

    1987-01-01

    1. Neural activity was recorded in an in vitro hamster hippocampal slice preparation while the temperature of the Ringer's solution bathing in the slice was controlled at selected levels. 2. The amplitude of the population spike (action potentials from a group of pyramidal cells) was measured as bath temperature was lowered from 35 degrees C to temperatures where a response could not be evoked. 3. Plots of population spike amplitude versus temperature have bell-shaped curves. The population spikes increased in amplitude as temperature was lowered from 35 degrees C, reached a peak amplitude between 25 and 20 degrees C, and then decreased until a response could not be evoked when temperature was further lowered. 4. These in vitro results obtained in the slice preparation are related to in vivo hippocampal studies. Results are interpreted as consistent with the proposal reviewed here that neural activity in the hippocampus plays a role at specific stages of entrance into and arousal from hibernation.

  6. Monitoring axonal and somatodendritic dopamine release using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti C; Rice, Margaret E

    2013-01-01

    Brain dopamine pathways serve wide-ranging functions including the control of movement, reward, cognition, learning, and mood. Consequently, dysfunction of dopamine transmission has been implicated in clinical conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Establishing factors that regulate dopamine release can provide novel insights into dopaminergic communication under normal conditions, as well as in animal models of disease in the brain. Here we describe methods for the study of somatodendritic and axonal dopamine release in brain slice preparations. Topics covered include preparation and calibration of carbon-fiber microelectrodes for use with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, preparation of midbrain and forebrain slices, and procedures of eliciting and recording electrically evoked dopamine release from in vitro brain slices.

  7. A hyperbolic slicing condition adapted to Killing fields and densitized lapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcubierre, Miguel; Corichi, Alejandro; González, José A.; Núñez, Darío; Salgado, Marcelo

    2003-09-01

    We study the properties of a modified version of the Bona Masso family of hyperbolic slicing conditions. This modified slicing condition has two very important features: in the first place, it guarantees that if a spacetime is static or stationary, and one starts the evolution in a coordinate system in which the metric coefficients are already time independent, then they will remain time independent during the subsequent evolution, i.e. the lapse will not evolve and will therefore not drive the time lines away from the Killing direction. Second, the modified condition is naturally adapted to the use of a densitized lapse as a fundamental variable, which in turn makes it a good candidate for a dynamic slicing condition that can be used in conjunction with some recently proposed hyperbolic reformulations of the Einstein evolution equations.

  8. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  9. BONLAC: A Combinatorial Proteomic Technique to Measure Stimulus-induced Translational Profiles in Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Heather; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Zhang, Guoan; Lebowitz, Joseph Z.; Alam, Danyal; Smith, Peter T.; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Neubert, Thomas A.; Vogel, Christine; Chao, Moses V.; Klann, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus-triggered protein synthesis is critical for brain health and function. However, due to technical hurdles, de novo neuronal translation is predominantly studied in cultured cells, whereas electrophysiological and circuit analyses often are performed in brain slices. The different properties of these two experimental systems create an information gap about stimulus-induced alterations in the expression of new proteins in mature circuits. To address this, we adapted two existing techniques, BONCAT and SILAC, to a combined proteomic technique, BONLAC, for use in acute adult hippocampal slices. Using BDNF-induced protein synthesis as a proof of concept, we found alterations in expression of proteins involved in neurotransmission, trafficking, and cation binding that differed from those found in a similar screen in cultured neurons. Our results indicate important differences between cultured neurons and slices, and suggest that BONLAC could be used to dissect proteomic changes underlying synaptic events in adult circuits. PMID:26205778

  10. SCH 58261 differentially influences quinolinic acid-induced effects in striatal and in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2002-08-30

    The influence of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-trizolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine) (50, 200 nM, 1 microM) on quinolinic acid effects has been studied in rat striatal and hippocampal slices. Quinolinic acid induced disappearance of field potentials at concentrations of 500 microM and 2 mM in hippocampal and corticostriatal slices, respectively. We found that 1 microM SCH 58261 prevented quinolinic acid-induced field potential disappearance in corticostriatal but not in hippocampal slices. This finding demonstrates that the peculiar binding profile of SCH 58261 and the predominance in the hippocampus of "atypical" adenosine A(2A) receptor population (not recognized by SCH 58261) could have a functional relevance in the occurrence of region-specific neuroprotective effects.

  11. Pertussis toxin prevents neomycin-induced calcium-dependent electrophysiological effects in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Frank, C; Longo, R; Sagratella, S

    1994-09-01

    1. The influence of pertussis toxin has been studied on the effects of neomycin on CA1 field potentials in rat hippocampal slices in order to determine a role played by G protein in the modulation of synaptic transmission by the drug. 2. Neomycin (500 microM), within 30 min significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the magnitude of the somatic CA1 excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP) and population spike (PS) in control hippocampal slices. 3. Neomycin (500 microM), within 30 min failed to significantly affect the magnitude of the somatic CA1 EPSP and PS in slices obtained from animals treated intracerebroventricularly (ICV) with 1-2 micrograms of pertussis toxin 3 days before. 4. The results demonstrated that pertussis toxin prevents some electrophysiological effects of neomycin, suggesting a role of G protein in the modulation of the aminoglycoside antibiotic on central synaptic transmission.

  12. The opto-mechanical design of the sub-orbital local interstellar cloud experiment (SLICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Robert; Nell, Nicholas; Schultz, Ted; France, Kevin; Beasley, Matthew; Burgh, Eric; Bushinsky, Rachel; Hoadley, Keri

    2013-09-01

    We present the fabrication and testing of the Sub-orbital Local Interstellar Cloud Experiment (SLICE), a rocket-borne payload for ultraviolet astrophysics in the 1020 to 1070 Å bandpass. The SLICE optical system is composed of an ultraviolet-optimized telescope feeding a Rowland Circle spectrograph. The telescope is an 8-inch Classical Cassegrain operating at F/7, with Al optics overcoated with LiF for enhanced far-ultraviolet reflectivity. The holographically-ruled grating focuses light at an open-faced microchannel plate detector employing an opaque RbBr photocathode. In this proceeding, we describe the design trades and calibration issues confronted during the build-up of this payload. We place particular emphasis on the technical details of the design, modifications, construction, and alignment procedures for SLICE in order to provide a roadmap for the optimization of future ruggedized experiments for ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy.

  13. Quality changes of sea bass slices wrapped with gelatin film incorporated with lemongrass essential oil.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mehraj; Benjakul, Soottawat; Sumpavapol, Punnanee; Nirmal, Nilesh Prakash

    2012-04-16

    Microbiological, chemical and physical changes of sea bass slices wrapped with gelatin film incorporated with 25% (w/w) lemongrass essential oil (LEO) during storage of 12 days at 4 °C were investigated. Sea bass slices wrapped with LEO film had the retarded growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), psychrophilic bacteria and spoilage microorganisms including H₂S-producing bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae throughout storage of 12 days in comparison with the control and those wrapped with gelatin film without LEO (G film) (P<0.05). Lowered changes of colour, K value, total volatile base nitrogen (TVB) and TBARS value were also found in LEO film wrapped samples, compared with those wrapped with G film and control, respectively. Therefore, the incorporation of LEO into gelatin film could enhance the antimicrobial and antioxidative properties of the film, thereby maintaining the qualities and extending the shelf-life of the sea bass slices stored at refrigerated temperature.

  14. Microbial growth and sensory quality of dried potato slices irradiated by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Song, Hyeon-Jeong; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam irradiation was applied to secure the microbial safety of dried purple sweet potato. After purple sweet potato slices had been dehydrated with 20% (w/w) maltodextrin solution, the samples were irradiated at doses 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 kGy and then stored at 20 °C for 60 days. Microbiological data indicated that the populations of total aerobic bacteria and of yeast and molds significantly decreased with increase in irradiation dosage. Specifically, microbial load was reduced by about three log cycles at 6 kGy compared to those of the control. Based on the color measurement of the potato slices, electron beam irradiation treatment did not affect the color quality. Sensory evaluation results also showed that electron beam irradiation did not affect overall sensory scores during storage. These results suggest that electron beam irradiation could be useful for improving microbial safety without impairing the quality of the potato slices during storage.

  15. Effects of pretreatments on the diffusion kinetics and some quality parameters of osmotically dehydrated apple slices.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, K A; Angersbach, A; Ade-Omowaye, B I; Knorr, D

    2001-06-01

    This study compared mass transfer during osmotic dehydration (OD) and some quality indices of untreated apple slices to those of apple slices pretreated by either blanching, freezing, or applying high-intensity electric field pulses (HELP) or high pressure (HP). HP, HELP, and blanching increased water loss. Untreated and HELP-treated samples had comparable solids gains, which were lower (P < 0.05) than in the other samples. Apple slices turned brown after pretreatment but the L values of these samples increased with OD. The breaking force of dried samples increased with OD time, and pretreated samples had firmer dried texture than the untreated. Vitamin C content decreased with OD time, but HP- and HELP-treated apples had better retention of vitamin C.

  16. Global Free Tropospheric NO2 Abundances Derived Using a Cloud Slicing Technique Applied to Satellite Observations from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S.; Joiner, J.; Choi, Y.; Duncan, B. N.; Bucsela, E.

    2014-01-01

    We derive free-tropospheric NO2 volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and stratospheric column amounts of NO2 by applying a cloud slicing technique to data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. In the cloud-slicing approach, the slope of the above-cloud NO2 column versus the cloud scene pressure is proportional to the NO2 VMR. In this work, we use a sample of nearby OMI pixel data from a single orbit for the linear fit. The OMI data include cloud scene pressures from the rotational-Raman algorithm and above-cloud NO2 vertical column density (VCD) (defined as the NO2 column from the cloud scene pressure to the top-of-the-atmosphere) from a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm. Estimates of stratospheric column NO2 are obtained by extrapolating the linear fits to the tropopause. We compare OMI-derived NO2 VMRs with in situ aircraft profiles measured during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign in 2006. The agreement is generally within the estimated uncertainties when appropriate data screening is applied. We then derive a global seasonal climatology of free-tropospheric NO2 VMR in cloudy conditions. Enhanced NO2 in the free troposphere commonly appears near polluted urban locations where NO2 produced in the boundary layer may be transported vertically out of the boundary layer and then horizontally away from the source. Signatures of lightning NO2 are also shown throughout low and middle latitude regions in summer months. A profile analysis of our cloud slicing data indicates signatures of uplifted and transported anthropogenic NO2 in the middle troposphere as well as lightning-generated NO2 in the upper troposphere. Comparison of the climatology with simulations from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) for cloudy conditions (cloud optical thicknesses > 10) shows similarities in the spatial patterns of continental pollution outflow. However, there are also some differences in

  17. Global free tropospheric NO2 abundances derived using a cloud slicing technique applied to satellite observations from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Joiner, J.; Choi, Y.; Duncan, B. N.; Bucsela, E.

    2014-01-01

    We derive free-tropospheric NO2 volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and stratospheric column amounts of NO2 by applying a cloud slicing technique to data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. In the cloud-slicing approach, the slope of the above-cloud NO2 column vs. the cloud scene pressure is proportional to the NO2 VMR. In this work, we use a sample of nearby OMI pixel data from a single orbit for the linear fit. The OMI data include cloud scene pressures from the rotational-Raman algorithm and above-cloud NO2 vertical column density (VCD) (defined as the NO2 column from the cloud scene pressure to the top-of-the-atmosphere) from a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm. Estimates of stratospheric column NO2 are obtained by extrapolating the linear fits to the tropopause. We compare OMI-derived NO2 VMRs with in situ aircraft profiles measured during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign in 2006. The agreement is generally within the estimated uncertainties when appropriate data screening is applied. We then derive a global seasonal climatology of free-tropospheric NO2 VMR in cloudy conditions. Enhanced NO2 in the free troposphere commonly appears near polluted urban locations where NO2 produced in the boundary layer may be transported vertically out of the boundary layer and then horizontally away from the source. Signatures of lightning NO2 are also shown throughout low and middle latitude regions in summer months. A profile analysis of our cloud slicing data indicates signatures of uplifted and transported anthropogenic NO2 in the middle troposphere as well as lightning-generated NO2 in the upper troposphere. Comparison of the climatology with simulations from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) for cloudy conditions (cloud optical thicknesses > 10) shows similarities in the spatial patterns of continental pollution outflow. However, there are also some differences in the

  18. Time-Course of Changes in Choroidal Thickness after Complete Mydriasis Induced by Compound Tropicamide in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Junwen; Jin, Wei; Long, Wen; Lan, Weizhong; Yang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the time-course of changes in choroidal thickness (ChT) following complete mydriasis induced by compound tropicamide. Methods ChT was measured by OCT with the enhanced-depth imaging technique (Spectralis HRA+OCT, Heidelberg Engineering, Germany) at nine locations of the fundus: subfoveal ChT (SFChT) and ChT at 1 mm and 3 mm from the fovea in four quadrants. Mydriasis was induced with compound tropicamide (0.5% tropicamide plus 0.5% phenylephrine hydrochloride, three doses at 5-minute intervals). Measurements were conducted prior to the instillation and at 0, 30, and 60 min following complete mydriasis. Results at different time-points were compared using repeated-measures ANOVA to investigate the time-course of the changes. Results Thirty-nine subjects (mean age 11.9±2 years; 16 males and 23 females) were enrolled in the study. Compound tropicamide resulted in a statistically significant decrease in SFChT at 0, 30, and 60 min after complete mydriasis, as compared to baseline (−5±4 μm, −12±4 μm, and −13±4 μm, respectively; all P<0.0001). No significant changes were detected in the parafoveal choroid except at 1 mm temporal (T1mm) and nasal (N1mm) to the fovea at 30 and 60 min (T1mm: −6±4 μm and −7±5 μm at 30 and 60 min; N1mm: −6±4 μm and −7±5 μm at 30 and 60 min, respectively; all P<0.0001). Repeated-measures ANOVA showed a significant interaction between the time after complete mydriasis and the effect of the mydriasis agent. Conclusions Complete mydriasis induced by compound tropicamide led to choroidal thinning, and the magnitude varied over time. PMID:27622495

  19. Slicing Method for curved façade and window extraction from point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iman Zolanvari, S. M.; Laefer, Debra F.

    2016-09-01

    Laser scanning technology is a fast and reliable method to survey structures. However, the automatic conversion of such data into solid models for computation remains a major challenge, especially where non-rectilinear features are present. Since, openings and the overall dimensions of the buildings are the most critical elements in computational models for structural analysis, this article introduces the Slicing Method as a new, computationally-efficient method for extracting overall façade and window boundary points for reconstructing a façade into a geometry compatible for computational modelling. After finding a principal plane, the technique slices a façade into limited portions, with each slice representing a unique, imaginary section passing through a building. This is done along a façade's principal axes to segregate window and door openings from structural portions of the load-bearing masonry walls. The method detects each opening area's boundaries, as well as the overall boundary of the façade, in part, by using a one-dimensional projection to accelerate processing. Slices were optimised as 14.3 slices per vertical metre of building and 25 slices per horizontal metre of building, irrespective of building configuration or complexity. The proposed procedure was validated by its application to three highly decorative, historic brick buildings. Accuracy in excess of 93% was achieved with no manual intervention on highly complex buildings and nearly 100% on simple ones. Furthermore, computational times were less than 3 sec for data sets up to 2.6 million points, while similar existing approaches required more than 16 hr for such datasets.

  20. Temperature sensitivity of neurones in slices of the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Pehl, U; Schmid, H A; Simon, E

    1997-01-01

    1. The inherent temperature sensitivity of 343 spontaneously active neurones recorded from rat spinal cord (SC) slices was investigated electrophysiologically. Recordings were made from 321 neurons from transverse and 22 neurons from longitudinal slices and their thermosensitivity was determined by relating changes in firing rate to changes in slice temperature. 2. Of the neurones from transverse slices, 53% were warm sensitive, 2% were cold sensitive and 45% were temperature insensitive. In longitudinal slices, 68% were warm sensitive and the remaining neurones were temperature insensitive. 3. When classified according to their recording sites in transverse slices, warm-sensitive neurones in laminae I and II had the same mean temperature coefficient compared with those recorded from lamina X, despite the fact that the latter had a significantly higher spontaneous activity. 4. The intrinsic temperature sensitivity of the majority of warm-sensitive neurones was confirmed by blocking their synaptic input. 5. A transient overshoot in activity, i.e. a dynamic response characteristic following rapid temperature stimuli (0.4 degree C s-1) was observed in 73% of the warm-sensitive and 59% of the temperature-insensitive neurones in laminae I and II in response to rapid warming, but only rarely (< 10%) in lamina X. 6. Temperature-sensitive SC neurones share response characteristics with temperature-sensitive neurones in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamic (PO/AH) area and with peripheral temperature receptors. Functionally, these neurones may represent the cellular basis for the temperature sensory function of the spinal cord that has been well characterized in vivo in homeothermic species. PMID:9032695

  1. Relation between visceral fat and carotid intimal media thickness in Mexican postmenopausal women: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Azpilcueta, Yessica Mireya Moreno; Ortiz, Sergio Rosales

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To investigate the relationship between visceral fat and carotid IMT (intima media thickness) in Mexican postmenopausal women. Material and methods In 71 postmenopausal women divided in two groups: group 1, IMT > 1 mm and group 2, IMT ≤ 1 mm, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), waist hip ratio (WHR), visceral and subcutaneous fats and carotid IMT were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were used and the comparison among those with abnormal and normal IMT was carried out using Mann-Whitney U test; also Spearman's correlation analysis was done. Results When comparing group 1 (n = 9, 12.7%) with group 2 (n = 62, 87.3%), it was found that the subcutaneous fat, visceral fat and systolic blood pressure were significantly greater in group 1 (p < 0.018, p < 0.001 and p < 0.006, respectively), and also in this group there was a correlation between BMI and subcutaneous fat (ρ = 0.686, p < 0.041) and between visceral fat and the systolic blood pressure (ρ = 0.712, p < 0.031). In group 2, there was a correlation between IMT and diastolic blood pressure (ρ = 0.251, p < 0.049). Conclusion Subcutaneous and visceral fat have an unfavorable effect in the carotid IMT and in blood pressure. PMID:27582681

  2. Ice thickness in the Northwest Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Christian; Howell, Stephen E. L.

    2015-09-01

    Recently, the feasibility of commercial shipping in the ice-prone Northwest Passage (NWP) has attracted a lot of attention. However, very little ice thickness information actually exists. We present results of the first ever airborne electromagnetic ice thickness surveys over the NWP carried out in April and May 2011 and 2015 over first-year and multiyear ice. These show modal thicknesses between 1.8 and 2.0 m in all regions. Mean thicknesses over 3 m and thick, deformed ice were observed over some multiyear ice regimes shown to originate from the Arctic Ocean. Thick ice features more than 100 m wide and thicker than 4 m occurred frequently. Results indicate that even in today's climate, ice conditions must still be considered severe. These results have important implications for the prediction of ice breakup and summer ice conditions, and the assessment of sea ice hazards during the summer shipping season.

  3. Tailored slice selection in solid-state MRI by DANTE under magic-echo line narrowing.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shigeru; Masumoto, Hidefumi; Hashimoto, Takeyuki

    2007-06-01

    We propose a method of slice selection in solid-state MRI by combining DANTE selective excitation with magic-echo (ME) line narrowing. The DANTE RF pulses applied at the ME peaks practically do not interfere with the ME line narrowing in the combined ME DANTE sequence. This allows straightforward tailoring of the slice profile simply by introducing an appropriate modulation, such as a sinc modulation, into the flip angles of the applied DANTE RF pulses. The utility of the method has been demonstrated by preliminary experiments performed on a test sample of adamantane.

  4. Coherent states on quaternion slices and a measurable field of Hilbert spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraleetharan, B.; Thirulogasanthar, K.

    2016-12-01

    A set of reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces are obtained on Hilbert spaces over quaternion slices with the aid of coherent states. It is proved that the so obtained set forms a measurable field of Hilbert spaces and their direct integral appears again as a reproducing kernel Hilbert space for a bigger Hilbert space over the whole quaternions. Hilbert spaces over quaternion slices are identified as representation spaces for a set of irreducible unitary group representations and their direct integral is shown to be a reducible representation for the Hilbert space over the whole quaternion field.

  5. Ultra-Fast MRI of the Human Brain with Simultaneous Multi-Slice Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, David A.; Setsompop, Kawin

    2013-01-01

    The recent advancement of simultaneous multi-slice imaging using multiband excitation has dramatically reduced the scan time of the brain. The evolution of this parallel imaging technique began over a decade ago and through recent sequence improvements has reduced the acquisition time of multi-slice EPI by over ten fold. This technique has recently become extremely useful for i) functional MRI studies for improving the statistical definition of neuronal networks, and ii) diffusion based fiber tractography for improving the ability to visualize structural connections in the human brain. Several applications and evaluations are underway which show promise for this family of fast imaging sequences. PMID:23473893

  6. Domain formation and polarization reversal under atomic force microscopy-tip voltages in ion-sliced LiNbO{sub 3} films on SiO{sub 2}/LiNbO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gainutdinov, R. V.; Volk, T. R.; Zhang, H. H.

    2015-10-19

    We report on studies on writing of micro- and nanodomains and specified domain patterns by AFM-tip voltages U{sub DC} in thin (0.5 μm thick) ion-sliced LiNbO{sub 3} films embedded to SiO{sub 2}/LiNbO{sub 3} substrates. A peculiar feature is an overlapping of domains as the distance between them decreases. Piezoelectric hysteresis loops were measured in a wide range of U{sub DC} pulse durations. Domain dynamics and characteristics of hysteresis loops reveal marked distinctions from those observed so far in LiNbO{sub 3} films and bulk crystals.

  7. A study of microclad thickness variation (1987)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, R.S.; Armstrong, K.P.

    1989-06-22

    A study was conducted to investigate the thickness variation of microclad material used in fabricating 1E38 bridges. For the role sampled (nine reels), standard deviations within reels ranged from 6.11 to 12.07 {mu}in. Thickness variations within reels ranged from 16.2 to 40.9 {mu}in., with the average thickness between 142.90 and 161.28 {mu}in.

  8. Localizing gravity on exotic thick 3-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Felisola, Oscar; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Ramirez, Alba

    2004-11-15

    We consider localization of gravity on thick branes with a nontrivial structure. Double walls that generalize the thick Randall-Sundrum solution, and asymmetric walls that arise from a Z{sub 2} symmetric scalar potential, are considered. We present a new asymmetric solution: a thick brane interpolating between two AdS{sub 5} spacetimes with different cosmological constants, which can be derived from a 'fake supergravity' superpotential, and show that it is possible to confine gravity on such branes.

  9. [A preliminary study on macular retinal and choroidal thickness and blood flow change after posterior scleral reinforcement by optical coherence tomography angiography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, X F; Qiao, L Y; Li, X X; Ma, N; Li, M; Guan, Z; Wang, H Z; Wang, N L

    2017-01-11

    Objective: To investigate macular retinal and choroidal thickness and blood flow change using optical coherence tomography angiography after posterior scleral reinforcement (PSR) surgery. Methods: Prospective study. Twenty eyes of 10 patients with high myopia were enrolled in this open-label, single-treatment group and prospective study. Radial lines and Angio retina (3 mm×3 mm) module were performed for 20 eyes using Angio-vue optical coherence tomography (Avanti, Optovue) without pupil dilation, and best corrected visual acuity, spherical equivalent and axial length were compared before and 60 days after surgery. Retinal and choroidal thickness was measured in the fovea, 1 mm superior, 1 mm inferior, 1 mm nasal and 1 mm temporal to the fovea. Flow area, flow density and flow index were recorded using self-provided software in the superficial retina layer, deep retina layer, outer retina layer and choroid capillary layer, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0. Data that followed normal distribution were compared with paired two-sample t-test, while others were compared with Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Of the patients participating in this preliminary study, the mean age was (35.5±4.2) years, and 50% were female. No significant difference was found between before and 60 days after PSR surgery in best corrected visual acuity (t=0.99, P=0.33), spherical equivalent (t=-1.89, P=0.07) and axial length (t=0.2, P=0.08). The retinal thickness in the fovea was thinner (Z=-2.58, P=0.01), while there was no significant difference in the 1 mm superior (t=0.44, P=0.67) , 1 mm inferior (t=0.05, P=0.96) , 1 mm nasal (Z=0.87, P=0.64) and 1 mm temporal (Z=-0.78, P=0.99) to the fovea. No significant difference was found in choroidal thickness (t=-0.12, P=0.87; t=-0.25, P=0.81. t=0.53, P=0.61; t=-0.91, P=0.38. t=1.2, P=0.25) before and after surgery. The postoperative flow density in the superficial and deep retinal layers (48.18±4.56% and 31.47

  10. A thick multilayer thermal barrier coating: Design, deposition, and internal stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, Hamed

    Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (Y-PSZ) plasma-sprayed coatings are widely used in turbine engines as thermal barrier coatings. However, in diesel engines Y-PSZ TBCs have not met with wide success. To reach the desirable temperature of 850-900°C in the combustion chamber from the current temperature of 400-600°C, a coating with a thickness of approximately 1mm is required. This introduces different considerations than in the case of turbine blade coatings, which are on the order of 100mum thick. Of the many factors affecting the durability and failure mechanism of TBCs, in service and residual stresses play an especially important role as the thickness of the coating increases. For decreasing the residual stress in the system, a multi-layer coating is helpful. The design of a multilayer coating employing relatively low cost materials with complementary thermal properties is described. Numerical models were used to describe the residual stress after deposition and under operating conditions for a multilayer coating that exhibited the desired temperature gradient. Results showed that the multilayer coating had a lower maximum stress under service conditions than a conventional Y-PSZ coating. Model validation with experiments showed a good match between the two.

  11. Effect of Cortical Bone Thickness on Detection of Intraosseous Lesions by Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Adibi, Sadaf; Shakibafard, Alireza; Karimi Sarvestani, Zohreh; Saadat, Najmeh; Khojastepour, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background. Usefulness of ultrasound (US) in detection of intrabony lesions has been showed. A cortical bone perforation or a very thin and intact cortical bone is prerequisite for this purpose. Objective. The current in vitro study was aimed at measuring the cut-off thickness of the overlying cortical bone which allows ultrasonic assessment of bony defects. Materials and Methods. 20 bovine scapula blocks were obtained. Samples were numbered from 1 to 20. In each sample, 5 artificial lesions were made. The lesions were made in order to increase the overlying bone thickness, from 0.1 mm in the first sample to 2 mm in the last one (with 0.1 mm interval). After that, the samples underwent ultrasound examinations by two practicing radiologists. Results. All five lesions in samples numbered 1 to 11 were detected as hypoechoic area. Cortical bone thickness more than 1.1 mm resulted in a failure in the detection of central lesions. Conclusion. We can conclude that neither bony perforation nor very thin cortical bones are needed to consider US to be an effective imaging technique in the evaluation of bony lesion. PMID:26366296

  12. Theoretical analysis of engineered cartilage oxygenation: influence of construct thickness and media flow rate.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Julien; Gemmiti, Christopher V; Kolambkar, Yash M; Oddou, Christian; Guldberg, Robert E

    2008-12-01

    A novel parallel-plate bioreactor has been shown to modulate the mechanical and biochemical properties of engineered cartilage by the application of fluid-induced shear stress. Flow or perfusion bioreactors may improve tissue development via enhanced transport of nutrients or gases as well as the application of mechanical stimuli, or a combination of these factors. The goal of this study was to complement observed experimental responses to flow by simulating oxygen transport within cartilage constructs of different thicknesses (250 microm or 1 mm). Using numerical computation of convection-diffusion equations, the evaluation of the tissue oxygenation is performed. Four culture conditions are defined based on tissue thickness and flow rates ranging from 0 to approximately 25 mL min(-1). Under these experimental conditions results show a mean oxygen concentration within the tissue varying from 0.01 to 0.19 mol m(-3) as a function of the tissue thickness and the magnitude of the applied shear stress. More generally, the influence of shear stress varying (via flow rate modification) from 10(-3) to 10 dynes cm(-2) on the tissue oxygenation is studied. The influence on the results of important physical parameters such as the maximal oxygen consumption rate of cells is discussed. Lastly, the importance of oxygen concentration in the lower chamber and its relevance to tissue oxygenation are highlighted by the model results.

  13. 3D image reconstruction for PET by multi-slice rebinning and axial filtering. [Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewitt, R.M. Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA . Dept. of Radiology); Muehllehner, G. ); Karp, J.S. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Two different approaches are used at present to reconstruct from 3D coincidence data in PET. We refer to these approaches as the single-slice rebinning approach and the fully-3D approach. The single-slice rebinning approach involves geometrical approximations, but it requires the least possible amount of computation. Fully-3D reconstruction algorithms, both iterative and non-iterative, do not make such approximations, but require much more computation. Multi-slice rebinning with axial filtering is a new approach which attempts to achieve the geometrical accuracy of the fully-3D approach with the simplicity and modest amount of computation of the single-slice rebinning approach. The first step (multi-slice rebinning) involves rebinning of coincidence lines into a stack of 2D sinograms, where multiple sinograms are incremented for each oblique coincidence line. This operation is followed by an axial filtering operation, either before or after slice-by-slice reconstruction, to reduce the blurring in the axial direction. Tests with simulated and experimental data indicate that the new method has better geometrical accuracy than single-slice rebinning, at the cost of only a modest increase in computation. 11 refs.

  14. Processing and Quality Characteristics of Apple Slices under Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration with Continuous Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of various processing parameters on apple slices exposed to infrared (IR) radiation heating in a continuous heating mode for achieving simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD). The parameters studied included radiation intensity, slice thickne...

  15. Processing and quality characteristics of apple slices under simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration with continuous heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of various processing parameters on apple slices exposed to infrared (IR) radiation heating in a continuous heating mode for achieving simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD). The investigated parameters were radiation intensity, slice thickne...

  16. THE THICKNESS DEPENDENCE OF OXYGEN PERMEABILITY IN SOL-GEL DERIVED CGO-COFE2O4 THIN FILMS ON POROUS CERAMIC SUBSTRATES: A SPUTTERED BLOCKING LAYER FOR THICKNESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K

    2009-01-08

    Mixed conductive oxides are a topic of interest for applications in oxygen separation membranes as well as use in producing hydrogen fuel through the partial oxidation of methane. The oxygen flux through the membrane is governed both by the oxygen ionic conductivity as well as the material's electronic conductivity; composite membranes like Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} (CGO)-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) use gadolinium doped ceria oxides as the ionic conducting material combined with cobalt iron spinel which serves as the electronic conductor. In this study we employ {approx} 50 nm sputtered CeO{sub 2} layers on the surface of porous CGO ceramic substrates which serve as solution 'blocking' layers during the thin film fabrication process facilitating the control of film thickness. Films with thickness of {approx} 2 and 4 microns were prepared by depositing 40 and 95 separate sol-gel layers respectively. Oxygen flux measurements indicated that the permeation increased with decreasing membrane thickness; thin film membrane with thickness on the micron level showed flux values an order of magnitude greater (0.03 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2} s) at 800 C as compared to 1mm thick bulk ceramic membranes (0.003 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2}).

  17. Investigation of the screen optics of thick CsI(Tl) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howansky, Adrian; Peng, Boyu; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Masanori; Lubinsky, A. R.; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Flat panel imagers (FPI) are becoming the dominant detector technology for digital x-ray imaging. In indirect FPI, the scintillator that provides the highest image quality is Thallium (Tl) doped Cesium Iodide (CsI) with columnar structure. The maximum CsI thickness used in existing FPI is ~600 microns, due to concerns of loss in spatial resolution and light output with further increase in thickness. The goal of the present work is to investigate the screen-optics for CsI with thicknesses much larger than that used in existing FPI, so that the knowledge can be used to improve imaging performance in dose sensitive and higher energy applications, such as cone-beam CT (CBCT). Columnar CsI(Tl) scintillators up to 1 mm in thickness with different screen-optical design were investigated experimentally. Pulse height spectra (PHS) were measured to determine the Swank factor at x-ray energies between 25 and 75 keV, and to derive depth-dependent light escape efficiency i.e. gain. Detector presampling MTF, NPS and DQE were measured using a high-resolution CMOS optical sensor. Optical Monte Carlo simulation was performed to estimate optical parameters for each screen design and derive depth-dependent gain and MTF, from which overall MTF and DQE were calculated and compared with measured results. The depth-dependent imaging performance parameters were then used in a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) to investigate detector performance under screen- and sensor-side irradiation conditions. The methodology developed for understanding the optics of thick CsI(Tl) will lead to detector optimization in CBCT.

  18. Insertion torque versus mechanical resistance of mini-implants inserted in different cortical thickness

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Renata de Faria; Ruellas, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira; Fernandes, Daniel Jogaib; Elias, Carlos Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to measure insertion torque, tip mechanical resistance to fracture and transmucosal neck of mini-implants (MI) (Conexão Sistemas de PróteseT), as well as to analyze surface morphology. Methods Mechanical tests were carried out to measure the insertion torque of MIs in different cortical thicknesses, and tip mechanical resistance to fracture as well as transmucosal neck of MIs. Surface morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the mechanical tests. Results Values of mechanical resistance to fracture (22.14 N.cm and 54.95 N.cm) were higher and statistically different (P < 0.05) from values of insertion torque for 1-mm (7.60 N.cm) and 2-mm (13.27 N.cm) cortical thicknesses. Insertion torque was statistically similar (P > 0.05) to torsional fracture in the tip of MI (22.14 N.cm) when 3 mm cortical thickness (16.11 N.cm) and dense bone (23.95 N.cm) were used. Torsional fracture of the transmucosal neck (54.95 N.cm) was higher and statistically different (P < 0.05) from insertion torsional strength in all tested situations. SEM analysis showed that the MIs had the same smooth surface when received from the manufacturer and after the mechanical tests were performed. Additionally, no significant marks resulting from the manufacturing process were observed. Conclusion All mini-implants tested presented adequate surface morphology. The resistance of mini-implants to fracture safely allows placement in 1 and 2-mm cortical thickness. However, in 3-mm cortical thickness and dense bones, pre-drilling with a bur is recommended before insertion. PMID:25162571

  19. Problems of radioisotope thickness gauge metrological provisions

    SciTech Connect

    Veits, B.; Karasev, A.; Krop, V.

    1993-12-31

    Results of research and development in the area of metrological provisions of thickness gages of sheet materials and coating are presented. The problem of measurement of different nature sample combinations for beta thickness gages of coatings is provided by an experimental-calculative method.

  20. Cloud Thickness from Offbeam Returns - Thor Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Kolasinski, J.; McGill, M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Physical thickness of a cloud layer, and sometimes multiple cloud layers, can be estimated from the time delay of off-beam returns from a pulsed laser source illuminating one side of the cloud layer. In particular, the time delay of light returning from the outer diffuse halo of light surrounding the beam entry point, relative to the time delay at beam center, determines the cloud physical thickness. The delay combined with the pulse stretch gives the optical thickness. The halo method works best for thick cloud layers, typically optical thickness exceeding 2, and thus compliments conventional lidar which cannot penetrate thick clouds. Cloud layer top and base have been measured independently over the ARM/SGP site using conventional laser ranging (lidar) and the top minus base thickness are compared with a cloud top halo estimate obtained from the NASA/Goddard THOR System (THOR = THickness from Offbeam Returns). THOR flies on the NASA P3, and measures the halo timings from several km above cloud top, at the same time providing conventional lidar cloud top height. The ARM/SGP micropulse lidar provides cloud base height for validation.

  1. Cortical thickness gradients in structural hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Wagstyl, Konrad; Ronan, Lisa; Goodyer, Ian M.; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    MRI, enabling in vivo analysis of cortical morphology, offers a powerful tool in the assessment of brain development and pathology. One of the most ubiquitous measures used—the thickness of the cortex—shows abnormalities in a number of diseases and conditions, but the functional and biological correlates of such alterations are unclear. If the functional connotations of structural MRI measures are to be understood, we must strive to clarify the relationship between measures such as cortical thickness and their cytoarchitectural determinants. We therefore sought to determine whether patterns of cortical thickness mirror a key motif of the cortex, specifically its structural hierarchical organisation. We delineated three sensory hierarchies (visual, somatosensory and auditory) in two species—macaque and human—and explored whether cortical thickness was correlated with specific cytoarchitectural characteristics. Importantly, we controlled for cortical folding which impacts upon thickness and may obscure regional differences. Our results suggest that an easily measurable macroscopic brain parameter, namely, cortical thickness, is systematically related to cytoarchitecture and to the structural hierarchical organisation of the cortex. We argue that the measurement of cortical thickness gradients may become an important way to develop our understanding of brain structure–function relationships. The identification of alterations in such gradients may complement the observation of regionally localised cortical thickness changes in our understanding of normal development and neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:25725468

  2. Effect of time, temperature, and slicing on respiration rate of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, T; Rodrigues, F A S; Mahajan, P V; Kerry, J P

    2009-08-01

    Respiration rate measurement considering the effects of cutting, temperature, and storage time are important for the shelf life study and modified atmosphere-packaging design of fresh-cut produce. This study investigates in the respiration rate of fresh whole and sliced mushrooms at 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 degrees C under ambient atmosphere and different storage times. The O(2) consumption rate increased with temperature and ranged from 22.13 to 102.41 mL/(kg.h) and 28.87 to 143.22 mL/(kg.h) for whole and sliced mushrooms, respectively, in the temperature range tested. Similar trend was observed for CO(2) production rate. Slicing of mushrooms increased the respiration rate by 30% at 0 degrees C and 40% at 20 degrees C indicating that the mushrooms are not as sensitive to the stress caused by cutting as other fresh produce. Storage time affected both respiration rate of whole and sliced mushrooms and this effect was prominent at higher temperatures. The respiration rates increased initially for some time, then decreased and reached steady state value at 12, 16, and 20 degrees C. A 2nd-order polynomial equation was used to fit the respiration rate data as a function of time at each temperature tested.

  3. The Reliability and Validity of the Thin Slice Technique: Observational Research on Video Recorded Medical Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Tanina S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Observational research using the thin slice technique has been routinely incorporated in observational research methods, however there is limited evidence supporting use of this technique compared to full interaction coding. The purpose of this study was to determine if this technique could be reliability coded, if ratings are…

  4. Human brain slices for epilepsy research: Pitfalls, solutions and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Jones, Roland S G; da Silva, Anderson Brito; Whittaker, Roger G; Woodhall, Gavin L; Cunningham, Mark O

    2016-02-15

    Increasingly, neuroscientists are taking the opportunity to use live human tissue obtained from elective neurosurgical procedures for electrophysiological studies in vitro. Access to this valuable resource permits unique studies into the network dynamics that contribute to the generation of pathological electrical activity in the human epileptic brain. Whilst this approach has provided insights into the mechanistic features of electrophysiological patterns associated with human epilepsy, it is not without technical and methodological challenges. This review outlines the main difficulties associated with working with epileptic human brain slices from the point of collection, through the stages of preparation, storage and recording. Moreover, it outlines the limitations, in terms of the nature of epileptic activity that can be observed in such tissue, in particular, the rarity of spontaneous ictal discharges, we discuss manipulations that can be utilised to induce such activity. In addition to discussing conventional electrophysiological techniques that are routinely employed in epileptic human brain slices, we review how imaging and multielectrode array recordings could provide novel insights into the network dynamics of human epileptogenesis. Acute studies in human brain slices are ultimately limited by the lifetime of the tissue so overcoming this issue provides increased opportunity for information gain. We review the literature with respect to organotypic culture techniques that may hold the key to prolonging the viability of this material. A combination of long-term culture techniques, viral transduction approaches and electrophysiology in human brain slices promotes the possibility of large scale monitoring and manipulation of neuronal activity in epileptic microcircuits.

  5. Effect of UV-B light and genotype on antioxidant enhancement of carrot slices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh-cut processing (such as slicing) has been shown to enhance the nutrient content of carrots by stimulating the synthesis of secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds. Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light exposure in conjunction with wounding further promoted the formation of soluble phenolic co...

  6. Influence of cooling rate on activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors in brain slices at hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Mokrushin, Anatoly A; Pavlinova, Larisa I; Borovikov, Sergey E

    2014-08-01

    Hypothermia is a known approach in the treatment of neurological pathologies. Mild hypothermia enhances the therapeutic window for application of medicines, while deep hypothermia is often accompanied by complications, including problems in the recovery of brain functions. The purpose of present study was to investigate the functioning of glutamate ionotropic receptors in brain slices cooled with different rates during mild, moderate and deep hypothermia. Using a system of gradual cooling combined with electrophysiological recordings in slices, we have shown that synaptic activity mediated by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in rat olfactory cortex was strongly dependent on the rate of lowering the temperature. High cooling rate caused a progressive decrease in glutamate receptor activity in brain slices during gradual cooling from mild to deep hypothermia. On the contrary, low cooling rate slightly changed the synaptic responses in deep hypothermia. The short-term potentiation may be induced in slices by electric tetanization at 16 °C in this case. Hence, low cooling rate promoted preservation of neuronal activity and plasticity in the brain tissue.

  7. Sensory properties and consumer acceptance of imported and domestic sliced black ripe olives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soh Min; Kitsawad, Kamolnate; Sigal, Abdulkadir; Flynn, Dan; Guinard, Jean-Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Table olives are healthy and nutritious products with high contents of monounsaturated fatty acids, phenolics, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Understanding sensory cues affecting consumer preferences would enable the increase of olive consumption. The objectives of this study were to characterize the sensory properties of commercial sliced black ripe olives from different regions, including California, Egypt, Morocco, Portugal, and Spain, and to examine the preferences of California consumers for sliced black ripe olives. Sensory profiles and preferences for 20 sliced olive samples were determined using descriptive analysis with a trained panel and a consumer test with 104 users and likers of table olives. Aroma and flavor characteristics separated the olives according to country of origin, and were the main determinants of consumer preferences for sliced olives, even though the biggest differences among the samples were in appearance and texture. Total of 2 consumer segments were identified with 51 and 53 consumers, respectively, that both liked Californian products, but differed in the olives they disliked. Negative drivers of liking for both segments included alcohol, oak barrel, and artificial fruity/floral characteristics; however, consumers from Cluster 1 were further negatively influenced by rancid, gassy, and bitter characteristics. This study stresses the need for sound and appealing flavor quality for table olives to gain wider acceptance among U.S. consumers.

  8. Improving the time efficiency of the Fourier synthesis method for slice selection in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, B; Khaneja, N; Johnston, L A; Farrell, P M; Mareels, I M Y

    2016-01-01

    The design of slice selective pulses for magnetic resonance imaging can be cast as an optimal control problem. The Fourier synthesis method is an existing approach to solve these optimal control problems. In this method the gradient field as well as the excitation field are switched rapidly and their amplitudes are calculated based on a Fourier series expansion. Here, we provide a novel insight into the Fourier synthesis method via representing the Bloch equation in spherical coordinates. Based on the spherical Bloch equation, we propose an alternative sequence of pulses that can be used for slice selection which is more time efficient compared to the original method. Simulation results demonstrate that while the performance of both methods is approximately the same, the required time for the proposed sequence of pulses is half of the original sequence of pulses. Furthermore, the slice selectivity of both sequences of pulses changes with radio frequency field inhomogeneities in a similar way. We also introduce a measure, referred to as gradient complexity, to compare the performance of both sequences of pulses. This measure indicates that for a desired level of uniformity in the excited slice, the gradient complexity for the proposed sequence of pulses is less than the original sequence.

  9. An Intact Kidney Slice Model to Investigate Vasa Recta Properties and Function in situ

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, C.; Kennedy-Lydon, T.; Sprott, C.; Desai, T.; Sawbridge, L.; Munday, J.; Unwin, R.J.; Wildman, S.S.P.; Peppiatt-Wildman, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Medullary blood flow is via vasa recta capillaries, which possess contractile pericytes. In vitro studies using isolated descending vasa recta show that pericytes can constrict/dilate descending vasa recta when vasoactive substances are present. We describe a live kidney slice model in which pericyte-mediated vasa recta constriction/dilation can be visualized in situ. Methods Confocal microscopy was used to image calcein, propidium iodide and Hoechst labelling in ‘live’ kidney slices, to determine tubular and vascular cell viability and morphology. DIC video-imaging of live kidney slices was employed to investigate pericyte-mediated real-time changes in vasa recta diameter. Results Pericytes were identified on vasa recta and their morphology and density were characterized in the medulla. Pericyte-mediated changes in vasa recta diameter (10–30%) were evoked in response to bath application of vasoactive agents (norepinephrine, endothelin-1, angiotensin-II and prostaglandin E2) or by manipulating endogenous vasoactive signalling pathways (using tyramine, L-NAME, a cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1) inhibitor indomethacin, and ATP release). Conclusions The live kidney slice model is a valid complementary technique for investigating vasa recta function in situ and the role of pericytes as regulators of vasa recta diameter. This technique may also be useful in exploring the role of tubulovascular crosstalk in regulation of medullary blood flow. PMID:22833057

  10. Drying characteristics and modeling of yam slices under different relative humidity conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying characteristics of yam slices under different 23 constant relative humidity (RH) and step-down RH levels were studied. A mass transfer model was developed based on Bi-Di correlations containing a drying coefficient and a lag factor to describe the drying process. It was validated using ex...

  11. Regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in striatal and prefrontal cortical brain slices

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Brain slices were used to investigate the role of nerve terminal autoreceptors in modulating dopamine (DA) synthesis and release in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) was used as an index of tyrosine hydroxylation in vitro. Nomifensine, a DA uptake blocker, inhibited DOPA synthesis in striatal but not prefrontal slices. This effect was reversed by the DA antagonist sulpiride, suggesting it involved activation of DA receptors by elevated synaptic levels of DA. The autoreceptor-selective agonist EMD-23-448 also inhibited striatal but not prefrontal DOPA synthesis. DOPA synthesis was stimulated in both brain regions by elevated K/sup +/, however only striatal synthesis could be further enhanced by sulpiride. DA release was measured by following the efflux of radioactivity from brain slices prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)-DA. EMD-23-448 and apomorphine inhibited, while sulpiride enhanced, the K/sup +/-evoked overflow of radioactivity from both striatal and prefrontal cortical slices. These findings suggest that striatal DA nerve terminals possess autoreceptors which modulate tyrosine hydroxylation as well as autoreceptors which modulate release. Alternatively, one site may be coupled to both functions through distinct transduction mechanisms. In contrast, autoreceptors on prefrontal cortical terminals appear to regulate DA release but not DA synthesis.

  12. Automated Slicing for a Multi-Axis Metal Deposition System (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    14] Tata, Kamesh; Fadel, Georges ; Bagchi, Amit and Aziz, Nadim, “Efficient slicing for layered manufacturing”, Rapid Prototyping, Vol. 4. No. 4...Shape Modeling International 2003. [22] Naf, M.; Szekely, G.; Kikinis, R.; Shenton, M.; Kubler , O., “3D Voronoi Skeletons and Their Usage for the

  13. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Pedro, Daniela Zótico; de Cordova, Fabiano Mendes; Lopes, Mark William; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Walz, Roger; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old). The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM) caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain. PMID:24324973

  14. Self-Mixing Thin-Slice Solid-State Laser Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Kenju

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the dynamic effect of thin-slice solid-state lasers subjected to frequency-shifted optical feedback, which led to the discovery of the self-mixing modulation effect, and its applications to quantum-noise-limited versatile laser metrology systems with extreme optical sensitivity. PMID:22319406

  15. The Energy Demand of Fast Neuronal Network Oscillations: Insights from Brain Slice Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Kann, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Fast neuronal network oscillations in the gamma range (30–100 Hz) in the cerebral cortex have been implicated in higher cognitive functions such as sensual perception, working memory, and, perhaps, consciousness. However, little is known about the energy demand of gamma oscillations. This is mainly caused by technical limitations that are associated with simultaneous recordings of neuronal activity and energy metabolism in small neuronal networks and at the level of mitochondria in vivo. Thus recent studies have focused on brain slice preparations to address the energy demand of gamma oscillations in vitro. Here, reports will be summarized and discussed that combined electrophysiological recordings, oxygen sensor microelectrodes, and live-cell fluorescence imaging in acutely prepared slices and organotypic slice cultures of the hippocampus from both, mouse and rat. These reports consistently show that gamma oscillations can be reliably induced in hippocampal slice preparations by different pharmacological tools. They suggest that gamma oscillations are associated with high energy demand, requiring both rapid adaptation of oxidative energy metabolism and sufficient supply with oxygen and nutrients. These findings might help to explain the exceptional vulnerability of higher cognitive functions during pathological processes of the brain, such as circulatory disturbances, genetic mitochondrial diseases, and neurodegeneration. PMID:22291647

  16. The Analysis of Neurovascular Remodeling in Entorhino-hippocampal Organotypic Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chip, Sophorn; Zhu, Xinzhou; Kapfhammer, Josef P.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is among the most common and devastating conditions compromising proper brain function and often leads to persisting functional deficits in the affected patients. Despite intensive research efforts, there is still no effective treatment option available that reduces neuronal injury and protects neurons in the ischemic areas from delayed secondary death. Research in this area typically involves the use of elaborate and problematic animal models. Entorhino-hippocampal organotypic slice cultures challenged with oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) are established in vitro models which mimic cerebral ischemia. The novel aspect of this study is that changes of the brain blood vessels are studied in addition to neuronal changes and the reaction of both the neuronal compartment and the vascular compartment can be compared and correlated. The methods presented in this protocol substantially broaden the potential applications of the organotypic slice culture approach. The induction of OGD or hypoxia alone can be applied by rather simple means in organotypic slice cultures and leads to reliable and reproducible damage in the neural tissue. This is in stark contrast to the complicated and problematic animal experiments inducing stroke and ischemia in vivo. By broadening the analysis to include the study of the reaction of the vasculature could provide new ways on how to preserve and restore brain functions. The slice culture approach presented here might develop into an attractive and important tool for the study of ischemic brain injury and might be useful for testing potential therapeutic measures aimed at neuroprotection. PMID:25408363

  17. Development of Multi-slice Analytical Tool to Support BIM-based Design Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmodiwirjo, P.; Johanes, M.; Yatmo, Y. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the on-going development of computational tool to analyse architecture and interior space based on multi-slice representation approach that is integrated with Building Information Modelling (BIM). Architecture and interior space is experienced as a dynamic entity, which have the spatial properties that might be variable from one part of space to another, therefore the representation of space through standard architectural drawings is sometimes not sufficient. The representation of space as a series of slices with certain properties in each slice becomes important, so that the different characteristics in each part of space could inform the design process. The analytical tool is developed for use as a stand-alone application that utilises the data exported from generic BIM modelling tool. The tool would be useful to assist design development process that applies BIM, particularly for the design of architecture and interior spaces that are experienced as continuous spaces. The tool allows the identification of how the spatial properties change dynamically throughout the space and allows the prediction of the potential design problems. Integrating the multi-slice analytical tool in BIM-based design process thereby could assist the architects to generate better design and to avoid unnecessary costs that are often caused by failure to identify problems during design development stages.

  18. Mini-Ruby is Rapidly Taken up by Neurons and Astrocytes in Organotypic Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Celine; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons are intensively studied, because they degenerate in Alzheimer’s disease. Although neurotracer techniques are widely used to study axonal transport, guidance, regeneration or sprouting it is not clear if cholinergic neurons can be stained by tracer techniques and studied in brain slices. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the characteristics of the neurotracer Miniruby in organotypic brain slices of the basal nucleus of Meynert (nBM), focusing on cholinergic neurons. Miniruby is a biotinylated dextran amine and is taken up very fast by a variety of cells. When 2-week old nerve growth factor-incubated brain slices of the nBM were treated with Mini-ruby crystals for 1 h, only a few (2–3%) cholinergic neurons were clearly labeled as shown by co-localization with choline acetyltransferase. The staining was found in neuN-positive neurons and microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP-2)-positive nerve fibers. A very rapid dynamic change was observed in these labeled varicosities within seconds. However, Mini-ruby was taken up also by many glutamine synthethase-positive astrocytes. At the site of Mini-ruby application an intense CD11b-positive microglial staining was evident. In conclusion, neurons and astrocytes in organotypic brain slices can be labeled very fast with the fluorescent dye Mini-ruby which undergoes dynamic processes. PMID:21604155

  19. Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration of apple slices Controlled by Intermittent Heating Mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared heating controlled by intermittent heating mode was found to be able to achieve simultaneous dry-blanching and dehydration of apple slices with a desirable quality. In order to better understand the performance of intermittent heating for simultaneous dry-blanching and dehydration (SIDBD),...

  20. Rapid recovery of DNA from agarose gel slices by coupling electroelution with monolithic SPE.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengbing; Yang, Shuixian; Zhou, Ping; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xiangdong

    2009-06-01

    An amino silica monolithic column prepared by in situ polymerization of tetraethoxysilane and N-(beta-aminoethyl)-gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was firstly applied to recover DNA from agarose gel slices by coupling electroelution with monolithic SPE. DNA was electroeluted from the agarose gel slices onto the amino silica monolithic column. The DNA adsorbed on this monolithic column was then recovered using sodium phosphate solution at pH 10. The whole recovery procedure could be completed within 10 min because the use of amino silica monolithic column accelerated the DNA capture and facilitated the DNA release. Electroelution conditions, such as buffer pH, buffer concentration and applied voltage, were online optimized. The average yield for herring sperm DNA, pBR 322 DNA and lambda DNA recovered from 1.0% w/v agarose gel slices were 55+/-4, 50+/-6 and 42+/-7% (n=3), respectively. The polymerase chain reaction performance of pGM plasmid recovered from agarose gel slices demonstrated that the method could provide high-quality DNA for downstream processes. The combination of electroelution with monolithic SPE allows a rapid, simple and efficient DNA recovery method. This technique is especially useful for applications that need to purify small starting amounts of DNA.

  1. Designing an optical set-up of differential laser triangulation for oil film thickness measurement on water.

    PubMed

    Ge, Baozhene; Sun, Jingbin; Liu, Pengcheng; Lü, Qieni; Wu, Di

    2013-01-01

    Based on the differential laser triangulation principle, an optical system configuration for measuring the oil film thickness on water is designed and developed. A semiconductor laser of 650 nm wavelength with the maximum power of 5 mW is used as a light source, the magnification of the imaging system is 1.4; the range of the measurement is 0.1 mm-10 mm; the resolution is 2.3 μm and the measurement accuracy is 10 μm theoretically. Experiments are conducted with block gauges and feeler gauges, and the experimental results, with absolute error less than ±25 μm and the maximal measurable thickness 12 mm, indicate that this system presented in this paper can fulfill high accuracy.

  2. Effect of thickness of flowable resins on marginal leakage in class II composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Hans S; Schlueter, Marc; Roach, Terence; Moss, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Despite limited scientific evaluation, there is an increased use of low elastic modulus flowable resin composite (FRC) as a stress-relieving gingival increment in Class II restorations. This study compared marginal leakage in preparations with gingival margins in enamel or dentin/cementum (sub-CEJ and supra-CEJ) after FRC was used as a gingival increment to hybrid resin composite used alone. In addition, the extent of leakage around restorations with or without the use of FRC gingival increments when light curing the resin composites from occlusal direction only or buccal, lingual and occlusal directions was compared. Sixty extracted human molars were prepared with two identical Class II (MO and OD) preparations (30 were 1 mm sub-CEJ and 30 were 1 mm supra-CEJ) and randomly assigned to six groups. After etching, dentin-bonding agent was applied to all prepared tooth surfaces according to the manufacturer's specifications. One of three different thicknesses of FRC (0.5 mm, 1 mm or 2 mm) was placed on the gingival floor, cured and a hybrid resin composite was placed occlusally to complete the restoration. The control preparation on each tooth was restored in the same manner, except that a hybrid resin composite was used for both the gingival and occlusal increments. The restored teeth were thermocycled (300 cycles), then immersed in 50% silver nitrate prior to the hemi-section and measured for leakage under a light microscope. The data were evaluated using paired measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Most of the occlusal margins showed no leakage, while almost every gingival margin demonstrated some silver nitrate penetration regardless of whether it was located sub or supra-CEJ, although significantly less leakage was found in restorations with supra-CEJ margins (p=0.0001). Among supra-CEJ restorations, there was a pronounced reduction in leakage as FRC thickness increased (p=0.0005). In the teeth restored with the gingival-margin located supra-CEJ, the 2 mm

  3. Neuroprotective effects of arachidonic acid against oxidative stress on rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze-Jian; Liang, Cui-Ling; Li, Guang-Mei; Yu, Cai-Yi; Yin, Ming

    2006-11-07

    Arachidonic acid (AA), 5,8,11,14-eicosateraenoic acid is abundant, active and necessary in the human body. In the present study, we reported the neuroprotective effects and mechanism of arachidonic acid on hippocampal slices insulted by glutamate, NaN(3) or H(2)O(2)in vitro. Different types of models of brain injury in vitro were developed by 1mM glutamate, 10mM NaN(3) or 2mM H(2)O(2). After 30 min of preincubation with arachidonic acid or linoleic acid, hippocampal slices were subjected to glutamate, NaN(3) or H(2)O(2), then the tissue activities were evaluated by using the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride method. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activities (SOD, GSH-PX and catalase) in hippocampal slices were evaluated during the course of incubation. MK886 (5 microM; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor [PPAR]alpha), BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether; 100 microM; an antagonist of PPARgamma) and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 microM; an inhibitor of protein synthesis) were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by arachidonic acid. Population spikes were recorded in randomly selected hippocapal slices. Arachidonic acid (1-10 microM) dose dependently protected hippocampal slices from glutamate and H(2)O(2) injury (P<0.01), and arachidonic acid (10 microM) can significantly improve the activities of Cu/Zn-SOD in hippocampal slices after 1h incubation. In addition, 10 microM arachidonic acid significantly increased the activity of Mn-SOD and catalase, and decreased the activities of Cu/Zn-SOD to control value after 3h incubation. These secondary changes of SOD during incubation can be reversed by indomethacine (10 microM; a nonspecific cyclooxygenase inhibitor) or AA 861 (20 microM; a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor). Its neuroprotective effect was completely abolished by BADGE and CHX. These observations reveal that arachidonic acid can defense against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant system of hippocampal slices

  4. Patch-clamp Capacitance Measurements and Ca2+ Imaging at Single Nerve Terminals in Retinal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; Vickers, Evan; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Visual stimuli are detected and conveyed over a wide dynamic range of light intensities and frequency changes by specialized neurons in the vertebrate retina. Two classes of retinal neurons, photoreceptors and bipolar cells, accomplish this by using ribbon-type active zones, which enable sustained and high-throughput neurotransmitter release over long time periods. ON-type mixed bipolar cell (Mb) terminals in the goldfish retina, which depolarize to light stimuli and receive mixed rod and cone photoreceptor input, are suitable for the study of ribbon-type synapses both due to their large size (~10-12 μm diameter) and to their numerous lateral and reciprocal synaptic connections with amacrine cell dendrites. Direct access to Mb bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices with the patch-clamp technique allows the measurement of presynaptic Ca2+ currents, membrane capacitance changes, and reciprocal synaptic feedback inhibition mediated by GABAA and GABAC receptors expressed on the terminals. Presynaptic membrane capacitance measurements of exocytosis allow one to study the short-term plasticity of excitatory neurotransmitter release 14,15. In addition, short-term and long-term plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmitter release from amacrine cells can also be investigated by recordings of reciprocal feedback inhibition arriving at the Mb terminal 21. Over short periods of time (e.g. ~10 s), GABAergic reciprocal feedback inhibition from amacrine cells undergoes paired-pulse depression via GABA vesicle pool depletion 11. The synaptic dynamics of retinal microcircuits in the inner plexiform layer of the retina can thus be directly studied. The brain-slice technique was introduced more than 40 years ago but is still very useful for the investigation of the electrical properties of neurons, both at the single cell soma, single dendrite or axon, and microcircuit synaptic level 19. Tissues that are too small to be glued directly onto the slicing chamber are often first

  5. Image reconstruction and image quality evaluation for a 16-slice CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Th; Stierstorfer, K; Bruder, H; Simon, J; Polacin, A; Schaller, S

    2003-05-01

    We present a theoretical overview and a performance evaluation of a novel approximate reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam spiral CT, the adaptive multiple plane reconstruction (AMPR), which has been introduced by Schaller, Flohr et al. [Proc. SPIE Int. Symp. Med. Imag. 4322, 113-127 (2001)] AMPR has been implemented in a recently introduced 16-slice CT scanner. We present a detailed algorithmic description of AMPR which allows for a free selection of the spiral pitch. We show that dose utilization is better than 90% independent of the pitch. We give an overview on the z-reformation functions chosen to allow for a variable selection of the spiral slice width at arbitrary pitch values. To investigate AMPR image quality we present images of anthropomorphic phantoms and initial patient results. We present measurements of spiral slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) and measurements of the maximum achievable transverse resolution, both in the isocenter and off-center. We discuss the pitch dependence of image noise measured in a centered 20 cm water phantom. Using the AMPR approach, cone-beam artifacts are considerably reduced for the 16-slice scanner investigated. Image quality in MPRs is independent of the pitch and equivalent to a single-slice CT system at pitch p approximately 1.5. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the spiral SSPs shows only minor variations as a function of the pitch, nominal, and measured values differ by less than 0.2 mm. With 16 x 0.75 mm collimation, the measured FWHM of the smallest reconstructed slice is about 0.9 mm. Using this slice width and overlapping image reconstruction, cylindrical holes with 0.6 mm diameter can be resolved in a z-resolution phantom. Image noise for constant effective mAs is nearly independent of the pitch. Measured and theoretically expected dose utilization are in good agreement. Meanwhile, clinical practice has demonstrated the excellent image quality and the increased diagnostic capability that is obtained

  6. Aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Bacon, D L

    1923-01-01

    This investigation is an extension of NACA report no. 75 for the purpose of studying the effect of various modifications in a given wing section, including changes in thickness, height of lower camber, taper in thickness, and taper in plan form with special reference to the development of thick, efficient airfoils. The method consisted in testing the wings in the NACA 5-foot wind tunnel at speeds up to 50 meters (164 feet) per second while they were being supported on a new type of wire balance. Some of the airfoils developed showed results of great promise. For example, one wing (no. 81) with a thickness in the center of 4.5 times that of the U. S. A. 16 showed both uniformly high efficiency and a higher maximum lift than this excellent section. These thick sections will be especially useful on airplanes with cantilever construction. (author)

  7. Micro-droplets lubrication film thickness dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerre, Axel; Theodoly, Olivier; Cantat, Isabelle; Leshansky, Alexander; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Jullien, Marie-Caroline; MMN Team; LAI Team; IPR Team; Department of Chemical Engineering Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of droplets or bubbles in confined geometries has been extensively studied; showing an intrinsic relationship between the lubrication film thickness and the droplet velocity. When capillary forces dominate, the lubrication film thickness evolves non linearly with the capillary number due to viscous dissipation between meniscus and wall. However, this film may become thin enough that intermolecular forces come into play and affect classical scalings. We report here the first experimental evidence of the disjoining pressure effect on confined droplets by measuring droplet lubrication film thicknesses in a microfluidic Hele-Shaw cell. We find and characterize two distinct dynamical regimes, dominated respectively by capillary and intermolecular forces. In the former case rolling boundary conditions at the interface are evidenced through film thickness dynamics, interface velocity measurement and film thickness profile.

  8. Cosmo-geo-anthropo-logical history and political and deep future events in climate and life evolution conveyed by a physical/virtual installation at a scale of 1 mm per 100 years across Denmark during the COP15 climate summit meeting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm Jacobsen, Bo

    2010-05-01

    During the COP15 climate summit meeting a physical and virtual installation of time was performed at a linear scale of 1 mm per 100 years. The "track of time" was carefully anchored geographically so that highlights in time history coincided with landmarks of historical and cultural significance to both tourists and the local Danish population; with Big Bang at the site of early royal settlements from the Viking age (13.7 billion years ~ 137 km from now), Earth origin at Kronborg in Elsinore (4.6 bil. Years ~ 46 km), and fish go on land at The Little Mermaid (390 mil. Years ~ 3900 m). The venue of the COP15 meeting coincided with the position of severe global warming, driven by the steady solar constant increase, to be expected 600 million years into the future. Nested in this grand track of time were the Quaternary ice-ages (2.6 mil. years ~ 26 m), human origin as species (100,000 years ~ 1 m), human history (< 10,000 years ~ 100 mm), personal life and the scope of political consequences of voting action (100 years ~ 1 mm). This installation of time involved several media. Highlights in time history and future were installed as a kml-file so that the convenient user interface of Google Earth could be utilized to provide both overview of time and understanding of details and proportions events antropo-geo-cosmo-history. Each Google Earth marker-balloon gave short explanations and linked to "on location" video-narratives. A classical printed text-folder was prepared as a tour guide for those who wanted to actually walk the Phanerozoic (~5 km). Credit-card-shaped graphs of temperature, CO2 and sealevel development and scenarios were prepared to scale for the period 4000 BP to 1000 years into the future. Along the time line from "Fish on land" to the present 3900 chalk marks were placed on the street surface, one for every metre = time span of Man as a species so far. A "NowGate" marking the present was implemented physically as a door frame, where citizens could meet

  9. Integrated RF photonic devices based on crystal ion sliced lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Vincent; Toney, James; Pollick, Andrea; Busch, James; Scholl, Jon; Pontius, Peter; Sriram, Sri

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™) electro-optic devices at SRICO. TFLN™ is formed on various substrates using a layer transfer process called crystal ion slicing. In the ion slicing process, light ions such as helium and hydrogen are implanted at a depth in a bulk seed wafer as determined by the implant energy. After wafer bonding to a suitable handle substrate, the implanted seed wafer is separated (sliced) at the implant depth using a wet etching or thermal splitting step. After annealing and polishing of the slice surface, the transferred film is bulk quality, retaining all the favorable properties of the bulk seed crystal. Ion slicing technology opens up a vast design space to produce lithium niobate electro-optic devices that were not possible using bulk substrates or physically deposited films. For broadband electro-optic modulation, TFLN™ is formed on RF friendly substrates to achieve impedance matched operation at up to 100 GHz or more. For narrowband RF filtering functions, a quasi-phase matched modulator is presented that incorporates domain engineering to implement periodic inversion of electro-optic phase. The thinness of the ferroelectric films makes it possible to in situ program the domains, and thus the filter response, using only few tens of applied volts. A planar poled prism optical beam steering device is also presented that is suitable for optically switched true time delay architectures. Commercial applications of the TFLN™ device technologies include high bandwidth fiber optic links, cellular antenna remoting, photonic microwave signal processing, optical switching and phased arrayed radar.

  10. Reconstructing liver shape and position from MR image slices using an active shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenchel, Matthias; Thesen, Stefan; Schilling, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    We present an algorithm for fully automatic reconstruction of 3D position, orientation and shape of the human liver from a sparsely covering set of n 2D MR slice images. Reconstructing the shape of an organ from slice images can be used for scan planning, for surgical planning or other purposes where 3D anatomical knowledge has to be inferred from sparse slices. The algorithm is based on adapting an active shape model of the liver surface to a given set of slice images. The active shape model is created from a training set of liver segmentations from a group of volunteers. The training set is set up with semi-manual segmentations of T1-weighted volumetric MR images. Searching for the optimal shape model that best fits to the image data is done by maximizing a similarity measure based on local appearance at the surface. Two different algorithms for the active shape model search are proposed and compared: both algorithms seek to maximize the a-posteriori probability of the grey level appearance around the surface while constraining the surface to the space of valid shapes. The first algorithm works by using grey value profile statistics in normal direction. The second algorithm uses average and variance images to calculate the local surface appearance on the fly. Both algorithms are validated by fitting the active shape model to abdominal 2D slice images and comparing the shapes, which have been reconstructed, to the manual segmentations and to the results of active shape model searches from 3D image data. The results turn out to be promising and competitive to active shape model segmentations from 3D data.

  11. Preparation of postsynaptic density fraction from hippocampal slices and proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dosemeci, Ayse . E-mail: dosemeca@mail.nih.gov; Tao-Cheng, J.-H.; Vinade, Lucia; Jaffe, Howard

    2006-01-13

    Hippocampal slices offer an excellent experimental system for the study of activity-induced changes in the postsynaptic density (PSD). While studies have documented electrophysiological and structural changes at synapses in response to precise manipulations of hippocampal slices, parallel biochemical and proteomic analyses were hampered by the lack of subcellular fractionation techniques applicable to starting tissue about three orders of magnitude smaller than that used in conventional protocols. Here, we describe a simple and convenient method for the preparation of PSD fractions from hippocampal slices and the identification of its components by proteomic techniques. The 'micro PSD fraction' obtained following two consecutive extractions of a synaptosomal fraction with Triton X-100 shows a significant enrichment in the marker protein PSD-95. Thin section electron microscopy shows PSDs similar to those observed in situ. However, other particulate material, especially myelin, and membrane vesicles are also present. The composition of the PSD fraction from hippocampal slices was analyzed by 2D LC/MS/MS. The proteomic approach which utilizes as little as 10 {mu}g total protein allowed the identification of >100 proteins. Many of the proteins detected in the fraction are the same as those identified in conventional PSD preparations including specialized PSD-scaffolding proteins, signaling molecules, cytoskeletal elements as well as certain contaminants. The results show the feasibility of the preparation of a PSD fraction from hippocampal slices of reasonable purity and of sufficient yield for proteomic analyses. In addition, we show that further purification of PSDs is possible using magnetic beads coated with a PSD-95 antibody.

  12. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate does not preserve ATP in hypoxic-ischemic neonatal cerebrocortical slices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Hirai, Kiyoshi; Litt, Lawrence

    2008-10-31

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), an endogenous intracellular metabolite in glycolysis, was found in many preclinical studies to be neuroprotective during hypoxia-ischemia (HI) when administered exogenously. We looked for HI neuroprotection from FBP in a neonatal rat brain slice model, using 14.1 T (1)H/(31)P/(13)C NMR spectroscopy of perchloric acid slice extracts to ask: 1) if FBP preserves high energy phosphates during HI; and 2) if exogenous [1-(13)C]FBP enters cells and is glycolytically metabolized to [3-(13)C]lactate. We also asked: 3) if substantial superoxide production occurs during and after HI, thinking such might be treatable by exogenous FBP's antioxidant effects. Superfused P7 rat cerebrocortical slices (350 mum) were treated with 2 mM FBP before and during 30 min of HI, and then given 4 h of recovery with an FBP-free oxygenated superfusate. Slices were removed before HI, at the end of HI, and at 1 and 4 h after HI. FBP did not improve high energy phosphate levels or change (1)H metabolite profiles. Large increases in [3-(13)C]lactate were seen with (13)C NMR, but the lactate fractional enrichment was always (1.1+/-0.5)%, implying that all of lactate's (13)C was natural abundance (13)C, that none was from metabolism of (13)C-FBP. FBP had no effect on the fluorescence of ethidium produced from superoxide oxidation of hydroethidine. Compared to control slices, ethidium fluorescence was 25% higher during HI and 50% higher at the end of recovery. Exogenous FBP did not provide protection or enter glycolysis. Its use as an antioxidant might be worth studying at higher FBP concentrations.

  13. Effects of Relative Hypoglycemia on LTP and NADH Imaging in Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Beaver, Christopher J.; Turner, Dennis A.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive and neuronal impairment in diabetes may be associated with iatrogenic hypoglycemia, particularly at low serum glucose levels (< 3 mM). To evaluate cellular impairment, we assessed acute hippocampal slice functioning during decreased ambient glucose, by monitoring evoked field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP), and slice nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence. The effects of lowered glucose levels (60 min) were analyzed by examining the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP), and NADH metabolic imaging in the CA1 region. The basal fEPSP response was reduced by lowered ambient glucose, an effect that was reversible in 2.5 mM glucose, partially reversible in 1.25 mM glucose and irreversible in 0 mM glucose, after 25 min recovery. LTP induction and maintenance declined during glucose restriction, demonstrating reversibly failed maintenance in 5 mM and 2.5 mM ambient glucose, and absent induction in 1.25 mM glucose. Peak NADH levels observed during train-induced biphasic transients were significantly reduced during 1.25 mM and 2.5 mM glucose. Significant functional compromise in our slice model occurred at 2.5 mM ambient glucose, equivalent to <1mM tissue glucose in the slice center, due to diffusion limitations and active glucose utilization. This tissue glucose level correlates with human observations of a serum threshold of <3mM for cognitive impairment, since brain tissue glucose is approximately one third of serum levels. The physiological effects of hypoglycemia in our slice model, assessed through fEPSP, LTP, and NADH responses, replicate closely the in vivo situation, confirming the usefulness of this model in assessing consequences of relative hypoglycemia. PMID:17651706

  14. Electrophysiological observations in hippocampal slices from rats treated with the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Stafstrom, C E; Wang, C; Jensen, F E

    1999-11-01

    The electrophysiological effects of the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) were assessed in normal and epileptic [kainic-acid(KA)-treated] adult rats using hippocampal slices. In the first set of experiments, normal rats were fed the KD or a standard control diet for 6-8 weeks (beginning on postnatal day 56, P56), after which they were sacrificed for hippocampal slices. All rats on the KD became ketotic. The baseline effects of the KD were determined by comparing extracellular measures of synaptic transmission and responses to evoked stimulation, and hippocampal excitability was tested in Mg(2+)-free medium. There were no differences in EPSP slope, input/output relationship, responses to evoked stimulation or Mg(2+)-free burst frequency between slices from control and KD-fed rats. In another set of experiments, rats were made epileptic by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA) on P54, which caused status epilepticus followed by the development of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) over the next few weeks. Two days after KA-induced status, rats were divided into a control-fed group and a KD-fed group. Animals on the KD had significantly fewer SRS over the ensuing 8 weeks. In hippocampal slices from KA-treated, KD-fed rats, there were fewer evoked CA1 population spikes than from slices of control-fed rats. These results suggest that the KD does not alter baseline electrophysiological parameters in normal rats. In rats made chronically epileptic by administration of KA, KD treatment was associated with fewer spontaneous seizures and reduced CA1 excitability in vitro. Therefore, at least part of the KD mechanism of action may involve long-term changes in network excitability.

  15. Citrulline uptake in rat cerebral cortex slices: modulation by Thioacetamide -Induced hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Obara-Michlewska, Marta; Hilgier, Wojciech; Albrecht, Jan

    2014-12-01

    L-citrulline (Cit) is a co-product of NO synthesis and a direct L-arginine (Arg) precursor for de novo NO synthesis. Acute liver failure (ALF) is associated with increased nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) synthesis in the brain, indirectly implicating a role for active transport of Cit. In the present study we characterized [(3)H]Cit uptake to the cortical brain slices obtained from control rats and rats with thioacetamide (TAA)-induced ALF ("TAA slices"). In both control and TAA slices the uptake was partially Na(+)-dependent and markedly inhibited by substrates of systems L and N, including L-glutamine (Gln), which accumulates in excess in brain during ALF. Cit uptake was not affected by Arg, the y(+)/y(+)L transport system substrate, nor by amino acids taken up by systems A, xc (-)or XAG. The Vmax of the uptake in TAA slices was ~60 % higher than in control slices. Chromatographic (HPLC) analysis revealed a ~30 % increase of Cit concentration in the cerebral cortical homogenates of TAA rats. The activity of argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), the two enzymes of Cit-NO cycle catalyzing synthesis of Arg, showed an increase in TAA rats, consistent with increased ASS and ASL protein expression, by ~30 and ~20 %, respectively. The increased Cit-NO cycle activity was paralleled by increased expression of mRNA coding for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Taken together, the results suggest a role for Cit in the activation of cerebral NO synthesis during ALF.

  16. Thalamic stimulation largely elicits orthodromic, rather than antidromic, cortical activation in an auditory thalamocortical slice.

    PubMed

    Rose, H J; Metherate, R

    2001-01-01

    Stimulation of the medial geniculate body in an auditory thalamocortical slice elicits a short-latency current sink in the middle cortical layers, as would be expected following activation of thalamocortical relay neurons. However, corticothalamic neurons can have axon collaterals that project to the middle layers, thus, a middle-layer current sink could also result from antidromic activation of corticothalamic neurons and their axon collaterals. The likelihood of thalamic stimulation activating corticothalamic neurons would be reduced substantially if the corticothalamic pathway was not well preserved in the slice, and/or if the threshold for antidromic activation was significantly higher than for orthodromic activation. To determine the prevalence and threshold of antidromic activation, we recorded intracellularly from day 14-17 mouse brain slices containing infragranular cortical neurons while stimulating the medial geniculate or thalamocortical pathway. Antidromic spikes were confirmed by spike collision and characterized according to spike latency "jitter" and the ability to follow a high-frequency (100 Hz) stimulus train. The ability to follow a 100-Hz tetanus was a reliable indicator of antidromic activation, but both antidromic and orthodromic spikes could have low jitter. Thalamic stimulation produced antidromic activation in two of 69 infragranular cortical neurons (<3%), indicating the presence of antidromic activity, but implying a limited corticothalamic connection in the slice. Antidromic spikes in 13 additional neurons were obtained by stimulating axons in the thalamocortical pathway. The antidromic threshold averaged 214+/-40.6 microA (range 6-475 microA), over seven times the orthodromic threshold for medial geniculate-evoked responses in layer IV extracellular (28+/-5.4 microA) or intracellular (27+/-5.6 microA) recordings. We conclude that medial geniculate stimulation activates relatively few corticothalamic neurons. Conversely, low

  17. Improvement in thickness uniformity of thick SOI by numerically controlled local wet etching.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Kazuya; Ueda, Kazuaki; Hosoda, Mao; Zettsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-04-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers are promising semiconductor materials for high-speed LSIs, low-power-consumption electric devices and micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). The thickness distribution of an SOI causes the variation of threshold voltage in electronic devices manufactured on the SOI wafer. The thickness distribution of a thin SOI, which is manufactured by applying a smart cut technique, is comparatively uniform. On the other hand, a thick SOI has a large thickness distribution because a bonded wafer is thinned by conventional grinding and polishing. For a thick SOI wafer with a thickness of 1 microm, it is required that the tolerance of thickness variation is less than 50 nm. However, improving the thickness uniformity of a thick SOI layer to a tolerance of +/- 5% is difficult by conventional machining because of the fundamental limitations of these techniques. We have developed numerically controlled local wet etching (NC-LWE) technique as a novel deterministic subaperture figuring and finishing technique, which utilizes a localized chemical reaction between the etchant and the surface of the workpiece. We demonstrated an improvement in the thickness distribution of a thick SOI by NC-LWE using an HF/HNO3 mixture, and thickness variation improved from 480 nm to 200 nm within a diameter of 170 mm.

  18. Body physique and heart rate variability determine the occurrence of stair-step artefacts in 64-slice CT coronary angiography with prospective ECG-triggering.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Lars; Herzog, Bernhard A; Burkhard, Nina; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Valenta, Ines; Gaemperli, Oliver; Wyss, Christophe A; Landmesser, Ulf; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the frequency and extent of stair-step artefacts in computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) with prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggering and to identify their determinants. One hundred and forty three consecutive patients (55 women, mean age 57 +/- 13 years) underwent 64-slice CTCA using prospective ECG-triggering. Occurrence of stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the thoracic wall and the coronary arteries was determined and maximum offset was measured. If stair-step artefacts occurred in both cases, a difference between thoracic wall and coronary artery offset of 0.6 mm or greater was attributed to additional motion of the heart. Mean effective radiation dose was 2.1 +/- 0.7 mSv (range 1.0-3.5 mSv). Eighty-nine patients (62%) had stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the coronary arteries (mean offset of 1.7 +/- 1.1 mm), while only 77 patients had thoracic wall stair-step artefacts (mean offset of 1.0 +/- 0.3 mm; significantly different, P < 0.001). Stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the thoracic wall were determined by BMI and weight (P < 0.01), while artefacts in CTCA of the coronary arteries were associated with heart rate variability (P < 0.05). Stair-step artefacts in CTCA with prospective ECG-triggering are determined by (a) motion of the entire patient during table travel, particularly in large patients and (b) by motion of the heart, particularly when heart rates are variable.

  19. Macular thickness in healthy Saudi adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zamil, Waseem M.; Al-Zwaidi, Fahad M.; Yassin, Sanaa A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the macular thickness in the eyes of healthy Saudi adults using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional study, including 158 healthy participants between August and December 2015. Mean subject age was 29.9 ± 7.85 years old. All participants underwent full ophthalmic evaluation, including SD-OCT imaging, and axial length measurement. Data from the right eye were included. Mean retinal thickness was determined. Correlations between retinal thickness and gender, age, axial length, and spherical equivalence were analyzed. Results: Mean central retinal thickness was 244.76 ± 23.62 µm, mean axial length was 23.8 ± 1.062 mm (range: 20.5-29 mm) and mean spherical equivalent was -0.31 ± 1.75 diopters (D) (range: -5.50 to +4.25 D). Central subfield (CSF) thickness and foveal volume were significantly lower in women than in men (both p<0.001). Data from the various age groups did not show statistically significant differences in the CSF thickness (p=0.389) or foveal volume (p=0.341). A positive correlation between CSF thickness and axial length (p<0.001) was observed. Conclusion: The normal macular thickness values in healthy Saudi individuals is different from that reported in other ethnic groups, as obtained by SD-OCT. Saudi men had thicker CSF than Saudi women and axial length was positively correlated to the central foveal thickness. PMID:28042632

  20. Automatic cortical thickness analysis on rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Niethammer, Marc; Budin, Francois; Paniagua, Beatriz; Sulik, Kathy; Johns, Josephine; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2011-03-01

    Localized difference in the cortex is one of the most useful morphometric traits in human and animal brain studies. There are many tools and methods already developed to automatically measure and analyze cortical thickness for the human brain. However, these tools cannot be directly applied to rodent brains due to the different scales; even adult rodent brains are 50 to 100 times smaller than humans. This paper describes an algorithm for automatically measuring the cortical thickness of mouse and rat brains. The algorithm consists of three steps: segmentation, thickness measurement, and statistical analysis among experimental groups. The segmentation step provides the neocortex separation from other brain structures and thus is a preprocessing step for the thickness measurement. In the thickness measurement step, the thickness is computed by solving a Laplacian PDE and a transport equation. The Laplacian PDE first creates streamlines as an analogy of cortical columns; the transport equation computes the length of the streamlines. The result is stored as a thickness map over the ne